WorldWideScience

Sample records for charge coupled devices

  1. Charge coupled device image sensor study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of a charge-coupled device (CCD) image sensors for use in spacecraft-borne imaging systems was conducted. The study resulted in design recommendations for two sensors, an approximately 500 times 500 element imaging device and a 1 times 190 element linear imaging device with a 190 times 121 buffer store. Emphasis was placed on the higher resolution, area-imaging sensor. The objectives of the proposed sensors are listed, results of the experiments are analyzed, and estimates of the device performance are presented. A summary of the major technical recommendations is included.

  2. Simulation for signal charge transfer of charge coupled devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zujun; Liu Yinong; Chen Wei; Tang Benqi; Xiao Zhigang; Huang Shaoyan; Liu Minbo; Zhang Yong

    2009-01-01

    Physical device models and numerical processing methods are presented to simulate a linear buried channel charge coupled devices (CCDs). The dynamic transfer process of CCD is carried out by a three-phase clock pulse driver. By using the semiconductor device simulation software MEDICI, dynamic transfer pictures of signal charges cells, electron concentration and electrostatic potential are presented. The key parameters of CCD such as charge transfer efficiency (CTE) and dark electrons are numerically simulated. The simulation results agree with the theoretic and experimental results.

  3. Two-phase charge-coupled device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosonocky, W. F.; Carnes, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A charge-transfer efficiency of 99.99% per stage was achieved in the fat-zero mode of operation of 64- and 128-stage two-phase charge-coupled shift registers at 1.0-MHz clock frequency. The experimental two-phase charge-coupled shift registers were constructed in the form of polysilicon gates overlapped by aluminum gates. The unidirectional signal flow was accomplished by using n-type substrates with 0.5 to 1.0 ohm-cm resistivity in conjunction with a channel oxide thickness of 1000 A for the polysilicon gates and 3000 A for the aluminum gates. The operation of the tested shift registers with fat zero is in good agreement with the free-charge transfer characteristics expected for the tested structures. The charge-transfer losses observed when operating the experimental shift registers without the fat zero are attributed to fast interface state trapping. The analytical part of the report contains a review backed up by an extensive appendix of the free-charge transfer characteristics of CCD's in terms of thermal diffusion, self-induced drift, and fringing field drift. Also, a model was developed for the charge-transfer losses resulting from charge trapping by fast interface states. The proposed model was verified by the operation of the experimental two-phase charge-coupled shift registers.

  4. LSST Charge-Coupled Device Calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prototype charge-coupled device created at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope must be tested to check its functionality and performance. It was installed into the Calypso telescope in Arizona in November of 2008 for this purpose. Since then it has taken many images of various astronomical objects. By doing photometry on standard stars in these images, we can compare our magnitude results to the known magnitudes of these stars. This comparison allows us to then determine the chip's performance and functional capabilities. Expecting to see first light in 2016, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an extremely large ground based telescope that anticipates funding and will be built in Chile. Described as 'Wide-Fast-Deep', the LSST will have an unprecedented wide field of view (ten square degrees for surveys), short exposures (fifteen to thirty seconds and still see faint objects), and the largest digital camera in the world. One of the goals hoped to be achieved with this camera is the measurement of dark matter using strong and weak gravitational lensing. Gravitational lensing occurs when a large cluster of galaxies distorts the light from a galaxy behind this cluster. This causes an arc of light to form around the cluster. By measuring the length of this arc, one can calculate how much matter should be present in the cluster. Since the amount that should be present is vastly greater than the amount of visible matter that can be seen, it is postulated that the difference between these two numbers is made up of dark matter. This is a direct way of measuring the amount of dark matter in the universe. Thousands of galaxy clusters will be seen with LSST, allowing precise measurements of strong lensing effects. Weak lensing is a much smaller effect, distorting the shape of galaxies by only a few percent. The scale of LSST will allow these small effects to be measured with a precision unavailable with current smaller

  5. Panoramic dental radiography using a charge-coupled device receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Farman, Allan G.; Farman, Taeko T.

    1998-01-01

    Panoramic radiography using a slit beam and film/screen receptor is standard for the emergency room evaluation of mandibular fractures and also in dentistry. This study compared the spatial resolution, area distortion factors, and the dosage considerations for a panoramic system where standard film/screen and a charge-coupled device were alternatively employed as the image receptor. Resolution and image contours were determined using a lead resolution grid positioned at selected beam projecti...

  6. Surface contamination of the charge-coupled device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An experimental method to study the influence of surface contamination of a thinned, backside illuminated charge-coupled device(CCD) upon its quantum efficiency in soft X-ray region is suggested. A transmission grating spectrometer(TGS),in which the transmission grating is coupled to a thinned, backside illuminated charge coupled device, is used to measure the continuum X-ray emission from the end of cylindrical target irradiated by laser. In the measured spectra, only the carbon K absorption edge at wavelength of 4.4nm due to condensation of the vacuum oil on the CCD surface is clearly seen. The surface contamination is considered as an effective "carbon filter" and the filter absorption to correct the quantum efficiency of the CCD camera is taken into account. The effective thickness of the carbon filter is determined by comparing the jump height of the measured spectra at 4.4nm with those of the carbon absorption coefficient curves obtained from various carbon thickness. The accuracy of this method is tested by comparing the X-ray spectrum measured by the TGS with that obtained by a soft X-ray spectrometer.

  7. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. Deep-ultraviolet-induced damage of charge coupled device sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to facilitate the inspection of deep-submicron features, a generation of semiconductor inspection systems are being pushed to image using deep-ultraviolet (UV) sensitive cameras at increasingly shorter wavelengths. In this article, we present a deep-UV sensitive thinned front-illuminated linear charge coupled device (Ccd) image sensor structure and investigate its behavior after exposure to F2 (λ=157 nm) excimer laser. Two key manifestations of radiation damage are observed: (1) Extrinsic quantum efficiency drifts with increasing 157 nm exposure, and (2) dark current increases almost exponentially with 157 nm exposure. These fluctuations in Ccd parameters can be caused by several factors including UV-induced color center formation in the oxide, charge generation in the oxide, interface modification, and structural rearrangement. These UV-induced effects alter the optical and electrical properties of the oxide and Si-SiO2 interface, resulting in both temporal and permanent shifts in device performance. The experimental results suggest that careful control of the oxide thickness and the Si-SiO2 interface quality are critical for realizing Ccd sensors with high responsivity and stability for deep-UV imaging

  9. Edge passivated charge-coupled device image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosonocky, Walter F. (Inventor); Elabd, Hammam (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A charge-coupled device (CCD) image sensor includes in a substrate of single crystalline silicon of one conductivity type an array of a plurality of spaced, parallel channel regions of the opposite conductivity type extending along one major surface of the substrate. A plurality of parallel conductive gates are over the one major surface of the substrate and extend transversely across the channel regions. The outermost channel regions of the array are positioned adjacent edges of the substrate so that a plurality of the image sensors can be mounted in edge-to-edge relation with the channel regions of the various sensors being close together. The sensor includes passivating means between each outermost channel region and the adjacent edge to prevent charge carriers generated by the edge from being injected into the outermost channel region. The passivating means includes a highly conductive drain region of a conductivity type opposite to that of the substrate within the substrate and extending along the one major surface between the outermost channel region and the edge. Also, a highly conductive region of the same conductivity type as the substrate is on the substrate and extends along the one major surface directly at the edge.

  10. Combining Charge Couple Devices and Rate Sensors for the Feedforward Control System of a Charge Coupled Device Tracking Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tao; Tian, Jing; Zhong, Daijun; Fu, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    A rate feed forward control-based sensor fusion is proposed to improve the closed-loop performance for a charge couple device (CCD) tracking loop. The target trajectory is recovered by combining line of sight (LOS) errors from the CCD and the angular rate from a fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG). A Kalman filter based on the Singer acceleration model utilizes the reconstructive target trajectory to estimate the target velocity. Different from classical feed forward control, additive feedback loops are inevitably added to the original control loops due to the fact some closed-loop information is used. The transfer function of the Kalman filter in the frequency domain is built for analyzing the closed loop stability. The bandwidth of the Kalman filter is the major factor affecting the control stability and close-loop performance. Both simulations and experiments are provided to demonstrate the benefits of the proposed algorithm. PMID:27347970

  11. An Efficient Image Compressor for Charge Coupled Devices Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the discrete wavelet transforms- (DWT- based compressor, such as JPEG2000 and CCSDS-IDC, is widely seen as the state of the art compression scheme for charge coupled devices (CCD camera. However, CCD images project on the DWT basis to produce a large number of large amplitude high-frequency coefficients because these images have a large number of complex texture and contour information, which are disadvantage for the later coding. In this paper, we proposed a low-complexity posttransform coupled with compressing sensing (PT-CS compression approach for remote sensing image. First, the DWT is applied to the remote sensing image. Then, a pair base posttransform is applied to the DWT coefficients. The pair base are DCT base and Hadamard base, which can be used on the high and low bit-rate, respectively. The best posttransform is selected by the lp-norm-based approach. The posttransform is considered as the sparse representation stage of CS. The posttransform coefficients are resampled by sensing measurement matrix. Experimental results on on-board CCD camera images show that the proposed approach significantly outperforms the CCSDS-IDC-based coder, and its performance is comparable to that of the JPEG2000 at low bit rate and it does not have the high excessive implementation complexity of JPEG2000.

  12. An efficient image compressor for charge coupled devices camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Xing, Fei; You, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the discrete wavelet transforms- (DWT-) based compressor, such as JPEG2000 and CCSDS-IDC, is widely seen as the state of the art compression scheme for charge coupled devices (CCD) camera. However, CCD images project on the DWT basis to produce a large number of large amplitude high-frequency coefficients because these images have a large number of complex texture and contour information, which are disadvantage for the later coding. In this paper, we proposed a low-complexity posttransform coupled with compressing sensing (PT-CS) compression approach for remote sensing image. First, the DWT is applied to the remote sensing image. Then, a pair base posttransform is applied to the DWT coefficients. The pair base are DCT base and Hadamard base, which can be used on the high and low bit-rate, respectively. The best posttransform is selected by the l p -norm-based approach. The posttransform is considered as the sparse representation stage of CS. The posttransform coefficients are resampled by sensing measurement matrix. Experimental results on on-board CCD camera images show that the proposed approach significantly outperforms the CCSDS-IDC-based coder, and its performance is comparable to that of the JPEG2000 at low bit rate and it does not have the high excessive implementation complexity of JPEG2000. PMID:25114977

  13. Neutron-computed tomography using charge-coupled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a prototype position- sensitive neutron detector designed and built for two- and three-dimensional tomographic imaging of materials and complex assemblies. The detector system consists of an LiF- ZnS scintillator screen optically coupled to a cooled charge- coupled device (CCD). Practical resolution limits of the single screen system were calculated to be approximately 100 μm, determined by the neutron beam divergence and the resolution of the scintillator screen. Contrast resolution in a (200 μm)3 volume element was calculated to be 1% of the cross-section in small samples. The system included the MIT Research Reactor as a thermal neutron source (nominal flux approximately 2.4 x 108 n degrees/cm2 sec), a rotating sample holder, and the two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. Two- and three-dimensional tomograms were obtained of phantoms and several demonstration objects, including a control valve and oil well dolomite core sample. The spatial resolution in the images compared favorably to predictions, and it is expected that the final system will improve resolution by at least a factor of 10 over current technology

  14. A new clocking method for a charge coupled device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose and demonstrate a new clocking method for a charge-coupled device (CCD). When a CCD is used for a photon counting detector of X-rays, its weak point is a limitation of its counting rate, because high counting rate makes non-negligible pile-up of photons. In astronomical usage, this pile-up is especially severe for an observation of a bright point-like object. One typical idea to reduce the pile-up is a parallel sum (P-sum) mode. This mode completely loses one-dimensional information. Our new clocking method, panning mode, provides complementary properties between the normal mode and the P-sum mode. We performed a simple simulation in order to investigate a pile-up probability and compared the simulated result and actual obtained event rates. Using this simulation and the experimental results, we compared the pile-up tolerance of various clocking modes including our new method and also compared their other characteristics

  15. Scintillation gas detector based on a charge coupled device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new imaging X-ray detector able to copy with the high photon flux of ESRF X-ray sources has been proposed. The detector has been based on scintillation gas chamber, which converts X-ray photon with a wavelength of 1.54 Angstrom in U.V. photons, coupled with a CCD, which detects in the position of the U.V. photons with wavelength greater than 1800 Angstrom. Using this detector, saturation effects due to the spatial charge of the avalanche discharge in the gas and radiation damage on the CCD, have been eliminated. A conical optical fibre system, collecting the U.V. photon flashes on CCD, magnyfying the detecting area of detector and allowing to obtain spatial resolution better than 0.3 mm, is suggested

  16. Design of a VLSI charge-coupled device analog delay line

    OpenAIRE

    Gedra, David R.

    1995-01-01

    Charge coupled devices (CCDs) are semiconductor devices which can transfer information, represented by a quantity of electrical charge, from one physical location of the semiconductor substrate to another in a controlled manner with the use of properly sequenced clock pulses. These devices can be applied to imaging, signal processing, logic, and digital storage applications. In this thesis, the design of an electrically stimulated CCD analog delay line, using the design tools currently availa...

  17. Automatic digitization of optical spark chamber data using charge coupled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system of charge-coupled imagers capable of recording optical spark chamber data has been developed. The operation of charge-coupled devices (CCD's) is discussed and details of systems utilizing single and multiple CCD imagers are presented. Data taken using a multiple CCD system in parallel with film are given. CCD sensitivity, spatial resolution and accuracy are discussed and comparisons are made between CCD data and that obtained from film

  18. Automatic digitization of optical spark chamber data using charge coupled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system of charge-coupled imagers capable of recording optical spark chamber data has been developed. The operation of charge-coupled devices (CCDs) is discussed and details of systems utilizing single and multiple CCD imagers are presented. Data taken using a multiple CCD system in parallel with film are given. CCD sensitivity, spatial resolution and accuracy are discussed and comparisons are made between CCD data and that obtained from film. (orig.)

  19. Plasma effect in silicon charge coupled devices (CCDs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, J., E-mail: estrada@fnal.gov [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Molina, J., E-mail: jmolina@ing.una.py [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Asuncion, Laboratorio de Mecanica y Energia, Campus de la UNA, San Lorenzo 2160 (Paraguay); Blostein, J.J., E-mail: jeronimo@cab.cnea.gov.ar [CONICET (Argentina); Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Fernandez, G., E-mail: fmoroni.guillermo@gmail.com [Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2011-02-11

    Plasma effect is observed in CCDs exposed to heavy ionizing {alpha}-particles with energies in the range 0.5-5.5 MeV. The results obtained for the size of the charge clusters reconstructed on the CCD pixels agree with previous measurements in the high energy region ({>=}3.5 MeV). The measurements were extended to lower energies using {alpha}-particles produced by (n,{alpha}) reactions of neutrons in a {sup 10}B target. The effective linear charge density for the plasma column is measured as a function of energy. The results demonstrate the potential for high position resolution in the reconstruction of {alpha} particles, which opens an interesting possibility for using these detectors in neutron imaging applications.

  20. Plasma effect in silicon charge coupled devices (CCDs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma effect is observed in CCDs exposed to heavy ionizing α-particles with energies in the range 0.5-5.5 MeV. The results obtained for the size of the charge clusters reconstructed on the CCD pixels agree with previous measurements in the high energy region (≥3.5 MeV). The measurements were extended to lower energies using α-particles produced by (n,α) reactions of neutrons in a 10B target. The effective linear charge density for the plasma column is measured as a function of energy. The results demonstrate the potential for high position resolution in the reconstruction of α particles, which opens an interesting possibility for using these detectors in neutron imaging applications.

  1. Feasibility study of a lens-coupled charge-coupled device gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A charge-coupled device (CCD) is generally used in a digital camera as a light-collecting device such as a photomultiplier tube (PMT). Because of its low sensitivity and very high dark current, CCD have not been popularly used for gamma imaging systems. However, a recent CCD technological breakthrough has improved CCD sensitivity, and the use of a Peltier cooling system can significantly minimize the dark current. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of a prototype CCD gamma camera consisting of a CsI scintillator, optical lenses, and a CCD module. Despite electron-multiplying (EM) CCDs having higher performance, in this study, we built a cost-effective system consisted of low-cost components compared to EMCCDs. Our prototype detector consists of a CsI scintillator, two optical lenses, and a conventional Peltier-cooled CCD. The performance of this detector was evaluated by acquiring the sensitivity, resolution, and the modulation transfer function (MTF). The sensitivity of the prototype detector showed excellent linearity. With a 1 mm-diameter pinhole collimator, the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of a 1.1 mm Tc-99m line source image was 2.85 mm. These results show that the developed prototype camera is feasible for small animal gamma imaging.

  2. A spacecraft cooling system for a charged coupled device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mary S.; Tulkoff, Philip

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the thermal analysis, design, and testing of a dedicated cooling system for a Spartan spacecraft payload. A simple reliable design that requires minimum power consumption and minimum weight was developed. The payload has a CCD detector that must be maintained at a temperature of approximately -40 C or colder. The cooling system consists of a fin radiator, dual redundant heat pipes, and a thermal electric device (TED). The system was analytically modeled through the use of the Simplified Shuttle Payload Thermal Analyzer (SSPTA) computer program. A thermal test of the system simulating flight conditions was conducted to correlate the computer model and verify performance specifications.

  3. Design and fabrication of short gate-length heterostructure charge coupled devices for transversal filter applications

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Hiang Teik; Hunter, Ian C.; Snowden, Christopher M.; Ranson, Richard

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the first reported quarter-micron double delta doped AlGaAs/ InGaAs charge coupled device for microwave filter applications. The design and fabrication of conventional and multi tapped delay line MMICs for RF filter applications are also discussed. Schrödinger and Poisson’s equations are self consistently solved with current continuity equations to show the variation in channel charge concentration as the gate voltagesare varied. The device is implemented as a recessed cap...

  4. Absolute calibration of a charge-coupled device camera with twin beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the absolute calibration of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera by exploiting quantum correlation. This method exploits a certain number of spatial pairwise quantum correlated modes produced by spontaneous parametric-down-conversion. We develop a measurement model accounting for all the uncertainty contributions, and we reach the relative uncertainty of 0.3% in low photon flux regime. This represents a significant step forward for the characterization of (scientific) CCDs used in mesoscopic light regime.

  5. The noise performance of electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices at X-ray energies

    OpenAIRE

    Tutt, James H.; Holland, Andrew D.; Hall, David J.; Harriss, Richard D.; Murray, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    Electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) are used in low-light-level (L3) applications for detecting optical, ultraviolet, and near-infrared photons (10–1100 nm). The on-chip gain process is able to increase the detectability of any signal collected by the device through the multiplication of the signal before the output node. Thus, the effective readout noise can be reduced to subelectron levels, allowing the detection of single photons. However, this gain process introduces an a...

  6. A Simple Illustrative Model of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillo, Michael F.

    2009-10-01

    Many students (as well as the general public) use modern technology without an understanding of how these devices actually work. They are what scientists refer to in the laboratory as "black boxes." Students often wonder how physics relates to the technology used in the real world and are interested in such applications. An example of one such "black box" is the charge-coupled device (CCD), an electronic imaging sensor invented in 1970 by Bell Labs researchers Willard Boyle and George Smith. Astronomers first embraced CCD technology in the early 1980s because CCDs are very light sensitive, consume low amounts of power, and generate digital images quickly. More than three decades later, CCDs have become ubiquitous, as they are found in consumer digital cameras, scanners, photocopiers, medical imaging devices and spectroscopic detectors. This paper presents a model of a CCD "chip" that can be easily adapted as a classroom demonstration.

  7. Event-driven charge-coupled device design and applications therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, John P. (Inventor); Ricker, Jr., George R. (Inventor); Burke, Barry E. (Inventor); Prigozhin, Gregory Y. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An event-driven X-ray CCD imager device uses a floating-gate amplifier or other non-destructive readout device to non-destructively sense a charge level in a charge packet associated with a pixel. The output of the floating-gate amplifier is used to identify each pixel that has a charge level above a predetermined threshold. If the charge level is above a predetermined threshold the charge in the triggering charge packet and in the charge packets from neighboring pixels need to be measured accurately. A charge delay register is included in the event-driven X-ray CCD imager device to enable recovery of the charge packets from neighboring pixels for accurate measurement. When a charge packet reaches the end of the charge delay register, control logic either dumps the charge packet, or steers the charge packet to a charge FIFO to preserve it if the charge packet is determined to be a packet that needs accurate measurement. A floating-diffusion amplifier or other low-noise output stage device, which converts charge level to a voltage level with high precision, provides final measurement of the charge packets. The voltage level is eventually digitized by a high linearity ADC.

  8. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  9. Study of a charge-coupled device for high-energy-particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation is based on measurements made to evaluate the application of charge-coupled devices as detectors of high-energy particles. The experiment was performed with a Fairchild Linear 256-Cell CCD111 array (size 8μm x 17 μm/cell), utilizing a light source instead of a particle beam. It was observed that the minimum detectable signal was limited to approx. 488 electrons at -500C, where the readout and exposure times were about 260 ms and 400 ms respectively. The transfer inefficiency of the CCD111 was determined to be approx. 10-4. It has been concluded that at a lower temperature (approx. -1000C) or with faster readout (approx. 10 ms), the CCD111 would be able to detect the total deposited energy of minimum-ionizing charged particles

  10. Preliminary evaluation of charge-coupled device (CCD) multispectral analysis in ophthalmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work described was originally aimed at providing a new diagnostic technique for the early detection of malignant ocular tumors through their spectral signature. The instrument developed comprises a modified fundus camera, a Charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and a 16 bit microcomputer equipped with floopy disk drives and a 512 x 512 x 8-bit display device. The system allows the recording of digitized fundus or iris reflectance pictures in eight spectral bands between 500 and 1100 nm. After calibration and preprocessing of the data, a multispectral analysis is performed by means of a VAX computer. The image processing methods are described and their ability to characterize pigmented lesions or other ocular anatomical features through their spectral signature is evaluated

  11. X-ray apparatus with scintillator and charge-coupled devices (CCD) sensor for dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apparatus includes an X-ray source coupled with a receiver both being placed on a support which can rotate about a vertical axis. The receiver comprises a slit receiving incident X-rays which are collected by a charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor via a scintillator screen. The sensor consists of an array of X-ray detectors which generate the X-ray image line by line. The image is transferred to an output amplifier and processed so that each element of the image is digitized and stored in a memory unit. The receiver also includes a mobile part which can be moved with the speed of a radiography film. The advantage of this technology is to enable panoramic images of objects using CCD detectors which can be adapted to existing apparatus. (authors). 2 figs

  12. Improved charge-coupled device detectors for high-speed, charge exchange spectroscopy studies on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge exchange spectroscopy is one of the key ion diagnostics on the DIII-D tokamak. It allows determination of ion temperature, poloidal and toroidal velocity, impurity density, and radial electric field Er throughout the plasma. For the 2003 experimental campaign, we replaced the intensified photodiode array detectors on the central portion of the DIII-D charge exchange spectroscopy system with advanced charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors mounted on faster (f/4.7) Czerny-Turner spectrometers equipped with toroidal mirrors. The CCD detectors are improved versions of the ones installed on our edge system in 1999. The combination improved the photoelectron signal level by about a factor of 20 and the signal to noise by a factor of 2-8, depending on the absolute signal level. The new cameras also allow shorter minimum integration times while archiving to PC memory: 0.552 ms for the slower, lower-read noise (15 e) readout mode and 0.274 ms in the faster, higher-read noise (30 e) mode

  13. PRESBYOPIA OPTOMETRY METHOD BASED ON DIOPTER REGULATION AND CHARGE COUPLE DEVICE IMAGING TECHNOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q; Wu, X X; Zhou, J; Wang, X; Liu, R F; Gao, J

    2015-01-01

    With the development of photoelectric technology and single-chip microcomputer technology, objective optometry, also known as automatic optometry, is becoming precise. This paper proposed a presbyopia optometry method based on diopter regulation and Charge Couple Device (CCD) imaging technology and, in the meantime, designed a light path that could measure the system. This method projects a test figure to the eye ground and then the reflected image from the eye ground is detected by CCD. The image is then automatically identified by computer and the far point and near point diopters are determined to calculate lens parameter. This is a fully automatic objective optometry method which eliminates subjective factors of the tested subject. Furthermore, it can acquire the lens parameter of presbyopia accurately and quickly and can be used to measure the lens parameter of hyperopia, myopia and astigmatism. PMID:26403390

  14. Visible charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane design considerations for multispectral applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, H.

    1982-01-01

    The typical Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) Instrument mission would be to gather high-resolution, radiometrically accurate earth resources data in several spectral bands over a prolonged period of time. These bands would include the visible (VIS), near infrared (NIR) and short wavelength infrared. Silicon charge-coupled imaging devices (CCDs) can be assembled into contiguous pixel focal planes which will cover the VIS/NIR region and operate reliably for several years in a space environment. A typical MLA focal plane would have approximately 12,000 pixels, with a pixel-to-pixel registration requirement on the order of + or - 0.1 pixel. The technology to assemble such focal planes has been developed and is described. The problem of polarization sensitivity associated with certain types of focal plane assemblies is addressed. Radiation effects on CCDs are also discussed, and a practical solution to the problem through the use of shielding is described.

  15. Determining the Spectral Resolution of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) Raman Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chuan; Berg, Rolf W.

    2012-01-01

    A new method based on dispersion equations is described to express the spectral resolution of an applied charge-coupled device (CCD) Czerny-Turner Raman instrument entirely by means of one equation and principal factors determined by the actual setup. The factors involved are usual quantities such...... spectral resolution of the Raman instrument. An essential feature of the new method is a proposed way to compensate for non-ideality (diffractions, aberrations, etc.) by use of a hyperbola model function to describe the relationship between the width of the entrance slit and the image signal width on the...... 1332.4 cm(-1) diamond Raman fundamental band, excited with two quite different wavelengths (a deep ultraviolet 257.3 nm laser line and a visible green 514.5 nm line). A low pressure mercury line at 265.2042 nm also was applied to give further verification of the given expression. A useful method to...

