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Sample records for charged peptide clusters

  1. Amine reactivity with charged sulfuric acid clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Bzdek

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of charged species produced by electrospray of an ammonium sulfate solution in both positive and negative polarities is examined using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS. Positively-charged ammonium bisulfate cluster composition differs significantly from negatively-charged cluster composition. For positively-charged clusters all sulfuric acid is neutralized to bisulfate, whereas for negatively-charged clusters the degree of sulfuric acid neutralization is cluster size-dependent. With increasing cluster size (and, therefore, a decreasing role of charge, both positively- and negatively-charged cluster compositions converge toward ammonium bisulfate. The reactivity of negatively-charged sulfuric acid-ammonia clusters with dimethylamine and ammonia is also investigated by FTICR-MS. Two series of negatively-charged clusters are investigated: [(HSO4(H2SO4x] and [(NH4x(HSO4x+1(H2SO43]. Dimethylamine substitution for ammonia in [(NH4 x(HSO4 x+1(H2SO43] clusters is nearly collision-limited, and subsequent addition of dimethylamine to neutralize H2SO4 to bisulfate is within one order of magnitude of the substitution rate. Dimethylamine addition to [(HSO4 (H2SO4 x] clusters is either not observed or very slow. The results of this study indicate that amine chemistry will be evident and important only in large ambient negative ions (>m/z 400, whereas amine chemistry may be evident in small ambient positive ions. Addition of ammonia to unneutralized clusters occurs at a rate that is ~2–3 orders of magnitude slower than incorporation of dimethylamine either by substitution or addition

  2. Analytical model of peptide mass cluster centres with applications

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    Lehrach Hans

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elemental composition of peptides results in formation of distinct, equidistantly spaced clusters across the mass range. The property of peptide mass clustering is used to calibrate peptide mass lists, to identify and remove non-peptide peaks and for data reduction. Results We developed an analytical model of the peptide mass cluster centres. Inputs to the model included, the amino acid frequencies in the sequence database, the average length of the proteins in the database, the cleavage specificity of the proteolytic enzyme used and the cleavage probability. We examined the accuracy of our model by comparing it with the model based on an in silico sequence database digest. To identify the crucial parameters we analysed how the cluster centre location depends on the inputs. The distance to the nearest cluster was used to calibrate mass spectrometric peptide peak-lists and to identify non-peptide peaks. Conclusion The model introduced here enables us to predict the location of the peptide mass cluster centres. It explains how the location of the cluster centres depends on the input parameters. Fast and efficient calibration and filtering of non-peptide peaks is achieved by a distance measure suggested by Wool and Smilansky.

  3. Charged water- and CO2-clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A supersonic molecular beam source with an internal radioactive β-emitter produces a variety of unusual positively or negatively charged cluster ions, among them the so called ''hydrated'' electrons (H2O)sub(n)-, with n>=8. For a CO2-expansion the metastable ion CO2- is observed. (Auth.)

  4. Charged water- and CO2-clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A supersonic molecular beam source with an internal radioactive #betta#-emitter produces a variety of unusual positively or negatively charged cluster ions, among them the so called 'hydrated' electrons (H2O)sup(-n), with n>=81. For a CO2-expansion the metastable ion CO-2 is observed. (Author)

  5. Impact of multivalent charge presentation on peptide-nanoparticle aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöne, Daniel; Schade, Boris; Böttcher, Christoph; Koksch, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Strategies to achieve controlled nanoparticle aggregation have gained much interest, due to the versatility of such systems and their applications in materials science and medicine. In this article we demonstrate that coiled-coil peptide-induced aggregation based on electrostatic interactions is highly sensitive to the length of the peptide as well as the number of presented charges. The quaternary structure of the peptide was found to play an important role in aggregation kinetics. Furthermore, we show that the presence of peptide fibers leads to well-defined nanoparticle assembly on the surface of these macrostructures. PMID:26124881

  6. Charge Transport Phenomena in Peptide Molecular Junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) is a valuable in situ spectroscopic analysis technique that provides a direct portrait of the electron transport properties of a molecular species. In the past, IETS has been applied to small molecules. Using self-assembled nano electronic junctions, IETS was performed for the first time on a large polypeptide protein peptide in the phosphorylated and native form, yielding interpretable spectra. A reproducible 10-fold shift of the I/V characteristics of the peptide was observed upon phosphorylation. Phosphorylation can be utilized as a site-specific modification to alter peptide structure and thereby influence electron transport in peptide molecular junctions. It is envisioned that kinases and phosphatases may be used to create tunable systems for molecular electronics applications, such as biosensors and memory devices.

  7. Charge Transport Phenomena in Peptide Molecular Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Luchini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS is a valuable in situ spectroscopic analysis technique that provides a direct portrait of the electron transport properties of a molecular species. In the past, IETS has been applied to small molecules. Using self-assembled nanoelectronic junctions, IETS was performed for the first time on a large polypeptide protein peptide in the phosphorylated and native form, yielding interpretable spectra. A reproducible 10-fold shift of the I/V characteristics of the peptide was observed upon phosphorylation. Phosphorylation can be utilized as a site-specific modification to alter peptide structure and thereby influence electron transport in peptide molecular junctions. It is envisioned that kinases and phosphatases may be used to create tunable systems for molecular electronics applications, such as biosensors and memory devices.

  8. Peptide protected gold clusters: chemical synthesis and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing; Wang, Yaling; Zhao, Lina; Liu, Ru; Gao, Fuping; Gao, Liang; Gao, Xueyun

    2016-06-01

    Bridging the gap between atoms and nanoparticles, noble metal clusters with atomic precision continue to attract considerable attention due to their important applications in catalysis, energy transformation, biosensing and biomedicine. Greatly different to common chemical synthesis, a one-step biomimetic synthesis of peptide-conjugated metal clusters has been developed to meet the demand of emerging bioapplications. Under mild conditions, multifunctional peptides containing metal capturing, reactive and targeting groups are rationally designed and elaborately synthesized to fabricate atomically precise peptide protected metal clusters. Among them, peptide-protected Au Cs (peptide-Au Cs) possess a great deal of exceptional advantages such as nanometer dimensions, high photostability, good biocompatibility, accurate chemical formula and specific protein targeting capacity. In this review article, we focus on the recent advances in potential theranostic fields by introducing the rising progress of peptide-Au Cs for biological imaging, biological analysis and therapeutic applications. The interactions between Au Cs and biological systems as well as potential mechanisms are also our concerned theme. We expect that the rapidly growing interest in Au Cs-based theranostic applications will attract broader concerns across various disciplines.

  9. Multiply-negatively charged aluminium clusters and fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Noelle

    2008-07-15

    Multiply negatively charged aluminium clusters and fullerenes were generated in a Penning trap using the 'electron-bath' technique. Aluminium monoanions were generated using a laser vaporisation source. After this, two-, three- and four-times negatively charged aluminium clusters were generated for the first time. This research marks the first observation of tetra-anionic metal clusters in the gas phase. Additionally, doubly-negatively charged fullerenes were generated. The smallest fullerene dianion observed contained 70 atoms. (orig.)

  10. Dynamics and thermodynamics of decay in charged clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Mark A; Moerland, Christian P; Gray, Sarah J; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method for quantifying charge-driven instabilities in clusters, based on equilibrium simulations under confinement at constant external pressure. This approach makes no assumptions about the mode of decay and allows different clusters to be compared on an equal footing. A comprehensive survey of stability in model clusters of 309 Lennard-Jones particles augmented with Coulomb interactions is presented. We proceed to examine dynamic signatures of instability, finding that rate constants for ejection of charged particles increase smoothly as a function of total charge with no sudden changes. For clusters where many particles carry charge, ejection of individual charges competes with a fission process that leads to more symmetric division of the cluster into large fragments. The rate constants for fission depend much more sensitively on total charge than those for ejection of individual particles.

  11. Dynamic Peptide Library for the Discovery of Charge Transfer Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdugo, Cristina; Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Javid, Nadeem; Escuder, Beatriu; Miravet, Juan F; Ulijn, Rein V

    2015-11-25

    Coupling of peptide self-assembly to dynamic sequence exchange provides a useful approach for the discovery of self-assembling materials. In here, we demonstrate the discovery and optimization of aqueous, gel-phase nanostructures based on dynamically exchanging peptide sequences that self-select to maximize charge transfer of n-type semiconducting naphthalenediimide (NDI)-dipeptide bioconjugates with various π-electron-rich donors (dialkoxy/hydroxy/amino-naphthalene or pyrene derivatives). These gel-phase peptide libraries are characterized by spectroscopy (UV-vis and fluorescence), microscopy (TEM), HPLC, and oscillatory rheology and it is found that, of the various peptide sequences explored (tyrosine Y-NDI with tyrosine Y, phenylalanine F, leucine L, valine V, alanine A or glycine G-NH2), the optimum sequence is tyrosine-phenylalanine in each case; however, both its absolute and relative yield amplification is dictated by the properties of the donor component, indicating cooperativity of peptide sequence and donor/acceptor pairs in assembly. The methodology provides an in situ discovery tool for nanostructures that enable dynamic interfacing of supramolecular electronics with aqueous (biological) systems. PMID:26540455

  12. Multiply charged neon cluster ions: critical size and Coulomb explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Multiply charged neon cluster ions are formed upon electron impact ionization of large neutral clusters and analyzed utilizing a two sector field mass spectrometer applying techniques developed recently. The critical size for doubly charged neon cluster ions is determined experimentally with isotopically pure 20Ne to be 287. In spectra of natural neon, the presence of doubly charged clusters can be observed as an increase of the ion yield at the same cluster size confirming the above result. This method allows in addition an approximate estimation of the critical size for triply charged cluster ions. Utilizing a beam deflection method 19 it is possible to observe (for the first time) directly the asymmetric fission of multiply charged neon clusters right after the ionization event. The most abundant low mass fragment ion from this reaction process is the dimer ion. The yield of larger fragment ions decreases exponentially with the fragment size. The kinetic energy of the emitted low mass fragment ions is of the order of 200 meV which is surprisingly low when comparing the results with a simple point charge model taking into account the critical cluster sizes presently determined. (author)

  13. Energy and charge transfer in ionized argon coated water clusters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kočišek, Jaroslav; Lengyel, Jozef; Fárník, Michal; Slavíček, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 21 (2013), s. 214308. ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0161 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 238671 - ICONIC Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Charged clusters * Charged fragments * Complex reactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.122, year: 2013

  14. Alternating strings and clusters in suspensions of charged colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Everts, Jeffrey C; van Blaaderen, Alfons; van Roij, René

    2016-01-01

    We report the formation of alternating strings and clusters in a binary suspension of repulsive charged colloids with double layers larger than the particle size. Within a binary cell model we include many-body and charge-regulation effects under the assumption of a constant surface po- tential, and consider their repercussions on the two-particle interaction potential. We find that the formation of induced dipoles close to a charge-reversed state may explain the formation of these structures. Finally, we will touch upon the formation of dumbbells and small clusters in a one-component system, where the effective electrostatic interaction is always repulsive.

  15. Charge distribution and radii in clusters from nuclear pasta models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the consistency of the description of charge distributions and radii of nuclear clusters obtained with semiclassical nuclear pasta models. These nuclei are expected to exist in the low density outer crust of neutron stars. Properties of the arising clusterized nucleon matter can be compared to realistic nuclear properties as experimentally extracted on earth. We focus on non iso-symmetric light clusters with nucleon number 8 ≤ A ≤ 30 and use Monte Carlo many-body techniques. We simulate isotopic chains for a set of selected nuclei using a model Hamiltonian consisting of the usual kinetic term, hadronic nucleon nucleon (NN), Coulomb and an effective density dependent Pauli potential. It is shown that for neutron rich (deficient) clusters neutron (proton) skins develop. Different (matter, neutron, proton, electric charge) radii are computed for this set of non iso-symmetric nuclei. Nuclear binding energies are also analyzed in the isotopic chains. (author)

  16. Electrostatically induced recruitment of membrane peptides into clusters requires ligand binding at both interfaces.

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    Yuri N Antonenko

    Full Text Available Protein recruitment to specific membrane locations may be governed or facilitated by electrostatic attraction, which originates from a multivalent ligand. Here we explored the energetics of a model system in which this simple electrostatic recruitment mechanism failed. That is, basic poly-L-lysine binding to one leaflet of a planar lipid bilayer did not recruit the triply-charged peptide (O-Pyromellitylgramicidin. Clustering was only observed in cases where PLL was bound to both channel ends. Clustering was indicated (i by the decreased diffusional PLL mobility D(PLL and (ii by an increased lifetime τ(PLL of the clustered channels. In contrast, if PLL was bound to only one leaflet, neither D(PLL nor τ(P changed. Simple calculations suggest that electrostatic repulsion of the unbound ends prevented neighboring OPg dimers from approaching each other. We believe that a similar mechanism may also operate in cell signaling and that it may e.g. contribute to the controversial results obtained for the ligand driven dimerization of G protein-coupled receptors.

  17. Effect of solid surface charge on the binding behaviour of a metal-binding peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Donatan, Senem; Sarikaya, Mehmet; TAMERLER, Candan; Urgen, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, solid-binding peptides have been increasingly used as molecular building blocks coupling bio- and nanotechnology. Despite considerable research being invested in this field, the effects of many surface-related parameters that define the binding of peptide to solids are still unknown. In the quest to control biological molecules at solid interfaces and, thereby, tailoring the binding characteristics of the peptides, the use of surface charge of the solid surface may proba...

  18. Selective Acylation Enhances Membrane Charge Sensitivity of the Antimicrobial Peptide Mastoparan-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etzerodt, Thomas Povl; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Rasmussen, Palle;

    2011-01-01

    The partitioning of the wasp venom peptide mastoparan-X (MPX) into neutral and negatively charged lipid membranes has been compared with two new synthetic analogs of MPX where the Nα-terminal of MPX was acylated with propanoic acid (PA) and octanoic acid (OA). The acylation caused a considerable...... change in the membrane partitioning properties of MPX and it was found that the shorter acylation with PA gave improved affinity and selectivity toward negatively charged membranes, whereas OA decreased the selectivity. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that minor differences in the embedding and...... positioning of the peptide in the membrane caused by either PA or OA acylation play a critical role in the fine-tuning of the effective charge of the peptide and thereby the fine-tuning of the peptide's selectivity between neutral and negatively charged lipid membranes. This finding is unique compared to...

  19. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

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    Ari Morgenthau

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides.

  20. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24465982

  1. A genome-wide analysis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters and their peptides in a Planktothrix rubescens strain

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    Nederbragt Alexander J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria often produce several different oligopeptides, with unknown biological functions, by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS. Although some cyanobacterial NRPS gene cluster types are well described, the entire NRPS genomic content within a single cyanobacterial strain has never been investigated. Here we have combined a genome-wide analysis using massive parallel pyrosequencing ("454" and mass spectrometry screening of oligopeptides produced in the strain Planktothrix rubescens NIVA CYA 98 in order to identify all putative gene clusters for oligopeptides. Results Thirteen types of oligopeptides were uncovered by mass spectrometry (MS analyses. Microcystin, cyanopeptolin and aeruginosin synthetases, highly similar to already characterized NRPS, were present in the genome. Two novel NRPS gene clusters were associated with production of anabaenopeptins and microginins, respectively. Sequence-depth of the genome and real-time PCR data revealed three copies of the microginin gene cluster. Since NRPS gene cluster candidates for microviridin and oscillatorin synthesis could not be found, putative (gene encoded precursor peptide sequences to microviridin and oscillatorin were found in the genes mdnA and oscA, respectively. The genes flanking the microviridin and oscillatorin precursor genes encode putative modifying enzymes of the precursor oligopeptides. We therefore propose ribosomal pathways involving modifications and cyclisation for microviridin and oscillatorin. The microviridin, anabaenopeptin and cyanopeptolin gene clusters are situated in close proximity to each other, constituting an oligopeptide island. Conclusion Altogether seven nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS gene clusters and two gene clusters putatively encoding ribosomal oligopeptide biosynthetic pathways were revealed. Our results demonstrate that whole genome shotgun sequencing combined with MS-directed determination of oligopeptides successfully

  2. Self-assembly and adsorption properties of Fmoc-substituted short peptide bearing charged side chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Toru; Sakuraba, Taro; Yamamoto, Yohei

    2015-12-01

    Charge-separated peptide β-sheet with a positive charge on one side and a negative charge on the other side adsorbed on a mica surface with well-ordered geometry along the crystallographic direction of the mica surface. In MeOH and MeOH/H2O mixed solvent, the peptides do not form β-sheet structure. During the evaporation process of the solvent on a mica substrate, the peptides self-assembled to form β-sheet and adsorb on the surface via electrostatic interaction between negative charge of the mica surface and positive charge of the lysine side chain on one side of the β-sheet.

  3. Charging dynamics of metal clusters in intense laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döppner, T.; Teuber, S.; Schumacher, M.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.

    2000-09-01

    Clusters of heavy metal atoms in strong femtosecond laser-light fields undergo multi-ionization with the loss of hundreds of electrons. The cross section largely exceeds that of corresponding isolated atoms, which leads in the case of PbN to a complete ionization of the 4f shell with a light intensity of 1.2×1015 W/cm2. Experimental investigations on Pb and Pt clusters with variable pulse widths and, for the first time, with the pump&probe technique give insight into the dynamics of the coupling of electromagnetic radiation into the clusters. Both approaches support the picture according to which, after an initial charging, the clusters expand due to Coulomb forces. This expansion is accompanied by a reduction of the electron density and at the same time by an increase of the optical sensitivity. Once the plasmon energy of the diluted nanoplasma approaches the photon energy, the charging efficiency increases significantly. The experimental observations are confirmed by random-phase approximation (RPA) calculations of the optical response, including molecular-dynamics simulations of the expanding systems.

  4. Experimental study of the fragmentation of water clusters induced by multiply charged ions

    OpenAIRE

    Maisonny, Rémi

    2011-01-01

    This work deals with the fragmentation of neutral water clusters induced by collisions with slow and swift multiply charged ions. Strong projectile charge dependence is found for all of the fragmentation patterns in the charge transfer regime. When increasing the projectile charge (from q = 2 to q = 20), we observe a modification of the scenario of the fragmentation dynamics with a transition from a partial dissociation to a full cluster explosion. We observe that water clusters are more stro...

  5. Multipole correction of atomic monopole models of molecular charge distribution. I. Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokalski, W. A.; Keller, D. A.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1993-01-01

    The defects in atomic monopole models of molecular charge distribution have been analyzed for several model-blocked peptides and compared with accurate quantum chemical values. The results indicate that the angular characteristics of the molecular electrostatic potential around functional groups capable of forming hydrogen bonds can be considerably distorted within various models relying upon isotropic atomic charges only. It is shown that these defects can be corrected by augmenting the atomic point charge models by cumulative atomic multipole moments (CAMMs). Alternatively, sets of off-center atomic point charges could be automatically derived from respective multipoles, providing approximately equivalent corrections. For the first time, correlated atomic multipoles have been calculated for N-acetyl, N'-methylamide-blocked derivatives of glycine, alanine, cysteine, threonine, leucine, lysine, and serine using the MP2 method. The role of the correlation effects in the peptide molecular charge distribution are discussed.

  6. Cell-Penetrating Ability of Peptide Hormones: Key Role of Glycosaminoglycans Clustering

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    Armelle Tchoumi Neree

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the potential usage of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs for the intracellular delivery of various molecules has prompted the identification of novel peptidic identities. However, cytotoxic effects and unpredicted immunological responses have often limited the use of various CPP sequences in the clinic. To overcome these issues, the usage of endogenous peptides appears as an appropriate alternative approach. The hormone pituitary adenylate-cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP38 has been recently identified as a novel and very efficient CPP. This 38-residue polycationic peptide is a member of the secretin/glucagon/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH superfamily, with which PACAP38 shares high structural and conformational homologies. In this study, we evaluated the cell-penetrating ability of cationic peptide hormones in the context of the expression of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. Our results indicated that among all peptides evaluated, PACAP38 was unique for its potent efficiency of cellular uptake. Interestingly, the abilities of the peptides to reach the intracellular space did not correlate with their binding affinities to sulfated GAGs, but rather to their capacity to clustered heparin in vitro. This study demonstrates that the uptake efficiency of a given cationic CPP does not necessarily correlate with its affinity to sulfated GAGs and that its ability to cluster GAGs should be considered for the identification of novel peptidic sequences with potent cellular penetrating properties.

  7. Fragmentation of phosphorylated and singly charged peptide ions via interaction with metastable atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkout, Vadym D; Doroshenko, Vladimir M

    2008-12-01

    Fragmentation of phosphorylated peptide ions via interaction with electronically excited metastable argon atoms was studied in a linear trap - time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Doubly charged ions of phosphorylated peptides from an Enolase digest were produced by electrospray ionization and subjected to a metastable atom beam in the linear trap. The metastable argon atoms were generated using a glow-discharge source. An intensive series of c- and z- ions were observed in all cases, with the phosphorylation group intact. The formation of molecular radical cations with reduced charge indicated that an electron transfer from a highly excited metastable state of argon to the peptide cation occurred. Additionally, singly charged Bradykinin, Substance P and Fibrinopeptide A molecular ions were fragmented via interaction with electronically excited metastable helium atoms. The fragmentation mechanism was different in this case and involved Penning ionization. PMID:19956340

  8. Characterization of Protein and Peptide Binding to Nanogels Formed by Differently Charged Chitosan Derivatives

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    Anastasia Zubareva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (Chi is a natural biodegradable cationic polymer with remarkable potency as a vehicle for drug or vaccine delivery. Chi possesses multiple groups, which can be used both for Chi derivatization and for particle formation. The aim of this work was to produce stable nanosized range Chi gels (nanogels, NGs with different charge and to study the driving forces of complex formation between Chi NGs and proteins or peptides. Positively charged NGs of 150 nm in diameter were prepared from hexanoyl chitosan (HC by the ionotropic gelation method while negatively charged NGs of 190 nm were obtained from succinoyl Chi (SC by a Ca2+ coacervation approach. NGs were loaded with a panel of proteins or peptides with different weights and charges. We show that NGs preferentially formed complexes with oppositely charged molecules, especially peptides, as was demonstrated by gel-electrophoresis, confocal microscopy and HPLC. Complex formation was accompanied by a change in zeta-potential and decrease in size. We concluded that complex formation between Chi NGs and peptide/proteins is mediated mostly by electrostatic interactions.

  9. Dynamical Interactions of 5-Fluorouracil Drug with Dendritic Peptide Vectors: The Impact of Dendrimer Generation, Charge, Counterions, and Structured Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Sergio; Seal, Prasenjit; Ouyang, Defang; Parekh, Harendra S; Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Smith, Sean C

    2016-06-30

    Molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to investigate the interactions between the skin cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and peptide-based dendritic carrier systems. We find that these drug-carrier interactions do not conform to the traditional picture of long-time retention of the drug within a hydrophobic core of the dendrimer carrier. Rather, 5FU, which is moderately soluble in its own right, experiences weak, transient chattering interactions all over the dendrimer, mediated through multiple short-lived hydrogen bonding and close contact events. We find that charge on the periphery of the dendrimer actually has a negative effect on the frequency of drug-carrier interactions due to a counterion screening effect that has not previously been observed. However, charge is nevertheless an important feature since neutral dendrimers are shown to have a significant mutual attraction that can lead to clustering or agglomeration. This clustering is prevented due to charge repulsion for the titrated dendrimers, such that they remain independent in solution. PMID:27267604

  10. Clustering of settling charged particles in turbulence: theory and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Jiang; Nordsiek, Hansen; Shaw, Raymond A, E-mail: rashaw@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Atmospheric clouds, electrosprays and protoplanetary nebula (dusty plasma) contain electrically charged particles embedded in turbulent flows, often under the influence of an externally imposed, approximately uniform gravitational or electric force. We have developed a theoretical description of the dynamics of such systems of charged, sedimenting particles in turbulence, allowing radial distribution functions (RDFs) to be predicted for both monodisperse and bidisperse particle size distributions. The governing parameters are the particle Stokes number (particle inertial time scale relative to turbulence dissipation time scale), the Coulomb-turbulence parameter (ratio of Coulomb 'terminal' speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale) and the settling parameter (the ratio of the gravitational terminal speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale). The theory is compared to measured RDFs for water particles in homogeneous, isotropic air turbulence. The RDFs are obtained from particle positions measured in three dimensions using digital holography. The measurements verify the general theoretical expression, consisting of a power law increase in particle clustering due to particle response to dissipative turbulent eddies, modulated by an exponential electrostatic interaction term. Both terms are modified as a result of the gravitational diffusion-like term, and the role of 'gravity' is explored by imposing a macroscopic uniform electric field to create an enhanced, effective gravity.

  11. Clustering of settling charged particles in turbulence: theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric clouds, electrosprays and protoplanetary nebula (dusty plasma) contain electrically charged particles embedded in turbulent flows, often under the influence of an externally imposed, approximately uniform gravitational or electric force. We have developed a theoretical description of the dynamics of such systems of charged, sedimenting particles in turbulence, allowing radial distribution functions (RDFs) to be predicted for both monodisperse and bidisperse particle size distributions. The governing parameters are the particle Stokes number (particle inertial time scale relative to turbulence dissipation time scale), the Coulomb-turbulence parameter (ratio of Coulomb 'terminal' speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale) and the settling parameter (the ratio of the gravitational terminal speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale). The theory is compared to measured RDFs for water particles in homogeneous, isotropic air turbulence. The RDFs are obtained from particle positions measured in three dimensions using digital holography. The measurements verify the general theoretical expression, consisting of a power law increase in particle clustering due to particle response to dissipative turbulent eddies, modulated by an exponential electrostatic interaction term. Both terms are modified as a result of the gravitational diffusion-like term, and the role of 'gravity' is explored by imposing a macroscopic uniform electric field to create an enhanced, effective gravity.

  12. Simultaneous alignment and clustering of peptide data using a Gibbs sampling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    peptide datasets, however, is a complex task, especially when the data contain multiple receptor binding motifs, and/or the motifs are found at different locations within distinct peptides.Results: The algorithm presented in this article, based on Gibbs sampling, identifies multiple specificities in...... unaligned peptide datasets of variable length. Example applications described in this article include mixtures of binders to different MHC class I and class II alleles, distinct classes of ligands for SH3 domains and sub-specificities of the HLA-A*02:01 molecule.Availability: The Gibbs clustering method is...... available online as a web server at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/GibbsCluster.Contact: massimo@cbs.dtu.dkSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online....

  13. High-confidence de novo peptide sequencing using positive charge derivatization and tandem MS spectra merging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Mingrui; Zou, Xiao; Wang, Qingsong; Zhao, Xuyang; Wu, Jing; Xu, Li-Ming; Shen, Hong-Yan; Xiao, Xueyuan; He, Dacheng; Ji, Jianguo

    2013-05-01

    De novo peptide sequencing holds great promise in discovering new protein sequences and modifications but has often been hindered by low success rate of mass spectra interpretation, mainly due to the diversity of fragment ion types and insufficient information for each ion series. Here, we describe a novel methodology that combines highly efficient on-tip charge derivatization and tandem MS spectra merging, which greatly boosts the performance of interpretation. TMPP-Ac-OSu (succinimidyloxycarbonylmethyl tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide) was used to derivatize peptides at N-termini on tips to reduce mass spectra complexity. Then, a novel approach of spectra merging was adopted to combine the benefits of collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) fragmentation. We applied this methodology to rat C6 glioma cells and the Cyprinus carpio and searched the resulting peptide sequences against the protein database. Then, we achieved thousands of high-confidence peptide sequences, a level that conventional de novo sequencing methods could not reach. Next, we identified dozens of novel peptide sequences by homology searching of sequences that were fully backbone covered but unmatched during the database search. Furthermore, we randomly chose 34 sequences discovered in rat C6 cells and verified them. Finally, we conclude that this novel methodology that combines on-tip positive charge derivatization and tandem MS spectra merging will greatly facilitate the discovery of novel proteins and the proteome analysis of nonmodel organisms. PMID:23536960

  14. Delta-sleep inducing peptide entrapment in the charged macroporous matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanova, Tatiana V., E-mail: sukhanovat@mail.ru [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Laboratory of Cell Interactions, Miklukho-Maklaya st., 16/10 Moscow (Russian Federation); Artyukhov, Alexander A.; Gurevich, Yakov M.; Semenikhina, Marina A. [Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Research and Teaching Center “Biomaterials”, Miusskaya sq., 9 Moscow (Russian Federation); Prudchenko, Igor A. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Laboratory of Peptide Chemistry, Miklukho-Maklaya st., 16/10 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shtilman, Mikhail I. [Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Research and Teaching Center “Biomaterials”, Miusskaya sq., 9 Moscow (Russian Federation); Markvicheva, Elena A. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Laboratory Polymers for Biology, Miklukho-Maklaya st., 16/10 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-01

    Various biomolecules, for example proteins, peptides etc., entrapped in polymer matrices, impact interactions between matrix and cells, including stimulation of cell adhesion and proliferation. Delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) possesses numerous beneficial properties, including its abilities in burn treatment and neuronal protection. DSIP entrapment in two macroporous polymer matrices based on copolymer of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and methylen-bis-acrylamide (Co-DMAEMA-MBAA) and copolymer of acrylic acid and methylen-bis-acrylamide (Co-AA-MBAA) has been studied. Quite 100% of DSIP has been entrapped into positively charged Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix, while the quantity of DSIP adsorbed on negatively charged Co-AA-MBAA was only 2–6%. DSIP release from Co-DMAEMA-MBAA was observed in saline solutions (0.9% NaCl and PBS) while there was no DSIP release in water or 25% ethanol, thus ionic strength was a reason of this process. - Graphical abstract: Delta-sleep inducing peptide possessing neuroprotective and wound healing properties was adsorbed on positively charged polymer matrix Co-DMAEMA-MBAA for tissue engineering. The peptide released from Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix in function of ionic strength of solution, pH decreasing stimulated peptide release from Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix for 3 h. This construction could be a base of new bioactive implants. - Highlights: • Macroporous positively charged Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix pore size was 20–35 μm. • DSIP was adsorbed on Co-DMAEMA-MBAA totally in 16 h. • Its release depends on ionic strength of solution (no release in 25% ethanol or water). • Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix swelling depends on pH and ionic strength of solution. • DSIP is destroyed in PBS and 0.9% NaCl in 5 days, but in water it was more stable.

  15. Delta-sleep inducing peptide entrapment in the charged macroporous matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various biomolecules, for example proteins, peptides etc., entrapped in polymer matrices, impact interactions between matrix and cells, including stimulation of cell adhesion and proliferation. Delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) possesses numerous beneficial properties, including its abilities in burn treatment and neuronal protection. DSIP entrapment in two macroporous polymer matrices based on copolymer of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and methylen-bis-acrylamide (Co-DMAEMA-MBAA) and copolymer of acrylic acid and methylen-bis-acrylamide (Co-AA-MBAA) has been studied. Quite 100% of DSIP has been entrapped into positively charged Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix, while the quantity of DSIP adsorbed on negatively charged Co-AA-MBAA was only 2–6%. DSIP release from Co-DMAEMA-MBAA was observed in saline solutions (0.9% NaCl and PBS) while there was no DSIP release in water or 25% ethanol, thus ionic strength was a reason of this process. - Graphical abstract: Delta-sleep inducing peptide possessing neuroprotective and wound healing properties was adsorbed on positively charged polymer matrix Co-DMAEMA-MBAA for tissue engineering. The peptide released from Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix in function of ionic strength of solution, pH decreasing stimulated peptide release from Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix for 3 h. This construction could be a base of new bioactive implants. - Highlights: • Macroporous positively charged Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix pore size was 20–35 μm. • DSIP was adsorbed on Co-DMAEMA-MBAA totally in 16 h. • Its release depends on ionic strength of solution (no release in 25% ethanol or water). • Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix swelling depends on pH and ionic strength of solution. • DSIP is destroyed in PBS and 0.9% NaCl in 5 days, but in water it was more stable

  16. Strong Electrostatic Interactions Lead to Entropically Favorable Binding of Peptides to Charged Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, K G; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic analyses can provide key insights into the origins of protein self-assembly on surfaces, protein function, and protein stability. However, obtaining quantitative measurements of thermodynamic observables from unbiased classical simulations of peptide or protein adsorption is challenging because of sampling limitations brought on by strong biomolecule/surface binding forces as well as time scale limitations. We used the parallel tempering metadynamics in the well-tempered ensemble (PTMetaD-WTE) enhanced sampling method to study the adsorption behavior and thermodynamics of several explicitly solvated model peptide adsorption systems, providing new molecular-level insight into the biomolecule adsorption process. Specifically studied were peptides LKα14 and LKβ15 and trpcage miniprotein adsorbing onto a charged, hydrophilic self-assembled monolayer surface functionalized with a carboxylic acid/carboxylate headgroup and a neutral, hydrophobic methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer surface. Binding free energies were calculated as a function of temperature for each system and decomposed into their respective energetic and entropic contributions. We investigated how specific interfacial features such as peptide/surface electrostatic interactions and surface-bound ion content affect the thermodynamic landscape of adsorption and lead to differences in surface-bound conformations of the peptides. Results show that upon adsorption to the charged surface, configurational entropy gains of the released solvent molecules dominate the configurational entropy losses of the bound peptide. This behavior leads to an apparent increase in overall system entropy upon binding and therefore to the surprising and seemingly nonphysical result of an apparent increased binding free energy at elevated temperatures. Opposite effects and conclusions are found for the neutral surface. Additional simulations demonstrate that by adjusting the ionic strength of the solution

  17. Charge Exchange, from the Laboratory to Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory; Hell, Natalie; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray emission due to charge exchange (CX) between solar wind ions and neutrals in comets and planetary atmospheres is ubiquitous in the solar system, and is also a significant foreground in all observations from low-Earth orbit. It is also possible that CX is common astrophysically, in any environment where hot plasma and cold gas interact. A current challenge is that theoretical models of CX spectra do not always accurately describe observations, and require further experimental verification. This is especially important to focus on now, as the recent launch of Astro-H is providing us with the first high-resolution spectra of extended x-ray sources. In order to improve our understanding and modeling of CX spectra, we take advantage of the laboratory astrophysics program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and use an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) to perform CX experiments, using the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer. We present experimental benchmarks that can be used to develop a more comprehensive and accurate CX theory. On the observational side, we also investigate the possibility of CX occurring in the filaments around the central galaxy of the Perseus cluster, NGC 1275. We use Chandra ACIS data, combined with what we know about laboratory CX spectra, to investigate the possibility of CX being a significant contributor to the x-ray emission.

  18. Charge properties of peptides derived from casein affect their bioavailability and cytoprotection against H2O2-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Xie, Ningning; Li, Bo

    2016-04-01

    The effects of charge properties of casein peptides on absorption stability, antioxidant activity, and cytoprotection were evaluated. Alcalase hydrolysates of casein were separated into 4 fractions by cation-exchange chromatography according to charge properties. After simulated digestion and Caco-2 cell transmembrane transport, we determined the total antioxidant capacity (Trolox equivalent antioxidative capacity and oxygen radical antioxidant activity) and nitrogen content of peptide fractions to estimate available antioxidant efficacy and bioavailability (BA) of peptides. Results showed that negatively charged peptide fractions had greater BA and antioxidant activities after digestion and absorption. The peptide permeates were used to test the cytoprotective effect against H2O2-induced oxidative damage in HepG-2 cells. All peptide permeates increased cell viability, elevated catalase activity, and decreased superoxide dismutase activity. However, negatively charged peptide fractions preserved cell viability to a greater degree. Therefore, the negatively charged peptides from casein may be potential antioxidants and could be used as ingredients in functional foods and dietary supplements. PMID:26851854

  19. The reactivity of stoichiometric tungsten oxide clusters towards carbon monoxide: the effects of cluster sizes and charge states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Juan; Cheng, Jing; Zhang, Chang-Fu; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Yong-Fan; Huang, Xin

    2015-05-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are employed to investigate the reactivity of tungsten oxide clusters towards carbon monoxide. Extensive structural searches show that all the ground-state structures of (WO3)n(+) (n = 1-4) contain an oxygen radical center with a lengthened W-O bond which is highly active in the oxidation of carbon monoxide. Energy profiles are calculated to determine the reaction mechanisms and evaluate the effect of cluster sizes. The monomer WO3(+) has the highest reactivity among the stoichiometric clusters of different sizes (WO3)n(+) (n = 1-4). The reaction mechanisms for CO with mono-nuclear stoichiometric tungsten oxide clusters with different charges (WO3(-/0/+)) are also studied to clarify the influence of charge states. Our calculated results show that the ability to oxidize CO gets weaker from WO3(+) to WO3(-) as the negative charge accumulates progressively. PMID:25854200

  20. Statistical characterization of the charge state and residue dependence of low-energy CID peptide dissociation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yingying; Triscari, Joseph M; Tseng, George C; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2005-09-15

    Data mining was performed on 28 330 unique peptide tandem mass spectra for which sequences were assigned with high confidence. By dividing the spectra into different sets based on structural features and charge states of the corresponding peptides, chemical interactions involved in promoting specific cleavage patterns in gas-phase peptides were characterized. Pairwise fragmentation maps describing cleavages at all Xxx-Zzz residue combinations for b and y ions reveal that the difference in basicity between Arg and Lys results in different dissociation patterns for singly charged Arg- and Lys-ending tryptic peptides. While one dominant protonation form (proton localized) exists for Arg-ending peptides, a heterogeneous population of different protonated forms or more facile interconversion of protonated forms (proton partially mobile) exists for Lys-ending peptides. Cleavage C-terminal to acidic residues dominates spectra from singly charged peptides that have a localized proton and cleavage N-terminal to Pro dominates those that have a mobile or partially mobile proton. When Pro is absent from peptides that have a mobile or partially mobile proton, cleavage at each peptide bond becomes much more prominent. Whether the above patterns can be found in b ions, y ions, or both depends on the location of the proton holder(s) in multiply protonated peptides. Enhanced cleavages C-terminal to branched aliphatic residues (Ile, Val, Leu) are observed in both b and y ions from peptides that have a mobile proton, as well as in y ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton; enhanced cleavages N-terminal to these residues are observed in b ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton. Statistical tools have been designed to visualize the fragmentation maps and measure the similarity between them. The pairwise cleavage patterns observed expand our knowledge of peptide gas-phase fragmentation behaviors and may be useful in algorithm development that employs

  1. Spatial distribution of ion charges in fast, partially stripped clusters traversing solid targets

    CERN Document Server

    Miskovic, Z L; Goodman, F O; Wang, Y N

    2002-01-01

    Joint statistical description of the distribution of ion charge states and the spatial structure of a cluster, made of heavy ions, allows a self-consistent generalization of the Brandt-Kitagawa variational theory, including dynamically-screened inter-ionic interactions, in a form of a non-linear integral equation. Solution of such an equation for fast clusters passing very thin foils shows the familiar reduction of charge per ion, compared to the charge on an isotactic ion, which is rather non-homogeneously distributed throughout the volume of the cluster. As a consequence, the distribution of individual ion charges in the cluster exhibits large dispersion around an average value, which drops with the increasing cluster size.

  2. Spatial distribution of ion charges in fast, partially stripped clusters traversing solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joint statistical description of the distribution of ion charge states and the spatial structure of a cluster, made of heavy ions, allows a self-consistent generalization of the Brandt-Kitagawa variational theory, including dynamically-screened inter-ionic interactions, in a form of a non-linear integral equation. Solution of such an equation for fast clusters passing very thin foils shows the familiar reduction of charge per ion, compared to the charge on an isotactic ion, which is rather non-homogeneously distributed throughout the volume of the cluster. As a consequence, the distribution of individual ion charges in the cluster exhibits large dispersion around an average value, which drops with the increasing cluster size

  3. Peptide Fragmentation and Surface Structural Analysis by Means of ToF-SIMS Using Large Cluster Ion Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yuta; Aoyagi, Satoka; Fujii, Makiko; Matsuo, Jiro; Fletcher, John S; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Vickerman, John C; Passarelli, Melissa K; Havelund, Rasmus; Seah, Martin P

    2016-04-01

    Peptide or protein structural analysis is crucial for the evaluation of biochips and biodevices, therefore an analytical technique with the ability to detect and identify protein and peptide species directly from surfaces with high lateral resolution is required. In this report, the efficacy of ToF-SIMS to analyze and identify proteins directly from surfaces is evaluated. Although the physics governing the SIMS bombardment process precludes the ability for researchers to detect intact protein or larger peptides of greater than a few thousand mass unit directly, it is possible to obtain information on the partial structures of peptides or proteins using low energy per atom argon cluster ion beams. Large cluster ion beams, such as Ar clusters and C60 ion beams, produce spectra similar to those generated by tandem MS. The SIMS bombardment process also produces peptide fragment ions not detected by conventional MS/MS techniques. In order to clarify appropriate measurement conditions for peptide structural analysis, peptide fragmentation dependency on the energy of a primary ion beam and ToF-SIMS specific fragment ions are evaluated. It was found that the energy range approximately 6 ≤ E/n ≤ 10 eV/atom is most effective for peptide analysis based on peptide fragments and [M + H] ions. We also observed the cleaving of side chain moieties at extremely low-energy E/n ≤ 4 eV/atom. PMID:26916620

  4. Anisotropic "charge-flipping" acceleration of highly charged ions from $(N_2)_n$ clusters in strong optical fields

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, M.; D. Mathur; Kumarappan, V.

    2003-01-01

    The disassembly of molecular clusters $(N_2)_n$ ($n$=50-3000) in strong optical fields is investigated using two-dimensional time-of-flight spectrometry. Very highly charged ions are formed with a two-component energy distribution. A low-energy, isotropic component correlates with Coulomb explosion. A high-energy, anisotropic component, that results from a ``charge flipping" acceleration mechanism, gives rise to ions with energies in excess of the Coulombic limit.

  5. Effects of Electron-Transfer Coupled with Collision-Induced Dissociation (ET/CID) on Doubly Charged Peptides and Phosphopeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chih-Wei; Lai, Chien-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) is a useful peptide fragmentation technique that can be applied to investigate post-translational modifications (PTMs), the sequencing of highly hydrophilic peptides, and the identification of large peptides and even intact proteins. In contrast to traditional fragmentation methods, such as collision-induced dissociation (CID), ETD produces c- and z·-type product ions by randomly cleaving the N-Cα bonds. The disappointing fragmentation efficiency of ETD for doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptide ions has been improved by ETcaD (supplemental activation). However, the ETD data derived from most database search algorithms yield low confidence scores due to the presence of unreacted precursors and charge-reduced ions within MS/MS spectra. In this work, we demonstrate that eight out of ten standard doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides can be effortlessly identified by electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) using the SEQUEST algorithm without further spectral processing. ET/CID was performed with the further dissociation of the charge-reduced ions isolated from ETD ion/ion reactions. ET/CID had high fragmentation efficiency, which elevated the confidence scores of doubly charged peptide and phosphospeptide sequencing. ET/CID was found to be an effective fragmentation strategy in "bottom-up" proteomic analysis.

  6. Experimental study of the fragmentation of water clusters induced by multiply charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the fragmentation of neutral water clusters induced by collisions with slow and swift multiply charged ions. Strong projectile charge dependence is found for all of the fragmentation patterns in the charge transfer regime. When increasing the projectile charge (from q = 2 to q = 20), we observe a modification of the scenario of the fragmentation dynamics with a transition from a partial dissociation to a full cluster explosion. We observe that water clusters are more strongly heated by Xe20+ than by He2+. These results are in contrast to the generally accepted idea that highly charged ions are an efficient tool to ionize the target at large impact parameters without a huge amount of energy transfer. The results obtained with high energy projectiles Ni25+ i.e. in the ionization regime, are very similar than those obtained with low velocity Xe20+ i.e. in the charge transfer regime. These results suggest that even if the primary mechanism is different, the 'same' electrons are into play and ejected from the target. In this work, we have also produced size-selected protonated water clusters by the coupling of an Electro-Spray Ion source together with a quadrupole mass filter. In order to perform, in the next future, collisions between these size-selected water clusters and projectile ions, we designed and realized a new experimental device which allows us to produce intense singly charged ions beams. (author)

  7. Charge stripping effects from highly charged iodine ions formed from Coulomb explosion of CH3I clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine ions of high charge states are observed upon irradiation of methyl iodide clusters with an intense femtosecond laser pulse. All signals from multicharged ions exhibit a peak splitting in the time-of-flight mass spectra, indicating their origin from a Coulomb explosion process. These main peaks are accompanied by smaller peaks attributed to field ionization of highly charged species in the ion optics of the TOF mass spectrometer. It is shown that highly charged atomic ions formed from Coulomb explosion, upon interaction with electric field close to the mesh, can lose another electron leading to the formation of even higher charged species. The observation of this charge stripping process is evidence for the formation of highly excited ions in the course of the Coulomb explosion process, providing new insights into the mechanisms of femtosecond ionization involving multi-electron loss. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  8. Charge separation reaction in clusters of polar molecules. MD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rate constant of intermolecular electron transfer (ET) in a photoexcited donor-acceptor model system solvated by a cluster of polar molecules has been expressed in terms of the statistical distribution of the electrostatic potential energy difference between the reacting sites. This distribution has been calculated for a particular case of acetonitrile clusters at ∼ 120 K by MD computer simulation. The MD values of the cluster reorganization energy and the ET rate constant have been compared with the corresponding MD results for the donor-acceptor pair solvated in bulk acetonitrile and with theoretical predictions based on the continuum model. (author)

  9. Cluster ions and multiply charged ions formed in frozen CO2 molecules under heavy ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of cluster ions, positive or negative, as well as multiply charged atomic ions have been observed from the frozen CO2 targets under (MeV/amu) energetic, highly charged projectile ion impact. Their spectra are found to be quite different from those produced in the cooled expanding CO2 gas targets

  10. Impact of peptide clustering on unbinding forces in the context of fusion mimetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Coiled-coil peptides as SNARE mimetics for membrane fusion. ► Interaction forces assessed by colloidal probe microscopy. ► Lateral organization of lipopeptides visualized by atomic force microscopy. -- Abstract: Coiled-coil zipping and unzipping is a pivotal process in SNARE-regulated membrane fusion. In this study we examine this process mediated by a minimal model for coiled-coil formation employing force spectroscopy in the context of membrane-coated surfaces and probes. The interaction forces of several hundred pN are surprisingly low considering the proposed amount of molecular bonds in the contact zone. However, by means of high-resolution imaging employing atomic force microscopy and studying the lateral mobility of lipids and peptides as a function of coiled-coil formation, we are able to supply a detailed view on processes occurring on the membrane surfaces during force measurements. The interaction forces determined here are not only dependent on the peptide concentration on the surface, but also on the regional organization of lateral peptide clusters found prior to coiled-coil formation

  11. Impact of peptide clustering on unbinding forces in the context of fusion mimetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pähler, Gesa; Lorenz, Bärbel [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Tammannstr. 6, University of Goettingen, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Janshoff, Andreas, E-mail: ajansho@gwdg.de [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Tammannstr. 6, University of Goettingen, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Coiled-coil peptides as SNARE mimetics for membrane fusion. ► Interaction forces assessed by colloidal probe microscopy. ► Lateral organization of lipopeptides visualized by atomic force microscopy. -- Abstract: Coiled-coil zipping and unzipping is a pivotal process in SNARE-regulated membrane fusion. In this study we examine this process mediated by a minimal model for coiled-coil formation employing force spectroscopy in the context of membrane-coated surfaces and probes. The interaction forces of several hundred pN are surprisingly low considering the proposed amount of molecular bonds in the contact zone. However, by means of high-resolution imaging employing atomic force microscopy and studying the lateral mobility of lipids and peptides as a function of coiled-coil formation, we are able to supply a detailed view on processes occurring on the membrane surfaces during force measurements. The interaction forces determined here are not only dependent on the peptide concentration on the surface, but also on the regional organization of lateral peptide clusters found prior to coiled-coil formation.

  12. Fission of Multiply Charged Cesium and Potassium Clusters in Helium Droplets - Approaching the Rayleigh Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Renzler, Michael; Daxner, Matthias; Kranabetter, Lorenz; Kuhn, Martin; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Electron ionization of helium droplets doped with cesium or potassium results in doubly and, for cesium, triply charged cluster ions. The smallest observable doubly charged clusters are $Cs_{9}^{2+}$ and $K_{11}^{2+}$; they are a factor two smaller than reported previously. The size of potassium dications approaches the Rayleigh limit nRay for which the fission barrier is calculated to vanish, i.e. their fissilities are close to 1. Cesium dications are even smaller than nRay, implying that their fissilities have been significantly overestimated. Triply charged cesium clusters as small as $Cs_{19}^{3+}$ are observed; they are a factor 2.6 smaller than previously reported. Mechanisms that may be responsible for enhanced formation of clusters with high fissilities are discussed.

  13. Fission of multiply charged alkali clusters in helium droplets - approaching the Rayleigh limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzler, Michael; Harnisch, Martina; Daxner, Matthias; Kranabetter, Lorenz; Kuhn, Martin; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2016-04-21

    Electron ionization of helium droplets doped with sodium, potassium or cesium results in doubly and, for cesium, triply charged cluster ions. The smallest observable doubly charged clusters are Na9(2+), K11(2+), and Cs9(2+); they are a factor two to three smaller than reported previously. The size of sodium and potassium dications approaches the Rayleigh limit nRay for which the fission barrier is calculated to vanish, i.e. their fissilities are close to 1. Cesium dications are even smaller than nRay, implying that their fissilities have been significantly overestimated. Triply charged cesium clusters as small as Cs19(3+) are observed; they are a factor 2.6 smaller than previously reported. Mechanisms that may be responsible for enhanced formation of clusters with high fissilities are discussed. PMID:27035406

  14. Diet-induced neuropeptide expression: feasibility of quantifying extended and highly charged endogenous peptide sequences by selected reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, Thierry; Boender, Arjen J; Frese, Christian K; Heck, Albert J R; Adan, Roger A H; Altelaar, A F Maarten

    2015-10-01

    Understanding regulation and action of endogenous peptides, especially neuropeptides, which serve as inter- and intracellular signal transmitters, is key in understanding a variety of functional processes, such as energy balance, memory, circadian rhythm, drug addiction, etc. Therefore, accurate and reproducible quantification of these bioactive endogenous compounds is highly relevant. The biosynthesis of endogenous peptides, involving multiple possible trimming and modification events, hinders the de novo prediction of the active peptide sequences, making MS-based measurements very valuable in determining the actual active compounds. Here, we report an extended selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based strategy to reproducibly and quantitatively monitor the abundances of a set of 15 endogenously occurring peptides from Rattus norvegicus hypothalamus. We demonstrate that SRM can be extended toward reproducible detection and quantification of peptides, bearing characteristics very different from tryptic peptides. We show that long peptide sequences, producing precursors with up to five and MS2 fragment ions with up to three charges, can be targeted by SRM on a triple quadrupole instrument. Using this approach to quantify endogenous peptide levels in hypothalami of animals subjected to different diets revealed several significant changes, most notably the significant upregulation of VGF-derived signaling peptide AQEE-30 upon high caloric feeding. PMID:26376940

  15. On the ultrafast charge migration dynamics in isolated ionized halogen, chalcogen, pnicogen, and tetrel bonded clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sankhabrata; Rana, Bhaskar; Periyasamy, Ganga; Bhattacharya, Atanu

    2016-06-01

    Here we demonstrate, compare and contrast relaxation- and correlation-driven charge migration dynamics in halogen, chalcogen, pnicogen and tetrel bonded clusters, following their vertical ionization. For this work, we have selected different isolated A-X:NH3 clusters, where A represents F, Cl, CN and NH2 substituents and X features Cl, SH, PH2 and SiH3 to exhibit specific noncovalent bonding interaction. The charge migration dynamics in these clusters is studied using the density functional theory (DFT) with the wB97XD functional and the 6-31+G(d,p) basis set. Approximately 400-600 attosecond time scale is predicted for charge migration in (1:1) AX:NH3 complexes. Effects of basis set and intermolecular distance on the ultrafast charge migration dynamics through the halogen, chalcogen, pnicogen, and tetrel bonded clusters are also discussed. This is the first report on pure relaxation- and correlation-driven charge migration dynamics in chalcogen, pnicogen and tetrel bonded clusters.

  16. Effects of charging and doping on orbital hybridizations and distributions in TiO2 clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong Min; Wu, Miao Miao; Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru

    2011-11-01

    Charging and doping are two important strategies used in TiO2 quantum dots for photocatalysis and photovoltaics. Using small clusters as the prototypes for quantum dots, we have carried out density functional calculations to study the size-specific effects of charging and doping on geometry, electronic structure, frontier orbital distribution, and orbital hybridization. We find that in neutral (TiO2)n clusters the charge transfer from Ti to O is almost size independent, while for the anionic (TiO2)n clusters the corresponding charge transfer is reduced but it increases with size. When one O atom is substituted with N, the charge transfer is also reduced due to the smaller electron affinity of N. As the cluster size increases, the populations of 3d and 4s orbitals of Ti decrease with size, while the populations of the 4p orbital increase, suggesting size dependence of spd hybridizations. The present study clearly shows that charging and doping are effective ways for tailoring the energy gap, orbital distributions, and hybridizations.