  16. [A study of the necessity of cooling of charge-coupled devices in x-ray imaging systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgun, O N; Nemchenko, K E; Rogov, Iu V

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this work was to study one of the widely used X-ray imaging systems: luminescent screen-optical system-matrix of photosensitive charge-coupled device (CCD)-amplifier-analog-to-digital converter. Experimental and theoretical studies were performed to substantiate the necessity of cooling of charge-coupled devices for improvement of X-ray image characteristics. The obtained results reveal the necessity of cooling of CCD-matrix crystals in the X-ray imaging system under consideration. PMID:16610280

  17. Angular sensitivity of modeled scientific silicon charge-coupled devices to initial electron direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plimley, Brian; Coffer, Amy; Zhang, Yigong; Vetter, Kai

    2016-08-01

    Previously, scientific silicon charge-coupled devices (CCDs) with 10.5-μm pixel pitch and a thick (650 μm), fully depleted bulk have been used to measure gamma-ray-induced fast electrons and demonstrate electron track Compton imaging. A model of the response of this CCD was also developed and benchmarked to experiment using Monte Carlo electron tracks. We now examine the trade-off in pixel pitch and electronic noise. We extend our CCD response model to different pixel pitch and readout noise per pixel, including pixel pitch of 2.5 μm, 5 μm, 10.5 μm, 20 μm, and 40 μm, and readout noise from 0 eV/pixel to 2 keV/pixel for 10.5 μm pixel pitch. The CCD images generated by this model using simulated electron tracks are processed by our trajectory reconstruction algorithm. The performance of the reconstruction algorithm defines the expected angular sensitivity as a function of electron energy, CCD pixel pitch, and readout noise per pixel. Results show that our existing pixel pitch of 10.5 μm is near optimal for our approach, because smaller pixels add little new information but are subject to greater statistical noise. In addition, we measured the readout noise per pixel for two different device temperatures in order to estimate the effect of temperature on the reconstruction algorithm performance, although the readout is not optimized for higher temperatures. The noise in our device at 240 K increases the FWHM of angular measurement error by no more than a factor of 2, from 26° to 49° FWHM for electrons between 425 keV and 480 keV. Therefore, a CCD could be used for electron-track-based imaging in a Peltier-cooled device.

  18. One-dimensional ionizing radiation detector on the charge-coupled device basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic features of the one-dimensional ionizing radiation detector designed on the charge-coupled device (CCD) basis with surface as well as deepened channel are studied. The eta (E) dependence of the detector quantum efficiency on the density of soft X radiation energy is given. It has been found on the basis of the analysis of the eta(E) dependence that the most acceptable range of using CCD-detectors lies in the limits of radiation energy from 2 to 12 keV. In this energy region the linearity of ionizing radiation flux conversion into electrical charge is assured. The CCD-detector sensitivity constitutes 2x108 photon/(cm2xs). The upper limit of the detector dynamic range equals to 1010 photon/(cm2xs) while the whole dynamic range equals to 50. The effect of long-term irradiation on the basic features of the CCD-detectors is considered as well as restoration methods of their operating performances are proposed. The real irradiation levels, which the CCD-detectors made on the n-Si base withstand, constitute (1-3)x104 rad. It is pointed out that most prospective CCD-detectors are those with a deepened channel and Schottky gates in which control through the oxide layer is missing

  19. A simple, low-cost, versatile charge-coupled device spectrometer for plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have constructed a simple, low-cost charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometer capable of both high resolution (Δλ≤0.015 nm) and large bandpass (110 nm with Δλ∼0.3 nm). These two modes of operation provide two broad areas of capability for plasma spectroscopy. The first major application is measurement of emission line broadening; the second is emission line surveys from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. Measurements have been made on a low-temperature plasma produced by a miniature electrostatic plasma source and the high-temperature plasma in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch. The spectrometer is a modified Jarrell endash Ash 0.5 m Ebert endash Fastie monochromator. Light is coupled into the entrance slit with a fused silica fiber optic bundle. The exposure time (2 ms minimum) is controlled by a fast electro-mechanical shutter. The exit plane detector is a compact and robust CCD detector developed for amateur astronomy by Santa Barbara Instrument Group. The CCD detector is controlled and read out by a Macintosh reg-sign computer. This spectrometer is sophisticated enough to serve well in a research laboratory, yet is simple and inexpensive enough to be affordable for instructional use. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  20. Multi-dimensional neutron-computed tomography using cooled charge-coupled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a prototype position-sensitive neutron detector designed and built for two- and three-dimensional tomographic imaging of materials and complex assemblies. The detector system consists of an Lif-ZnS scintillator screen optically coupled to a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD). Practical resolution limits of the single screen system were calculated to be approximately 100 μm, determined by the neutron beam divergence and the resolution of the scintillator screen. Contrast resolution in a (200 μm)3 volume element was calculated to be 1% of the cross-section in small samples. The system included the MIT Research Reactor as a thermal neutron source (nominal flux approximately 2.4 x 108 n degrees/cm2-sec), a rotating sample holder, and the two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. The effects of scatter were estimated and compared to data. Two- and three-dimensional tomograms were obtained of phantoms and several demonstration objects, including a control valve and an oil well dolomite core sample. The spatial resolution in the images compared favorably to predictions, and it is expected that the final system will improve resolution by at least a factor 10 over current technology

  1. Development of a novel neutron detection technique by using a boron layer coating a Charge Coupled Device

    OpenAIRE

    Blostein, Juan Jerónimo; Estrada, Juan; Tartaglione, Aureliano; Haro, Miguel Sofo; Moroni, Guillermo Fernández; Cancelo, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the design features and the first test measurements obtained during the installation of a novel high resolution 2D neutron detection technique. The technique proposed in this work consists of a boron layer (enriched in ${^{10}}$B) placed on a scientific Charge Coupled Device (CCD). After the nuclear reaction ${^{10}}$B(n,$\\alpha$)${^{7}}$Li, the CCD detects the emitted charge particles thus obtaining information on the neutron absorption position. The above mentioned io...

  2. Performance characteristics of high-resolution charge-coupled device film digitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Butson, Philip D.; Lin, Jyh-Shyan; Li, Huai; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes the performance characteristics of two high resolution charged-coupled device (CCD) film scanners for radiological imaging. The two models of recently developed CCD film scanners made by DBA Systems have been available on the market for ultra high resolution film digitization. One model of the scanner digitizes the film at 21 micrometers and the other one at 42 micrometers . Both systems can be interfaced to a PC. Line-pair, star-pattern and single edge on films were used to test the spatial resolution in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the CCD scan line. Step wedges generated on films through a mammographic system and print transparencies were employed to test the gray value versus the optical density response and variations on a `uniform area.' Geometric distortion of the digitized images was determined to be negligible at less than 1%. This gray value versus optical density response was linearly plotted from optical density (OD) 0 to 2.8. Depending upon optical density regions, gray value fluctuations varied. Both ultra high resolution CCD scanners showed reasonable performance. However, some digital noises were shown in the high OD range.

  3. CCD [charge-coupled device] sensors in synchrotron x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intense photon flux from advanced synchrotron light sources, such as the 7-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, require integrating-type detectors. Charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are well suited as synchrotron x-ray detectors. When irradiated indirectly via a phosphor followed by reducing optics, diffraction patterns of 100 cm2 can be imaged on a 2 cm2 CCD. With a conversion efficiency of ∼1 CCD electron/x-ray photon, a peak saturation capacity of >106 x rays can be obtained. A programmable CCD controller operating at a clock frequency of 20 MHz has been developed. The readout rate is 5 x 106 pixels/s and the shift rate in the parallel registers is 106 lines/s. The test detector was evaluated in two experiments. In protein crystallography diffraction patterns have been obtained from a lysozyme crystal using a conventional rotating anode x-ray generator. Based on these results we expect to obtain at a synchrotron diffraction images at the rate of ∼1 frame/s or a complete 3-dimensional data set from a single crystal in ∼2 min. 16 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Image Reconstruction of a Charge Coupled Device Based Optical Tomographic Instrumentation System for Particle Sizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafiz Fazalul Rahiman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the use of charge coupled device (abbreviated as CCD linear image sensors in an optical tomographic instrumentation system used for sizing particles. The measurement system, consisting of four CCD linear image sensors are configured around an octagonal shaped flow pipe for a four projections system is explained. The four linear image sensors provide 2,048 pixel imaging with a pixel size of 14 micron × 14 micron, hence constituting a high-resolution system. Image reconstruction for a four-projection optical tomography system is also discussed, where a simple optical model is used to relate attenuation due to variations in optical density, [R], within the measurement section. Expressed in matrix form this represents the forward problem in tomography [S] [R] = [M]. In practice, measurements [M] are used to estimate the optical density distribution by solving the inverse problem [R] = [S]−1[M]. Direct inversion of the sensitivity matrix, [S], is not possible and two approximations are considered and compared—the transpose and the pseudo inverse sensitivity matrices.

  5. An image compression method for space multispectral time delay and integration charge coupled device camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multispectral time delay and integration charge coupled device (TDICCD) image compression requires a low-complexity encoder because it is usually completed on board where the energy and memory are limited. The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) has proposed an image data compression (CCSDS-IDC) algorithm which is so far most widely implemented in hardware. However, it cannot reduce spectral redundancy in multispectral images. In this paper, we propose a low-complexity improved CCSDS-IDC (ICCSDS-IDC)-based distributed source coding (DSC) scheme for multispectral TDICCD image consisting of a few bands. Our scheme is based on an ICCSDS-IDC approach that uses a bit plane extractor to parse the differences in the original image and its wavelet transformed coefficient. The output of bit plane extractor will be encoded by a first order entropy coder. Low-density parity-check-based Slepian—Wolf (SW) coder is adopted to implement the DSC strategy. Experimental results on space multispectral TDICCD images show that the proposed scheme significantly outperforms the CCSDS-IDC-based coder in each band

  6. Charge Coupled Devices for detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Moroni, Guillermo [Fermilab; Estrada, Juan [Fermilab; Paolini, Eduardo E. [Buenos Aires U.; Cancelo, Gustavo [Fermilab; Tiffenberg, Javier [Fermilab; Molina, Jorge [Asuncion Natl. U.

    2015-04-03

    In this article the feasibility of using charge coupled devices (CCD) to detect low-energy neutrinos through their coherent scattering with nuclei is analyzed. The detection of neutrinos through this standard model process has been elusive because of the small energy deposited in such interaction. Typical particle detectors have thresholds of a few keV, and most of the energy deposition expected from coherent scattering is well below this level. The CCD detectors discussed in this paper can operate at a threshold of approximately 30 eV, making them ideal for observing this signal. On a CCD array of 500 g located next to a power nuclear reactor the number of coherent scattering events expected is about 3000 events/year. Our results shows that a detection with a confidence level of 99% can be reached within 16 days of continuous operation; with the current 52 g detector prototype this time lapse extends to five months.

  7. Quantifying the performance of charge-coupled devices in ambient conditions - Oral presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dungee, Ryan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-22

    Telescope surveys have given us a great deal of information about our universe, but the images they capture carry with them an inherent limitation. The question then is how do we take this information to the next level? The answer: the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). DESI is an instrument that will measure the distance to tens of millions of galaxies in our night sky. This information can be combined with already existing images to construct a three dimensional map of our universe providing a great deal of new opportunities for cosmological research. The DESI guidance system consists of 10 detectors called charge-coupled devices (CCDs). Each CCD is made of silicon atoms that emit electrons when struck with light, the electrons are counted and then used to reconstruct an image. But, CCDs suffer from an issue known as ‘dark current’ which are false counts that come from thermal motions of the silicon atoms. This is particularly problematic since they contribute to the uncertainty of a measurement without contributing to our signal. This causes a drop in the signal to noise ratio, a value that needs to be maximized in order to meet DESI’s high precision requirements. This summer was spent ensuring the DESI guidance system would meet its specifications. Data was collected using a CCD of the same type that would be used on DESI and the effectiveness of dark current removal was tested. Exposures were taken for a wide range of temperatures and exposure lengths and a number of dark current removal methods were implemented. While further testing is required, the initial results are quite promising and the DESI guidance system is on track to meet its specifications

  8. Texas Instruments /TI/ 800 x 800 charge-coupled device /CCD/ image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouke, M. M.; Hall, J. E.; Cowens, M. W.; Janesick, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Very-large area high-performance CCD image sensors with 800 x 800 pixel format have been successfully fabricated and operated on the basis of a three-level polysilicon gate technology. They are thinned to 8 microns over the entire 12.2 x 12.2 mm active area, and are used in the rear illumination mode. The light transfer characteristic has a gamma value of 1.000 + or - 0.002 over most of the dynamic range. Analysis of the noise behavior shows that the device SNR is shot-noise-limited over most of the dynamic range. Simple on-chip signal processing can be performed using an integration well to noiselessly collect signal charge from multiple pixels prior to reading out the charge. A UV-sensitive phosphor has been applied to the chip, yielding a device capable of imaging at wavelengths from the vacuum UV to the near IR.

  9. Detection of a Single Genetically Modified Bacterial Cell in Soil by Using Charge Coupled Device-Enhanced Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Silcock, Deborah J.; Waterhouse, Rosemary N.; Glover, L. Anne; Prosser, James I.; Killham, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    Genes encoding bioluminescence from Vibrio harveyi were cloned into Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseoli-cola, resulting in high levels of bioluminescence. After inoculation of sterile and nonsterile soil slurries with bioluminescent P. syringae, cells could not be identified by conventional light microscopy. However, when we used charge coupled device-enhanced microscopy, bioluminescent single cells were detected easily in dark fields despite masking by soil particulate matter, and in addition,...

  10. Analysis of electron multiplying charge coupled device and scientific CMOS readout noise models for Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor accuracy.

    OpenAIRE

    Basden, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, detectors with subelectron readout noise have been used very effectively in astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare readout noise models for the two key faint flux level detector technologies that are commonly used: electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) detectors. We find that in almost all situations, EMCCD technology is advantageous, and that the commonly used simplified model for EMCCD readout is appropriate. We also ...

  11. A comparison of image characteristics and convenience in panoramic radiography using charge-coupled device, storage phosphor, and film receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Farman, Allan G.; Farman, Taeko Takemori

    2001-01-01

    This study compared the image layer characteristics, dose requirements, and convenience in use of panoramic radiography using each of four different image receptors including traditional indirect exposure x-ray film, a storage phosphor system, and two solid-state sensors. The OP 100 D (Instrumentarium Imaging, Tuusula, Finland) charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor provided an instant image with a wide focal trough, making patient positioning error unlikely, but at the same time required a patie...

  12. Development of a novel neutron detection technique by using a boron layer coating a Charge Coupled Device

    CERN Document Server

    Blostein, Juan Jerónimo; Tartaglione, Aureliano; Haro, Miguel Sofo; Moroni, Guillermo Fernández; Cancelo, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the design features and the first test measurements obtained during the installation of a novel high resolution 2D neutron detection technique. The technique proposed in this work consists of a boron layer (enriched in ${^{10}}$B) placed on a scientific Charge Coupled Device (CCD). After the nuclear reaction ${^{10}}$B(n,$\\alpha$)${^{7}}$Li, the CCD detects the emitted charge particles thus obtaining information on the neutron absorption position. The above mentioned ionizing particles, with energies in the range 0.5-5.5 MeV, produce a plasma effect in the CCD which is recorded as a circular spot. This characteristic circular shape, as well as the relationship observed between the spot diameter and the charge collected, is used for the event recognition, allowing the discrimination of undesirable gamma events. We present the first results recently obtained with this technique, which has the potential to perform neutron tomography investigations with a spatial resolution better than that...

  13. Programmable scan/read circuitry for charge coupled device imaging detectors. [spcecraft attitude control and star trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, P. M.; Smilowitz, K.

    1984-01-01

    A circuit for scanning and outputting the induced charges in a solid state charge coupled device (CCD) image detector is disclosed in an image detection system for use in a spacecraft attitude control system. The image detection system includes timing control circuitry for selectively controlling the output of the CCD detector so that video outputs are provided only with respect to induced charges corresponding to predetermined sensing element lines of the CCD detector. The timing control circuit and the analog to digital converter are controlled by a programmed microprocessor which defines the video outputs to be converted and further controls the timing control circuit so that no video outputs are provided during the delay associated with analog to digital conversion.

  14. The noise performance of electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices at soft X-ray energy values

    OpenAIRE

    Tutt, James H.; Holland, Andrew D.; Murray, Neil J.; Hall, David J.; Harriss, Richard D.; Clarke, Andrew; Evagora, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (CCDs) for high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy has been proposed in previous studies, and the analysis that followed experimentally identified and verified a modified Fano factor for X-ray detection using an 55Fe X-ray source. However, further experiments with soft X-rays at 1000 eV were less successful, attributed to excessive split events. More recently, through the use of deep-depletion e2v CCD220 and on-chip binning, it has been p...

  15. Fabrication, Testing and Integration Technologies of Polymer Microlens for Pt/Si Schottky-Barrier Infrared Charge Coupled Device Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Cai-Jun; YI Xin-Jian; LAI Jian-Jun; CHEN Si-Hai

    2005-01-01

    @@ A novel polymer refractive microlens array has been formed on the surface of 256(V)×290(H) PtSi Schottkybarrier infrared charge coupled device (IRCCD) image sensors to improve the photoresponsivity of the IRCCD.The fabrication process flows of polymer microlens array are described. An effective aperture ratio in excess of 92% of microlens array has been achieved. An experimental facility to evaluate the optical performance ofmicrolens array is introduced. The measurement results show that the microlens array indicates better than 4% non-uniformity of focal length and high optical performance. The application of the microlens array to improve the photosensitivity of infrared CCD is discussed.

  16. Degradation of saturation output of the COTS array charge-coupled devices induced by total dose radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments of total dose radiation effects on COTS array charge-coupled device (CCD) and annealing measurements are shown. Degradations of saturation output voltage at different bias conditions are analyzed, and their mechanisms induced by radiation are also demonstrated. Degradations of saturation output imaging at different total doses and the recovery after annealing are also compared. The phenomena of imaging degradation induced by total dose irradiation are analyzed. The camera imaging quality of resolution test card degraded by total dose irradiation is also analyzed. Finally, integration research from the irradiation-sensitive parameter degradation to the camera imaging degradation of the array CCD is achieved

  17. X-ray color movie using the charge-coupled device with a direct X-ray detection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here a high-speed direct X-ray detection system using the charge-coupled device (CCD). It can obtain digital output from the CCD at a speed of one million pixels per second. With an appropriate size, we can obtain images at the speed of a movie. The CCD we employed has a thicker depletion region than that of the optical-use CCD. Our system can obtain energy-resolved X-ray images. We demonstrated its validity using the pinhole camera system and obtained images resolved with Fe-K and Ti-K X-rays. The image quality was determined not by the pixel size of the CCD (12 x 12 μm2) but by the pinhole size (200 μm in diameter) that we used. Our system is a promising focal plane detector for X-ray optics such as an X-ray microscope. (author)

  18. Teaching Charge Coupled Devices Using Models as Part of the Engineering Design Process at Maui Community College

    CERN Document Server

    Mostafanezhad, Isar; Rozic, Ciril; Harrington, David; Jacobs, Brad; Swindle, Ryan; Reader, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    The CCD Modeling Activity was designed to supplement the curriculum of the Electrical and Computing Engineering Technology program at the Maui Community College. The activity was designed to help learners understand how a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) works. A team of visiting graduate students was invited to teach an activity through the Teaching and Curriculum Collaborative (TeCC) as part of the Center for Adaptive Optics/Institute for Science and Engineer Educators Professional Development Program. One of the primary goals was to have students gain an understanding of the function of a CCD by constructing a model representing the CCD readout process. In this paper we discuss the design and implementation of the activity and the challenges we faced.

  19. Position sensitive detector of soft x-radiation and alpha particles on the charge-coupled device base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The position-sensitive detector based on a matrix of charge-coupled devices (CCD) operating on-line with the Pravets personal computer is designed. Application of the yttrium oxysulfide as a converter and give an opportunity to obtain 1300 electrons in CCD matrix per 1 photon absorbed in a phosphore for 8 keV X-ray photons. The detector ensures detection of single 5.5 MeV α particles. Spatial resolution for the detector with Y2O2S-Tb phosphore 40 mm in-diameter is about 350 μm for both X-ray photons and α particles. Detection efficiency nonuniformity over the detector area is ≤1% when the correcting matrix is used

  20. Analysis of electron multiplying charge coupled device and scientific CMOS readout noise models for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basden, Alastair G.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, detectors with subelectron readout noise have been used very effectively in astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare readout noise models for the two key faint flux level detector technologies that are commonly used: electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) detectors. We find that in almost all situations, EMCCD technology is advantageous, and that the commonly used simplified model for EMCCD readout is appropriate. We also find that the commonly used simple models for sCMOS readout noise are optimistic, and we recommend that a proper treatment of the sCMOS root mean square readout noise probability distribution should be considered during instrument performance modeling and development.

  1. On-line monitoring system for roller wear with axes shift compensation based on laser-linear charge coupled device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liansuo; Guo, Yuan

    2013-04-01

    Based on the principle of laser-linear array charge-coupled device (CCD) detection technology, a high accuracy nontouch on-line system for monitoring roller wear is brought forward. The principle and composition of the laser-linear array CCD detection system and the operation process were expatiated. Aiming at the errors of the roller's axes shifting during the detection process, compensating steps were adopted from the vertical and the parallel direction to the detection surface. This effectively enhanced the accuracy of the detection system. Experiments proved that the accuracy of the system could reach the demand of the practical production process. It provides a new method for high speed, accuracy, and automatic on-line monitoring of roller wear. r shapegear array CCD detection. A simulation-software program is also compiled based on this principle. By using this program, the I/O signals's data for this system is gained and the detection curves can be drawn automatically.

  2. Development of a large format charge-coupled device (CCD) for applications in X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the development of a charge-coupled device (CCD) for astronomical X-ray detection. Characteristics, performance and use of various CCD chips are described. Sizes range from a front-illuminated 2.5cmx2.5cm square chip for the MAXI mission with a depletion layer thickness of 70μm to a back-illuminated 3cmx6cm rectangular p-channel CCD with 200μm depletion thickness which exhibits improved quantum efficiency at low energy (below 0.5 keV). Combining the CCD with a scintillator deposit (SD-CCD) expands the effective energy range up to 100 keV. We describe the use of the SD-CCD in a balloon experiment

  3. Test of scintillating bars coupled to Silicon Photomultipliers for a charged particle tracking device

    CERN Document Server

    Cecchini, S; Esposti, L Degli; Lax, I; Mandrioli, G; Mauri, N; Pasqualini, L; Patrizii, L; Pozzato, M; Sirri, G; Tenti, M

    2016-01-01

    The results obtained in laboratory tests, using scintillator bars read by silicon photomultipliers are reported. The present approach is the first step for designing a precision tracking system to be placed inside a free magnetized volume for the charge identification of low energy crossing particles. The devised system is demonstrated able to provide a spatial resolution better than 2 mm.

  4. Four-shooter - A large format charge-coupled device camera for the Hale telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, James E.; Carr, Michael; Danielson, G. Edward; Lorenz, Ernest O.; Lucinio, Richard; Nenow, Victor E.; Smith, J. Devere; Westphal, James A.; Schneider, Donald P.; Zimmerman, Barbara A.

    1987-01-01

    The Hale telescope has employed an astronomical camera using four 800x800 CCDs in an optical arrangement that allows the imaging of a contiguous 1600-pixel-square region of the sky; reimaging optics are then used to yield a scale of 0.33 arcsec/pixel. Optical coatings are incorporated to yield a throughput at peak efficiency of nearly 50 percent, including telescope losses. This camera can be used in a scanning mode, in which the telescope tracking rate is offset and the charge is clocked in the chips in such a way that the charge image remains aligned with the optical image. Attention is given to the results of a survey for high-redshift quasars using this equipment, which has produced images for the most distant galaxy clusters yet discovered.

  5. Development of an SOI analog front-end ASIC for X-ray charge coupled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FD-SOI technology is a fascinating LSI fabrication process as a possible radiation-tolerant device. In order to confirm benefits of the FD-SOI and expand application ranges in front-end electronics, we experimentally designed an analog front-end ASIC for X-ray CCD readout with the FD-SOI process. The circuit design was submitted to OKI Semiconductor Co., Ltd. via the multi-chip project as a part of the SOI pixel-detector R and D program in KEK. The ASIC contains seven readout channels using the correlated double sampling technique, and includes key circuit elements for a low-noise LSI. This paper describes the circuit design and the performance of the ASIC together with the radiation tolerance.

  6. High Voltage CMOS control interface for astronomy—Grade charged coupled devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E.; Varner, G.; Koga, A.; Ruckman, L.; Onaka, P.; Tonry, J.; Lee, A.

    2008-08-01

    The Pan-STARRS telescope consists of an array of smaller mirrors viewed by a Giga-pixel arrays of CCDs. These focal planes employ Orthogonal Transfer CCDs (OTCCDs) to allow on-chip image stabilization. Each OTCCD has advanced logic features that are controlled externally. A CMOS Interface Device for High Voltage has been developed to provide the appropiate voltage signal levels from a readout and control system designated STARGRASP. OTCCD chip output levels range from -3.3V to 16.7V, with two different output drive strengths required depending on load capacitance (50pF and 1000pF), with 24mA of drive and a rise time on the order of 100ns. Additional testing Wilkinson ADC structures have been included in this chip to evaluate future functional additions for a next version of the chip.

  7. High Voltage CMOS Control Interface for Astronomy - Grade Charged Coupled Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Elena; Koga, Aaron; Ruckman, Larry; Onaka, Peter; Tonry, John; Lee, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    The Pan-STARRS telescope consists of an array of smaller mirrors viewed by a Gigapixel arrays of CCDs. These focal planes employ Orthogonal Transfer CCDs (OTCCDs) to allow on-chip image stabilization. Each OTCCD has advanced logic features that are controlled externally. A CMOS Interface Device for High Voltage has been developed to provide the appropiate voltage signal levels from a readout and control system designated STARGRASP. OTCCD chip output levels range from -3.3V to 16.7V, with two different output drive strenghts required depending on load capacitance (50pF and 1000pF), with 24mA of drive and a rise time on the order of 100ns. Additional testing ADC structures have been included in this chip to evaluate future functional additions for a next version of the chip.

  8. Design, fabrication, and evaluation of charge-coupled devices with aluminum-anodized-aluminum gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassaway, J. D.; Causey, W. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A 4-phase, 49 1/2 bit CCD shift register was designed and fabricated using two levels of aluminum metallization with anodic Al2O3 insulation separating the layers. Test circuitry was also designed and constructed. A numerical analysis of an MOS-RC transmission line was made and results are given to characterize performance for various conductivities. The electrical design of the CCD included a low-noise dual-gate input and a balanced floating diffusion output circuit. Metallization was accomplished both by low voltage DC sputtering and thermal evaporation. The audization was according to published procedures using a buffered tartaric acid bath. Approximately 20 wafers were processed with 50 complete chips per wafer. All devices failed by shorting between the metal levels at some point. Experimental procedures eliminated temperature effects from sintering and drying, anodic oxide thickness, edge effects, photoresist stripping procedures, and metallization techniques as the primary causes of failure. It was believed from a study of SEM images that protuberances (hillocks) grow up from the first level metal through the oxide either causing a direct short or producing a weak, highly stressed insulation point which fails at low voltage. The cause of these hillocks is unknown; however, they have been observed to grow during temperature excursions to 470 C.

  9. Application of a charge coupled device Raman microscope imaging system for quantitative analysis of aqueous surfactant phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tile development of the molecular optical laser examiner Raman microprobe during the 70's has provided the ability to acquire analytical quality Raman spectra with spatial resolution of the order of one micron. In recent years, with the introduction of charge coupled device detectors and holographic filters, this technology has become efficient enough to allow spectral mapping experiments to be possible. The main aim of this project was to modify the Jobin Yvon/Spex confocal Raman spectrometer to provide line imaging capabilities and use this feature to provide a rapid means of producing a phase composition diagram of a surface active agent with water. The surfactants chosen for phase behavior were polyoxyethylenes C12H25(OCH2CH2)xOH [C12EO8] and C12H25(OCH2CH2)6OH [C12EO6]. Each solid surfactant was placed at one end in a 0.4 mm pathlength borosilicate cell and water introduced at the other end. The different phases and boundaries were allowed to develop, in the cell by means of the diffuse interfacial transport method at different temperatures. These were then examined by line imaging and their corresponding composition determined using a series of external ethoxylate standards. The resulting phase boundaries were found to be comparable with those obtained using alternative methods, however the time taken to obtain them was considerably reduced. (author)

  10. Characterization of an x-ray framing camera utilizing a charge coupled device or film as recording media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact charge coupled device (CCD) camera system has been designed and characterized for use in the six inch manipulator (SIM) at the Nova laser facility. The camera system has been designed to directly replace the 35 mm film packages currently used in SIM-based x-ray imaging diagnostics. The unit close-quote s electronic package has been constructed for small size and high thermal conductivity which reduces the overall camera size and improves its performance when operated within the vacuum environment of the Nova target chamber. Measurements of the x-ray imager close-quote s contrast transfer function (CTF) were made under a variety of operating conditions on a static x-ray Manson source using both the CCD and Kodak T-Max 3200 film as recording media. The CTF data were converted to an equivalent modulation transfer function (MTF). The MTF plots show that the microchannel plate has a uniform response within our measurement accuracy along its strips. In a direction normal to the strip, however, the MTF is reduced due to the slant angle of the pores in the MCP. The measurements show that the CCD camera has a lower MTF response than T-MAX film for all spatial frequencies and configurations measured. However, data obtained from the film exhibited reciprocity failure and border effects that are not observed in the CCD data. Measurements indicate that the signal-to-noise ratio for the CCD data is four to six times larger than that obtained with film and higher photon flux levels were recorded. The CCD-based diagnostic offers immediate access to the data, improved dynamic range, and reduced turnaround time, while eliminating the need for film development, digitization, equipment, and personnel. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  11. Improving the spatial resolution of soft X-ray detection using an Electron-Multiplying Charge-Coupled Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) is an instrument at the Swiss Light Source designed for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering with an energy resolution (E/ΔE) better than 12000 at 930 eV. Improvements to the instrument have been predicted that could allow the energy resolution to be improved by a factor of two. To achieve this, the spatial resolution of the detector (currently a Charge-Coupled Device, CCD) over which the energy spectrum is dispersed would have to be improved to better than 5 μm. X-ray photons with energies between a few hundred to a few thousand electron volts primarily interact within the field-free region of back-illuminated CCDs, where each photon forms an electron cloud that diffuses isotropically before reaching the depleted region close to the electrodes. Each photon's electron cloud is likely to be detected as an event with signal split across multiple pixels. Analysing these split events using centroiding techniques allows the photon's interaction position to be determined to a sub-pixel level. PolLux is a soft X-ray microspectroscopy endstation at the Swiss Light Source that can focus 200 eV to 1200 eV X-rays to a spot size of approximately 20 nm. Previous studies using data taken with a linear scan across the centre of a pixel in 3 μm steps predicted an improved resolution by applying centroiding techniques and using an Electron-Multiplying CCD (EM-CCD). In this study, a full 2D map of the centroiding accuracy in the pixel is presented, formed by rastering in two dimensions across the image plane in single micron steps. The improved spatial resolution from centroiding events in the EM-CCD in all areas of the pixel over the standard CCD is attributed to the improved signal to noise ratio provided by the multiplication register even at high pixel readout speeds (tens of MHz).

  12. Effect of the absorbed energy spectrum on the sensitivity of the photoreceiver on charge-coupled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of absorbed energy on sensitivity of the photoreceiver assembled on charge-transport devices (CTD) is evaluated. The calculation of photoreceiver sensitivity is carried out within 2 to 100 keV energy range for the main type of radiation interaction with the substance in this energy range is photoelectric absorption. Calculations have been conducted for CTD with surface transfer having Al x1 thick blocks and uniform dielectrical SiO2 x2 thick layer for the two cases when x1=x2=0.1 μm and x1=2x=1 . The given dependences of the photoreceiver sensitivity on the energy H=f(E) differ only in the range of low energies up to 10 keV. Both dependences have the minimum about 6 keV where h=4x105 quantum/cm2. It is stated that the photoreceiver sensitivity rapidly worsens with the energy growth of the registered quanta. It is concluded on the base of the data obtained that it is advisable to use photoreceivers on CTD only for registration of soft X-ray radiation

  13. Development of two-channel prototype ITER vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer with back-illuminated charge-coupled device and microchannel plate detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrometer of a five-channel spectral system is designed for ITER main plasma impurity measurement. To develop and verify the system design, a two-channel prototype system is fabricated with No. 3 (14.4-31.8 nm) and No. 4 (29.0-60.0 nm) among the five channels. The optical system consists of a collimating mirror to collect the light from source to slit, two holographic diffraction gratings with toroidal geometry, and two different electronic detectors. For the test of the prototype system, a hollow cathode lamp is used as a light source. To find the appropriate detector for ITER VUV system, two kinds of detectors of the back-illuminated charge-coupled device and the microchannel plate electron multiplier are tested, and their performance has been investigated.

  14. Experimental study of heavy-ion computed tomography using a scintillation screen and an electron-multiplying charged coupled device camera for human head imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraishi, Hiroshi; Hara, Hidetake; Abe, Shinji; Yokose, Mamoru; Watanabe, Takara; Takeda, Tohoru; Koba, Yusuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a heavy-ion computed tomography (IonCT) system using a scintillation screen and an electron-multiplying charged coupled device (EMCCD) camera that can measure a large object such as a human head. In this study, objective with the development of the system was to investigate the possibility of applying this system to heavy-ion treatment planning from the point of view of spatial resolution in a reconstructed image. Experiments were carried out on a rotation phantom using 12C accelerated up to 430 MeV/u by the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). We demonstrated that the reconstructed image of an object with a water equivalent thickness (WET) of approximately 18 cm was successfully achieved with the spatial resolution of 1 mm, which would make this IonCT system worth applying to the heavy-ion treatment planning for head and neck cancers.

  15. Dose performance evaluation of a charge coupled device and a flat-panel digital fluoroscopy system recently installed in an Interventional Cardiology laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the dose performance of a flat-panel (FP) and an image intensifier (II) charge coupled device (CCD) digital fluoroscopy X-ray systems newly installed in an Interventional Cardiology (IC) department. Filter entrance dose rate, detector dose rate (during fluoroscopy) and filter entrance dose per image were measured at 70 cm from the focus using 2 mm copper sheets to mimic normal size patient. Image quality was also evaluated. The patient dose survey included 277 patients, which had either a Coronary Angiography (CA) or a Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA). Dose area product (DAP), fluoroscopy time (T) and total number of frames (F) values were also collected. The results showed that both systems performed within international recommendations with the exception of higher cine radiation doses, stressing the fact that neither specific protocols of measurement nor reference values for digital equipment were provided by the official bodies. (authors)

  16. Proton irradiation experiment for X-ray charge-coupled devices of the monitor of all-sky X-ray image mission onboard the international space station. 1. Experimental setup and measurement of the charge transfer inefficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the radiation damage effects on a charge-coupled device (CCD) to be employed in the Japanese X-ray astronomy mission including the monitor of all-sky X-ray image (MAXI) onboard the international space station (ISS). Since low-energy protons release their energy mainly at the charge transfer channel, resulting in a decrease of the charge transfer efficiency, we focused on low-energy protons in our experiments. A 171 keV to 3.91 MeV proton beam was irradiated onto a given device. We measured the degradation of the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) as a function of incremental fluence. A 292 keV proton beam degraded the CTI critically. Taking into account the proton energy dependence of the CTI, we confirmed that the transfer channel has the lowest radiation tolerance. We have also developed different device architectures to reduce the radiation damage in orbit. Among them, the 'notch' CCD, in which the buried channel implant concentration is increased, resulting in a potential well deeper than outside, has a three times higher radiation tolerance than that of the normal CCD. We then estimated the CTI of the CCD in the orbit of the ISS, considering the proton energy spectrum. The CTI value is estimated to be 1.1x10-5 per transfer after two years of mission life in the worst case analysis if the highest radiation tolerant device is employed. This value is well within the acceptable limit and we have confirmed the high radiation-tolerance of CCDs for the MAXI mission. (author)

  17. On a possibility of construction of the fast micropower analog-to-digital converter on the base of using charge-coupled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possibility of construction of the fast micropower analog-to-digital converter (ADC) on the base of using the charge-coupled devices (CCD) has been considered, and its comparison with the bit coding ADC has been carried out. The results of the analysis of the ADC of both types revealed the 4-5 times gain over occupied area and supply power for the ADC on the base of CCD as compared to the bit coding ADC. Particular amphasis is placed upon the accuracy of conversion in the ADC on the base of CCD. The spread of the charge detector gain has been shown to influence upon the accuracy of conversion. This undesirable effect appears due to the large CCD gate area spread. Possible ways of avoiding the effects of area spread on the conversion accuracy have been indicated. As a result of the study made is a conclusion on the possibility of designing the 8-bit ADC (without analogous units) on the base of 1x1 mm crystal with a response of about several MHz at energy power unit of about hundreds of milliwatts

  18. Detection of 1 - 100 keV x-rays from high intensity, 500 fs laser- produced plasmas using charge-coupled devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J.; Young, B.K.F.; Conder, A.D.; Stewart, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a compact, vacuum compatible, large format, charge- coupled device (CCD) camera for scientific imaging and detection of 1- 100 keV x rays in experiments at LLNL JANUS-1ps laser. A standard, front-illuminated, multi-pin phase device with 250 k electron full well capacity, low dark current (10 pA/cm{sup 2} at 20 C) and low read noise (5 electron rms) is cooled to -35 C to give the camera excellent 15-bit dynamic range and signal-to-noise response. Intensity and x-ray energy linear response were determined for optical and x-ray (<65 keV) photons and are in excellent agreement. Departure from linearity was less than 0.7%. Inherent linearity and energy dispersive characteristics of CCD cameras are well suited for hard x-ray photon counting. X-rays absorbed within the depletion and field-free regions can be distinguished by studying the pulse height spectrum. Results are presented for the detection of 1-100 keV Bremsstrahlung continuum, K-shell and L-shell fluorescence spectra emitted from high intensity (10{sup 18}W cm{sup -2}), 500 fs laser- produced plasmas.

  19. A charge-coupled-device camera image analysis system for quantifying DNA distributions in agarose gels after pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A charge-coupled-device camera system was coupled to a personal computer and, with uniformity in illumination and detection (within 4-8%) along each lane, was used for quantifying the distribution of DNA molecules that migrate from the PFGE well (plug) into the lane at distances varying from 1 to 50 mm (with 0.5 mm/pixel). By using a specially designed transmission filter for transmitting 470-725 nm fluorescence from ethidium bromide-stained DNA while eliminating most of the fluorescence (3H]dThd. However, scattering of fluorescence from one lane into an adjacent lane 3 mm away and as far as 10 mm from the plug into the lane presented a problem. This problem was overcome by using a form with slots to cover every other lane when the images were obtained and either (1) cutting the lane from the plug and moving it 15 mm away or (2) imaging the intact gel and applying a correction for ∼ 7% of the fluorescence from the plug tailing out ∼ 10 mm beyond the first 1 mm in the lane. In addition, the following were required: (1) carefully controlled staining and destaining procedures, and (2) a low background that is obtained as an average uniform background in each lane 5 mm beyond where DNA migration stops. 31 refs., 7 figs

  20. CCD[charge-coupled device]-based synchrotron x-ray detector for protein crystallography: Performance projected from an experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intense x radiation from a synchrotron source could, with a suitable detector, provide a complete set of diffraction images from a protein crystal before the crystal is damaged by radiation (2 to 3 min). An area detector consisting of a 40 mm dia. x-ray fluorescing phosphor, coupled with an image intensifier and lens to a CCD image sensor, was developed to determine the effectiveness of such a detector in protein crystallography. The detector was used in an experiment with a rotating anode x-ray generator. Diffraction patterns from a lysozyme crystal obtained with this detector are compared to those obtained with film. The two images appear to be virtually identical. The flux of 104 x-ray photons/s was observed on the detector at the rotating anode generator. At the 6-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, the flux on an 80 x 80 mm2 detector is expected to be >109 photons/s. The projected design of such a synchrotron detector shows that a diffraction-peak count >106 could be obtained in ∼0.5 s. With an additional ∼0.5 s readout time of a 512 x 512 pixel CCD, the data acquisition time per frame would be ∼1 s so that ninety 10 diffraction images could be obtained, with approximately 1% precision, in less than 3 min

  1. Evaluation and improvement in the accuracy of a charge-coupled-device-based pyrometer for temperature field measurements of continuous casting billets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Haicheng; Xie, Zhi; Zhang, Yuzhong; Hu, Zhenwei

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a radiometric high-temperature field measurement model based on a charge-coupled-device (CCD). According to the model, an intelligent CCD pyrometer with a digital signal processor as the core is developed and its non-uniformity correction algorithm for reducing the differences in accuracy between individual pixel sensors is established. By means of self-adaptive adjustment for the light-integration time, the dynamic range of the CCD is extended and its accuracy in low-temperature range is improved. The non-uniformity correction algorithm effectively reduces the accuracy differences between different pixel sensors. The performance of the system is evaluated through a blackbody furnace and an integrating sphere, the results of which show that the dynamic range of 400 K is obtained and the accuracy in low temperature range is increased by 7 times compared with the traditional method based on the fixed light-integration time. In addition, the differences of accuracy between the on-axis pixel and the most peripheral pixels are decreased from 19.1 K to 2.8 K. Therefore, this CCD pyrometer ensures that the measuring results of all pixels tend to be equal-accuracy distribution across the entire measuring ranges. This pyrometric system has been successfully applied to the temperature field measurements in continuous casting billets.

  2. A new method for polychromatic X-ray μLaue diffraction on a Cu pillar using an energy-dispersive pn-junction charge-coupled device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    μLaue diffraction with a polychromatic X-ray beam can be used to measure strain fields and crystal orientations of micro crystals. The hydrostatic strain tensor can be obtained once the energy profile of the reflections is measured. However, this remains a challenge both on the time scale and reproducibility of the beam position on the sample. In this review, we present a new approach to obtain the spatial and energy profiles of Laue spots by using a pn-junction charge-coupled device, an energy-dispersive area detector providing 3D resolution of incident X-rays. The morphology and energetic structure of various Bragg peaks from a single crystalline Cu micro-cantilever used as a test system were simultaneously acquired. The method facilitates the determination of the Laue spots’ energy spectra without filtering the white X-ray beam. The synchrotron experiment was performed at the BM32 beamline of ESRF using polychromatic X-rays in the energy range between 5 and 25 keV and a beam size of 0.5 μm × 0.5 μm. The feasibility test on the well known system demonstrates the capabilities of the approach and introduces the “3D detector method” as a promising tool for material investigations to separate bending and strain for technical materials

  3. A new method for polychromatic X-ray μLaue diffraction on a Cu pillar using an energy-dispersive pn-junction charge-coupled device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, A.; Send, S.; Pashniak, N.; Pietsch, U. [Department of Physics, University of Siegen, Siegen 57072 (Germany); Kirchlechner, C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Düsseldorf 40237 (Germany); Montanuniversität Leoben, Leoben 8700 (Austria); Micha, J. S.; Ulrich, O. [CEA-Grenoble/DRFMC/SprAM, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38054 (France); Strüder, L. [PNSensor GmbH, Munich 80803 (Germany); Keckes, J. [Montanuniversität Leoben, Leoben 8700 (Austria); Material Center Leoben Forschungs GmbH, Leoben 8700 (Austria)

    2014-11-15

    μLaue diffraction with a polychromatic X-ray beam can be used to measure strain fields and crystal orientations of micro crystals. The hydrostatic strain tensor can be obtained once the energy profile of the reflections is measured. However, this remains a challenge both on the time scale and reproducibility of the beam position on the sample. In this review, we present a new approach to obtain the spatial and energy profiles of Laue spots by using a pn-junction charge-coupled device, an energy-dispersive area detector providing 3D resolution of incident X-rays. The morphology and energetic structure of various Bragg peaks from a single crystalline Cu micro-cantilever used as a test system were simultaneously acquired. The method facilitates the determination of the Laue spots’ energy spectra without filtering the white X-ray beam. The synchrotron experiment was performed at the BM32 beamline of ESRF using polychromatic X-rays in the energy range between 5 and 25 keV and a beam size of 0.5 μm × 0.5 μm. The feasibility test on the well known system demonstrates the capabilities of the approach and introduces the “3D detector method” as a promising tool for material investigations to separate bending and strain for technical materials.

  4. Design of Low-Noise Output Amplifiers for P-channel Charge-Coupled Devices Fabricated on High-Resistivity Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, S; Frost, F Dion R.; Groulx, R; Holland, S E; Karcher, A; Kolbe, W F; Roe, N A; Wang, G; Yu, Y

    2011-12-22

    We describe the design and optimization of low-noise, single-stage output amplifiers for p-channel charge-coupled devices (CCDs) used for scientific applications in astronomy and other fields. The CCDs are fabricated on high-resistivity, 4000–5000 -cm, n-type silicon substrates. Single-stage amplifiers with different output structure designs and technologies have been characterized. The standard output amplifier is designed with an n{sup +} polysilicon gate that has a metal connection to the sense node. In an effort to lower the output amplifier readout noise by minimizing the capacitance seen at the sense node, buried-contact technology has been investigated. In this case, the output transistor has a p{sup +} polysilicon gate that connects directly to the p{sup +} sense node. Output structures with buried-contact areas as small as 2 μm × 2 μm are characterized. In addition, the geometry of the source-follower transistor was varied, and we report test results on the conversion gain and noise of the various amplifier structures. By use of buried-contact technology, better amplifier geometry, optimization of the amplifier biases and improvements in the test electronics design, we obtain a 45% reduction in noise, corresponding to 1.7 e{sup -} rms at 70 kpixels/sec.

  5. Breath-hold monitoring and visual feedback for radiotherapy using a charge-coupled device camera and a head-mounted display. System development and feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to present the technical aspects of the breath-hold technique with respiratory monitoring and visual feedback and to evaluate the feasibility of this system in healthy volunteers. To monitor respiration, the vertical position of the fiducial marker placed on the patient's abdomen was tracked by a machine vision system with a charge-coupled device camera. A monocular head-mounted display was used to provide the patient with visual feedback about the breathing trace. Five healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this study. They held their breath at the end-inspiration and the end-expiration phases. They performed five repetitions of the same type of 15-s breath-holds with and without a head-mounted display, respectively. A standard deviation of five mean positions of the fiducial marker during a 15-s breath-hold in each breath-hold type was used as the reproducibility value of breath-hold. All five volunteers well tolerated the breath-hold maneuver. For the inspiration breath-hold, the standard deviations with and without visual feedback were 1.74 mm and 0.84 mm, respectively (P=0.20). For the expiration breath-hold, the standard deviations with and without visual feedback were 0.63 mm and 0.96 mm, respectively (P=0.025). Our newly developed system might help the patient achieve improved breath-hold reproducibility. (author)

  6. The use and characterization of a backilluminated charge-coupled device in investigations of pulsed x-ray and radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Examinations of bremsstrahlung and energetic electron beams from a novel laser plasma source motivate and assist characterization of a backthinned, backilluminated direct detection x-ray charge-coupled device (CCD), a topology that is uncommon in hard x-ray work. Behavior toward pseudomonochromatic (55Fe) and multichromatic (241Am) sources is briefly reviewed under optimized noise conditions. Results collectively establish the previously unknown functional depth structure. Several modes of usage are illustrated in ∼4-20 keV x-ray laser plasma source investigations, where the significance of the characterization is briefly discussed. The spectral redistribution associated with this CCD topology is unfavorable, yet appropriate analysis ensures that sufficient spectral information remains for quantitative determination of broadband x-ray flux and spectra in essentially single laser shot measurements. The energy dependence of nascent electron cloud radii in silicon is determined using broadband x-rays from the laser plasma source, turning the narrow depletion depth to advantage. Finally, the characterization is used to quantify recent x-ray spectral explorations of the water jet laser plasma source operating under aspirator vacuum. These results will have key value for establishment of laboratory based ultrafast extended x-ray absorption fine structure experiments using microbolometric detectors.

  7. Coupling Electromagnetism to Global Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Guendelman, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that an alternative to the standard scalar QED is possible. In this new version there is only global gauge invariance as far as the charged scalar fields are concerned although local gauge invariance is kept for the electromagnetic field. The electromagnetic coupling has the form $j_\\mu (A^{\\mu} +\\partial^{\\mu}B)$ where $B$ is an auxiliary field and the current $j_\\mu$ is $A_{\\mu}$ independent so that no "sea gull terms" are introduced. In a model of this kind spontaneous breaking of symmetry does not lead to photon mass generation, instead the Goldstone boson becomes a massless source for the electromagnetic field. Infrared questions concerning the theory when spontaneous symmetry breaking takes place and generalizations to global vector QED are discussed. In this framework Q-Balls and other non topological solitons that owe their existence to a global U(1) symmetry can be coupled to electromagnetism and could represent multiply charged particles now in search in the LHC. Finally, we give an exam...

  8. Two-dimensional microchemical observation of mast cell biogenic amine release as monitored by a 128 × 128 array-type charge-coupled device ion image sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Toshiaki; Tamamura, Youichiro; Tokunaga, Kenta; Sakurai, Takashi; Kato, Ryo; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2014-05-01

    Available array-type, chemical-sensing image sensors generally only provide on/off responses to the sensed chemical and produce qualitative information. Therefore, there is a need for an array sensor design that can detect chemical concentration changes to produce quantitative, event-sensitive information. In this study, a 128 × 128 array-type image sensor was modified and applied to imaging of biogenic amines released from stimulated rat mast cells, providing recordable responses of the time course of their release and diffusion. The imaging tool was manufactured by an integrated circuit process, including complementary metal oxide semiconductor and charge-coupled device technology. It was fitted with an amine-sensitive membrane prepared from plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) including a hydrophobic anion, which allowed the sensor to detect amines, such as histamine and serotonin, in Tyrode's solution. As mast cells were larger in diameter than the pixel hollows, some pixels monitored amines released from single cells. The image from the array responses yielded sequential snapshots at a practical frame speed that followed amine concentration changes over time, after mast cell amine release was synchronized by chemical stimulation. This sensor was shown to be sensitive to amine release at very low stimulus concentrations and was able to detect localized spots of high amine release. The entire time course of the amine release was recorded, including maximum concentration at 4-6 s and signal disappearance at 30 s after stimulation. With further development, this sensor will increase opportunities to study a variety of biological systems, including neuronal chemical processes. PMID:24731060

  9. Characterization of a fiber-taper charge-coupled device system for plastic scintillation dosimetry and comparison with the traditional lens system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), dose sensitivity and stability, and reproducibility of a lens-less charge-coupled device (CCD) photon-counting system with those of a traditional CCD + lens photon-counting system for plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs). Methods: The PSD used in this study was made from a 1-mm diameter, 2-mm long BCF60 scintillating fiber (emission peak at 530 nm) coupled to a 2.6-m Eska GH-4001 clear plastic fiber. This PSD was coupled to either a fiber-taper-based photon-counting system (FTS) or a lens-based photon-counting system (LS). In the FTS, the fiber-taper was attached to a 2048 × 2048 pixel, uncooled Alta 4020 polychromatic CCD camera. The LS consisted of a 1600 × 1200 pixel Alta 2020 polychromatic CCD camera (cooled to −18 °C) with a 50-mm lens with f/# = 1. Dose measurements were made under the same conditions for each system (isocentric setup; depth of 1.5 cm in solid water using a 10 × 10 cm2 field size and 6-MV photon beam). The performance of each system was determined and compared, using the chromatic Čerenkov removal method to account for the stem effects produced in the clear plastic fiber. Results: The FTS increased the light collected by a factor of 4 compared with the LS, for the same dose measurements. This gain was possible because the FTS was not limited by the optical aberration that comes with a lens system. Despite a 45 °C operating temperature difference between the systems, the SNR was 1.8–1.9 times higher in the FTS than in the LS, for blue and green channels respectively. Low-dose measurements of 1.0 and 0.5 cGy were obtained with an accuracy of 3.4% and 5.6%, respectively, in the FTS, compared with 5.8% and 15.9% in the LS. The FTS provided excellent dose measurement stability as a function of integration time, with at most a 1% difference at 5 cGy. Under the same conditions, the LS system produced a measurement difference between 2 and 3%. Conclusion: Our results showed that

  10. Reading and writing charge on graphene devices

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, M. R.; Herbschleb, E. D.; Puddy, R.K.; Roy, M.; Anderson, D.(California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA); Jones, G. A. C.; Maksym, P.; Smith, C. G.