  17. Resonant charging of Xe clusters in Helium nanodroplets under intense laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Peltz, Christian

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the impact of multiple plasmon resonances on the charging of Xe clusters embedded in He nanodroplets under intense pump-probe laser excitation. Our molecular dynamics simulations on Xe309He10000$ and comparison to results for free Xe309$ give clear evidence for selective resonance heating in the He shell and the Xe cluster, but no corresponding double hump feature in the final Xe charge spectra is found. Though the presence of the He shell substantially increases the maximum charge states, the pump-probe dynamics of the Xe spectra from embedded system is similar to that of the free species. In strong contrast to that, the predicted electron spectra do show well-separated and pronounced features from highly efficient plasmon assisted electron acceleration for both resonances in the embedded clusters. A detailed analysis of the underlying ionization and recombination dynamics is presented and explains the apparent disaccord between the resonance features in the ion and electron spec...

  18. Long-Ranged Oppositely Charged Interactions for Designing New Types of Colloidal Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirörs, Ahmet Faik; Stiefelhagen, Johan C. P.; Vissers, Teun; Smallenburg, Frank; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Imhof, Arnout; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2015-04-01

    Getting control over the valency of colloids is not trivial and has been a long-desired goal for the colloidal domain. Typically, tuning the preferred number of neighbors for colloidal particles requires directional bonding, as in the case of patchy particles, which is difficult to realize experimentally. Here, we demonstrate a general method for creating the colloidal analogs of molecules and other new regular colloidal clusters without using patchiness or complex bonding schemes (e.g., DNA coating) by using a combination of long-ranged attractive and repulsive interactions between oppositely charged particles that also enable regular clusters of particles not all in close contact. We show that, due to the interplay between their attractions and repulsions, oppositely charged particles dispersed in an intermediate dielectric constant (4 Thomson problem. We also use the simulations to explore the dependence of such clusters on Debye screening length κ-1 and the ratio of charges on the particles, showing good agreement with experimental observations.

  19. Peptide sequencing and characterization of post-translational modifications by enhanced ion-charging and liquid chromatography electron-transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Giessing, Anders; Ingrell, Christian R; Jensen, Ole N

    2007-01-01

    We have tested the effect of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) as a method to increase the average charge state of protonated gas-phase molecular ions generated by ESI from tryptic peptides and phosphopeptides. Various concentrations of m-NBA were added to the mobile phases of a liquid chromatography...... Mascot score (24 units) than doubly charged peptides. m-NBA also increased the average charge state of phosphopeptides by up to 0.5 charge unit. The ease of implementation and the analytical benefits of charge enhancement of tryptic peptides by addition of m-NBA to the LC solvents suggest the general...

  20. Interplay of electronic and geometry shell effects in properties of neutral and charged Sr clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2007-01-01

    The optimized structure and electronic properties of neutral, singly, and doubly charged strontium clusters have been investigated using ab initio theoretical methods based on density-functional theory. We have systematically calculated the optimized geometries of neutral, singly, and doubly...... charged strontium clusters consisting of up to 14 atoms, average bonding distances, electronic shell closures, binding energies per atom, the gap between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, and spectra of the density of electronic states (DOS). It is demonstrated that the...... size evolution of structural and electronic properties of strontium clusters is governed by an interplay of the electronic and geometry shell closures. Influence of the electronic shell effects on structural rearrangements can lead to violation of the icosahedral growth motif of strontium clusters. It...

  1. Dependence of multiply charged ions on the polarization state in nanosecond laser-benzene cluster interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguo; Zhao, Wuduo; Hua, Lei; Hou, Keyong; Li, Haiyang

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigated the dependence of multiply charged ions on the laser polarization state when benzene cluster was irradiated with 532 and 1064 nm nanosecond laser. A circle, square and flower distribution for C2+, C3+ and C4+ were observed with 532 nm laser respectively, while flower petals for C2+, C3+ and C4+ were observed at 1064 nm as the laser polarization varied. A theoretical calculation was performed to interpret the polarization state and wavelength dependence of the multiply charged ions. The simulated results agreed well with the experimental observation with considering the contribution from the cluster disintegration.

  2. Structure, Reactivity, and Fragmentation of Small Multi-Charged Methane Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaag, A Sanaa; Yazidi, O; Jaidane, N-E; Ross, M W; Castleman, A W; Al Mogren, M M; Linguerri, R; Hochlaf, M

    2016-03-17

    Small methane clusters (CH4)n are irradiated using intense femtosecond laser excitation at 624 nm. The ionized species and those resulting from their fragmentation are detected via time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS). We find evidence of bound, multiply charged methane molecules and clusters resulting from Coulomb explosion upon exposure to highly energetic, ultrafast radiation. The assignment of the mass spectra is done after first-principles calculations (at the (R)MP2/aug-cc-pVXZ (X = D,T) level) on the charged (CH4)n(q+) clusters (n = 1-4, q = 1-4). We also considered the cluster stabilities and fragments that may result from intracluster molecular reactivity. Complex intracluster ion-molecule reactions induced by photoionization are expected to occur. Interestingly, we show that multi charged small methane clusters undergo intracluster reactions and fragmentations which are different from those observed for isolated methane ions or for large ionized methane clusters. PMID:26911361

  3. Excess-electron and excess-hole states of charged alkali halide clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honea, Eric C.; Homer, Margie L.; Whetten, R. L.

    1990-12-01

    Charged alkali halide clusters from a He-cooled laser vaporization source have been used to investigate two distinct cluster states corresponding to the excess-electron and excess-hole states of the crystal. The production method is UV-laser vaporization of an alkali metal rod into a halogen-containing He flow stream, resulting in variable cluster composition and cooling sufficient to stabilize weakly bound forms. Detection of charged clusters is accomplished without subsequent ionization by pulsed-field time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the skimmed cluster beam. Three types of positively charged sodium fluoride cluster are observed, each corresponding to a distinct physical situation: NanF+n-1 (purely ionic form), Nann+1F+n-1 (excess-electron form), and NanF+n (excess-hole form). The purely ionic clusters exhibit an abundance pattern similar to that observed in sputtering and fragmentation experiments and are explained by the stability of completed cubic microlattice structures. The excess-electron clusters, in contrast, exhibit very strong abundance maxima at n = 13 and 22, corresponding to the all-odd series (2n + 1 = jxkxl;j,k,l odd). Their high relative stability is explained by the ease of Na(0) loss except when the excess electron localizes in a lattice site to complete a cuboid structure. These may correspond to the internal F-center state predicted earlier. A localized electron model incorporating structural simulation results as account for the observed pattern. The excess-hole clusters, which had been proposed as intermediates in the ionization-induced fragmentation of neutral AHCs, exhibit a smaller variation in stability, indicating that the hole might not be well localized.

  4. Infrared spectroscopic studies on the cluster size dependence of charge carrier structure in nitrous oxide cluster anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael C.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2016-03-01

    We report infrared photodissociation spectra of nitrous oxide cluster anions of the form (N2O)nO- (n = 1-12) and (N2O)n- (n = 7-15) in the region 800-1600 cm-1. The charge carriers in these ions are NNO2- and O- for (N2O)nO- clusters with a solvation induced core ion switch, and N2O- for (N2O)n- clusters. The N-N and N-O stretching vibrations of N2O- (solvated by N2O) are reported for the first time, and they are found at (1595 ± 3) cm-1 and (894 ± 5) cm-1, respectively. We interpret our infrared spectra by comparison with the existing photoelectron spectroscopy data and with computational data in the framework of density functional theory.

  5. Inducing Transient Charge State of a Single Water Cluster on Cu(111) Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Ding, Zijing; Sun, Lihuan; Li, Jianmei; Meng, Sheng; Lu, Xinghua

    2016-04-26

    The hydrated electron on solid surface is a crucial species to interfacial chemistry. We present a joint low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory investigation to explore the existence of a transient hydrated electron state induced by injecting tunneling electrons into a single water nonamer cluster on Cu(111) surface. The directional diffusion of water cluster under the Coulomb repulsive potential has been observed as evidence for the emergence of the transient hydrated electron. A critical structure transformation in water cluster for the emergence of hydrated electron has been identified. A charging mechanism has been proposed based on density functional theory calculation and scanning tunneling microscope results. PMID:27007702

  6. Hydrogen binding effect on charged P2 ( = 1-7) clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhicong Fang; Xiangjun Kuang

    2013-11-01

    An all-electron (AE) calculation of the hydrogen binding effect on charged phosphorus clusters has been performed under the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Compared with the P$^{\\pm}_{2n}$ ( = 1-7) clusters, the HP$^{\\pm}_{2n}$ ( = 1-7), cluster has shorter average P-P bond length, larger binding energy and HOMOLUMO gap (HLG), higher chemical hardness and frequency of P-P mode. After binding with one hydrogen atom, the electronic structure is changed from open electronic shell to closed electronic shell. Geometrical stability, chemical stability and electronic stability are strengthened. These stability enhancements may be simply understood considering the electron pairing effect.

  7. Neutral and charged clusters in the atmosphere - Their importance and potential role in heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An assessment is presented of current knowledge concerning the role and importance of neutral and charged clusters in atmospheric heterogeneous catalysis, with a view to the recommendation of future studies needed for progress in the quantification of aerosol formation and catalytic reactivity. It is established that nucleation from the gaseous to the aerosol state commences via the formation of clusters among molecules participating in the phase-transformation process. Nucleation may proceed in some cases by way of the formation of prenucleation embryos, which then evolve through the energy barrier and undergo phase transformation. In other cases, cluster-cluster interaction among neutral particles or stagewise building of alternate-sign ion clusters may be important in the gas-to-particle conversion process.

  8. Hall effect in quantum critical charge-cluster glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T; Sun, Yujie; Božović, Ivan

    2016-04-19

    Upon doping, cuprates undergo a quantum phase transition from an insulator to a d-wave superconductor. The nature of this transition and of the insulating state is vividly debated. Here, we study the Hall effect in La2-xSrxCuO4(LSCO) samples doped near the quantum critical point atx∼ 0.06. Dramatic fluctuations in the Hall resistance appear belowTCG∼ 1.5 K and increase as the sample is cooled down further, signaling quantum critical behavior. We explore the doping dependence of this effect in detail, by studying a combinatorial LSCO library in which the Sr content is varied in extremely fine steps,Δx∼ 0.00008. We observe that quantum charge fluctuations wash out when superconductivity emerges but can be restored when the latter is suppressed by applying a magnetic field, showing that the two instabilities compete for the ground state. PMID:27044081

  9. Hall effect in quantum critical charge-cluster glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T.; Sun, Yujie

    2016-04-01

    Upon doping, cuprates undergo a quantum phase transition from an insulator to a d-wave superconductor. The nature of this transition and of the insulating state is vividly debated. Here, we study the Hall effect in La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) samples doped near the quantum critical point at x ˜ 0.06. Dramatic fluctuations in the Hall resistance appear below TCG ˜ 1.5 K and increase as the sample is cooled down further, signaling quantum critical behavior. We explore the doping dependence of this effect in detail, by studying a combinatorial LSCO library in which the Sr content is varied in extremely fine steps, Δx ˜ 0.00008. We observe that quantum charge fluctuations wash out when superconductivity emerges but can be restored when the latter is suppressed by applying a magnetic field, showing that the two instabilities compete for the ground state.

  10. Comprehensive decay law for emission of charged particles and exotic cluster radioactivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Basudeb Sahu

    2014-04-01

    A general decay formula for the emission of charged particles from metastable nuclei is developed based on the basic phenomenon of resonances occurring in quantum scattering process under Coulomb-nuclear potential. It relates the half-lives of radioactive decays with the values of the outgoing elements with masses and charges of the nuclei involved in the decay. The relation is found to be a generalization of the Geiger–Nuttall law in radioactivity and explains well all the known emissions of charged particles including clusters, alpha and proton.

  11. O2 adsorption on AunRh n = 1-5 neutral and charged clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buendía, Fernando; Beltrán, Marcela R.

    2016-04-01

    Theoretical evidence is presented for the molecular and dissociative adsorption of O2 on free AunRh neutral, anionic and cationic clusters with 1 to 5 gold atoms, indicating that the stabilization of the activated di-oxygen species is a key factor for the unusual catalytic activities of Au-based catalysts. The structure, stability, for both molecular and dissociative O2 adsorption on AunRh n = 1-5 clusters has been investigated using density-functional theory. To find the transition states, the minimum energy paths have been explored for a few clusters. In general, lower values for the activation energy have been found when compared with the barriers that occur on pure Aun based clusters. The higher binding energies in the AuRh mix favor oxygen dissociation among any other possible reaction paths. The anionic clusters being the most reactive of all. The molecular bonding mechanism to these complexes involves charge transfer to the oxygen molecule with a concomitant activation of the O-O bond to a superoxo-like state. The characteristic planar structures of both pure gold and AuRh clusters prevail for most of the cases here studied. The odd-even characteristic catalytic activation of pure gold clusters is not observed once even a single rhodium atom has been added to the cluster.

  12. Nonribosomal peptide synthase gene clusters for lipopeptide biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis 916 and their phenotypic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chuping; Liu, Xuehui; Zhou, Huafei; Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Zhiyi

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cyclic lipopeptides (LPs) have been well studied for their phytopathogen-antagonistic activities. Recently, research has shown that these LPs also contribute to the phenotypic features of Bacillus strains, such as hemolytic activity, swarming motility, biofilm formation, and colony morphology. Bacillus subtilis 916 not only coproduces the three families of well-known LPs, i.e., surfactins, bacillomycin Ls (iturin family), and fengycins, but also produces a new family of LP called locillomycins. The genome of B. subtilis 916 contains four nonribosomal peptide synthase (NRPS) gene clusters, srf, bmy, fen, and loc, which are responsible for the biosynthesis of surfactins, bacillomycin Ls, fengycins, and locillomycins, respectively. By studying B. subtilis 916 mutants lacking production of one, two, or three LPs, we attempted to unveil the connections between LPs and phenotypic features. We demonstrated that bacillomycin Ls and fengycins contribute mainly to antifungal activity. Although surfactins have weak antifungal activity in vitro, the strain mutated in srfAA had significantly decreased antifungal activity. This may be due to the impaired productions of fengycins and bacillomycin Ls. We also found that the disruption of any LP gene cluster other than fen resulted in a change in colony morphology. While surfactins and bacillomycin Ls play very important roles in hemolytic activity, swarming motility, and biofilm formation, the fengycins and locillomycins had little influence on these phenotypic features. In conclusion, B. subtilis 916 coproduces four families of LPs which contribute to the phenotypic features of B. subtilis 916 in an intricate way. PMID:25362061

  13. Computational design of peptide-Au cluster probe for sensitive detection of αIIbβ3 integrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Zhai, Jiao; Zhang, Xuejie; Gao, Xueyun; Fang, Xiaohong; Li, Jingyuan

    2016-02-01

    We have designed a novel peptide-Au cluster probe to specifically bind to αIIbβ3 integrin. As indicated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the binding mode of the native ligand of αIIbβ3 integrin, γC peptide, can be realized by the designed probe. More importantly, the peptide-Au probe can provide multiple coating peptides to form additional salt bridges with protein, and the binding stability of the probe is comparable to the native ligand. The designed probe was then successfully synthesized. The specific binding in a cellular environment was validated by colocalization analysis of confocal microscopy. In addition, the binding affinity was confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy. Our results suggest the combination of computational design and experimental verification can be a useful strategy for the development of nanoprobes.We have designed a novel peptide-Au cluster probe to specifically bind to αIIbβ3 integrin. As indicated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the binding mode of the native ligand of αIIbβ3 integrin, γC peptide, can be realized by the designed probe. More importantly, the peptide-Au probe can provide multiple coating peptides to form additional salt bridges with protein, and the binding stability of the probe is comparable to the native ligand. The designed probe was then successfully synthesized. The specific binding in a cellular environment was validated by colocalization analysis of confocal microscopy. In addition, the binding affinity was confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy. Our results suggest the combination of computational design and experimental verification can be a useful strategy for the development of nanoprobes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr09175f

  14. Formation of binary ion clusters from polar vapours: Effect of the dipole-charge interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Nadykto

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Formation of binary cluster ions from polar vapours is considered. The effect of vapour polarity on the size and composition of the critical clusters is investigated theoretically and a corrected version of classical Kelvin-Thomson theory of binary ion-induced nucleation is derived. The model predictions of the derived theory are compared to the results given by classical binary homogeneous nucleation theory and ion-induced nucleation theory. The calculations are performed in wide range of the ambient conditions for a system composed of sulfuric acid and water vapour. It is shown that dipole-charge interaction significantly decreases the size of the critical clusters, especially under the atmospheric conditions when the size of critical clusters is predicted to be small.

  15. Formation of binary ion clusters from polar vapours: effect of the dipole-charge interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Nadykto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of binary cluster ions from polar vapours is considered. The effect of vapour polarity on the size and composition of the critical clusters is investigated theoretically and a corrected version of classical Kelvin-Thomson theory of binary ion-induced nucleation is derived. The model predictions of the derived theory are compared to the results given by classical binary homogeneous nucleation theory and ion-induced nucleation theory. The calculations are performed in wide range of the ambient conditions for a system composed of sulfuric acid and water vapour. It is shown that dipole-charge interaction significantly decreases the size of the critical clusters, especially under the atmospheric conditions when the size of critical clusters is predicted to be small.

  16. The charging of neutral dimethylamine and dimethylamine-sulfuric acid clusters using protonated acetone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruusuvuori, K.; Hietala, P.; Kupiainen-Määttä, O.; Jokinen, T.; Junninen, H.; Sipilä, M.; Kurtén, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2015-06-01

    Sulfuric acid is generally considered one of the most important substances taking part in atmospheric particle formation. However, in typical atmospheric conditions in the lower troposphere, sulfuric acid and water alone are unable to form particles. It has been suggested that strong bases may stabilize sulfuric acid clusters so that particle formation may occur. More to the point, amines - strong organic bases - have become the subject of interest as possible cause for such stabilization. To probe whether amines play a role in atmospheric nucleation, we need to be able to measure accurately the gas-phase amine vapour concentration. Such measurements often include charging the neutral molecules and molecular clusters in the sample. Since amines are bases, the charging process should introduce a positive charge. This can be achieved by, for example, using chemical ionization with a positively charged reagent with a suitable proton affinity. In our study, we have used quantum chemical methods combined with a cluster dynamics code to study the use of acetone as a reagent ion in chemical ionization and compared the results with measurements performed with a chemical ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-APi-TOF). The computational results indicate that protonated acetone is an effective reagent in chemical ionization. However, in the experiments the reagent ions were not depleted at the predicted dimethylamine concentrations, indicating that either the modelling scheme or the experimental results - or both - contain unidentified sources of error.

  17. Peptide-induced Asymmetric Distribution of Charged Lipids in a Vesicle Bilayer Revealed by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, William; Qian, Shuo

    2012-02-01

    Cellular membranes are complex mixtures of lipids, proteins and other small molecules that provide functional, dynamic barriers between the cell and its environment, as well as between environments within the cell. The lipid composition of the membrane is highly specific and controlled in terms of both content and lipid localization. Here, small-angle neutron scattering and selective deuterium labeling were used to probe the impact of the membrane-active peptides melittin and alamethicin on the structure of lipid bilayers composed of a mixture of the lipids dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) and chain-perdeuterated dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC). We found that both peptides enriched the outer leaflet of the bilayer with the negatively charged DMPG, creating an asymmetric distribution of lipids. The level of enrichment is peptide concentration-dependent and is stronger for melittin than alamethicin. The enrichment between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets occurs at very low peptide concentrations, and increases with peptide concentration, including when the peptide adopts a membrane-spanning, pore-forming state.

  18. Quantum dot labeling using positive charged peptides in human hematopoetic and mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbarvaziri, Sarah; Kiani, Sahar; Akhlaghi, Aliasghar; Vosough, Ahmad; Baharvand, Hossein; Aghdami, Nasser

    2011-08-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), as new and promising fluorescent probes, hold great potential in long term non-invasive bio-imaging, however there are many uncovered issues regarding their competency. In the present study, different QDs (525, 585 and 800 nm) were used to label CD133, CD34, CD14 and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using positively charged peptides. Results demonstrated highly efficient internalization with the possible involvement of macropinocytosis. As indicated by LDH release and the TUNEL assay, no measurable effects on cell viability were detected at a concentration of 10 nM. QDs did not have any deleterious effects on normal cell functionality where both labeled CD133(+) cells and MSCs remarkably differentiated along multiple lineages with the use of the colony forming assay and adipo/osteo induction, respectively. Our results regarding QD maintenance revealed that these nano-particles are not properly stable and various excretion times have been observed depending on particle size and cell type. In vitro co-culture system and transplantation of labeled cells to an animal model showed that QDs leaked out from labeled cells and the released nano-particles were able to re-enter adjacent cells over time. These data suggest that before any utilization of QDs in bio-imaging and related applications, an efficient intra-cellular delivery technique should be considered to preserve QDs for a prolonged time as well as eliminating their leakage. PMID:21549422

  19. Effect of the Surface on Charge Reduction and Desorption Kinetics of Soft Landed Peptide Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadjar, Omar; Wang, Peng; Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia

    2009-06-01

    Charge reduction and desorption kinetics of ions and neutral molecules produced by soft-landing of mass-selected singly and doubly protonated Gramicidin S (GS) on different surfaces was studied using time dependant in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) integrated in a specially designed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) research instrument. Soft-landing targets utilized in this study included inert self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 1-dodecane thiol (HSAM) and its fluorinated analog (FSAM) on gold and hydrophilic carboxyl-terminated (COOH-SAM) and amine-terminated (NH2-SAM) SAM surfaces. We observed efficient neutralization of soft-landed ions on the COOH-SAM surface, partial retention of only one proton on the HSAM surface and efficient retention of two protons on the FSAM surface. Slow desorption rates measured experimentally indicate fairly strong binding between peptide molecules and SAM surfaces with the binding energy of 20-25 kcal/mol.

  20. Evidence for charged cluster emission in 147 GeV/c π-p collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of charged particle production in 147 GeV/c π-p collisions yields no evidence for an electrically neutral central region or corresponding rapidity plateau. The results do indicate that electric charge and transverse momentum may be locally conserved over small intervals on the rapidity axis. These results support a picture in which the observed hadrons are emitted in clusters whose quantum numbers vary as a function of rapidity and reflect the incident channel quantum numbers at the extremes of the rapidity scale. (Auth.)

  1. DFT + U investigation of charged point defects and clusters in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a physically justified formalism for the calculation of point defects and cluster formation energies in UO2. The accessible ranges of chemical potentials of the two components U and O are calculated using the U-O experimental phase diagram and a constraint on the formation energies of vacancies. We then apply this formalism to the DFT + U investigation of the point defects and cluster defects in this material (including charged ones). The most stable charge states obtained for these defects near stoichiometry are consistent with a strongly ionic system. Calculations predict similarly low formation energies for VU4− and IO2− in hyperstoichiometric UO2. In stoichiometric UO2, VO2+ and IO2− have the same formation energy in the middle of the gap and in hypostoichiometric UO2, VO2+ is the most stable defect. (paper)

  2. Charge-transfer interactions between TCNQ and silver clusters Ag20 and Ag13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Hanyu; Liu, Xianhu; Yuan, Chengqian; Jia, Meiye; Luo, Zhixun; Yao, Jiannian

    2016-03-14

    Interactions between tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and two typical silver clusters Ag13 and Ag20 are studied by first-principles DFT calculations. Charge transfer (CT) from silver clusters to TCNQ molecules initiates the Ag-N bond formation at selective sites resulting in the formation of different isomers of Ag13-TCNQ and Ag20-TCNQ complexes. We show here a comprehensive spectroscopic analysis for the two CT complexes on the basis of Raman and infrared activities. Furthermore, frontier molecular orbital (FMO) and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of the complexes provides a vivid illustration of electron cloud overlap and interactions. The behavior of TCNQ adsorbed on the tetrahedral Ag20 cluster was even found in good agreement with the experimental measurement of TCNQ molecules on a single-crystal Ag(111) surface. This study not only endeavors to clarify the charge-transfer interactions of TCNQ with silver, but also presents a finding of enhanced charge transfer between Ag13 and TCNQ indicating potential for candidate building blocks of granular materials. PMID:26888771

  3. Long-lived charge-separated states in ligand-stabilized silver clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Pelton, Matthew

    2012-07-25

    Recently developed synthesis methods allow for the production of atomically monodisperse clusters of silver atoms stabilized in solution by aromatic thiol ligands, which exhibit intense absorption peaks throughout the visible and near-IR spectral regions. Here we investigated the time-dependent optical properties of these clusters. We observed two kinetic processes following ultrafast laser excitation of any of the absorption peaks: a rapid decay, with a time constant of 1 ps or less, and a slow decay, with a time constant that can be longer than 300 ns. Both time constants decrease as the polarity of the solvent increases, indicating that the two processes correspond to the formation and recombination, respectively, of a charge-separated state. The long lifetime of this state and the broad optical absorption spectrum mean that the ligand-stabilized silver clusters are promising materials for solar energy harvesting. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. The medium-sized charged YbSin± (n = 7-13) clusters: A relativistic computational investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The geometries and electronic properties of the medium-sized YbSin± (n = 7-13) clusters are investigated systematically by using relativistic density functional method. The medium-sized YbSin± clusters with n = 8, 9, 10, and 13 significantly deform their neutral geometries, which are confirmed by the calculated AIP and VIP values. The relative stabilities in terms of the calculated fragmentation energies exhibit that the YbSin+ (n = 8, 10, 13) and YbSin- (n = 8, 10, 12) clusters have stronger abundances than their corresponding neighbors; the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gaps of the charged clusters are increased generally as the cluster size going from n = 7 to 13; the large HOMO-LUMO gaps of charged clusters indicate that their chemical activities are weaker than those of their neutral counterparts, especially for n = 7, 10, and 13 clusters. Generally, the obtained or removed charge influences electronic and geometrical structures of the charged clusters. Research highlights: → Most of the charged YbSin (n = 7-13) clusters keep frameworks as the neutrals, and the geometries of 8a+, 9a+, 10a+, and 13a+ are significant deformed, which are reflected from the calculated VIPs and AIPs values. The charged YbSi8 cluster is actually the most stable isomer. → According to the calculated HOMO-LUMO gaps of the clusters, one finds that the HOMO-LUMO gaps for the charged YbSin (n = 7-13) clusters are smaller than those of the neutrals, reflecting that the removed or obtained charge influences the HOMO-LUMO gaps of neutral clusters. → The calculated results show that the YbSin (n = 7-13) clusters are the nonmagnetic structures because the f orbitals are filled completely, which are not involved in the chemical bonding. - Abstract: The geometries and electronic properties of the medium-sized YbSin± (n = 7-13) clusters are investigated systematically by using relativistic density functional

  5. Analyzing Heat Capacity Profiles of Peptide-Containing Membranes: Cluster Formation of Gramicidin A

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanova, V.; Makarov, I.; Schaeffer, T.; Heimburg, T.

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of peptide and protein partitioning in lipid membranes is of high relevance for the understanding of biomembrane function. We used statistical thermodynamics analysis to demonstrate the effect of peptide mixing behavior on heat capacity profiles of lipid membranes with the aim to predict peptide aggregation from cP-profiles. This analysis was applied to interpret calorimetric data on the interaction of the antibiotic peptide gramicidin A with lipid membranes. The shape of the hea...

  6. Structural transformation of peptide amphiphile self-assembly induced by headgroup charge and size regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Changrui; Bedzyk, Michael; Olvera, Monica; Kewalramani, Sumit; Palmer, Liam

    The ability to control the nano and the meso-scale architecture of molecular assemblies is one of the major challenges in nanoscience. Significantly, structural transformations of amphiphilic aggregates induced by variations in environmental conditions have attracted attention due to their biotechnological relevance. Here, we study the assembly in aqueous solution for a modular series of peptide amphiphiles with 3, 2 or 1 lysine groups conjugated to a C16 carbon tail (C16K3, C16K2 and C16K1) . This system design allow us to probe how the equilibrium structure of the self-assembly can be tuned by controlling the coupling between steric (via choice of headgroup: K3, K2, or K1) and electrostatic (via solution pH) interactions. Solution small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies reveal that depending on pH and number of lysines in the lipid headgroup, amphiphiles can assemble into a range of structures: spherical micelles, bilayer ribbons and vesicles. We also perform detailed phase space mapping of pH-and headgroup size dependency of the structures of assembly over 0.1-100 nm length scales via SAXS/WAXS. The experimental results in conjunction with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations deduce quantitative relations between pH-dependent molecular charges, steric constraints and self-assembly morphologies, which is significant for developing experimental routes to obtain assembly structures with specific nano- and meso-scale features through controlled external stimuli.

  7. Generation of highly charged and energetic ions from the interaction of strong laser pulses with coinage metal clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radcliffe, P.; Doeppner, T.; Schumacher, M.; Teuber, S.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K.H. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    Plasmon-enhanced ionization of free coinage metal clusters is studied under intense laser field conditions. The charging and the subsequent Coulomb explosion results in huge recoil energies of the atomic fragment ions. In a charge-resolved measurement it is found that the maximum kinetic energy scales roughly linear with the charge state. The ionization efficiency could strongly be enhanced when the pulse structure is adapted to the expansion dynamics of the cluster Coulomb explosion. Irradiation with stretched laser pulses as well as with dual pulses show that atomic charge states up to Cu{sup 10+}, Ag{sup 15+} and Au{sup 15+} are generated whenever the plasmon mode of the cluster can be successfully excited. The charging enhancement when using dual pulses gives evidence that continuous heating is not necessary in order to get maximum energy absorption. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Structures and Stabilities of Doubly-Charged $(MgO)nMg^{2+}$ (n=1-29) Cluster Ions

    CERN Document Server

    López, F; López, J M; Lopez, Francisco; Aguado, Andres; Lopez, Jose M.

    1999-01-01

    Ab initio perturbed ion plus polarization calculations are reported for doubly-charged nonstoichiometric (MgO)nMg2+ (n=1--29) cluster ions. We consider a large number of isomers with full relaxations of the geometries, and add the correlation correction to the Hartree-Fock energies for all cluster sizes. The polarization contribution is included at a semiempirical level also for all cluster sizes. Comparison is made with theoretical results for neutral (MgO)n clusters and singly-charged alkali-halide cluster ions. Our method is also compared to phenomenological pair potential models in order to asses their reliability for calculations on small ionic systems. Bulk-like rocksalt structures are predominant from n=13 on. The relative stabilities of the cluster ions against evaporation of a MgO molecule shows variations that are in excellent agreement with the experimental abundance spectra.

  9. Bremsstrahlung of Fast Charged Particles on Clusters in a Wide Spectral Range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the first Born approximation and a simple model of the structural factor, the bremsstrahlung of fast charged particles on polyatomic clusters is calculated and analyzed with regard to the polarization mechanism in a wide spectral range including a domain of high frequencies. The role of cooperative phenomena in the static and polarization channels of bremsstrahlung is investigated. It is established that these phenomena, being negligible for static bremsstrahlung, substantially influence the polarization bremsstrahlung. It is shown that the constructive interference between the contributions of the atoms of a cluster to the polarization bremsstrahlung substantially increases its intensity and changes its dependence on the basic parameters of the problem compared with the case of bremsstrahlung on an isolated atom

  10. Bremsstrahlung of fast charged particles when scattering on clusters in wide spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the first Born approximation and a simple model of the structural factor, the bremsstrahlung of fast charged particles on polyatomic clusters is calculated and analyzed with regard to the polarization mechanism in a wide spectral range including a domain of high frequencies. The role of cooperative phenomena in the static and polarization channels of bremsstrahlung is investigated. It is established that these phenomena, being negligible for static bremsstrahlung, substantially influence the polarization bremsstrahlung. It is shown that the constructive interference between the contributions of the atoms of a cluster to the polarization bremsstrahlung substantially increases its intensity and changes its dependence on the basic parameters of the problem compared with the case of bremsstrahlung on an isolated atom

  11. Polymer depletion-driven cluster aggregation and initial phase separation in charged nanosized colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gögelein, Christoph; Nägele, Gerhard; Buitenhuis, Johan; Tuinier, Remco; Dhont, Jan K G

    2009-05-28

    We study polymer depletion-driven cluster aggregation and initial phase separation in aqueous dispersions of charge-stabilized silica spheres, where the ionic strength and polymer (dextran) concentration are systematically varied, using dynamic light scattering and visual observation. Without polymers and for increasing salt and colloid content, the dispersions become increasingly unstable against irreversible cluster formation. By adding nonadsorbing polymers, a depletion-driven attraction is induced, which lowers the stabilizing Coulomb barrier and enhances the cluster growth rate. The initial growth rate increases with increasing polymer concentration and decreases with increasing polymer molar mass. These observations can be quantitatively understood by an irreversible dimer formation theory based on the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek pair potential, with the depletion attraction modeled by the Asakura-Oosawa-Vrij potential. At low colloid concentration, we observe an exponential cluster growth rate for all polymer concentrations considered, indicating a reaction-limited aggregation mechanism. At sufficiently high polymer and colloid concentrations, and lower salt content, a gas-liquidlike demixing is observed initially. Later on, the system separates into a gel and fluidlike phase. The experimental time-dependent state diagram is compared to the theoretical equilibrium phase diagram obtained from a generalized free-volume theory and is discussed in terms of an initial reversible phase separation process in combination with irreversible aggregation at later times. PMID:19485479

  12. Tuning of silver cluster emission from blue to red using a bio-active peptide in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhasish; Baral, Abhishek; Banerjee, Arindam

    2014-03-26

    Blue, green, and red emitting silver quantum clusters have been prepared through green chemical approach by using a bio-active peptide glutathione (reduced) in a 50 mM phosphate buffer at pH 7.46. This study describes fluorescence emission tuning of the silver clusters by making different sized Ag clusters using slightly different reaction conditions keeping the same stabilizing ligand, reducing agent, solvent system, and silver salt precursor. The preparation procedure of these silver quantum clusters is new and highly reproducible. Each of these clusters shows very interesting fluorescence properties with large stokes shifts, and the quantum yields of blue, green, and red clusters are 2.08%, 0.125%, and 1.39%, respectively. These silver quantum clusters have been characterized by using different techniques including fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, field-emission gun transmission electron microscopic (FEG-TEM) imaging and MALDI-TOF MS analyses. MALDI-TOF MS analyses show that the size of these blue, green and red emitting silver clusters are Ag5 (NC1, nanoclusters 1), Ag8 (NC2, nanoclusters 2) and Ag13 (NC3, nanoclusters 3), respectively, by using 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as a matrix. These clusters are stable in broad ranges of pH. The NC3 (red emitting) has been successfully utilized for selective and sensitive detection of toxic Hg(II) ions in water by using even naked eyes, fluorometric, and calorimetric studies. The lower limit of detection of Hg(II) ions in water has been estimated to be 126 and 245 nM from fluorometric and UV-vis analyses, respectively. Enthalpy change (ΔH) during this Hg(II) sensing process is 2508 KJ mol(-1). PMID:24568193

  13. Collision of highly charged ion with clusters. Simulation study for electronic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabana, Kazuhiro [Niigata Univ. (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    Collision of highly charged ion with cluster, for example, collision of C{sub 60}-Ar{sup 8+} at E=80 KeV, was simulated by the time-dependence Kohn-Shame equation. The distribution of electron densities and the self-consistent potential were obtained. A part of C{sub 60} potential curve became depressed by the Coulomb force of ion, so that the saddle point was produced on the potential. The behavior of electron transfer on the saddle point was agreed with the classical barrier model. Time-dependent density functional method was explained. (S.Y.)

  14. Collision of highly charged ion with clusters. Simulation study for electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collision of highly charged ion with cluster, for example, collision of C60-Ar8+ at E=80 KeV, was simulated by the time-dependence Kohn-Shame equation. The distribution of electron densities and the self-consistent potential were obtained. A part of C60 potential curve became depressed by the Coulomb force of ion, so that the saddle point was produced on the potential. The behavior of electron transfer on the saddle point was agreed with the classical barrier model. Time-dependent density functional method was explained. (S.Y.)

  15. Studies of the charge instabilities in the complex nano-objects: clusters and bio-molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the last 6 years, my main research works focused on i) the Coulomb instabilities and the fragmentation processes of fullerenes and clusters of fullerenes ii) the stability and the reactivity of complex bio-molecular systems. Concerning the clusters of fullerenes, which are van der Waals type clusters, we have shown that the multiply charged species, obtained in collisions with slow highly charged ions, keep their structural properties but become very good electric conductor. In another hand, with the aim to understand the role of the biologic environment at the molecular scale in the irradiation damage of complex biomolecules, we have studied the charge stabilities of clusters of small biomolecules and the dissociation processes of larger nano-hydrated biomolecules. Theses studies have shown that first, specific molecular recognition mechanisms continue to exist in gas phase and secondly, a small and very simple biochemical environment is enough to change the dynamics of instabilities. (author)

  16. Coverage Dependent Charge Reduction of Cationic Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass-selected Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-11-29

    The ionic charge state of monodisperse cationic gold clusters on surfaces may be controlled by selecting the coverage of mass-selected ions soft landed onto a substrate. Polydisperse diphosphine-capped gold clusters were synthesized in solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. The polydisperse gold clusters were introduced into the gas phase by electrospray ionization and mass selection was employed to select a multiply charged cationic cluster species (Au11L53+, m/z = 1409, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to the surfaces of four different self-assembled monolayers on gold (SAMs) at coverages of 1011 and 1012 clusters/mm2. Employing the spatial profiling capabilities of in-situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is shown that, in addition to the chemical functionality of the monolayer (as demonstrated previously: ACS Nano, 2012, 6, 573) the coverage of cationic gold clusters on the surface may be used to control the distribution of ionic charge states of the soft-landed multiply charged clusters. In the case of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol SAM (FSAM) almost complete retention of charge by the deposited Au11L53+ clusters was observed at a lower coverage of 1011 clusters/mm2. In contrast, at a higher coverage of 1012 clusters/mm2, pronounced reduction of charge to Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ was observed on the FSAM. When soft landed onto 16- and 11-mercaptohexadecanoic acid surfaces on gold (16,11-COOH-SAMs), the mass-selected Au11L53+ clusters exhibited partial reduction of charge to Au11L52+ at lower coverage and additional reduction of charge to both Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ at higher coverage. The reduction of charge was found to be more pronounced on the surface of the shorter (thinner) C11 than the longer (thicker) C16-COOH-SAM. On the surface of the 1-dodecanethiol (HSAM) monolayer, the most abundant charge state

  17. First Observation of Charge Reduction and Desorption Kinetics of Multiply Protonated Peptides Soft Landed onto Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadjar, Omar; Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia

    2007-12-13

    The kinetics of charge reduction and desorption of different species produced by soft-landing of mass-selected ions was studied using in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). The improved SIMS capability described in this work utilizes an in-line 8 keV Cs+ ion gun and allows us to interrogate the surface both during the ion deposition and after the deposition is terminated. As a model system doubly protonated ions of Gramicidin S were deposited onto a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (FSAM) surface. Our results demonstrate for the first time that various peptide-related peaks in FT-ICR SIMS spectra follow very different kinetics. We obtained unique kinetics signatures for doubly protonated, singly protonated and neutral peptides retained on the surface and followed their evolution as a function of time. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with a kinetic model that takes into account charge reduction and thermal desorption of different species from the surface.

  18. Effect of oxygen content and charge on the structure, stability and optoelectronic properties of yttrium oxide clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramanan, Natarajan Sathiyamoorthy

    2015-07-01

    The electronic and geometrical structures of neutral and charged YOn (n=2-12) clusters have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) with generalized gradient approximation. The oxygen atom in YOn has been found to be in oxo, peroxo and in superoxo forms. The geometrical structures and topologies of small size anionic clusters resemble that of neutral clusters. Yttrium showed higher coordination number than scandium. Computed results reveal the existence of YO10 cluster to have a penta-peroxo oxygen with a homoleptic Y(η2 -O2)5 geometrical configuration. The HOMO-LUMO gaps decrease with increasing n due to the increase in 2p orbital population of oxygen atoms. It has been shown that in these clusters bonding are predominantly ionic in nature and anions are thermodynamically more stable, due to the charge delocalization between the metal atom and oxygen ligands. YO10+ and YO12+ were found to be highly exothermic to release one and two oxygen molecules, while YO11+ dissociates though the ozonide dissociation channel. Computed absorption spectra of small clusters are mainly contributed by yttrium metal d and s valence orbitals. The absorbance spectra, shifts towards lower energy with cluster size increase, while charge has no substantial effect on the absorption spectrum.

  19. Strategy for Designing Self-Assembling Peptides to Prepare Transparent Nano fiber Hydrogel at Neutral ph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the formation of nano fiber hydrogels at neutral ph for 16 types of peptides with different net charges, hydrophobicities, and degrees of polymerization. The peptides formed various hydrogels depending on the arrangement of charged amino acids in the antiparallel β-sheet structure. Circular dichroism (CD) measurement, atomic force microscopy (AFM), visible light spectroscopy, and dynamic viscoelasticity measurement showed that the formation of transparent nano fiber hydrogels in peptides requires at least 2 additional positively or negatively charged amino acids per peptide. When designing the amino acid sequence, it is important to consider both the net charge and position of the charged amino acids, and it should be ensured that basic amino acids do not face other basic ones in the antiparallel β-sheet structure. Peptides that had charged amino acids clustered at the center of the nano fiber formed rigid gels.

  20. Effects of Charge Location on the Absorptions and Lifetimes of Protonated Tyrosine Peptides in Vacuo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, O.; Calvert, C.R.; Greenwood, J.B.;

    2012-01-01

    -crown-6-ether (CE). The CE targets the ammonium group by forming internal ionic hydrogen bonds and limits the folding of the peptide. In the tripeptide, the distance between the chromophore and the backbone ammonium is enlarged relative to that in the dipeptide. Experiments were performed...... in an electrostatic ion storage ring using a tunable laser system, and action spectra based on lifetime measurements were obtained in the range from 210 to 310 nm. The spectra are all quite similar though there seems to be some changes in the absorption band between 210 and 250 nm, while in the lower energy band all...

  1. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedialkova, Lilia V.; Amat, Miguel A. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Kevrekidis, Ioannis G., E-mail: yannis@princeton.edu, E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Hummer, Gerhard, E-mail: yannis@princeton.edu, E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de [Department of Theoretical Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue-Str. 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-09-21

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small—but nontrivial—differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space.

  2. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small—but nontrivial—differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space

  3. Investigation of the antibacterial activity and the biosynthesis gene cluster of the peptide antibiotic feglymycin

    OpenAIRE

    Rausch, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    Feglymycin ist ein aus Streptomyces sp. DSM 11171 isoliertes, lineares 13mer-Peptid, das zu einem hohen Anteil aus den nicht-proteinogenen Aminosäuren Hpg (4-Hydroxyphenylglycine) und Dpg (3,5-Dihydroxyphenylglycine) besteht. Zudem besitzt es eine interessante, alternierende Abfolge von D- und L- Aminosäuren und strukturelle Ähnlichkeiten mit den Glycopeptiden der Vancomycin-Gruppe von Antibiotika und den Glycodepsipeptid-Antibiotika Ramoplanin und Enduracidin. Außerdem besitzt Feglymycin ein...

  4. On the ultrafast charge migration and subsequent charge directed reactivity in Cl⋯N halogen-bonded clusters following vertical ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Sankhabrata; Bhattacharya, Atanu, E-mail: atanub@ipc.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India); Periyasamy, Ganga [Department of Chemistry, Central College Campus, Bangalore University, Bangalore (India)

    2015-06-28

    In this article, we have presented ultrafast charge transfer dynamics through halogen bonds following vertical ionization of representative halogen bonded clusters. Subsequent hole directed reactivity of the radical cations of halogen bonded clusters is also discussed. Furthermore, we have examined effect of the halogen bond strength on the electron-electron correlation- and relaxation-driven charge migration in halogen bonded complexes. For this study, we have selected A-Cl (A represents F, OH, CN, NH{sub 2}, CF{sub 3}, and COOH substituents) molecules paired with NH{sub 3} (referred as ACl:NH{sub 3} complex): these complexes exhibit halogen bonds. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on purely electron correlation- and relaxation-driven ultrafast (attosecond) charge migration dynamics through halogen bonds. Both density functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field theory with 6-31 + G(d, p) basis set are employed for this work. Upon vertical ionization of NCCl⋯NH{sub 3} complex, the hole is predicted to migrate from the NH{sub 3}-end to the ClCN-end of the NCCl⋯NH{sub 3} complex in approximately 0.5 fs on the D{sub 0} cationic surface. This hole migration leads to structural rearrangement of the halogen bonded complex, yielding hydrogen bonding interaction stronger than the halogen bonding interaction on the same cationic surface. Other halogen bonded complexes, such as H{sub 2}NCl:NH{sub 3}, F{sub 3}CCl:NH{sub 3}, and HOOCCl:NH{sub 3}, exhibit similar charge migration following vertical ionization. On the contrary, FCl:NH{sub 3} and HOCl:NH{sub 3} complexes do not exhibit any charge migration following vertical ionization to the D{sub 0} cation state, pointing to interesting halogen bond strength-dependent charge migration.

  5. On the ultrafast charge migration and subsequent charge directed reactivity in Cl⋯N halogen-bonded clusters following vertical ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, we have presented ultrafast charge transfer dynamics through halogen bonds following vertical ionization of representative halogen bonded clusters. Subsequent hole directed reactivity of the radical cations of halogen bonded clusters is also discussed. Furthermore, we have examined effect of the halogen bond strength on the electron-electron correlation- and relaxation-driven charge migration in halogen bonded complexes. For this study, we have selected A-Cl (A represents F, OH, CN, NH2, CF3, and COOH substituents) molecules paired with NH3 (referred as ACl:NH3 complex): these complexes exhibit halogen bonds. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on purely electron correlation- and relaxation-driven ultrafast (attosecond) charge migration dynamics through halogen bonds. Both density functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field theory with 6-31 + G(d, p) basis set are employed for this work. Upon vertical ionization of NCCl⋯NH3 complex, the hole is predicted to migrate from the NH3-end to the ClCN-end of the NCCl⋯NH3 complex in approximately 0.5 fs on the D0 cationic surface. This hole migration leads to structural rearrangement of the halogen bonded complex, yielding hydrogen bonding interaction stronger than the halogen bonding interaction on the same cationic surface. Other halogen bonded complexes, such as H2NCl:NH3, F3CCl:NH3, and HOOCCl:NH3, exhibit similar charge migration following vertical ionization. On the contrary, FCl:NH3 and HOCl:NH3 complexes do not exhibit any charge migration following vertical ionization to the D0 cation state, pointing to interesting halogen bond strength-dependent charge migration

  6. Charge exchange processes of foil dissociation fragments of fast H+2 ions and H+n clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured angular and charge state distributions of atomic fragments resulting from the foil dissociation of 30-120 KeV/p H+n clusters. The fragment neutralization probability has been investigated for beam velocities above and around the Bohr velocity. At a given velocity the width of the angular distribution of neutral atoms and their yield are observed to increase with n up to n > 5 and n > 7, respectively. Moreover we have used the simpler H+2 case to propose new ideas to explain the vicinity effects observed on the charge exchange processes

  7. Quantum size correction to the work function and the centroid of excess charge in positively ionized simple metal clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Payami

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available  In this work, we have shown the important role of the finite-size correction to the work function in predicting the correct position of the centroid of excess charge in positively charged simple metal clusters with different values . For this purpose, firstly we have calculated the self-consistent Kohn-Sham energies of neutral and singly-ionized clusters with sizes in the framework of local spin-density approximation and stabilized jellium model (SJM as well as simple jellium model (JM with rigid jellium. Secondly, we have fitted our results to the asymptotic ionization formulas both with and without the size correction to the work function. The results of fittings show that the formula containing the size correction predict a correct position of the centroid inside the jellium while the other predicts a false position, outside the jellium sphere.

  8. Electron-ion plasma dynamics in the presence of highly charged dust-clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djebli, Mourad, E-mail: mdjebli@usthb.dz; Benkhelifa, El-Amine [USTHB, Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, B.P. 32 Bab-Ezzouar, 16079 Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-05-15

    Electron-ion plasma expansion is studied in the presence of positively (negatively) highly charged uniformly distributed dust particles, considered as impurities. For that purpose, a multi-fluid model is used, where the charged impurities characteristics are included in Poisson's equation. We found that ion acceleration is enhanced by the presence of positively charged dust. The latter leads to spiky structures in the ion front which have a higher amplitude as the charge increases. The charged impurities have a significant effect when the combination of their charge and density is greater than a critical value which depends on ion to electron temperature ratio.

  9. De-novo design of antimicrobial peptides for plant protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Zeitler

    Full Text Available This work describes the de-novo design of peptides that inhibit a broad range of plant pathogens. Four structurally different groups of peptides were developed that differ in size and position of their charged and hydrophobic clusters and were assayed for their ability to inhibit bacterial growth and fungal spore germination. Several peptides are highly active at concentrations between 0,1 and 1 µg/ml against plant pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas syringae, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and Xanthomonas vesicatoria. Importantly, no hemolytic activity could be detected for these peptides at concentrations up to 200 µg/ml. Moreover, the peptides are also active after spraying on the plant surface demonstrating a possible way of application. In sum, our designed peptides represent new antimicrobial agents and with the increasing demand for antimicrobial compounds for production of "healthy" food, these peptides might serve as templates for novel antibacterial and antifungal agents.

  10. Ionic polymer cluster energetics: Computational analysis of pendant chain stiffness and charge imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Lisa Mauck; Leo, Donald J.

    2005-06-01

    In recent years there has been considerable study of the potential mechanisms underlying the electromechanical response of ionic-polymer-metal composites. The most recent models have been based on the response of the ion-containing clusters that are formed when the material is synthesized. Most of these efforts have employed assumptions of uniform ion distribution within spherical cluster shapes. This work investigates the impact of dispensing with these assumptions in order to better understand the parameters that impact cluster shape, size, and ion transport potential. A computational micromechanics model applying Monte Carlo methodology is employed to predict the equilibrium state of a single cluster of a solvated ionomeric polymer. For a constant solvated state, the model tracks the position of individual ions within a given cluster in response to ion-ion interaction, mechanical stiffness of the pendant chain, cluster surface energy, and external electric-field loading. Results suggest that cluster surface effects play a significant role in the equilibrium cluster state, including ion distribution; pendant chain stiffness also plays a role in ion distribution but to a lesser extent. Moreover, ion pairing is rarely complete even in cation-rich clusters; this in turn supports the supposition of the formation of anode and cathode boundary layers.

  11. Calcitonin gene-related peptide in blood: is it increased in the external jugular vein during migraine and cluster headache? A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Le, Han

    2009-01-01

    The involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in migraine pathophysiological mechanisms is shown by the facts that CGRP can induce migraine and that two CGRP antagonists, olcegepant and telcagepant, are effective in the treatment of migraine attacks. Increase of the neuropeptide CGRP ...... most likely a 'nervous vasodilatory drive' in the extracranial vascular bed. It remains an enigma how the observed increase of CGRP in the EJV fits into the mechanisms of migraine and cluster headache....