    2011-01-01

    We use a combination of charge writing and scanning gate microscopy to map and modify the local charge neutrality point of graphene field-effect devices. We give a demonstration of the technique by writing remote charge in a thin dielectric layer over the graphene-metal interface and detecting the resulting shift in local charge neutrality point. We perform electrostatic simulations to characterize the gating effect of a realistic scanning probe tip on a graphene bilayer and find a good agree...

  11. Energy storage device with large charge separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holme, Timothy P.; Prinz, Friedrich B.; Iancu, Andrei

    2016-04-12

    High density energy storage in semiconductor devices is provided. There are two main aspects of the present approach. The first aspect is to provide high density energy storage in semiconductor devices based on formation of a plasma in the semiconductor. The second aspect is to provide high density energy storage based on charge separation in a p-n junction.

  12. New Charged Particles from Higgs Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Andrew G

    2012-01-01

    The recently reported observation of a new particle with mass about 125 GeV and couplings generally resembling those of the Standard Model Higgs boson provides a potential probe of the physics of electroweak symmetry breaking. Although the current data only provides hints, we suggest a particular combination of Higgs couplings as an assay for new charged particles connected with electroweak symmetry breaking, and construct a simple model with charge 5/3 quarks as a demonstration of its use.

  13. Signal processing applications of massively parallel charge domain computing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor); Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is embodied in a charge coupled device (CCD)/charge injection device (CID) architecture capable of performing a Fourier transform by simultaneous matrix vector multiplication (MVM) operations in respective plural CCD/CID arrays in parallel in O(1) steps. For example, in one embodiment, a first CCD/CID array stores charge packets representing a first matrix operator based upon permutations of a Hartley transform and computes the Fourier transform of an incoming vector. A second CCD/CID array stores charge packets representing a second matrix operator based upon different permutations of a Hartley transform and computes the Fourier transform of an incoming vector. The incoming vector is applied to the inputs of the two CCD/CID arrays simultaneously, and the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier transform are produced simultaneously in the time required to perform a single MVM operation in a CCD/CID array.

  14. Proton Irradiation Experiment for the X-ray Charge-Coupled Devices of the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image mission onboard the International Space Station I. Experimental Setup and Measurement of the Charge Transfer Inefficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Miyata, E; Kouno, H; Mihara, M; Matsuta, K; Tsunemi, H; Tanaka, K; Minamisono, T; Tomida, H; Miyaguchi, K

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the radiation damage effects on a CCD to be employed in the Japanese X-ray astronomy mission including the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Since low energy protons release their energy mainly at the charge transfer channel, resulting a decrease of the charge transfer efficiency, we thus focused on the low energy protons in our experiments. A 171 keV to 3.91 MeV proton beam was irradiated to a given device. We measured the degradation of the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) as a function of incremental fluence. A 292 keV proton beam degraded the CTI most seriously. Taking into account the proton energy dependence of the CTI, we confirmed that the transfer channel has the lowest radiation tolerance. We have also developed the different device architectures to reduce the radiation damage in orbit. Among them, the ``notch'' CCD, in which the buried channel implant concentration is increased, resulting in a deeper potential well than outsi...

  15. Decoherence of charge qubit coupled to interacting background charges

    OpenAIRE

    Yurkevich, I. V.; Baldwin, J.; Lerner, I. V.; Altshuler, B. L.

    2009-01-01

    The major contribution to decoherence of a double quantum dot or a Josephson junction charge qubit comes from the electrostatic coupling to fluctuating background charges hybridized with the conduction electrons in the reservoir. However, estimations according to previously developed theories show that finding a sufficient number of effective fluctuators in a realistic experimental layout is quite improbable. We show that this paradox is resolved by allowing for a short-range Coulomb interact...

  16. Charge transport in strongly coupled quantum dot solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Cherie R.; Murray, Christopher B.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of high-mobility, colloidal semiconductor quantum dot (QD) solids has triggered fundamental studies that map the evolution from carrier hopping through localized quantum-confined states to band-like charge transport in delocalized and hybridized states of strongly coupled QD solids, in analogy with the construction of solids from atoms. Increased coupling in QD solids has led to record-breaking performance in QD devices, such as electronic transistors and circuitry, optoelectronic light-emitting diodes, photovoltaic devices and photodetectors, and thermoelectric devices. Here, we review the advances in synthesis, assembly, ligand treatments and doping that have enabled high-mobility QD solids, as well as the experiments and theory that depict band-like transport in the QD solid state. We also present recent QD devices and discuss future prospects for QD materials and device design.

  17. Measurements of Charge Transfer Efficiency in a Proton-irradiated Swept Charge Device

    CERN Document Server

    YuSa, Wang; XiaoYan, Liu; WeiWei, Cui; YuPeng, Xu; ChengKui, Li; MaoShun, Li; DaWei, Han; TianXiang, Chen; Jia, Huo; Juan, Wang; Wei, Li; Wei, Hu; Yi, Zhang; Bo, Lu; GuoHe, Yin; Yue, Zhu; ZiLiang, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) have been successfully used in several low energy X-ray astronomical satellite over the past two decades. Their high energy resolution and high spatial resolution make them an perfect tool for low energy astronomy, such as formation of galaxy clusters and environment of black holes. The Low Energy X-ray Telescope (LE) group is developing Swept Charge Device (SCD) for the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) satellite. SCD is a special low energy X-ray CCD, which could be read out a thousand times faster than traditional CCDs, simultaneously keeping excellent energy resolution. A test method for measuring the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) of a prototype SCD has been set up. Studies of the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) have been performed at a temperature range of operation, with a proton-irradiated SCD.

  18. Device for measuring charge density distribution in charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device to measure charge density distribution in charged particle beams has been described. The device contains a set of hollow interinsulated current-receiving electrodes, recording system, and cooling system. The invention is aimed at the increase of admissible capacity of the beams measured at the expense of cooling efficiency increase. The aim is achieved by the fact, that in the device a dynamic evaporating-condensational cooling of electrodes is realized by means of cooling agent supply in perpendicular to their planes through the tubes introduced inside special cups. Spreading in radial direction over electrode surface the cooling agent gradually and intensively washes the side surface of the cup, after that, it enters the cooling cavity in the form of vapour-liquid mixture. In the cavity the cooling agent, supplied using dispensina and receiving collectors in which vapoUr is condensed, circulates. In the device suggested the surface of electrode cooling is decreased significantly at the expense of side surface of the cups which receives the electrode heat

  19. Transverse Mode Coupling Instability with Space Charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbekov, V. [Fermilab

    2016-03-11

    Transverse mode coupling instability of a bunch with space charge and wake field is considered in frameworks of the boxcar model. Eigenfunctions of the bunch without wake are used as the basis for solution of the equations with the wake field included. Dispersion equation for the bunch eigentunes is obtained in the form of an infinite continued fraction. It is shown that influence of space charge on the instability essentially depends on the wake sign. In particular, threshold of the negative wake increases in absolute value until the space charge tune shift is rather small, and goes to zero at higher space charge. The explanation of this behavior is developed by analysis of the bunch spectrum. A comparison of the results with published articles is represented.

  20. Transverse Mode Coupling Instability with Space Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Balbekov, V

    2016-01-01

    Transverse mode coupling instability of a bunch with space charge and wake field is considered in frameworks of the boxcar model. Eigenfunctions of the bunch without wake are used as the basis for solution of the equations with the wake field included. Dispersion equation for the bunch eigentunes is obtained in the form of an infinite continued fraction. It is shown that influence of space charge on the instability essentially depends on the wake sign. In particular, threshold of the negative wake increases in absolute value until the space charge tune shift is rather small, and goes to zero at higher space charge. The explanation of this behavior is developed by analysis of the bunch spectrum. A comparison of the results with published articles is represented.

  1. Proton irradiation experiment for x-ray charge-coupled devices of the monitor of all-sky x-ray image mission onboard the international space station. 2. Degradation of dark current and identification of electron trap level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the radiation damage effects on a charge-coupled device (CCD) to be used for the Japanese X-ray mission, the monitor of all-sky X-ray image (MAXI), onboard the international space station (ISS). A temperature dependence of the dark current as a function of incremental dose is studied. We found that the protons having energy of >292 keV seriously increased the dark current of the devices. In order to improve the radiation tolerance of the devices, we have developed various device architectures to minimize the radiation damage in orbit. Among them, nitride oxide enables us to reduce the dark current significantly and therefore we adopted nitride oxide for the flight devices. We also compared the dark current of a device in operation and that out of operation during the proton irradiation. The dark current of the device in operation became twofold that out of operation, and we thus determined that devices would be turned off during the passage of the radiation belt. The temperature dependence of the dark current enables us to determine the electron trap level that generates the dark current. We fitted dark current as a function of temperature by the theoretical models and found that the dark current increase after proton irradiations is caused by, at least, two kinds of electron trap levels. The shallow trap level (Ec - Et c and Et are the energy at the bottom of the conduction band and the energy level of electron trap) might be associated with oxygen which is dominant at the operating temperature of >210 K. On the other hand, another trap level is located roughly at the center of the silicon bandgap which might be associated with divacancies or P-V traps. We finally investigated the spatial distribution of the low-energy protons in the orbit of the ISS. Their density has a peak around l - 20deg and b - 55deg independent of the altitude. The peak value is roughly two orders of magnitude higher than that at the South Atlantic Anomaly. (author)

  2. Design And Construction Of Wireless Charging System Using Inductive Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Lam Mung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Wireless charging system described by using the method of inductive coupling. In this project oscillation circuit converts DC energy to AC energytransmitter coil to transmit magnetic field by passing frequency and then induce the receiver coil. The properties of Induction coupling are wavemagnetic field-wideband rangevery shortcm efficiencyhight and operation frequencyLF-bandseveral handred kHz.The project shows as a small charging for 5V battery of phone in this method. The system bases on coupling magnetic field then designed and constructed as two parts. There are transmitter part and receiver part. The transmitter coil transmitter part transmits coupling magnetic field to receiver coil receiver part by passing frequency at about 1.67MHz. The Amperes law Biot-Savart law and Faraday law are used to calculate the inductive coupling between the transmitter coil and the receiver coil. The calculation of this law shows how many power transfer in receiver part when how many distance between the transmitter coil and the receiver coil. The system is safe for users and neighbouring electronic devices. To get more accurate wireless charging system it needs to change the design of the following keywords.

  3. Charge transfer inefficiency in the pre- and post-irradiated Swept Charge Device CCD236

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the mapping of spectral response of an e2v technologies Swept Charge Device (SCD) CCD236 pre and post irradiation with a 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence of 5.0 × 108 protons cm−2. The CCD236 is a large area (4.4 cm2) X-ray detector which will be used in India's Chandrayaan-2 Large Soft X-ray Spectrometer (CLASS) and China's Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT). To enable the suppression of surface dark current, clocking is performed continuously resulting in a linear readout. As such the flat field illumination used to measure any change in spectral response over a conventional Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) is not possible. An alternative masking technique has been used to expose pinpoint regions of the device to Mn-Kα and Mn-Kβ X-rays, enabling a local map of spectral response to be built up over the device. This novel approach allows for an estimation of the Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI) of the device to be made by allowing the creation of a CTI scatter plot similar to that typically observed in conventional CCDs

  4. A Charge-Conjugation-Invariance Constrained Pomeron-Quark Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Lon-chang

    2005-01-01

    The commonly used $\\gamma_{\\mu}} Pomeron-quark coupling changes its sign under charge conjugation, in contradiction to the property of Pomeron. I show that the Pomeron-quark coupling is tensorial and is invariant under the charge conjugation.

  5. New permanent magnet couplings for screwing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quellec, L.; Lemarquand, V.; Lemarquand, G.

    1998-06-01

    The use of permanent magnet coaxial synchronous couplings in screwing devices allows one to adjust the screwing torque very precisely, but the symmetrical behavior of classical systems always leads to a partial unscrewing. This article shows that the dissymmetry of this behavior can be enhanced only by the modification of the shape of the magnets stuck on the rotors. The consideration of some basic geometrical parameters (number and length of poles) and the application of rules to reach the dissymmetry lead to improved couplings for screwing devices.

  6. Fabrication and electrical characteristics of graphene-based charge-trap memory devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Se J. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung M.; Song, Emil B.; Wang, Kang L. [University of California Los Angeles, CA (United States); Seo, David H. [Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Sun A. [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Graphene-based non-volatile charge-trap memory devices were fabricated and characterized to investigate the implementation effect of both 2-dimensional graphene and the 3-dimensional memory structure. The single-layer-graphene (SLG) channel devices exhibit larger memory windows compared to the multi-layer-graphene (MLG) channel devices. This originates from the gate-coupling strength being larger in SLG devices than in MLG devices. Namely, the electrostatic charge screening effect becomes enhanced upon increasing the number of graphene layers; therefore, the gate tunability is reduced in MLG compared to SLG. The results suggest that SLG is more desirable for memory applications than MLG.

  7. Fully Depleted Charge-Coupled Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed fully depleted, back-illuminated CCDs that build upon earlier research and development efforts directed towards technology development of silicon-strip detectors used in high-energy-physics experiments. The CCDs are fabricated on the same type of high-resistivity, float-zone-refined silicon that is used for strip detectors. The use of high-resistivity substrates allows for thick depletion regions, on the order of 200-300 um, with corresponding high detection efficiency for near-infrared and soft x-ray photons. We compare the fully depleted CCD to the p-i-n diode upon which it is based, and describe the use of fully depleted CCDs in astronomical and x-ray imaging applications

  8. Controllable spin-charge transport in strained graphene nanoribbon devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diniz, Ginetom S., E-mail: ginetom@gmail.com; Guassi, Marcos R. [Institute of Physics, University of Brasília, 70919-970, Brasília-DF (Brazil); Qu, Fanyao [Institute of Physics, University of Brasília, 70919-970, Brasília-DF (Brazil); Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    We theoretically investigate the spin-charge transport in two-terminal device of graphene nanoribbons in the presence of a uniform uniaxial strain, spin-orbit coupling, exchange field, and smooth staggered potential. We show that the direction of applied strain can efficiently tune strain-strength induced oscillation of band-gap of armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR). It is also found that electronic conductance in both AGNR and zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) oscillates with Rashba spin-orbit coupling akin to the Datta-Das field effect transistor. Two distinct strain response regimes of electronic conductance as function of spin-orbit couplings magnitude are found. In the regime of small strain, conductance of ZGNR presents stronger strain dependence along the longitudinal direction of strain. Whereas for high values of strain shows larger effect for the transversal direction. Furthermore, the local density of states shows that depending on the smoothness of the staggered potential, the edge states of AGNR can either emerge or be suppressed. These emerging states can be determined experimentally by either spatially scanning tunneling microscope or by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Our findings open up new paradigms of manipulation and control of strained graphene based nanostructure for application on novel topological quantum devices.

  9. Measuring Charge Carrier Diffusion in Coupled Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Zhitomirsky, David

    2013-06-25

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are attractive materials for inexpensive, room-temperature-, and solution-processed optoelectronic devices. A high carrier diffusion length is desirable for many CQD device applications. In this work we develop two new experimental methods to investigate charge carrier diffusion in coupled CQD solids under charge-neutral, i.e., undepleted, conditions. The methods take advantage of the quantum-size-effect tunability of our materials, utilizing a smaller-bandgap population of quantum dots as a reporter system. We develop analytical models of diffusion in 1D and 3D structures that allow direct extraction of diffusion length from convenient parametric plots and purely optical measurements. We measure several CQD solids fabricated using a number of distinct methods and having significantly different doping and surface ligand treatments. We find that CQD materials recently reported to achieve a certified power conversion efficiency of 7% with hybrid organic-inorganic passivation have a diffusion length of 80 ± 10 nm. The model further allows us to extract the lifetime, trap density, mobility, and diffusion coefficient independently in each material system. This work will facilitate further progress in extending the diffusion length, ultimately leading to high-quality CQD solid semiconducting materials and improved CQD optoelectronic devices, including CQD solar cells. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. Mobile stand for testing charging machine ram devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equipment described is designed to functional testing of the charging machine (CM) end, in laboratory or NPP conditions, over the span of maintenance activities. It appears to be a portable panel that can be easily coupled to the regulation and control elements of the ram driving systems. Such an equipment occurred as necessary following the analyses of the results and technical problems issued from the technical assistance services which INR Pitesti performed for Cernavoda NPP in the period 1996-1999. The experience acquired from these works resulted in a new design and execution of the CM ram devices the characteristics of which are indicated. The equipment was certified and is now successfully utilized at INR Pitesti and Cernavoda NPP Unit 1. The mobile stand will be used in the near future for testing operations of the CM ends number 4 and 5 destined to Cernavoda NPP Unit 2, planned for year 2002

  11. Coupled Thermoelectric Devices: Theory and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaziel A. Rojas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address theoretically and experimentally the optimization problem of the heat transfer occurring in two coupled thermoelectric devices. A simple experimental set up is used. The optimization parameters are the applied electric currents. When one thermoelectric is analysed, the temperature difference Δ T between the thermoelectric boundaries shows a parabolic profile with respect to the applied electric current. This behaviour agrees qualitatively with the corresponding experimental measurement. The global entropy generation shows a monotonous increase with the electric current. In the case of two coupled thermoelectric devices, elliptic isocontours for Δ T are obtained in applying an electric current through each of the thermoelectrics. The isocontours also fit well with measurements. Optimal figure of merit is found for a specific set of values of the applied electric currents. The entropy generation-thermal figure of merit relationship is studied. It is shown that, given a value of the thermal figure of merit, the device can be operated in a state of minimum entropy production.

  12. Dust charge measurement in a strongly coupled dusty plasma produced by an rf discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electric charge on silica microparticles (5 µm in diameter) levitating in the sheath of an rf discharge plasma is determined in a newly installed device for dusty plasma experiments at the IASST. The sheath potential profile is measured using an emissive probe and the electric field is obtained in order to determine the dust charge. The measured dust charge in the pressure range 0.50–5.0 Pa using the electric field value at the levitation height is found to be of the order of 104 elementary charges. Dust charge is also examined using the vertical resonance method which gives a similar order of charges. The experimentally measured charge is compared with the estimated values based on the orbital motion limited charging model. The coupling strength between the particles forming a 2D plasma crystal lattice is estimated using the measured dust charge. (paper)

  13. Charge Transport in DNA-Based Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Porath, Danny; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Di Felice, Rosa

    2004-01-01

    Charge migration along DNA molecules has attracted scientific interest for over half a century. Reports on possible high rates of charge transfer between donor and acceptor through the DNA, obtained in the last decade from solution chemistry experiments on large numbers of molecules, triggered a series of direct electrical transport measurements through DNA single molecules, bundles and networks. These measurements are reviewed and presented here. From these experiments we conclude that elect...

  14. Charge transport in DNA-based devices

    OpenAIRE

    Porath, Danny; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Felice, Rosa di

    2004-01-01

    Charge migration along DNA molecules attracted scientific interest for over half a century. Reports on possible high rates of charge transfer between donor and acceptor through the DNA, obtained in the last decade from solution chemistry experiments on large numbers of molecules, triggered a series of direct electrical transport measurements through DNA single molecules, bundles and networks. These measurements are reviewed and presented here. From these experiments we conclude that electrica...

  15. Non-coupled charge explosion and geo-mechanical dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Fengjun; Li Xiaojun; Zhou Li; Zheng Lei

    2012-01-01

    The non-coupled charge explosion and geo-mechanical dynamics problem in real air condition is studied in this paper. It analyzes and calculates the problem by using the real air state equations. Through researching on the non- coupled charge rock bench blasting with big clearance of air, its result indicates that the borehole wall reflection over- pressure is far higher than strength of rock, but much lower than detonation front pressure of the charge. So non-coupled charge explosion blasting engineering is very successful. Furthermore, it introduces the method of shaft forming by blas- ting once and the new tube room technology. And the non-coupled charge explosion is used successfully in the method of shaft forming by blasting once. As it drills and blasts in the top and removes the broken rock from the bottom tunnel, it increases the construction efficiency significantly. This paper has important reference on the improvement of the large- span underground engineering construction.

  16. Characterization of superconducting devices spanning the charging to Josephson regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge states in mesoscopic Josephson devices are considered promising candidates for a solid-state implementation of quantum computing. We studied three superconducting single electron transistors (SSETs) fabricated with small Al/AlOx/Al tunnel junctions, which, with a different choice of the construction parameters, can realize both the quantum bit and the readout system for the qubit charge state. We varied the junction capacitance and barrier transparency, making the Josephson energy EJ of the device smaller, comparable and larger than the charging energy EC: the first case is suitable to build the qubit, while the latter can be suitable for the qubit readout. (author)

  17. The detection of soft X-rays with charged coupled detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of an ideal soft X-ray imaging detector are enumerated. Of recent technical developments the CCD or charge coupled device goes furthest to meeting these requirements. Several properties of CCDs are described with reference to experimental work and their application to practical instruments is reviewed

  18. Quantum superposition of charge states on capacitively coupled superconducting islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heij, C.P.; Dixon, D.C.; Wal, C.H. van der; Hadley, P.; Mooij, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the ground state properties of a system containing two superconducting islands coupled capacitively by a wire. The ground state is a macroscopic superposition of charge states, even though the islands cannot exchange charge carriers. The ground state of the system is probed by measuri

  19. Quantum superposition of charge states on capacitively coupled superconducting islands

    OpenAIRE

    Heij, C. P.; Dixon, D C; van der Wal, C H; Hadley, P.; Mooij, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the ground state properties of a system containing two superconducting islands coupled capacitively by a wire. The ground state is a macroscopic superposition of charge states, even though the islands cannot exchange charge carriers. The ground state of the system is probed by measuring the switching current of a Bloch transistor containing one of the islands. Calculations based on superpositions of charge states on both islands show good agreement with the experiments. The abi...

  20. Multiplexed charge-locking device for large arrays of quantum devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method of forming and controlling large arrays of gate-defined quantum devices. The method uses an on-chip, multiplexed charge-locking system and helps to overcome the restraints imposed by the number of wires available in cryostat measurement systems. The device architecture that we describe here utilises a multiplexer-type scheme to lock charge onto gate electrodes. The design allows access to and control of gates whose total number exceeds that of the available electrical contacts and enables the formation, modulation and measurement of large arrays of quantum devices. We fabricate such devices on n-type GaAs/AlGaAs substrates and investigate the stability of the charge locked on to the gates. Proof-of-concept is shown by measurement of the Coulomb blockade peaks of a single quantum dot formed by a floating gate in the device. The floating gate is seen to drift by approximately one Coulomb oscillation per hour

  1. Multiplexed charge-locking device for large arrays of quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puddy, R. K., E-mail: rkp27@cam.ac.uk; Smith, L. W; Chong, C. H.; Farrer, I.; Griffiths, J. P.; Ritchie, D. A.; Smith, C. G. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Al-Taie, H.; Kelly, M. J. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Centre for Advanced Photonics and Electronics, Electrical Engineering Division, Department of Engineering, 9 J. J. Thomson Avenue, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Pepper, M. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    We present a method of forming and controlling large arrays of gate-defined quantum devices. The method uses an on-chip, multiplexed charge-locking system and helps to overcome the restraints imposed by the number of wires available in cryostat measurement systems. The device architecture that we describe here utilises a multiplexer-type scheme to lock charge onto gate electrodes. The design allows access to and control of gates whose total number exceeds that of the available electrical contacts and enables the formation, modulation and measurement of large arrays of quantum devices. We fabricate such devices on n-type GaAs/AlGaAs substrates and investigate the stability of the charge locked on to the gates. Proof-of-concept is shown by measurement of the Coulomb blockade peaks of a single quantum dot formed by a floating gate in the device. The floating gate is seen to drift by approximately one Coulomb oscillation per hour.

  2. Magnetization States of All-Oxide Spin Valves Controlled by Charge-orbital Ordering of Coupled Ferromagnets

    OpenAIRE

    SHVETS, IGOR

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED Charge-orbital ordering is commonly present in complex transition metal oxides and offers interesting opportunities for novel electronic devices. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time that the magnetization states of the spin valve can be directly manipulated by charge-orbital ordering. We investigate the interlayer exchange coupling (IEC) between two epitaxial magnetite layers separated by a nonmagnetic epitaxial MgO dielectric. We find that the state of the charge-orb...

  3. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: Charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2013-07-01

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D6h Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D2 eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D1, D2 (N+-Phenyl, N-Phenyl+). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled nuclear motion, one observes an

  4. Organization of synchronized storage at a matrix charge-coupled photodetector in modulation spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To increase fast response of detection and primary data processing in the systems of radioactivity detection on the basis of optical-digital spectrometer it is suggested to use photodetectors with matrix charged-coupled devices (MCCD). MCCD permit to expand the system potentialities at the expense of utilization of second spatial coordinate for conducting analogous optical and electronic processing. Possibility of organization of the modulated signal synchronous accumulation in a charge form is shown. Experimental investigation results allow one to make a conclusion on possibility of signal modulation frequency increase in a modulation spectrometer by one-two orders without any equipment modification of the computer input channel

  5. Superconducting charge-phase qubit networks with controllable couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We investigate two cases of Josephson junctions (JJ) networks forming systems of coupled charge-phase qubits (CPQ). The CPQ consists of a Single Cooper pair Transistor (SCT) in a superconducting loop and is controlled by charge and flux gates, positioning the qubit in a 2-dimensional energy landscape for the | 0 > and | 1 > states, determining the qubit excitation energy and the coupling to the environment. The CPQs are coupled via two types of oscillator coupling elements. In the first case, we investigate and develop a proposal for a switchable nearest-neighbour coupling in a chain of connected CPQs with a current-biased coupling JJ oscillator in the common leg. The switchable coupling allows independent control of the interaction of every qubit pair. In the second case we consider CPQs connected to a common tunable microwave cavity oscillator. In this case the coupling is achieved by tuning of qubits and/or the oscillator bus, allowing coupling of distant qubits without swapping. Both approaches allow scalability and the possibility to perform universal sets of quantum gates. Josephson networks may be employed also in certain quantum communication protocols. This may be especially important whenever information has to be swapped between distant parts of the same Josephson quantum computer. As examples of quantum communication protocols, using the two types of CPQ networks we examine the implementation of teleportation of a quantum state and quantum cloning. A very important test of the performance of solid state qubit circuits is to experimentally test Bell's inequalities in a solid state environment. For the multi-qubit JJ networks discussed above we will present designs and gate sequences to generate Bell and GHZ states, to test Bell's inequalities and to generate multi-qubit entangled states. (author)

  6. Electro-optic device with gap-coupled electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deri, Robert J.; Rhodes, Mark A.; Bayramian, Andrew J.; Caird, John A.; Henesian, Mark A.; Ebbers, Christopher A.