  12. Soft Landing of Mass-Selected Gold Clusters: Influence of Ion and Ligand on Charge Retention and Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-02-01

    Herein, we employ a combination of reduction synthesis in solution, soft landing of mass-selected precursor and product ions, and in situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to examine the influence of ion and the length of diphosphine ligands on the charge retention and reactivity of ligated gold clusters deposited onto self-assembled monolayer surfaces (SAMs). Product ions (Au10L42+, (10,4)2+, L = 1,3-bis(diphenyl-phosphino)propane, DPPP) were prepared through in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) and precursor ions [(8,4)2+, L = 1,6-bis(diphenylphosphino)hexane, DPPH] were synthesized in solution for comparison to (11,5)3+ precursor ions ligated with DPPP investigated previously (ACS Nano 2012, 6, 573 and J. Phys. Chem. C. 2012, 116, 24977). Similar to (11,5)3+ precursor ions, the (10,4)2+ product ions are shown to retain charge on 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol monolayers (FSAMs). Additional abundant peaks at higher m/z indicative of reactivity are observed in the TOF-SIMS spectrum of (10,4)2+ product ions that are not seen for (11,5)3+ precursor ions. The abundance of (10,4)2+ on 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (COOH-SAMs) is demonstrated to be lower than on FSAMs, consistent with partial reduction of charge. The (10,4)2+ product ion on 1-dodecanethiol (HSAMs) exhibits peaks similar to those seen on the COOH-SAM. On the HSAM, higher m/z peaks indicative of reactivity are observed similar to those on the FSAM. The (8,4)2+ DPPH precursor ions are shown to retain charge on FSAMs similar to (11,5)3+ precursor ions prepared with DPPP. An additional peak corresponding to attachment of one gold atom to (8,4)2+ is observed at higher m/z for DPPH-ligated clusters. On the COOH-SAM, (8,4)2+ is less abundant than on the FSAM consistent with partial neutralization. The results indicate that although retention of charge by product ions generated by CID is similar to precursor ions their reactivity during analysis with SIMS is different

  13. Investigations on the structure and stability of positively and negatively charged cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamics of the energy acquisition, storage and disposal processes in cluster ions produced by electron impact ionization of weakly bound van der Waals clusters have been studied in a double-focusing sector field mass spectrometer. The new phenomena observed include the multiple scattering of an incoming electron within the cluster, the excimer-induced metastable fragmentation of rare-gas cluster ions initiated by radiative decay and subsequent dissociation of the Rg2* (3Σu+) excimer (where Rg = Ar or Ne) in the cluster, the scavenging of electrons with rather high electron energy (approx. 11.5 eV) in mixed rare-gas - oxygen clusters, the occurrence of hydride ion (H-) transfer reactions between some fragment ions (such as C2H5+, C2H4+ and CH3+) and neighboring propane and butane molecules in propane and butane cluster ions, respectively, and the metastable fragmentation of (C3H8)n-lC3H7+ and (C4H10)n-lC4H7+ cluster ions induced by isomerization processes of the C3H7+ and C4H7+ radical ions within the cluster. Energy transfer from the Ar2* (3Σu+) excimer and the Arq+ ionic core to an embedded oxygen molecule has been studied in Arn(O2)m+ (m60+ fullerene ion has been constructed from second derivatives of the ionization efficiency curves for C58+, C56+ and C54+ fragment ions produced by electron impact ionization of C60. The dissociation energy (C58+ - C2) of 7.1 ± 0.4 eV has been obtained from the best fit between the measured and the calculated breakdown graphs. (author)

  14. Temperature dependence of the deposition behavior of yttria-stabilized zirconia CVD films: approach by charged cluster model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, I.D. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea); Gueroudji, L. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Taejeon (Korea); Kim, D.Y. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films were deposited with varying temperatures of ZrCl{sub 4} between 250{approx}550 deg. C with YCl{sub 3} and the substrate at 1000 deg. C. Nanoamperes per square centimeter of the electric current were measured in the reactor during deposition and the current increased with increasing evaporation temperature of ZrCl{sub 4}. The zirconia nanometer size clusters were captured on the grid membrane near the substrate during the CVD process and observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The deposition rate decreased with increasing evaporation temperature of ZrCl{sub 4}. A cauliflower-shaped structure was developed at 250 deg. C then gradually changed to a faceted-grain structure above 350 deg. C. Dependence of the growth rate and the morphological evolution on the evaporation temperature of ZrCl{sub 4} was approached by the charged cluster model. (author). 28 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Charge transfer, excitation and evaporation in low energy collisions of simple metal clusters and fullerenes with atomic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present charge transfer, excitation and evaporation cross sections in low energy collisions of small and medium-size metal clusters (Nanq+, Linq+) and C60 with atomic targets (H+, He2+ and Cs) using a molecular close-coupling formalism and a post-collision rate equation model. The theoretical model benefits from different time scales associated with the collision and the internal motion of the cluster nuclei. The collision description includes the many-electron aspect of the problem and makes use of a realistic cluster potential obtained with density functional theory and a spherical jellium model. The evaporation model takes into account the non-harmonic effects of the ionic motion and describes sequential evaporation to any order within the framework of the microcanonical statistical model of Weisskopf. We show that the relative abundance of different fragments depends critically on the cluster temperature and the spectrometer time of flight window. We have found good agreement with recent experimental results [Eur. Phys. J. D 12 (2000) 185

  16. Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfei Liu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available DBSCAN is a well-known density-based clustering algorithm which offers advantages for finding clusters of arbitrary shapes compared to partitioning and hierarchical clustering methods. However, there are few papers studying the DBSCAN algorithm under the privacy preserving distributed data mining model, in which the data is distributed between two or more parties, and the parties cooperate to obtain the clustering results without revealing the data at the individual parties. In this paper, we address the problem of two-party privacy preserving DBSCAN clustering. We first propose two protocols for privacy preserving DBSCAN clustering over horizontally and vertically partitioned data respectively and then extend them to arbitrarily partitioned data. We also provide performance analysis and privacy proof of our solution..

  17. Imidate-Based Cross-Linkers for Structural Proteomics: Increased Charge of Protein and Peptide Ions and CID and ECD Fragmentation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolen, Hector H. F.; Gomes, Alexandre F.; Schwab, Nicolas V.; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Gozzo, Fabio C.

    2014-07-01

    Chemical cross-linking is an attractive low-resolution technique for structural studies of protein complexes. Distance constraints obtained from cross-linked peptides identified by mass spectrometry (MS) are used to construct and validate protein models. Amidinating cross-linkers such as diethyl suberthioimidate (DEST) have been used successfully in chemical cross-linking experiments. In this work, the application of a commercial diimidate cross-linking reagent, dimethyl suberimidate (DMS), was evaluated with model peptides and proteins. The peptides were designed with acetylated N-termini followed by random sequences containing two Lys residues separated by an Arg residue. After cross-linking reactions, intra- and intermolecular cross-linked species were submitted to CID and ECD dissociations to study their fragmentation features in the gas phase. Fragmentation of intramolecular peptides by collision induced dissociation (CID) demonstrates a unique two-step fragmentation pathway involving formation of a ketimine as intermediate. Electron capture and electron transfer dissociation (ECD and ETD) experiments demonstrated that the cyclic moiety is not dissociated. Intermolecular species demonstrated previously described fragmentation behavior in both CID and ECD experiments. The charge state distributions (CSD) obtained after reaction with DMS were compared with those obtained with disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS). CSDs for peptides and proteins were increased after their reaction with DMS, owing to the higher basicity of DMS modified species. These features were also observed in LC-MS experiments with bovine carbonic anhydrase II (BCA) after cross-linking with DMS and tryptic proteolysis. Cross-linked peptides derived from this protein were identified at high confidence and those species were in agreement with the crystal structure of BCA.

  18. Effect of α-cluster structure of 12C nucleus on charge from factor formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In terms of the Brink α-cluster model one calculated the form factors of 12C nucleus 01+-, 21+- and 02+-states with application of a simple combination of wave functions based on a triangular and a linear structures of cluster arrangement. Contribution of the linear structure turned to be the governing one for conformity of theoretical one with experimental form factor of the excited 02+-state. By and large when fitting to the experimental data one fails to obtain a unified package of the model parameters for all the form factors that possibility indicated the necessity to plot wave function using the Hill-Wheeler method for configuration combination

  19. Charge form factors and α cluster internal structure of 12C nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    12C nucleus form factors for 0+, 2+ and 3- states were calculated in terms of α-cluster model. The wave functions of nucleons in α-cluster were taken from 4He nucleus models based on density single-particle taking account of the effect of short-range NN-correlations and d-shell impurities. It was shown that it resulted as well as to variations of 12C nucleus form factors and offered a basis for findings as to the nature of internuclear interactions forming the structure of 4He and 12C wave function high-pulse components

  20. Diet-Induced Neuropeptide Expression : Feasibility of Quantifying Extended and Highly Charged Endogenous Peptide Sequences by Selected Reaction Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidlin, Thierry; Boender, Arjen J.; Frese, Christian K.; Heck, Albert J R; Adan, Roger A H; Altelaar, A. F Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Understanding regulation and action of endogenous peptides, especially neuropeptides, which serve as inter- and intracellular signal transmitters, is key in understanding a variety of functional processes, such as energy balance, memory, circadian rhythm, drug addiction, etc. Therefore, accurate and

  1. Charge modulation of magnetization in X-doped MgO nanotube clusters (X=C, N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su-Fang; Chen, Li-Yong; Zhang, Tao; Xie, You

    2016-02-01

    First-principles calculations based on density functional theory are performed to study the magnetic and electronic properties of X-doped 8×7 MgO nanotube clusters (X=C, N). The N dopant easily occupies the O-site at the edge of MgO nanotube, embracing neutral or charged defect state, and induces notable magnetization in N-doped MgO tubular cluster. More important, this p-electron magnetization can be significantly modulated as the charged state of the defect changes. Regarding C doping, impurity atom readily substitute the Mg atom located at the edge of MgO nanotube to form neutral defect, and net magnetization is found to be zero. The calculated electron densities of states show that the O-site N doping at the edge greatly narrows or even destroys band-gap, while it enlarges somewhat for the Mg-site C doping at the edge. The results are likely to stimulate a promising class of materials for various applications ranging from spintronics to magneto-optics.

  2. The charging of neutral dimethylamine and dimethylamine-sulphuric acid clusters using protonated acetone

    OpenAIRE

    Ruusuvuori, K.; P. Hietala; O. Kupiainen-Määttä; Jokinen, T; Junninen, H.; Sipilä, M.; Kurtén, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2014-01-01

    Sulphuric acid is generally considered one of the most important substances taking part in atmospheric particle formation. However, in typical atmospheric conditions in the lower troposphere sulphuric acid and water alone are unable to form particles. It has been suggested that strong bases may stabilize sulphuric acid clusters so that particle formation may occur. More to the point, amines – strong organic bases – have become the subject of interest as pos...

  3. The charging of neutral dimethylamine and dimethylamine–sulfuric acid clusters using protonated acetone

    OpenAIRE

    Ruusuvuori, K.; P. Hietala; O. Kupiainen-Määttä; Jokinen, T; Junninen, H.; Sipilä, M.; Kurtén, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is generally considered one of the most important substances taking part in atmospheric particle formation. However, in typical atmospheric conditions in the lower troposphere, sulfuric acid and water alone are unable to form particles. It has been suggested that strong bases may stabilize sulfuric acid clusters so that particle formation may occur. More to the point, amines – strong organic bases – have become the subject of interest as possible cause for such...

  4. Long-Ranged Oppositely Charged Interactions for Designing New Types of Colloidal Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Demirors, Ahmet Faik; Stiefelhagen, Johan C. P.; Vissers, Teun; Smallenburg, Frank; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Imhof, Arnout; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2015-01-01

    Getting control over the valency of colloids is not trivial and has been a long-desired goal for the colloidal domain. Typically, tuning the preferred number of neighbors for colloidal particles requires directional bonding, as in the case of patchy particles, which is difficult to realize experimentally. Here, we demonstrate a general method for creating the colloidal analogs of molecules and other new regular colloidal clusters without using patchiness or complex bonding schemes (e.g., DNA ...

  5. Trends in Energies and Geometric Structures of Neutral and Charged Aluminum Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, René

    2007-05-01

    The minimum energy geometric structures of Aln, A[Formula: see text] , and A[Formula: see text] (4 ≤ n ≤ 15) are predicted from the results of "Tabu Search" (TS) global optimizations performed directly on the BPW91/LANL2DZ potential energy surface. In 24 of the 36 cases investigated, the TS delivered a lower energy structure than previously reported, in one case (A[Formula: see text] ) it failed to find the global minimum, and in the remaining 11 cases TS confirmed previous structures. All clusters (with 4 ≤ n ≤ 15) have the lowest spin state as their ground state except Al4 (triplet), A[Formula: see text] (quartet), A[Formula: see text] (triplet), and maybe A[Formula: see text] (singlet and triplet are degenerate). The 20-electron A[Formula: see text] and 40-electron A[Formula: see text] clusters are relatively stable compared to other clusters, on several criteria; to a lesser degree, Al7, Al12, and A[Formula: see text] are also stable. PMID:26627412

  6. Interaction of nanosecond laser pulse with tetramethyl silane (Si(CH34 clusters: Generation of multiply charged silicon and carbon ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purav M. Badani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Present work reports significantly high levels of ionization, eventually leading to Coulomb explosion of Tetramethyl silane (TMS clusters, on interaction with laser pulses of intensity ∼109 W/cm2. Tetramethyl silane clusters, prepared by supersonic expansion were photoionized at 266, 355 or 532 nm and the resultant ions were detected using time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It is observed that wavelength of irradiation and the size of the cluster are crucial parameters which drastically affect the nature of charge species generated upon photoionization of cluster. The results show that clusters absorb significantly higher energy from the laser field at longer wavelengths (532 nm and generate multiply charged silicon and carbon ions which have large kinetic energies. Further, laser-cluster interaction at different wavelengths has been quantified and charge densities at 266, 355 and 532 nm are found to be 4x 1010, 5x 1010 and 5x 1011 charges/cm3 respectively. These unusual results have been rationalized based on dominance of secondary ionization processes at 532 nm ultimately leading to Coulomb explosion of clusters. In another set of experiments, multiply charged ions of Ar (up to +5 state and Kr (up to +6 state were observed when TMS doped inert gas clusters were photoionized at 532 and 355 nm. The extent of energy absorption at these two wavelengths is clearly manifested from the charge state of the atomic ions generated upon Coulomb disintegration of the doped cluster. These experiments thus demonstrate a novel method for generation of multiply charged atomic ions of inert gases at laser intensity of ∼ 109 W/cm2. The average size of the cluster exhibiting Coulomb explosion phenomena under giga watt intensity conditions has been estimated to be ∼ 6 nm. Experimental results obtained in the present work agree qualitatively with the model proposed earlier [D. Niu, H. Li, F. Liang, L. Wen, X. Luo, B. Wang, and H. Qu, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 151103

  7. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  8. Cluster-assisted generation of multi-charged ions in nanosecond laser ionization of pulsed hydrogen sulfide beam at 1064 and 532 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Dong-Mei; Li Hai-Yang; Luo Xiao-Lin; Liang Feng; Cheng Shuang; Li An-Lin

    2006-01-01

    The multi-charged sulfur ions of Sq+ (q ≤ 6) have been generated when hydrogen sulfide cluster beams are irradiated by a nanosecond laser of 1064 and 532 nm with an intensity of 1010 ~ 1012W·cm-2. S6+ is the dominant multicharged species at 1064 nm, while S4+, S3+ and S2+ ions are the main multi-charged species at 532 nm. A three-step model (i.e., multiphoton ionization triggering, inverse bremsstrahlung heating, electron collision ionizing) is proposed to explain the generation of these multi-charged ions at the laser intensity stated above. The high ionization level of the clusters and the increasing charge state of the ion products with increasing laser wavelength are supposed mainly due to the rate-limiting step, i.e., electron heating by absorption energy from the laser field via inverse bremsstrahlung, which is proportional to λ2, λ being the laser wavelength.

  9. Aβ1-25-Derived Sphingolipid-Domain Tracer Peptide SBD Interacts with Membrane Ganglioside Clusters via a Coil-Helix-Coil Motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaofeng Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Amyloid-β (Aβ-derived, sphingolipid binding domain (SBD peptide is a fluorescently tagged probe used to trace the diffusion behavior of sphingolipid-containing microdomains in cell membranes through binding to a constellation of glycosphingolipids, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol. However, the molecular details of the binding mechanism between SBD and plasma membrane domains remain unclear. Here, to investigate how the peptide recognizes the lipid surface at an atomically detailed level, SBD peptides in the environment of raft-like bilayers were examined in micro-seconds-long molecular dynamics simulations. We found that SBD adopted a coil-helix-coil structural motif, which binds to multiple GT1b gangliosides via salt bridges and CH–π interactions. Our simulation results demonstrate that the CH–π and electrostatic forces between SBD monomers and GT1b gangliosides clusters are the main driving forces in the binding process. The presence of the fluorescent dye and linker molecules do not change the binding mechanism of SBD probes with gangliosides, which involves the helix-turn-helix structural motif that was suggested to constitute a glycolipid binding domain common to some sphingolipid interacting proteins, including HIV gp120, prion, and Aβ.

  10. Aβ1-25-Derived Sphingolipid-Domain Tracer Peptide SBD Interacts with Membrane Ganglioside Clusters via a Coil-Helix-Coil Motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaofeng; Kraut, Rachel; Mu, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    The Amyloid-β (Aβ)-derived, sphingolipid binding domain (SBD) peptide is a fluorescently tagged probe used to trace the diffusion behavior of sphingolipid-containing microdomains in cell membranes through binding to a constellation of glycosphingolipids, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol. However, the molecular details of the binding mechanism between SBD and plasma membrane domains remain unclear. Here, to investigate how the peptide recognizes the lipid surface at an atomically detailed level, SBD peptides in the environment of raft-like bilayers were examined in micro-seconds-long molecular dynamics simulations. We found that SBD adopted a coil-helix-coil structural motif, which binds to multiple GT1b gangliosides via salt bridges and CH-π interactions. Our simulation results demonstrate that the CH-π and electrostatic forces between SBD monomers and GT1b gangliosides clusters are the main driving forces in the binding process. The presence of the fluorescent dye and linker molecules do not change the binding mechanism of SBD probes with gangliosides, which involves the helix-turn-helix structural motif that was suggested to constitute a glycolipid binding domain common to some sphingolipid interacting proteins, including HIV gp120, prion, and Aβ. PMID:26540054

  11. Spectroscopic observation of highly-charged ions produced by cluster target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-density nitrogen gas was irradiated with an ultrashort high-intensity pulse laser (pulse width: 1.5 ps, intensity: >1015 W/cm2). It was found that highly charged ions were produced effectively as the gas density became higher. From distribution of population densities of high-lying levels of lithium like ions, the electron temperature in a recombining phase was estimated. This electron temperature together with a calculation using a collisional-radiative model, in which doubly excited levels of beryllium like ions are included, indicated that the electron density was ne=3x1019 cm-3. Moreover, the spectra also showed that population inversions between some excited states of hydrogen-, helium-, lithium like nitrogen ions were generated under this plasma conditions. (author)

  12. Charged vanadium-benzene multidecker clusters: DFT and quantum Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokár, K; Derian, R; Mitas, L; Štich, I

    2016-02-14

    Using explicitly correlated fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo and density functional theory (DFT) methods, we study electronic properties, ground-state multiplets, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and low-energy fragmentation channels of charged half-sandwich and multidecker vanadium-benzene systems with up to 3 vanadium atoms, including both anions and cations. It is shown that, particularly in anions, electronic correlations play a crucial role; these effects are not systematically captured with any commonly used DFT functionals such as gradient corrected, hybrids, and range-separated hybrids. On the other hand, tightly bound cations can be described qualitatively by DFT. A comparison of DFT and quantum Monte Carlo provides an in-depth understanding of the electronic structure and properties of these correlated systems. The calculations also serve as a benchmark study of 3d molecular anions that require a balanced many-body description of correlations at both short- and long-range distances. PMID:26874484

  13. Charged vanadium-benzene multidecker clusters: DFT and quantum Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokár, K.; Derian, R.; Mitas, L.; Štich, I.

    2016-02-01

    Using explicitly correlated fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo and density functional theory (DFT) methods, we study electronic properties, ground-state multiplets, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and low-energy fragmentation channels of charged half-sandwich and multidecker vanadium-benzene systems with up to 3 vanadium atoms, including both anions and cations. It is shown that, particularly in anions, electronic correlations play a crucial role; these effects are not systematically captured with any commonly used DFT functionals such as gradient corrected, hybrids, and range-separated hybrids. On the other hand, tightly bound cations can be described qualitatively by DFT. A comparison of DFT and quantum Monte Carlo provides an in-depth understanding of the electronic structure and properties of these correlated systems. The calculations also serve as a benchmark study of 3d molecular anions that require a balanced many-body description of correlations at both short- and long-range distances.

  14. Charged vanadium-benzene multidecker clusters: DFT and quantum Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using explicitly correlated fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo and density functional theory (DFT) methods, we study electronic properties, ground-state multiplets, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and low-energy fragmentation channels of charged half-sandwich and multidecker vanadium-benzene systems with up to 3 vanadium atoms, including both anions and cations. It is shown that, particularly in anions, electronic correlations play a crucial role; these effects are not systematically captured with any commonly used DFT functionals such as gradient corrected, hybrids, and range-separated hybrids. On the other hand, tightly bound cations can be described qualitatively by DFT. A comparison of DFT and quantum Monte Carlo provides an in-depth understanding of the electronic structure and properties of these correlated systems. The calculations also serve as a benchmark study of 3d molecular anions that require a balanced many-body description of correlations at both short- and long-range distances

  15. Charged vanadium-benzene multidecker clusters: DFT and quantum Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokár, K.; Derian, R. [Institute of Physics, CCMS, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Mitas, L. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Štich, I., E-mail: ivan.stich@savba.sk [Institute of Physics, CCMS, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ruprecht A. Institute of Technology, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2016-02-14

    Using explicitly correlated fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo and density functional theory (DFT) methods, we study electronic properties, ground-state multiplets, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and low-energy fragmentation channels of charged half-sandwich and multidecker vanadium-benzene systems with up to 3 vanadium atoms, including both anions and cations. It is shown that, particularly in anions, electronic correlations play a crucial role; these effects are not systematically captured with any commonly used DFT functionals such as gradient corrected, hybrids, and range-separated hybrids. On the other hand, tightly bound cations can be described qualitatively by DFT. A comparison of DFT and quantum Monte Carlo provides an in-depth understanding of the electronic structure and properties of these correlated systems. The calculations also serve as a benchmark study of 3d molecular anions that require a balanced many-body description of correlations at both short- and long-range distances.

  16. Cluster-assisted generation of multi-charged ions in nanosecond laser ionization of pulsed hydrogen sulfide beam at 1064 and 532 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Dong-Mei; Li, Hai-Yang; Luo, Xiao-Lin; Liang, Feng; Cheng, Shuang; Li, An-Lin

    2006-07-01

    The multi-charged sulfur ions of Sq+ (qlaser of 1064 and 532 nm with an intensity of 1010~ 1012W.cm-2. S6+ is the dominant multi-charged species at 1064 nm, while S4+, S3+ and S2+ ions are the main multi-charged species at 532 nm. A three-step model (i.e., multiphoton ionization triggering, inverse bremsstrahlung heating, electron collision ionizing) is proposed to explain the generation of these multi-charged ions at the laser intensity stated above. The high ionization level of the clusters and the increasing charge state of the ion products with increasing laser wavelength are supposed mainly due to the rate-limiting step, i.e., electron heating by absorption energy from the laser field via inverse bremsstrahlung, which is proportional to λ2, λ being the laser wavelength.

  17. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) B27 Allotype-Specific Binding and Candidate Arthritogenic Peptides Revealed through Heuristic Clustering of Data-independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry (DIA-MS) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittenhelm, Ralf B; Sivaneswaran, Saranjah; Lim Kam Sian, Terry C C; Croft, Nathan P; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-06-01

    Expression of HLA-B27 is strongly associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other spondyloarthropathies. While this is true for the majority of HLA-B27 allotypes, HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 are not associated with AS. These two subtypes contain polymorphisms that are ideally positioned to influence the bound peptide repertoire. The existence of disease-inducing peptides (so-called arthritogenic peptides) has therefore been proposed that are exclusively presented by disease-associated HLA-B27 allotypes. However, we have recently demonstrated that this segregation of allotype-bound peptides is not the case and that many peptides that display sequence features predicted to favor binding to disease-associated subtypes are also capable of being presented naturally by protective alleles. To further probe more subtle quantitative changes in peptide presentation, we have used a combination of data-independent acquisition (DIA) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to quantify the abundance of 1646 HLA-B27 restricted peptides across the eight most frequent HLA-B27 allotypes (HLA-B*27:02-HLA-B*27:09). We utilized K means cluster analysis to group peptides with similar allelic binding preferences across the eight HLA-B27 allotypes, which enabled us to identify the most-stringent binding characteristics for each HLA-B27 allotype and further refined their existing consensus-binding motifs. Moreover, a thorough analysis of this quantitative dataset led to the identification of 26 peptides, which are presented in lower abundance by HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 compared with disease-associated HLA-B27 subtypes. Although these differences were observed to be very subtle, these 26 peptides might encompass the sought-after arthritogenic peptide(s). PMID:26929215

  18. Use of charge sensitivity analysis in diagnosing chemisorption clusters: Minimum-energy coordinate and Fukui function study of model toluene-[V2O5] systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge sensitivity analysis (CSA) is carried out for model toluene-vanadium pentoxide chemisorption complexes involving the two-pyramidal model of the active site on the (010)-V2O5 surface. Maps of the electrostatic potential around the adsorbate and the substrate cluster are used to rationalize energetical preferences of alternative perpendicular and parallel arrangements of the toluene ring relative to the pyramid bases, known from previous SCF MO studies. The minimum-energy coordinates (MEC) in the electron population space are determined from the CSA semiempirical, finite difference atomic hardness matrix for the actual SCF MO charges in the chemisorption clusters. They represent collective charge displacements which minimize the system energy per unit change in the oxidation state of a specified atom, thus providing a convenient diagnostic tool for testing the alternative charge rearrangements and range of perturbations due to the chemisorption bond or changes in the cluster environment. The MEC relaxed hardnesses diagnose mode stabilities and together with the MEC relaxed hardnesses diagnose mode stabilities and together with the MEC topologies identify the most probable locations of the adsorbate activation. Finally, the atomic Fukui function indices are used to explore trends in the distribution of the external charge transfer due to the system environment. 14 refs., 4 figs

  19. A surface charge-switchable and folate modified system for co-delivery of proapoptosis peptide and p53 plasmid in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si; Rong, Lei; Lei, Qi; Cao, Peng-Xi; Qin, Si-Yong; Zheng, Di-Wei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Zhu, Jing-Yi; Cheng, Si-Xue; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    To improve the tumor therapeutic efficiency and reduce undesirable side effects, ternary FK/p53/PEG-PLL(DA) complexes with a detachable surface shielding layer were designed. The FK/p53/PEG-PLL(DA) complexes were fabricated by coating the folate incorporated positively charged FK/p53 complexes with charge-switchable PEG-shield (PEG-PLL(DA)) through electrostatic interaction. At the physiological pH 7.4 in the bloodstream, PEG-PLL(DA) could extend the circulating time by shielding the positively charged FK/p53 complexes. After the accumulation of the FK/p53/PEG-PLL(DA) complexes in tumor sites, tumor-acidity-triggered charge switch led to the detachment of PEG-PLL(DA) from the FK/p53 complexes, and resulted in efficient tumor cell entry by folate-mediated uptake and electrostatic attraction. Stimulated by the high content glutathione (GSH) in cytoplasm, the cleavage of disulfide bond resulted in the liberation of proapoptosis peptide C-KLA(TPP) and the p53 gene, which exerted the combined tumor therapy by regulating both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. Both in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that the ternary detachable complexes FK/p53/PEG-PLL(DA) could enhance antitumor efficacy and reduce adverse effects to normal cells. These findings indicate that the tumor-triggered decomplexation of FK/p53/PEG-PLL(DA) supplies a useful strategy for targeting delivery of different therapeutic agents in synergetic anticancer therapy. PMID:26599622

  20. Macrocluster desorption effect caused by single MCI: charges of gold clusters (2-20 nm) desorbed due to electronic processes induced by fission fragment bombardment in nanodispersed gold targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the charge state of the negatively charged gold nanocluster ions (2-20 nm) that were desorbed from nanodispersed gold islet targets by 252Cf fission fragments via electronic processes is studied. Mean cluster charge was calculated as a ratio of mean cluster mass to mean mass-to-charge ratio . Cluster masses were measured by means of a collector technique employing transmission electron microscopy and scanning force microscopy, while m/q was measured by means of a tandem TOF-spectrometer. It is shown that the nanocluster ions are mostly multiply charged (2-16e) and the charge increases non-linearly with the cluster size. The results are discussed

  1. Ab initio LCAO-MO cluster-type calculation of the self-consistent electronic screening charge density around a single hydrogen impurity in a nickel crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic structure for a Ni atom cluster embedded in bulk Ni by use of a spin-averaged local exchange SCF Ni crystal potential is calculated with an ab initio LCAO-Mo variational method. A single hydrogen impurity is added at the cluster center (fcc octahedral interstitial site) and the electronic structure computed iteratively until the change in electron density from the pure Ni cluster density is self-consistent. The H-Ni6 self-consistent density change is compared to the charge density around a free hydrogen atom and to the initial-response density change in H-Ni14 and H-Ni38 clusters. 14 references

  2. Penetration of Hydrogen clusters from 10 to 120 kev/u in carbon foils. Study of their slowing-down and charge distribution of emerging fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is devoted to the experimental study of the interaction between fast (10 to 120 keV/p) hydrogen clusters with thin solid targets. First, we have studied the slowing-down of Hn+(2≤n≤21) clusters through carbon foils. Up to date this had been made only with molecular ions. We obtain evidence for vicinage effects on the energy loss of proton-clusters. We show that for projectile energies larger than 50 keV/p, the energy loss of a proton in a cluster is enhanced when compared to that of an isolated proton of the same velocity. At lower incident energies, it is a decrease of the energy loss which is observed. The same effect is also observed in the energy lost in the entrance window of a surface barrier detector bombarded by clusters. This phenomenon is interpreted in terms of interferences between individual polarisation wakes induced by each proton of the cluster. In the second part, we propose an accurate method to study the charge state of the atomic fragments resulting from the dissociation of fast Hn+ (2≤n≤15) clusters through a carbon foil. This method gives also the distribution of the neutral atoms among the emerging fragments. These distributions are finally compared with binomial laws expected from independent particles

  3. An Ab Initio Study of the Structures and Relative Stabilities of Doubly Charged [(NaCl)m(Na)2]2+ Cluster Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Aguado, A

    2001-01-01

    We present ab initio perturbed ion calculations on the structures and relative stabilities of doubly charged [(NaCl)_m(Na)_2]2+ cluster ions. The obtained stabilities show excellent agreement with experimental abundances obtained from mass spectra. Those enhanced stabilities are found to be a consequence of highly compact structures that can be built only for certain values of m. Nearly all magic number clusters can be shown to be constructed in one of the two following ways: (a) by adding tri- or penta-atomic chains to two edges of a perfect neutral (NaCl)_n cuboid, with n=m-2 or n=m-4, respectively; (b) by removing a chloride anion from a perfect singly charged (NaCl)_nNa+ cuboid, with n=m+1.

  4. Atomic and electronic structures of neutral and charged Pbn clusters (n=2-15): Theoretical investigation based on density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Chinagandham; Majumder, Chiranjib

    2007-06-01

    The geometric and electronic structures of the Pbn+ clusters (n=2-15) have been investigated and compared with neutral clusters. The search for several low-lying isomers was carried out under the framework of the density functional theory formalism using the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange correlation energy. The wave functions were expanded using a plane wave basis set and the electron-ion interactions have been described by the projector augmented wave method. The ground state geometries of the singly positively charged Pbn+ clusters showed compact growth pattern as those observed for neutrals with small local distortions. Based on the total energy of the lowest energy isomers, a systematic analysis was carried out to obtain the physicochemical properties, viz., binding energy, second order difference in energy, and fragmentation behavior. It is found that n =4, 7, 10, and 13 clusters are more stable than their neighbors, reflecting good agreement with experimental observation. The chemical stability of these clusters was analyzed by evaluating their energy gap between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals and adiabatic ionization potentials. The results revealed that, although Pb13 showed higher stability from the total energy analysis, its energy gap and ionization potential do not follow the trend. Albeit of higher stability in terms of binding energy, the lower ionization potential of Pb13 is interesting which has been explained based on its electronic structure through the density of states and electron shell filling model of spherical clusters.

  5. Binding of the Cationic Peptide (KL)4K to Lipid Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface: Effect of Lipid Headgroup Charge, Acyl Chain Length, and Acyl Chain Saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädicke, André; Blume, Alfred

    2016-04-28

    The binding of the cationic peptide (KL)4K to monolayers of different anionic lipids was determined by adsorption experiments. The chemical structure of the anionic phospholipids was changed in different ways. First, the hydrophobic region of phosphatidylglycerols was altered by elongation of the acyl chain length. Second, an unsaturated chain was introduced. Third, lipids with negatively charged headgroups of different chemical structure were compared. (KL)4K itself shows no surface activity and does not bind to monolayers of zwitterionic lipids. Analysis of (KL)4K binding to anionic lipid monolayers reveals a competition between two binding processes: (i) incorporation of the peptide into the acyl chain region (surface pressure increase) and (ii) electrostatic interaction screening the negative charges with reduction of charge repulsion (surface pressure decrease due to monolayer condensation). The lipid acyl chain length and the chemical structure of the headgroup have minor effects on the binding properties. However, a strong dependence on the phase state of the monolayer was observed. In the liquid-expanded (LE) phase, the fluid monolayer provides enough space, so that peptide insertion due to hydrophobic interactions dominates. For monolayers in the liquid-condensed (LC) phase, peptide binding followed by monolayer condensation is the main effect. PMID:27049846

  6. Biocatalytic self-assembly of supramolecular charge-transfer nanostructures based on n-type semiconductor-appended peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Berdugo, Cristina; Javid, Nadeem; Frederix, Pim W J M; Ulijn, Rein V

    2014-06-01

    The reversible in situ formation of a self-assembly building block (naphthalenediimide (NDI)-dipeptide conjugate) by enzymatic condensation of NDI-functionalized tyrosine (NDI-Y) and phenylalanine-amide (F-NH2) to form NDI-YF-NH2 is described. This coupled biocatalytic condensation/assembly approach is thermodynamically driven and gives rise to nanostructures with optimized supramolecular interactions as evidenced by substantial aggregation induced emission upon assembly. Furthermore, in the presence of di-hydroxy/alkoxy naphthalene donors, efficient charge-transfer complexes are produced. The dynamic formation of NDI-YF-NH2 and electronic and H-bonding interactions are analyzed and characterized by different methods. Microscopy (TEM and AFM) and rheology are used to characterize the formed nanostructures. Dynamic nanostructures, whose formation and function are driven by free-energy minimization, are inherently self-healing and provide opportunities for the development of aqueous adaptive nanotechnology. PMID:24788665

  7. Influence of temperature and crown ether complex formation on the charge partitioning between z and c fragments formed after electron capture by small peptide dications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlerding, Anneli; Jensen, Camilla S.; Wyer, Jean A.; Holm, Anne I. S.; Jørgensen, Palle; Kadhane, Umesh; Larsen, Mikkel K.; Panja, Subhasis; Poully, Jean Christophe; Worm, Esben S.; Zettergren, Henning; Hvelplund, Preben; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2009-04-01

    Electron capture by peptide dications results in N-C[alpha] bond cleavage to give c+ and z or c and z+ fragments. In this work we have investigated how crown ether (18-crown-6 = CE) complex formation and a change in the internal energy affect the charge division between the z and c fragments. Both complex formation and a high temperature have the effect of breaking internal ionic hydrogen bonds. The crown ether complex also lowers the probability of internal proton transfer between the two fragments, and reduces the recombination energy of the charged group it targets. The systems under study were doubly protonated di- and tripeptides, [AK+2H]2+, [AR+2H]2+, [KK+2H]2+ and [GHK+2H]2+ (A = alanine, K = lysine, R = arginine, G = glycine and H = histidine). For crown ether complexes the formation of z+ ions was always preferred over c+ ions. In the case of [GHK+2H]2+, the bare ion dissociated into z2+ + c1 and z1 + c2+ from cleavage of the first and second N-C[alpha] bond, respectively, whereas z1+ fragment ions had higher yield than c2+ for [GHK+2H]2+(CE). The internal energy of the ions was changed by storing them in a 22-pole ion trap in which they were equilibrated to a temperature between -60 and 90 °C in collisions with helium gas. The average internal energy increased by about 0.4 eV from the lowest to the highest temperature for the dipeptides and 0.6 eV for the tripeptide. More fragmentation occurred at the higher temperature, as observed by an increase in the formation of b+ and y+ ions after breakage of the peptide bond of vibrationally hot even-electron cations and from secondary reactions of z+ radical cations within the time window of the experiment. However, the z+ to c+ partitioning was not found to depend significantly on temperature in the measured range. In addition the decay of [GHK+H]+/[GHK+2H]+ and [AK+H]+ formed after electron capture by [GHK+2H]2+ and [AK+2H]2+ was found to occur on a microsecond to millisecond timescale. The data are well

  8. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on small aluminum oxide clusters: Role of the local atomic environment and charge state on the oxidation of the CO molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations dedicated to analyze the adsorption behavior of CO molecules on small AlxOy± clusters. Following the experimental results of Johnson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 112, 4732 (2008)], we consider structures having the bulk composition Al2O3, as well as smaller Al2O2 and Al2O units. Our electron affinity and total energy calculations are consistent with aluminum oxide clusters having two-dimensional rhombus-like structures. In addition, interconversion energy barriers between two- and one-dimensional atomic arrays are of the order of 1 eV, thus clearly defining the preferred isomers. Single CO adsorption on our charged AlxOy± clusters exhibits, in general, spontaneous oxygen transfer events leading to the production of CO2 in line with the experimental data. However, CO can also bind to both Al and O atoms of the clusters forming aluminum oxide complexes with a CO2 subunit. The vibrational spectra of AlxOy + CO2 provides well defined finger prints that may allow the identification of specific isomers. The AlxOy+ clusters are more reactive than the anionic species and the final Al2O+ + CO reaction can result in the production of atomic Al and carbon dioxide as observed from experiments. We underline the crucial role played by the local atomic environment, charge density distribution, and spin-multiplicity on the oxidation behavior of CO molecules. Finally, we analyze the importance of coadsorption and finite temperature effects by performing DFT Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Our calculations show that CO oxidation on AlxOy+ clusters can be also promoted by the binding of additional CO species at 300 K, revealing the existence of fragmentation processes in line with the ones experimentally inferred

  9. Effect of charged microenvironment on the electrochemistry of [Fe2S2(OC6H5)4]2− cluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dhanada Sarmah; Diganta Kumar Das

    2013-11-01

    Although cysteine is the preferred ligand for [Fe-S] core in case of iron-sulphur proteins, presence of other ligands together with cysteine is not uncommon. Being basically electron transfer proteins, redox potential of [Fe-S] core in these proteins in crucial to their functioning. Among other factors, charged nature of the microenvironment is believed to tune the redox potential. The iron-sulphur cluster, [Fe2S2(OC6H5)4]2−, has been investigated electrochemically in positive and negative microenvironments, both in solution and in film. Charge nature around the active centre has been found to affect its redox potential and diffusion coefficient significantly. In a film, where charges are more localized compared to solution, the effect on redox potential was more prominent.

  10. Measurement of circulating transcripts and gene cluster analysis predicts and defines therapeutic efficacy of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in neuroendocrine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodei, L. [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); LuGenIum Consortium, Milan, Rotterdam, Bad Berka, London, Italy, Netherlands, Germany (Country Unknown); Kidd, M. [Wren Laboratories, Branford, CT (United States); Modlin, I.M. [LuGenIum Consortium, Milan, Rotterdam, Bad Berka, London, Italy, Netherlands, Germany (Country Unknown); Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Severi, S.; Nicolini, S.; Paganelli, G. [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine and Radiometabolic Units, Meldola (Italy); Drozdov, I. [Bering Limited, London (United Kingdom); Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Krenning, E.P. [LuGenIum Consortium, Milan, Rotterdam, Bad Berka, London, Italy, Netherlands, Germany (Country Unknown); Erasmus Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Baum, R.P. [LuGenIum Consortium, Milan, Rotterdam, Bad Berka, London, Italy, Netherlands, Germany (Country Unknown); Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Theranostics Center for Molecular Radiotherapy and Imaging, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is an effective method for treating neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). It is limited, however, in the prediction of individual tumor response and the precise and early identification of changes in tumor size. Currently, response prediction is based on somatostatin receptor expression and efficacy by morphological imaging and/or chromogranin A (CgA) measurement. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of circulating NET transcripts as a measure of PRRT efficacy, and moreover to identify prognostic gene clusters in pretreatment blood that could be interpolated with relevant clinical features in order to define a biological index for the tumor and a predictive quotient for PRRT efficacy. NET patients (n = 54), M: F 37:17, median age 66, bronchial: n = 13, GEP-NET: n = 35, CUP: n = 6 were treated with {sup 177}Lu-based-PRRT (cumulative activity: 6.5-27.8 GBq, median 18.5). At baseline: 47/54 low-grade (G1/G2; bronchial typical/atypical), 31/49 {sup 18}FDG positive and 39/54 progressive. Disease status was assessed by RECIST1.1. Transcripts were measured by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and multianalyte algorithmic analysis (NETest); CgA by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Gene cluster (GC) derivations: regulatory network, protein:protein interactome analyses. Statistical analyses: chi-square, non-parametric measurements, multiple regression, receiver operating characteristic and Kaplan-Meier survival. The disease control rate was 72 %. Median PFS was not achieved (follow-up: 1-33 months, median: 16). Only grading was associated with response (p < 0.01). At baseline, 94 % of patients were NETest-positive, while CgA was elevated in 59 %. NETest accurately (89 %, χ{sup 2} = 27.4; p = 1.2 x 10{sup -7}) correlated with treatment response, while CgA was 24 % accurate. Gene cluster expression (growth-factor signalome and metabolome) had an AUC of 0.74 ± 0.08 (z-statistic = 2.92, p < 0

  11. Measurement of circulating transcripts and gene cluster analysis predicts and defines therapeutic efficacy of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is an effective method for treating neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). It is limited, however, in the prediction of individual tumor response and the precise and early identification of changes in tumor size. Currently, response prediction is based on somatostatin receptor expression and efficacy by morphological imaging and/or chromogranin A (CgA) measurement. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of circulating NET transcripts as a measure of PRRT efficacy, and moreover to identify prognostic gene clusters in pretreatment blood that could be interpolated with relevant clinical features in order to define a biological index for the tumor and a predictive quotient for PRRT efficacy. NET patients (n = 54), M: F 37:17, median age 66, bronchial: n = 13, GEP-NET: n = 35, CUP: n = 6 were treated with 177Lu-based-PRRT (cumulative activity: 6.5-27.8 GBq, median 18.5). At baseline: 47/54 low-grade (G1/G2; bronchial typical/atypical), 31/49 18FDG positive and 39/54 progressive. Disease status was assessed by RECIST1.1. Transcripts were measured by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and multianalyte algorithmic analysis (NETest); CgA by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Gene cluster (GC) derivations: regulatory network, protein:protein interactome analyses. Statistical analyses: chi-square, non-parametric measurements, multiple regression, receiver operating characteristic and Kaplan-Meier survival. The disease control rate was 72 %. Median PFS was not achieved (follow-up: 1-33 months, median: 16). Only grading was associated with response (p < 0.01). At baseline, 94 % of patients were NETest-positive, while CgA was elevated in 59 %. NETest accurately (89 %, χ2 = 27.4; p = 1.2 x 10-7) correlated with treatment response, while CgA was 24 % accurate. Gene cluster expression (growth-factor signalome and metabolome) had an AUC of 0.74 ± 0.08 (z-statistic = 2.92, p < 0.004) for predicting

  12. Monitoring peptide-surface interaction by means of molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Protein-surface interactions play a crucial role in a wide field of research areas like biology, biotechnology, or pharmacology. Only recently, it has been shown that not only peptide adsorption represents an important process but also spreading and clustering of adsorbed proteins. By means of classical molecular dynamics, peptide adsorption as well as the dynamics of adsorbed peptides have been investigated in order to gain deeper insight into such processes. The picture shows a snapshot of an adsorbed peptide on a silica surface showing strong direct hydrogen bonding. Research highlights: → Simulation of peptide surface interaction. → Dynamics of hydrogen bond formation and destruction. → Internal flexibility of adsorbed peptides. - Abstract: Protein adsorption and protein surface interactions have become an important research topic in recent years. Very recently, for example, it has been shown that protein clusters can undergo a surface-induced spreading after adsorption. Such phenomena emphasize the need of a more detailed insight into protein-silica interaction at an atomic level. Therefore, we have studied a model system consisting of a short peptide, a silica slab, and water molecules by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations. The study reveals that, besides of electrostatic interactions caused by the chosen charge distribution, the peptide interacts with the silica surface through formation of direct peptide-surface hydrogen bonds as well as indirect peptide-water-surface hydrogen bonds. The number of created hydrogen bonds varies considerably among the simulated structures. The strength of hydrogen bonding determines the mobility of the peptide on the surface and the internal flexibility of the adsorbed peptide.

  13. Two-plasmon decay instability’s signature in spectral lines and spectroscopic measurements of charge exchange rate in a femtosecond laser-driven cluster-based plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first study of two kinds of dips (L-dips and X-dips) in spectral lines from femtosecond laser-driven cluster-based plasma. We found that the observed L-dips are caused by Langmuir waves resulting from the two-plasmon decay instability and our experiment constitutes the first observation of the signature of this instability in spectral line profiles. We also observed an X-dip caused by charge exchange and used it for the experimental determination of the rate of charge exchange between the hydrogenic oxygen and fully-stripped helium—an important fundamental reference data virtually inaccessible by other experimental methods. (fast track communication)

  14. A dual cryogenic ion trap spectrometer for the formation and characterization of solvated ionic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new experimental approach is presented in which two separate cryogenic ion traps are used to reproducibly form weakly bound solvent clusters around electrosprayed ions and messenger-tag them for single-photon infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. This approach thus enables the vibrational characterization of ionic clusters comprised of a solvent network around large and non-volatile ions. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by clustering water, methanol, and acetone around a protonated glycylglycine peptide. For water, cluster sizes with greater than twenty solvent molecules around a single ion are readily formed. We further demonstrate that similar water clusters can be formed around ions having a shielded charge center or those that do not readily form hydrogen bonds. Finally, infrared photodissociation spectra of D2-tagged GlyGlyH+ ⋅ (H2O)1−4 are presented. They display well-resolved spectral features and comparisons with calculations reveal detailed information on the solvation structures of this prototypical peptide

  15. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation. PMID:26281357

  16. Collagen peptide-based biomaterials for protein delivery and peptide-promoted self-assembly of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernenwein, Dawn M.

    2011-12-01

    Bottom-up self-assembly of peptides has driven the research progress for the following two projects: protein delivery vehicles of collagen microflorettes and the assembly of gold nanoparticles with coiled-coil peptides. Collagen is the most abundant protein in the mammals yet due to immunogenic responses, batch-to-batch variability and lack of sequence modifications, synthetic collagen has been designed to self-assemble into native collagen-like structures. In particular with this research, metal binding ligands were incorporated on the termini of collagen-like peptides to generate micron-sized particles, microflorettes. The over-arching goal of the first research project is to engineer MRI-active microflorettes, loaded with His-tagged growth factors with differential release rates while bound to stem cells that can be implemented toward regenerative cell-based therapies. His-tagged proteins, such as green fluorescent protein, have successfully been incorporated on the surface and throughout the microflorettes. Protein release was monitored under physiological conditions and was related to particle degradation. In human plasma full release was obtained within six days. Stability of the microflorettes under physiological conditions was also examined for the development of a therapeutically relevant delivery agent. Additionally, MRI active microflorettes have been generated through the incorporation of a gadolinium binding ligand, DOTA within the collagen-based peptide sequence. To probe peptide-promoted self-assemblies of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by non-covalent, charge complementary interactions, a highly anionic coiled-coil peptide was designed and synthesized. Upon formation of peptide-GNP interactions, the hydrophobic domain of the coiled-coil were shown to promote the self-assembly of peptide-GNPs clustering. Hydrophobic forces were found to play an important role in the assembly process, as a peptide with an equally overall negative charge, but lacking an

  17. Charge configurations in viral proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Karlin, S; Brendel, V

    1988-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the charged residues of a protein is of interest with respect to potential electrostatic interactions. We have examined the proteins of a large number of representative eukaryotic and prokaryotic viruses for the occurrence of significant clusters, runs, and periodic patterns of charge. Clusters and runs of positive charge are prominent in many capsid and core proteins, whereas surface (glyco)proteins frequently contain a negative charge cluster. Significant charge ...

  18. Tuning the charge states of CrW2O9 clusters deposited on perfect and defective MgO(001) surfaces with different color centers: A comprehensive DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia; Zhang, Hui; Tong, Yawen; Wang, Chengxing; Wang, Bin; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Yongfan

    2016-05-01

    The structures and electronic properties of bimetallic oxide CrW2O9 clusters supported on the perfect and defective MgO(001) surfaces with three different color centers, FS0, FS+, and FS2+ centers, respectively, have been investigated by density functional theory calculations. Our results show that the configurations, adsorption energies, charge transfers, and bonding modes of dispersed CrW2O9 clusters are sensitive to the charge states of the FS centers. Compared with the gas-phase configuration, the CrW2O9 clusters supported on the defective surfaces are distorted dramatically, which exhibit different chain structures. On the perfect MgO surface, the depositions of clusters do not involve obvious charge transfer, while the situation is quite different on the defective MgO(001) surfaces in which significant electron transfer occurs from the surface to the cluster. Interestingly, this effect becomes more remarkable for electron-rich oxygen vacancies (FS0 center) than that for electron-poor oxygen vacancies (FS+ and FS2+ centers). Furthermore, our work reveals a progressive Brønsted acid sites where spin density preferentially localized around the Cr atoms not the W atoms for all kinds of FS-centers, indicating the better catalytic activities can be expected for CrW2O9 cluster on defective MgO(001) surfaces with respect to the W3O9 cluster.

  19. DNA Repair Glycosylases with a [4Fe-4S] Cluster: A Redox Cofactor for DNA-mediated Charge Transport?

    OpenAIRE

    Boal, Amie K.; Yavin, Eylon; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2007-01-01

    The [4Fe-4S] cluster is ubiquitous to a class of base excision repair enzymes, in organisms ranging from bacteria to man, and was first considered as a structural element, owing to its redox stability under physiological conditions. When studied bound to DNA, two of these repair proteins (MutY and Endonuclease III from Escherichia coli) display DNA-dependent reversible electron transfer with characteristics typical of high potential iron proteins. These results have inspired a reexamination o...

  20. Gold-superheavy-element interaction in diatomics and cluster adducts: A combined four-component Dirac-Kohn-Sham/charge-displacement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Sergio; Storchi, Loriano; Belpassi, Leonardo

    2015-07-14

    The chemistry of superheavy elements (Z ≥ 104) is actively investigated in atom-at-a-time experiments of volatility through adsorption on gold surfaces. In this context, common guidelines for interpretation based on group trends in the periodic table should be used cautiously, because relativistic effects play a central role and may cause predictions to fall short. In this paper, we present an all-electron four-component Dirac-Kohn-Sham comparative study of the interaction of gold with Cn (Z = 112), Fl (Z = 114), and Uuo (Z = 118) versus their lighter homologues of the 6th period, Hg, Pb, and Rn plus the noble gas Xe. Calculations were carried out for Au-E (E = Hg, Cn, Pb, Fl, Xe, Rn, Uuo), Au7- and Au20-E (E = Hg, Cn, Pb, Fl, Rn) complexes, where Au7 (planar) and Au20 (pyramidal) are experimentally determined clusters having structures of increasing complexity. Results are analysed both in terms of the energetics of the complexes and of the electron charge rearrangement accompanying their formation. In line with the available experimental data, Cn and more markedly Fl are found to be less reactive than their lighter homologues. On the contrary, Uuo is found to be more reactive than Rn and Xe. Cn forms the weakest bond with the gold atom, compared to Fl and Uuo. The reactivity of Fl decreases with increasing gold-fragment size more rapidly than that of Cn and, as a consequence, the order of the reactivity of these two elements is inverted upon reaching the Au20-cluster adduct. Density difference maps between adducts and fragments reveal similarities in the behaviour of Cn and Xe, and in that of Uuo and the more reactive species Hg and Pb. These findings are given a quantitative ground via charge-displacement analysis. PMID:26178105

  1. Gold-superheavy-element interaction in diatomics and cluster adducts: A combined four-component Dirac-Kohn-Sham/charge-displacement study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Sergio; Storchi, Loriano; Belpassi, Leonardo

    2015-07-01

    The chemistry of superheavy elements (Z ≥ 104) is actively investigated in atom-at-a-time experiments of volatility through adsorption on gold surfaces. In this context, common guidelines for interpretation based on group trends in the periodic table should be used cautiously, because relativistic effects play a central role and may cause predictions to fall short. In this paper, we present an all-electron four-component Dirac-Kohn-Sham comparative study of the interaction of gold with Cn (Z = 112), Fl (Z = 114), and Uuo (Z = 118) versus their lighter homologues of the 6th period, Hg, Pb, and Rn plus the noble gas Xe. Calculations were carried out for Au-E (E = Hg, Cn, Pb, Fl, Xe, Rn, Uuo), Au7- and Au20-E (E = Hg, Cn, Pb, Fl, Rn) complexes, where Au7 (planar) and Au20 (pyramidal) are experimentally determined clusters having structures of increasing complexity. Results are analysed both in terms of the energetics of the complexes and of the electron charge rearrangement accompanying their formation. In line with the available experimental data, Cn and more markedly Fl are found to be less reactive than their lighter homologues. On the contrary, Uuo is found to be more reactive than Rn and Xe. Cn forms the weakest bond with the gold atom, compared to Fl and Uuo. The reactivity of Fl decreases with increasing gold-fragment size more rapidly than that of Cn and, as a consequence, the order of the reactivity of these two elements is inverted upon reaching the Au20-cluster adduct. Density difference maps between adducts and fragments reveal similarities in the behaviour of Cn and Xe, and in that of Uuo and the more reactive species Hg and Pb. These findings are given a quantitative ground via charge-displacement analysis.

  2. Gold–superheavy-element interaction in diatomics and cluster adducts: A combined four-component Dirac-Kohn-Sham/charge-displacement study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampino, Sergio, E-mail: srampino@thch.unipg.it; Belpassi, Leonardo, E-mail: leonardo.belpassi@cnr.it [Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche c/o Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via Elce di Sotto 8, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Storchi, Loriano [Dipartimento di Farmacia, Università degli Studi “G. D’Annunzio,” Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti (Italy)

    2015-07-14

    The chemistry of superheavy elements (Z ≥ 104) is actively investigated in atom-at-a-time experiments of volatility through adsorption on gold surfaces. In this context, common guidelines for interpretation based on group trends in the periodic table should be used cautiously, because relativistic effects play a central role and may cause predictions to fall short. In this paper, we present an all-electron four-component Dirac-Kohn-Sham comparative study of the interaction of gold with Cn (Z = 112), Fl (Z = 114), and Uuo (Z = 118) versus their lighter homologues of the 6th period, Hg, Pb, and Rn plus the noble gas Xe. Calculations were carried out for Au–E (E = Hg, Cn, Pb, Fl, Xe, Rn, Uuo), Au{sub 7}– and Au{sub 20}–E (E = Hg, Cn, Pb, Fl, Rn) complexes, where Au{sub 7} (planar) and Au{sub 20} (pyramidal) are experimentally determined clusters having structures of increasing complexity. Results are analysed both in terms of the energetics of the complexes and of the electron charge rearrangement accompanying their formation. In line with the available experimental data, Cn and more markedly Fl are found to be less reactive than their lighter homologues. On the contrary, Uuo is found to be more reactive than Rn and Xe. Cn forms the weakest bond with the gold atom, compared to Fl and Uuo. The reactivity of Fl decreases with increasing gold-fragment size more rapidly than that of Cn and, as a consequence, the order of the reactivity of these two elements is inverted upon reaching the Au{sub 20}-cluster adduct. Density difference maps between adducts and fragments reveal similarities in the behaviour of Cn and Xe, and in that of Uuo and the more reactive species Hg and Pb. These findings are given a quantitative ground via charge-displacement analysis.

  3. Laserspray Ionization, a New Atmospheric Pressure MALDI Method for Producing Highly Charged Gas-phase Ions of Peptides and Proteins Directly from Solid Solutions*

    OpenAIRE

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D.; Herath, Thushani N.; McEwen, Charles N.

    2009-01-01

    The first example of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) process producing multiply charged mass spectra nearly identical to those observed with electrospray ionization (ESI) is presented. MALDI is noted for its ability to produce singly charged ions, but in the experiments described here multiply charged ions are produced by laser ablation of analyte incorporated into a common MALDI matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, using standard solvent-based sample preparation protocols...

  4. Resonance assignment of an engineered amino-terminal domain of a major ampullate spider silk with neutralized charge cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Daniel; Bauer, Joschka; Schweimer, Kristian; Scheibel, Thomas; Rösch, Paul; Schwarzinger, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Spider dragline fibers are predominantly made out of the major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) 1 and 2. The assembly of dissolved spidroin into a stable fiber is highly controlled for example by dimerization of its amino-terminal domain (NRN) upon acidification, as well as removal of sodium chloride along the spinning duct. Clustered residues D39, E76 and E81 are the most highly conserved residues of the five-helix bundle, and they are hypothesized to be key residues for switching between a monomeric and a dimeric conformation. Simultaneous replacement of these residues by their non-titratable analogues results in variant D39N/E76Q/E81Q, which is supposed to fold into an intermediate conformation between that of the monomeric and the dimeric state at neutral pH. Here we report the resonance assignment of Latrodectus hesperus NRN variant D39N/E76Q/E81Q at pH 7.2 obtained by high-resolution triple resonance NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26892754

  5. Identification of a (H2O)8 cluster in a supramolecular host of a charge transfer platinum(II) complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sutanuva Mandal; Ipsita Chatterjee; Alfonso Castiñeirs; Sreebrata Goswami

    2014-09-01

    The chemical reaction of PtII(L1)Cl2 [L1 = 2-(phenylazo)pyridine] with a bidentate N,S-donor atom ligand, 2-phenylthioaniline, (HL2) in alkaline acetonitrile yielded a mixed ligand donor acceptor complex, [PtII(L1)(L2)−]Cl, [1]Cl. The complex has been characterized by using a host of physical methods: X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, cyclic voltammetry, absorption spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance. The complex showed intense interligand charge transfer (ILCT) transition in the long wavelength region of UV-vis spectrum at 785 nm. The single-crystal X-ray structure of complex, [1]Cl·2.6H2O is reported. The cationic complex upon crystallization from aqueous methanol solvent produces an assembly of three dimensional (H2O)8 guest moiety within the host lattice of reference Pt-complex. The water assembly showed a unique type of aggregation of two trigonal pyramids hydrogen bonded with three chloride anions. The complex displayed two reversible responses at −0.34 and −1.05 V along with one irreversible anodic response at 0.91 V versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The redox processes are characterized by examination of EPR spectra of the electrogenerated complexes.

  6. Effective cytoplasmic release of siRNA from liposomal carriers by controlling the electrostatic interaction of siRNA with a charge-invertible peptide, in response to cytoplasmic pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Shoko; Hama, Susumu; Matsui, Ryo; Kogure, Kentaro

    2016-05-01

    Condensing siRNA with cationic polymers is a major strategy used in the development of siRNA carriers that can avoid degradation by nucleases and achieve effective delivery of siRNA into the cytoplasm. However, ineffective release of siRNA from such condensed forms into the cytoplasm is a limiting step for induction of RNAi effects, and can be attributed to tight condensation of siRNA with the cationic polymers, due to potent electrostatic interactions. Here, we report that siRNA condensed with a slightly acidic pH-sensitive peptide (SAPSP), whose total charge is inverted from positive to negative in response to cytoplasmic pH, is effectively released via electrostatic repulsion of siRNA with negatively charged SAPSP at cytoplasmic pH (7.4). The condensed complex of siRNA and positively-charged SAPSP at acidic pH (siRNA/SAPSP) was found to result in almost complete release of siRNA upon charge inversion of SAPSP at pH 7.4, with the resultant negatively-charged SAPSP having no undesirable interactions with endogenous mRNA. Moreover, liposomes encapsulating siRNA/SAPSP demonstrated knockdown efficiencies comparable to those of commercially available siRNA carriers. Taken together, SAPSP may be very useful as a siRNA condenser, as it facilitates effective cytoplasmic release of siRNA, and subsequent induction of specific RNAi effects.Condensing siRNA with cationic polymers is a major strategy used in the development of siRNA carriers that can avoid degradation by nucleases and achieve effective delivery of siRNA into the cytoplasm. However, ineffective release of siRNA from such condensed forms into the cytoplasm is a limiting step for induction of RNAi effects, and can be attributed to tight condensation of siRNA with the cationic polymers, due to potent electrostatic interactions. Here, we report that siRNA condensed with a slightly acidic pH-sensitive peptide (SAPSP), whose total charge is inverted from positive to negative in response to cytoplasmic pH, is

  7. Encapsulation of bioactive whey peptides in soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes: Influence of peptide molecular weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Aishwarya; McClements, David Julian; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-12-15

    Encapsulation of peptides can be used to enhance their stability, delivery and bioavailability. This study focused on the effect of the molecular weight range of whey peptides on their encapsulation within soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes. Peptide molecular weight did not have a major impact on encapsulation efficiency or liposome size. However, it influenced peptide distribution amongst the surface, core, and bilayer regions of the liposomes, as determined by electrical charge (ζ-potential) and FTIR analysis. The liposome ζ-potential depended on peptide molecular weight, suggesting that the peptide charged groups were in different locations relative to the liposome surfaces. FTIR analysis indicated that the least hydrophobic peptide fractions interacted more strongly with choline on the liposome surfaces. The results suggested that the peptides were unequally distributed within the liposomes, even at the same encapsulation efficiency. These findings are important for designing delivery systems for commercial production of encapsulated peptides with improved functional attributes. PMID:27451165

  8. Exploration of the Medicinal Peptide Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The chemical properties of peptide medicines, known as the 'medicinal peptide space' is considered a multi-dimensional subset of the global peptide space, where each dimension represents a chemical descriptor. These descriptors can be linked to biofunctional, medicinal properties to varying degrees. Knowledge of this space can increase the efficiency of the peptide-drug discovery and development process, as well as advance our understanding and classification of peptide medicines. For 245 peptide drugs, already available on the market or in clinical development, multivariate dataexploration was performed using peptide relevant physicochemical descriptors, their specific peptidedrug target and their clinical use. Our retrospective analysis indicates that clusters in the medicinal peptide space are located in a relatively narrow range of the physicochemical space: dense and empty regions were found, which can be explored for the discovery of novel peptide drugs. PMID:26876881

  9. Peptide dendrimers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niederhafner, Petr; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Ježek, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), 757-788. ISSN 1075-2617 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : multiple antigen peptides * peptide dendrimers * synthetic vaccine * multipleantigenic peptides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.803, year: 2005

  10. On the Attosecond charge migration in Cl.....N, Cl.....O, Br.....N and Br.....O Halogen-bonded clusters: Effect of donor, acceptor, vibration, rotation, and electron correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SANKHABRATA CHANDRA; MOHAMMED MUSTHAFA IQBAL; ATANU BHATTACHARYA

    2016-08-01

    The electron-electron relaxation and correlation-driven charge migration process, which features pure electronic aspect of ultrafast charge migration phenomenon, occurs on a very short timescale in ionized molecules and molecular clusters, prior to the onset of nuclear motion. In this article, we have presented natureof ultrafast pure electronic charge migration dynamics through Cl.....N, Cl.....O, Br.....N, and Br.....O halogen bonds, explored using density functional theory. We have explored the role of donor, acceptor, electron correlation, vibration and rotation in charge migration dynamics through these halogen bonds. For this work, we have selected ClF, Cl₂, ClOH, ClCN, BrF, BrCl, BrOH, and BrCN molecules paired with either NH₃ or H₂O. We have found that the timescale for pure electron-electron relaxation and correlation-driven charge migration through the Cl.....N, Br.....N, Cl.....O, and Br.....O halogen bonds falls in the range of 300–600 attosecond. The primary driving force behind the attosecond charge migration through the Cl.....N, Br.....N, Cl.....O, and Br.....O halogen bonds is the energy difference (∆E) between two stationary cationic orbitals (LUMO-β and HOMO-β), which together represents the initial hole density immediately following vertical ionization. We have also predicted that the strength of electron correlation has significant effect on the charge migration timescale in Cl.....N, Br.....N, Cl.....O, and Br.....O halogen bonded clusters. Vibration and rotation are also found to exhibit profound effect on attosecond charge migration dynamics through halogen bonds.

  11. Positively charged templates for labeling internalizing antibodies: comparison of N-succinimidyl 5-iodo-3-pyridinecarboxylate and the D-amino acid peptide KRYRR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulon, Catherine F.; Welsh, Philip C.; Bigner, Darell D.; Zalutsky, Michael R. E-mail: zalut001@mc.duke.edu

    2001-10-01

    Receptor-mediated internalization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), such as those specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII), can lead to rapid loss of radioactivity from the target cell. In the current study, the anti-EGFRvIII mAb L8A4 was radioiodinated using two methods -N-succinimidyl 5-iodo-3-pyridinecarboxylate (SIPC) and via a D-amino acid peptide LysArgTyrArgArg (D-KRYRR). Paired-label internalization assays performed on EGFRvIII-expressing U87{delta}EGFR cells in vitro demonstrated that labeling L8A4 using D-KRYRR resulted in significantly higher retention of radioiodine in the intracellular compartment. In athymic mice with D256 human glioma xenografts, tumor uptake was similar for both labeling methods through 24 hr. However, an up to fourfold higher tumor retention was observed for mAb labeled with the D-amino acid peptide at later time points. Radiation absorbed dose calculations based on these biodistribution data indicated that L8A4 labeled using D-KRYRR exhibited better tumor-to-normal-organ radiation dose ratios, suggesting that this labeling method may be of particular value for labeling internalizing mAbs.

  12. Tuning the charge state of Ag and Au atoms and clusters deposited on oxide surfaces by doping: a DFT study of the adsorption properties of nitrogen- and niobium-doped TiO2 and ZrO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlexer, Philomena; Ruiz Puigdollers, Antonio; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2015-09-14

    The charge state of Ag and Au atoms and clusters (Ag4 and Au4, Ag5 and Au5) adsorbed on defective TiO2 anatase(101) and tetragonal ZrO2(101) has been systematically investigated as a function of oxide doping and defectivity using a DFT+U approach. As intrinsic defects, we have considered the presence of oxygen vacancies. As extrinsic defects, substitutional nitrogen- and niobium-doping have been investigated, respectively. Both surface and sub-surface defects and dopants have been considered. Whereas on surfaces with oxygen vacancies or Nb-doping, atoms and clusters may become negatively charged, N-doping always leads to the formation of positively charged adsorbates, independently of the supporting material (TiO2 or ZrO2). This suggests the possibility to tune the electronic properties of supported metal clusters by selective doping of the oxide support, an effect that may result in complete changes in chemical reactivity. PMID:26248205

  13. Genome Sequence of Dickeya solani, a New soft Rot Pathogen of Potato, Suggests its Emergence May Be Related to a Novel Combination of Non-Ribosomal Peptide/Polyketide Synthetase Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Garlant

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Soft rot Enterobacteria in the genera Pectobacterium and Dickeya cause rotting of many crop plants. A new Dickeya isolate has been suggested to form a separate species, given the name Dickeya solani. This bacterium is spreading fast and replacing the closely related, but less virulent, potato pathogens. The genome of D. solani isolate D s0432-1 shows highest similarity at the nucleotide level and in synteny to D. dadantii strain 3937, but it also contains three large polyketide/fatty acid/non-ribosomal peptide synthetase clusters that are not present in D. dadantii 3937. These gene clusters may be involved in the production of toxic secondary metabolites, such as oocydin and zeamine. Furthermore, the D. solani genome harbors several specific genes that are not present in other Dickeya and Pectobacterium species and that may confer advantages for adaptation to new environments. In conclusion, the fast spreading of D. solani may be related to the acquisition of new properties that affect its interaction with plants and other microbes in the potato ecosystem.

  14. Helical hairpin structure of influenza hemagglutinin fusion peptide stabilized by charge-dipole interactions between the N-terminal amino group and the second helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorieau, Justin L; Louis, John M; Bax, Ad

    2011-03-01

    The fusion domain of the influenza coat protein hemagglutinin HA2, bound to dodecyl phosphocholine micelles, was recently shown to adopt a structure consisting of two antiparallel α-helices, packed in an exceptionally tight hairpin configuration. Four interhelical H(α) to C═O aliphatic H-bonds were identified as factors stabilizing this fold. Here, we report evidence for an additional stabilizing force: a strong charge-dipole interaction between the N-terminal Gly(1) amino group and the dipole moment of helix 2. pH titration of the amino-terminal (15)N resonance, using a methylene-TROSY-based 3D NMR experiment, and observation of Gly(1 13)C' show a strongly elevated pK = 8.8, considerably higher than expected for an N-terminal amino group in a lipophilic environment. Chemical shifts of three C-terminal carbonyl carbons of helix 2 titrate with the protonation state of Gly(1)-N, indicative of a close proximity between the N-terminal amino group and the axis of helix 2, providing an optimal charge-dipole stabilization of the antiparallel hairpin fold. pK values of the side-chain carboxylate groups of Glu(11) and Asp(19) are higher by about 1 and 0.5 unit, respectively, than commonly seen for solvent-exposed side chains in water-soluble proteins, indicative of dielectric constants of ε = ∼30 (Glu(11)) and ∼60 (Asp(19)), placing these groups in the headgroup region of the phospholipid micelle. PMID:21319795

  15. Collision-induced dissociation of noncovalent complexes between vancomycin antibiotics and peptide ligand stereoisomers: evidence for molecular recognition in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Delforge, D; Remacle, J;

    1999-01-01

    In solution, the antibiotics of the vancomycin group bind stereospecifically to peptides with the C-terminal sequence: -L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, Substitution by a L-Ala at either of the two C-terminal residues causes a dramatic decrease in the binding affinity to the antibiotics. This solution behavior...... ions consisting of an antibiotic, a -L-Ala peptide, a -D-Ala stereoisomer, one ligand isotopically labelled. Upon CID of the negatively charged mixed cluster ions a stereoselective loss of the assumed "nonspecifically" bound -L-Ala ligand was observed. (Int J Mass Spectrom 188 (1999) 63-85) (C) 1999...

  16. The specificity of protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides by lactoferrin binding protein B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Partha, Sarathy K; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-10-01

    A variety of Gram-negative pathogens possess host-specific lactoferrin (Lf) receptors that mediate the acquisition of iron from host Lf. The integral membrane protein component of the receptor, lactoferrin binding protein A specifically binds host Lf and is required for acquisition of iron from Lf. In contrast, the role of the bi-lobed surface lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB), in Lf binding and iron acquisition is uncertain. A common feature of LbpBs from most species is the presence of clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the protein's C-terminal lobe. Recently it has been shown that the negatively charged regions from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB are responsible for protecting against an 11 amino acid cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAP), lactoferricin (Lfcin), derived from human Lf. In this study we investigated whether the LbpB confers resistance to other CAPs since N. meningitidis is likely to encounter other CAPs from the host. LbpB provided protection against the cathelicidin derived peptide, cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (mCRAMP), but did not confer protection against Tritrp 1 or LL37 under our experimental conditions. When tested against a range of rationally designed synthetic peptides, LbpB was shown to protect against IDR-1002 and IDR-0018 but not against HH-2 or HHC10. PMID:25038734

  17. An Interplay between Electrostatic and Polar Interactions in Peptide Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Joyner, Katherine; Taraban, Marc B; Feng, Yue; Yu, Y. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Inherent chemical programmability available in peptide-based hydrogels has allowed diversity in the development of these materials for use in biomedical applications. Within the 20 natural amino acids, a range of chemical moieties are present. Here we used a mixing-induced self-assembly of two oppositely charged peptide modules to form a peptide-based hydrogel. To investigate electrostatic and polar interactions on the hydrogel, we replace amino acids from the negatively charged acidic glutam...

  18. Isolation, Characterization, and Synthesis of the Barrettides: Disulfide-Containing Peptides from the Marine Sponge Geodia barretti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Bodil B; Rosengren, K Johan; Gunasekera, Sunithi; Schempp, Stefanie; Bohlin, Lars; Dahlström, Mia; Clark, Richard J; Göransson, Ulf

    2015-08-28

    Two disulfide-containing peptides, barrettides A (1) and B (2), from the cold-water marine sponge Geodia barretti are described. Those 31 amino acid residue long peptides were sequenced using mass spectrometry methods and structurally characterized using NMR spectroscopy. The structure of 1 was confirmed by total synthesis using the solid-phase peptide synthesis approach that was developed. The two peptides were found to differ only at a single position in their sequence. The three-dimensional structure of 1 revealed that these peptides possess a unique fold consisting of a long β-hairpin structure that is cross-braced by two disulfide bonds in a ladder-like arrangement. The peptides are amphipathic in nature with the hydrophobic and charged residues clustered on separate faces of the molecule. The barrettides were found not to inhibit the growth of either Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus but displayed antifouling activity against barnacle larvae (Balanus improvisus) without lethal effects in the concentrations tested. PMID:26222779

  19. Study of the interaction of multiply charged ions and complex systems of biological interest: effects of the molecular environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This PhD thesis describes the experimental study of the interaction between slow multiply charged ions (tens of keV) and molecular systems of biological interest (amino acids and nucleobases). It is the aim to identify and to better understand the effect of a molecular environment on different collision induced phenomena. To do so, the time of flight spectra of cationic products emerging from collisions with isolated molecules as well as clusters are compared. It is shown that the molecular environment protects the molecule as it allows to distribute the transferred energies and charges over the whole system (global decrease of the fragmentation and quenching of some fragmentation channels). Furthermore, in the case of adenine clusters, the molecular environment weakens some intramolecular bonds. Moreover, products of chemical reactions are observed concerning proton transfer processes in hydrated cluster of adenine and the formation of peptides bonds between beta-alanine molecules in a cluster. The latter finding is studied as a function of the cluster size and type of the projectile. Some criteria for peptide bond formation, such as flexibility and geometry of the molecule, are investigated for different amino acids. (author)

  20. Collagen-like antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Ryo; Kudo, Masakazu; Dazai, Yui; Mima, Takehiko; Koide, Takaki

    2016-11-01

    Combinatorial library composed of rigid rod-like peptides with a triple-helical scaffold was constructed. The component peptides were designed to have various combinations of basic and neutral (or hydrophobic) amino acid residues based on collagen-like (Gly-Pro-Yaa)-repeating sequences, inspired from the basic and amphiphilic nature of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. Screening of the peptide pools resulted in identification of antimicrobial peptides. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the position of Arg-cluster at N-terminus and cystine knots at C-terminus in the triple helix significantly contributed to the antimicrobial activity. The most potent peptide RO-A showed activity against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. In addition, Escherichia coli exposed to RO-A resulted in abnormal elongation of the cells. RO-A was also shown to have remarkable stability in human serum and low cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 453-459, 2016. PMID:27271210

  1. Snapshots of Proton Accommodation at a Microscopic Water Surface: Understanding the Vibrational Spectral Signatures of the Charge Defect in Cryogenically Cooled H(+)(H2O)(n=2-28) Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Joseph A; Wolke, Conrad T; Johnson, Mark A; Odbadrakh, Tuguldur T; Jordan, Kenneth D; Kathmann, Shawn M; Xantheas, Sotiris S

    2015-09-10

    We review the role that gas-phase, size-selected protonated water clusters, H(+)(H2O)n, have played in unraveling the microscopic mechanics responsible for the spectroscopic behavior of the excess proton in bulk water. Because the larger (n ≥ 10) assemblies are formed with three-dimensional cage morphologies that more closely mimic the bulk environment, we report the spectra of cryogenically cooled (10 K) clusters over the size range 2 ≤ n ≤ 28, over which the structures evolve from two-dimensional arrangements to cages at around n = 10. The clusters that feature a complete second solvation shell around a surface-embedded hydronium ion yield spectral signatures of the proton defect similar to those observed in dilute acids. The origins of the large observed shifts in the proton vibrational signature upon cluster growth were explored with two types of theoretical analyses. First, we calculate the cubic and semidiagonal quartic force constants and use these in vibrational perturbation theory calculations to establish the couplings responsible for the large anharmonic red shifts. We then investigate how the extended electronic wave functions that are responsible for the shapes of the potential surfaces depend on the nature of the H-bonded networks surrounding the charge defect. These considerations indicate that, in addition to the sizable anharmonic couplings, the position of the OH stretch most associated with the excess proton can be traced to large increases in the electric fields exerted on the embedded hydronium ion upon formation of the first and second solvation shells. The correlation between the underlying local structure and the observed spectral features is quantified using a model based on Badger's rule as well as via the examination of the electric fields obtained from electronic structure calculations. PMID:26158593

  2. Albumin-derived peptides efficiently reduce renal uptake of radiolabelled peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vegt, Erik; Eek, Annemarie; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Gotthardt, Martin; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine (444), PO Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jong, Marion de [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15

    In peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), the maximum activity dose that can safely be administered is limited by high renal uptake and retention of radiolabelled peptides. The kidney radiation dose can be reduced by coinfusion of agents that competitively inhibit the reabsorption of radiolabelled peptides, such as positively charged amino acids, Gelofusine, or trypsinised albumin. The aim of this study was to identify more specific and potent inhibitors of the kidney reabsorption of radiolabelled peptides, based on albumin. Albumin was fragmented using cyanogen bromide and six albumin-derived peptides with different numbers of electric charges were selected and synthesised. The effect of albumin fragments (FRALB-C) and selected albumin-derived peptides on the internalisation of {sup 111}In-albumin, {sup 111}In-minigastrin, {sup 111}In-exendin and {sup 111}In-octreotide by megalin-expressing cells was assessed. In rats, the effect of Gelofusine and albumin-derived peptides on the renal uptake and biodistribution of {sup 111}In-minigastrin, {sup 111}In-exendin and {sup 111}In-octreotide was determined. FRALB-C significantly reduced the uptake of all radiolabelled peptides in vitro. The albumin-derived peptides showed different potencies in reducing the uptake of {sup 111}In-albumin, {sup 111}In-exendin and {sup 111}In-minigastrin in vitro. The most efficient albumin-derived peptide (peptide 6), was selected for in vivo testing. In rats, 5 mg of peptide 6 very efficiently inhibited the renal uptake of {sup 111}In-minigastrin, by 88%. Uptake of {sup 111}In-exendin and {sup 111}In-octreotide was reduced by 26 and 33%, respectively. The albumin-derived peptide 6 efficiently inhibited the renal reabsorption of {sup 111}In-minigastrin, {sup 111}In-exendin and {sup 111}In-octreotide and is a promising candidate for kidney protection in PRRT. (orig.)

  3. Albumin-derived peptides efficiently reduce renal uptake of radiolabelled peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), the maximum activity dose that can safely be administered is limited by high renal uptake and retention of radiolabelled peptides. The kidney radiation dose can be reduced by coinfusion of agents that competitively inhibit the reabsorption of radiolabelled peptides, such as positively charged amino acids, Gelofusine, or trypsinised albumin. The aim of this study was to identify more specific and potent inhibitors of the kidney reabsorption of radiolabelled peptides, based on albumin. Albumin was fragmented using cyanogen bromide and six albumin-derived peptides with different numbers of electric charges were selected and synthesised. The effect of albumin fragments (FRALB-C) and selected albumin-derived peptides on the internalisation of 111In-albumin, 111In-minigastrin, 111In-exendin and 111In-octreotide by megalin-expressing cells was assessed. In rats, the effect of Gelofusine and albumin-derived peptides on the renal uptake and biodistribution of 111In-minigastrin, 111In-exendin and 111In-octreotide was determined. FRALB-C significantly reduced the uptake of all radiolabelled peptides in vitro. The albumin-derived peptides showed different potencies in reducing the uptake of 111In-albumin, 111In-exendin and 111In-minigastrin in vitro. The most efficient albumin-derived peptide (peptide 6), was selected for in vivo testing. In rats, 5 mg of peptide 6 very efficiently inhibited the renal uptake of 111In-minigastrin, by 88%. Uptake of 111In-exendin and 111In-octreotide was reduced by 26 and 33%, respectively. The albumin-derived peptide 6 efficiently inhibited the renal reabsorption of 111In-minigastrin, 111In-exendin and 111In-octreotide and is a promising candidate for kidney protection in PRRT. (orig.)

  4. Extracellular DNA-induced antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShawnLewenza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA (eDNA is in the environment, bodily fluids, in the matrix of biofilms, and accumulates at infection sites. Extracellular DNA can function as a nutrient source, a universal biofilm matrix component and an innate immune effector in extracellular DNA traps. In biofilms, eDNA is required for attachment, aggregation and stabilization of microcolonies. We have recently shown that eDNA can sequester divalent metal cations, which has interesting implications on antibiotic resistance. Extracellular DNA binds metal cations and thus activates the Mg2+-responsive PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component systems. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa and many other Gram-negative bacteria, the PhoPQ/PmrAB systems control various genes required for virulence and resisting killing by antimicrobial peptides, including the pmr genes (PA3552-PA3559 that are responsible for the addition of aminoarabinose to lipid A. The PA4773-PA4775 genes are a second DNA-induced cluster and are required for the production of spermidine on the outer surface, which protects the outer membrane from antimicrobial peptide treatment. Both modifications mask the negative surface charges and limit membrane damage by antimicrobial peptides. DNA-enriched biofilms or planktonic cultures have increased antibiotic resistance phenotypes to antimicrobial peptides and aminoglycosides. These dual antibiotic resistance and immune evasion strategies may be expressed in DNA-rich environments and contribute to long-term survival.

  5. Cell surface binding and uptake of arginine- and lysine-rich penetratin peptides in absence and presence of proteoglycans

    KAUST Repository

    Åmand, Helene L.

    2012-11-01

    Cell surface proteoglycans (PGs) appear to promote uptake of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), but their exact functions are unclear. To address if there is specificity in the interactions of arginines and PGs leading to improved internalization, we used flow cytometry to examine uptake in relation to cell surface binding for penetratin and two arginine/lysine substituted variants (PenArg and PenLys) in wildtype CHO-K1 and PG-deficient A745 cells. All peptides were more efficiently internalized into CHO-K1 than into A745, but their cell surface binding was independent of cell type. Thus, PGs promote internalization of cationic peptides, irrespective of the chemical nature of their positive charges. Uptake of each peptide was linearly dependent on its cell surface binding, and affinity is thus important for efficiency. However, the gradients of these linear dependencies varied significantly. Thus each peptide\\'s ability to stimulate uptake once bound to the cell surface is reliant on formation of specific uptake-promoting interactions. Heparin affinity chromatography and clustering experiments showed that penetratin and PenArg binding to sulfated sugars is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and result in clustering, whereas PenLys only interacts through electrostatic attraction. This may have implications for the molecular mechanisms behind arginine-specific uptake stimulation as penetratin and PenArg are more efficiently internalized than PenLys upon interaction with PGs. However, PenArg is also least affected by removal of PGs. This indicates that an increased arginine content not only improve PG-dependent uptake but also that PenArg is more adaptable as it can use several portals of entry into the cell. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Long-range charge transfer in biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astakhova, T. Yu; Likhachev, V. N.; Vinogradov, G. A.

    2012-11-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies on the charge transfer in biopolymers, namely, DNA and peptides, are presented. Conditions that ensure the efficient long-range charge transport (by several tens of nanometres) are considered. The known theoretical models of charge transfer mechanisms are discussed and the scopes of their application are analyzed. Attention is focused on the charge transport by the polaron mechanism. The bibliography includes 262 references.

  7. Critical interpretation of CH– and OH– stretching regions for infrared spectra of methanol clusters (CH3OH)n (n = 2–5) using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibrational infrared (IR) spectra of gas-phase O–H⋅⋅⋅O methanol clusters up to pentamer are simulated using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding method using two distinct methodologies: standard normal mode analysis and Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function. The twofold simulations aim at the direct critical assignment of the C–H stretching region of the recently recorded experimental spectra [H.-L. Han, C. Camacho, H. A. Witek, and Y.-P. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144309 (2011)]. Both approaches confirm the previous assignment (ibid.) of the C–H stretching bands based on the B3LYP/ANO1 harmonic frequencies, showing that ν3, ν9, and ν2 C–H stretching modes of the proton-accepting (PA) and proton-donating (PD) methanol monomers experience only small splittings upon the cluster formation. This finding is in sharp discord with the assignment based on anharmonic B3LYP/VPT2/ANO1 vibrational frequencies (ibid.), suggesting that some procedural faults, likely related to the breakdown of the perturbational vibrational treatment, led the anharmonic calculations astray. The IR spectra based on the Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function include new, previously unaccounted for physical factors such as non-zero temperature of the system and large amplitude motions of the clusters. The elevation of temperature results in a considerable non-homogeneous broadening of the observed IR signals, while the presence of large-amplitude motions (methyl group rotations and PA-PD flipping), somewhat surprisingly, does not introduce any new features in the spectrum

  8. Artificial neural networks for the prediction of peptide drift time in ion mobility mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plasencia Manolo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing usage of ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS in proteomics. IMMS combines the features of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS and mass spectrometry (MS. It separates and detects peptide ions on a millisecond time-scale. IMS separates peptide ions based on drift time that is determined by the collision cross-section of each peptide ion in a given experiment condition. A peptide ion's collision cross-section is related to the ion size and shape resulted from the peptide amino acid sequence and their modifications. This inherent relation between the drift time of peptide ion and peptide sequence indicates that the drift time of peptide ions can be used to infer peptide sequence and therefore, for peptide identification. Results This paper describes an artificial neural networks (ANNs regression model for the prediction of peptide ion drift time in IMMS. Each peptide in this work was represented using three descriptors (i.e., molecular weight, sequence length and a two-dimensional sequence index. An ANN predictor consisting of four input nodes, three hidden nodes and one output node was constructed for peptide ion drift time prediction. For the model training and testing, a 10-fold cross-validation strategy was employed for three datasets each containing different charge states. Dataset one contains 212 singly-charged peptide ions, dataset two has 306 doubly-charged peptide ions, and dataset three has 77 triply-charged peptide ions. Our proposed method achieved 94.4%, 93.6% and 74.2% prediction accuracy for singly-, doubly- and triply-charged peptide ions, respectively. Conclusions An ANN-based method has been developed for predicting the drift time of peptide ions in IMMS. The results achieved here demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the prediction model. This work can enhance the confidence of protein identification by combining with current database search approaches for protein identification.

  9. Charge transfer and transition-metal cluster: Boron bonding in the bct superconducting Y(Rh/sub 1-x/Ru/sub x/)4B4 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the bonding and charge transfer as a function of transition-metal concentration is presented for the bct superconducting system Y(Rh/sub 1-x/Ru/sub x/)4B4. A sharp drop in the superconducting critical temperature T/sub c/ from 9.5 K to below 1.0 K near a critical concentration is not reflected in the smooth, linear variation of the single-crystal lattice parameters and B-B interatomic distances. Analysis of the boron KVV Auger data indicates the boron p-like states near the Fermi energy are increasingly populated in a continuous manner with increasing x. We find no evidence of any abrupt changes in the electronic structure near x/sub cr/

  10. Cluster Automorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Assem, Ibrahim; Schiffler, Ralf; Shramchenko, Vasilisa

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we introduce the notion of cluster automorphism of a given cluster algebra as a $\\ZZ$-automorphism of the cluster algebra that sends a cluster to another and commutes with mutations. We study the group of cluster automorphisms in detail for acyclic cluster algebras and cluster algebras from surfaces, and we compute this group explicitly for the Dynkin types and the Euclidean types.

  11. Electron attachment to HCl clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negatively charged cluster ions of hydrogen chloride are formed by electron attachment to HCl clusters, which are produced in a seeded supersonic beam traversing a sustained gas discharge. Cluster ions of (HCl)n-, with n = 2, and tentatively with n = 3 and 4 are observed. Cluster ions like Cln-, Cln- (HCl)m, and with Ar attached to them are also seen. The relevance to radiation chemistry of HCl is briefly discussed. Atoms evaporating from the hot, thoriated tungsten filament of the glow discharge lead to clusters such as Thn- and its oxides. (orig.)

  12. Studies on Titin PEVK Peptides and Their Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Yingli; DeKeyser, Joshua G.; Damodaran, Srinivasan; Greaser, Marion L.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on several synthetic and expressed peptides from the PEVK region of titin, the giant muscle protein. Different secondary structure prediction methods based on amino acid sequence gave estimates ranging from over 70% alpha helical to no helix (totally disordered) for the polyE peptide corresponding to human exon 115. Circular dichroism (CD) experiments demonstrated that both the positively charged PPAK modules and the negatively charged PolyE repeats had similar spec...

  13. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen;

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2, wh...

  14. From a pro-apoptotic peptide to a lytic peptide: One single residue mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xi-Rui; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Xi-Bo; Cao, Yi-Meng; Liu, Zhu-Qing; Fan, Ruru; Ding, Xiu-Fang; Zhu, Zhentai; Chen, Long; Luo, Shi-Zhong

    2016-08-01

    Further discovery and design of new anticancer peptides are important for the development of anticancer therapeutics, and study on the detailed acting mechanism and structure-function relationship of peptides is critical for anticancer peptide design and application. In this study, a novel anticancer peptide ZXR-1 (FKIGGFIKKLWRSKLA) derived from a known anticancer peptide mauriporin was developed, and a mutant ZXR-2 (FKIGGFIKKLWRSLLA) with only one residue difference at the 14th position (Lys→Leu) was also engineered. Replacement of the lysine with leucine made ZXR-2 more potent than ZXR-1 in general. Even with only one residue mutation, the two peptides displayed distinct anticancer modes of action. ZXR-1 could translocate into cells, target on the mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis, while ZXR-2 directly targeted on the cell membranes and caused membrane lysis. The variance in their acting mechanisms might be due to the different amphipathicity and positive charge distribution. In addition, the two Ile-Leu pairs (3-10 and 7-14) in ZXR-2 might also play a role in improving its cytotoxicity. Further study on the structure-function relationship of the two peptides may be beneficial for the design of novel anticancer peptides and peptide based therapeutics. PMID:27207743

  15. Clusters in strong laser fields: Comparison between carbon, platinum, and lead clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, M.; Teuber, S.; Köller, L.; Köhn, J.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.

    Carbon and metal clusters are excited by strong femtosecond laser pulses with up to 1016 W/cm2, yielding ionized clusters and highly charged atomic ions. For small carbon clusters and fullerenes the abundance of charged species correlates with the laser power, while for metal clusters the ionization efficiency is additionally strongly affected by the chosen laser pulse width which may result in an enhanced up-charging of the metal particle. In the case of platinum atomic charge states up to z=20 are detected at a pulse duration of about 600 fs. This observation is in accordance with a model based on a multi-plasmon excitation process.

  16. Continuous scanning of the mobility and size distribution of charged clusters and nanometer particles in atmospheric air and the Balanced Scanning Mobility Analyzer BSMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammet, H.

    2006-12-01

    Measuring of charged nanometer particles in atmospheric air is a routine task in research on atmospheric electricity, where these particles are called the atmospheric ions. An aspiration condenser is the most popular instrument for measuring atmospheric ions. Continuous scanning of a mobility distribution is possible when the aspiration condenser is connected as an arm of a balanced bridge. Transfer function of an aspiration condenser is calculated according to the measurements of geometric dimensions, air flow rate, driving voltage, and electric current. The most complicated phase of the calibration is the estimation of the inlet loss of ions due to the Brownian deposition. The available models of ion deposition on the protective inlet screen and the inlet control electrofilter have the uncertainty of about 20%. To keep the uncertainty of measurements low the adsorption should not exceed a few tens of percent. The online conversion of the mobility distribution to the size distribution and a correct reduction of inlet losses are possible when air temperature and pressure are measured simultaneously with the mobility distribution. Two instruments called the Balanced Scanning Mobility Analyzers (BSMA) were manufactured and tested in routine atmospheric measurements. The concentration of atmospheric ions of the size of about a few nanometers is very low and a high air flow rate is required to collect enough of ion current. The air flow of 52 l/s exceeds the air flow in usual aerosol instruments by 2-3 orders of magnitude. The high flow rate reduces the time of ion passage to 60 ms and the heating of air in an analyzer to 0.2 K, which suppresses a possible transformation of ions inside the instrument. The mobility range of the BSMA of 0.032-3.2 cm 2 V - 1 s - 1 is logarithmically uniformly divided into 16 fractions. The size distribution is presented by 12 fractions in the diameter range of 0.4-7.5 nm. The measurement noise of a fraction concentration is typically

  17. Investigating the effects of L- to D-amino acid substitution and deamidation on the activity and membrane interactions of antimicrobial peptide anoplin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Amy; Khan, Mourin; Gustin, Sorin; Akpawu, Akuvi; Seebun, Deeptee; Avis, Tyler J; Leung, Bonnie O; Hitchcock, Adam P; Ianoul, Anatoli

    2011-06-01

    Isolated from the venom sac of solitary spider wasp, Anoplius samariensis, anoplin is the smallest linear α-helical antimicrobial peptide found naturally with broad spectrum activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and little hemolytic activity toward human erythrocytes. Deamidation was found to decrease the peptide's antibacterial properties. In the present work, interactions of amidated (Ano-NH2) and deamidated (Ano-OH) forms of anoplin as well as Ano-NH2 composed of all D-amino acids (D-Ano-NH2) with model cell membranes were investigated by means of Langmuir Blodgett (LB) technique, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) and carboxyfluorescein leakage assay in order to gain a better understanding of the effect of these peptide modifications on membrane binding and lytic properties. According to LB, all three peptides form stable monolayers at the air/water interface with Ano-NH2 occupying a slightly greater area per molecule than Ano-OH. All three forms of the peptide interact preferentially with anionic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DPPG), rather than zwitterionic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid monolayer. Peptides form nanoscale clusters in zwitterionic but not in anionic monolayers. Finally, membrane lytic activity of all derivatives was found to depend strongly on membrane composition and lipid/peptide ratio. The results suggest that amidated forms of peptides are likely to possess higher membrane binding affinity due to the increased charge. PMID:21078293

  18. Formation of charged nanoparticles in hydrocarbon flames: principal mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starik, A M; Savel' ev, A M; Titova, N S [Central Institute of Aviation Motors, 2 Aviamotornaya st., 111116 Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: star@ciam.ru

    2008-11-01

    The processes of charged gaseous and particulate species formation in sooting hydrocarbon/air flame are studied. The original kinetic model, comprising the chemistry of neutral and charged gaseous species, generation of primary clusters, which then undergo charging due to attachment of ions and electrons to clusters and via thermoemission, and coagulation of charged-charged, charged-neutral and neutral-neutral particles, is reported. The analysis shows that the principal mechanisms of charged particle origin in hydrocarbon flames are associated with the attachment of ions and electrons produced in the course of chemoionization reactions to primary small clusters and particles and coagulation via charged-charged and charged-neutral particle interaction. Thermal ionization of particles does not play a significant role in the particle charging.

  19. Formation of charged nanoparticles in hydrocarbon flames: principal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starik, A. M.; Savel'ev, A. M.; Titova, N. S.

    2008-11-01

    The processes of charged gaseous and particulate species formation in sooting hydrocarbon/air flame are studied. The original kinetic model, comprising the chemistry of neutral and charged gaseous species, generation of primary clusters, which then undergo charging due to attachment of ions and electrons to clusters and via thermoemission, and coagulation of charged-charged, charged-neutral and neutral-neutral particles, is reported. The analysis shows that the principal mechanisms of charged particle origin in hydrocarbon flames are associated with the attachment of ions and electrons produced in the course of chemoionization reactions to primary small clusters and particles and coagulation via charged-charged and charged-neutral particle interaction. Thermal ionization of particles does not play a significant role in the particle charging. This paper was presented at the Third International Symposium on Nonequilibrium Process, combustion, and Atmospheric Phenomena (Dagomys, Sochi, Russia, 25-29 June 2007).

  20. Formation of charged nanoparticles in hydrocarbon flames: principal mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processes of charged gaseous and particulate species formation in sooting hydrocarbon/air flame are studied. The original kinetic model, comprising the chemistry of neutral and charged gaseous species, generation of primary clusters, which then undergo charging due to attachment of ions and electrons to clusters and via thermoemission, and coagulation of charged-charged, charged-neutral and neutral-neutral particles, is reported. The analysis shows that the principal mechanisms of charged particle origin in hydrocarbon flames are associated with the attachment of ions and electrons produced in the course of chemoionization reactions to primary small clusters and particles and coagulation via charged-charged and charged-neutral particle interaction. Thermal ionization of particles does not play a significant role in the particle charging.

  1. Novel pH-Sensitive Cyclic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerakkody, Dhammika; Moshnikova, Anna; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Adochite, Ramona-Cosmina; Slaybaugh, Gregory; Golijanin, Jovana; Tiwari, Rakesh K; Andreev, Oleg A; Parang, Keykavous; Reshetnyak, Yana K

    2016-01-01

    A series of cyclic peptides containing a number of tryptophan (W) and glutamic acid (E) residues were synthesized and evaluated as pH-sensitive agents for targeting of acidic tissue and pH-dependent cytoplasmic delivery of molecules. Biophysical studies revealed the molecular mechanism of peptides action and localization within the lipid bilayer of the membrane at high and low pHs. The symmetric, c[(WE)4WC], and asymmetric, c[E4W5C], cyclic peptides translocated amanitin, a polar cargo molecule of similar size, across the lipid bilayer and induced cell death in a pH- and concentration-dependent manner. Fluorescently-labelled peptides were evaluated for targeting of acidic 4T1 mammary tumors in mice. The highest tumor to muscle ratio (5.6) was established for asymmetric cyclic peptide, c[E4W5C], at 24 hours after intravenous administration. pH-insensitive cyclic peptide c[R4W5C], where glutamic acid residues (E) were replaced by positively charged arginine residues (R), did not exhibit tumor targeting. We have introduced a novel class of cyclic peptides, which can be utilized as a new pH-sensitive tool in investigation or targeting of acidic tissue. PMID:27515582

  2. A host–guest system to study structure–function relationships of membrane fusion peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Xing; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2000-01-01

    We designed a host–guest fusion peptide system, which is completely soluble in water and has a high affinity for biological and lipid model membranes. The guest sequences are those of the fusion peptides of influenza hemagglutinin, which are solubilized by a highly charged unstructured C-terminal host sequence. These peptides partition to the surface of negatively charged liposomes or erythrocytes and elicit membrane fusion or hemolysis. They undergo a conformational ...

  3. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined.......To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  4. Hydration studies of electrospray ions from amino acids and small peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Chuong (Steve)

    regarding the ion formation mechanism of ESI. Additional studies revealed that the extent of the increase in ion yield was directly related to the charge state and molecular weight of the solute ions. In sum, this evidence strongly indicated that gas phase ions produced from charged droplets, as in electrospray ionization, must proceed by the sequence of events assumed in the Ion Evaporation Model proposed by Iribarne and Thomson rather than in the Charged Residue Model originally proposed by Malcolm Dole and coworkers. The hydration behaviors of electrospray ions from peptides with similar primary amino acid sequences and capable of forming ions with more than one charge state were also investigated. In a study with dipeptides, the extent of hydration was found to vary widely and to depend not only on the chemical composition of the ions but also on their configurations and charge states. The results obtained with lysine oligomers clearly indicated that the number of charges on an ion played an important role in the solvation process. An exception to this generalization was found in an experiment with multiply protonated pentalysine ions. For example, the quadruply protonated monomers of that species were found to undergo charge reduction via proton exchange with the surrounding water molecules in such a way as to maximize the distance between charges on the molecule, thereby reducing the internal repulsive forces. The hydration study of angiotensin II and III showed that while the former has an additional hydrophilic amino acid on the N-terminus, the latter peptide was more hydrophilic. This result suggests that the hydrophilicities of peptides are not a simple sum of the hydrophilicities of the individual amino acid components. As further evidence of interaction complexity, the Magic Number Clusters containing 21 water molecules were obtained with the doubly protonated angiotensin III, but not with the doubly protonated angiotensin II. Taken together, these observations

  5. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina;

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both the...... partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  6. Cluster Headache

    OpenAIRE

    Frederick G Freitag

    1985-01-01

    Learning Objectives: Review the current understanding of the pathophysiology of cluster headache Be able to recognize the clinical features of cluster headache Be able to develop a strategy for treatment of cluster headache Cluster headache is divided into multiple subtypes under the IHC classification criteria. The vast majority of patients present with episodic cluster headache (3.1.1). This will be the focus of the presentation. The syndrome is characterized by repeated at...

  7. Ionization of Sodium Cluster by Heavy Ion Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Energetic ions have recently been used as an efficient means to produce highly charged cold clusters~[1]. There are two ways to obtain highly-charged clusters: low-fluence nano-second lasers irradiation and energetic highly charged ions impact. Compared to the low-density laser, heavy ions, e.g. delivered by ECR sources, have the

  8. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  9. Peptider holder krabben rask

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchmann, Kurt

    Antimikrobielle Peptider har hos mere primitive dyr en vigtig funktion i organismernes immunforsvar Udgivelsesdato: 1. februar......Antimikrobielle Peptider har hos mere primitive dyr en vigtig funktion i organismernes immunforsvar Udgivelsesdato: 1. februar...

  10. Fractional charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    20 years ago fractional charges were imagined to explain values of conductivity in some materials. Recent experiments have proved the existence of charges whose value is the third of the electron charge. This article presents the experimental facts that have led theorists to predict the existence of fractional charges from the motion of quasi-particles in a linear chain of poly-acetylene to the quantum Hall effect. According to the latest theories, fractional charges are neither bosons nor fermions but anyons, they are submitted to an exclusive principle that is less stringent than that for fermions. (A.C.)

  11. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  12. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  13. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  14. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  16. Finite-temperature coupled-cluster, many-body perturbation, and restricted and unrestricted Hartree-Fock study on one-dimensional solids: Luttinger liquids, Peierls transitions, and spin- and charge-density waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Matthew R; Hirata, So

    2015-09-14

    One-dimensional (1D) solids exhibit a number of striking electronic structures including charge-density wave (CDW) and spin-density wave (SDW). Also, the Peierls theorem states that at zero temperature, a 1D system predicted by simple band theory to be a metal will spontaneously dimerize and open a finite fundamental bandgap, while at higher temperatures, it will assume the equidistant geometry with zero bandgap (a Peierls transition). We computationally study these unique electronic structures and transition in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene using finite-temperature generalizations of ab initio spin-unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) and spin-restricted coupled-cluster doubles (CCD) theories, extending upon previous work [He et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 024702 (2014)] that is based on spin-restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories. Unlike RHF, UHF can predict SDW as well as CDW and metallic states, and unlike MP2, CCD does not diverge even if the underlying RHF reference wave function is metallic. UHF predicts a gapped SDW state with no dimerization at low temperatures, which gradually becomes metallic as the temperature is raised. CCD, meanwhile, confirms that electron correlation lowers the Peierls transition temperature. Furthermore, we show that the results from all theories for both polymers are subject to a unified interpretation in terms of the UHF solutions to the Hubbard-Peierls model using different values of the electron-electron interaction strength, U/t, in its Hamiltonian. The CCD wave function is shown to encompass the form of the exact solution of the Tomonaga-Luttinger model and is thus expected to describe accurately the electronic structure of Luttinger liquids. PMID:26374011

  17. Finite-temperature coupled-cluster, many-body perturbation, and restricted and unrestricted Hartree–Fock study on one-dimensional solids: Luttinger liquids, Peierls transitions, and spin- and charge-density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One-dimensional (1D) solids exhibit a number of striking electronic structures including charge-density wave (CDW) and spin-density wave (SDW). Also, the Peierls theorem states that at zero temperature, a 1D system predicted by simple band theory to be a metal will spontaneously dimerize and open a finite fundamental bandgap, while at higher temperatures, it will assume the equidistant geometry with zero bandgap (a Peierls transition). We computationally study these unique electronic structures and transition in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene using finite-temperature generalizations of ab initio spin-unrestricted Hartree–Fock (UHF) and spin-restricted coupled-cluster doubles (CCD) theories, extending upon previous work [He et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 024702 (2014)] that is based on spin-restricted Hartree–Fock (RHF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories. Unlike RHF, UHF can predict SDW as well as CDW and metallic states, and unlike MP2, CCD does not diverge even if the underlying RHF reference wave function is metallic. UHF predicts a gapped SDW state with no dimerization at low temperatures, which gradually becomes metallic as the temperature is raised. CCD, meanwhile, confirms that electron correlation lowers the Peierls transition temperature. Furthermore, we show that the results from all theories for both polymers are subject to a unified interpretation in terms of the UHF solutions to the Hubbard–Peierls model using different values of the electron-electron interaction strength, U/t, in its Hamiltonian. The CCD wave function is shown to encompass the form of the exact solution of the Tomonaga–Luttinger model and is thus expected to describe accurately the electronic structure of Luttinger liquids

  18. Experimental study of multicharged sodium clusters stability generated by collision of neutral clusters with ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis is to study the stability of a sodium cluster with respect to a positive charge excess. In the experiment, clusters of several atoms to about a thousand of atoms were obtained using a gaseous thermalization type source. A two stages Wiley-McLaren type time-of-flight mass spectrometer was built for the experiment but with a better focalization. A mass resolution above 2000 is obtained around the 1100 u ma mass, and mono-charged sodium clusters up to 700 atoms can be separated. The sequential ionization of a neutral clusters with a laser pulse can lead to hot multicharged clusters (with atom evaporation). The maximum cluster charge is limited by the photon energy. The interaction between neutral clusters and ions shows the coexistence of two ionization processes: the remote capture of electrons by the ion coulomb field and the statistical electron emission following the electronic excitation of the cluster when an ion goes through it. When the ion charge increases, the first process becomes predominant and corresponds to a diminution of multicharged clusters temperature and critical size. In conclusion, the interaction between neutral clusters with ions allows to produce multicharged clusters with variable charge, size and temperature. This method seems to be of prime importance for fragmentation study of unstable structures. (J.S.). 72 refs., 90 figs., 16 tabs

  19. Charged Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Gabadadze, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    We consider Bose-Einstein condensation of massive electrically charged scalars in a uniform background of charged fermions. We focus on the case when the scalar condensate screens the background charge, while the net charge of the system resides on its boundary surface. A distinctive signature of this substance is that the photon acquires a Lorentz-violating mass in the bulk of the condensate. Due to this mass, the transverse and longitudinal gauge modes propagate with different group velocities. We give qualitative arguments that at high enough densities and low temperatures a charged system of electrons and helium-4 nuclei, if held together by laboratory devices or by force of gravity, can form such a substance. We briefly discuss possible manifestations of the charged condensate in compact astrophysical objects.

  20. Cluster headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache ... Doctors do not know exactly what causes cluster headaches. They ... (chemical in the body released during an allergic response) or ...

  1. Isotopic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectra of isotopically mixed clusters (dimers of SF6) are calculated as well as transition frequencies. The result leads to speculations about the suitability of the laser-cluster fragmentation process for isotope separation. (Auth.)