    2013-08-20

    An electro-optic device includes an electro-optic crystal having a predetermined thickness, a first face and a second face. The electro-optic device also includes a first electrode substrate disposed opposing the first face. The first electrode substrate includes a first substrate material having a first thickness and a first electrode coating coupled to the first substrate material. The electro-optic device further includes a second electrode substrate disposed opposing the second face. The second electrode substrate includes a second substrate material having a second thickness and a second electrode coating coupled to the second substrate material. The electro-optic device additionally includes a voltage source electrically coupled to the first electrode coating and the second electrode coating.

  7. Mode-selective vibrational modulation of charge transport in organic electronic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Bakulin, Artem A.

    2015-08-06

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular, nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to influence charge transport in organic electronic devices by exciting molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such approach has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be modulated by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1,500–1,700 cm−1 region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. This presents a new tool for studying electron–phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials.

  8. Integrated FET and charge reset device for gamma spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a specially designed and processed five-terminal device incorporating a low noise field effect transistor and an integrated charge restoration mechanism used with an HPGe coaxial detector to produce a high rate, high resolution gamma spectrometer. A controlled charge pulse is injected into the FET channel and then collected by the gate to discharge the feedback capacitor and reset the amplifier. The reset time is fast and the high resolution is maintained at energy rate products in excess of 1011 eV/s. The FET input capacitance is 8 pF and the noise voltage is 0.45 nV/sq. root Hz at optimum temperature, When it is used with a 22 pF HPGe n-type coaxial detector the total pulser noise is 420 eV at 12 μs amplifier peaking time

  9. Spin-coupled charge dynamics in layered manganite crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Tokura, Y; Ishikawa, T

    1998-01-01

    Anisotropic charge dynamics has been investigated for single crystals of layered manganites, La sub 2 sub - sub 2 sub x Sr sub 1 sub + sub 2 sub x Mn sub 2 O sub 7 (0.3<=X<=0.5). Remarkable variations in the magnetic structure and in the charge-transport properties are observed by changing the doping level x . A crystal with x = 0.3 behaves like a 2-dimensional ferromagnetic metal in the temperature region between approx 90 K and approx 270 K and shows an interplane tunneling magnetoresistance at lower temperatures which is sensitive to the interplane magnetic coupling between the adjacent MnO sub 2 bilayers. Optical probing of these layered manganites has also clarified the highly anisotropic and incoherent charge dynamics.

  10. Ab initio analysis of electron-phonon coupling in molecular devices

    OpenAIRE

    Sergueev, N.; Roubtsov, D.; Guo, Hong

    2005-01-01

    We report first principles analysis of electron-phonon coupling in molecular devices under external bias voltage and during current flow. Our theory and computational framework are based carrying out density functional theory within the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. We analyze which molecular vibrational modes are most relevant to charge transport under nonequilibrium conditions. For a molecular tunnel junction of a 1,4-benzenedithiolate molecule contacted by two leads, t...

  11. Charge transport models for reliability engineering of semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simulation of semiconductor devices is important for the assessment of device lifetimes before production. In this context, this work investigates the influence of the charge carrier transport model on the accuracy of bias temperature instability and hot-carrier degradation models in MOS devices. For this purpose, a four-state defect model based on a non-radiative multi phonon (NMP) theory is implemented to study the bias temperature instability. However, the doping concentrations typically used in nano-scale devices correspond to only a small number of dopants in the channel, leading to fluctuations of the electrostatic potential. Thus, the granularity of the doping cannot be ignored in these devices. To study the bias temperature instability in the presence of fluctuations of the electrostatic potential, the advanced drift diffusion device simulator Minimos-NT is employed. In a first effort to understand the bias temperature instability in p-channel MOSFETs at elevated temperatures, data from direct-current-current-voltage measurements is successfully reproduced using a four-state defect model. Differences between the four-state defect model and the commonly employed trapping model from Shockley, Read and Hall (SRH) have been investigated showing that the SRH model is incapable of reproducing the measurement data. This is in good agreement with the literature, where it has been extensively shown that a model based on SRH theory cannot reproduce the characteristic time constants found in BTI recovery traces. Upon inspection of recorded recovery traces after bias temperature stress in n-channel MOSFETs it is found that the gate current is strongly correlated with the drain current (recovery trace). Using a random discrete dopant model and non-equilibrium greens functions it is shown that direct tunnelling cannot explain the magnitude of the gate current reduction. Instead it is found that trap-assisted tunnelling, modelled using NMP theory, is the cause of this

  12. Luminescent coupling in planar opto-electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, Matthew, E-mail: mwilkins@eecs.uottawa.ca; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Gabr, Ahmed M.; Hinzer, Karin [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Ottawa, 25 Templeton St., Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Masson, Denis; Fafard, Simon [Azastra Opto, Inc., Suite M50-IPF-206, 1200 Montreal Rd, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2015-10-14

    Effects of luminescent coupling are observed in monolithic 5 V, five-junction GaAs phototransducers. Power conversion efficiency was measured at 61.6% ± 3% under the continuous, monochromatic illumination for which they were designed. Modeling shows that photon recycling can account for up to 350 mV of photovoltage in these devices. Drift-diffusion based simulations including a luminescent coupling term in the continuity equation show a broadening of the internal quantum efficiency curve which agrees well with experimental measurements. Luminescent coupling is shown to expand the spectral bandwidth of the phototransducer by a factor of at least 3.5 for devices with three or more junctions, even in cases where multiple absorption/emission events are required to transfer excess carriers into the limiting junction. We present a detailed description of the novel luminescent coupling modeling technique used to predict these performance enhancements.

  13. Luminescent coupling in planar opto-electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Matthew; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Gabr, Ahmed M.; Masson, Denis; Fafard, Simon; Hinzer, Karin

    2015-10-01

    Effects of luminescent coupling are observed in monolithic 5 V, five-junction GaAs phototransducers. Power conversion efficiency was measured at 61.6% ± 3% under the continuous, monochromatic illumination for which they were designed. Modeling shows that photon recycling can account for up to 350 mV of photovoltage in these devices. Drift-diffusion based simulations including a luminescent coupling term in the continuity equation show a broadening of the internal quantum efficiency curve which agrees well with experimental measurements. Luminescent coupling is shown to expand the spectral bandwidth of the phototransducer by a factor of at least 3.5 for devices with three or more junctions, even in cases where multiple absorption/emission events are required to transfer excess carriers into the limiting junction. We present a detailed description of the novel luminescent coupling modeling technique used to predict these performance enhancements.

  14. Interfacial Charge Induced Magnetoelectric Coupling at BiFeO₃/BaTiO₃ Bilayer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rekha; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Kotnala, R K

    2015-04-29

    Bilayer thin films of BiFeO3-BaTiO3 at different thicknesses of BiFeO3 were prepared by RF-magnetron sputtering technique. A pure phase polycrystalline growth of thin films was confirmed from XRD results. Significantly improved ferroelectric polarization (2Pr ∼ 30 μC/cm(2)) and magnetic moment (Ms ∼ 33 emu/cc) were observed at room temperature. Effect of ferroelectric polarization on current conduction across the interface has been explored. Accumulation and depletion of charges at the bilayer interface were analyzed by current-voltage measurements which were further confirmed from hysteretic dynamic resistance and capacitance voltage profiles. Magnetoelectric coupling due to induced charges at grain boundaries of bilayer interface was further investigated by room temperature magnetocapacitance analysis. A room temperature magnetocapacitance was found to originate from induced charge at the bilayer interface which can be manipulated by varying the thickness of BFO to obtain higher ME coupling coefficient. Dynamic magnetoelectric coupling was investigated, and maximum longitudinal magnetoelectric coupling was observed to be 61 mV/cm·Oe at 50 nm thickness of BiFeO3. The observed magnetoelectric properties are potentially useful for novel room temperature magnetoelectric and spintronic device applications. PMID:25856737

  15. Dynamical Couplings and Charge Confinement/Deconfinement from Gravity Coupled to Nonlinear Gauge Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    We briefly outline several main results concerning various new physically relevant features found in gravity -- both ordinary Einstein or $f(R)=R+R^2$ gravity in the first-order formalism, coupled to a special kind of nonlinear electrodynamics containing a square-root of the standard Maxwell Lagrangian and known to produce charge confinement in flat spacetime.

  16. Neutrino-Electron Scattering: Charge Radius and Effective Couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the neutral-current scattering cross-section for neutrinos on electrons is calculated assuming that a massive Dirac neutrino is characterized by a phenomenological parameters, a charge radius (r2) and the right-handed currents are present in the framework of a Left-Right symmetric model (LR). Using the CHARM II result for the charge radius of the muon-neutrino |(r2)| < 6.0 × 10−33 cm2, we place a bound on −7.9 × 10−33 cm2 ≤ (r2)LR ≤ 7.9 × 10−33 cm2. We discuss the relationship between the electron neutral couplings gveV and gveA and the LR model parameters

  17. Transverse Mode Coupling Instability with chromaticity and space charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbekov, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-10-29

    Transverse mode coupling instability is considered in the paper at different bunch and wake shapes. Exact solution for “hollow” bunch is arrived at and used to develop a proper technique for more realistic distributions. The three-modes approach is proposed for arbitrary bunch with chromaticity included. It is shown that the TMCI threshold and rate depend only slightly on the bunch model used being rather sensitive to the wake shape. Resistive wall wake is considered in detail, and a comparison of the TMCI and collective mode instability with this wake is performed. Space charge tune shift of arbitrary value is included in the consideration providing a firm bridge between the known cases of absent and dominating space charge

  18. Charged current top quark couplings at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The top quark plays an important role in current particle physics, from a theoretical point of view because of its uniquely large mass, but also experimentally because of the large number of top events recorded by the LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS, which makes it possible to directly measure the properties of this particle, for example its couplings to the other particles of the standard model (SM), with previously unknown precision. In this thesis, an effective field theory approach is employed to introduce a minimal and consistent parametrization of all anomalous top couplings to the SM gauge bosons and fermions which are compatible with the SM symmetries. In addition, several aspects and consequences of the underlying effective operator relations for these couplings are discussed. The resulting set of couplings has been implemented in the parton level Monte Carlo event generator WHIZARD in order to provide a tool for the quantitative assessment of the phenomenological implications at present and future colliders such as the LHC or a planned international linear collider. The phenomenological part of this thesis is focused on the charged current couplings of the top quark, namely anomalous contributions to the trilinear tbW coupling as well as quartic four-fermion contact interactions of the form tbff', both affecting single top production as well as top decays at the LHC. The study includes various aspects of inclusive cross section measurements as well as differential distributions of single tops produced in the t channel, bq → tq', and in the s channel, u anti d→t anti b. We discuss the parton level modelling of these processes as well as detector effects, and finally present the prospected LHC reach for setting limits on these couplings with 10 resp. 100 fb-1 of data recorded at √(s)=14 TeV.

  19. Charged current top quark couplings at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, Fabian

    2013-07-01

    The top quark plays an important role in current particle physics, from a theoretical point of view because of its uniquely large mass, but also experimentally because of the large number of top events recorded by the LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS, which makes it possible to directly measure the properties of this particle, for example its couplings to the other particles of the standard model (SM), with previously unknown precision. In this thesis, an effective field theory approach is employed to introduce a minimal and consistent parametrization of all anomalous top couplings to the SM gauge bosons and fermions which are compatible with the SM symmetries. In addition, several aspects and consequences of the underlying effective operator relations for these couplings are discussed. The resulting set of couplings has been implemented in the parton level Monte Carlo event generator WHIZARD in order to provide a tool for the quantitative assessment of the phenomenological implications at present and future colliders such as the LHC or a planned international linear collider. The phenomenological part of this thesis is focused on the charged current couplings of the top quark, namely anomalous contributions to the trilinear tbW coupling as well as quartic four-fermion contact interactions of the form tbff', both affecting single top production as well as top decays at the LHC. The study includes various aspects of inclusive cross section measurements as well as differential distributions of single tops produced in the t channel, bq {yields} tq', and in the s channel, u anti d{yields}t anti b. We discuss the parton level modelling of these processes as well as detector effects, and finally present the prospected LHC reach for setting limits on these couplings with 10 resp. 100 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at {radical}(s)=14 TeV.

  20. Coupling strength effect on shot noise in boron devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shot noise properties in boron devices are investigated with a tight-binding model and the non-equilibrium Green's function. It is found that the shot noise and Fano factors can be tuned by changing the structures, the size, and the coupling strength. The shot noise is suppressed momentarily as we switch on the bias voltage, and the electron correlation is significant. The Fano factors are more sensitive to the ribbon width than to the ribbon length in the full coupling context. In the weak-coupling context, the Fano factors are almost invariant with the increase of length and width over a wide bias range

  1. Simulating charge transport to understand the spectral response of Swept Charge Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Athiray, P S; Narendranath, S; Gow, J P D

    2015-01-01

    Swept Charge Devices (SCD) are novel X-ray detectors optimized for improved spectral performance without any demand for active cooling. The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) experiment onboard the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft used an array of SCDs to map the global surface elemental abundances on the Moon using the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. The successful demonstration of SCDs in C1XS spurred an enhanced version of the spectrometer on Chandrayaan-2 using the next-generation SCD sensors. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate validation of a physical model developed to simulate X-ray photon interaction and charge transportation in a SCD. The model helps to understand and identify the origin of individual components that collectively contribute to the energy-dependent spectral response of the SCD. Furthermore, the model provides completeness to various calibration tasks, such as generating spectral response matrices (RMFs - redistribution matrix files), estimating efficiency, optimizing event...

  2. Quantum Dot Device Design Optimization for Resonator Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Cameron; Coppersmith, S. N.; Friesen, Mark

    Coupling a semiconductor quantum dot qubit to a superconducting resonator broadens the possibilities for interqubit communication and potentially allows integration of quantum dots with other qubit systems. The major technological hurdle that must be overcome is reaching the strong coupling limit, where the coupling frequency between the resonator and the qubit is larger than both the qubit decoherence rate and the photon loss rate of the resonator. In this work, we examine optimization of the quantum dot device design. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in conjunction with a metallic dot capacitive model, we focus on improving the capacitive coupling between a resonator gate and a quantum dot while decreasing the cross-coupling to nearby dots. Through these simulations, we find that the optimization follows an intuitive geometric relation. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607), NSF (PHY-1104660), and ONR (N00014-15-1-0029).

  3. Field enhanced charge carrier reconfiguration in electronic and ionic coupled dynamic polymer resistive memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic resistive memory devices based on a conjugated polymer composite (PPy0DBS-Li+ (PPy: polypyrrole; DBS-: dodecylbenzenesulfonate)), with field-driven ion migration, have been demonstrated. In this work the dynamics of these systems has been investigated and it has been concluded that increasing the applied field can dramatically increase the rate at which information can be 'written' into these devices. A conductance model using space charge limited current coupled with an electric field induced ion reconfiguration has been successfully utilized to interpret the experimentally observed transient conducting behaviors. The memory devices use the rising and falling transient current states for the storage of digital states. The magnitude of these transient currents is controlled by the magnitude and width of the write/read pulse. For the 500 nm length devices used in this work an increase in 'write' potential from 2.5 to 5.5 V decreased the time required to create a transient conductance state that can be converted into the digital signal by 50 times. This work suggests that the scaling of these devices will be favorable and that 'write' times for the conjugated polymer composite memory devices will decrease rapidly as ion driving fields increase with decreasing device size.

  4. Quantification of strain and charge co-mediated magnetoelectric coupling on ultra-thin Permalloy/PMN-PT interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Tianxiang; Zhou, Ziyao; Liu, Ming; Yang, Xi; Gao, Yuan; Assaf, Badih A; Lin, Hwaider; Velu, Siddharth; Wang, Xinjun; Luo, Haosu; Chen, Jimmy; Akhtar, Saad; Hu, Edward; Rajiv, Rohit; Krishnan, Kavin; Sreedhar, Shalini; Heiman, Don; Howe, Brandon M; Brown, Gail J; Sun, Nian X

    2014-01-01

    Strain and charge co-mediated magnetoelectric coupling are expected in ultra-thin ferromagnetic/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, which could lead to significantly enhanced magnetoelectric coupling. It is however challenging to observe the combined strain charge mediated magnetoelectric coupling, and difficult in quantitatively distinguish these two magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms. We demonstrated in this work, the quantification of the coexistence of strain and surface charge mediated magnetoelectric coupling on ultra-thin Ni0.79Fe0.21/PMN-PT interface by using a Ni0.79Fe0.21/Cu/PMN-PT heterostructure with only strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling as a control. The NiFe/PMN-PT heterostructure exhibited a high voltage induced effective magnetic field change of 375 Oe enhanced by the surface charge at the PMN-PT interface. Without the enhancement of the charge-mediated magnetoelectric effect by inserting a Cu layer at the PMN-PT interface, the electric field modification of effective magnetic field was 202 Oe. By distinguishing the magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms, a pure surface charge modification of magnetism shows a strong correlation to polarization of PMN-PT. A non-volatile effective magnetic field change of 104 Oe was observed at zero electric field originates from the different remnant polarization state of PMN-PT. The strain and charge co-mediated magnetoelectric coupling in ultra-thin magnetic/ferroelectric heterostructures could lead to power efficient and non-volatile magnetoelectric devices with enhanced magnetoelectric coupling. PMID:24418911

  5. Tuning The Optical, Charge Injection, and Charge Transport Properties of Organic Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalar, Peter

    Since the early 1900's, synthetic insulating polymers (plastics) have slowly taken over the role that traditional materials like wood or metal have had as basic components for construction, manufactured goods, and parts. Plastics allow for high throughput, low temperature processing, and control of bulk properties through molecular modifications. In the same way, pi-conjugated organic molecules are emerging as a possible substitute for inorganic materials due to their electronic properties. The semiconductive nature of pi-conjugated materials make them an attractive candidate to replace inorganic materials, primarily due to their promise for low cost and large-scale production of basic semiconducting devices such as light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and field-effect transistors. Before organic semiconductors can be realized as a commercial product, several hurdles must be cleared. The purpose of this dissertation is to address three distinct properties that dominate the functionality of devices harnessing these materials: (1) optical properties, (2) charge injection, and (3) charge transport. First, it is shown that the electron injection barrier in the emissive layer of polymer light-emitting diodes can be significantly reduced by processing of novel conjugated oligoelectrolytes or deoxyribonucleic acid atop the emissive layer. Next, the charge transport properties of several polymers could be modified by processing them from solvents containing small amounts of additives or by using regioregular and enantiopure chemical structures. It is then demonstrated that the optical and electronic properties of Lewis basic polymer structures can be readily modified by interactions with strongly electron-withdrawing Lewis acids. Through red-shifted absorption, photoluminescence, and electroluminescence, a single pi-conjugated backbone can be polychromatic. In addition, interaction with Lewis acids can remarkably p-dope the hole transport of the parent polymer, leading to a

  6. Half adder capabilities of a coupled quantum dot device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, P.; Hartmann, F.; Neri, I.; Schade, A.; Emmerling, M.; Kamp, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Höfling, S.; Worschech, L.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we demonstrate two realizations of a half adder based on a voltage-rectifying mechanism involving two Coulomb-coupled quantum dots. First, we examine the ranges of operation of the half adder’s individual elements, the AND and XOR gates, for a single rectifying device. It allows a switching between the two gates by a control voltage and thus enables a clocked half adder operation. The logic gates are shown to be reliably operative in a broad noise amplitude range with negligible error probabilities. Subsequently, we study the implementation of the half adder in a combined double-device consisting of two individually tunable rectifiers. We show that this double device allows a simultaneous operation of both relevant gates at once. The presented devices draw their power solely from electronic fluctuations and are therefore an advancement in the field of energy efficient and autonomous electronics.

  7. Simulating charge transport to understand the spectral response of Swept Charge Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athiray, P. S.; Sreekumar, P.; Narendranath, S.; Gow, J. P. D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Swept Charge Devices (SCD) are novel X-ray detectors optimized for improved spectral performance without any demand for active cooling. The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) experiment onboard the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft used an array of SCDs to map the global surface elemental abundances on the Moon using the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. The successful demonstration of SCDs in C1XS spurred an enhanced version of the spectrometer on Chandrayaan-2 using the next-generation SCD sensors. Aims: The objective of this paper is to demonstrate validation of a physical model developed to simulate X-ray photon interaction and charge transportation in a SCD. The model helps to understand and identify the origin of individual components that collectively contribute to the energy-dependent spectral response of the SCD. Furthermore, the model provides completeness to various calibration tasks, such as generating spectral matrices (RMFs - redistribution matrix files), estimating efficiency, optimizing event selection logic, and maximizing event recovery to improve photon-collection efficiency in SCDs. Methods: Charge generation and transportation in the SCD at different layers related to channel stops, field zones, and field-free zones due to photon interaction were computed using standard drift and diffusion equations. Charge collected in the buried channel due to photon interaction in different volumes of the detector was computed by assuming a Gaussian radial profile of the charge cloud. The collected charge was processed further to simulate both diagonal clocking read-out, which is a novel design exclusive for SCDs, and event selection logic to construct the energy spectrum. Results: We compare simulation results of the SCD CCD54 with measurements obtained during the ground calibration of C1XS and clearly demonstrate that our model reproduces all the major spectral features seen in calibration data. We also describe our understanding of interactions at

  8. Quantum efficiency measurements in the swept charge device CCD236

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The e2v technologies plc. CCD236 is a Swept Charge Device (SCD) designed as a large area (20 mm × 20 mm) soft X-ray detector for spectroscopy in the range 0.8 keV to 10 keV. It benefits from improvements in design over the previous generation, the e2v CCD54, such as: a 4 times increased detector area, a reduction in split X-ray events due to the 100 μm × 100 μm 'pixel' size, and improvements to radiation hardness. The CCD236 will be used in India's Chandrayaan-2 Large Soft X-ray Spectrometer (CLASS) instrument and China's Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT). Measurements of the Quantum Efficiency (QE) have been obtained relative to a NIST calibrated photodiode over the energy range 0.2 keV to 1.9 keV, using the BESSY II X-ray synchrotron in Berlin. Two X-ray event counting methods are described and compared, and QE for soft X-ray interaction is reported. Uniformity of QE across the device is also investigated at energies between 0.52 keV and 1.5 keV in different areas of the detector. This work will enable the actual number of photons incident on the detectors to be calculated, thus ensuring that the CCD236 detectors provide valuable scientific data during use. By comparing the QE methods in this paper with the event processing techniques to be used with CLASS, an estimate of the instrument-specific QE for CLASS can be provided

  9. Quasiclassical methods for spin-charge coupled dynamics in low-dimensional systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corini, Cosimo

    2009-06-12

    Spintronics is a new field of study whose broad aim is the manipulation of the spin degrees of freedom in solid state systems. One of its main goals is the realization of devices capable of exploiting, besides the charge, the carriers' - and possibly the nuclei's - spin. The presence of spin-orbit coupling in a system enables the spin and charge degrees of freedom to ''communicate'', a favorable situation if one is to realize such devices. More importantly, it offers the opportunity of doing so by relying solely on electric fields, whereas magnetic fields are otherwise required. Eminent examples of versatile systems with built-in and variously tunable spin-orbit interaction are two-dimensional electron - or hole - gases. The study of spin-charge coupled dynamics in such a context faces a large number of open questions, both of the fundamental and of the more practical type. To tackle the problem we rely on the quasiclassical formalism. This is an approximate quantum-field theoretical formulation with a solid microscopic foundation, perfectly suited for describing phenomena at the mesoscopic scale, and bearing a resemblance to standard Boltzmann theory which makes for physical transparency. Originally born to deal with transport in electron-phonon systems, we first generalize it to the case in which spin-orbit coupling is present, and then move on to apply it to specific situations and phenomena. Among these, to the description of the spin Hall effect and of voltage induced spin polarizations in two-dimensional electron gases under a variety of conditions - stationary or time-dependent, in the presence of magnetic and non-magnetic disorder, in the bulk or in confined geometries -, and to the problem of spin relaxation in narrow wires. (orig.)

  10. Quasiclassical methods for spin-charge coupled dynamics in low-dimensional systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spintronics is a new field of study whose broad aim is the manipulation of the spin degrees of freedom in solid state systems. One of its main goals is the realization of devices capable of exploiting, besides the charge, the carriers' - and possibly the nuclei's - spin. The presence of spin-orbit coupling in a system enables the spin and charge degrees of freedom to ''communicate'', a favorable situation if one is to realize such devices. More importantly, it offers the opportunity of doing so by relying solely on electric fields, whereas magnetic fields are otherwise required. Eminent examples of versatile systems with built-in and variously tunable spin-orbit interaction are two-dimensional electron - or hole - gases. The study of spin-charge coupled dynamics in such a context faces a large number of open questions, both of the fundamental and of the more practical type. To tackle the problem we rely on the quasiclassical formalism. This is an approximate quantum-field theoretical formulation with a solid microscopic foundation, perfectly suited for describing phenomena at the mesoscopic scale, and bearing a resemblance to standard Boltzmann theory which makes for physical transparency. Originally born to deal with transport in electron-phonon systems, we first generalize it to the case in which spin-orbit coupling is present, and then move on to apply it to specific situations and phenomena. Among these, to the description of the spin Hall effect and of voltage induced spin polarizations in two-dimensional electron gases under a variety of conditions - stationary or time-dependent, in the presence of magnetic and non-magnetic disorder, in the bulk or in confined geometries -, and to the problem of spin relaxation in narrow wires. (orig.)

  11. Charge redistribution from anomalous magneto-vorticity coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate novel transport phenomena in a chiral fluid originated from an interplay between a vorticity and strong magnetic field, which induces a redistribution of vector charges in the system and an axial current along the magnetic field. The corresponding transport coefficients are obtained from an energy-shift argument for the chiral fermions in the lowest Landau level (LLL) due to a spin-vorticity coupling and also from diagrammatic computations on the basis of the linear response theory. Based on consistent results from the both methods, we observe that the transport coefficients are proportional to the anomaly coefficient and are independence of temperature and chemical potential. We therefore speculate that these transport phenomena are connected to quantum anomaly.