  2. Review: Formation of Peptide Radical Ions Through Dissociative Electron Transfer in Ternary Metal-Ligand-Peptide Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and fragmentation of odd-electron ions of peptides and proteins is of interest to applications in biological mass spectrometry. Gas-phase redox chemistry occurring during collision-induced dissociation of ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes enables the formation of a variety of peptide radicals including the canonical radical cations, M+#smbullet#, radical dications, (M+H)2+#smbullet#, radical anions, (M-2H)-#smbullet#. In addition, odd-electron peptide ions with well-defined initial location of the radical site are produced through side chain losses from the radical ions. Subsequent fragmentation of these species provides information on the role of charge and the location of the radical site on the competition between radical-induced and proton-driven fragmentation of odd-electron peptide ions. This account summarizes current understanding of the factors that control the efficiency of the intramolecular electron transfer (ET) in ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes resulting in formation of odd-electron peptide ions. Specifically, we discuss the effect of the metal center, the ligand and the peptide structure on the competition between the ET, proton transfer (PT), and loss of neutral peptide and neutral peptide fragments from the complex. Fundamental studies of the structures, stabilities, and the energetics and dynamics of fragmentation of such complexes are also important for detailed molecular-level understanding of photosynthesis and respiration in biological systems.

  3. Weighted Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina; Loker, David

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clusteringproblem, considering clustering tasks in which differentinstances may have different weights.We conduct the firstextensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighteddata on standard clustering algorithms in both the partitionaland hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions underwhich algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent frameworkfor clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitiveproperties that...

  4. Meaningful Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  5. Rational Development of a Cytotoxic Peptide to Trigger Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Boohaker, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Ge; Lee, Michael W; Nemec, Kathleen N.; Santra, Santimukul; Perez, J Manuel; Khaled, Annette R.

    2012-01-01

    Defects in the apoptotic machinery can contribute to tumor formation and resistance to treatment, creating a need to identify new agents that kill cancer cells by alternative mechanisms. To this end, we examined the cytotoxic properties of a novel peptide, CT20p, derived from the C-terminal, alpha-9 helix of Bax, an amphipathic domain with putative membrane binding properties. Like many anti-microbial peptides, CT20p contains clusters of hydrophobic and cationic residues that could enable the...

  6. Automatic recognition of hydrophobic clusters and their correlation with protein folding units.

    OpenAIRE

    Zehfus, M. H.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described to objectively identify hydrophobic clusters in proteins of known structure. Clusters are found by examining a protein for compact groupings of side chains. Compact clusters contain seven or more residues, have an average of 65% hydrophobic residues, and usually occur in protein interiors. Although smaller clusters contain only side-chain moieties, larger clusters enclose significant portions of the peptide backbone in regular secondary structure. These clusters agree we...

  7. Silica precipitation with synthetic silaffin peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieneke, Ralph; Bernecker, Anja; Riedel, Radostan; Sumper, Manfred; Steinem, Claudia; Geyer, Armin

    2011-08-01

    Silaffins are highly charged proteins which are one of the major contributing compounds that are thought to be responsible for the formation of the hierarchically structured silica-based cell walls of diatoms. Here we describe the synthesis of an oligo-propyleneamine substituted lysine derivative and its incorporation into the KXXK peptide motif occurring repeatedly in silaffins. N(ε)-alkylation of lysine was achieved by a Mitsunobu reaction to obtain a protected lysine derivative which is convenient for solid phase peptide synthesis. Quantitative silica precipitation experiments together with structural information about the precipitated silica structures gained by scanning electron microscopy revealed a dependence of the amount and form of the silica precipitates on the peptide structure. PMID:21674108

  8. Aspects on the pathophysiology of migraine and cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L

    2001-01-01

    release of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide, probably from C fibres. In cluster headache and in a case of chronic paroxysmal headache there was in addition release of the parasympathetic neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide, which was associated with headache, nasal congestion and...

  9. Nucleic Acid Charge Transfer: Black, White and Gray

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatramani, Ravindra; Keinan, Shahar; Balaeff, Alexander; Beratan, David N.

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical studies of charge transport in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) indicate that structure and dynamics modulate the charge transfer rates, and that different members of a structural ensemble support different charge transport mechanisms. Here, we review the influences of nucleobase geometry, electronic structure, solvent environment, and thermal conformational fluctuations on the charge transfer mechanism. We describe an emerging framework for understanding...

  10. Cluster Lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Kneib, Jean-Paul; 10.1007/s00159-011-0047-3

    2012-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the most recently assembled, massive, bound structures in the Universe. As predicted by General Relativity, given their masses, clusters strongly deform space-time in their vicinity. Clusters act as some of the most powerful gravitational lenses in the Universe. Light rays traversing through clusters from distant sources are hence deflected, and the resulting images of these distant objects therefore appear distorted and magnified. Lensing by clusters occurs in two regimes, each with unique observational signatures. The strong lensing regime is characterized by effects readily seen by eye, namely, the production of giant arcs, multiple-images, and arclets. The weak lensing regime is characterized by small deformations in the shapes of background galaxies only detectable statistically. Cluster lenses have been exploited successfully to address several important current questions in cosmology: (i) the study of the lens(es) - understanding cluster mass distributions and issues pertaining...

  11. Re-shaping colloidal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the geometry and yield of anisotropic colloidal particles remains a challenge for hierarchical self-assembly. I will discuss a synthetic strategy for fabricating colloidal clusters by creating order in randomly aggregated polymer spheres using surface tension and geometrical constraints. The technique can be extended to a variety of charge-stabilized polymer spheres and offers control over the cluster size distribution. VENI grant from The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  12. Collisional versus laser driven ionization in metal clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Suraud

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available We compare the capabilities of rapid highly charged projectiles and intense femtosecond lasers to ionize simple metal clusters while leaving as little intrinsic excitation as possible in the residue. We show that both excitation mechanisms are able to produce highly charged clusters. The deposited excitation energies increase with ionization but with different trends. Cold ionization, corresponding to moderate deposited excitation energy, is better attained with ionic projectiles for low charge states, and with lasers for high charge states.

  13. Plant signalling peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Wiśniewska, Justyna; Trejgell, Alina; Tretyn, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Biochemical and genetic studies have identified peptides that play crucial roles in plant growth and development, including defence mechanisms in response to wounding by pests, the control of cell division and expansion, and pollen self-incompatibility. The first two signalling peptides to be described in plants were tomato systemin and phytosulfokine (PSK). There is also biochemical evidence that natriuretic peptide-like molecules, immunologically-relatedt o those found ...

  14. Silica precipitation with synthetic silaffin peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Wieneke, Ralph; Bernecker, Anja; Riedel, Radostan; Sumper, Manfred; Steinem, Claudia; Geyer, Armin

    2011-01-01

    Silaffins are highly charged proteins which are one of the major contributing compounds that are thought to be responsible for the formation of the hierarchically structured silica-based cell walls of diatoms. Here we describe the synthesis of an oligo-propyleneamine substituted lysine derivative and its incorporation into the KXXK peptide motif occurring repeatedly in silaffins. Ne-alkylation of lysine was achieved by a Mitsunobu reaction to obtain a protected lysine derivative w...

  15. Antimicrobial peptides: a new class of antimalarial drugs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno eVale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A range of antimicrobial peptides (AMP exhibit activity on malaria parasites, Plasmodium spp, in their blood or mosquito stages, or both. These peptides include a diverse array of both natural and synthetic molecules varying greatly in size, charge, hydrophobicity and secondary structure features. Along with an overview of relevant literature reports regarding AMP that display antiplasmodial activity, this review makes a few considerations about those molecules as a potential new class of antimalarial drugs.

  16. Charge independence and charge symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, G A; Miller, Gerald A; van Oers, Willem T H

    1994-01-01

    Charge independence and charge symmetry are approximate symmetries of nature, violated by the perturbing effects of the mass difference between up and down quarks and by electromagnetic interactions. The observations of the symmetry breaking effects in nuclear and particle physics and the implications of those effects are reviewed.

  17. Charge independence and charge symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge independence and charge symmetry are approximate symmetries of nature, violated by the perturbing effects of the mass difference between up and down quarks and by electromagnetic interactions. The observations of the symmetry breaking effects in nuclear and particle physics and the implications of those effects are reviewed. (author). 145 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs

  18. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. PMID:23355488

  19. Atomic scale insights into urea-peptide interactions in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Nicola; Gillams, Richard J; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Lorenz, Christian D; McLain, Sylvia E

    2016-02-01

    The mechanism by which proteins are denatured by urea is still not well understood, especially on the atomic scale where these interactions occur in vivo. In this study, the structure of the peptide GPG has been investigated in aqueous urea solutions in order to understand the combination of roles that both urea and water play in protein unfolding. Using a combination of neutron diffraction enhanced by isotopic substitution and computer simulations, it was found, in opposition with previous simulations studies, that urea is preferred over water around polar and charged portions of the peptides. Further, it appears that while urea directly replaces water around the nitrogen groups on GPG that urea and water occupy different positions around the peptide bond carbonyl groups. This suggests that urea may in fact weaken the peptide bond, disrupting the peptide backbone, thus ultimately causing denaturation. PMID:26764567

  20. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  1. Pulling peptides across nanochannels: resolving peptide binding and translocation through the hetero-oligomeric channel from Nocardia farcinica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pratik Raj; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Modi, Niraj; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Benz, Roland; Winterhalter, Mathias; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R

    2012-12-21

    We investigated translocation of cationic peptides through nanochannels derived from the Gram-positive bacterium Nocardia farcinica at the single-molecule level. The two subunits NfpA and NfpB form a hetero-oligomeric cation selective channel. On the basis of amino acid comparison we performed homology modeling and obtained a channel structurally related to MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis. The quantitative single-molecule measurements provide an insight into transport processes of solutes through nanochannels. High-resolution ion conductance measurements in the presence of peptides of different charge and length revealed the kinetics of peptide binding. The observed asymmetry in peptide binding kinetics indicated a unidirectional channel insertion in the lipid bilayer. In the case of cationic peptides, the external voltage acts as a driving force that promotes the interaction of the peptide with the channel surface. At low voltage, the peptide just binds to the channel, whereas at higher voltage, the force is strong enough to pull the peptide across the channel. This allows distinguishing quantitatively between peptide binding and translocation through the channel. PMID:23121560

  2. Assembly Properties of an Alanine-Rich, Lysine-Containing Peptide and the Formation of Peptide/Polymer Hybrid Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Grieshaber, Sarah E.; Nie, Ting; Yan, Congqi; Zhong, Sheng; Teller, Sean S.; Clifton, Rodney J.; Pochan, Darrin J.; Kiick, Kristi L.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2011-01-01

    We are interested in developing peptide/polymer hybrid hydrogels that are chemically diverse and structurally complex. Towards this end, an alanine-based peptide doped with charged lysines with a sequence of (AKA3KA)2 (AK2) was selected from the crosslinking regions of the natural elastin. Pluronic® F127, known to self-assemble into defined micellar structures, was employed as the synthetic building blocks. Fundamental investigations on the environmental effects on the secondary structure and...

  3. Formation and Dissociation of Phosphorylated Peptide Radical Cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ricky P. W.; Quan, Quan; Hao, Qiang; Lai, Cheuk-Kuen; Siu, Chi-Kit; Chu, Ivan K.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we generated phosphoserine- and phosphothreonine-containing peptide radical cations through low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the ternary metal-ligand phosphorylated peptide complexes [CuII(terpy) p M]·2+ and [CoIII(salen) p M]·+ [ p M: phosphorylated angiotensin III derivative; terpy: 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; salen: N, N '-ethylenebis(salicylideneiminato)]. Subsequent CID of the phosphorylated peptide radical cations ( p M·+) revealed fascinating gas-phase radical chemistry, yielding (1) charge-directed b- and y-type product ions, (2) radical-driven product ions through cleavages of peptide backbones and side chains, and (3) different degrees of formation of [M - H3PO4]·+ species through phosphate ester bond cleavage. The CID spectra of the p M·+ species and their non-phosphorylated analogues featured fragment ions of similar sequence, suggesting that the phosphoryl group did not play a significant role in the fragmentation of the peptide backbone or side chain. The extent of neutral H3PO4 loss was influenced by the peptide sequence and the initial sites of the charge and radical. A preliminary density functional theory study, at the B3LYP 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, of the neutral loss of H3PO4 from a prototypical model— N-acetylphosphorylserine methylamide—revealed several factors governing the elimination of neutral phosphoryl groups through charge- and radical-induced mechanisms.

  4. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  5. Hidden Charged Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Jonathan L; Tu, Huitzu; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2009-01-01

    We examine the possibility that dark matter is hidden, that is, neutral under all standard model gauge interactions, but charged under an exact U(1) gauge symmetry of the hidden sector. Such candidates are predicted in simple WIMPless models, supersymmetric models in which hidden dark matter has the desired thermal relic density for a wide range of masses. Hidden charged dark matter has many potentially disastrous implications for astrophysics: (1) bound state formation and Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation after chemical freeze out may destroy its relic density, (2) similar effects greatly enhance dark matter annihilation in protohalos at redshifts of z ~ 30, (3) Compton scattering off hidden photons delays kinetic decoupling, suppressing small scale structure, and (4) Rutherford scattering makes such dark matter self-interacting and collisional, potentially violating constraints from the Bullet Cluster and the observed morphology of galactic halos. We show that all of these constraints are satisfied and are ...

  6. ''Anomalous'' properties of technetium clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors show how some properties of technetium clusters can be explained on the basis of a qualitative model of the electrostatic repulsion of the metal atoms in the clusters. The position of technetium in the periodic table, as well as the experimentally recently discovered ability of technetium to lower the effective charge on its atoms when M-M bonds are formed by them, impart a high capacity to this element to form clusters with both weak-field ligands and strong field ligands

  7. Cluster Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cansisting of eight scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Xiamen University, this creative research group is devoted to the research of cluster chemistry and creation of nanomaterials.After three-year hard work, the group scored a series of encouraging progresses in synthesis of clusters with special structures, including novel fullerenes, fullerene-like metal cluster compounds as well as other related nanomaterials, and their properties study.

  8. Charged Leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, J; Babu, K; Bernstein, R H; Blum, T; Brown, D N; Casey, B C K; Cheng, C -h; Cirigliano, V; Cohen, A; Deshpande, A; Dukes, E C; Echenard, B; Gaponenko, A; Glenzinski, D; Gonzalez-Alonso, M; Grancagnolo, F; Grossman, Y; Harnik, R; Hitlin, D G; Kiburg, B; Knoepfe, K; Kumar, K; Lim, G; Lu, Z -T; McKeen, D; Miller, J P; Ramsey-Musolf, M; Ray, R; Roberts, B L; Rominsky, M; Semertzidis, Y; Stoeckinger, D; Talman, R; Van De Water, R; Winter, P

    2013-01-01

    This is the report of the Intensity Frontier Charged Lepton Working Group of the 2013 Community Summer Study "Snowmass on the Mississippi", summarizing the current status and future experimental opportunities in muon and tau lepton studies and their sensitivity to new physics. These include searches for charged lepton flavor violation, measurements of magnetic and electric dipole moments, and precision measurements of the decay spectrum and parity-violating asymmetries.

  9. Peptide adsorption on the hydrophobic surface: A free energy perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yuebiao; Wang, Wei; Chen, P.

    2011-05-01

    Protein adsorption is a very attractive topic which relates to many novel applications in biomaterials, biotechnology and nanotechnology. Ionic complementary peptides are a group of novel nano-biomaterials with many biomedical applications. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations of the ionic-complementary peptide EAK16-II on a hydrophobic graphite surface were performed under neutral, acidic and basic solution conditions. Adsorption free energy contour maps were obtained by analyzing the dynamical trajectories. Hydrophobic interactions were found to govern the adsorption of the first peptide molecule, and both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions contributed to the adsorption of the second peptide molecule. Especially under acidic and basic solution conditions, interplay existed among chain-chain hydrophobic, chain-surface hydrophobic and chain-chain electrostatic interactions during the adsorption of the second peptide molecule. Non-charged residues were found to lie on the graphite surface, while charged residue side-chains oriented towards the solution after the peptide deposited on the surface. These results provide a basis for understanding peptide adsorption on the hydrophobic surface under different solution conditions, which is useful for novel applications such as bioactive implant devices and drug delivery material design.

  10. Environment Dependent Charge Potential for Water

    OpenAIRE

    Muralidharan, Krishna; Valone, Steven M.; Atlas, Susan R.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new interatomic potential for water captured in a charge-transfer embedded atom method (EAM) framework. The potential accounts for explicit, dynamical charge transfer in atoms as a function of the local chemical environment. As an initial test of the charge-transfer EAM approach for a molecular system, we have constructed a relatively simple version of the potential and examined its ability to model the energetics of small water clusters. The excellent agreement between our resul...

  11. A Mechanistic Investigation of the Enhanced Cleavage at Histidine in the Gas-Phase Dissociation of Protonated Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Tsaprailis, George; Nair, Hari; Zhong, Wenqing; Kuppannan, Krishnamoorthy; Futrell, Jean H.; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2004-01-01

    Enhanced gas-phase cleavage of peptides adjacent to histidine was investigated. The peptides examined were angiotensins III (RVYIHPF) and IV (VYIHPF) as well as synthetic peptide analogs with altered key residues ((R)VYI-X-Z-F; X=F or H and Z=A, P or Sar) or a fixed charge Φ3P+CH2C(O)-VYIHPF. While all singly protonated peptide ions containing both histidine and arginine fragment non-selectively, the doubly protonated peptide ions with arginine and histidine, and the singly protonated peptide...

  12. CD and UV Resonance Raman Indicate Little arg-glu Side Chain α-helix Peptide Stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Zhenmin; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Asher, Sanford A.

    2011-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions between side chains can control the conformation and folding of peptides and proteins. We used CD and UV resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) to examine the impact of side chain charge on the conformations of two 21 residue mainly polyala peptides with a few arg and glu residues. We expected that attractions between arg-10 and glu-14 side chains would stabilize the α-helix conformation compared to a peptide with an arg-14. Surprisingly, CD suggests that the peptide w...

  13. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin produced by the body and insulin injected ...

  14. Impact of multivalent charge presentation on peptide–nanoparticle aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schöne

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Strategies to achieve controlled nanoparticle aggregation have gained much interest, due to the versatility of such systems and their applications in materials science and medicine. In this article we demonstrate that coiled-coil peptide-induced aggregation based on electrostatic interactions is highly sensitive to the length of the peptide as well as the number of presented charges. The quaternary structure of the peptide was found to play an important role in aggregation kinetics. Furthermore, we show that the presence of peptide fibers leads to well-defined nanoparticle assembly on the surface of these macrostructures.

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a...

  16. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.; Jørgensen, M.; Larsson, C.; Buchardt, O.; Stanly, C.J.; Norden, B.; Nielsen, P.E.; Ørum, H.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields.......Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  17. Optimization of heavy chain and light chain signal peptides for high level expression of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Haryadi

    Full Text Available Translocation of a nascent protein from the cytosol into the ER mediated by its signal peptide is a critical step in protein secretion. The aim of this work was to develop a platform technology to optimize the signal peptides for high level production of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells. A database of signal peptides from a large number of human immunoglobulin (Ig heavy chain (HC and kappa light chain (LC was generated. Most of the HC signal peptides contain 19 amino acids which can be divided into three domains and the LC signal peptides contain 22 amino acids. The signal peptides were then clustered according to sequence similarity. Based on the clustering, 8 HC and 2 LC signal peptides were analyzed for their impacts on the production of 5-top selling antibody therapeutics, namely, Herceptin, Avastin, Remicade, Rituxan, and Humira. The best HC and LC signal peptides for producing these 5 antibodies were identified. The optimized signal peptides for Rituxan is 2-fold better compared to its native signal peptides which are available in the public database. Substitution of a single amino acid in the optimized HC signal peptide for Avastin reduced its production significantly. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed that all optimized signal peptides are accurately removed in the mature antibodies. The results presented in this report are particularly important for the production of these 5 antibodies as biosimilar drugs. They also have the potential to be the best signal peptides for the production of new antibodies in CHO cells.

  18. Optimization of heavy chain and light chain signal peptides for high level expression of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryadi, Ryan; Ho, Steven; Kok, Yee Jiun; Pu, Helen X; Zheng, Lu; Pereira, Natasha A; Li, Bin; Bi, Xuezhi; Goh, Lin-Tang; Yang, Yuansheng; Song, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of a nascent protein from the cytosol into the ER mediated by its signal peptide is a critical step in protein secretion. The aim of this work was to develop a platform technology to optimize the signal peptides for high level production of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells. A database of signal peptides from a large number of human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain (HC) and kappa light chain (LC) was generated. Most of the HC signal peptides contain 19 amino acids which can be divided into three domains and the LC signal peptides contain 22 amino acids. The signal peptides were then clustered according to sequence similarity. Based on the clustering, 8 HC and 2 LC signal peptides were analyzed for their impacts on the production of 5-top selling antibody therapeutics, namely, Herceptin, Avastin, Remicade, Rituxan, and Humira. The best HC and LC signal peptides for producing these 5 antibodies were identified. The optimized signal peptides for Rituxan is 2-fold better compared to its native signal peptides which are available in the public database. Substitution of a single amino acid in the optimized HC signal peptide for Avastin reduced its production significantly. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed that all optimized signal peptides are accurately removed in the mature antibodies. The results presented in this report are particularly important for the production of these 5 antibodies as biosimilar drugs. They also have the potential to be the best signal peptides for the production of new antibodies in CHO cells. PMID:25706993

  19. Cancer Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cancer. Cancer clusters can help scientists identify cancer-causing substances in the environment. For example, in the early 1970s, a cluster ... the area and time period over which the cancers were diagnosed. They also ask about specific environmental hazards or concerns in the affected area. If ...

  20. Sound oscillation of dropwise cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There was registered sound oscillation of a dropwise cluster formed over the warmed-up water surface. We have calculated the electrical charge of drops on the basis of experimental data on ion-sound oscillation. It was demonstrated that the charge is proportional to surface area of the drops and does not depend on intensity of their evaporation (condensation) in the range of 60–100 °C. The charge of drops reaches 102–103 units of elementary charge and coincides on magnitude order with the literary value of a charge calculated by another method. -- Highlights: ► The present investigation registered short-wave sound oscillations of water drops in a dropwise cluster in the range of 60–100 °C. ► We have found autocorrelation functions and Fourier transforms of time series of interdroplet distance; defined oscillation frequencies. ► Calculated electrical charge of drops and specified that the charge is proportional to the drop surface area.

  1. Cluster Structure of Atomic Nuclei and Nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the static and dynamic α-cluster models of nuclei, which describe an elastic electron scattering, photodisintegration reactions and pion double charge exchange reactions on α-cluster nuclei are in favor of the α-capture and α process of the formation of these nuclei

  2. Strontium clusters: electronic and geometry shell effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2008-01-01

    charged strontium clusters consisting of up to 14 atoms, average bonding distances, electronic shell closures, binding energies per atom, and spectra of the density of electronic states (DOS). It is demonstrated that the size-evolution of structural and electronic properties of strontium clusters is...

  3. Peptide folding driven by Van der Waals interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Shen-Shu

    2015-09-01

    Contrary to the widespread view that hydrogen bonding and its entropy effect play a dominant role in protein folding, folding into helical and hairpin-like structures is observed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations without hydrogen bonding in the peptide-solvent system. In the widely used point charge model, hydrogen bonding is calculated as part of the interaction between atomic partial charges. It is removed from these simulations by setting atomic charges of the peptide and water to zero. Because of the structural difference between the peptide and water, van der Waals (VDW) interactions favor peptide intramolecular interactions and are a major contributing factor to the structural compactness. These compact structures are amino acid sequence dependent and closely resemble standard secondary structures, as a consequence of VDW interactions and covalent bonding constraints. Hydrogen bonding is a short range interaction and it locks the approximate structure into the specific secondary structure when it is included in the simulation. In contrast to standard molecular simulations where the total energy is dominated by charge-charge interactions, these simulation results will give us a new view of the folding mechanism. PMID:26013298

  4. Clustering processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ryabko, Daniil

    2010-01-01

    The problem of clustering is considered, for the case when each data point is a sample generated by a stationary ergodic process. We propose a very natural asymptotic notion of consistency, and show that simple consistent algorithms exist, under most general non-parametric assumptions. The notion of consistency is as follows: two samples should be put into the same cluster if and only if they were generated by the same distribution. With this notion of consistency, clustering generalizes such classical statistical problems as homogeneity testing and process classification. We show that, for the case of a known number of clusters, consistency can be achieved under the only assumption that the joint distribution of the data is stationary ergodic (no parametric or Markovian assumptions, no assumptions of independence, neither between nor within the samples). If the number of clusters is unknown, consistency can be achieved under appropriate assumptions on the mixing rates of the processes. (again, no parametric ...

  5. Geometric frustration in small colloidal clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Malins, Alex; Stephen R Williams; Eggers, Jens; Tanaka, Hajime; Royall, C. Patrick

    2009-01-01

    We study the structure of clusters in a model colloidal system with competing interactions using Brownian dynamics simulations. A short-ranged attraction drives clustering, while a weak, long-ranged repulsion is used to model electrostatic charging in experimental systems. The former is treated with a short-ranged Morse attractive interaction, the latter with a repulsive Yukawa interaction. We consider the yield of clusters of specific structure as a function of the strength of the interactio...

  6. Peptide and protein sequence analysis by electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Syka, John E. P.; Coon, Joshua J.; Schroeder, Melanie J.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.

    2004-01-01

    Peptide sequence analysis using a combination of gas-phase ion/ion chemistry and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is demonstrated. Singly charged anthracene anions transfer an electron to multiply protonated peptides in a radio frequency quadrupole linear ion trap (QLT) and induce fragmentation of the peptide backbone along pathways that are analogous to those observed in electron capture dissociation. Modifications to the QLT that enable this ion/ion chemistry are presented, and automated ac...

  7. HER2 Targeting Peptides Screening and Applications in Tumor Imaging and Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Xiangqian; Han, Qiuju; Xiang, Zhichu; Li, Dan; Yang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Di; Bu, Xiangli; Wang, Weizhi; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Herein, computational-aided one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide library design combined with in situ single-bead sequencing microarray methods were successfully applied in screening peptides targeting at human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), a biomarker of human breast cancer. As a result, 72 novel peptides clustered into three sequence motifs which are PYL***NP, YYL***NP and PPL***NP were acquired. Particularly one of the peptides, P51, has nanomolar affinity and high specificity for HER2 in ex vivo and in vivo tests. Moreover, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome nanoparticles were modified with peptide P51 or P25 and demonstrated to improve the targeted delivery against HER2 positive cells. Our study provides an efficient peptide screening method with a combination of techniques and the novel screened peptides with a clear binding site on HER2 can be used as probes for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27279916

  8. Characterizing gaseous peptide structure with action-EET and simulated annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Nathan G; Julian, Ryan R

    2015-10-21

    Evaluation of biomolecular structure in the gas phase is challenging, but worthwhile due to advantages in sensitivity and speed relative to traditional condensed phase approaches. Herein, we demonstrate that a recently developed method utilizing energy transfer to establish distance constraints can be combined with molecular dynamics calculations to rapidly and accurately reveal gaseous peptide structures. Three peptides in various charge states are examined. The influence of increasing charge state on peptide structure is easily observed. The presence of multiple conformations can be detected. Furthermore, the method is demonstrated to aid the assignment of charge, which is frequently nontrivial for peptides containing numerous acidic and basic residues that could adopt a variety of conformers of equal charge state. Comparison with ion mobility reveals that many low energy structures that are distinguishable by distance constraints would not be resolvable by collision cross section. Action-EET is demonstrated to be a powerful new tool for structure elucidation. PMID:25925078

  9. Mechanistic studies of ocular peptide absorption and its enhancement by various penetration enhancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two major aspects of corneal peptide absorption, namely the transport mechanisms and the promoting effect of some penetration enhancers, were investigated. Studies on transport mechanisms involve (a) identification of transport pathways of peptides across the cornea, (b) determination of rate-limiting barrier(s) for peptide absorption, and (c) permselective properties of the cornea. To study the transport pathways of peptides, four model peptides differing in molecular size and charge were either fluorescently or radioactively labeled and their movement across the cornea was detected by laser scanning confocal microscopy and autoradiography. Results from these studies indicate that peptides can penetrate the cornea via different pathways, depending on the physicochemical properties and membrane specificity of the peptides. In all cases, the outermost layer of the corneal epithelium presents the rate-limiting barrier for peptide absorption. The results also indicate a charge discrimination effect to transport of negatively charged peptides. In permselectivity studies, it has been shown that the cornea, due to the presence of ionizable charged groups, is amphoteric and exhibits dual selective characteristics to transport of charged molecules. At pH's above the isoelectric point, 3.2, the cornea carries a net negative charge and is selective to positively-charged molecules. Below the isoelectric pH, the reverse is valid. The promoting mechanisms of penetration enhancers were studied microscopically using confocal fluorescence microscopy with the aid of a specific fluorescent membrane probe (3,3'-dioctadecyloxacarbocyanine) and a non-permeating polar tracer. All enhancers, including chelators, non-ionic surfactants, bile salts, and cytoskeleton-active agents, significantly increase membrane permeability depending on concentration and exposure time

  10. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class of...... antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which of these are...

  11. Clustering analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluster analysis is the name of group of multivariate techniques whose principal purpose is to distinguish similar entities from the characteristics they process.To study this analysis, there are several algorithms that can be used. Therefore, this topic focuses to discuss the algorithms, such as, similarity measures, and hierarchical clustering which includes single linkage, complete linkage and average linkage method. also, non-hierarchical clustering method, which is popular name K-mean method' will be discussed. Finally, this paper will be described the advantages and disadvantages of every methods

  12. Cluster editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böcker, S.; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The Cluster Editing problem asks to transform a graph into a disjoint union of cliques using a minimum number of edge modifications. Although the problem has been proven NP-complete several times, it has nevertheless attracted much research both from the theoretical and the applied side. The...... algorithms for biological problems. © 2013 Springer-Verlag....... problem has been the inspiration for numerous algorithms in bioinformatics, aiming at clustering entities such as genes, proteins, phenotypes, or patients. In this paper, we review exact and heuristic methods that have been proposed for the Cluster Editing problem, and also applications of these...

  13. Cluster analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Everitt, Brian S; Leese, Morven; Stahl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cluster analysis comprises a range of methods for classifying multivariate data into subgroups. By organizing multivariate data into such subgroups, clustering can help reveal the characteristics of any structure or patterns present. These techniques have proven useful in a wide range of areas such as medicine, psychology, market research and bioinformatics.This fifth edition of the highly successful Cluster Analysis includes coverage of the latest developments in the field and a new chapter dealing with finite mixture models for structured data.Real life examples are used throughout to demons

  14. Electrical transport properties of peptide nanotubes coated with gold nanoparticles via peptide-induced biomineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present temperature dependent electrical transport measurements of peptide nanotube devices coated with monodisperse arrays of gold nanoparticles (AuNP). As the temperature is lowered, the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics become increasingly nonlinear and below 20 K conduction only occurs above a threshold voltage VT. The current follows the scaling behavior I∝[(V-VT)/VT]α for V > VT with α ∼ 2.5 signifying two-dimensional (2D) charge transport. The temperature dependence of the resistance shows thermally activated behavior with an activation energy of 18.2 meV corresponding to the sequential tunneling of charges through 6 nm monodispersed AuNP arrays grown on a peptide surface.

  15. Spitzer Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krick, Kessica

    This proposal is a specific response to the strategic goal of NASA's research program to "discover how the universe works and explore how the universe evolved into its present form." Towards this goal, we propose to mine the Spitzer archive for all observations of galaxy groups and clusters for the purpose of studying galaxy evolution in clusters, contamination rates for Sunyaev Zeldovich cluster surveys, and to provide a database of Spitzer observed clusters to the broader community. Funding from this proposal will go towards two years of support for a Postdoc to do this work. After searching the Spitzer Heritage Archive, we have found 194 unique galaxy groups and clusters that have data from both the Infrared array camera (IRAC; Fazio et al. 2004) at 3.6 - 8 microns and the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; Rieke et al. 2004) at 24microns. This large sample will add value beyond the individual datasets because it will be a larger sample of IR clusters than ever before and will have sufficient diversity in mass, redshift, and dynamical state to allow us to differentiate amongst the effects of these cluster properties. An infrared sample is important because it is unaffected by dust extinction while at the same time is an excellent measure of both stellar mass (IRAC wavelengths) and star formation rate (MIPS wavelengths). Additionally, IRAC can be used to differentiate star forming galaxies (SFG) from active galactic nuclei (AGN), due to their different spectral shapes in this wavelength regime. Specifically, we intend to identify SFG and AGN in galaxy groups and clusters. Groups and clusters differ from the field because the galaxy densities are higher, there is a large potential well due mainly to the mass of the dark matter, and there is hot X-ray gas (the intracluster medium; ICM). We will examine the impact of these differences in environment on galaxy formation by comparing cluster properties of AGN and SFG to those in the field. Also, we will

  16. Novel heparan sulfate-binding peptides for blocking herpesvirus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranay Dogra

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection can lead to congenital hearing loss and mental retardation. Upon immune suppression, reactivation of latent HCMV or primary infection increases morbidity in cancer, transplantation, and late stage AIDS patients. Current treatments include nucleoside analogues, which have significant toxicities limiting their usefulness. In this study we screened a panel of synthetic heparin-binding peptides for their ability to prevent CMV infection in vitro. A peptide designated, p5+14 exhibited ~ 90% reduction in murine CMV (MCMV infection. Because negatively charged, cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs, serve as the attachment receptor during the adsorption phase of the CMV infection cycle, we hypothesized that p5+14 effectively competes for CMV adsorption to the cell surface resulting in the reduction in infection. Positively charged Lys residues were required for peptide binding to cell-surface HSPGs and reducing viral infection. We show that this inhibition was not due to a direct neutralizing effect on the virus itself and that the peptide blocked adsorption of the virus. The peptide also inhibited infection of other herpesviruses: HCMV and herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 in vitro, demonstrating it has broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Therefore, this peptide may offer an adjunct therapy for the treatment of herpes viral infections and other viruses that use HSPGs for entry.

  17. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.;

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  18. Cluster Bulleticity

    OpenAIRE

    Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas D.; Nagai, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, like the bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) and baby bullet (MACSJ0025-12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distribution of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary 'baryonic' matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by th...

  19. Cluster Bulleticity

    OpenAIRE

    Massey, R; Kitching, T.; Nagai, D.

    2010-01-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, such as the bullet cluster (1E 0657−56) and baby bullet (MACS J0025−12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distributions of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary ‘baryonic’ matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by their rarity. C...

  20. Cluster generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  1. Biological activity of Tat (47-58) peptide on human pathogenic fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tat (47-58) peptide, a positively charged Arginine-rich peptide derived from HIV-1 regulatory protein Tat, is known for a peptidic delivery factor as a cell-penetrating peptide on mammalian cells. In this study, antifungal effect and its mode of action of Tat peptide were investigated on fungal cells. The results indicate that Tat peptide exhibits antifungal activity against pathogenic fungal cells without hemolytic effect on human erythrocytes. To understand the mechanism(s) of Tat peptide, the cellular distribution of the peptide was investigated. Tat peptide internalized in the fungal cells without any damage to cell membrane when examined using an artificial liposome (PC/cholesterol; 10:1, w/w). Moreover, flow cytometry analysis exhibited the uptake of Tat peptide by energy- and salt-independent pathway, and confocal scanning microscopy displayed that this peptide accumulated in the nucleus of fungal cells rapidly without any impediment by time or temperature, which generally influence on the viral infections. After penetration into the nuclear, the peptide affected the process of cell cycle of Candida albicans through the arrest at G1 phase

  2. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ErkkiRuoslahti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  3. Introduction to Peptide Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Stawikowski, Maciej; Fields, Gregg B.

    2002-01-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar-substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones, such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  4. The Role Of Milk Peptide As Antimicrobial Agent In Supporting Health Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Kusumaningtyas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptide is commonly present in all species as a component of their innate immune defense against infection. Antimicrobial peptides derived from milk such as isracidin, casocidin, casecidin and other fragments with variety of amino acid sequence are released upon enzymatic hydrolysis from milk protein К-casein, α-casein, β-casein, α-lactalbumin and β- lactoglobulin. These peptides were produced by the activity of digestive or microbial protease such as trypsin, pepsin, chymosin or alcalase. The mode of action of these peptides is by interaction of their positive with negative charge of target cell membrane leading to disruption of membrane associated with physiological event such as cell division or translocation of peptide across the membrane to interact with cytoplasmic target. Modification of charged or nonpolar aliphatic residues within peptides can enhance or reduce the activities of the peptides against a number of microbial strains and it seems to be strain dependent. Several peptides act not only as an antimicrobial but also as an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, antioxidant, immunomodulator, antiinflamation, food and feed preservative. Although the commercial production of these peptides is still limited due to lack of suitable large-scale technologies, fast development of some methods for peptide production will hopefully increase the possibility for mass production.

  5. Membrane interactions of synthetic peptides with antimicrobial potential: effect of electrostatic interactions and amphiphilicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion, Matthieu; Valois-Paillard, Geneviève; Lorin, Aurélien; Noël, Mathieu; Voyer, Normand; Auger, Michèle

    2015-03-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are considered promising candidates to complement currently used antibiotics, which are less effective against increasingly resistant pathogens. To determine the mechanism of action of these peptides, a better understanding of each molecular determinant involved in their membrane interactions is of great importance. In this study, we have focused on the role of electrostatic interactions and amphiphilicity on the membrane interactions since the large majority of natural antimicrobial peptides are cationic. Therefore, cationic and anionic peptides have been prepared based on a model 14-mer peptide. The latter is a synthetic peptide composed of ten leucines and four phenylalanines, which are modified by the addition of the crown ether. Infrared spectroscopy results indicate that the position of substitution is the main determinant involved in the secondary structure adopted by the peptides, and not the charge of the substituted residues. Fluorescence vesicle leakage assays indicate, however, differences between the ability of cationic and anionic peptides to induce calcein release in zwitterionic and anionic lipid vesicles, suggesting an importance of electrostatic interactions and repulsions. Finally, (31)P NMR results indicate that the vesicle morphologies is not significantly affected by the interactions with both cationic and anionic peptides but that their effect on lipid bilayers is mainly determined by their secondary structure. This study therefore indicates that the membrane interactions of model 14-mer peptides are mainly governed by their secondary structure, which depends on the position of substitution, and not the charge of the residues. PMID:25422123

  6. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides. PMID:27003128

  7. Ionization and fragmentation of cold clusters of PAH molecules: collisions with keV ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on collisions between atomic ions and pure, loosely bound, clusters of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. We find that charge and excitation energy is distributed on the cluster constituents before break-up which mostly leads to emissions of intact, excited, singly charged monomers. Surprisingly, collisions with highly charged ions lead to hotter monomers than collisions with ions in low charge states. Small PAH clusters fragment promptly when singly ionized while clusters of more than 13 or 5 molecules may remain intact for anthracene or coronene clusters, respectively.

  8. Structure-function relationships of peptides forming the calcin family of ryanodine receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liang; Gurrola, Georgina B; Zhang, Jing; Valdivia, Carmen R; SanMartin, Mario; Zamudio, Fernando Z; Zhang, Liming; Possani, Lourival D; Valdivia, Héctor H

    2016-05-01

    Calcins are a novel family of scorpion peptides that bind with high affinity to ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and increase their activity by inducing subconductance states. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the structure-function relationships of the eight calcins known to date, based on their primary sequence, three-dimensional modeling, and functional effects on skeletal RyRs (RyR1). Primary sequence alignment and evolutionary analysis show high similarity among all calcins (≥78.8% identity). Other common characteristics include an inhibitor cysteine knot (ICK) motif stabilized by three pairs of disulfide bridges and a dipole moment (DM) formed by positively charged residues clustering on one side of the molecule and neutral and negatively charged residues segregating on the opposite side. [(3)H]Ryanodine binding assays, used as an index of the open probability of RyRs, reveal that all eight calcins activate RyR1 dose-dependently with Kd values spanning approximately three orders of magnitude and in the following rank order: opicalcin1 > opicalcin2 > vejocalcin > hemicalcin > imperacalcin > hadrucalcin > maurocalcin > urocalcin. All calcins significantly augment the bell-shaped [Ca(2+)]-[(3)H]ryanodine binding curve with variable effects on the affinity constants for Ca(2+) activation and inactivation. In single channel recordings, calcins induce the appearance of a subconductance state in RyR1 that has a unique fractional value (∼20% to ∼60% of the full conductance state) but bears no relationship to binding affinity, DM, or capacity to stimulate Ca(2+) release. Except for urocalcin, all calcins at 100 nM concentration stimulate Ca(2+) release and deplete Ca(2+) load from skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum. The natural variation within the calcin family of peptides offers a diversified set of high-affinity ligands with the capacity to modulate RyRs with high dynamic range and potency. PMID:27114612

  9. Evolutionary Pareto-optimization of stably folding peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Daniel

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a rule, peptides are more flexible and unstructured than proteins with their substantial stabilizing hydrophobic cores. Nevertheless, a few stably folding peptides have been discovered. This raises the question whether there may be more such peptides that are unknown as yet. These molecules could be helpful in basic research and medicine. Results As a method to explore the space of conformationally stable peptides, we have developed an evolutionary algorithm that allows optimization of sequences with respect to several criteria simultaneously, for instance stability, accessibility of arbitrary parts of the peptide, etc. In a proof-of-concept experiment we have perturbed the sequence of the peptide Villin Headpiece, known to be stable in vitro. Starting from the perturbed sequence we applied our algorithm to optimize peptide stability and accessibility of a loop. Unexpectedly, two clusters of sequences were generated in this way that, according to our criteria, should form structures with higher stability than the wild-type. The structures in one of the clusters possess a fold that markedly differs from the native fold of Villin Headpiece. One of the mutants predicted to be stable was selected for synthesis, its molecular 3D-structure was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and its stability was measured by circular dichroism. Predicted structure and stability were in good agreement with experiment. Eight other sequences and structures, including five with a non-native fold are provided as bona fide predictions. Conclusion The results suggest that much more conformationally stable peptides may exist than are known so far, and that small fold classes could comprise well-separated sub-folds.

  10. Singular electrostatic energy of nanoparticle clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian; Krapf, Nathan W.; Witten, Thomas A.

    2016-02-01

    The binding of clusters of metal nanoparticles is partly electrostatic. We address difficulties in calculating the electrostatic energy when high charging energies limit the total charge to a single quantum, entailing unequal potentials on the particles. We show that the energy at small separation h has a singular logarithmic dependence on h . We derive a general form for this energy in terms of the singular capacitance of two spheres in near contact c (h ) , together with nonsingular geometric features of the cluster. Using this form, we determine the energies of various clusters, finding that more compact clusters are more stable. These energies are proposed to be significant for metal-semiconductor binary nanoparticle lattices found experimentally. We sketch how these effects should dictate the relative abundances of metal nanoparticle clusters in nonpolar solvents.

  11. Bacterial strategies of resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hwang-Soo; Fu, Chih-Iung; Otto, Michael

    2016-05-26

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a key component of the host's innate immune system, targeting invasive and colonizing bacteria. For successful survival and colonization of the host, bacteria have a series of mechanisms to interfere with AMP activity, and AMP resistance is intimately connected with the virulence potential of bacterial pathogens. In particular, because AMPs are considered as potential novel antimicrobial drugs, it is vital to understand bacterial AMP resistance mechanisms. This review gives a comparative overview of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strategies of resistance to various AMPs, such as repulsion or sequestration by bacterial surface structures, alteration of membrane charge or fluidity, degradation and removal by efflux pumps.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160595

  12. Denominators of cluster variables

    OpenAIRE

    Buan, Aslak Bakke; Marsh, Robert J.; Reiten, Idun

    2007-01-01

    Associated to any acyclic cluster algebra is a corresponding triangulated category known as the cluster category. It is known that there is a one-to-one correspondence between cluster variables in the cluster algebra and exceptional indecomposable objects in the cluster category inducing a correspondence between clusters and cluster-tilting objects. Fix a cluster-tilting object T and a corresponding initial cluster. By the Laurent phenomenon, every cluster variable can be written as a Laurent...

  13. Cluster Bulleticity

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, Richard; Nagai, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, like the bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) and baby bullet (MACSJ0025-12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distribution of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary 'baryonic' matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by their rarity. Constraints on the properties of dark matter, such as its interaction cross-section, are therefore restricted by uncertainties in the individual systems' impact velocity, impact parameter and orientation with respect to the line of sight. Here we develop a complementary, statistical measurement in which every piece of substructure falling into every massive cluster is treated as a bullet. We define 'bulleticity' as the mean separation between dark matter and ordinary matter, and we measure a positive signal in hydrodynamical si...

  14. Solution Versus Gas-Phase Modification of Peptide Cations with NHS-Ester Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentinova, Marija; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2012-02-01

    A comparison between solution and gas phase modification of primary amine sites in model peptide cations with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester reagents is presented. In all peptides, the site of modification in solution was directed to the N-terminus by conducting reactions at pH = 5, whereas for the same peptides, a lysine residue was preferentially modified in the gas phase. The difference in pKa values of the N-terminus and ɛ-amino group of the lysine allows for a degree of control over sites of protonation of the peptides in aqueous solution. With removal of the dielectric and multiple charging of the peptide ions in the gas phase, the accommodation of excess charge can affect the preferred sites of reaction. Interaction of the lone pair of the primary nitrogen with a proton reduces its nucleophilicity and, as a result, its reactivity towards NHS-esters. While no evidence for reaction of the N-terminus with sulfo-NHS-acetate was noted in the model peptide cations, a charge inversion experiment using bis[sulfosuccinimidyl] suberate, a cross-linking reagent with two sulfo-NHS-ester functionalities, showed modification of the N-terminus. Hence, an unprotonated N-terminus can serve as a nucleophile to displace NHS, which suggests that its lack of reactivity with the peptide cations is likely due to the participation of the N-terminus in solvating excess charge.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Tam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic, lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms.

  17. Electromembrane extraction of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balchen, Marte; Reubsaet, Léon; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2008-06-20

    Rapid extraction of eight different peptides using electromembrane extraction (EME) was demonstrated for the first time. During an extraction time of 5 min, the model peptides migrated from a 500 microL aqueous acidic sample solution, through a thin supported liquid membrane (SLM) of an organic liquid sustained in the pores in the wall of a porous hollow fiber, and into a 25 microL aqueous acidic acceptor solution present inside the lumen of the hollow fiber. The driving force of the extraction was a 50 V potential sustained across the SLM, with the positive electrode in the sample and the negative electrode in the acceptor solution. The nature and the composition of the SLM were highly important for the EME process, and a mixture of 1-octanol and 15% di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate was found to work properly. Using 1mM HCl as background electrolyte in the sample and 100 mM HCl in the acceptor solution, and agitation at 1050 rpm, enrichment up to 11 times was achieved. Recoveries were found to be dependent on the structure of the peptide, indicating that the polarity and the number of ionized groups were important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency. The experimental findings suggested that electromembrane extraction of peptides is possible and may be a valuable tool for future extraction of peptides. PMID:18479691

  18. A rock-salt-type Li-based oxide, Li3Ni2RuO6, exhibiting a chaotic ferrimagnetism with cluster spin-glass dynamics and thermally frozen charge carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Sanjay Kumar; Iyer, Kartik K; Rayaprol, S; Paulose, P L; Sampathkumaran, E V

    2016-01-01

    The area of research to discover new Li containing materials and to understand their physical properties has been of constant interest due to applications potential for rechargeable batteries. Here, we present the results of magnetic investigations on a Li compound, Li3Ni2RuO6, which was believed to be a ferrimagnet below 80 K. While our neutron diffraction (ND) and isothermal magnetization (M) data support ferrimagnetism, more detailed magnetic studies establish that this ferrimagnetic phase exhibits some features similar to spin-glasses. In addition, we find another broad magnetic anomaly around 40-55 K in magnetic susceptibility (χ), attributable to cluster spin-glass phenomenon. Gradual dominance of cluster spin-glass dynamics with a decrease of temperature (T) and the apparent spread in freezing temperature suggest that the ferrimagnetism of this compound is a chaotic one. The absence of a unique freezing temperature for a crystalline material is interesting. In addition, pyroelectric current (Ipyro) data reveals a feature in the range 40-50 K, attributable to thermally stimulated depolarization current. We hope this finding motivates future work to explore whether there is any intriguing correlation of such a feature with cluster spin-glass dynamics. We attribute these magnetic and electric dipole anomalies to the crystallographic disorder, intrinsic to this compound. PMID:27545439

  19. Interaction of 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical segments of globular proteins with model membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chandrasekaran Sivakamasundari; Ramakrishnan Nagaraj

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the interaction of six 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical segments of globular proteins with model membranes. The net charge of the peptides at neutral pH varies from –1 to +6. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that peptides with a high net positive charge tend to fold into a helical conformation in the presence of negatively charged lipid vesicles. In helical conformation, their average hydrophobic moment and hydrophobicity would render them surface-active. The composition of amino acids on the polar face of the helix in the peptides is considerably different. The peptides show variations in their ability to permeabilise zwitterionic and anionic lipid vesicles. Whereas increased net positive charge favours greater permeabilisation, the distribution of charged residues in the polar face also plays a role in determining membrane activity. The distribution of amino acids in the polar face of the helix in the peptides that were investigated do not fall into the canonical classes described. Amphipathic helices, which are part of proteins, with a pattern of amino acid distribution different from those observed in class L, A and others, could help in providing newer insights into peptide–membrane interactions.

  20. Reaction of tungsten anion clusters with molecular and atomic nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young Dok; Stolcic, Davor; Fischer, Matthias; Ganteför, Gerd

    2003-01-01

    Ultraviolet photoelectron spectra for WnN-2 (n=1 8) clusters produced by addition of atomic and molecular nitrogen on W anion clusters are presented. Evidence is provided that molecular chemisorption of N2 is more stable than the dissociative one on tungsten anion clusters consisting of eight atoms or less, which is completely different from the results on tungsten bulk surfaces. A general tendency toward molecular chemisorption for small clusters can be explained by reduced charge transfer f...

  1. Cluster emission under femtosecond laser ablation of silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Bulgakov, Alexander,; Ozerov, Igor; Marine, Wladimir

    2003-01-01

    Rich populations of clusters have been observed after femtosecond laser ablation of bulk silicon in vacuum. Size and velocity distributions of the clusters as well as their charge states have been analyzed by reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry. An efficient emission of both neutral silicon clusters Sin (up to n = 6) and their cations Sin+ (up to n = 10) has been observed. The clusters are formed even at very low laser fluences, below ablation threshold, and their relative yield incre...

  2. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26724202

  3. Defensins promote fusion and lysis of negatively charged membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, G; Selsted, M E; Eisenberg, D.

    1993-01-01

    Defensins, a family of cationic peptides isolated from mammalian granulocytes and believed to permeabilize membranes, were tested for their ability to cause fusion and lysis of liposomes. Unlike alpha-helical peptides whose lytic effects have been extensively studied, the defensins consist primarily of beta-sheet. Defensins fuse and lyse negatively charged liposomes but display reduced activity with neutral liposomes. These and other experiments suggest that fusion and lysis is mediated prima...

  4. Biomimetic peptide nanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue; Kim, Sang N; Naik, Rajesh R; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    The development of a miniaturized sensing platform tailored for sensitive and selective detection of a variety of biochemical analytes could offer transformative fundamental and technological opportunities. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratios, nanoscale materials are extremely sensitive sensors. Likewise, peptides represent robust substrates for selective recognition due to the potential for broad chemical diversity within their relatively compact size. Here we explore the possibilities of linking peptides to nanosensors for the selective detection of biochemical targets. Such systems raise a number of interesting fundamental challenges: What are the peptide sequences, and how can rational design be used to derive selective binders? What nanomaterials should be used, and what are some strategies for assembling hybrid nanosensors? What role does molecular modeling play in elucidating response mechanisms? What is the resulting performance of these sensors, in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time? What are some potential applications? This Account will highlight our early attempts to address these research challenges. Specifically, we use natural peptide sequences or sequences identified from phage display as capture elements. The sensors are based on a variety of nanomaterials including nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. We couple peptides to the nanomaterial surfaces via traditional surface functionalization methods or self-assembly. Molecular modeling provides detailed insights into the hybrid nanostructure, as well as the sensor detection mechanisms. The peptide nanosensors can distinguish chemically camouflaged mixtures of vapors and detect chemical warfare agents with sensitivities as low as parts-per-billion levels. Finally, we anticipate future uses of this technology in biomedicine: for example, devices based on these sensors could detect disease from the molecular components in human breath. Overall, these results provide a

  5. Fuzzy Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berks, G.; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf von; Jantzen, Jan;

    2000-01-01

    and clustering are the basic concerns in medicine. Classification depends on definitions of the classes and their required degree of participant of the elements in the cases' symptoms. In medicine imprecise conditions are the rule and therefore fuzzy methods are much more suitable than crisp ones...

  6. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  7. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Laverty, Garry; Gilmore, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy serves as a valuable tool for assessing the structural integrity and viability of eukaryotic cells. Through the use of calcein AM and the DNA stain 4,6-diamidino-2 phenylindole (DAPI), cell viability and membrane integrity can be qualified. Our group has previously shown the ultra-short cationic antimicrobial peptide H-OOWW-NH2; the amphibian derived 27-mer peptide Maximin-4and the ultra-short lipopeptide C12-OOWW-NH2 to be effective against a range of bacterial biofil...

  8. Quotients of cluster categories

    OpenAIRE

    Jorgensen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Higher cluster categories were recently introduced as a generalization of cluster categories. This paper shows that in Dynkin types A and D, half of all higher cluster categories are actually just quotients of cluster categories. The other half can be obtained as quotients of 2-cluster categories, the "lowest" type of higher cluster categories. Hence, in Dynkin types A and D, all higher cluster phenomena are implicit in cluster categories and 2-cluster categories. In contrast, the same is not...

  9. Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes: Effect of charge distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Mingtian; Li, Baohui, E-mail: dliang@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: baohui@nankai.edu.cn [School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Functional Polymer Materials of Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhou, Jihan; Su, Cuicui; Niu, Lin; Liang, Dehai, E-mail: dliang@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: baohui@nankai.edu.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences and the Key Laboratory of Polymer Chemistry and Physics of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-05-28

    Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes in a solution is investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experiments, focusing on the influence of polyelectrolyte charge distributions along the chains on the structure of the polyelectrolyte complexes. The simulations are performed using Monte Carlo with the replica-exchange algorithm for three model systems where each system is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged model polyelectrolyte chains (EGEG){sub 5}/(KGKG){sub 5}, (EEGG){sub 5}/(KKGG){sub 5}, and (EEGG){sub 5}/(KGKG){sub 5}, in a solution including explicit solvent molecules. Among the three model systems, only the charge distributions along the chains are not identical. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated as a function of temperature (or ionic strength), and the microscopic structures of complexes are examined. It is found that the three systems have different transition temperatures, and form complexes with different sizes, structures, and densities at a given temperature. Complex microscopic structures with an alternating arrangement of one monolayer of E/K monomers and one monolayer of G monomers, with one bilayer of E and K monomers and one bilayer of G monomers, and with a mixture of monolayer and bilayer of E/K monomers in a box shape and a trilayer of G monomers inside the box are obtained for the three mixture systems, respectively. The experiments are carried out for three systems where each is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged peptide chains. Each peptide chain is composed of Lysine (K) and glycine (G) or glutamate (E) and G, in solution, and the chain length and amino acid sequences, and hence the charge distribution, are precisely controlled, and all of them are identical with those for the corresponding model chain. The complexation behavior and complex structures are characterized through laser light scattering and atomic force microscopy measurements. The order

  10. Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes: Effect of charge distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes in a solution is investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experiments, focusing on the influence of polyelectrolyte charge distributions along the chains on the structure of the polyelectrolyte complexes. The simulations are performed using Monte Carlo with the replica-exchange algorithm for three model systems where each system is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged model polyelectrolyte chains (EGEG)5/(KGKG)5, (EEGG)5/(KKGG)5, and (EEGG)5/(KGKG)5, in a solution including explicit solvent molecules. Among the three model systems, only the charge distributions along the chains are not identical. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated as a function of temperature (or ionic strength), and the microscopic structures of complexes are examined. It is found that the three systems have different transition temperatures, and form complexes with different sizes, structures, and densities at a given temperature. Complex microscopic structures with an alternating arrangement of one monolayer of E/K monomers and one monolayer of G monomers, with one bilayer of E and K monomers and one bilayer of G monomers, and with a mixture of monolayer and bilayer of E/K monomers in a box shape and a trilayer of G monomers inside the box are obtained for the three mixture systems, respectively. The experiments are carried out for three systems where each is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged peptide chains. Each peptide chain is composed of Lysine (K) and glycine (G) or glutamate (E) and G, in solution, and the chain length and amino acid sequences, and hence the charge distribution, are precisely controlled, and all of them are identical with those for the corresponding model chain. The complexation behavior and complex structures are characterized through laser light scattering and atomic force microscopy measurements. The order of the apparent weight-averaged molar

  11. Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes: Effect of charge distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingtian; Zhou, Jihan; Su, Cuicui; Niu, Lin; Liang, Dehai; Li, Baohui

    2015-05-01

    Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes in a solution is investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experiments, focusing on the influence of polyelectrolyte charge distributions along the chains on the structure of the polyelectrolyte complexes. The simulations are performed using Monte Carlo with the replica-exchange algorithm for three model systems where each system is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged model polyelectrolyte chains (EGEG)5/(KGKG)5, (EEGG)5/(KKGG)5, and (EEGG)5/(KGKG)5, in a solution including explicit solvent molecules. Among the three model systems, only the charge distributions along the chains are not identical. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated as a function of temperature (or ionic strength), and the microscopic structures of complexes are examined. It is found that the three systems have different transition temperatures, and form complexes with different sizes, structures, and densities at a given temperature. Complex microscopic structures with an alternating arrangement of one monolayer of E/K monomers and one monolayer of G monomers, with one bilayer of E and K monomers and one bilayer of G monomers, and with a mixture of monolayer and bilayer of E/K monomers in a box shape and a trilayer of G monomers inside the box are obtained for the three mixture systems, respectively. The experiments are carried out for three systems where each is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged peptide chains. Each peptide chain is composed of Lysine (K) and glycine (G) or glutamate (E) and G, in solution, and the chain length and amino acid sequences, and hence the charge distribution, are precisely controlled, and all of them are identical with those for the corresponding model chain. The complexation behavior and complex structures are characterized through laser light scattering and atomic force microscopy measurements. The order of the apparent weight-averaged molar

  12. Multiple peptide resistance factor (MprF)-mediated Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus against antimicrobial peptides coincides with a modulated peptide interaction with artificial membranes comprising lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrä, Jörg; Goldmann, Torsten; Ernst, Christoph M; Peschel, Andreas; Gutsmann, Thomas

    2011-05-27

    Modification of the membrane lipid phosphatidylglycerol (PG) of Staphylococcus aureus by enzymatic transfer of a l-lysine residue leading to lysyl-PG converts the net charge of PG from -1 to +1 and is thought to confer resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Lysyl-PG synthesis and translocation to the outer leaflet of the bacterial membrane are achieved by the membrane protein MprF. Consequently, mutants lacking a functional mprF gene are in particular vulnerable to the action of AMPs. Hence, we aim at elucidating whether and to which extent lysyl-PG modulates membrane binding, insertion, and permeabilization by various AMPs. Lysyl-PG was incorporated into artificial lipid bilayers, mimicking the cytoplasmic membrane of S. aureus. Moreover, we determined the activity of the peptides against a clinical isolate of S. aureus strain SA113 and two mutants lacking a functional mprF gene and visualized peptide-induced ultrastructural changes of bacteria by transmission electron microscopy. The studied peptides were: (i) NK-2, an α-helical fragment of mammalian NK-lysin, (ii) arenicin-1, a lugworm β-sheet peptide, and (iii) bee venom melittin. Biophysical data obtained by FRET spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and electrical measurements with planar lipid bilayers were correlated with the biological activities of the peptides. They strongly support the hypothesis that peptide-membrane interactions are a prerequisite for eradication of S. aureus. However, degree and mode of modulation of membrane properties such as fluidity, capacitance, and conductivity were unique for each of the peptides. Altogether, our data support and underline the significance of lysyl-PG for S. aureus resistance to AMPs. PMID:21474443

  13. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac p...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....... characterized. An ongoing characterization of the molecular heterogeneity will help appreciate the biosynthetic capacity of the endocrine heart and could introduce new diagnostic possibilities. Notably, different biosynthetic products may not be equal markers of the same pathophysiological processes. An...... inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...

  14. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac...... inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....

  15. Regional Innovation Clusters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — The Regional Innovation Clusters serve a diverse group of sectors and geographies. Three of the initial pilot clusters, termed Advanced Defense Technology clusters,...

  16. Fingerprinting Desmosine-Containing Elastin Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schräder, Christoph U.; Heinz, Andrea; Majovsky, Petra; Schmelzer, Christian E. H.

    2015-05-01

    Elastin is a vital protein of the extracellular matrix of jawed vertebrates and provides elasticity to numerous tissues. It is secreted in the form of its soluble precursor tropoelastin, which is subsequently cross-linked in the course of the elastic fiber assembly. The process involves the formation of the two tetrafunctional amino acids desmosine (DES) and isodesmosine (IDES), which are unique to elastin. The resulting high degree of cross-linking confers remarkable properties, including mechanical integrity, insolubility, and long-term stability to the protein. These characteristics hinder the structural elucidation of mature elastin. However, MS2 data of linear and cross-linked peptides released by proteolysis can provide indirect insights into the structure of elastin. In this study, we performed energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation experiments of DES, IDES, their derivatives, and DES-/IDES-containing peptides to determine characteristic product ions. It was found that all investigated compounds yielded the same product ion clusters at elevated collision energies. Elemental composition determination using the exact masses of these ions revealed molecular formulas of the type CxHyN, suggesting that the pyridinium core of DES/IDES remains intact even at relatively high collision energies. The finding of these specific product ions enabled the development of a similarity-based scoring algorithm that was successfully applied on LC-MS/MS data of bovine elastin digests for the identification of DES-/IDES-cross-linked peptides. This approach facilitates the straightforward investigation of native cross-links in elastin.

  17. Oligomer Formation of Toxic and Functional Amyloid Peptides Studied with Atomistic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Pacheco, Martín; Ismail, Ahmed E; Strodel, Birgit

    2015-07-30

    Amyloids are associated with diseases, including Alzheimer's, as well as functional roles such as storage of peptide hormones. It is still unclear what differences exist between aberrant and functional amyloids. However, it is known that soluble oligomers formed during amyloid aggregation are more toxic than the final fibrils. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide Aβ25-35, associated with Alzheimer's disease, and two functional amyloid-forming tachykinin peptides: kassinin and neuromedin K. Although the three peptides have similar primary sequences, tachykinin peptides, in contrast to Aβ25-35, form nontoxic amyloids. Our simulations reveal that the charge of the C-terminus is essential to controlling the aggregation process. In particular, when the kassinin C-terminus is not amidated, the aggregation kinetics decreases considerably. In addition, we observe that the monomeric peptides in extended conformations aggregate faster than those in collapsed hairpin-like conformations. PMID:26130191

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties. [Atomic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) (0.1981), 0.1895(9) (0.1874(4)), 0.1530(34) (0.1599(73)), 0.1664(37) (0.1724(110)), 0.1613(43) (0.1675(110)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) (0.0203(12)), 0.0188(10) (0.0220(21)), 0.0247(8) (0.0310(12)), 0.0253(8) (0.0351(8)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  19. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  20. Clustering experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhengwei; Tan, Ken; Di, Zengru; Roehner, Bertrand M

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that bees cluster together in cold weather, in the process of swarming (when the ``old'' queen leaves with part of the colony) or absconding (when the queen leaves with all the colony) and in defense against intruders such as wasps or hornets. In this paper we describe a fairly different clustering process which occurs at any temperature and independently of any special stimulus or circumstance. As a matter of fact, this process is about four times faster at 28 degree Celsius than at 15 degrees. Because of its simplicity and low level of ``noise'' we think that this phenomenon can provide a means for exploring the strength of inter-individual attraction between bees or other living organisms. For instance, and at first sight fairly surprisingly, our observations showed that this attraction does also exist between bees belonging to different colonies. As this study is aimed at providing a comparative perspective, we also describe a similar clustering experiment for red fire ants.

  1. Cysteine and arginine-rich peptides as molecular carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Amir Nasrolahi; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Mandal, Dindayal; Tiwari, Rakesh K; Tavakoli, Kathy; Etesham, Matthew; Parang, Keykavous

    2016-01-15

    A number of linear and cyclic peptides containing alternative arginine and cysteine residues, namely linear (CR)3, linear (CR)4, linear (CR)5, cyclic [CR]4, and cyclic [CR]5, were synthesized. The peptides were evaluated for their ability to deliver two molecular cargos, fluorescence-labeled cell-impermeable negatively charged phosphopeptide (F'-GpYEEI) and fluorescence-labeled lamivudine (F'-3TC), intracellularly in human leukemia cancer (CCRF-CEM) cells. We investigated the role of cyclization and the number of amino acids in improving the transporting ability of the peptides. The flow cytometry studies suggested that the synthesized peptides were able to work efficiently as transporters for both cargos. Among all compounds, cyclic [CR]4 was found to be the most efficient peptide in transporting the cargo into cells. For instance, the cellular uptake of F'-3TC (5μM) and F'-GpYEEI (5μM) was enhanced by 16- and 20-fold, respectively, in the presence of cyclic [CR]4 compared to that of the parent compound alone. The mechanism of F'-GpYEEI uptake by cells was found to be energy-independent. The results showed that the number of amino acids and their cyclic nature can impact the efficiency of the peptide in transporting the molecular cargos. PMID:26631317

  2. Prediction of Biofilm Inhibiting Peptides: An In silico Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sudheer; Sharma, Ashok K.; Jaiswal, Shubham K.; Sharma, Vineet K.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 75% of microbial infections found in humans are caused by microbial biofilms. These biofilms are resistant to host immune system and most of the currently available antibiotics. Small peptides are extensively studied for their role as anti-microbial peptides, however, only a limited studies have shown their potential as inhibitors of biofilm. Therefore, to develop a unique computational method aimed at the prediction of biofilm inhibiting peptides, the experimentally validated biofilm inhibiting peptides sequences were used to extract sequence based features and to identify unique sequence motifs. Biofilm inhibiting peptides were observed to be abundant in positively charged and aromatic amino acids, and also showed selective abundance of some dipeptides and sequence motifs. These individual sequence based features were utilized to construct Support Vector Machine-based prediction models and additionally by including sequence motifs information, the hybrid models were constructed. Using 10-fold cross validation, the hybrid model displayed the accuracy and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 97.83% and 0.87, respectively. On the validation dataset, the hybrid model showed the accuracy and MCC value of 97.19% and 0.84, respectively. The validated model and other tools developed for the prediction of biofilm inhibiting peptides are available freely as web server at http://metagenomics.iiserb.ac.in/biofin/ and http://metabiosys.iiserb.ac.in/biofin/. PMID:27379078

  3. CHARGE Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semanti Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here a case of 17-year-old boy from Kolkata presenting with obesity, bilateral gynecomastia, mental retardation, and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The patient weighed 70 kg and was of 153 cm height. Facial asymmetry (unilateral facial palsy, gynecomastia, decreased pubic and axillary hair, small penis, decreased right testicular volume, non-palpable left testis, and right-sided congenital inguinal hernia was present. The patient also had disc coloboma, convergent squint, microcornea, microphthalmia, pseudohypertelorism, low set ears, short neck, and choanalatresia. He had h/o VSD repaired with patch. Laboratory examination revealed haemoglobin 9.9 mg/dl, urea 24 mg/dl, creatinine 0.68 mg/dl. IGF1 77.80 ng/ml (decreased for age, GH <0.05 ng/ml, testosterone 0.25 ng/ml, FSH-0.95 ΅IU/ml, LH 0.60 ΅IU/ml. ACTH, 8:00 A.M cortisol, FT3, FT4, TSH, estradiol, DHEA-S, lipid profile, and LFT was within normal limits. Prolactin was elevated at 38.50 ng/ml. The patient′s karyotype was 46XY. Echocardiography revealed ventricularseptal defect closed with patch, grade 1 aortic regurgitation, and ejection fraction 67%. Ultrasound testis showed small right testis within scrotal sac and undescended left testis within left inguinal canal. CT scan paranasal sinuses revealed choanalatresia and deviation of nasal septum to the right. Sonomammography revealed bilateral proliferation of fibroglandular elements predominantly in subareoalar region of breasts. MRI of brain and pituitary region revealed markedly atrophic pituitary gland parenchyma with preserved infundibulum and hypothalamus and widened suprasellar cistern. The CHARGE association is an increasingly recognized non-random pattern of congenital anomalies comprising of coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear abnormalities, and/or deafness. [1] These anomalies have a higher probability of occurring together. In this report, we have

  4. Peptide iodination on phenylalanine residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peptide labelling with radioactive isotopes is always a compromise between peptide chemistry, labelling chemistry, and biological receptor tolerance. Therefore new ways for isotope introduction are always useful. The present contribution describes the introduction of iodine isotopes onto synthetic polypeptides by means of the Gattermann/ Sandmeyer reactions. Peptides containing the nitrophenylalanyl residue are reduced to the corresponding aminophenylalanyl, diazolized to the diazonium phenylalanyl peptide and converted to the iodophenylalanyl peptide in the presence of copper. Two examples are presented: angiotensin II and enkephalin. In both cases, the iodophenylalanyl residue is well accepted by the biological target. (author). 13 refs.; 4 figs

  5. Charged histidine affects alpha-helix stability at all positions in the helix by interacting with the backbone charges.

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, K M; Baldwin, R L

    1993-01-01

    To determine whether a charged histidine side chain affects alpha-helix stability only when histidine is close to one end of the helix or also when it is in the central region, we substitute a single histidine residue at many positions in two reference peptides and measure helix stability and histidine pKa. The position of a charged histidine residue has a major effect on helix stability in 0.01 M NaCl: the helix content of a 17-residue peptide is 24% when histidine is at position 3 compared ...

  6. Characterization of a highly potent antimicrobial peptide microcin N from uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kamaljit; Tarassova, Oxana; Dangeti, Ramana Venkata; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Wishart, David; McMullen, Lynn; Stiles, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Microcin N is a low-molecular weight, highly active antimicrobial peptide produced by uropathogenic Escherichia coli In this study, the native peptide was expressed and purified from pGOB18 plasmid carrying E. coli in low yield. The pure peptide was characterized using mass spectrometry, N-terminal sequencing by Edman degradation as well as trypsin digestion. We found that the peptide is 74-residue long, cationic (+2 total charge), highly hydrophobic and consists of glycine as the first N-terminal residue. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the peptide against Salmonella enteritidis was found to be 150 nM. Evaluation of the solution conformation of the peptide using circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the peptide is well folded in 40% trifluoroethanol with helical structure whereas the folded structure is lost in aqueous solution. To increase the yield of this potent peptide, we overexpressed GST-tagged microcin N using E. coli BL21. Recombinant GST-tagged microcin N was successfully expressed in E. coli BL21; however, the cleaved mature microcin N did not show activity against the indicator strain (S. enterica) most likely due to the extreme hydrophobic nature of the peptide. Efforts to produce active microcin N in large scale are discussed as this peptide has huge potential to be the next generation antimicrobial agent. PMID:27190283

  7. A molecular dynamics and circular dichroism study of a novel synthetic antimicrobial peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodina, N. P.; Yudenko, A. N.; Terterov, I. N.; Eliseev, I. E.

    2013-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are a class of small, usually positively charged amphiphilic peptides that are used by the innate immune system to combat bacterial infection in multicellular eukaryotes. Antimicrobial peptides are known for their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and thus can be used as a basis for a development of new antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria. The most challengeous task on the way to a therapeutic use of antimicrobial peptides is a rational design of new peptides with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity. Here we report a molecular dynamics and circular dichroism study of a novel synthetic antimicrobial peptide D51. This peptide was earlier designed by Loose et al. using a linguistic model of natural antimicrobial peptides. Molecular dynamics simulation of the peptide folding in explicit solvent shows fast formation of two antiparallel beta strands connected by a beta-turn that is confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. Obtained from simulation amphipatic conformation of the peptide is analysed and possible mechanism of it's interaction with bacterial membranes together with ways to enhance it's antibacterial activity are suggested.

  8. A molecular dynamics and circular dichroism study of a novel synthetic antimicrobial peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antimicrobial peptides are a class of small, usually positively charged amphiphilic peptides that are used by the innate immune system to combat bacterial infection in multicellular eukaryotes. Antimicrobial peptides are known for their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and thus can be used as a basis for a development of new antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria. The most challengeous task on the way to a therapeutic use of antimicrobial peptides is a rational design of new peptides with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity. Here we report a molecular dynamics and circular dichroism study of a novel synthetic antimicrobial peptide D51. This peptide was earlier designed by Loose et al. using a linguistic model of natural antimicrobial peptides. Molecular dynamics simulation of the peptide folding in explicit solvent shows fast formation of two antiparallel beta strands connected by a beta-turn that is confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. Obtained from simulation amphipatic conformation of the peptide is analysed and possible mechanism of it's interaction with bacterial membranes together with ways to enhance it's antibacterial activity are suggested

  9. Factor PD-Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Gettler Summa, Mireille; Palumbo, Francesco; Tortora, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Factorial clustering methods have been developed in recent years thanks to the improving of computational power. These methods perform a linear transformation of data and a clustering on transformed data optimizing a common criterion. Factorial PD-clustering is based on Probabilistic Distance clustering (PD-clustering). PD-clustering is an iterative, distribution free, probabilistic, clustering method. Factor PD-clustering make a linear transformation of original variables into a reduced numb...

  10. Complexes of DNA with cationic peptides: conditions of formation and factors effecting internalization by mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizhe, E B; Ignatovich, I A; Burov, S V; Pohvoscheva, A V; Akifiev, B N; Efremov, A M; Perevozchikov, A P; Orlov, S V

    2006-12-01

    This work was devoted to the study of conditions of the formation of DNA/K8 complex and analysis of factors effecting the entry of DNA/K8 complex into mammalian cells in comparison with DNA complexes with arginine-rich fragment (47-57) of human immunodeficiency virus (type 1) transcription factor Tat (Tat peptide). The stoichiometry of positively charged DNA/K8 complexes has been studied for the first time. Non-cooperative character of DNA-K8 interaction was revealed. It has been shown that along with the positive charge of such complexes, the presence of an excess of free K8 peptide in the culture medium is a necessary condition for maximal efficiency of cell transfection with DNA/K8 complexes. A stimulatory effect of free K8 peptide on the efficiency of mammalian cell transfection by DNA/K8 complexes is likely to be mediated by the interactions of cationic peptide K8 with negatively charged proteoglycans on the cell surface, which leads to protection of DNA/K8 complexes from disruption by cellular heparan sulfates. However, the protective role of free cationic peptides depends not only on their positive charge, but also on the primary structure of the peptide. In contrast with the results obtained for DNA complexes with molecular conjugates based on poly-L-lysine, the aggregation of DNA/K8 complexes leads to a significant increase in the expression of transferred gene. PMID:17223788

  11. Surface charging by large multivalent molecules. Extending the standard Gouy-Chapman treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Stankowski, S

    1991-01-01

    Traditionally, Gouy-Chapman theory has been used to calculate the distribution of ions in the diffuse layer next to a charged surface. In recent years, the same theory has found application to adsorption (incorporation, partitioning) of charged peptides, hormones, or drugs at the membrane-water interface. Empirically it has been found that an effective charge, smaller than the physical charge, must often be used in the Gouy-Chapman formula. In addition, the large size of these molecules can b...

  12. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Boerman, Otto C.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of research in nuclear medicine. The {sup 111}In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (OctreoScan trademark) is the most successful radiopeptide for tumour imaging, and was the first to be approved for diagnostic use. Based on the success of these studies, other receptor-targeting peptides such as cholecystokinin/gastrin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1, bombesin (BN), chemokine receptor CXCR4 targeting peptides, and RGD peptides are currently under development or undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of these peptides and their analogues, with regard to their potential for radionuclide imaging of tumours. (orig.)

  13. Electrostatic cluster formation in lipid monolayers

    OpenAIRE

    Ellenbroek, Wouter G.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Christian, David A.; Discher, Dennis E.; Janmey, Paul A.; Liu, Andrea J.

    2010-01-01

    We study phase separation in mixed monolayers of neutral and highly negatively charged lipids, induced by the addition of divalent positively charged counterions. We find good agreement between experiments on mixtures of pip2 and sopc and simulations of a simplified model in which only the essential electrostatic interactions are retained. Thus, our results support an interpretation of pip2 clustering as governed primarily by electrostatic interactions, in which divalent ions such as calcium ...

  14. Singular electrostatic energy of nanoparticle clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Jian; Krapf, Nathan W.; Witten, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    The binding of clusters of metal nanoparticles is partly electrostatic. We address difficulties in calculating the electrostatic energy when high charging energies limit the total charge to a single quantum, entailing unequal potentials on the particles. We show that the energy at small separation $h$ has a singular logarithmic dependence on $h$. We derive a general form for this energy in terms of the singular capacitance of two spheres in near contact $c(h)$, together with nonsingular geome...

  15. Membrane interaction and secondary structure of de novo designed arginine-and tryptophan peptides with dual function

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.

    2012-10-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides are two classes of positively charged membrane active peptides with several properties in common. The challenge is to combine knowledge about the membrane interaction mechanisms and structural properties of the two classes to design peptides with membrane-specific actions, useful either as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances. Membrane active peptides are commonly rich in arginine and tryptophan. We have previously designed a series of arg/trp peptides and investigated how the position and number of tryptophans affect cellular uptake. Here we explore the antimicrobial properties and the interaction with lipid model membranes of these peptides, using minimal inhibitory concentrations assay (MIC), circular dichroism (CD) and linear dichroism (LD). The results show that the arg/trp peptides inhibit the growth of the two gram positive strains Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pyogenes, with some individual variations depending on the position of the tryptophans. No inhibition of the gram negative strains Proteus mirabilis or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was noticed. CD indicated that when bound to lipid vesicles one of the peptides forms an α-helical like structure, whereas the other five exhibited rather random coiled structures. LD indicated that all six peptides were somehow aligned parallel with the membrane surface. Our results do not reveal any obvious connection between membrane interaction and antimicrobial effect for the studied peptides. By contrast cell-penetrating properties can be coupled to both the secondary structure and the degree of order of the peptides. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  16. Analysis of Intrinsic Peptide Detectability via Integrated Label-Free and SRM-Based Absolute Quantitative Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarnuczak, Andrew F; Lee, Dave C H; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W; Eyers, Claire E; Hubbard, Simon J

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics of complex biological samples remains challenging in part due to the variability and charge competition arising during electrospray ionization (ESI) of peptides and the subsequent transfer and detection of ions. These issues preclude direct quantification from signal intensity alone in the absence of a standard. A deeper understanding of the governing principles of peptide ionization and exploitation of the inherent ionization and detection parameters of individual peptides is thus of great value. Here, using the yeast proteome as a model system, we establish the concept of peptide F-factor as a measure of detectability, closely related to ionization efficiency. F-factor is calculated by normalizing peptide precursor ion intensity by absolute abundance of the parent protein. We investigated F-factor characteristics in different shotgun proteomics experiments, including across multiple ESI-based LC-MS platforms. We show that F-factors mirror previously observed physicochemical predictors as peptide detectability but demonstrate a nonlinear relationship between hydrophobicity and peptide detectability. Similarly, we use F-factors to show how peptide ion coelution adversely affects detectability and ionization. We suggest that F-factors have great utility for understanding peptide detectability and gas-phase ion chemistry in complex peptide mixtures, selection of surrogate peptides in targeted MS studies, and for calibration of peptide ion signal in label-free workflows. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003472. PMID:27454336

  17. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  18. Cluster automorphisms and compatibility of cluster variables

    OpenAIRE

    Assem, Ibrahim; Schiffler, Ralf; Shramchenko, Vasilisa

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a notion of unistructural cluster algebras, for which the set of cluster variables uniquely determines the clusters. We prove that cluster algebras of Dynkin type and cluster algebras of rank 2 are unistructural, then prove that if $\\mathcal{A}$ is unistructural or of Euclidean type, then $f: \\mathcal{A}\\to \\mathcal{A}$ is a cluster automorphism if and only if $f$ is an automorphism of the ambient field which restricts to a permutation of the cluster variables. In ...

  19. Antimicrobial peptides in crustaceans

    OpenAIRE

    RD Rosa; MA Barracco

    2010-01-01

    Crustaceans are a large and diverse invertebrate animal group that mounts a complex and efficient innate immune response against a variety of microorganisms. The crustacean immune system is primarily related to cellular responses and the production and release of important immune effectors into the hemolymph. Antimicrobial proteins and/or peptides (AMPs) are key components of innate immunity and are widespread in nature, from bacteria to vertebrate animals. In crustaceans, 15 distinct AMP fam...

  20. Globular Cluster Formation in the Virgo Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, C Corbett; Lake, G

    2014-01-01

    Metal poor globular clusters (MPGCs) are a unique probe of the early universe, in particular the reionization era. Systems of globular clusters in galaxy clusters are particularly interesting as it is in the progenitors of galaxy clusters that the earliest reionizing sources first formed. Although the exact physical origin of globular clusters is still debated, it is generally admitted that globular clusters form in early, rare dark matter peaks (Moore et al. 2006; Boley et al. 2009). We provide a fully numerical analysis of the Virgo cluster globular cluster system by identifying the present day globular cluster system with exactly such early, rare dark matter peaks. A popular hypothesis is that that the observed truncation of blue metal poor globular cluster formation is due to reionization (Spitler et al. 2012; Boley et al. 2009; Brodie & Strader 2006); adopting this view, constraining the formation epoch of MPGCs provides a complementary constraint on the epoch of reionization. By analyzing both the l...

  1. [Brain natriuretic peptide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Villa, G; Lazzeri, C; Fronzaroli, C; Franchi, F; Gentilini, P

    1995-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac hormone with a spectrum of activities quite similar to those of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), including diuretic, natriuretic, hypotensive and smooth muscle relaxant activities. These effects are due to the stimulation of guanylate cyclase-linked natriuretic peptide receptors, leading to an increase in cyclic GMP concentration in target cells. BNP has a lower affinity than ANP for C (clearance) receptors, and is less susceptible to degradation by neutral endopeptidase-24.11, resulting in a longer half-life. In the kidney, BNP increases the glomerular filtration rate and inhibits sodium reabsorption in the distal tubule. It also inhibits the release of renin and aldosterone. Unlike ANP, produced by the atria, BNP is mainly synthesized and released into circulation by the left ventricle and is therefore influenced by stimuli involving this cardiac chamber, such as an increase in arterial pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and dilation. Plasma BNP levels are very low in healthy subjects, and respond modestly, although significantly to physiological stimuli such as changes in posture or sodium intake. In contrast, plasma BNP concentrations increase in disease states such as cirrhosis with ascites, hypertension, chronic renal failure, acute myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure. In the latter condition, plasma BNP concentration is a reliable prognostic index. Evidence obtained by administering BNP to healthy subjects and hypertensive patients suggests that BNP, at physiological and pathophysiological plasma concentrations, markedly influences cardiovascular homeostasis, mainly due to its effects on sodium excretion and the renin-aldosterone axis. PMID:8718658

  2. Efficient Covalent Bond Formation in Gas-Phase Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes with the Photoleucine Stapler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Christopher J.; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Řezáč, Jan; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Tureček, František

    2016-04-01

    Noncovalent complexes of hydrophobic peptides GLLLG and GLLLK with photoleucine (L*) tagged peptides G(L* n L m )K (n = 1,3, m = 2,0) were generated as singly charged ions in the gas phase and probed by photodissociation at 355 nm. Carbene intermediates produced by photodissociative loss of N2 from the L* diazirine rings underwent insertion into X-H bonds of the target peptide moiety, forming covalent adducts with yields reaching 30%. Gas-phase sequencing of the covalent adducts revealed preferred bond formation at the C-terminal residue of the target peptide. Site-selective carbene insertion was achieved by placing the L* residue in different positions along the photopeptide chain, and the residues in the target peptide undergoing carbene insertion were identified by gas-phase ion sequencing that was aided by specific 13C labeling. Density functional theory calculations indicated that noncovalent binding to GL*L*L*K resulted in substantial changes of the (GLLLK + H)+ ground state conformation. The peptide moieties in [GL*L*LK + GLLLK + H]+ ion complexes were held together by hydrogen bonds, whereas dispersion interactions of the nonpolar groups were only secondary in ground-state 0 K structures. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for 100 ps trajectories of several different conformers at the 310 K laboratory temperature showed that noncovalent complexes developed multiple, residue-specific contacts between the diazirine carbons and GLLLK residues. The calculations pointed to the substantial fluidity of the nonpolar side chains in the complexes. Diazirine photochemistry in combination with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is a promising tool for investigations of peptide-peptide ion interactions in the gas phase.

  3. Cluster ion impacts on solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental methods for the production of cluster ions by expansion of weakly ionized plasmas through a supersonic nozzle and skimmer were described. Techniques for the production of relatively narrow mass distributions of singly charged ions containing as many as thousands of molecules of Hydrogen, Argon, Water, Alcohols and Hydrocarbons were reviewed with an explanation of the dependence of the mean cluster ion size on stagnation conditions in the ion source and the orifice geometry in nozzle or free jet expansions. Diagnostic techniques for the mass analysis and detection of these high molecule weight cluster ions were reviewed. A description of the BNL 400 kilovolt post-acceleration detection system and the advantages of secondary electron pulse distributions were presented and discussed. The application of energetic cluster ion impacts for deposition of large amounts of translational energy in thin films and solid surfaces was the main topic of the presentation. Cluster ions can be used to generate assemblies of atoms in solid surfaces with energies determined by available acceleration facilities. The production of assemblies of thousands of atoms with energies of in excess of several hundred volts per atom is readily achieved. The consequence of the ability of generate high energy densities is among other things the production of craters, cavities and in thin films holes of sizes that are smaller than those achievable by atomic ion bombardment and wet etching techniques. Examples of such results were presented showing holes in thin carbon films obtained by transmissions electron microscopy

  4. Workplace Charging. Charging Up University Campuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giles, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Ryder, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Lommele, Stephen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This case study features the experiences of university partners in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Workplace Charging Challenge with the installation and management of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging stations.

  5. Accurate Peptide Fragment Mass Analysis: Multiplexed Peptide Identification and Quantification

    OpenAIRE

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Baker, Tahmina; Bruce, James E.

    2012-01-01

    FT All Reaction Monitoring (FT-ARM) is a novel approach for the identification and quantification of peptides that relies upon the selectivity of high mass accuracy data and the specificity of peptide fragmentation patterns. An FT-ARM experiment involves continuous, data-independent, high mass accuracy MS/MS acquisition spanning a defined m/z range. Custom software was developed to search peptides against the multiplexed fragmentation spectra by comparing theoretical or empirical fragment ion...

  6. Clusters of mobile molecules in supercooled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Starr, Francis W.

    2005-07-01

    We study the spatially heterogeneous dynamics in water via molecular dynamics simulations using the extended simple point charge potential. We identify clusters formed by mobile molecules and study their properties. We find that these clusters grow in size and become more compact as temperature decreases. We analyze the probability density function of cluster size, and we study the cluster correlation length. We find that clusters appear to be characterized by a fractal dimension consistent with that of lattice animals. We relate the cluster size and correlation length to the configurational entropy, Sconf . We find that these quantities depend weakly on 1/Sconf . In particular, the linearity found between the cluster mass n* and 1/Sconf suggests that n* may be interpreted as the mass of the cooperatively rearranging regions that form the basis of the Adam-Gibbs approach to the dynamics of supercooled liquids. We study the motion of molecules within a cluster, and find that each molecule preferentially follows a neighboring molecule in the same cluster. Based on this finding we hypothesize that stringlike cooperative motion may be a general mechanism for molecular rearrangement of complex, as well as simple liquids. By mapping each equilibrium configuration onto its corresponding local potential energy minimum or inherent structure (IS), we are able to compare the mobile molecule clusters in the equilibrium system with the molecules forming the clusters identified in the transitions between IS. We find that (i) mobile molecule clusters obtained by comparing different system configurations and (ii) clusters obtained by comparing the corresponding IS are completely different for short time scales, but are the same on the longer time scales of diffusive motion.

  7. Adaptive Evolutionary Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Kevin S.; Kliger, Mark; Hero III, Alfred O.

    2011-01-01

    In many practical applications of clustering, the objects to be clustered evolve over time, and a clustering result is desired at each time step. In such applications, evolutionary clustering typically outperforms traditional static clustering by producing clustering results that reflect long-term trends while being robust to short-term variations. Several evolutionary clustering algorithms have recently been proposed, often by adding a temporal smoothness penalty to the cost function of a st...

  8. Relational visual cluster validity

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Y.; Harrison, R F

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of cluster validity plays a very important role in cluster analysis. Most commonly used cluster validity methods are based on statistical hypothesis testing or finding the best clustering scheme by computing a number of different cluster validity indices. A number of visual methods of cluster validity have been produced to display directly the validity of clusters by mapping data into two- or three-dimensional space. However, these methods may lose too much information to corre...

  9. Collisional versus laser driven ionization in metal clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Suraud, E.; P.-G. Reinhard

    2000-01-01

    We compare the capabilities of rapid highly charged projectiles and intense femtosecond lasers to ionize simple metal clusters while leaving as little intrinsic excitation as possible in the residue. We show that both excitation mechanisms are able to produce highly charged clusters. The deposited excitation energies increase with ionization but with different trends. Cold ionization, corresponding to moderate deposited excitation energy, is better attained with ionic projectiles for low char...

  10. Revealing the multi-bonding state between hydrogen and graphene-supported Ti clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Omori, Kengo; Mashoff, Torge; Convertino, Domenica; Miseikis, Vaidotas; Coletti, Camilla; Tozzini, Valentina; Heun, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on graphene-supported metal clusters has brought much controversy due to the complex nature of the bonding between hydrogen and metal clusters. The bond types of hydrogen and graphene-supported Ti clusters are experimentally and theoretically investigated. Transmission electron microscopy shows that Ti clusters of nanometer-size are formed on graphene. Thermal desorption spectroscopy captures three hydrogen desorption peaks from hydrogenated graphene-supported Ti clusters. First principle calculations also found three types of interaction: Two types of bonds with different partial ionic character and physisorption. The physical origin for this rests on the charge state of the Ti clusters: when Ti clusters are neutral, H2 is dissociated, and H forms bonds with the Ti cluster. On the other hand, H2 is adsorbed in molecular form on positively charged Ti clusters, resulting in physisorption. Thus, this work clarifies the bonding mechanisms of hydrogen on graphene-supported Ti clusters.

  11. Sequential oxygen atom chemisorption on surfaces of small iron Clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report photoelectron spectra of iron oxide clusters, FexOy- (x=1 endash 4, y=1 endash 6). For a given x, we find that the electron affinity increases with the number of O atoms, consistent with an increasing degree of oxidation. The results are interpreted based on charge transfer interactions between the Fex clusters and the O atoms, and provide key information about the oxide cluster structures, in which each O atom is suggested to locate on the surface of the clusters for the x=3 and 4 series. These clusters provide novel model systems to understand the electronic structure of bulk iron oxides. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  12. NCAM Mimetic Peptides: An Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    pharmacological tools interfering with NCAM functions. Recent progress in our understanding of the structural basis of NCAM-mediated cell adhesion and signaling has allowed a structure-based design of NCAM mimetic peptides. Using this approach a number of peptides termed P2, P1-B, P-3-DE and P-3-G, whose...... sequences contain one or several NCAM homophilic binding sites involved in NCAM binding to itself, have been identified. By means of NMR titration analysis and molecular modeling a number of peptides derived from NCAM and targeting NCAM heterophilic ligands such as the fibroblast growth factor receptor and...... heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) have been identified. The FGL, dekaCAM, FRM/EncaminA, BCL, EncaminC and EncaminE peptides all target the FGF receptor whereas the heparin binding peptide HBP targets HSPG. Moreover, a number of NCAM binding peptides have been identified employing screening of...

  13. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 1. Peptides to Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Gregory C.; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  14. The PeptideAtlas Project

    OpenAIRE

    Deutsch, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    PeptideAtlas is a multi-species compendium of peptides observed with tandem mass spectrometry methods. Raw mass spectrometer output files are collected from the community and reprocessed through a uniform analysis and validation pipeline that continues to advance. The results are loaded into a database and the information derived from the raw data is returned to the community via several web-based data exploration tools. The PeptideAtlas resource is useful for experiment planning, improving g...

  15. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-01-01

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified ...

  16. Cell Penetrating Peptides: How Do They Do It?

    OpenAIRE

    Herce, Henry D.; Garcia, Angel E.

    2007-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides consist of short sequences of amino acids containing a large net positive charge that are able to penetrate almost any cell, carrying with them relatively large cargoes such as proteins, oligonucleotides, and drugs. During the 10 years since their discovery, the question of how they manage to translocate across the membrane has remained unanswered. The main discussion has been centered on whether they follow an energy-independent or an energy-dependent pathway. Recen...

  17. Studies on Interactions between Sulfadiazine and Peptide Amides

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Yiwei; Zhang Xiaoqin; Du Jun; Hua Song; Guo Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the optimal structures and binding energies of 14 hydrogen bonded complexes, which contained the sulfadiazine, N-methylacetamide, a glycine dipeptide and an alanine dipeptide, were obtained. The sites preference of sulfadiazine hydrogen bonding to peptide amides were explored. The interaction energies of all the complexes were corrected by Basis Set Superposition Error (BSSE). By the analysis interaction energy, charge density and second-order interaction energies E(2) of the c...

  18. An expanded set of amino acid analogs for the ribosomal translation of unnatural peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C T Hartman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The application of in vitro translation to the synthesis of unnatural peptides may allow the production of extremely large libraries of highly modified peptides, which are a potential source of lead compounds in the search for new pharmaceutical agents. The specificity of the translation apparatus, however, limits the diversity of unnatural amino acids that can be incorporated into peptides by ribosomal translation. We have previously shown that over 90 unnatural amino acids can be enzymatically loaded onto tRNA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have now used a competition assay to assess the efficiency of tRNA-aminoacylation of these analogs. We have also used a series of peptide translation assays to measure the efficiency with which these analogs are incorporated into peptides. The translation apparatus tolerates most side chain derivatives, a few alpha,alpha disubstituted, N-methyl and alpha-hydroxy derivatives, but no beta-amino acids. We show that over 50 unnatural amino acids can be incorporated into peptides by ribosomal translation. Using a set of analogs that are efficiently charged and translated we were able to prepare individual peptides containing up to 13 different unnatural amino acids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that a diverse array of unnatural building blocks can be translationally incorporated into peptides. These building blocks provide new opportunities for in vitro selections with highly modified drug-like peptides.

  19. The SMART model: Soft Membranes Adapt and Respond, also Transiently, in the presence of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechinger, Burkhard

    2015-05-01

    Biophysical and structural studies of peptide-lipid interactions, peptide topology and dynamics have changed our view on how antimicrobial peptides insert and interact with membranes. Clearly, both the peptides and the lipids are highly dynamic, change and mutually adapt their conformation, membrane penetration and detailed morphology on a local and a global level. As a consequence, the peptides and lipids can form a wide variety of supramolecular assemblies in which the more hydrophobic sequences preferentially, but not exclusively, adopt transmembrane alignments and have the potential to form oligomeric structures similar to those suggested by the transmembrane helical bundle model. In contrast, charged amphipathic sequences tend to stay intercalated at the membrane interface where they cause pronounced disruptions of the phospholipid fatty acyl packing. At increasing local or global concentrations, the peptides result in transient membrane openings, rupture and ultimately lysis. Depending on peptide-to-lipid ratio, lipid composition and environmental factors (temperature, buffer composition, ionic strength, etc.), the same peptide sequence can result in a variety of those responses. Therefore, the SMART model has been introduced to cover the full range of possibilities. With such a view in mind, novel antimicrobial compounds have been designed from amphipathic polymers, peptide mimetics, combinations of ultra-short polypeptides with hydrophobic anchors or small designer molecules. PMID:25522713

  20. Prediction of peptide drift time in ion mobility mass spectrometry from sequence-based features

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Bing

    2013-05-09

    Background: Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS), an analytical technique which combines the features of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS), can rapidly separates ions on a millisecond time-scale. IMMS becomes a powerful tool to analyzing complex mixtures, especially for the analysis of peptides in proteomics. The high-throughput nature of this technique provides a challenge for the identification of peptides in complex biological samples. As an important parameter, peptide drift time can be used for enhancing downstream data analysis in IMMS-based proteomics.Results: In this paper, a model is presented based on least square support vectors regression (LS-SVR) method to predict peptide ion drift time in IMMS from the sequence-based features of peptide. Four descriptors were extracted from peptide sequence to represent peptide ions by a 34-component vector. The parameters of LS-SVR were selected by a grid searching strategy, and a 10-fold cross-validation approach was employed for the model training and testing. Our proposed method was tested on three datasets with different charge states. The high prediction performance achieve demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the prediction model.Conclusions: Our proposed LS-SVR model can predict peptide drift time from sequence information in relative high prediction accuracy by a test on a dataset of 595 peptides. This work can enhance the confidence of protein identification by combining with current protein searching techniques. 2013 Wang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. Characterization of Sviceucin from Streptomyces Provides Insight into Enzyme Exchangeability and Disulfide Bond Formation in Lasso Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Ducasse, Rémi; Zirah, Séverine; Blond, Alain; Goulard, Christophe; Lescop, Ewen; Giraud, Caroline; Hartke, Axel; Guittet, Eric; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Rebuffat, Sylvie

    2015-11-20

    Lasso peptides are bacterial ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides. They have sparked increasing interest in peptide-based drug development because of their compact, interlocked structure, which offers superior stability and protein-binding capacity. Disulfide bond-containing lasso peptides are rare and exhibit highly sought-after activities. In an effort to expand the repertoire of such molecules, we heterologously expressed, in Streptomyces coelicolor, the gene cluster encoding sviceucin, a type I lasso peptide with two disulfide bridges originating from Streptomyces sviceus, which allowed it to be fully characterized. Sviceucin and its reduced forms were characterized by mass spectrometry and peptidase digestion. The three-dimensional structure of sviceucin was determined using NMR. Sviceucin displayed antimicrobial activity selectively against Gram-positive bacteria and inhibition of fsr quorum sensing in Enterococcus faecalis. This study adds sviceucin to the type I lasso peptide family as a new representative. Moreover, new clusters encoding disulfide-bond containing lasso peptides from Actinobacteria were identified by genome mining. Genetic and functional analyses revealed that the formation of disulfide bonds in sviceucin does not require a pathway-encoded thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase. Most importantly, we demonstrated the functional exchangeability of the sviceucin and microcin J25 (a non-disulfide-bridged lasso peptide) macrolactam synthetases in vitro, highlighting the potential of hybrid lasso synthetases in lasso peptide engineering. PMID:26343290

  2. Stylicins, a new family of antimicrobial peptides from the Pacific blue shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris

    OpenAIRE

    Rolland, Jean-Luc; Abdelouahab, Mahdia; Dupont, J.; Lefevre, F.; Bachere, Evelyne; Romestand, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The present study reports the characterization of Ls-Stylicin1, a novel antimicrobial peptide from the penaeid shrimp, Litopenoeus stylirostris. The predicted mature peptide of 82 residues is negatively charged (theoretical pl=5.0) and characterized by a proline-rich N-terminal region and a C-terminal region containing 13 cysteine residues. The recombinant Ls-Stylicin1 has been isolated in both monomeric and dimeric forms. Both display strong antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum (1....

  3. Cationic amphipathic peptides accumulate sialylated proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic host cells

    OpenAIRE

    Weghuber, Julian; Aichinger, Michael C.; Brameshuber, Mario; Wieser, Stefan; Ruprecht, Verena; Plochberger, Birgit; Madl, Josef; Horner, Andreas; Reipert, Siegfried; Lohner, Karl; Henics, Tamas; Schuetz, Gerhard J

    2011-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) selectively target bacterial membranes by electrostatic interactions with negatively charged lipids. It turned out that for inhibition of microbial growth a high CAMP membrane concentration is required, which can be realized by the incorporation of hydrophobic groups within the peptide. Increasing hydrophobicity, however, reduces the CAMP selectivity for bacterial over eukaryotic host membranes, thereby causing the risk of detrimental side-effects. In t...

  4. Rubella virion polypeptides. Characterization by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing and peptide mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho-Terry, L.; Cohen, A. (University Coll. Hospital Medical School, London (UK))

    1982-01-01

    Four polypeptides with molecular weights of 55K, 47K, 45K, and 33K have been resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of immune precipitated rubella virus. The 47K and 45K components have similar peptide maps but different isoelectric points so that the same polypeptide may exist in more than one charged form. The 55K and 45K components have similar isoelectric points but different peptide maps showing that similarity of isoelectric point is not evidence of identity.

  5. The Generalized Fixed-Charge Network Design Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomadsen, Tommy; Stidsen, Thomas K.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present the generalized fixed-charge network design (GFCND) problem. The GFCND problem is an instance of the so-called generalized network design problems. In such problems, clusters instead of nodes have to be interconnected by a network. The network interconnecting the clusters...... is a fixed-charge network, and thus the GFCND problem generalizes the fixed-charge network design problem. The GFCND problem is related to the more general problem of designing hierarchical telecommunication networks. A mixed integer programming model is described and a branch-cut-and-price algorithm...

  6. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology. PMID:26279082

  7. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  8. Design of an α-helical antimicrobial peptide with improved cell-selective and potent anti-biofilm activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Kun; Song, Jin-Wen; Gong, Feng; Li, Su-Bo; Chang, Hong-Yu; Xie, Hui-Min; Gao, Hong-Wei; Tan, Ying-Xia; Ji, Shou-Ping

    2016-01-01

    AR-23 is a melittin-related peptide with 23 residues. Like melittin, its high α-helical amphipathic structure results in strong bactericidal activity and cytotoxicity. In this study, a series of AR-23 analogues with low amphipathicity were designed by substitution of Ala1, Ala8 and Ile17 with positively charged residues (Arg or Lys) to study the effect of positively charged residue distribution on the biological viability of the antimicrobial peptide. Substitution of Ile17 on the nonpolar face with positively charged Lys dramatically altered the hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, helicity and the membrane-penetrating activity against human cells as well as the haemolytic activity of the peptide. However, substitution on the polar face only slightly affected the peptide biophysical properties and biological activity. The results indicate that the position rather than the number of positively charged residue affects the biophysical properties and selectivity of the peptide. Of all the analogues, A(A1R, A8R, I17K), a peptide with Ala1-Arg, Ala8-Arg and Ile17-Lys substitutions, exhibited similar bactericidal activity and anti-biofilm activity to AR-23 but had much lower haemolytic activity and cytotoxicity against mammalian cells compared with AR-23. Therefore, the findings reported here provide a rationalization for peptide design and optimization, which will be useful for the future development of antimicrobial agents. PMID:27271216

  9. Design of an α-helical antimicrobial peptide with improved cell-selective and potent anti-biofilm activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Kun; Song, Jin-wen; Gong, Feng; Li, Su-Bo; Chang, Hong-Yu; Xie, Hui-Min; Gao, Hong-Wei; Tan, Ying-Xia; Ji, Shou-Ping

    2016-01-01

    AR-23 is a melittin-related peptide with 23 residues. Like melittin, its high α-helical amphipathic structure results in strong bactericidal activity and cytotoxicity. In this study, a series of AR-23 analogues with low amphipathicity were designed by substitution of Ala1, Ala8 and Ile17 with positively charged residues (Arg or Lys) to study the effect of positively charged residue distribution on the biological viability of the antimicrobial peptide. Substitution of Ile17 on the nonpolar face with positively charged Lys dramatically altered the hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, helicity and the membrane-penetrating activity against human cells as well as the haemolytic activity of the peptide. However, substitution on the polar face only slightly affected the peptide biophysical properties and biological activity. The results indicate that the position rather than the number of positively charged residue affects the biophysical properties and selectivity of the peptide. Of all the analogues, A(A1R, A8R, I17K), a peptide with Ala1-Arg, Ala8-Arg and Ile17-Lys substitutions, exhibited similar bactericidal activity and anti-biofilm activity to AR-23 but had much lower haemolytic activity and cytotoxicity against mammalian cells compared with AR-23. Therefore, the findings reported here provide a rationalization for peptide design and optimization, which will be useful for the future development of antimicrobial agents. PMID:27271216

  10. Cluster-cluster aggregation of Ising dipolar particles under thermal noise

    KAUST Repository

    Suzuki, Masaru

    2009-08-14

    The cluster-cluster aggregation processes of Ising dipolar particles under thermal noise are investigated in the dilute condition. As the temperature increases, changes in the typical structures of clusters are observed from chainlike (D1) to crystalline (D2) through fractal structures (D1.45), where D is the fractal dimension. By calculating the bending energy of the chainlike structure, it is found that the transition temperature is associated with the energy gap between the chainlike and crystalline configurations. The aggregation dynamics changes from being dominated by attraction to diffusion involving changes in the dynamic exponent z=0.2 to 0.5. In the region of temperature where the fractal clusters grow, different growth rates are observed between charged and neutral clusters. Using the Smoluchowski equation with a twofold kernel, this hetero-aggregation process is found to result from two types of dynamics: the diffusive motion of neutral clusters and the weak attractive motion between charged clusters. The fact that changes in structures and dynamics take place at the same time suggests that transitions in the structure of clusters involve marked changes in the dynamics of the aggregation processes. © 2009 The American Physical Society.

  11. Structure and properties of small sodium clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2002-01-01

    and the results of other theoretical work. We have systematically calculated the optimized geometries of neutral and singly charged sodium clusters having up to 20 atoms, their multipole moments (dipole and quadrupole), static polarizabilities, binding energies per atom, ionization potentials, and...