  12. Ocean Remote Sensing With A Charge Injection Device (CID) Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, S. E.; Buntzen, R. R.

    1984-09-01

    Ocean optical data has been remotely collected using the Advanced Solidstate Array Spectroradiometer (ASAS). ASAS is a multispectral pushbroom scanner with 32 channels extending from 400 to 850 nm. It is built around a 32 by 512 element charge injection device (CID) array with enhanced sensitivity in the blue. Twelve-bit digital output with variable gain and offset in the pre-amp and low system noise give this scanner the ability to pick up low level subsurface upwelling light from the ocean. The scanner was built by General Electric and the NASA Johnson Space Center with optics from TRW under a Naval Ocean Systems Center program for ocean remote sensing. It was first flown with the detector uncooled in September of 1983 at the Naval Coastal Systems Center in Panama City, Florida. Preliminary analysis of the data indicates a signal-to-noise ratio of at least 200 to 1. Subsequent image processing and refinements in the scanner hardware promise to improve this figure significantly. Details of the scanner design, calibration, and noise reduction will be presented. The scan-ner's potential for use in shallow water bottom mapping and chlorophyll determination will be discussed. Fi-nally, projected improvements in the scanner and its performance will be described.

  13. Charge transport and magnetoresistance of G4-DNA molecular device modulated by counter ions and dephasing effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Da-wei; Sun, Meng-le; Zuo, Zheng-wei; Wang, Hui-xian; Lv, Shi-jie; Li, Xin-zhong; Li, Li-ben

    2016-02-01

    The charge transport properties of the G4-DNA molecular device in the presence of counter ions and dephasing effect are investigated based on the Green function method and Landauer-Büttiker theory. The currents through the G4-DNA molecular device depend on the interference patterns at different coupling configurations. There is an effective electrostatic interaction between the counter ions and the G4-DNA molecule which introduces disorder into the on-site energies of G bases. The current through the device can be enhanced by the small disorder which avoids the strong interference of electrons at the same energy in some coupling configurations, however the diagonal disorder can suppress the overall current due to the Anderson localization of charge carriers when the disorder is large. In the presence of dephasing effect the current through the device at all coupling configurations can be enhanced as a result of the phase coherence losing of electron. As for the magnetic field response, the magnetoresistance of the device is always suppressed by the counter ions and dephasing effect.

  14. Conserved Charges of Minimal Massive Gravity Coupled to Scalar Field

    CERN Document Server

    Setare, M R

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the theory of Topologically massive gravity non-minimally coupled to a scalar field has been proposed which comes from Lorentz-Chern-Simons theory \\cite{1}. That theory is a torsion free one. We extend that theory by adding an extra term which makes torsion to be non-zero. The extended theory can be regarded as an extension of Minimal massive gravity such that it is non-minimally coupled to a scalar field. We obtain equations of motion of extended theory such that they are expressed in terms of usual torsion free spin-connection. We show that BTZ spacetime is a solution of this theory when scalar field is constant. We define quasi-local conserved charge by the concept of generalized off-shell ADT current which both are conserved for any asymptotically Killing vector field as well as a Killing vector field which is admitted by spacetime everywhere. Also we find general formula for entropy of stationary black hole solution in the context of considered theory. We apply the obtained formulas on BTZ blac...

  15. Design of Image Processing System Based on Charge Coupled Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Guosheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To speed up the image acquisition and make full use of effective information, a design method of CCD partial image scanning system is presented. The system achieves to functions of the high -speed data collection, the high -speed video data compression the real time video data Network Transmission and the real time compression picture data storage. the data processed was transferred to PC through USB2.0 real-time to reconstruct defects microscopic images. The experimental results demonstrated that defects within 50μm~1000μm were inspected effectively by the CCD scanning defects inspection instrument, that this method has a repetition error no more than 2.24 pixels, with high precision and good anti-noise ability.

  16. Ab initio analysis of electron-phonon coupling in molecular devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergueev, N; Roubtsov, D; Guo, Hong

    2005-09-30

    We report a first principles analysis of electron-phonon coupling in molecular devices under external bias voltage and during current flow. Our theory and computational framework are based on carrying out density functional theory within the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. Using a molecular tunnel junction of a 1,4-benzenedithiolate molecule contacted by two aluminum leads as an example, we analyze which molecular vibrational modes are most relevant to charge transport under nonequilibrium conditions. We find that the low-lying modes are most important. As a function of bias voltage, the electron-phonon coupling strength can change drastically while the vibrational spectrum changes at a few percent level. PMID:16241682

  17. Induction charging device for the MGU NIIYaF electrostatic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operation principle for induction-type charging device set on the MGU NIIYaF electrostatic accelerator is presented. Design of units is described and main parameters of induction charging device (ICD) are given. Comparison of ICD with foreign charging devices of induction-type allows to speak about certain advantages of ICD. Current transfered by ICD transport unit is higher by several times than that of pelletron. ICD transport unit is comparable with laddetron according to value of transfered current. Weight of length unit of ICD transport part is however by 2-3 times less than that of laddetron. 6 refs.; 9 figs

  18. Investigation of Interface Charges at the Heterojunction Discontinuity in HBT Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuente, Jesús Grajal de al; Krozer, Viktor

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the impact of interface charges at heterojunctions on the performance of heterostructure bipolar transistors (HBT). Interface charges can modify the limiting process for the carrier transport in a device. Therefore. intentional interface charges introduced by delta......-doped layers are basic tools for interface engineering. An accurate modelling of heterointerfaces which includes thermionic-field emission, surface charges, and surface dipoles allows to analyse the electrical performance of some modern devices based on band gap and interface engineering. It is demonstrated...

  19. Tight-binding modeling of charge migration in DNA devices

    OpenAIRE

    Cuniberti, G.; Macia, E.; Rodriguez, A.; R.A. Römer

    2007-01-01

    Long range charge transfer experiments in DNA oligomers and the subsequently measured -- and very diverse -- transport response of DNA wires in solid state experiments exemplifies the need for a thorough theoretical understanding of charge migration in DNA-based natural and artificial materials. Here we present a review of tight-binding models for DNA conduction which have the intrinsic merit of containing more structural information than plain rate-equation models while still retaining suffi...

  20. Enhanced charge storage performance in AlTi4Ox/Al2O3 multilayer charge trapping memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Changjie; Ou, Xin; Xu, Bo; Lan, Xuexin; Lei, Yan; Lu, Jianxin; Chen, Yan; Yin, Jiang; Xia, Yidong; Liu, Zhiguo; Li, Aidong; Yan, Feng

    2014-08-01

    The charge-trapping memory devices with the structures p-Si/Al2O3/AlTi4Ox/Al2O3/Pt were fabricated by using atomic layer deposition and RF magnetron sputtering techniques, and a memory window of 6.61 V and a high charge-trapping density of 1.29 × 1013 cm-2 at gate voltage of ±11 V have been obtained. The remarkable charge-trapping effect in the high-k composite oxide layer was ascribed to the electron-occupied defect states formed by the inter-diffusion at the interface of TiO2/Al2O3. An Al2O3 layer intercalated in the charge-trapping layer AlTi4Ox enlarged the memory window to 14.59 V and also improved the data retention property by suppressing the vertical charge migration.

  1. Energy and Charge Transfer from Guest to Host in Doped Organic Electroluminescent Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宏建; 彭景翠; 许雪梅; 瞿述; 罗小华; 赵楚军

    2002-01-01

    The luminescence properties of doped organic electroluminescent devices are explained by means off Hamiltonian model. The results show that there is a corresponding relation between the amount of transferred charge and the change of the energy originating from charge transfer, and the relation can be influenced by dopant concentration.As the amount of transferred charge increases, the total energy decreases and the luminescence intensity increases.Therefore, we deduce that the energy transfer from guest to host may be derived from the charge transfer. For a given organic electroluminescent device, the maximum value of the conductivity can be observed in a specific dopant concentration. The calculated results show that the greater the transferred charges, the higher the conductivities in doped organic electroluminescent devices. The results agree basically with experimental results.

  2. Coupling of transit time instabilities in electrostatic confinement fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of the behavior of transit time instabilities in an electrostatic confinement fusion reactor is presented in this letter. It is demonstrated that different modes are excited within the spherical cathode of a Farnsworth fusor. Each of these modes is dependent on the fusion products as well as the acceleration voltage applied between the two electrodes and they couple to a resulting oscillation showing non-linear beat phenomena. This type of instability is similar to the transit time instability of electrons between two resonant surfaces but the presence of ions and the occurring fusion reactions alter the physics of this instability considerably. The physics of this plasma instability is examined in detail for typical physical parameter ranges of electrostatic confinement fusion devices

  3. Development of Pointing Device Using DC-Coupled Electrooculogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchitomi, Hirotaka; Hori, Junichi

    A purpose of this study is to support communication of developmentally disabled individuals with motor paralysis, such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome, brain-stem infarction, having difficulty in conveying their intention. In the present paper, a pointing device controlled by DC-coupled electrooculograms (EOGs) has been developed. The optic angle of the subject was estimated from the amplitude of vertical and horizontal EOGs for determining the two dimensional pointing position on the PC screen in real time. The eye blinking artifact was reduced using a median filter. The displacement of electrode position was compensated by considering the potential gradient. Moreover, the position error caused by drift phenomenon was adjusted by using head movement. The accuracy and operating speed of the proposed method were evaluated in human experiments.

  4. Stability of longitudinal coupling for Josephson charge qubits

    OpenAIRE

    Hutter, C.; Makhlin, Yu.; Shnirman, A.; Schön, G.

    2007-01-01

    For inductively coupled superconducting quantum bits, we determine the conditions when the coupling commutes with the single-qubit terms. We show that in certain parameter regimes such longitudinal coupling can be stabilized with respect to variations of the circuit parameters. In addition, we analyze its stability against fluctuations of the control fields.

  5. Coupled spin, elastic and charge dynamics in magnetic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamra, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this Thesis, I address the interaction of magnetic degrees of freedom with charge current and elastic dynamics in hybrid systems composed of magnetic and non-magnetic materials. The objective, invariably, is to control and study spin dynamics using charge and elastic degrees of freedom. In certai

  6. Monolithic crystals for PET devices: Optical coupling optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present a method to efficiently collect scintillation light when using monolithic scintillator crystals. The acceptance angle of the scintillation light has been reduced by means of optical devices reducing the border effect which typically affects continuous crystals. We have applied this procedure on gamma detectors for PET systems using both position sensitive PMTs and arrays of SiPMs. In the case of using SiPMs, this approach also helps to reduce the photosensor active area. We evaluated the method using PMTs with a variety of different crystals with thicknesses ranging from 10 to 24 mm. We found that our design allows the use of crystal blocks with a thickness of up to 18 mm without degrading the spatial resolution caused by edge effects and without a significant detriment to the energy resolution. These results were compared with simulated data. The first results of monolithic LYSO crystals coupled to an array of 256 SiPMs by means of individual optical light guides are also presented. -- Highlights: •Acceptance angle reduction decreases border effect in continuous crystals. •Experimental measurements with PMTs correlate well with simulated data. •Optical devices called faceplates serve to control the scintillation light angle. •Simulation on the light propagation for SiPMs requires exhaustive modeling

  7. Gold nanoparticle charge trapping and relation to organic polymer memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prime, D; Paul, S; Josephs-Franks, P W

    2009-10-28

    Nanoparticle-based polymer memory devices (PMDs) are a promising technology that could replace conventional silicon-based electronic memory, offering fast operating speeds, simple device structures and low costs. Here we report on the current state of nanoparticle PMDs and review some of the problems that are still present in the field. We also present new data regarding the charging of gold nanoparticles in metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors, showing that charging is possible under the application of an electric field with a trapped charge density due to the nanoparticles of 3.3 x 10(12) cm(-2). PMID:19770145

  8. Single charge detection in capacitively coupled integrated single electron transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Ishibashi, Koji

    2012-09-01

    Single charge detection is demonstrated in the capacitively coupled integrated single electron transistors (SETs) in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) quantum dots. Two SETs are fabricated based on two different SWCNTs aligned in parallel, by taking advantage of the aligned growth of SWCNTs and subsequent transfer-printed techniques. In order to make both two SETs be capacitively coupled, a metal finger is fabricated on the top of them. The charge sensing is proved by the response of a detector current in one SWCNT-SET when the number of electrons in the other SWCNT-SET is changed by sweeping the corresponding gate voltages. In this integrated device, shifts of Coulomb oscillation peaks due to the single electron event are also observed.

  9. Improved pellet charge exchange measurements in Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pellet charge exchange technique (PCX), which is a combination of the compact neutral particle analyzer and an impurity pellet, is a unique method to observe the radial energetic particle distribution. There are not only charge exchange reactions between the hydrogen in the pellet and a proton, but also between the partially ionized carbon in the pellet and the proton. The neutralization factor from energetic ion to neutral particle could be deduced from the electron temperature and the electron density of the pellet cloud. The radial profiles of energetic particle distribution were measured and compared in various ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICH) plasmas. The energetic particle flux significantly increased at the resonance layer created by the ICH. PCX provides more precise information about the resonance layer than conventional neutral particle diagnostics. (author)

  10. Charge-Transfer CMOS Image Sensors: Device and Radiation Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandra Rao, P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was twofold: investigating the effect of ionizing radiation on 4-T CMOS image sensors and the possibility of realizing a CCD like sensor in standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology (for medical applications). Both the aims are complementary; borrowing and lending many aspects of radiation and device physics amongst each other.

  11. Experimental Studies of Charge Transport in Single Crystal Diamond Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Majdi, Saman

    2012-01-01

    Diamond is a promising material for high-power, high-frequency and high- temperature electronics applications, where its outstanding physical properties can be fully exploited. It exhibits an extremely high bandgap, very high carrier mobilities, high breakdown field strength, and the highest thermal conductivity of any wide bandgap material. It is therefore an outstanding candidate for the fastest switching, the highest power density, and the most efficient electronic devices obtainable, with...

  12. External Cooling Coupled to Reduced Extremity Pressure Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetz, Lawrence H.

    2011-01-01

    Although suited astronauts are currently cooled with a Liquid Cooled Ventilation Garment (LCVG), which can remove up to 85 percent of body heat, their effectiveness is limited because cooling must penetrate layers of skin, muscle, fat, bone, and tissue to reach the bloodstream, where its effect is prominent. Vasoconstriction further reduces the effectiveness by limiting arterial flow when exposed to cold (the frostbite response), resulting in a time constant on the order of 20 minutes from application to maximum effect. This delay can be crucial in severe exposure to hypo- or hyper-thermic conditions, compromising homeostasis. The purpose of this innovation is to provide a lightweight, effective means of delivering heat or cold from an external source directly to the bloodstream. The effectiveness of this ECCREP (External Cooling Coupled to Reduced Extremity Pressure) device is based on not having to penetrate layers of skin, muscle, fat, and tissue, thereby avoiding the thermal lag associated with their mass and heat capacity. This is accomplished by means of an outer boot operating at a slightly reduced pressure than the rest of the body, combined with an inner boot cooled or heated by an external source via water or chemicals. Heat transfer from the external source to the foot takes place by means of circulating water or flexible heat pipes.

  13. Active control of near-field coupling in conductively coupled microelectromechanical system metamaterial devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchappa, Prakash; Manjappa, Manukumara; Ho, Chong Pei; Qian, You; Singh, Ranjan; Singh, Navab; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally report a structurally reconfigurable metamaterial for active switching of near-field coupling in conductively coupled, orthogonally twisted split ring resonators (SRRs) operating in the terahertz spectral region. Out-of-plane reconfigurable microcantilevers integrated into the dark SRR geometry are used to provide active frequency tuning of dark SRR resonance. The geometrical parameters of individual SRRs are designed to have identical inductive-capacitive resonant frequency. This allows for the excitation of classical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) due to the strong conductive coupling between the SRRs. When the microcantilevers are curved up, the resonant frequency of dark SRR blue-shifts and the EIT peak is completely modulated while the SRRs are still conductively connected. EIT modulation contrast of ˜50% is experimentally achieved with actively switchable group delay of ˜2.5 ps. Electrical control, miniaturized size, and readily integrable fabrication process of the proposed structurally reconfigurable metamaterial make it an ideal candidate for the realization of various terahertz communication devices such as electrically controllable terahertz delay lines, buffers, and tunable data-rate channels.

  14. Electronic coupling calculations with transition charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles derived from electrostatic potential fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transition charge, dipole, and quadrupole from electrostatic potential (TrESP-CDQ) method for electronic coupling calculations is proposed. The TrESP method is based on the classical description of electronic Coulomb interaction between transition densities for individual molecules. In the original TrESP method, only the transition charge interactions were considered as the electronic coupling. In the present study, the TrESP method is extended to include the contributions from the transition dipoles and quadrupoles as well as the transition charges. Hence, the self-consistent transition density is employed in the ESP fitting procedure. To check the accuracy of the present approach, several test calculations are performed to a helium dimer, a methane dimer, and an ethylene dimer. As a result, the TrESP-CDQ method gives a much improved description of the electronic coupling, compared with the original TrESP method. The calculated results also show that the self-consistent treatment to the transition densities contributes significantly to the accuracy of the electronic coupling calculations. Based on the successful description of the electronic coupling, the contributions to the electronic coupling are also analyzed. This analysis clearly shows a negligible contribution of the transition charge interaction to the electronic coupling. Hence, the distribution of the transition density is found to strongly influence the magnitudes of the transition charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles. The present approach is useful for analyzing and understanding the mechanism of excitation-energy transfer

  15. Does a coupling capacitor enhance the charge balance during neural stimulation? An empirical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dongen, M.N.; Serdijn, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their DC-blocking characteristic, coupling capacitors are widely used to prevent potentially harmful charge buildup at the electrode–tissue interface. Although the capacitors can be an effective safety measure, it often seems overlooked that coupling capacitors actually introduce an offset vo

  16. Electrosynthesis of Copper-Tetracyanoquinodimethane Based on the Coupling Charge Transfer across Water/1,2-Dichloroethane Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Organic semiconductor CuTCNQ is synthesized through electrochemistry of liquid/liquid interface. • A coupling charge transfer (CCT) mechanism is proposed for organic electrosynthesis. • The obtained CuTCNQ has good electrochemical and electronic properties. - Abstract: The organic salt Copper-Tetracyanoquinodimethane (CuTCNQ) is an important semiconductor used in electronics for field-effect transistors, switches and memory devices. Here we present a novel electrosynthetic method of CuTCNQ microneedles based on the coupling charge transfer across water/1,2-dichloroethane (W/1,2-DCE) interface. A HOPG electrode is covered by a small volume of 1,2-DCE solution, which is further covered by an aqueous solution to construct the W/1,2-DCE interface. When TCNQ in 1,2-DCE phase is reduced on HOPG, Cu2+ in the aqueous solution will transfer across the W/1,2-DCE interface in order to maintain the electric neutrality. Therein CuTCNQ microneedles are formed which have good solid-state electrochemical and electronic properties. This coupling charge transfer mechanism is valuable and broadens the applications of liquid/liquid interface in organic electrosynthesis

  17. Strong-coupling electrostatic theory of polymer counterions close to planar charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sandipan; Jho, Y. S.

    2016-01-01

    Strong-coupling phenomena, such as like-charge macroion attraction, opposite-charged macroion repulsion, charge renormalization, and charge inversion, are known to be mediated by multivalent counterions. Most theories treat the counterions as point charges and describe the system by a single coupling parameter that measures the strength of the Coulomb interactions. In many biological systems, the counterions are highly charged and have finite sizes and can be well-described by polyelectrolytes. The shapes and orientations of these polymer counterions play a major role in the thermodynamics of these systems. In this work we apply a field-theoretic description in the strong-coupling regime to the polymer counterions in the presence of a fixed charge distribution. We work out the special cases of rodlike polymer counterions confined by one, and two charged walls, respectively. The effects of the geometry of the rodlike counterions and the excluded volume of the walls on the density, pressure, and free energy of the rodlike counterions are discussed.

  18. Anomalous Threshold Voltage Variability of Nitride Based Charge Storage Nonvolatile Memory Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Chuan Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional technology scaling is implemented to meet the insatiable demand of high memory density and low cost per bit of charge storage nonvolatile memory (NVM devices. In this study, effect of technology scaling to anomalous threshold voltage ( variability is investigated thoroughly on postcycled and baked nitride based charge storage NVM devices. After long annealing bake of high temperature, cell’s variability of each subsequent bake increases within stable distribution and found exacerbate by technology scaling. Apparent activation energy of this anomalous variability was derived through Arrhenius plots. Apparent activation energy (Eaa of this anomalous variability is 0.67 eV at sub-40 nm devices which is a reduction of approximately 2 times from 110 nm devices. Technology scaling clearly aggravates this anomalous variability, and this poses reliability challenges to applications that demand strict control, for example, reference cells that govern fundamental program, erase, and verify operations of NVM devices. Based on critical evidence, this anomalous variability is attributed to lateral displacement of trapped charges in nitride storage layer. Reliability implications of this study are elucidated. Moreover, potential mitigation methods are proposed to complement technology scaling to prolong the front-runner role of nitride based charge storage NVM in semiconductor flash memory market.

  19. Charge order from orbital-dependent coupling evidenced by NbSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicker, Felix; van Wezel, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Niobium diselenide has long served as a prototype of two-dimensional charge ordering, believed to arise from an instability of the electronic structure analogous to the one-dimensional Peierls mechanism. Despite this, various anomalous properties have recently been identified experimentally, which cannot be explained by Peierls-like weak-coupling theories. Here, we consider instead a model with strong electron-phonon coupling, taking into account both the full momentum and orbital dependence of the coupling matrix elements. We show that both are necessary for a consistent description of the full range of experimental observations. We argue that NbSe2 is typical in this sense, and that any charge-ordered material in more than one dimension will generically be shaped by the momentum and orbital dependence of its electron-phonon coupling as well as its electronic structure. The consequences will be observable in many charge-ordered materials, including cuprate superconductors. PMID:25948390

  20. Radiation detector device for rejecting and excluding incomplete charge collection events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Vernon, Emerson; Yang, Ge; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; Hossain, Anwar; Kim, Ki Hyun; James, Ralph B.

    2016-05-10

    A radiation detector device is provided that is capable of distinguishing between full charge collection (FCC) events and incomplete charge collection (ICC) events based upon a correlation value comparison algorithm that compares correlation values calculated for individually sensed radiation detection events with a calibrated FCC event correlation function. The calibrated FCC event correlation function serves as a reference curve utilized by a correlation value comparison algorithm to determine whether a sensed radiation detection event fits the profile of the FCC event correlation function within the noise tolerances of the radiation detector device. If the radiation detection event is determined to be an ICC event, then the spectrum for the ICC event is rejected and excluded from inclusion in the radiation detector device spectral analyses. The radiation detector device also can calculate a performance factor to determine the efficacy of distinguishing between FCC and ICC events.

  1. Improved blue light-emitting polymeric device by the tuning of drift mobility and charge balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Byung Doo; Suh, Min Chul; Lee, Seong Taek; Chung, Ho Kyoon; Lee, Chang Hee

    2004-03-01

    We have prepared blue polymer-small molecule hybrid electroluminescence devices with improved efficiency and lower driving voltage by the statistical design method. Analysis of time-of-flight measurement shows that amorphous small molecule hole-transporter blended with a blue light-emitting polymer increases the field-dependent hole mobility, with transition from nondispersive to dispersive transport induced by the charge-trapping effect. Moreover, at the electroluminescent devices with different electron injection/transport layer (LiF/Al, LiF/Ca/Al, and Alq3/LiF/Al), efficiency was further increased. We have analyzed that carrier mobility of a multilayered device can also be controlled by the change of electron injection and transport layers. We find that structural design and matching overall charge balance is an essential factor to improve both the operating voltage and efficiency of existing blue polymer devices.

  2. Novel charge pump converter with Tunnel FET devices for ultra-low power energy harvesting sources

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes Cavalheiro, David Manuel; Moll Echeto, Francisco de Borja; Valtchev, Stanimir

    2015-01-01

    Compared to conventional technologies, the superior electrical characteristics of III-V Tunnel FET (TFET) devices can highly improve the process of energy harvesting conversion at ultra-low input voltage operation (sub-0.25V). In order to extend the input voltage/power range of operation in conventional charge pump topologies with TFET devices, it is of the major importance to reduce the band-to-band tunneling current when the transistor is under reverse bias conditions. This paper p...

  3. Quantifying charge resonance and multiexciton character in coupled chromophores by charge and spin cumulant analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We extend excited-state structural analysis to quantify the charge-resonance and multi-exciton character in wave functions of weakly interacting chromophores such as molecular dimers. The approach employs charge and spin cumulants which describe inter-fragment electronic correlations in molecular complexes. We introduce indexes corresponding to the weights of local, charge resonance, and biexciton (with different spin structure) configurations that can be computed for general wave functions thus allowing one to quantify the character of doubly excited states. The utility of the approach is illustrated by applications to several small dimers, e.g., He-H2, (H2)2, and (C2H4)2, using full and restricted configuration interaction schemes. In addition, we present calculations for several systems relevant to singlet fission, such as tetracene, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, and 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran dimers

  4. Quantifying charge resonance and multiexciton character in coupled chromophores by charge and spin cumulant analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luzanov, Anatoliy V. [STC “Institute for Single Crystals,” National Academy of Sciences, Kharkov 61001 (Ukraine); Casanova, David [Kimika Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea (UPV/EHU) and Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P.K. 1072, 20080 Donostia (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48013 Bilbao, Euskadi (Spain); Feng, Xintian; Krylov, Anna I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0482 (United States)

    2015-06-14

    We extend excited-state structural analysis to quantify the charge-resonance and multi-exciton character in wave functions of weakly interacting chromophores such as molecular dimers. The approach employs charge and spin cumulants which describe inter-fragment electronic correlations in molecular complexes. We introduce indexes corresponding to the weights of local, charge resonance, and biexciton (with different spin structure) configurations that can be computed for general wave functions thus allowing one to quantify the character of doubly excited states. The utility of the approach is illustrated by applications to several small dimers, e.g., He-H{sub 2}, (H{sub 2}){sub 2}, and (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, using full and restricted configuration interaction schemes. In addition, we present calculations for several systems relevant to singlet fission, such as tetracene, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, and 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran dimers.