  12. Polyclonal Peptide Antisera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl, Tina H; Illigen, Kristin E; Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce and may supplement monoclonal antibodies for some applications or even have some advantages. The choice of species for production of (peptide) antisera is based on practical considerations, including availability of immunogen (vaccine) and animals. Two major factors govern the production of antisera: the nature of adaptive immune responses, which take place over days/weeks and ethical guidelines for animal welfare. Here, simple procedures for immunization of mice, rabbits, sheep, goats, pigs, horses, and chickens are presented. PMID:26424267

  13. Dynamics and orientation of a cationic antimicrobial peptide in two membrane-mimetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosol, Simone; Zangger, Klaus

    2010-04-01

    In order to investigate the functional and structural properties of cationic alpha-helical peptides in two different membranes, we studied the 20-residue peptide maximin H6 in two membrane-mimetic systems by NMR spectroscopy using partially (15)N-labeled peptide and paramagnetic relaxation enhancements. Maximin H6, which is found in skin secretions of frogs of the Bombinae family, attacks gram-negative bacteria and acts haemolytically. While the peptide spontaneously folds into similar structures in both neutral dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) and negatively charged sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micelles, its structure is more flexible in SDS as shown by (15)N relaxation measurements. In addition, it is bound closer to the surface of the micelle and rotated by approximately 70 degrees around its helix axis in the negatively charged membrane surrogate compared to the structure in DPC. This might form the basis for peptide-peptide interactions through a GxxxG motif, which could finally lead to membrane disruption and, thus, preferential attack of negatively charged microbial cell walls. PMID:20045466

  14. Applicability of condensation particle counters to measure atmospheric clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Sipilä, M.; Lehtipalo, K.; M. Kulmala; T. Petäjä; Junninen, H.; Aalto, P.P.; Manninen, H. E.; E.-M. Kyrö; Asmi, E.; Riipinen, I; J. Curtius; A. Kürten; S. Borrmann; C. D. O'Dowd

    2008-01-01

    The ambient and laboratory molecular and ion clusters were investigated. Here we present data on the ambient concentrations of both charged and uncharged molecular clusters as well as the performance of a pulse height condensation particle counter (PH-CPC) and an expansion condensation particle counter (E-CPC). The ambient molecular cluster concentrations were measured using both instruments, and they were deployed in conjunction with ion spectrometers and other aerosol instruments in Hyytiäl...

  15. Membrane interactions of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as carriers of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Katharina; Pochert, Alexander; Lindén, Mika; Davoudi, Mina; Schmidtchen, Artur; Nordström, Randi; Malmsten, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Membrane interactions are critical for the successful use of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to elucidate these, we here investigate effects of nanoparticle charge and porosity on AMP loading and release, as well as consequences of this for membrane interactions and antimicrobial effects. Anionic mesoporous silica particles were found to incorporate considerable amounts of the cationic AMP LLGDFFRKSKEKIGKEFKRIVQRIKDFLRNLVPRTES (LL-37), whereas loading is much lower for non-porous or positively charged silica nanoparticles. Due to preferential pore localization, anionic mesoporous particles, but not the other particles, protect LL-37 from degradation by infection-related proteases. For anionic mesoporous nanoparticles, membrane disruption is mediated almost exclusively by peptide release. In contrast, non-porous silica particles build up a resilient LL-37 surface coating due to their higher negative surface charge, and display largely particle-mediated membrane interactions and antimicrobial effects. For positively charged mesoporous silica nanoparticles, LL-37 incorporation promotes the membrane binding and disruption displayed by the particles in the absence of peptide, but also causes toxicity against human erythrocytes. Thus, the use of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as AMP delivery systems requires consideration of membrane interactions and selectivity of both free peptide and the peptide-loaded nanoparticles, the latter critically dependent on nanoparticle properties. PMID:27174622

  16. Alpha-cluster model of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The approach based on the α-cluster model proposes some formulas to calculate the binding energies and the charge radii of the nuclei of the β-stability valley and around it [1]. The formulas have been derived on the basis of the idea of isospin independence of inter-nucleon interactions. The approach implies that the nucleus is a dense package of alpha-clusters. The inter-cluster distances are determined by the charge radii of the clusters, so the radius of the nucleus R is defined by their number. Some amount of excess neutrons fill in the gap between the matter bodies of the -clusters of the core [2]. Then the radius Rm of a β - stable isotope can be estimated by the volume occupied by the matter of the core and the volume of the charge of a few peripheral clusters. It has been shown that the condition Rm = R determines the amount of excess neutrons. The energy of these excess neutrons is described by a smooth function on the number of the neutron pairs. The formula to calculate the binding energy proper for the nucleus with five α-clusters turned out to be good for the other nuclei up to the most heavy ones. The formula to calculate the nuclear binding energy is evidently different from the well known Weizsacker formula. These two approaches give different estimations of the total Coulomb energy and the energy due to all inter-nucleon interactions, but the values of the total binding energies of these approaches are close. To calculate the charge radii both the approaches propose successful but different formulas, one is R ∼A1/3 and the other R∼Z1/3. A few useful phenomenological formulas have been found in the approach. These are the formulas to calculate the root mean square charge radius, the Coulomb radius and the radius of the last proton's position in dependence on the number of α-clusters. Besides, the empirical values of the Coulomb energy and the surface tension energy with a good accuracy have been obtained for the nuclei with N

  17. Partitional clustering algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book summarizes the state-of-the-art in partitional clustering. Clustering, the unsupervised classification of patterns into groups, is one of the most important tasks in exploratory data analysis. Primary goals of clustering include gaining insight into, classifying, and compressing data. Clustering has a long and rich history that spans a variety of scientific disciplines including anthropology, biology, medicine, psychology, statistics, mathematics, engineering, and computer science. As a result, numerous clustering algorithms have been proposed since the early 1950s. Among these algorithms, partitional (nonhierarchical) ones have found many applications, especially in engineering and computer science. This book provides coverage of consensus clustering, constrained clustering, large scale and/or high dimensional clustering, cluster validity, cluster visualization, and applications of clustering. Examines clustering as it applies to large and/or high-dimensional data sets commonly encountered in reali...

  18. Molecular recognition mechanism of peptide chain bound to the tRNA(Lys3) anticodon loop in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xingqing; Agris, Paul F; Hall, Carol K

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which proteins recognize and bind the post-transcriptional modifications of RNAs is unknown, yet these interactions play important functions in biology. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed to examine the folding of the model peptide chain -RVTHHAFLGAHRTVG- and the complex formed by the folded peptide with the native anticodon stem and loop of the human tRNA(Lys3) (hASL(Lys3)) in order to explore the binding mechanism. By analyzing and comparing two folded conformations of this peptide obtained from the folding simulation, we found that the van der Waals (VDW) energy is necessary for the thermal stability of the peptide, and the charge-charge (ELE + EGB) energy is crucial for determining the three-dimensional folded structure of the peptide backbone. Subsequently, two conformations of the peptide were employed to investigate their binding behaviors to hASL(Lys3). The metastable folded peptide was found to bind to hASL(Lys3) much easier than the stable folded peptide in the binding simulations. An energetic analysis reveals that the VDW energy favors the binding, whereas the ELE + EGB energies disfavor the binding. Arginines on the peptide preferentially attract the phosphate backbone via the inter-chain ELE + EGB interaction, significantly contributing to the binding affinity. The hydrophobic phenylalanine interacts with the anticodon loop of hASL(Lys3) via the inter-chain VDW interaction, significantly contributing to the binding specificity. PMID:24417415

  19. Phytosulfokine peptide signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Margret

    2015-08-01

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) belongs to the group of plant peptide growth factors. It is a disulfated pentapeptide encoded by precursor genes that are ubiquitously present in higher plants, suggestive of universal functions. Processing of the preproprotein involves sulfonylation by a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase in the trans-golgi and proteolytic cleavage in the apoplast. The secreted peptide is perceived at the cell surface by a membrane-bound receptor kinase of the leucine-rich repeat family. The PSK receptor PSKR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is an active kinase and has guanylate cyclase activity resulting in dual-signal outputs. Receptor activity is regulated by calmodulin. While PSK may be an autocrine growth factor, it also acts non-cell autonomously by promoting growth of cells that are receptor-deficient. In planta, PSK has multiple functions. It promotes cell growth, acts in the quiescent centre cells of the root apical meristem, contributes to funicular pollen tube guidance, and differentially alters immune responses depending on the pathogen. It has been suggested that PSK integrates growth and defence signals to balance the competing metabolic costs of these responses. This review summarizes our current understanding of PSK synthesis, signalling, and activity. PMID:25754406

  20. Heterologous expression in Escherichia coli of the first module of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase for chloroeremomycin, a vancomycin-type glycopeptide antibiotic

    OpenAIRE

    Trauger, John W.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2000-01-01

    The gene cluster from Amycolotopsis orientalis responsible for biosynthesis of the vancomycin-type glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin was recently sequenced, indicating that this antibiotic derives from a seven-residue peptide synthesized by a three-subunit (CepA, CepB, and CepC) modular nonribosomal peptide synthetase. Expression of all or parts of the peptide synthetase in Escherichia coli would facilitate biochemical characterization of its substrate specificity, an important step to...

  1. Cluster Evaluation of Density Based Subspace Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Sembiring, Rahmat Widia; Zain, Jasni Mohamad

    2010-01-01

    Clustering real world data often faced with curse of dimensionality, where real world data often consist of many dimensions. Multidimensional data clustering evaluation can be done through a density-based approach. Density approaches based on the paradigm introduced by DBSCAN clustering. In this approach, density of each object neighbours with MinPoints will be calculated. Cluster change will occur in accordance with changes in density of each object neighbours. The neighbours of each object ...

  2. Clustering with Spectral Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Gaertler, Marco

    2002-01-01

    Grouping and sorting are problems with a great tradition in the history of mankind. Clustering and cluster analysis is a small aspect in the wide spectrum. But these topics have applications in most scientific disciplines. Graph clustering is again a little fragment in the clustering area. Nevertheless it has the potential for new pioneering and innovative methods. One such method is the Markov Clustering presented by van Dongen in 'Graph Clustering by Flow Simulation'. We investigated the qu...

  3. Sparse Convex Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Binhuan; Zhang, Yilong; Sun, Wei; Fang, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    Convex clustering, a convex relaxation of k-means clustering and hierarchical clustering, has drawn recent attentions since it nicely addresses the instability issue of traditional nonconvex clustering methods. Although its computational and statistical properties have been recently studied, the performance of convex clustering has not yet been investigated in the high-dimensional clustering scenario, where the data contains a large number of features and many of them carry no information abo...

  4. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes in the Microbial Metagenomes of Marine Sponges

    OpenAIRE

    Ute Hentschel; Sheila Marie Pimentel-Elardo; Sebastian Proksch; Lubomir Grozdanov

    2012-01-01

    Genomic mining revealed one major nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) phylogenetic cluster in 12 marine sponge species, one ascidian, an actinobacterial isolate and seawater. Phylogenetic analysis predicts its taxonomic affiliation to the actinomycetes and hydroxy-phenyl-glycine as a likely substrate. Additionally, a phylogenetically distinct NRPS gene cluster was discovered in the microbial metagenome of the sponge Aplysina aerophoba, which shows ...

  5. Membrane-Bound Basic Peptides Sequester Multivalent (PIP2), but Not Monovalent (PS), Acidic Lipids

    OpenAIRE

    Golebiewska, Urszula; Gambhir, Alok; Hangyás-Mihályné, Gyöngyi; Zaitseva, Irina; Rädler, Joachim; McLaughlin, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Several biologically important peripheral (e.g., myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) and integral (e.g., the epidermal growth factor receptor) membrane proteins contain clusters of basic residues that interact with acidic lipids in the plasma membrane. Previous measurements demonstrate that the polyvalent acidic lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate is bound electrostatically (i.e., sequestered) by membrane-adsorbed basic peptides corresponding to these clusters. We report he...

  6. Nostophycin Biosynthesis Is Directed by a Hybrid Polyketide Synthase-Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase in the Toxic Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain 152▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Fewer, David P.; Österholm, Julia; Rouhiainen, Leo; Jokela, Jouni; Wahlsten, Matti; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are a rich source of natural products with interesting pharmaceutical properties. Here, we report the identification, sequencing, annotation, and biochemical analysis of the nostophycin (npn) biosynthetic gene cluster. The npn gene cluster spans 45.1 kb and consists of three open reading frames encoding a polyketide synthase, a mixed polyketide nonribosomal peptide synthetase, and a nonribosomal peptide synthetase. The genetic architecture and catalytic domain organization of th...

  7. Controlled clustering of carboxylated SPIONs through polyethylenimine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clusters of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized using poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid) coated MNPs (PAM@MNP) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). Materials were characterized by potentiometric titration, zeta potential and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. PEI and PAM@MNP are oppositely charged as characterized by zeta potential measurements (+8, −34 mV respectively) and titration (10.30 mmol −NH3+/g PEI; 0.175 mmol −COO−/g PAM@MNP) at pH 6.5±0.2; therefore magnetic clusters are formed by electrostatic adhesion. Two different preparation methods and the effect of PEI and electrolyte (NaCl) concentration on the cluster formation was studied. Choosing an optimal concentration of PEI (charge ratio of PEI to PAM@MNP: 0.17) and electrolyte (10 mM), a concentrated (10 g MNP/L) product containing PEI–PAM@MNP nanoclusters with size of 165±10 nm was prepared. Its specific absorption rate (SAR) measured in AC magnetic field (110 kHz, 25 mT) is 12 W/g Fe. The clustered product is expected to have enhanced contrast efficiency in MRI. - Highlights: • SPION clusters of controlled size were prepared by means of electrostatic adhesion. • Nanocluster formation optimum was at 0.17 charge ratio of PEI to PAM@MNP. • Huge aggregates form at higher PEI to PAM@MNP charge ratio. • Higher ionic strength promotes the formation of clusters at lower PEI concentrations

  8. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  9. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Although peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) are well-known for nucleic acids delivery and therapy, reports on internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides are limited in number. To develop a convenient route for preparation of internally labeled POCs with improved biomedical...

  10. Solid-phase peptide synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective....

  11. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, P.; Sosabowski, J.K.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of resea

  12. On the photostability of peptides after selective photoexcitation of the backbone: Prompt versus slow dissociation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov, Camilla Skinnerup; Jensen, Frank; Jørgensen, Thomas J D;

    2014-01-01

    , which is remote from the initial site of excitation. Hence loss of CE serves as direct proof that energy has reached the charge-site end, leaving the backbone intact. Our work demonstrates that excitation of tertiary amide moieties (proline linkages) results in both prompt dissociation and statistical...... present a protocol to disentangle slow and non-hazardous statistical dissociation from prompt cleavage of peptide bonds by 210 nm light based on experiments on protonated peptides isolated in vacuo and tagged by 18-crown-6 ether (CE). The weakest link in the system is between the charged site and CE...

  13. Molecular Recognition of Cobalt(III)-ligated Peptides by Serine Proteases: The Role of Electrostatic Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Sven; Wagner, Kim

    1998-01-01

    A series of peptides with a positively charged cobalt(III)-complex group attached to the carboxylate terminal was synthesized. The behaviour of these metallopeptides as acceptor nucleophiles in acyl transfer reactions catalyzed by the three serine proteases bovine pancreatic à-chymotrypsin, porcine...... pancreatic trypsin, and proteinase K from Tritirachium album was examined. The efficiency of the substrates was assessed by kinetic measurement of the partition between aminolysis and hydrolysis. The results are discussed with special reference to coulombic interactions between the metal-ligated substrates...... and charged residues on the enzyme surfaces. The idea of using the metallopeptides in practical enzymatic peptide synthesis is put forward....

  14. Ionic recoil energies in the Coulomb explosion of metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuber, S.; Döppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.

    The photoionization of metal clusters in intense femtosecond laser fields has been studied. In contrast to an experiment on atoms, the interaction in this case leads to a very efficient and high charging of the particle where tens of electrons per atom are ejected from the cluster. The recoil energy distribution of the atomic fragment ions was measured which in the case of lead clusters exceeds 180 keV. Enhanced charging efficiency which we observed earlier for specific pulse conditions is not reflected in the recoil energy spectra. Both the average and the maximum energies decrease with increasing laser pulse width. This is in good agreement with molecular dynamics calculations.

  15. Physicochemical properties determining the detection probability of tryptic peptides in Fourier transform mass spectrometry. A correlation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael L; Savitski, Mikhail M; Kjeldsen, Frank;

    2004-01-01

    Sequence verification and mapping of posttranslational modifications require nearly 100% sequence coverage in the "bottom-up" protein analysis. Even in favorable cases, routine liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detects from protein digests peptides covering 50-90% of the sequence. Here we...... investigated the reasons for limited peptide detection, considering various physicochemical aspects of peptide behavior in liquid chromatography-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LC-FTMS). No overall correlation was found between the detection probability and peptide mass. In agreement with literature data...... correlation between pI and signal response. An explanation of this paradoxal behavior was found through the observation that more acidic tryptic peptide lengths tend to be longer. Longer peptides tend to acquire higher average charge state in positive mode electrospray ionization than more basic but shorter...

  16. Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides in Vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Destoumieux-Garzón

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibrios are associated with a broad diversity of hosts that produce antimicrobial peptides (AMPs as part of their defense against microbial infections. In particular, vibrios colonize epithelia, which function as protective barriers and express AMPs as a first line of chemical defense against pathogens. Recent studies have shown they can also colonize phagocytes, key components of the animal immune system. Phagocytes infiltrate infected tissues and use AMPs to kill the phagocytosed microorganisms intracellularly, or deliver their antimicrobial content extracellularly to circumvent tissue infection. We review here the mechanisms by which vibrios have evolved the capacity to evade or resist the potent antimicrobial defenses of the immune cells or tissues they colonize. Among their strategies to resist killing by AMPs, primarily vibrios use membrane remodeling mechanisms. In particular, some highly resistant strains substitute hexaacylated Lipid A with a diglycine residue to reduce their negative surface charge, thereby lowering their electrostatic interactions with cationic AMPs. As a response to envelope stress, which can be induced by membrane-active agents including AMPs, vibrios also release outer membrane vesicles to create a protective membranous shield that traps extracellular AMPs and prevents interaction of the peptides with their own membranes. Finally, once AMPs have breached the bacterial membrane barriers, vibrios use RND efflux pumps, similar to those of other species, to transport AMPs out of their cytoplasmic space.

  17. Exhaustive extraction of peptides by electromembrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Chuixiu; Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2015-01-01

    15% (v/v) DEHP was selected as a suitable SLM for exhaustive extraction of peptides under low system-current conditions. Interestingly, increasing the SLM volume from 5 to 10 μL was found to be beneficial for stable and efficient EME. The pH of the sample strongly affected the EME process, and pH 3...... trifluoroacetate, and leu-enkephalin were extracted from 600 μL of 25 mM phosphate buffer (pH 3.5), through a supported liquid membrane (SLM) containing di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphate (DEHP) dissolved in an organic solvent, and into 600 μL of an acidified aqueous acceptor solution using a thin flat membrane-based EME...... device. Mass transfer of peptides across the SLM was enhanced by complex formation with the negatively charged DEHP. The composition of the SLM and the extraction voltage were important factors influencing recoveries and current with the EME system. 1-nonanol diluted with 2-decanone (1:1 v/v) containing...

  18. Scanning-force-microscopical studies on the specificity of the peptide adhesion on semiconductor surfaces; Rasterkraftmikroskopische Untersuchungen zur Spezifitaet der Peptidadhaesion auf Halbleiteroberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goede, Karsten

    2009-07-01

    This thesis in the boundary region of semiconductor physics and biologically inspired physics is dedicated to novel hybrid samples, which consist of peptide clusters on anorganic semiconductor surfaces. On standardizedly prepared samples by scanning-force microscopy the surface coverage by the peptide was measured in dependence on each sequence and the type of the surface. Quantitatively reproducable it is shown that the extension of the adhesion is dependent on the cooperation of the polar side chains in the amino acids of the peptides with the more or less polar semiconductors. Peptides with mostly basic-polar side chains adhere preferently on surface of intermediate polarity like gallium arsenide (GaAs)(100), especially badly on the other hand on surfaces of element-semiconductors like silicon (Si). If the procentual contribution of the surface is considered, which is peptide-covered, so covers this effect of the adhesion specificity substrate-dependently more than two orders of magnitude. Also the arrangement of the amino acids in the peptide influences the adhesion. The peptides appear on the surfaces as compact clusters (with sizes in the nano- to micrometer region), the geometric and structuralproperties of which are determined by peptide sequence and type of the surface. By cluster analyses of the surfaces as well as supporting scanning-tunnel-microscopical and circular-dichroism measurements knowledges on the folding of the peptides in the solution as well their behaviour on the surfaces could be obtained. The adhesion degree of a peptide can be tuned by choice of concentration, temperature, and pH value of the peptide solution as well as the dwelling time of the substrate in the solution. Comparisons with simulation calculations of the bonding behaviour of the relevant peptide sequences prove the influence of the folding of the peptide and possible phase transitions on the adhesion. Empirically observed effects can by this be foundedly explained.

  19. Cluster categories and cluster-tilted algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Torkildsen, Hermund Andre

    2006-01-01

    We have given an introduction to the theory of cluster categories and cluster-tilted algebras, and this was one of our main objectives in this thesis. We have seen that cluster-tilted algebras are relation-extension algebras, and this gave us a way of constructing the quiver of a cluster-tilted algebra from a tilted algebra. A cluster-tilted algebra of finite representation type is determined by its quiver, and this raised questions about the generality of this result. We defined a new class...

  20. Interactions of calmodulin with death-associated protein kinase peptides: experimental and modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczera, Krzysztof; Kursula, Petri

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the interactions between calmodulin (CaM) and three target peptides from the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) protein family using both experimental and modeling methods, aimed at determining the details of the underlying biological regulation mechanisms. Experimentally, calorimetric binding free energies were determined for the complexes of CaM with peptides representing the DAPK2 wild-type and S308D mutant, as well as DAPK1. The observed affinity of CaM was very similar for all three studied peptides. The DAPK2 and DAPK1 peptides differ significantly in sequence and total charge, while the DAPK2 S308D mutant is designed to model the effects of DAPK2 Ser308 phosphorylation. The crystal structure of the CaM-DAPK2 S308D mutant peptide is also reported. The structures of CaM-DAPK peptide complexes present a mode of CaM-kinase interaction, in which bulky hydrophobic residues at positions 10 and 14 are both bound to the same hydrophobic cleft. To explain the microscopic effects underlying these interactions, we performed free energy calculations based on the approximate MM-PBSA approach. For these highly charged systems, standard MM-PBSA calculations did not yield satisfactory results. We proposed a rational modification of the approach which led to reasonable predictions of binding free energies. All three complexes are strongly stabilized by two effects: electrostatic interactions and buried surface area. The strong favorable interactions are to a large part compensated by unfavorable entropic terms, in which vibrational entropy is the largest contributor. The electrostatic component of the binding free energy followed the trend of the overall peptide charge, with strongest interactions for DAPK1 and weakest for the DAPK2 mutant. The electrostatics was dominated by interactions of the positively charged residues of the peptide with the negatively charged residues of CaM. The nonpolar binding free energy was comparable for all three peptides, the

  1. High-throughput peptide quantification using mTRAQ reagent triplex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Kunsoo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein quantification is an essential step in many proteomics experiments. A number of labeling approaches have been proposed and adopted in mass spectrometry (MS based relative quantification. The mTRAQ, one of the stable isotope labeling methods, is amine-specific and available in triplex format, so that the sample throughput could be doubled when compared with duplex reagents. Methods and results Here we propose a novel data analysis algorithm for peptide quantification in triplex mTRAQ experiments. It improved the accuracy of quantification in two features. First, it identified and separated triplex isotopic clusters of a peptide in each full MS scan. We designed a schematic model of triplex overlapping isotopic clusters, and separated triplex isotopic clusters by solving cubic equations, which are deduced from the schematic model. Second, it automatically determined the elution areas of peptides. Some peptides have similar atomic masses and elution times, so their elution areas can have overlaps. Our algorithm successfully identified the overlaps and found accurate elution areas. We validated our algorithm using standard protein mixture experiments. Conclusions We showed that our algorithm was able to accurately quantify peptides in triplex mTRAQ experiments. Its software implementation is compatible with Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP, and thus enables high-throughput analysis of proteomics data.

  2. Energy dependence of small silver clusters sputtered by 150 keV Ar+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy distribution of small neutral silver clusters Agn and of positively and negatively charged cluster ions Agn+ and Agn-(n=1–4) sputtered by 150 keV Ar+ ions was investigated. The measured energy distributions asymptotically drop off with E-x, where x increases with cluster size n.

  3. Conus venom peptide pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard J; Dutertre, Sébastien; Vetter, Irina; Christie, MacDonald J

    2012-04-01

    Conopeptides are a diverse group of recently evolved venom peptides used for prey capture and/or defense. Each species of cone snails produces in excess of 1000 conopeptides, with those pharmacologically characterized (≈ 0.1%) targeting a diverse range of membrane proteins typically with high potency and specificity. The majority of conopeptides inhibit voltage- or ligand-gated ion channels, providing valuable research tools for the dissection of the role played by specific ion channels in excitable cells. It is noteworthy that many of these targets are found to be expressed in pain pathways, with several conopeptides having entered the clinic as potential treatments for pain [e.g., pyroglutamate1-MrIA (Xen2174)] and one now marketed for intrathecal treatment of severe pain [ziconotide (Prialt)]. This review discusses the diversity, pharmacology, structure-activity relationships, and therapeutic potential of cone snail venom peptide families acting at voltage-gated ion channels (ω-, μ-, μO-, δ-, ι-, and κ-conotoxins), ligand-gated ion channels (α-conotoxins, σ-conotoxin, ikot-ikot, and conantokins), G-protein-coupled receptors (ρ-conopeptides, conopressins, and contulakins), and neurotransmitter transporters (χ-conopeptides), with expanded discussion on the clinical potential of sodium and calcium channel inhibitors and α-conotoxins. Expanding the discovery of new bioactives using proteomic/transcriptomic approaches combined with high-throughput platforms and better defining conopeptide structure-activity relationships using relevant membrane protein crystal structures are expected to grow the already significant impact conopeptides have had as both research probes and leads to new therapies. PMID:22407615

  4. The internal sequence of the peptide-substrate determines its N-terminus trimming by ERAP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irini Evnouchidou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1 trims N-terminally extended antigenic peptide precursors down to mature antigenic peptides for presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules. ERAP1 has unique properties for an aminopeptidase being able to trim peptides in vitro based on their length and the nature of their C-termini. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In an effort to better understand the molecular mechanism that ERAP1 uses to trim peptides, we systematically analyzed the enzyme's substrate preferences using collections of peptide substrates. We discovered strong internal sequence preferences of peptide N-terminus trimming by ERAP1. Preferences were only found for positively charged or hydrophobic residues resulting to trimming rate changes by up to 100 fold for single residue substitutions and more than 40,000 fold for multiple residue substitutions for peptides with identical N-termini. Molecular modelling of ERAP1 revealed a large internal cavity that carries a strong negative electrostatic potential and is large enough to accommodate peptides adjacent to the enzyme's active site. This model can readily account for the strong preference for positively charged side chains. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge no other aminopeptidase has been described to have such strong preferences for internal residues so distal to the N-terminus. Overall, our findings indicate that the internal sequence of the peptide can affect its trimming by ERAP1 as much as the peptide's length and C-terminus. We therefore propose that ERAP1 recognizes the full length of its peptide-substrate and not just the N- and C- termini. It is possible that ERAP1 trimming preferences influence the rate of generation and the composition of antigenic peptides in vivo.

  5. Self-assembly of cyclo-diphenylalanine peptides in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Joohyun; Shell, M Scott

    2014-06-19

    The diphenylalanine (FF) peptide self-assembles into a variety of nanostructures, including hollow nanotubes that form in aqueous solution with an unusually high degree of hydrophilic surface area. In contrast, diphenylalanine can also be vapor-deposited in vacuum to produce rodlike assemblies that are extremely hydrophobic; in this process FF has been found to dehydrate and cyclize to cyclo-diphenylalanine (cyclo-FF). An earlier study used all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the early stages of the self-assembly of linear-FF peptides in solution. Here, we examine the self-assembly of cyclo-FF peptides in vacuum and compare it to these previous results to understand the differences underlying the two cases. Using all-atom replica exchange MD simulations, we consider systems of 50 cyclo-FF peptides and examine free energies along various structural association coordinates. We find that cyclo-FF peptides form ladder-like structures connected by double hydrogen bonds, and that multiple such ladders linearly align in a cooperative manner to form larger-scale, elongated assemblies. Unlike linear-FFs which mainly assemble through the interplay between hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, the assembly of cyclo-FFs in vacuum is primarily driven by electrostatic interactions along the backbone that induce alignment at long-range, followed by van der Waals interactions between side chains that become important for close-range packing. While both solution and vacuum phase driving forces result in ladder-like structures, the clustering of ladders is opposite: linear-FF peptide ladders form assemblies with side-chains buried inward, while cyclo-FF ladders point outward. PMID:24877752

  6. Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of Amphiphilic Peptides and Their Nanostructured Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Mohammadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Breast cancer is the second leading cancer type among people of advanced countries. Various methods have been used for cancer treatment such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In the present study we have designed and synthesized a new group of drug delivery systems (DDS containing a new class of Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs named Peptide Amphiphiles (PAs. Methods: Two PAs and anionic peptides were synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS, namely [KW]4, [KW]5, E4 and E8. Then nano-peptides were synthesized by non-covalent binding between PAs and poly anions as [KW]4-E4, [KW]4-E8, [KW]5-E4 and [KW]5-E8. Results: Flow cytometry studies showed that increased chain length of PAs with a higher ratio between hydrophobicity and net charge results in increased intracellular uptake by MCF7 cells after 2h incubation. Moreover, nano-peptides showed greater intracellular uptake compared to PAs. Anti-proliferative assay revealed that by increasing chain length of PAs, the toxicity effect on MCF7 cells is reduced, however nano-peptides did not show significant toxicity on MCF7 cells even at high concentration levels. Conclusion: These data suggest that due to the lack of toxicity effect at high concentration levels and also high cellular uptake, nano-peptides are more suitable carrier compared to PAs for drug delivery.

  7. New Milk Protein-Derived Peptides with Potential Antimicrobial Activity: An Approach Based on Bioinformatic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Dziuba

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available New peptides with potential antimicrobial activity, encrypted in milk protein sequences, were searched for with the use of bioinformatic tools. The major milk proteins were hydrolyzed in silico by 28 enzymes. The obtained peptides were characterized by the following parameters: molecular weight, isoelectric point, composition and number of amino acid residues, net charge at pH 7.0, aliphatic index, instability index, Boman index, and GRAVY index, and compared with those calculated for known 416 antimicrobial peptides including 59 antimicrobial peptides (AMPs from milk proteins listed in the BIOPEP database. A simple analysis of physico-chemical properties and the values of biological activity indicators were insufficient to select potentially antimicrobial peptides released in silico from milk proteins by proteolytic enzymes. The final selection was made based on the results of multidimensional statistical analysis such as support vector machines (SVM, random forest (RF, artificial neural networks (ANN and discriminant analysis (DA available in the Collection of Anti-Microbial Peptides (CAMP database. Eleven new peptides with potential antimicrobial activity were selected from all peptides released during in silico proteolysis of milk proteins.

  8. The membrane interaction of amphiphilic model peptides affects phosphatidylserine headgroup and acyl chain order and dynamics. Application of the phospholipid headgroup electrometer concept to phosphatidylserine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (2H NMR) was used to study the interaction of amphiphilic model peptides with model membranes consisting of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine deuterated either at the β-position of the serine moiety ([2-2H]DOPS) or at the 11-position of the acyl chains ([11,11-2H2]DOPS). The peptides are derived from the sequences H-Ala-Met-Leu-Trp-Ala-OH and H-Arg-Met-Leu-Trp-Ala-OH and contain a positive charge of +1 or +2 at the amino terminus or one positive charge at each end of the molecule. Upon titration of dispersions of DOPS with the peptides, the divalent peptides show a similar extent of binding to the DOPS bilyers, which is larger than that of the single charged peptide. Under these conditions the values of the quadrupolar splitting of both [2-2H]DOPS and [11,11-2H2]DOPS are decreased, indicating that the peptides reduce the order of both the DOPS headgroup and the acyl chains. The extent of the decrease depends on the amount of peptide bound and on the position of the charged moieties in the peptide molecule. Titrations of DOPS with poly(L-lysine)100, which were included for reasons of comparison, reveal increased Δvq values. When the peptide-lipid titrations are carried out without applying a freeze-thaw procedure to achieve full equilibration, two-component 2H NMR spectra occur. The apparently limited accessibility of the lipid to the peptides under these circumstances is discussed in relation to the ability of the peptides to exhibit transbilayer movement. 2H spin-lattice relaxation time T1 measurements demonstrate a decrease of the rates of motion of both headgroup and acyl chains of DOPS in the presence of the peptides

  9. The membrane interaction of amphiphilic model peptides affects phosphatidylserine headgroup and acyl chain order and dynamics. Application of the phospholipid headgroup electrometer concept to phosphatidylserine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Kroon, A.I.P.M.; Killian, J.A.; de Gier, J.; de Kruijff, B. (Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1991-01-29

    Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 2}H NMR) was used to study the interaction of amphiphilic model peptides with model membranes consisting of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine deuterated either at the {beta}-position of the serine moiety ((2-{sup 2}H)DOPS) or at the 11-position of the acyl chains ((11,11-{sup 2}H{sub 2})DOPS). The peptides are derived from the sequences H-Ala-Met-Leu-Trp-Ala-OH and H-Arg-Met-Leu-Trp-Ala-OH and contain a positive charge of +1 or +2 at the amino terminus or one positive charge at each end of the molecule. Upon titration of dispersions of DOPS with the peptides, the divalent peptides show a similar extent of binding to the DOPS bilyers, which is larger than that of the single charged peptide. Under these conditions the values of the quadrupolar splitting of both (2-{sup 2}H)DOPS and (11,11-{sup 2}H{sub 2})DOPS are decreased, indicating that the peptides reduce the order of both the DOPS headgroup and the acyl chains. The extent of the decrease depends on the amount of peptide bound and on the position of the charged moieties in the peptide molecule. Titrations of DOPS with poly(L-lysine){sub 100}, which were included for reasons of comparison, reveal increased {Delta}v{sub q} values. When the peptide-lipid titrations are carried out without applying a freeze-thaw procedure to achieve full equilibration, two-component {sup 2}H NMR spectra occur. The apparently limited accessibility of the lipid to the peptides under these circumstances is discussed in relation to the ability of the peptides to exhibit transbilayer movement. {sup 2}H spin-lattice relaxation time T1 measurements demonstrate a decrease of the rates of motion of both headgroup and acyl chains of DOPS in the presence of the peptides.

  10. Clusters of dislocations in a carrier wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clusters of point dislocations (wave vortices) may be present within an otherwise perfect plane scalar wave, a carrier wave in two dimensions, which may be evanescent. The question arises: is it possible to deduce the orientation of the distant undisturbed carrier wave purely from local information about the cluster itself? For groups of two and four dislocations in a carrier wave, this may be done by using no other information than the local phase map or the individual positions of the singularities. The maximum number possible in a cluster with a carrier wave is 4 and the total strength (topological charge) of a cluster is always zero or ± 2. The study includes an examination of degenerate dislocations of strength zero or ± 1

  11. Observations on nocturnal growth of atmospheric clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junninen, Heikki; Hulkkonen, Mira; Riipinen, Ilona; Nieminen, Tuomo; Hirsikko, Anne; Suni, Tanja; Boy, Michael; Lee, Shan-Hu; Vana, Marko; Tammet, Hannes; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, we summarize recent observations of nighttime nucleation events observed during 4 yr, from 2003 to 2006, at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, southern Finland. Formation of new atmospheric aerosol particles has been frequently observed all around the world in daytime, but similar observations in nighttime are rare. The recently developed ion spectrometers enabled us to measure charged aerosol particles and ion clusters to diameters <1 nm and are efficient tools for evaluating cluster dynamics during nighttime. We observed clear growth of cluster ions during approximately 60 nights per yr. The newly formed intermediate ions usually persisted for several hours with typical concentrations of 100-200 cm-3. The evolution of nighttime growth events is different compared with daytime events. The mechanism behind nighttime events is still unclear, but the behaviour can be described by the hypothesis of activation of clusters.

  12. Beams of mass-selected clusters: realization and first experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this work concerns the production of beams of mass-selected clusters of metallic and semiconductor materials. Clusters are produced in magnetron sputtering source combined with a gas aggregation chamber, cooled by liquid nitrogen circulation. Downstream of the cluster source, a Wiley-McLaren time-of-flight setup allows to select a given cluster size or a narrow size range. The pulsed mass-selected cluster ion beam is separated from the continuous neutral one by an electrostatic 90-quadrupole deflector. After the deflector, the density of the pulsed beam amounts to about 103 particles/cm3. Preliminary deposition experiments of mass-selected copper clusters with a deposition energy of about 0.5 eV/atom have ben performed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrates, indicating that copper clusters are evidently mobile on the HOPG-surface until they reach cleavage steps, dislocation lines or other surface defects. In order to lower the cluster mobility on the HOPG-surface, we have first irradiated HOPG samples with slow highly charged ions (high dose) in order to create superficial defects. In a second step we have deposited mass-selected copper clusters on these pre-irradiated samples. The first analysis by AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) techniques showed that the copper clusters are trapped on the defects produced by the highly charged ions. (author)

  13. Multistep Charge Method by Charge Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segami, Go; Kusawake, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Iwasa, Minoru; Kibe, Koichi

    2008-09-01

    We studied reduction of the size and weight of the Power Control Unit (PCU). In this study, we specifically examined the weight of the Battery Charge Regulator (BCR), which accounts for half of the PCU weight for a low earth orbit (LEO) satellite. We found a multistep charge method by charge arrays and adopted a similar method for GEO satellites, thereby enabling the BCR reduction. We found the possibility of reducing the size and weight of PCU through more detailed design than that for a conventional PCU.BCRC1R1batterySAPower Control UnitBCRC1R1batterySAPower UnitHowever, this method decreases the state of charge (SOC) of the battery. Battery tests, a battery simulator test, and numerical analysis were used to evaluate the SOC decrease. We also studied effects of this method on the battery lifetime. The multistep charge method by charge arrays enabled charging to the same level of SOC as the conventional constant current/ constant voltage (CC/CV) charge method for a LEO satellite.

  14. Design and characterization of short antimicrobial peptides using leucine zipper templates with selectivity towards microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aqeel; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Srivastava, Saurabh; Kumar, Amit; Tripathi, Jitendra Kumar; Mishra, Nripendra N; Shukla, Praveen K; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2014-11-01

    Design of antimicrobial peptides with selective activity towards microorganisms is an important step towards the development of new antimicrobial agents. Leucine zipper sequence has been implicated in cytotoxic activity of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides; moreover, this motif has been utilized for the design of novel antimicrobial peptides with modulated cytotoxicity. To understand further the impact of substitution of amino acids at 'a' and/or 'd' position of a leucine zipper sequence of an antimicrobial peptides on its antimicrobial and cytotoxic properties four short peptides (14-residue) were designed on the basis of a leucine zipper sequence without or with replacement of leucine residues in its 'a' and 'd' positions with D-leucine or alanine or proline residue. The original short leucine zipper peptide (SLZP) and its D-leucine substituted analog, DLSA showed comparable activity against the tested Gram-positive and negative bacteria and the fungal strains. The alanine substituted analog (ASA) though showed appreciable activity against the tested bacteria, it showed to some extent lower activity against the tested fungi. However, the proline substituted analog (PSA) showed lower activity against the tested bacterial or fungal strains. Interestingly, DLSA, ASA and PSA showed significantly lower cytotoxicity than SLZP against both human red blood cells (hRBCs) and murine 3T3 cells. Cytotoxic and bactericidal properties of these peptides matched with peptide-induced damage/permeabilization of mammalian cells and bacteria or their mimetic lipid vesicles suggesting cell membrane could be the target of these peptides. As evidenced by tryptophan fluorescence and acrylamide quenching studies the peptides showed similarities either in interaction or in their localization within the bacterial membrane mimetic negatively charged lipid vesicles. Only SLZP showed localization inside the mammalian membrane mimetic zwitterionic lipid vesicles. The results show

  15. Cationic polymethacrylates with covalently linked membrane destabilizing peptides as gene delivery vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funhoff, Arjen M; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Lok, Martin C; Kruijtzer, John A W; Crommelin, Daan J A; Hennink, Wim E

    2005-01-01

    A membrane-disrupting peptide derived from the influenza virus was covalently linked to different polymethacrylates (pDMAEMA, pDAMA and the degradable pHPMA-DMAE, monomers depicted in Fig. 1) using N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP) as coupling agent to increase the transfection efficiency of polyplexes based on these polymers. It was shown by circular dichroism (CD) measurements that the polymer-conjugated peptide was, as the free peptide, able to undergo a conformational change of a random coil to an alpha helix upon lowering the pH to 5.0. This indicates that the property of the peptide to destabilize the endosomal membrane was preserved after its conjugation to the cationic polymers. In line herewith, a liposome leakage assay revealed that the polymer-bound peptide has comparable activity as the free peptide. The DNA condensing properties of the synthesized polymer-peptide conjugates were studied with dynamic light scattering and zeta-potential measurements, and it was shown that small (100 to 250 nm), positively charged (+15 to +20 mV) particles were formed. In vitro transfection and toxicity was tested in COS-7 cells, and these experiments showed that the polyplexes with grafted peptide had a substantially higher transfection activity than the control polyplexes, while the toxicity remained unchanged. Cellular uptake of the polyplexes was visualized with confocal laser scanning microscopy, and no differences in cellular uptake could be determined between the peptide containing systems and the control formulation. This shows that the increased transfection activity is indeed due to a better endosomal escape of the peptide grafted polyplexes. This study demonstrates that it is possible to covalently conjugate an endosome disruptive peptide to cationic gene delivery polymers with preservation of its membrane destabilization activity, making these conjugates suitable for in vivo DNA delivery. PMID:15588908

  16. The Alzheimer's disease Aβ peptide binds to the anionic DMPS lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Christopher; Klimov, Dmitri K

    2016-06-01

    We have applied isobaric-isothermal replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) and the all-atom explicit water model to study binding of Aβ10-40 peptide to the anionic DMPS bilayer. To provide comparison with a zwitterionic bilayer, we used our previous REMD simulations probing binding of the same peptide to the DMPC bilayer. Using two sets of simulations, we comparatively analyzed the equilibrium Aβ conformational ensemble, peptide-bilayer interactions, and changes in the bilayer structure induced by Aβ binding. Our results are six-fold. (1) Binding to the DMPS bilayer triggers the formation of stable helix in the Aβ C-terminal, although the helix-inducing effect caused by DMPS lipids is weaker than that of DMPC. (2) Compared to the DMPC-bound Aβ monomer, the anionic bilayer weakens intrapeptide interactions, particularly, formed by charged amino acids. (3) Binding of Aβ peptide to the DMPS bilayer is primarily governed by electrostatic interactions between charged amino acids and charged lipid groups. In contrast, these interactions play minor role in Aβ binding to the DMPC bilayer. (4) Aβ peptide generally resides on the DMPS bilayer surface causing relatively minor bilayer thinning. The opposite scenario applies to Aβ binding to the DMPC bilayer. (5) In contrast to DMPC simulations, Aβ largely expels anionic lipids from its binding "footprint" forming a ring of charged amino acids mixed with charged lipid groups around the peptide. (6) Aβ binding disorders proximal DMPS lipids more strongly than their DMPC counterparts. Our simulations show that Aβ monomers fail to perturb anionic or zwitterionic bilayers across both leaflets. PMID:26947182

  17. Learning predictive clustering rules

    OpenAIRE

    Ženko, Bernard; Džeroski, Sašo; Struyf, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The two most commonly addressed data mining tasks are predictive modelling and clustering. Here we address the task of predictive clustering, which contains elements of both and generalizes them to some extent. We propose a novel approach to predictive clustering called predictive clustering rules, present an initial implementation and its preliminary experimental evaluation.

  18. Clustering of correlated networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dorogovtsev, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    We obtain the clustering coefficient, the degree-dependent local clustering, and the mean clustering of networks with arbitrary correlations between the degrees of the nearest-neighbor vertices. The resulting formulas allow one to determine the nature of the clustering of a network.

  19. Structures of Mn clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tina M Briere; Marcel H F Sluiter; Vijay Kumar; Yoshiyuki Kawazoe

    2003-01-01

    The geometries of several Mn clusters in the size range Mn13–Mn23 are studied via the generalized gradient approximation to density functional theory. For the 13- and 19-atom clusters, the icosahedral structures are found to be most stable, while for the 15-atom cluster, the bcc structure is more favoured. The clusters show ferrimagnetic spin configurations.

  20. Foodservice Occupations Cluster Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist vocational teachers in developing and implementing a cluster program in food service occupations, this guide contains sections on cluster organization and implementation and instructional emphasis areas. The cluster organization and implementation section covers goal-based planning and includes a proposed cluster curriculum, a…

  1. How Membrane-Active Peptides Get into Lipid Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-21

    mechanism by which these membrane-active peptides lyse membranes. The last class of membrane-active peptides discussed are the CPPs, which translocate across the lipid bilayer without inducing severe disruption and have potential as drug vehicles. CPPs are typically highly charged and can show antimicrobial activity by targeting an intracellular target rather than via a direct membrane lytic mechanism. A critical aspect in the structure-function relationship of membrane-active peptides is their specific activity relative to the lipid membrane composition of the cell target. Cell membranes have a wide diversity of lipids, and those of eukaryotic and prokaryotic species differ greatly in composition and structure. The activity of AMPs from Australian tree frogs, toxins, and CPPs has been investigated within various lipid systems to assess whether a relationship between peptide and membrane composition could be identified. NMR spectroscopy techniques are being used to gain atomistic details of how these membrane-active peptides interact with model membranes and cells, and in particular, competitive assays demonstrate the difference between affinity and activity for a specific lipid environment. Overall, the interactions between these relatively small sized peptides and various lipid bilayers give insight into how these peptides function at the membrane interface. PMID:27187572

  2. Functional phylogenetics reveals contributions of pleiotropic peptide action to ligand-receptor coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    The evolution of peptidergic signaling has been accompanied by a significant degree of ligand-receptor coevolution. Closely related clusters of peptide signaling molecules are observed to activate related groups of receptors, implying that genes encoding these ligands may orchestrate an array of fu...

  3. Novel migraine therapy with calcitonin gene-regulated peptide receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Primary headaches, for example, migraine and cluster headaches represent the most prevalent neurological disorders, affecting up to 15-20% of the adult population. There is a clear association between head pain and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). In this review the role of...... vasoconstrictive, providing a new dimension in therapy....

  4. Radiopharmaceutical development of radiolabelled peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Receptor targeting with radiolabelled peptides has become very important in nuclear medicine and oncology in the past few years. The overexpression of many peptide receptors in numerous cancers, compared to their relatively low density in physiological organs, represents the molecular basis for in vivo imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy with radiolabelled peptide-based probes. The prototypes are analogs of somatostatin which are routinely used in the clinic. More recent developments include somatostatin analogs with a broader receptor subtype profile or with antagonistic properties. Many other peptide families such as bombesin, cholecystokinin/gastrin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/exendin, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) etc. have been explored during the last few years and quite a number of potential radiolabelled probes have been derived from them. On the other hand, a variety of strategies and optimized protocols for efficient labelling of peptides with clinically relevant radionuclides such as {sup 99m}Tc, M{sup 3+} radiometals ({sup 111}In, {sup 86/90}Y, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 67/68}Ga), {sup 64/67}Cu, {sup 18}F or radioisotopes of iodine have been developed. The labelling approaches include direct labelling, the use of bifunctional chelators or prosthetic groups. The choice of the labelling approach is driven by the nature and the chemical properties of the radionuclide. Additionally, chemical strategies, including modification of the amino acid sequence and introduction of linkers/spacers with different characteristics, have been explored for the improvement of the overall performance of the radiopeptides, e.g. metabolic stability and pharmacokinetics. Herein, we discuss the development of peptides as radiopharmaceuticals starting from the choice of the labelling method and the conditions to the design and optimization of the peptide probe, as well as some recent developments, focusing on a selected list of peptide families, including somatostatin

  5. Design of a shear-thinning recoverable peptide hydrogel from native sequences and application for influenza H1N1 vaccine adjuvant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptide hydrogels are considered injectable materials for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Most published hydrogel-forming sequences contain either alternating-charged and noncharged residues or amphiphilic blocks. Here, we report a self-assembling peptide, h9e (FLIVIGSIIGPGGDGPGGD...

  6. Relevant Subspace Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Günnemann, Stephan; Krieger, Ralph; Seidl, Thomas

    Subspace clustering aims at detecting clusters in any subspace projection of a high dimensional space. As the number of possible subspace projections is exponential in the number of dimensions, the result is often tremendously large. Recent approaches fail to reduce results to relevant subspace...... clusters. Their results are typically highly redundant, i.e. many clusters are detected multiple times in several projections. In this work, we propose a novel model for relevant subspace clustering (RESCU). We present a global optimization which detects the most interesting non-redundant subspace clusters...... achieves top clustering quality while competing approaches show greatly varying performance....

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest a mechanism for translocation of the HIV-1 TAT peptide across lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herce, Henry D; Garcia, Angel E

    2007-12-26

    The recombinant HIV-1 Tat protein contains a small region corresponding to residues (47)YGRKKRRQRR(57)R, which is capable of translocating cargoes of different molecular sizes, such as proteins, DNA, RNA, or drugs, across the cell membrane in an apparently energy-independent manner. The pathway that these peptides follow for entry into the cell has been the subject of strong controversy for the last decade. This peptide is highly basic and hydrophilic. Therefore, a central question that any candidate mechanism has to answer is how this highly hydrophilic peptide is able to cross the hydrophobic barrier imposed by the cell membrane. We propose a mechanism for the spontaneous translocation of the Tat peptides across a lipid membrane. This mechanism involves strong interactions between the Tat peptides and the phosphate groups on both sides of the lipid bilayer, the insertion of charged side chains that nucleate the formation of a transient pore, followed by the translocation of the Tat peptides by diffusing on the pore surface. This mechanism explains how key ingredients, such as the cooperativity among the peptides, the large positive charge, and specifically the arginine amino acids, contribute to the uptake. The proposed mechanism also illustrates the importance of membrane fluctuations. Indeed, mechanisms that involve large fluctuations of the membrane structure, such as transient pores and the insertion of charged amino acid side chains, may be common and perhaps central to the functions of many membrane protein functions. PMID:18093956

  8. Amine substitution into sulfuric acid – ammonia clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kupiainen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The substitution of ammonia by dimethylamine in sulfuric acid – ammonia – dimethylamine clusters was studied using a collision and evaporation dynamics model. Quantum chemical formation free energies were computed using B3LYP/CBSB7 for geometries and frequencies and RI-CC2/aug-cc-pV(T+dZ for electronic energies. We first demonstrate the good performance of our method by a comparison with an experimental study investigating base substitution in positively charged clusters, and then continue by simulating base exchange in neutral clusters, which cannot be measured directly. Collisions of a dimethylamine molecule with an ammonia containing positively charged cluster result in the instantaneous evaporation of an ammonia molecule, while the dimethylamine molecule remains in the cluster. According to our simulations, a similar base exchange can take place in neutral clusters, although the overall process is more complicated. Neutral sulfuric acid – ammonia clusters are significantly less stable than their positively charged counterparts, resulting in a competition between cluster evaporation and base exchange.

  9. Amine substitution into sulfuric acid – ammonia clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vehkamäki

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The substitution of ammonia by dimethylamine in sulfuric acid – ammonia – dimethylamine clusters was studied using a collision and evaporation dynamics model. Quantum chemical formation free energies were computed using B3LYP/CBSB7 for geometries and frequencies and RI-CC2/aug-cc-pV(T+dZ for electronic energies. We first demonstrate the good performance of our method by a comparison with an experimental study investigating base substitution in positively charged clusters, and then continue by simulating base exchange in neutral clusters, which cannot be measured directly. Collisions of a dimethylamine molecule with an ammonia containing positively charged cluster result in the instantaneous evaporation of an ammonia molecule, while the dimethylamine molecule remains in the cluster. According to our simulations, a similar base exchange can take place in neutral clusters, although the overall process is more complicated. Neutral sulfuric acid – ammonia clusters are significantly less stable than their positively charged counterparts, resulting in a competition between cluster evaporation and base exchange.

  10. Peptide primary messengers in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The peptide primary messengers regulate embryonic development,cell growth and many other activities in animal cells. But recent evidence verified that peptide primary messengers are also involved in plant defense responses, the recognition between pollen and stigma and keep the balance between cell proliferation and differentiations in shoot apical meristems. Those results suggest that plants may actually make wide use of peptide primary messengers, both in embryonic development and late life when they rally their cells to defend against pathogens and insect pests. The recent advance in those aspects is reviewed.

  11. Tilting theory and cluster algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Reiten, Idun

    2010-01-01

    We give an introduction to the theory of cluster categories and cluster tilted algebras. We include some background on the theory of cluster algebras, and discuss the interplay with cluster categories and cluster tilted algebras.