  5. Quantifying charge resonance and multiexciton character in coupled chromophores by charge and spin cumulant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzanov, Anatoliy V; Casanova, David; Feng, Xintian; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-06-14

    We extend excited-state structural analysis to quantify the charge-resonance and multi-exciton character in wave functions of weakly interacting chromophores such as molecular dimers. The approach employs charge and spin cumulants which describe inter-fragment electronic correlations in molecular complexes. We introduce indexes corresponding to the weights of local, charge resonance, and biexciton (with different spin structure) configurations that can be computed for general wave functions thus allowing one to quantify the character of doubly excited states. The utility of the approach is illustrated by applications to several small dimers, e.g., He-H2, (H2)2, and (C2H4)2, using full and restricted configuration interaction schemes. In addition, we present calculations for several systems relevant to singlet fission, such as tetracene, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, and 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran dimers. PMID:26071698

  6. Longitudinal spin-charge responses and collective modes in spin-polarized quantum devices

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, K S; Bae, Y N; Quinn, J J

    1999-01-01

    The generalized longitudinal charge-spin susceptibility functions and the collective excitations of spin-polarized quantum structures are investigated within the framework of spin-dependent linear response theory. We evaluate the charge response and the longitudinal spin response to a general external disturbance. Exchange-correlation effects between electrons of spin sigma and sigma' are included by using spin-polarization dependent generalized local field factors. Both collective charge-density and spin-density excitations are examined. The present results are compared with the case of a spin-unpolarized system. In contrast to the result for an unpolarized system, the mixing of charge and spin responses results in coupled charge-spin excitations in the spin polarized system.

  7. Three-phase inductive-coupled structures for contactless PHEV charging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jia-You; Shen, Hung-Yu; Li, Cheng-Bin

    2016-07-01

    In this article, a new-type three-phase inductive-coupled structure is proposed for the contactless plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) charging system regarding with SAE J-1773. Four possible three-phase core structures are presented and subsequently investigated by the finite element analysis. To study the correlation between the core geometric parameter and the coupling coefficient, the magnetic equivalent circuit model of each structure is also established. In accordance with the simulation results, the low reluctance and the sharing of flux path in the core material are achieved by the proposed inductive-coupled structure with an arc-shape and three-phase symmetrical core material. It results in a compensation of the magnetic flux between each phase and a continuous flow of the output power in the inductive-coupled structure. Higher coupling coefficient between inductive-coupled structures is achieved. A comparison of coupling coefficient, mutual inductance, and self-inductance between theoretical and measured results is also performed to verify the proposed model. A 1 kW laboratory scale prototype of the contactless PHEV charging system with the proposed arc-shape three-phase inductive-coupled structure is implemented and tested. An overall system efficiency of 88% is measured when two series lithium iron phosphate battery packs of 25.6 V/8.4 Ah are charged.

  8. Subterahertz acoustical pumping of electronic charge in a resonant tunneling device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E S K; Akimov, A V; Henini, M; Eaves, L; Kent, A J

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that controlled subnanosecond bursts of electronic charge can be transferred through a resonant tunneling diode by successive picosecond acoustic pulses. The effect exploits the nonlinear current-voltage characteristics of the device and its asymmetric response to the compressive and tensile components of the strain pulse. This acoustoelectronic pump opens new possibilities for the control of quantum phenomena in nanostructures. PMID:23003634

  9. Recent charge-breeding developments with EBIS/T devices (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, S., E-mail: schwarz@nscl.msu.edu; Lapierre, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Short breeding times, narrow charge state distributions, low background, high efficiency, and the flexible time structure of the ejected low-emittance ion pulses are among the most attractive features of electron beam ion source or trap (EBIS/T) based charge breeders. Significant progress has been made to further improve these properties: Several groups are working to increase current densities towards 10{sup 3} or even 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2}. These current densities will become necessary to deliver high charge states of heavy nuclei in a short time and/or provide sufficient space-charge capacity to handle high-current ion beams in next-generation rare-isotope beam (RIB) facilities. Efficient capture of continuous beams, attractive because of its potential of handling highest-current ion beams, has become possible with the development of high-density electron beams of >1 A. Requests for the time structure of the charge bred ion pulse range from ultra-short pulses to quasi-continuous beams. Progress is being made on both ends of this spectrum, by either dividing the extracted charge in many pulse-lets, adjusting the extraction potential for a near-uniform long pulse, or adding dedicated devices to spread the ion bunches delivered from the EBIS/T in time. Advances in EBIS/T charge state breeding are summarized, including recent results with NSCL’s ReA EBIS/T charge breeder.

  10. Recent charge-breeding developments with EBIS/T devices (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short breeding times, narrow charge state distributions, low background, high efficiency, and the flexible time structure of the ejected low-emittance ion pulses are among the most attractive features of electron beam ion source or trap (EBIS/T) based charge breeders. Significant progress has been made to further improve these properties: Several groups are working to increase current densities towards 103 or even 104 A/cm2. These current densities will become necessary to deliver high charge states of heavy nuclei in a short time and/or provide sufficient space-charge capacity to handle high-current ion beams in next-generation rare-isotope beam (RIB) facilities. Efficient capture of continuous beams, attractive because of its potential of handling highest-current ion beams, has become possible with the development of high-density electron beams of >1 A. Requests for the time structure of the charge bred ion pulse range from ultra-short pulses to quasi-continuous beams. Progress is being made on both ends of this spectrum, by either dividing the extracted charge in many pulse-lets, adjusting the extraction potential for a near-uniform long pulse, or adding dedicated devices to spread the ion bunches delivered from the EBIS/T in time. Advances in EBIS/T charge state breeding are summarized, including recent results with NSCL’s ReA EBIS/T charge breeder

  11. Recent charge-breeding developments with EBIS/T devices (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, S.; Lapierre, A.

    2016-02-01

    Short breeding times, narrow charge state distributions, low background, high efficiency, and the flexible time structure of the ejected low-emittance ion pulses are among the most attractive features of electron beam ion source or trap (EBIS/T) based charge breeders. Significant progress has been made to further improve these properties: Several groups are working to increase current densities towards 103 or even 104 A/cm2. These current densities will become necessary to deliver high charge states of heavy nuclei in a short time and/or provide sufficient space-charge capacity to handle high-current ion beams in next-generation rare-isotope beam (RIB) facilities. Efficient capture of continuous beams, attractive because of its potential of handling highest-current ion beams, has become possible with the development of high-density electron beams of >1 A. Requests for the time structure of the charge bred ion pulse range from ultra-short pulses to quasi-continuous beams. Progress is being made on both ends of this spectrum, by either dividing the extracted charge in many pulse-lets, adjusting the extraction potential for a near-uniform long pulse, or adding dedicated devices to spread the ion bunches delivered from the EBIS/T in time. Advances in EBIS/T charge state breeding are summarized, including recent results with NSCL's ReA EBIS/T charge breeder.

  12. Charge transfer through amino groups-small molecules interface improving the performance of electroluminescent devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havare, Ali Kemal; Can, Mustafa; Tozlu, Cem; Kus, Mahmut; Okur, Salih; Demic, Şerafettin; Demirak, Kadir; Kurt, Mustafa; Icli, Sıddık

    2016-05-01

    A carboxylic group functioned charge transporting was synthesized and self-assembled on an indium tin oxide (ITO) anode. A typical electroluminescent device [modified ITO/TPD (50 nm)/Alq3 (60 nm)/LiF (2 nm)/(120 nm)] was fabricated to investigate the effect of the amino groups-small molecules interface on the characteristics of the device. The increase in the surface work function of ITO is expected to facilitate the hole injection from the ITO anode to the Hole Transport Layer (HTL) in electroluminescence. The modified electroluminescent device could endure a higher current and showed a much higher luminance than the nonmodified one. For the produced electroluminescent devices, the I-V characteristics, optical characterization and quantum yields were performed. The external quantum efficiency of the modified electroluminescent device is improved as the result of the presence of the amino groups-small molecules interface.

  13. Low Exciton-Phonon Coupling, High Charge Carrier Mobilities, and Multiexciton Properties in Two-Dimensional Lead, Silver, Cadmium, and Copper Chalcogenide Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuchen; Singh, Vivek; Goodman, Samuel M; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-12-18

    The development of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials has revealed novel physical properties, like high carrier mobilities and the tunable coupling of charge carriers with phonons, which can enable wide-ranging applications in optoelectronic and thermoelectric devices. While mechanical exfoliation of graphene and some transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g., MoS2, WSe2) has enabled their fabrication as 2D semiconductors and integration into devices, lack of similar syntheses for other 2D semiconductor materials has hindered further progress. Here, we report measurements of fundamental charge carrier interactions and optoelectronic properties of 2D nanomaterials made from two-monolayers-thick PbX, CdX, Cu2X, and Ag2X (X = S, Se) using colloidal syntheses. Extremely low coupling of charge carriers with phonons (2-6-fold lower than bulk and other low-dimensional semiconductors), high carrier mobilities (0.2-1.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), without dielectric screening), observation of infrared surface plasmons in ultrathin 2D semiconductor nanostructures, strong quantum-confinement, and other multiexcitonic properties (different phonon coupling and photon-to-charge collection efficiencies for band-edge and higher-energy excitons) can pave the way for efficient solution-processed devices made from these 2D nanostructured semiconductors. PMID:26273976

  14. Charged colloids, polyelectrolytes and biomolecules viewed as strongly coupled Coulomb systems

    CERN Document Server

    Löwen, H; Likos, C N; Blaak, R; Dzubiella, J; Jusufi, A; Hoffmann, N; Harreis, H M

    2003-01-01

    A brief review is given on recent studies of charged soft matter solutions, as modelled by the 'primitive' approach of strongly coupled Coulomb systems, where the solvent just enters as a dielectric background. These include charged colloids, biological macromolecules such as proteins and DNA, polyelectrolytes and polyelectrolyte stars. Also some original results are presented on colloid-polyelectrolyte complex formation near walls and on the anomalous fluid structure of polyelectrolyte stars as a function of increasing concentration.

  15. Charged colloids, polyelectrolytes and biomolecules viewed as strongly coupled Coulomb systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review is given on recent studies of charged soft matter solutions, as modelled by the 'primitive' approach of strongly coupled Coulomb systems, where the solvent just enters as a dielectric background. These include charged colloids, biological macromolecules such as proteins and DNA, polyelectrolytes and polyelectrolyte stars. Also some original results are presented on colloid-polyelectrolyte complex formation near walls and on the anomalous fluid structure of polyelectrolyte stars as a function of increasing concentration

  16. Dust-Acoustic Waves in Strongly Coupled Dusty Plasmas Containing Variable-Charge Impurities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Bai-Song; HE Kai-Fen; M. Y. Yu

    2000-01-01

    A relatively self-consistent theory of dust-acoustic waves in the strongly coupled dusty plasmas containing variable charge impurities is given. Relevant physical processes such as dust elastic relaxation and dust charge relaxation are taken into account. It is shown that the negative dispersion of dust-acoustic waves due to the strong correlation of dusts is enhanced in the presence of dust-neutral collisions.

  17. Highly Charged Ions in a Dilute Plasma: An Exact Asymptotic Solution Involving Strong Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Lowell S.; Dooling, David C.; Preston, Dean L.

    2006-01-01

    The ion sphere model introduced long ago by Salpeter is placed in a rigorous theoretical setting. The leading corrections to this model for very highly charged but dilute ions in thermal equilibrium with a weakly coupled, one-component background plasma are explicitly computed, and the subleading corrections shown to be negligibly small. This is done using effective field theory methods advocated by Brown and Yaffe. Thus, corrections to nuclear reaction rates that such highly charged ions may...

  18. Isovector coupling channel and central properties of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Haddad

    2010-09-01

    The influence of the isovector coupling channel on the central depression parameter and the central value of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei was studied. The isovector coupling channel leads to about 50% increase of the central depression parameter, and weakens the dependency of both central depression parameter and central density on the asymmetry, impressively contributing to the semibubble form of the charge density distribution in heavy nuclei, and increasing the probability of larger nuclei with higher proton numbers and higher neutron-to-proton ratios stable.

  19. Isovector coupling channel and central properties of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the isovector coupling channel on the central depression parameter and the central value of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei was studied. The isovector coupling channel leads to about 50% increase of the central depression parameter, and weakens the dependency of both central depression parameter and the central density on the asymmetry, impressively contributing to the semibubble form of the charge density distribution in heavy nuclei, and increasing the probability of larger nuclei with higher proton numbers and higher neutron-to-proton ratios stable. (author)

  20. Design, fabrication, and delivery of a charge injection device as a stellar tracking device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, H. K.; Michon, G. J.; Tomlinson, H. W.; Vogelsong, T. L.; Grafinger, A.; Wilson, R.

    1979-01-01

    Six 128 x 128 CID imagers fabricated on bulk silicon and with thin polysilicon upper-level electrodes were tested in a star tracking mode. Noise and spectral response were measured as a function of temperature over the range of +25 C to -40 C. Noise at 0 C and below was less than 40 rms carriers/pixel for all devices at an effective noise bandwidth of 150 Hz. Quantum yield for all devices averaged 40% from 0.4 to 1.0 microns with no measurable temperature dependence. Extrapolating from these performance parameters to those of a large (400 x 400) array and accounting for design and processing improvements, indicates that the larger array would show a further improvement in noise performance -- on the order of 25 carriers. A preliminary evaluation of the projected performance of the 400 x 400 array and a representative set of star sensor requirements indicates that the CID has excellent potential as a stellar tracking device.

  1. Charge Transfer and Triplet States in High Efficiency OPV Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    The advantage of using polymers and molecules in electronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LED), field-effect transistors (FET) and, more recently, solar cells (SC) is justified by the unique combination of high device performance and processing of the semiconductors used. Power conversion efficiency of nanostructured polymer SC is in the range of 10% on lab scale, making them ready for up-scaling. Efficient charge carrier generation and recombination in SC are strongly related to dissociation of the primary singlet excitons. The dissociation (or charge transfer) process should be very efficient in photovoltaics. The mechanisms governing charge carrier generation, recombination and transport in SC based on the so-called bulk-heterojunctions, i.e. blends of two or more semiconductors with different electron affinities, appear to be very complex, as they imply the presence of the intermediate excited states, neutral and charged ones. Charge transfer states, or polaron pairs, are the intermediate states between free electrons/holes and strongly bound excitons. Interestingly, the mostly efficient OLEDs to date are based on the so-called triplet emitters, which utilize the triplet-triplet annihilation process. In SC, recent investigations indicated that on illumination of the device active layer, not only mobile charges but also triplet states were formed. With respect to triplets, it is unclear how these excited states are generated, via inter-system crossing or via back transfer of the electron from acceptor to donor. Triplet formation may be considered as charge carrier loss channel; however, the fusion of two triplets may lead to a formation of singlet excitons instead. In such case, a generation of charges by utilizing of the so far unused photons will be possible. The fundamental understanding of the processes involving the charge transfer and triplet states and their relation to nanoscale morphology and/or energetics of blends is essential for the

  2. Plasmon Decay and Thermal Transport from Spin-Charge Coupling in Generic Luttinger Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, Alex

    2014-11-01

    We discuss the violation of spin-charge separation in generic nonlinear Luttinger liquids and investigate its effect on the relaxation and thermal transport of genuine spin-1 /2 electron liquids in ballistic quantum wires. We identify basic scattering processes compatible with the symmetry of the problem and conservation laws that lead to the decay of plasmons into the spin modes. We derive a closed set of coupled kinetic equations for the spin-charge excitations and solve the problem of thermal conductance of interacting electrons for an arbitrary relation between the quantum wire length and spin-charge thermalization length.

  3. ReO{sub x} charge injection/blocking layers in organic electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Jiaxiu; Xiao Lixin; Chen Zhijian; Qu Bo; Gong Qihuang, E-mail: xiao66@pku.edu.c, E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.c [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-09-29

    The charge transport of rhenium oxide (ReO{sub x}) in organic electronic devices was investigated. The hole injection/transport was blocked and the electron injection/transport was enhanced with doping of ReO{sub x} in organic electronic devices. Thus the charge balance and efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes were improved; current efficiency of 2.7 cd A{sup -1} at 20 mA cm{sup -2} for the device with ReO{sub x} was higher than 1.5 cd A{sup -1} for the device without it. In the case of organic photovoltaic cells, the open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}), 0.58 V, was higher compared with the device without ReO{sub x} (0.44 V) due to the improvement of interface properties. The power conversion efficiency was increased to 2.27% by the combination of ReO{sub x} (increases V{sub oc}) with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) : poly(styrene-sulfonate) (improves hole transport to increase J{sub sc}) on the modification of the anode, higher than 1.85% for the device without ReO{sub x}.

  4. Highly charged ions in a weakly coupled plasma: an exact solution

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Lowell S.; Dooling, David C.; Preston, Dean L.

    2005-01-01

    The ion sphere model introduced long ago by Salpeter is placed in a rigorous theoretical setting. The leading corrections to this model for very highly charged but dilute ions in thermal equilibrium with a weakly coupled, one-component background plasma are explicitly computed, and the subleading corrections are shown to be negligibly small. Such analytic results for very strong coupling are rarely available, and they can serve as benchmarks for testing computer models in this limit.

  5. InAs quantum dots as charge storing elements for applications in flash memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Catalyst-free growth of InAs quantum dots was carried out on high-k ZrO2. • Memory device with InAs quantum dots as charge storage nodes are fabricated. • Superior memory window, low leakage and reasonably good retention were observed. • Carrier transport phenomena are explained in both program and erase operations. - Abstract: InAs quantum dots (QDs) were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique to use them as charge storage nodes. Uniform QDs were formed with average diameter 5 nm and height 5–10 nm with a density of 2 × 1011 cm−2. The QDs were grown on high-k dielectric layer (ZrO2), which was deposited onto ultra-thin GaP passivated p-GaAs (1 0 0) substrate. A charge storage device with the structure Metal/ZrO2/InAs QDs/ZrO2/(GaP)GaAs/Metal was fabricated. The devices containing InAs QDs exhibit superior memory window, low leakage current density along with reasonably good charge retention. A suitable electronic band diagram corresponding to programming and erasing operations was proposed to explain the operation

  6. InAs quantum dots as charge storing elements for applications in flash memory devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Sk Masiul; Biswas, Pranab [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Banerji, P., E-mail: pallab@matsc.iitkgp.ernet.in [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Chakraborty, S. [Applied Materials Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Sector-I, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Catalyst-free growth of InAs quantum dots was carried out on high-k ZrO{sub 2}. • Memory device with InAs quantum dots as charge storage nodes are fabricated. • Superior memory window, low leakage and reasonably good retention were observed. • Carrier transport phenomena are explained in both program and erase operations. - Abstract: InAs quantum dots (QDs) were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique to use them as charge storage nodes. Uniform QDs were formed with average diameter 5 nm and height 5–10 nm with a density of 2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}. The QDs were grown on high-k dielectric layer (ZrO{sub 2}), which was deposited onto ultra-thin GaP passivated p-GaAs (1 0 0) substrate. A charge storage device with the structure Metal/ZrO{sub 2}/InAs QDs/ZrO{sub 2}/(GaP)GaAs/Metal was fabricated. The devices containing InAs QDs exhibit superior memory window, low leakage current density along with reasonably good charge retention. A suitable electronic band diagram corresponding to programming and erasing operations was proposed to explain the operation.

  7. Ion beam induced charge and numerical modeling study of novel detector devices for single ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the near future devices which are fabricated from shallow arrays of few and single atoms will exploit quantum mechanical rules to perform useful functions including quantum computation. Fabrication of these devices presents formidable technological challenges. We have developed a single ion implantation system that is capable of verifiable fabrication of single donor devices using 14 keV 31P ions implanted into ultra-pure, high resistivity silicon substrates based on the technique of Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC). A detection system with integrated detector electrodes registers the charge transient from a single ion impact which is used to signal the implantation of an ion into the substrate. We describe here the use of IBIC with MeV ions to study the charge collection efficiency of the detector electrodes. By using three dimensional numerical technology computer-aided design (TCAD) models for the decrease in the IBIC signal as a function of distance from the detector electrode, we can obtain an accurate measurement of the resistivity of the silicon substrate, allowing confirmation of the values specified by the supplier, and providing us with confidence in the numerical models used by TCAD for simulation. This technique has advantages over resistivity measurements by four-point probes because it is spatially resolved, probes through the intact oxide, and can be done without making contact to the device in the area of the probe

  8. Reliability assessment of electrostatically driven MEMS devices: based on a pulse-induced charging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charging mechanism of electrostatically driven MEMS devices was investigated. This paper shows experimental results of (i) electrostatic discharge (ESD) experiments, (ii) charging mechanism modelling and (iii) Kelvin probe force microscopy tests. It highlighted dielectric failure signature occurred under ESD events and allowed understanding of the underlying breakdown mechanism. A further study of the charging effect in conditions below the breakdown was carried out. A new approach to explore trapping phenomena that take place in thin dielectric used for electrostatic actuation is reported. Indeed a pulse-induced charging (PIC) test procedure aimed at reliability assessment of electrostatically actuated MEMS devices is presented. Based on this method, a procedure for carrying out stress testing was defined and successfully demonstrated on capacitive MEMS switches. In this case, high-voltage pulses were applied as stimulus and the parameter Vcapamin, which is directly related to the charging of the insulator layer, was monitored. The PIC stress test results were correlated with conventional cycling stress ones. Finally, temperature-dependent measurements, ranging from 300 up to 355 K, were reported in order to validate the thermal-activated behaviour of the test structures. According to an Arrhenius model, the given reference material showed an activation energy of around 0.77 eV. (paper)

  9. Strong ferromagnetically-coupled spin valve sensor devices for droplet magnetofluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gungun; Makarov, Denys; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2015-01-01

    We report a magnetofluidic device with integrated strong ferromagnetically-coupled and hysteresis-free spin valve sensors for dynamic monitoring of ferrofluid droplets in microfluidics. The strong ferromagnetic coupling between the free layer and the pinned layer of spin valve sensors is achieved by reducing the spacer thickness, while the hysteresis of the free layer is eliminated by the interplay between shape anisotropy and the strength of coupling. The increased ferromagnetic coupling field up to the remarkable 70 Oe, which is five-times larger than conventional solutions, brings key advantages for dynamic sensing, e.g., a larger biasing field giving rise to larger detection signals, facilitating the operation of devices without saturation of the sensors. Studies on the fundamental effects of an external magnetic field on the evolution of the shape of droplets, as enabled by the non-visual monitoring capability of the device, provides crucial information for future development of a magnetofluidic device for multiplexed assays. PMID:26024419

  10. Longitudinal Waves in Strongly Coupled Magnetized Dusty Plasma with Dust Charging Relaxation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢柏松

    2002-01-01

    Low-frequency longitudinal dust waves in strongly coupled magnetized dusty plasmas are investigated. The dustcharging relaxation is taken into account. It is found that the frequency and damping of dust waves are modifiedsignificantly due to the existence of the magnetic field as well as the effect of dust charging.

  11. Locally controlled photonic crystal devices with coupled quantum dots: physics and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Faraon, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    One of the most promising ways of building future nano-photonic networks for classical and quantum information processing is by using photonic crystals. Quantum dots coupled to optical modes allow for efficient control of light in these devices. In this dissertation I present the work I have done at Stanford University toward building integrated photonic crystal devices with coupled quantum dots. The most significant experiments that we performed on this platform relied on perfecting the fabr...

  12. Precise Determination of Charge Dependent Pion-Nucleon-Nucleon Coupling Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, R Navarro; Arriola, E Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    We undertake a covariance error analysis of the pion-nucleon-nucleon coupling constants from the Granada-2013 np and pp database comprising a total of 6713 scattering data. Assuming a unique pion-nucleon coupling constant we obtain $f^2=0.0761(3)$. The effects of charge symmetry breaking on the $^3P_0$, $^3P_1$ and $^3P_2$ partial waves are analyzed and we find $f_{p}^2 = 0.0759(4)$, $f_{0}^2 = 0.079(1)$ and $f_{c}^2 = 0.0763(6)$ with minor correlations among the coupling constants. We successfully test normality for the residuals of the fit.

  13. Mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) semiconductor devices as charged particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beccetti, F.D.; Raymond, R.S.; Ristinen, R.A. (Colorado Univ., Boulder (USA). Nuclear Physics Lab.); Schnepple, W.F.; Ortale, C. (EG and G, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA). Santa Barbara Div.)

    1983-07-15

    The properties of HgI/sub 2/ semiconductor devices as charged particle detectors have been investigated. Nearly linear energy response with fwhm resolution of 5-15% is observed for sup(1.2)H and sup(3.4)He ions, E < 40 MeV. Fast proton damage is observed for > 10/sup 10/ protons/cm/sup 2/. However, based on measurements with the HgI/sub 2/ detectors, little fast neutron damage is apparent at fluences up to 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/. This suggests considerably greater resistance to radiation damage than is observed for Si and other solid state devices.

  14. Mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) semiconductor devices as charged-particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becchetti, F.D.; Raymond, R.S.; Ristinen, R.A.; Schnepple, W.F.; Ortale, C.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of HgI/sub 2/ semiconductor devices as charged particle detectors have been investigated. Nearly linear energy response with FWHM resolution of 5 to 15% is observed for /sup 1/ /sup 2/H and /sup 3/ /sup 4/He ions, E < 40 MeV. Fast proton damage is observed for > 10/sup 10/ protons/cm/sup 2/. However, based on measurements with two HgI/sub 2/ detectors, little fast neutron damage is apparent at fluences up to 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/. This suggests considerably greater resistance to radiation damage than is observed for Si and other solid state devices.

  15. Mercuric iodide (HgI2) semiconductor devices as charged particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of HgI2 semiconductor devices as charged particle detectors have been investigated. Nearly linear energy response with fwhm resolution of 5-15% is observed for sup(1.2)H and sup(3.4)He ions, E 1010 protons/cm2. However, based on measurements with the HgI2 detectors, little fast neutron damage is apparent at fluences up to 1015 neutrons/cm2. This suggests considerably greater resistance to radiation damage than is observed for Si and other solid state devices. (orig.)

  16. Mercuric iodide (HgI 2) semiconductor devices as charged particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becchetti, F. D.; Raymond, R. S.; Ristinen, R. A.; Schnepple, W. F.; Ortale, C.