  12. Parallel Local Graph Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Shun, Julian; Roosta-Khorasani, Farbod; Fountoulakis, Kimon; Mahoney, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Graph clustering has many important applications in computing, but due to growing sizes of graph, even traditionally fast clustering methods such as spectral partitioning can be computationally expensive for real-world graphs of interest. Motivated partly by this, so-called local algorithms for graph clustering have received significant interest due to the fact that they can find good clusters in a graph with work proportional to the size of the cluster rather than that of the entire graph. T...

  13. Clustering and classification

    CERN Document Server

    Arabie, Phipps

    1996-01-01

    At a moderately advanced level, this book seeks to cover the areas of clustering and related methods of data analysis where major advances are being made. Topics include: hierarchical clustering, variable selection and weighting, additive trees and other network models, relevance of neural network models to clustering, the role of computational complexity in cluster analysis, latent class approaches to cluster analysis, theory and method with applications of a hierarchical classes model in psychology and psychopathology, combinatorial data analysis, clusterwise aggregation of relations, review

  14. Cluster ion beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief state-of-the-art review in the field of cluster-surface interactions is presented. Ionised cluster beams could become a powerful and versatile tool for the modification and processing of surfaces as an alternative to ion implantation and ion assisted deposition. The main effects of cluster-surface collisions and possible applications of cluster ion beams are discussed. The outlooks of the Cluster Implantation and Deposition Apparatus (CIDA) being developed in Guteborg University are shown

  15. Graded cluster algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Grabowski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In the cluster algebra literature, the notion of a graded cluster algebra has been implicit since the origin of the subject. In this work, we wish to bring this aspect of cluster algebra theory to the foreground and promote its study. We transfer a definition of Gekhtman, Shapiro and Vainshtein to the algebraic setting, yielding the notion of a multi-graded cluster algebra. We then study gradings for finite type cluster algebras without coefficients, giving a full classification. Translating ...

  16. Screening of TACE Peptide Inhibitors from Phage Display Peptide Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To obtain the recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) ectodomain and use it as a selective molecule for the screening of TACE peptide inhibitors, the cDNA coding catalytic domain (T800) and full-length ectodomain (T1300) of TACE were amplified by RTPCR, and the expression plasmids were constructed by inserting T800 and T1300 into plasmid pET28a and pET-28c respectively. The recombinant T800 and T1300 were induced by IPTG, and SDSPAGE and Western blotting analysis results revealed that T800 and T1300 were highly expressed in the form of inclusion body. After Ni2+-NTA resin affinity chromatography, the recombinant proteins were used in the screening of TACE-binding peptides from phage display peptide library respectively. After 4 rounds of biopanning, the positive phage clones were analyzed by ELISA, competitive inhibition assay and DNA sequencing. A common amino acid sequence (TRWLVYFSRPYLVAT) was found and synthesized. The synthetic peptide could inhibit the TNF-α release from LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) up to 60.3 %. FACS analysis revealed that the peptide mediated the accumulation of TNF-α on the cell surface. These results demonstrate that the TACE-binding peptide is an effective antagonist of TACE.

  17. Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Schnöckel, Hansgeorg [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Eichhorn, Bryan W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P. [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium–aluminum cluster anions, Na{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

  18. Geometrical and statistical factors in fission of small metal clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Obolensky, O. I.; Lyalin, A. G.; Solov'yov, A. V.; Greiner, W.

    2005-01-01

    Fission of metastable charged univalent metal clusters has been studied on example of Na_{10}^{2+} and Na_{18}^{2+} clusters by means of density functional theory methods. Energetics of the process, i.e. dissociation energies and fission barriers, as well as its dynamics, i.e. fission pathways, have been analyzed. The dissociation energies and fission barriers have been calculated for the full range of fission channels for the Na_{10}^{2+} cluster. The impact of cluster structure on the fissi...

  19. Metal cluster fission: jellium model and Molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia;

    2004-01-01

    ^2+ --> 2 Na_9^+ are presented. Dependence of the fission barriers on isomer structure of the parent cluster is analyzed. Importance of rearrangement of the cluster structure during the fission process is elucidated. This rearrangement may include transition to another isomer state of the parent cluster......Fission of doubly charged sodium clusters is studied using the open-shell two-center deformed jellium model approximation and it ab initio molecular dynamic approach accounting for all electrons in the system. Results of calculations of fission reactions Na_10^2+ --> Na_7^+ + Na_3^+ and Na_18...

  20. Blackbody-induced radiative dissociation of cationic SF 6 clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toker, Jonathan; Rahinov, I.; Schwalm, D.;

    2012-01-01

    The stability of cationic SF5+(SF6)n−1 clusters was investigated by measuring their blackbody-induced radiative dissociation (BIRD) rates. The clusters were produced in a supersonic expansion ion source and stored in an electrostatic ion-beam trap at room temperature, where their abundances and...... lifetimes were measured. Using the “master equation” approach, relative binding energies of an SF6 unit in the clusters could be extracted from the storage-time dependence of the survival probabilities. The results allow for a deeper insight into the effect of a localized charge on the structure and...... stability of SF6-based clusters....

  1. Small rare gas clusters in XUV laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, D

    2003-01-01

    Semi-classical molecular dynamics simulations of small rare gas clusters in short laser pulses of 100 nm wavelength were performed. For comparison, the cluster response to 800 nm laser pulses was investigated as well. The inner ionization dynamics of the multi-electron atoms inside the cluster was treated explicitly. The simulation results underpin that at XUV wavelengths collisions play an important role in the energy absorption and the generation of the surprisingly high charge states of Xe atoms inside clusters, as they were observed in the free-electron laser experiment at DESY, Hamburg, Germany [Wabnitz et al., Nature 420, 482 (2002)].

  2. Cluster dynamics transcending chemical dynamics toward nuclear fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Heidenreich, Andreas; Jortner, Joshua; Last, Isidore

    2006-01-01

    Ultrafast cluster dynamics encompasses femtosecond nuclear dynamics, attosecond electron dynamics, and electron-nuclear dynamics in ultraintense laser fields (peak intensities 1015–1020 W·cm−2). Extreme cluster multielectron ionization produces highly charged cluster ions, e.g., (C4+(D+)4)n and (D+I22+)n at IM = 1018 W·cm−2, that undergo Coulomb explosion (CE) with the production of high-energy (5 keV to 1 MeV) ions, which can trigger nuclear reactions in an assembly of exploding clusters. Th...

  3. Cluster Evaluation of Density Based Subspace Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Sembiring, Rahmat Widia

    2010-01-01

    Clustering real world data often faced with curse of dimensionality, where real world data often consist of many dimensions. Multidimensional data clustering evaluation can be done through a density-based approach. Density approaches based on the paradigm introduced by DBSCAN clustering. In this approach, density of each object neighbours with MinPoints will be calculated. Cluster change will occur in accordance with changes in density of each object neighbours. The neighbours of each object typically determined using a distance function, for example the Euclidean distance. In this paper SUBCLU, FIRES and INSCY methods will be applied to clustering 6x1595 dimension synthetic datasets. IO Entropy, F1 Measure, coverage, accurate and time consumption used as evaluation performance parameters. Evaluation results showed SUBCLU method requires considerable time to process subspace clustering; however, its value coverage is better. Meanwhile INSCY method is better for accuracy comparing with two other methods, altho...

  4. On Dust Charging Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Tsintsadze, Nodar L.; Tsintsadze, Levan N.

    2008-01-01

    A general derivation of the charging equation of a dust grain is presented, and indicated where and when it can be used. A problem of linear fluctuations of charges on the surface of the dust grain is discussed.

  5. Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Analysis of Tryptic Digests/Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takats, Zoltan; Wiseman, Justin M; Ifa, Demian R; Cooks, R Graham

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONThe analytical utility of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is such that it can be applied to qualitative proteomics research in the same way as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) methods, although little work has yet been reported in this regard. Because DESI is a surface analysis technique and easily automated, it can be implemented for high-throughput applications, which include the analysis of chromatographic fractions of digested proteins. The analysis of tryptic peptides follows the same protocols as in typical MALDI or ESI methods, except that the mixture is spotted directly onto an insulating surface, allowed to dry, and analyzed directly without adding matrix compounds (as in the case of MALDI methods). The spectral characteristics are similar to those of ESI in that both singly and multiply charged analyte ions are detected. Spectra are highly similar to electrospray spectra of tryptic digests with regard to the overwhelming presence of multiply charged ions of peptides. DESI-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is an emerging technique with great promise, but its application range is still being investigated. Therefore, the protocol for DESI-MS analysis of tryptic digests/peptides presented here provides general procedures used for the applications that have been investigated so far. Optimal ion source parameters and surface types may vary, depending on the application. PMID:21356811

  6. Hydrogen Attachment/Abstraction Dissociation (HAD) of Gas-Phase Peptide Ions for Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Sekiya, Sadanori; Nishikaze, Takashi; Kodera, Kei; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Wada, Motoi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Dissociation of gas-phase peptide ions through interaction with low-energy hydrogen (H) radical (∼0.15 eV) was observed with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. The H radical generated by thermal dissociation of H2 molecules passing through a heated tungsten capillary (∼2000 °C) was injected into the ion trap containing target peptide ions. The fragmentation spectrum showed abundant c-/z- and a-/x-type ions, attributable to H attachment/abstraction to/from peptide ion. Because the low-energy neutral H radical initiated the fragmentation, the charge state of the precursor ion was maintained during the dissociation. As a result, precursor ions of any charge state, including singly charged positive and negative ions, could be analyzed for amino acid sequence. The sequence coverage exceeding 90% was obtained for both singly protonated and singly deprotonated substance P peptide. This mass spectrometry also preserved labile post-translational modification bonds. The modification sites of triply phosphorylated peptide (kinase domain of insulin receptor) were identified with the sequence coverage exceeding 80%. PMID:27002918

  7. Media Clusters and Media Cluster Policies

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Charlie; Picard, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Large media clusters have emerged in a limited number of large cities, characterizing the geographical concentration of the global media industry. This paper explores the reasons behind the localization patterns of media industries, the effect of the rapid advancement of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) on media clusters and the role of media cluster policies. One might draw the conclusion that with the developments of the ICT sector and the fact that there are no raw material...

  8. Structure and biosynthesis of a macrocyclic peptide containing an unprecedented lysine-to-tryptophan crosslink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramma, Kelsey R.; Bushin, Leah B.; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcal bacteria use peptide signals as a means of intraspecies communication. These peptides can contain unusual post-translational modifications, providing opportunities for expanding our understanding of nature's chemical and biosynthetic repertoires. Here, we have combined tools from natural products discovery and mechanistic enzymology to elucidate the structure and biosynthesis of streptide, a streptococcal macrocyclic peptide. We show that streptide bears an unprecedented post-translational modification involving a covalent linkage between two unactivated carbons within the side chains of lysine and tryptophan. The biosynthesis of streptide was addressed by genetic and biochemical studies. The former implicated a new SPASM-domain-containing radical SAM enzyme StrB, while the latter revealed that StrB contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters and installs the unusual lysine-to-tryptophan crosslink in a single step. By intramolecularly stitching together the side chains of lysine and tryptophan, StrB provides a new route for biosynthesizing macrocyclic peptides.

  9. Induced Charge Capacitive Deionization

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, S.; Suss, M. E.; Biesheuvel, P. M.; Bercovici, M.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the phenomenon of induced-charge capacitive deionization (ICCDI) that occurs around a porous and conducting particle immersed in an electrolyte, under the action of an external electrostatic field. The external electric field induces an electric dipole in the porous particle, leading to capacitive charging of its volume by both cations and anions at opposite poles. This regime is characterized both by a large RC charging time and a small electrochemical charge relaxation time, ...

  10. Primitive Virtual Negative Charge

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kiyoung

    2008-01-01

    Physical fields, such as gravity and electromagnetic field, are interpreted as results from rearrangement of vacuum particles to get the equilibrium of net charge density and net mass density in 4-dimensional complex space. Then, both fields should interact to each other in that physical interaction is considered as a field-to-field interaction. Hence, Mass-Charge interaction is introduced with primitive-virtual negative charge defined for the mass. With the concept of Mass-Charge interaction...

  11. The Equine PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Louise; Jacobsen, Stine; Sorensen, Mette A.;

    2014-01-01

    Progress in MS-based methods for veterinary research and diagnostics is lagging behind compared to the human research, and proteome data of domestic animals is still not well represented in open source data repositories. This is particularly true for the equine species. Here we present a first...... current release comprises 24 131 distinct peptides representing 2636 canonical proteins observed at false discovery rates of 0.2% at the peptide level and 1.4% at the protein level. Data from the Equine PeptideAtlas are available for experimental planning, validation of new datasets, and as a proteomic...... data mining resource. The advantages of the Equine PeptideAtlas are demonstrated by examples of mining the contents for information on potential and well-known equine acute phase proteins, which have extensive general interest in the veterinary clinic. The extracted information will support further...

  12. Peptide nanostructures in biomedical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyzizarnagh, Hamid; Yoon, Do-Young; Goltz, Mark; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2016-09-01

    Nanostructures of peptides have been investigated for biomedical applications due to their unique mechanical and electrical properties in addition to their excellent biocompatibility. Peptides may form fibrils, spheres and tubes in nanoscale depending on the formation conditions. These peptide nanostructures can be used in electrical, medical, dental, and environmental applications. Applications of these nanostructures include, but are not limited to, electronic devices, biosensing, medical imaging and diagnosis, drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. This review offers a discussion of basic synthesis methods, properties and application of these nanomaterials. The review concludes with recommendations and future directions for peptide nanostructures. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:730-743. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1393 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26846352

  13. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies are...... powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors such as......, including solid-phase peptide-carrier conjugation and peptide-carrier conjugation in solution. Upon immunization, adjuvants such as Al(OH)(3) are added together with the immunogenic peptide-carrier conjugate, which usually leads to high-titred antisera. Following immunization and peptide antibody...

  14. Cluster selection in divisive clustering algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Savaresi, Sergio,; Boley, Daniel L.; Bittanti, Sergio; Gazzaniga, Giovanna

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of clustering a data-set. In particular, the bisecting divisive approach is here considered. This approach can be naturally divided into two sub-problems: the problem of choosing which cluster must be divided, and the problem of splitting the selected cluster. The focus here is on the first problem. The contribution of this work is to propose a new technique for the selection of the cluster to split. This technique is based upon the shape of...

  15. Design and characterization of an acid-activated antimicrobial peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lina; He, Jian; Eckert, Randal; Yarbrough, Daniel; Lux, Renate; Anderson, Maxwell; Shi, Wenyuan

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries is a microbial biofilm infection in which the metabolic activities of plaque bacteria result in a dramatic pH decrease and shift the demineralization/remineralization equilibrium on the tooth surface towards demineralization. In addition to causing a net loss in tooth minerals, creation of an acidic environment favors growth of acid-enduring and acid-generating species, which causes further reduction in the plaque pH. In this study, we developed a prototype antimicrobial peptide capable of achieving high activity exclusively at low environmental pH to target bacterial species like Streptococcus mutans that produce acid and thrive under the low pH conditions detrimental for tooth integrity. The features of clavanin A, a naturally occurring peptide rich in histidine and phenylalanine residues with pH-dependent antimicrobial activity, served as a design basis for these prototype 'acid-activated peptides' (AAPs). Employing the major cariogenic species S. mutans as a model system, the two AAPs characterized in this study exhibited a striking pH-dependent antimicrobial activity, which correlated well with the calculated charge distribution. This type of peptide represents a potential new way to combat dental caries. PMID:19878192

  16. Charge exchange system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  17. Charge Trapping in Photovoltaically Active Perovskites and Related Halogenoplumbate Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Marin, Timothy W

    2014-04-01

    Halogenoplumbate perovskites (MeNH3PbX3, where X is I and/or Br) have emerged as promising solar panel materials. Their limiting photovoltaic efficiency depends on charge localization and trapping processes that are presently insufficiently understood. We demonstrate that in halogenoplumbate materials the holes are trapped by organic cations (that deprotonate from their oxidized state) and Pb(2+) cations (as Pb(3+) centers), whereas the electrons are trapped by several Pb(2+) cations, forming diamagnetic lead clusters that also serve as color centers. In some cases, paramagnetic variants of these clusters can be observed. We suggest that charge separation in the halogenoplumbates resembles latent image formation in silver halide photography. Electron and hole trapping by lead clusters in extended dislocations in the bulk may be responsible for accumulation of trapped charge observed in this photovoltaic material. PMID:26274450

  18. Targeting cancer with peptide aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    Seigneuric, Renaud; Gobbo, Jessica; Colas, Pierre; Garrido, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    A major endeavour in cancer chemotherapy is to develop agents that specifically target a biomolecule of interest. There are two main classes of targeting agents: small molecules and biologics. Among biologics (e.g.: antibodies), DNA, RNA but also peptide aptamers are relatively recent agents. Peptide aptamers are seldom described but represent attractive agents that can inhibit a growing panel of oncotargets including Heat Shock Proteins. Potential pitfalls and coming challenges towards succe...

  19. Charge density distributions derived from smoothed electrostatic potential functions: design of protein reduced point charge models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2011-10-01

    To generate reduced point charge models of proteins, we developed an original approach to hierarchically locate extrema in charge density distribution functions built from the Poisson equation applied to smoothed molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) functions. A charge fitting program was used to assign charge values to the so-obtained reduced representations. In continuation to a previous work, the Amber99 force field was selected. To easily generate reduced point charge models for protein structures, a library of amino acid templates was designed. Applications to four small peptides, a set of 53 protein structures, and four KcsA ion channel models, are presented. Electrostatic potential and solvation free energy values generated by the reduced models are compared with the corresponding values obtained using the original set of atomic charges. Results are in closer agreement with the original all-atom electrostatic properties than those obtained with a previous reduced model that was directly built from the smoothed MEP functions [Leherte and Vercauteren in J Chem Theory Comput 5:3279-3298, 2009]. PMID:21915750

  20. Manufacturing of peptides exhibiting biological activity

    OpenAIRE

    Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Timmer, Monika; Polanowski, Antoni; Lubec, Gert; Trziszka, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that food proteins may be a source of bioactive peptides. Those peptides are encrypted in the protein sequence. They stay inactive within the parental protein until release by proteolytic enzymes (Mine and Kovacs-Nolan in Worlds Poult Sci J 62(1):87–95, 2006; Hartman and Miesel in Curr Opin Biotechnol 18:163–169, 2007). Once released the bioactive peptides exhibit several biofunctionalities and may serve therapeutic roles in body systems. Opioid peptides, peptides ...

  1. Peptides and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopy make it possible to derive detailed structural information about biomolecular structures in solution. These techniques are critically dependent on the availability of labeled compounds. For example, NMR techniques used today to derive peptide and protein structures require uniformity {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled samples that are derived biosynthetically from (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. These experiments are possible now because, during the 1970s, the National Stable Isotope Resource developed algal methods for producing (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. If NMR techniques are to be used to study larger proteins, we will need sophisticated labelling patterns in amino acids that employ a combination of {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N labeling. The availability of these specifically labeled amino acids requires a renewed investment in new methods for chemical synthesis of labeled amino acids. The development of new magnetic resonance or vibrational techniques to elucidate biomolecular structure will be seriously impeded if we do not see rapid progress in labeling technology. Investment in labeling chemistry is as important as investment in the development of advanced spectroscopic tools.

  2. Antimicrobial peptides in annelids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tasiemski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene encoded antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are widely distributed among living organisms including plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. They constitute important effectors of the innate immune response by exerting multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with impact on epithelial and inflammatory cells influencing diverse processes such as cytokine release, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, wound healing, chemotaxis and immune induction. In invertebrates, most of the data describe the characterization and/or the function of AMPs in the numerically and economically most representative group which are arthropods. Annelids are among the first coelomates and are therefore of special phylogenetic interest. Compared to other invertebrate groups, data on annelid’s immunity reveal heavier emphasis on the cellular than on the humoral response suggesting that immune defense of annelids seems to be principally developed as cellular immunity.This paper gives an overview of the variety of AMPs identified in the three classes of annelids, i.e. polychaetes, oligochaetes and achaetes. Their functions, when they have been studied, in the humoral or cellular response of annelids are also mentioned.

  3. Kinins and peptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regoli, Domenico; Gobeil, Fernand

    2016-04-01

    This paper is divided into two sections: the first contains the essential elements of the opening lecture presented by Pr. Regoli to the 2015 International Kinin Symposium in S. Paulo, Brazil on June 28th and the second is the celebration of Dr. Regoli's 60 years of research on vasoactive peptides. The cardiovascular homeostasis derives from a balance of two systems, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). The biologically active effector entity of RAS is angiotensin receptor-1 (AT-1R), and that of KKS is bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R). The first mediates vasoconstriction, the second is the most potent and efficient vasodilator. Thanks to its complex and multi-functional mechanism of action, involving nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin and endothelial hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). B2R is instrumental for the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrition to tissues. KKS is present on the vascular endothelium and functions as an autacoid playing major roles in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and diabetes. KKS exerts a paramount role in the prevention of thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Such knowledge emphasizes the already prominent value of the ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) for the treatment of CVDs and diabetes. Indeed, the ACEIs, thanks to their double action (block of the RAS and potentiation of the KKS) are the ideal agents for a rational treatment of these diseases. PMID:26408609

  4. Antimicrobial peptides in crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RD Rosa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Crustaceans are a large and diverse invertebrate animal group that mounts a complex and efficient innate immune response against a variety of microorganisms. The crustacean immune system is primarily related to cellular responses and the production and release of important immune effectors into the hemolymph. Antimicrobial proteins and/or peptides (AMPs are key components of innate immunity and are widespread in nature, from bacteria to vertebrate animals. In crustaceans, 15 distinct AMP families are currently recognized, although the great majority (14 families comes from members of the order Decapoda. Crustacean AMPs are generally cationic, gene-encoded molecules that are mainly produced by circulating immune-competent cells (hemocytes or are derived from unrelated proteins primarily involved in other biological functions. In this review, we tentatively classified the crustacean AMPs into four main groups based on their amino acid composition, structural features and multi-functionality. We also attempted to summarize the current knowledge on their implication both in an efficient response to microbial infections and in crustacean survival.

  5. Comparison of marmoset and human FSH using synthetic peptides of the β-subunit L2 loop region and anti-peptide antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutteyil, Susha S; Kulkarni, Bhalchandra J; Mojidra, Rahul; Joseph, Shaini; Pathak, Bhakti R; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-06-01

    Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) is a glycoprotein hormone required for female and male gametogenesis in vertebrates. Common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a New World primate monkey, used as animal model in biomedical research. Observations like, requirement of extremely high dose of human FSH in marmosets for superovulation compared to other primates and generation of antibodies in marmoset against human FSH after repeated superovulation cycles, point towards the possibility that FSH-FSH receptor (FSHR) interaction in marmosets might be different than in the humans. In this study we attempted to understand some of these structural differences using FSH peptides and anti-peptide antibody approach. Based on sequence alignment, in silico modeling and docking studies, L2 loop of FSH β-subunit (L2β) was found to be different between marmoset and human. Hence, peptides corresponding to region 32-50 of marmoset and human L2β loop were synthesized, purified and characterized. The peptides displayed dissimilarity in terms of molecular mass, predicted isoelectric point, predicted charge and in the ability to inhibit hormone-receptor interaction. Polyclonal antibodies generated against both the peptides were found to exhibit specific binding for the corresponding peptide and parent FSH in ELISA and Western blotting respectively and exhibited negligible reactivity to cross-species peptide and FSH in ELISA. The anti-peptide antibody against marmoset FSH was also able to detect native FSH in marmoset plasma samples and pituitary sections. In summary, the L2β loop of marmoset and human FSH has distinct receptor interaction ability and immunoreactivity indicating possibility of subtle conformational and biochemical differences between the two regions which may affect the FSH-FSHR interaction in these two primates. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27282136

  6. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  7. Young massive star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Zwart, Simon Portegies; Gieles, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Young massive clusters are dense aggregates of young stars that form the fundamental building blocks of galaxies. Several examples exist in the Milky Way Galaxy and the Local Group, but they are particularly abundant in starburst and interacting galaxies. The few young massive clusters that are close enough to resolve are of prime interest for studying the stellar mass function and the ecological interplay between stellar evolution and stellar dynamics. The distant unresolved clusters may be effectively used to study the star-cluster mass function, and they provide excellent constraints on the formation mechanisms of young cluster populations. Young massive clusters are expected to be the nurseries for many unusual objects, including a wide range of exotic stars and binaries. So far only a few such objects have been found in young massive clusters, although their older cousins, the globular clusters, are unusually rich in stellar exotica. In this review we focus on star clusters younger than $\\sim100$\\,Myr, m...

  8. Cluster automorphism groups of cluster algebras with coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Wen; Zhu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We study the cluster automorphism group of a skew-symmetric cluster algebra with geometric coefficients. For this, we introduce the notion of gluing free cluster algebra, and show that under a weak condition the cluster automorphism group of a gluing free cluster algebra is a subgroup of the cluster automorphism group of its principal part cluster algebra (i.e. the corresponding cluster algebra without coefficients). We show that several classes of cluster algebras with coefficients are gluin...

  9. Atomic force microscopy of bacteria reveals the mechanobiology of pore forming peptide action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mularski, Anna; Wilksch, Jonathan J; Hanssen, Eric; Strugnell, Richard A; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved AFM images revealed that the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) caerin 1.1 caused localised defects in the cell walls of lysed Klebsiella pneumoniae cells, corroborating a pore-forming mechanism of action. The defects continued to grow during the AFM experiment, in corroboration with large holes that were visualised by scanning electron microscopy. Defects in cytoplasmic membranes were visualised by cryo-EM using the same peptide concentration as in the AFM experiments. At three times the minimum inhibitory concentration of caerin, 'pores' were apparent in the outer membrane. The capsule of K. pneumoniae AJ218 was unchanged by exposure to caerin, indicating that the ionic interaction of the positively charged peptide with the negatively charged capsular polysaccharide is not a critical component of AMP interaction with K. pneumoniae AJ218 cells. Further, the presence of a capsule confers no advantage to wild-type over capsule-deficient cells when exposed to the AMP caerin. PMID:26946245

  10. Molecular dynamics study of the solvation of an alpha-helical transmembrane peptide by DMSO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, A.M.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    10-ns molecular dynamics study of the solvation of a hydrophobic transmembrane helical peptide in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is presented. The objective is to analyze how this aprotic polar solvent is able to solvate three groups of amino acid residues (i.e., polar, apolar, and charged) that are loca

  11. Facilitation of peptide fibre formation by arginine-phosphate/carboxylate interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Krishna Prasad; Sandeep Verma

    2008-01-01

    This study describes peptide fibre formation in a hexapeptide, derived from the V3 loop of HIV-1, mediated by the interactions between arginine residues and phosphate/carboxylate anions. This charge neutralization approach was further confirmed when the deletion of arginine residue from the hexapeptide sequence resulted in fibre formation, which was studied by a combination of microscopic techniques.

  12. Measurements of Charge Transfer Efficiency in a Proton-irradiated Swept Charge Device

    CERN Document Server

    YuSa, Wang; XiaoYan, Liu; WeiWei, Cui; YuPeng, Xu; ChengKui, Li; MaoShun, Li; DaWei, Han; TianXiang, Chen; Jia, Huo; Juan, Wang; Wei, Li; Wei, Hu; Yi, Zhang; Bo, Lu; GuoHe, Yin; Yue, Zhu; ZiLiang, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) have been successfully used in several low energy X-ray astronomical satellite over the past two decades. Their high energy resolution and high spatial resolution make them an perfect tool for low energy astronomy, such as formation of galaxy clusters and environment of black holes. The Low Energy X-ray Telescope (LE) group is developing Swept Charge Device (SCD) for the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) satellite. SCD is a special low energy X-ray CCD, which could be read out a thousand times faster than traditional CCDs, simultaneously keeping excellent energy resolution. A test method for measuring the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) of a prototype SCD has been set up. Studies of the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) have been performed at a temperature range of operation, with a proton-irradiated SCD.

  13. Indication of a size-dependent transition from molecular to dissociative chemisorption on clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Burkart, Stefan; Blessing, Nico; Ganteför, Gerd

    1999-01-01

    We report experimental indications for a size-dependent change of the chemical nature of chemisorption on small atomic clusters. We studied chemisorption of atomic hydrogen on negatively charged Tin- clusters using mass and photoelectron spectroscopy. Our experimental data support the assumption that for clusters with up to four Ti atoms, adsorption of intact H2 molecules is the energetically preferred configuration. For larger Tin clusters with n>4, dissociative hydrogen chemisorption is the...

  14. Winds and Shocks in Galaxy Clusters: Shock Acceleration on an Intergalactic Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, T. W.; Miniati, Francesco; Ryu, Dongsu; Kang, Hyesung

    2000-01-01

    We review the possible roles of large scale shocks as particle accelerators in clusters of galaxies. Recent observational and theoretical work has suggested that high energy charged particles may constitute a substantial pressure component in clusters. If true that would alter the expected dynamical evolution of clusters and increase the dynamical masses consistent with hydrostatic equilibrium. Moderately strong shocks are probably common in clusters, through the actions of several agents. Th...

  15. On the applicability of jellium model to the description of alkali clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matveentsev, Anton; Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Ilia;

    2003-01-01

    -density approximations we have calculated the binding energies per atom, ionization potentials, deformation parameters and optimized values of the Wigner–Seitz radii for neutral and singly charged sodium clusters with the number of atoms N<=20. The characteristics calculated within the framework of the deformed jellium...... role of the cluster shape deformations in the formation cluster properties and quite reasonable level of applicability of the deformed jellium model. This elucidates the similarities of atomic cluster physics with the physics of atomic nuclei....

  16. Space Charge Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrario, M; Palumbo, L

    2014-01-01

    The space charge forces are those generated directly by the charge distribution, with the inclusion of the image charges and currents due to the interaction of the beam with a perfectly conducting smooth pipe. Space charge forces are responsible for several unwanted phenomena related to beam dynamics, such as energy loss, shift of the synchronous phase and frequency , shift of the betatron frequencies, and instabilities. We will discuss in this lecture the main feature of space charge effects in high-energy storage rings as well as in low-energy linacs and transport lines.

  17. On the zwitterionic nature of gas-phase peptides and protein ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Marchese

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Determining the total number of charged residues corresponding to a given value of net charge for peptides and proteins in gas phase is crucial for the interpretation of mass-spectrometry data, yet it is far from being understood. Here we show that a novel computational protocol based on force field and massive density functional calculations is able to reproduce the experimental facets of well investigated systems, such as angiotensin II, bradykinin, and tryptophan-cage. The protocol takes into account all of the possible protomers compatible with a given charge state. Our calculations predict that the low charge states are zwitterions, because the stabilization due to intramolecular hydrogen bonding and salt-bridges can compensate for the thermodynamic penalty deriving from deprotonation of acid residues. In contrast, high charge states may or may not be zwitterions because internal solvation might not compensate for the energy cost of charge separation.

  18. What Makes Clusters Decline?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark. The...... longitudinal study on the high-tech cluster reveals that technological lock-in and exit of key firms have contributed to decline. Entrepreneurship has a positive effect on the cluster’s adaptive capabilities, while multinational companies have contradicting effects by bringing in new resources to the cluster...

  19. Charge site assignment in native proteins by ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Lindsay J; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of all gas-phase charge sites of natively sprayed proteins and peptides is demonstrated using 193 nm UVPD. The high sequence coverage offered by UVPD is exploited for the accurate determination of charge sites in protein systems up to 18 kDa, allowing charge site to be studied as a function of protein conformation and the presence of disulfide bonds. Charging protons are found on both basic sidechains and on the amide backbone of less basic amino acids such as serine, glutamine, and proline. UVPD analysis was performed on the 3+ charge state of melittin, the 5+ to 8+ charge states of ubiquitin, and the 8+ charge state of reduced and oxidized β-lactoglobulin. The location of charges in gas-phase proteins is known to impact structure; molecular modeling of different charge site motifs of 3+ melittin demonstrates how placement of protons in simulations can dramatically impact the predicted structure of the molecule. The location of positive charge sites in ubiquitin and β-lactoglobulin are additionally found to depend on the presence or absence of salt-bridges, columbic repulsion across the length of the peptide, and protein conformation. Charge site isomers are demonstrated for ubiquitin and β-lactoglobulin but found to be much less numerous than previously predicted. PMID:26596460

  20. Purification Technology and Antimicrobial Activity Analysis of Antimicrobial Peptide from Ovotransferrin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tie-hua; ZHENG Jian; YE Hai-qing; YU Ya-li; ZHAO Ping; LIU Jing-bo

    2011-01-01

    Antibacterial peptides mixture purified from Ovotransferrin by pepsin digest was used as the raw material.Peptide sections with good antibacterial activity were determined after bacteriostasis experiments, its molecular weight and amino acid composition were analyzed. The results of experiments indicate that with Sephadex G-50 and distilled water as mobile phase, detection wavelength 220 nm, flow rate 1.5 mL/min, sample density 0.2 g/mL, and volume 0.2 mL are the optimal conditions. Bacteriostasis experiments of the fraction of purified peaks were carried out and the result was: peak 1>peak 3>peak 2; the molecular weight of peak 1 was about 3015 by high performance liquid chromatography; active peptide possessed positive charges by amino acid analysis, its cationic characteristics are in accordance with the nature of antimicrobial peptides.

  1. Analysis of protamine peptides in insulin pharmaceutical formulations by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamalle, Caroline; Servais, Anne-Catherine; Demelenne, Alice; Crommen, Jacques; Fillet, Marianne

    2016-03-01

    Protamines are a group of highly basic peptides that are sometimes added to insulin formulations to prolong the pharmacological action. In this study, different methods were investigated to identify protamine in insulin formulations. Capillary electrophoresis in aqueous and non-aqueous media was tested to separate these peptides with very close amino acid sequences. Different buffers (phosphate or formate, both acidified) and various additives (principally negatively charged and neutral surfactants) were investigated to optimize peptide separation. Finally, a micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography method using a capillary of 120 cm effective length and an aqueous background electrolyte made up of 100 mM phosphate buffer (pH 2) and 50 mM Thesit® gave the best results, providing the separation of the four major protamine peptides within 25 min. PMID:26829340

  2. Systematic Comparisons of Formulations of Linear Oligolysine Peptides with siRNA and Plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Albert; McCarthy, David; Hart, Stephen L; Tagalakis, Aristides D

    2016-05-01

    The effects of lysine peptide lengths on DNA and siRNA packaging and delivery were studied using four linear oligolysine peptides with 8 (K8), 16 (K16), 24 (K24) and 32 (K32) lysines. Oligolysine peptides with 16 lysines or longer were effective for stable monodisperse particle formation and optimal transfection efficiency with plasmid DNA (pDNA), but K8 formulations were less stable under anionic heparin challenge and consequently displayed poor transfection efficiency. However, here we show that the oligolysines were not able to package siRNA to form stable complexes, and consequently, siRNA transfection was unsuccessful. These results indicate that the physical structure and length of cationic peptides and their charge ratios are critical parameters for stable particle formation with pDNA and siRNA and that without packaging, delivery and transfection cannot be achieved. PMID:26684657

  3. Antibacterial Peptides from Plants: What They Are and How They Probably Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Barbosa Pelegrini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant antibacterial peptides have been isolated from a wide variety of species. They consist of several protein groups with different features, such as the overall charge of the molecule, the content of disulphide bonds, and structural stability under environmental stress. Although the three-dimensional structures of several classes of plant peptides are well determined, the mechanism of action of some of these molecules is still not well defined. However, further studies may provide new evidences for their function on bacterial cell wall. Therefore, this paper focuses on plant peptides that show activity against plant-pathogenic and human-pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, we describe the folding of several peptides and similarities among their three-dimensional structures. Some hypotheses for their mechanisms of action and attack on the bacterial membrane surface are also proposed.

  4. Peptide-Decorated Gold Nanoparticles as Functional Nano-Capping Agent of Mesoporous Silica Container for Targeting Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ganchao; Xie, Yusheng; Peltier, Raoul; Lei, Haipeng; Wang, Ping; Chen, Jun; Hu, Yi; Wang, Feng; Yao, Xi; Sun, Hongyan

    2016-05-11

    A stimuli-responsive drug delivery system (DDS) with bioactive surface is constructed by end-capping mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with functional peptide-coated gold nanoparticles (GNPs). MSNs are first functionalized with acid-labile α-amide-β-carboxyl groups to carry negative charges, and then capped with positively charged GNPs that are decorated with oligo-lysine-containing peptide. The resulting hybrid delivery system exhibits endo/lysosomal pH triggered drug release, and the incorporation of RGD peptide facilitates targeting delivery to αvβ3 integrin overexpressing cancer cells. The system can serve as a platform for preparing diversified multifunctional nanocomposites using various functional inorganic nanoparticles and bioactive peptides. PMID:27102225

  5. A model for the controlled assembly of semiconductor peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Hye; Parquette, Jon R.

    2012-10-01

    The self-assembly of small molecules provides a potentially powerful method to create functional nanomaterials for many applications ranging from optoelectronics to oncology. However, the design of well-defined nanostructures via molecular assembly is a highly empirical process, which severely hampers efforts to create functional nanostructures using this method. In this review, we describe a simple strategy to control the assembly of functionalized peptides by balancing attractive hydrophobic effects that drive assembly with opposing electrostatic repulsions. Extended π-π contacts are created in the nanostructures when assembly is driven by π-stacking interactions among chromophores that are appended to the peptide. The formation of insoluble β-sheet aggregates are mitigated by incorporating charged side-chains capable of attenuating the assembly process. Although the application of this approach to the assembly of organic semiconductors is described, we expect this strategy to be effective for many other functional organic materials.

  6. Geometric rearrangement of adsorbate driven by the charge transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlyukh, Yaroslav; Berakdar, Jamal [Institut fuer Physik, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany); Huebner, Wolfgang [Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, Kaiserslautern University of Technology (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Adsorption of alkali atoms induces a significant charge redistribution in the region around the adatom. Such charge displacement is associated with a large dipole moment responsible for the interaction of adatoms and a reduction of the surface work function. In addition to these well-known effects our first principles simulations for the Na{sub 9}{sup +} cluster on the Cu(001) surface demonstrate how the charge transfer (CT) from the adsorbate to the substrate can drastically change the geometric structure of the cluster. We report on a detailed study of the adsorption process using quantum chemistry. A representation of the substrate by a cluster of 54 Cu atoms allows us to treat quantum mechanically the electronic structure of both systems, the adsorbate and the surface, on equal footing. Subsequently, we analyze the charge distribution in the composite system. Convergence of the results is verified by considering a much larger substrate cluster containing 126 Cu atoms. The role of the CT is further elucidated by the geometry optimization of the bare cluster with and without an electron deficit. It is shown that the CT drives the system to a meta-stable state which thereafter relaxes to a new configuration. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Analysis of Various Clustering Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Asst Prof. Sunila Godara,; Ms. Amita Verma,

    2013-01-01

    Data clustering is a process of putting similar data into groups. A clustering algorithm partitions a data set into several groups such that the similarity within a group is larger than among groups. This paper reviews four types of clustering techniques- k-Means Clustering, Farther first clustering, Density Based Clustering, Filtered clusterer. These clustering techniques are implemented and analyzed using a clustering tool WEKA. Performance of the 4 techniques are presented and compared.

  8. Pep2Path: automated mass spectrometry-guided genome mining of peptidic natural products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnix H Medema

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonribosomally and ribosomally synthesized bioactive peptides constitute a source of molecules of great biomedical importance, including antibiotics such as penicillin, immunosuppressants such as cyclosporine, and cytostatics such as bleomycin. Recently, an innovative mass-spectrometry-based strategy, peptidogenomics, has been pioneered to effectively mine microbial strains for novel peptidic metabolites. Even though mass-spectrometric peptide detection can be performed quite fast, true high-throughput natural product discovery approaches have still been limited by the inability to rapidly match the identified tandem mass spectra to the gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of the corresponding compounds. With Pep2Path, we introduce a software package to fully automate the peptidogenomics approach through the rapid Bayesian probabilistic matching of mass spectra to their corresponding biosynthetic gene clusters. Detailed benchmarking of the method shows that the approach is powerful enough to correctly identify gene clusters even in data sets that consist of hundreds of genomes, which also makes it possible to match compounds from unsequenced organisms to closely related biosynthetic gene clusters in other genomes. Applying Pep2Path to a data set of compounds without known biosynthesis routes, we were able to identify candidate gene clusters for the biosynthesis of five important compounds. Notably, one of these clusters was detected in a genome from a different subphylum of Proteobacteria than that in which the molecule had first been identified. All in all, our approach paves the way towards high-throughput discovery of novel peptidic natural products. Pep2Path is freely available from http://pep2path.sourceforge.net/, implemented in Python, licensed under the GNU General Public License v3 and supported on MS Windows, Linux and Mac OS X.

  9. Pep2Path: automated mass spectrometry-guided genome mining of peptidic natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medema, Marnix H; Paalvast, Yared; Nguyen, Don D; Melnik, Alexey; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer

    2014-09-01

    Nonribosomally and ribosomally synthesized bioactive peptides constitute a source of molecules of great biomedical importance, including antibiotics such as penicillin, immunosuppressants such as cyclosporine, and cytostatics such as bleomycin. Recently, an innovative mass-spectrometry-based strategy, peptidogenomics, has been pioneered to effectively mine microbial strains for novel peptidic metabolites. Even though mass-spectrometric peptide detection can be performed quite fast, true high-throughput natural product discovery approaches have still been limited by the inability to rapidly match the identified tandem mass spectra to the gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of the corresponding compounds. With Pep2Path, we introduce a software package to fully automate the peptidogenomics approach through the rapid Bayesian probabilistic matching of mass spectra to their corresponding biosynthetic gene clusters. Detailed benchmarking of the method shows that the approach is powerful enough to correctly identify gene clusters even in data sets that consist of hundreds of genomes, which also makes it possible to match compounds from unsequenced organisms to closely related biosynthetic gene clusters in other genomes. Applying Pep2Path to a data set of compounds without known biosynthesis routes, we were able to identify candidate gene clusters for the biosynthesis of five important compounds. Notably, one of these clusters was detected in a genome from a different subphylum of Proteobacteria than that in which the molecule had first been identified. All in all, our approach paves the way towards high-throughput discovery of novel peptidic natural products. Pep2Path is freely available from http://pep2path.sourceforge.net/, implemented in Python, licensed under the GNU General Public License v3 and supported on MS Windows, Linux and Mac OS X. PMID:25188327

  10. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis to obtain therapeutic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Mäde

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The great versatility and the inherent high affinities of peptides for their respective targets have led to tremendous progress for therapeutic applications in the last years. In order to increase the drugability of these frequently unstable and rapidly cleared molecules, chemical modifications are of great interest. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS offers a suitable technology to produce chemically engineered peptides. This review concentrates on the application of SPPS by Fmoc/t-Bu protecting-group strategy, which is most commonly used. Critical issues and suggestions for the synthesis are covered. The development of automated methods from conventional to essentially improved microwave-assisted instruments is discussed. In order to improve pharmacokinetic properties of peptides, lipidation and PEGylation are described as covalent conjugation methods, which can be applied by a combination of automated and manual synthesis approaches. The synthesis and application of SPPS is described for neuropeptide Y receptor analogs as an example for bioactive hormones. The applied strategies represent innovative and potent methods for the development of novel peptide drug candidates that can be manufactured with optimized automated synthesis technologies.

  11. Cell penetrating peptides: how do they do it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herce, Henry D; Garcia, Angel E

    2007-12-01

    Cell penetrating peptides consist of short sequences of amino acids containing a large net positive charge that are able to penetrate almost any cell, carrying with them relatively large cargoes such as proteins, oligonucleotides, and drugs. During the 10 years since their discovery, the question of how they manage to translocate across the membrane has remained unanswered. The main discussion has been centered on whether they follow an energy-independent or an energy-dependent pathway. Recently, we have discovered the possibility of an energy-independent pathway that challenges fundamental concepts associated with protein-membrane interactions (Herce and Garcia, PNAS, 104: 20805 (2007) [1]). It involves the translocation of charged residues across the hydrophobic core of the membrane and the passive diffusion of these highly charged peptides across the membrane through the formation of aqueous toroidal pores. The aim of this review is to discuss the details of the mechanism and interpret some experimental results consistent with this view. PMID:19669523

  12. Super-atom properties of 13 atom clusters of group 13 elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varns, Rebecca; Strange, Paul [School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, SEPnet, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-15

    We report first principles calculations of the geometry and electronic structure of 13 atom clusters of boron, aluminium, gallium and indium. These density functional theory calculations support the jellium model in the energy levels and molecular orbitals of the cluster and enable us to discuss the relevance of the superatom concept. We go on to examine a number of cluster symmetries in detail as a function of charge and comment on the successes and limitations of the jellium and superatom models in describing these clusters. In particular we find that the monovalent anionic cluster is the most stable and has the most symmetric structure. As charge changes the symmetry of the clusters decreases in a way that is dependent on symmetry and charge, but not atomic species. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Protein quantification by MALDI-selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry using sulfonate derivatized peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesur, Antoine; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2010-06-15

    The feasibility of protein absolute quantification with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) using the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) acquisition mode on a triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer (QqQ(LIT)) equipped with a high-frequency laser is demonstrated. A therapeutic human monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used as a model protein, and four tryptic peptides generated by fast tryptic digestion were selected as quantification surrogates. MALDI produces mostly singly charged peptides which hardly fragment under low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID), and therefore the benefits of using 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate (SPITC) as a fragmentation enhancer derivatization agent were evaluated. Despite a moderate impact on the sensitivity, the N-terminus sulfonated peptides generate nearly complete y-ion ladders when native peptides produce few fragments. This aspect provides an alternative SRM transition set for each peptide. As a consequence, SRM transitions selectivity can be tuned more easily for peptide quantitation in complex matrices when monitoring several SRM transitions. From a quantitative point of view, the signal response depending on mAb concentration was found to be linear over 2.5 orders of magnitude for the most sensitive peptide, allowing precise and accurate measurement by MALDI-SRM/MS. PMID:20481516

  14. Self-assembly of 33-mer gliadin peptide oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, M G; Benedini, L A; Lonez, C; Schilardi, P L; Hellweg, T; Ruysschaert, J-M; Dodero, V I

    2015-11-28

    The 33-mer gliadin peptide, LQLQPF(PQPQLPY)3PQPQPF, is a highly immunogenic peptide involved in celiac disease and probably in other immunopathologies associated with gliadin. Herein, dynamic light scattering measurements showed that 33-mer, in the micromolar concentration range, forms polydisperse nano- and micrometer range particles in aqueous media. This behaviour is reminiscent of classical association of colloids and we hypothesized that the 33-mer peptide self-assembles into micelles that could be the precursors of 33-mer oligomers in water. Deposition of 33-mer peptide aqueous solution on bare mica generated nano- and microstructures with different morphologies as revealed by atomic force microscopy. At 6 μM, the 33-mer is organised in isolated and clusters of spherical nanostructures. In the 60 to 250 μM concentration range, the spherical oligomers associated mainly in linear and annular arrangements and structures adopting a "sheet" type morphology appeared. At higher concentrations (610 μM), mainly filaments and plaques immersed in a background of nanospherical structures were detected. The occurrence of different morphologies of oligomers and finally the filaments suggests that the unique specific geometry of the 33-mer oligomers has a crucial role in the subsequent condensation and organization of their fractal structures into the final filaments. The self-assembly process on mica is described qualitatively and quantitatively by a fractal diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) behaviour with the fractal dimension in the range of 1.62 ± 0.02 to 1.73 ± 0.03. Secondary structure evaluation of the oligomers by Attenuated Total Reflection FTIR spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) revealed the existence of a conformational equilibrium of self-assembled structures, from an extended conformation to a more folded parallel beta elongated structures. Altogether, these findings provide structural and morphological information about supramolecular organization of the 33-mer

  15. Cation Recombination Energy/Coulomb Repulsion Effects in ETD/ECD as Revealed by Variation of Charge per Residue at Fixed Total Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentinova, Marija; Crizer, David M.; Baba, Takashi; McGee, William M.; Glish, Gary L.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2013-11-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) experiments in electrodynamic ion traps operated in the presence of a bath gas in the 1-10 mTorr range have been conducted on a common set of doubly protonated model peptides of the form X(AG)nX (X = lysine, arginine, or histidine, n = 1, 2, or 4). The partitioning of reaction products was measured using thermal electrons, anions of azobenzene, and anions of 1,3-dinitrobenzene as reagents. Variation of n alters the charge per residue of the peptide cation, which affects recombination energy. The ECD experiments showed that H-atom loss is greatest for the n = 1 peptides and decreases as n increases. Proton transfer in ETD, on the other hand, is expected to increase as charge per residue decreases (i.e., as n increases). These opposing tendencies were apparent in the data for the K(AG)nK peptides. H-atom loss appeared to be more prevalent in ECD than in ETD and is rationalized on the basis of either internal energy differences, differences in angular momentum transfer associated with the electron capture versus electron transfer processes, or a combination of the two. The histidine peptides showed the greatest extent of charge reduction without dissociation, the arginine peptides showed the greatest extent of side-chain cleavages, and the lysine peptides generally showed the greatest extent of partitioning into the c/z•-product ion channels. The fragmentation patterns for the complementary c- and z•-ions for ETD and ECD were found to be remarkably similar, particularly for the peptides with X = lysine.

  16. Perspectives and Peptides of the Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Kim A.

    Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobial peptides from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were recognized as the next potential generation of pharmaceuticals to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and septic shock, to preserve food, or to sanitize surfaces. Initial research focused on identifying the spectrum of antimicrobial agents, determining the range of antimicrobial activities against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and assessing the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides versus their natural counterparts. Subsequent research then focused on the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in model membrane systems not only to identify the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in microorganisms but also to discern differences in cytotoxicity for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Recent, contemporary work now focuses on current and future efforts to construct hybrid peptides, peptide congeners, stabilized peptides, peptide conjugates, and immobilized peptides for unique and specific applications to control the growth of microorganisms in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Designing of peptides with desired half-life in intestine-like environment

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Arun

    2014-08-20

    Background: In past, a number of peptides have been reported to possess highly diverse properties ranging from cell penetrating, tumor homing, anticancer, anti-hypertensive, antiviral to antimicrobials. Owing to their excellent specificity, low-toxicity, rich chemical diversity and availability from natural sources, FDA has successfully approved a number of peptide-based drugs and several are in various stages of drug development. Though peptides are proven good drug candidates, their usage is still hindered mainly because of their high susceptibility towards proteases degradation. We have developed an in silico method to predict the half-life of peptides in intestine-like environment and to design better peptides having optimized physicochemical properties and half-life.Results: In this study, we have used 10mer (HL10) and 16mer (HL16) peptides dataset to develop prediction models for peptide half-life in intestine-like environment. First, SVM based models were developed on HL10 dataset which achieved maximum correlation R/R2 of 0.57/0.32, 0.68/0.46, and 0.69/0.47 using amino acid, dipeptide and tripeptide composition, respectively. Secondly, models developed on HL16 dataset showed maximum R/R2 of 0.91/0.82, 0.90/0.39, and 0.90/0.31 using amino acid, dipeptide and tripeptide composition, respectively. Furthermore, models that were developed on selected features, achieved a correlation (R) of 0.70 and 0.98 on HL10 and HL16 dataset, respectively. Preliminary analysis suggests the role of charged residue and amino acid size in peptide half-life/stability. Based on above models, we have developed a web server named HLP (Half Life Prediction), for predicting and designing peptides with desired half-life. The web server provides three facilities; i) half-life prediction, ii) physicochemical properties calculation and iii) designing mutant peptides.Conclusion: In summary, this study describes a web server \\'HLP\\' that has been developed for assisting scientific

  18. Clustering high dimensional data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assent, Ira

    2012-01-01

    for clustering are required. Consequently, recent research has focused on developing techniques and clustering algorithms specifically for high-dimensional data. Still, open research issues remain. Clustering is a data mining task devoted to the automatic grouping of data based on mutual similarity. Each cluster......High-dimensional data, i.e., data described by a large number of attributes, pose specific challenges to clustering. The so-called ‘curse of dimensionality’, coined originally to describe the general increase in complexity of various computational problems as dimensionality increases, is known...... groups objects that are similar to one another, whereas dissimilar objects are assigned to different clusters, possibly separating out noise. In this manner, clusters describe the data structure in an unsupervised manner, i.e., without the need for class labels. A number of clustering paradigms exist...

  19. Star clusters and associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All 33 papers presented at the symposium were inputted to INIS. They dealt with open clusters, globular clusters, stellar associations and moving groups, and local kinematics and galactic structures. (E.S.)

  20. Molecular dynamic simulation for laser-cluster interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three dimensional relativistic molecular dynamic model for studying the laser interaction with atomic clusters is presented. The model is used to simulate the interaction dynamics of deuterium, argon, and xenon clusters when irradiated by the short and high intensity laser pulses. The interaction of 82 A argon cluster by 100 fs, 806 nm laser pulse with the peak intensity of 8 x 1015 W/cm2 is studied and compared with the experimental results. The maximum ion energy in this case is found to be about 200 keV. Ion energies along and perpendicular to laser polarization direction is calculated and asymmetry along laser polarization direction is detected which is further explained on the basis of charge flipping model. The effect of cluster density on the energetics of the laser-cluster interaction is also being studied, which provides a qualitative understanding of the presence of optimum cluster size for maximum ion energies.