    1983-07-01

    The properties of HgI 2 semiconductor devices as charged particle detectors have been investigated. Nearly linear energy response with fwhm resolution of 5-15% is observed for 1,2H and 3,4He ions, E < 40 MeV. Fast proton damage is observed for 10 10 protons/cm 2. However, based on measurements with two HgI 2 detectors, little fast neutron damage is apparent at fluences up to 10 15 neutrons/cm 2. This suggests considerably greater resistance to radiation damage than is observed for Si and other solid state devices.

  17. Mercuric iodide (HgI2) semiconductor devices as charged-particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of HgI2 semiconductor devices as charged particle detectors have been investigated. Nearly linear energy response with FWHM resolution of 5 to 15% is observed for 12H and 34He ions, E 1010 protons/cm2. However, based on measurements with two HgI2 detectors, little fast neutron damage is apparent at fluences up to 1015 neutrons/cm2. This suggests considerably greater resistance to radiation damage than is observed for Si and other solid state devices

  18. Magnetic coupling in neutral and charged Cr2, Mn2, and CrMn dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical ab initio studies of neutral, cationic and anionic Cr2, Mn2, and CrMn dimers have been carried out to explore the progression of magnetic coupling with the number of electrons. It is shown that while Cr2 and Cr2- have antiferromagnetically coupled atomic spins, Cr2+ has a ferromagnetic ground state closely followed by an antiferromagnetic state. On the other hand, all Mn2 dimers are ferromagnetic, irrespective of the charge. The neutral CrMn is ferrimagnetic while the charged CrMn are antiferromagnetic. In all cases, the charged dimers are found to be more stable than the neutral ones. The results are compared with available calculations and experiments and the difficulties associated with theoretical description and the experimental interpretations are discussed. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  19. Persistent Spin and Charge Currents in Open Conducting Ring Subjected to Rashba Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xi-Sua; XIONG Shi-Jie

    2008-01-01

    We investigate persistent charge and spin currents of a one-dimensional ring with Rashba spin-orbit coupling and connected asymmetrically to two external leads spanned with angle (φ)0.Because of the asymmetry of the structure and the spin-reflection,the persistent charge and spin currents can be induced.The magnification of persistent currents can be obtained when tuning the energy of incident electron to the sharp zero and sharp resonance of transmission depending on the Aharonov-Casher (AC) phase due to the spin-orbit coupling and the angle spanned by two leads (φ)0.The general dependence of the charge and spin persistent currents on these parameters is obtained.This suggests a possible method of controlling the magnitude and direction of persistent currents by tuning the AC phase and (φ)0,without the electromagnetic flux though the ring.

  20. Persistent Spin and Charge Currents in Open Conducting Ring Subjected to Rashba Spin—Orbit Coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate persistent charge and spin currents of a one-dimensional ring with Rashba spin—orbit coupling and connected asymmetrically to two external leads spanned with angle φ0. Because of the asymmetry of the structure and the spin-reflection, the persistent charge and spin currents can be induced. The magnification of persistent currents can be obtained when tuning the energy of incident electron to the sharp zero and sharp resonance of transmission depending on the Aharonov–Casher (AC) phase due to the spin—orbit coupling and the angle spanned by two leads φ0. The general dependence of the charge and spin persistent currents on these parameters is obtained. This suggests a possible method of controlling the magnitude and direction of persistent currents by tuning the AC phase and φ0, without the electromagnetic flux though the ring. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  1. Charge creation and nucleation of the longitudinal plasma wave in coupled Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Hamdipour, M.

    2010-11-01

    We study the phase dynamics in coupled Josephson junctions described by a system of nonlinear differential equations. Results of detailed numerical simulations of charge creation in the superconducting layers and the longitudinal plasma wave (LPW) nucleation are presented. We demonstrate the different time stages in the development of the LPW and present the results of FFT analysis at different values of bias current. The correspondence between the breakpoint position on the outermost branch of current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the growing region in time dependence of the electric charge in the superconducting layer is established. The effects of noise in the bias current and the external microwave radiation on the charge dynamics of the coupled Josephson junctions are found. These effects introduce a way to regulate the process of LPW nucleation in the stack of IJJ.

  2. An advanced tracker design for pointing and control of space vehicles using the charge injection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C.; Kollodge, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of charge transfer devices (CTD) in pointing and control of space vehicles is examined, with emphasis on the use of charge injection devices (CID). The selection of CTD type and CID operation, including CID signal and noise analysis and signal improvement, are discussed. Star tracking operational advantages of the CTD are pointed out, and the tracking optical concept is discussed and graphically depicted. The position interpolation procedure and the effects of rate of stellar motion on position interpolation are considered, and error analysis is examined. Finally, the breadboard and test program are discussed in detail, coarse and fine acquisition, test for star, track pattern, test procedure and results. An overall accuracy performance of approximately 0.02 pixels or approximately 0.8 arcsec for the test equipment and tracker was obtained.

  3. Effect of ion implantation on oxide charge storage in MOS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements are reported in which the charge stored in the oxide of an MOS device exposed to ionizing radiation is studied as a function of oxide pretreatment. Implantation with Al+ ions is found to introduce electron traps into the oxide and the stability of these traps is examined in thermal annealing experiments. The predictions of a simple model, in which the implantation associated displacement damage is considered to be the source of the additional electron traps, are compared to the experimental observations

  4. High-Tc SNS Junctions: A New Generation of Proximity-Coupled Josephson Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsasser, A. W.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews this evolution of proximity - coupled Josephson jucntion from the early investigations on low temperature superconductor-normal -superconductor junctions through the introduction of hybrid superconductor-semiconductor devices and the resulting interest in mesoscopic Josephson junctions, to the recent development of high temperature devices.

  5. Charge-symmetry-breaking potentials from isospin-violating meson-baryon coupling constants

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, S; Piekarewicz, J; Gardner, Susan

    1995-01-01

    We consider charge-symmetry violations in the nucleon-nucleon force which result from isospin-violating meson-baryon coupling constants. The vector mesons are assumed to couple to the nucleon's electromagnetic current, which we decompose into isoscalar and isovector quark components. We compute these currents in the context of a constituent quark model. The isospin violations in the meson-baryon couplings arise from the difference in the up and down constituent quark masses. We show that class IV charge-symmetry-breaking potentials arise in the resulting \\omega and \\rho exchange contributions to the NN force. The magnitude of these contributions is consistent with that phenomenologically required by the measured difference of n and p analyzing powers in elastic \\vec{n}-\\vec{p} scattering at 183 MeV.

  6. Thin silicon layer SOI power device with linearly-distance fixed charge islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new high-voltage LDMOS with linearly-distanced fixed charge islands is proposed (LFI LDMOS). A lot of linearly-distanced fixed charge islands are introduced by implanting the Cs or I ion into the buried oxide layer and dynamic holes are attracted and accumulated, which is crucial to enhance the electric field of the buried oxide and the vertical breakdown voltage. The surface electric field is improved by increasing the distance between two adjacent fixed charge islands from source to drain, which lead to the higher concentration of the drift region and a lower on-resistance. The numerical results indicate that the breakdown voltage of 500 V with Ld = 45 μm is obtained in the proposed device in comparison to 209 V of conventional LDMOS, while maintaining low on-resistance. (paper)

  7. An Accurate and Linear Scaling Method to Calculate Charge-Transfer Excitation Energies and Diabatic Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Pavanello, Michele; Visscher, Lucas; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Quantum--Mechanical methods that are both computationally fast and accurate are not yet available for electronic excitations having charge transfer character. In this work, we present a significant step forward towards this goal for those charge transfer excitations that take place between non-covalently bound molecules. In particular, we present a method that scales linearly with the number of non-covalently bound molecules in the system and is based on a two-pronged approach: The molecular electronic structure of broken-symmetry charge-localized states is obtained with the Frozen Density Embedding formulation of subsystem Density-Functional Theory; subsequently, in a post-SCF calculation, the full-electron Hamiltonian and overlap matrix elements among the charge-localized states are evaluated with an algorithm which takes full advantage of the subsystem DFT density partitioning technique. The method is benchmarked against Coupled-Cluster calculations and achieves chemical accuracy for the systems considered...

  8. Integration of a waveguide self-electrooptic effect device and a vertically coupled interconnect waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2008-02-26

    A self-electrooptic effect device ("SEED") is integrated with waveguide interconnects through the use of vertical directional couplers. Light initially propagating in the interconnect waveguide is vertically coupled to the active waveguide layer of the SEED and, if the SEED is in the transparent state, the light is coupled back to the interconnect waveguide.

  9. Battery Coupling Impact on the Antenna Efficiency in a Small Wearable Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruaro, Andrea; Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    Wearable electronics is often challenged by the extremely reduced space available to the antenna design. This study assesses the impact that the coupling to a large battery has on a small antenna for wearable devices. The coupling mechanism and its potential risks for the Electromagnetic...

  10. Electronic-vibrational coupling in single-molecule devices

    OpenAIRE

    Aji, Vivek; Moore, J. E.; Varma, C. M.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments studying vibrational effects on electronic transport through single molecules have observed several seemingly inconsistent behaviors, ranging from up to 30 harmonics of a vibrational frequency in one experiment, to an absence of higher-harmonic peaks in another. We study the different manifestations of electronic-vibrational coupling in inelastic and elastic electron transport through single molecules. For the case of inelastic transport, higher harmonics are shown to be damped by...

  11. Organic photovoltaic devices with concurrent solar energy harvesting and charge storage capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takshi, Arash; Tevi, Tete; Rahimi, Fatemeh

    2015-09-01

    Due to large variation of the solar energy availability in a day, energy storage is required in many applications when solar cells are used. However, application of external energy storage devices, such as batteries and supercapacitors, increases the cost of solar energy systems and requires additional charging circuitry. This combination is bulky and relatively expensive, which is not ideal for many applications. In this work, a novel idea is presented for making electrochemical devices with dual properties of solar energy harvesting and internal charge storage. The device is essentially a supercapacitor with a photoactive electrode. Energy harvesting occurs through light absorption at one of the electrodes made of a composite of a conducting polymer (i.e. PEDOT:PSS) and a Porphyrin dye. The energy storage takes place in the both photoactive and counter electrode (CE). We have studied the effect of the CE material on the device characteristics. Using Y-Carbon (a commercial available electrode), an open circuit voltage of 0.49 V was achieved in light across the cell with ~1 mF capacitance. The other two choices for CE were activated carbon and carbon nanotube based electrodes. The cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy demonstrated that the Y Carbon electrode was a better match.

  12. Mismatch of dielectric constants at the interface of nanometer metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with high- gate dielectric impacts on the inversion charge density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ling-Feng Mao

    2011-04-01

    The comparison of the inversion electron density between a nanometer metal-oxidesemiconductor (MOS) device with high- gate dielectric and a SiO2 MOS device with the same equivalent oxide thickness has been discussed. A fully self-consistent solution of the coupled Schrödinger–Poisson equations demonstrates that a larger dielectric-constant mismatch between the gate dielectric and silicon substrate can reduce electron density in the channel of a MOS device under inversion bias. Such a reduction in inversion electron density of the channel will increase with increase in gate voltage. A reduction in the charge density implies a reduction in the inversion electron density in the channel of a MOS device. It also implies that a larger dielectric constant of the gate dielectric might result in a reduction in the source–drain current and the gate leakage current.

  13. A double inductively coupled plasma for sterilization of medical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double inductively coupled low pressure plasma for sterilization of bio-medical materials is introduced. It is developed for homogeneous treatment of three-dimensional objects. The short treatment times and low temperatures allow the sterilization of heat sensitive materials like ultra-high-molecular-weight-polyethylene or polyvinyl chloride. Using a non-toxic atmosphere reduces the total process time in comparision with common methods. Langmuir probe measurements are presented to show the difference between ICP- and CCP-mode discharges, the spatial homogeneity and the influence on the sterilization efficiency. To know more about the sterilization mechanisms optical emission is measured and correlated with sterilization results

  14. Securing Kiosk using Mobile Devices coupled with Visual Inspection

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Chengfang

    2010-01-01

    A kiosk is an unsecured network terminal that a user can conveniently connect to a server over public network. There are many methods proposed to secure the kiosk, but many do not achieve high level of security, or require additional resources that are infeasible in practical scenarios. An exception is a known method seeing-is-believing which establishes a communication channel from the kiosk's display unit to a trusted mobile device's camera, and thus able to carry out server authentication via the kiosk. However, it is not clear how subsequence browsing and interactions can be carried out seamlessly and securely. In this paper, we take a human-centric approach and propose a method of subregion authentication. Essentially, under this method, a screenshot consists of a few blocks of seemingly random images but with visual cues displayed in the blocks. The user can decrypt and verify each individual block by "inspecting" it using the mobile device's camera, and can visually verify the overall blocks' arrangeme...

  15. Lateral coupling and immunity to substrate effect in ΩFET devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzenthaler, R.; Cristoloveanu, S.; Faynot, O.; Jahan, C.; Kuriyama, A.; Brevard, L.; Deleonibus, S.

    2006-04-01

    The inter-gate coupling effects in multiple-gate SOI devices with Omega configuration, metal gate and HfO 2 dielectric are investigated. Electrical measurements together with 3D numerical simulations show that the back-gate influence is reduced for narrow devices due to a strong lateral coupling between the two lateral sides of the main gate. In spite of the full depletion of the transistor body, the threshold voltage and the subthreshold slope are no longer dependent on the back gate bias. It is also shown that the conduction channels can be separated in wide ΩFETs using the back-gate coupling in accumulation mode. DIVSB (drain-induced virtual substrate biasing) can be drastically reduced when the lateral coupling screens the drain influence. Narrow devices are then virtually immune to substrate effects.

  16. Coupling Charge Reduction Mass Spectrometry to Liquid Chromatography for Complex Mixture Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutzman, John R; Crowe, Matthew C; Alexander, James N; Bell, Bruce M; Dunkle, Melissa N

    2016-04-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) of solution mixtures often generates complex mass spectra, even following liquid chromatography (LC), due to analyte multiple charging. Multiple charge state distributions can lead to isobaric interferences, mass spectral congestion, and ambiguous ion identification. As a consequence, data interpretation increases in complexity. Several charge reduction mass spectrometry (MS) approaches have been previously developed to reduce the average charge state of gaseous ions; however, all of these techniques have been restricted to direct infusion MS. In this study, synthetic polyols and surfactants separated by liquid chromatography and ionized by positive mode ESI have been subjected to polonium-210 α-particle radiation to reduce the average charge state to singly charged cations prior to mass analysis. LC/MS analysis of 5000 molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG5000) generated an average charge state of 5.88+; whereupon, liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/charge reduction/mass spectrometry (LC/CR/MS) analysis of PEG 5000 generated an average charge state of 1.00+. The PEG5000 results demonstrated a decrease in spectral complexity and enabled facile interpretation. Other complex solution mixtures representing specific MS challenges (i.e., competitive ionization and isobaric ion overlap) were explored and analyzed with LC/CR/MS to demonstrate the benefits of coupling LC to CR/MS. For example, polyol information related to initiator, identity/relative amount of monomer, and estimated molecular weight was characterized in random and triblock ethylene oxide/propylene oxide polyols using LC/CR/MS. LC/CR/MS is a new analytical technique for the analysis of complex mixtures. PMID:26971559

  17. FLUXCAP: A flux-coupled ac/dc magnetizing device

    CERN Document Server

    Gopman, Daniel B; Kent, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    We report on an instrument for applying ac and dc magnetic fields by capturing the flux from a rotating permanent magnet and projecting it between two adjustable pole pieces. This can be an alternative to standard electromagnets for experiments with small samples or in probe stations in which an applied magnetic field is needed locally, with advantages that include a compact form-factor, very low power requirements and dissipation as well as fast field sweep rates. This flux capture instrument (FLUXCAP) can produce fields from -400 to +400 mT, with field resolution less than 1 mT. It generates static magnetic fields as well as ramped fields, with ramping rates as high as 10 T/s. We demonstrate the use of this apparatus for studying the magnetotransport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a nanoscale device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance.

  18. Spectral and structural stability properties of charged particle dynamics in coupled lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Hong [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Chung, Moses [Department of Physics, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Davidson, Ronald C.; Burby, Joshua W. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    It has been realized in recent years that coupled focusing lattices in accelerators and storage rings have significant advantages over conventional uncoupled focusing lattices, especially for high-intensity charged particle beams. A theoretical framework and associated tools for analyzing the spectral and structural stability properties of coupled lattices are formulated in this paper, based on the recently developed generalized Courant-Snyder theory for coupled lattices. It is shown that for periodic coupled lattices that are spectrally and structurally stable, the matrix envelope equation must admit matched solutions. Using the technique of normal form and pre-Iwasawa decomposition, a new method is developed to replace the (inefficient) shooting method for finding matched solutions for the matrix envelope equation. Stability properties of a continuously rotating quadrupole lattice are investigated. The Krein collision process for destabilization of the lattice is demonstrated.

  19. Spectral and structural stability properties of charged particle dynamics in coupled lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C; Burby, J W

    2015-01-01

    It has been realized in recent years that coupled focusing lattices in accelerators and storage rings have significant advantages over conventional uncoupled focusing lattices, especially for high-intensity charged particle beams. A theoretical framework and associated tools for analyzing the spectral and structural stability properties of coupled lattices are formulated in this paper, based on the recently developed generalized Courant-Snyder theory for coupled lattices. It is shown that for periodic coupled lattices that are spectrally and structurally stable, the matrix envelope equation must admit matched solutions. Using the technique of normal form and pre-Iwasawa decomposition, a new method is developed to replace the (inefficient) shooting method for finding matched solutions for the matrix envelope equation. Stability properties of a continuously rotating quadrupole lattice are investigated. The Krein collision process for destabilization of the lattice is demonstrated.

  20. Mode-Coupling Control in Resonant Devices: Application to Solid-State Ring Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the theoretical and experimental investigation of the effects of mode coupling in a resonant macroscopic quantum device, in the case of a solid-state ring laser. This is achieved by introducing an additional coupling source whose interplay with the already-existing nonlinear effects ensures the coexistence of two counterpropagating cavity modes yielding a rotation-sensitive beat note. The determination of the condition for rotation sensing, both theoretically and experimentally, allows a quantitative study of the role of various mode-coupling mechanisms, in particular, the gain-induced mode coupling. We point out the connection between our work and the theoretical work on mode coupling in superfluid devices. This work opens up the possibility of new types of active rotation sensors

  1. Study and Test of Cold Storage Heat Recovery Heat Pump Coupled Solar Drying Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we design the recovery of a heat pump combined solar drying device. Then, with this device, drying experiments of aquatic product, tilapia, were conducted, indicating that the newly designed device functions are well in temperature adjusting and controlling performance and showing that drying time is closely related to energy consumption and drying conditions. Heat recovery heat pump combined solar energy drier can improve the drying quality of aquatic products, but also can greatly reduce the drying energy consumption, which provides theoretical support to the design and processing of heat recovery heat pump of refrigeration system coupled solar drying device.

  2. Enhanced out-coupling factor of microcavity organic light-emitting devices with irregular microlens array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jongsun; Oh, Seung Seok; Youp Kim, Doo; Cho, Sang Hee; Kim, In Tae; Han, S. H.; Takezoe, Hideo; Choi, Eun Ha; Cho, Guang Sup; Seo, Yoon Ho; Oun Kang, Seung; Park, Byoungchoo

    2006-07-01

    We studied microcavity organic light-emitting devices with a microlens system. A microcavity for organic light-emitting devices (OLED) was fabricated by stacks of SiO2 and SiNx layers and a metal cathode together with the microlens array. Electroluminescence of the devices showed that color variation under the viewing angle due to the microcavity is suppressed remarkably by microlens arrays, which makes the use of devices acceptable in many applications. It was also demonstrated that the external out-coupling factor of the devise increases by a factor of ~1.8 with wide viewing angles compared to conventional OLEDs.

  3. Paramagnetic molecule induced strong antiferromagnetic exchange coupling on a magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Pawan; Baker, Collin; D'Angelo, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports our Monte Carlo (MC) studies aiming to explain the experimentally observed paramagnetic molecule induced antiferromagnetic coupling between ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes. Recently developed magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics devices (MTJMSDs) were prepared by chemically bonding the paramagnetic molecules between the FM electrodes along the tunnel junction’s perimeter. These MTJMSDs exhibited molecule-induced strong antiferromagnetic coupling. We simulated the 3D atomic model analogous to the MTJMSD and studied the effect of molecule’s magnetic couplings with the two FM electrodes. Simulations show that when a molecule established ferromagnetic coupling with one electrode and antiferromagnetic coupling with the other electrode, then theoretical results effectively explained the experimental findings. Our studies suggest that in order to align MTJMSDs’ electrodes antiparallel to each other, the exchange coupling strength between a molecule and FM electrodes should be ˜50% of the interatomic exchange coupling for the FM electrodes.

  4. Electroelastic coupling between membrane surface fluctuations and membrane-embedded charges: Continuum multidielectric treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miloshevsky, Gennady V., E-mail: gennady@purdue.edu; Hassanein, Ahmed, E-mail: hassanein@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Partenskii, Michael B., E-mail: partensky@gmail.com; Jordan, Peter C., E-mail: jordan@brandeis.edu [Department of Chemistry, MS-015, Brandeis University, P.O. Box 549110, Waltham, Massachusetts 02454-9110 (United States)

    2010-06-21

    The coupling of electric fields and charges with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations affects membrane electroporation, ionic conductance, and voltage gating. A modified continuum model is introduced to study charge interaction with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations in multidielectric environments. By surrounding a point charge with a low dielectric sphere, the linear Poisson–Boltzmann equation is directly solved by calculating the reaction field potential via a method that eliminates singularity contributions. This allows treatment of charges located at dielectric boundaries. Two complementary mechanisms governing charge-fluctuation interactions are considered: (1) electroelastic deformation (EED), treating the membrane as an elastic slab (smectic bilayer model), and (2) electrohydrophobic solvation (EHS), accounting for water penetration into the membrane’s hydrophobic core. EED often leads to large membrane thickness perturbations, far larger than those consistent with elastic model descriptions [M. B. Partenskii, G. V. Miloshevsky, and P. C. Jordan, Isr. J. Chem. 47, 385 (2007)]. We argue that a switch from EED to EHS can be energetically advantageous at intermediate perturbation amplitudes. Both perturbation mechanisms are simulated by introducing adjustable shapes optimized by the kinetic Monte Carlo reaction path following approach [G. V. Miloshevsky and P. C. Jordan, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 214901 (2005)]. The resulting energy profiles agree with those of recent atomistic molecular dynamics studies on translating a charged residue across a lipid bilayer [S. Dorairaj and T. W. Allen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 4943 (2007)].

  5. Electroelastic coupling between membrane surface fluctuations and membrane-embedded charges: Continuum multidielectric treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coupling of electric fields and charges with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations affects membrane electroporation, ionic conductance, and voltage gating. A modified continuum model is introduced to study charge interaction with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations in multidielectric environments. By surrounding a point charge with a low dielectric sphere, the linear Poisson–Boltzmann equation is directly solved by calculating the reaction field potential via a method that eliminates singularity contributions. This allows treatment of charges located at dielectric boundaries. Two complementary mechanisms governing charge-fluctuation interactions are considered: (1) electroelastic deformation (EED), treating the membrane as an elastic slab (smectic bilayer model), and (2) electrohydrophobic solvation (EHS), accounting for water penetration into the membrane’s hydrophobic core. EED often leads to large membrane thickness perturbations, far larger than those consistent with elastic model descriptions [M. B. Partenskii, G. V. Miloshevsky, and P. C. Jordan, Isr. J. Chem. 47, 385 (2007)]. We argue that a switch from EED to EHS can be energetically advantageous at intermediate perturbation amplitudes. Both perturbation mechanisms are simulated by introducing adjustable shapes optimized by the kinetic Monte Carlo reaction path following approach [G. V. Miloshevsky and P. C. Jordan, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 214901 (2005)]. The resulting energy profiles agree with those of recent atomistic molecular dynamics studies on translating a charged residue across a lipid bilayer [S. Dorairaj and T. W. Allen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 4943 (2007)

  6. Electroelastic coupling between membrane surface fluctuations and membrane-embedded charges: Continuum multidielectric treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloshevsky, Gennady V.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Partenskii, Michael B.; Jordan, Peter C.

    2010-06-01

    The coupling of electric fields and charges with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations affects membrane electroporation, ionic conductance, and voltage gating. A modified continuum model is introduced to study charge interaction with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations in multidielectric environments. By surrounding a point charge with a low dielectric sphere, the linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation is directly solved by calculating the reaction field potential via a method that eliminates singularity contributions. This allows treatment of charges located at dielectric boundaries. Two complementary mechanisms governing charge-fluctuation interactions are considered: (1) electroelastic deformation (EED), treating the membrane as an elastic slab (smectic bilayer model), and (2) electrohydrophobic solvation (EHS), accounting for water penetration into the membrane's hydrophobic core. EED often leads to large membrane thickness perturbations, far larger than those consistent with elastic model descriptions [M. B. Partenskii, G. V. Miloshevsky, and P. C. Jordan, Isr. J. Chem. 47, 385 (2007)]. We argue that a switch from EED to EHS can be energetically advantageous at intermediate perturbation amplitudes. Both perturbation mechanisms are simulated by introducing adjustable shapes optimized by the kinetic Monte Carlo reaction path following approach [G. V. Miloshevsky and P. C. Jordan, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 214901 (2005)]. The resulting energy profiles agree with those of recent atomistic molecular dynamics studies on translating a charged residue across a lipid bilayer [S. Dorairaj and T. W. Allen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 4943 (2007)].

  7. Charge collection efficiency degradation induced by MeV ions in semiconductor devices: Model and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittone, E.; Pastuovic, Z.; Breese, M. B. H.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Jaksic, M.; Raisanen, J.; Siegele, R.; Simon, A.; Vizkelethy, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates both theoretically and experimentally the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation in silicon diodes induced by energetic ions. Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out on n- and p-type silicon diodes which were previously irradiated with MeV He ions show evidence that the CCE degradation does not only depend on the mass, energy and fluence of the damaging ion, but also depends on the ion probe species and on the polarization state of the device. A general one-dimensional model is derived, which accounts for the ion-induced defect distribution, the ionization profile of the probing ion and the charge induction mechanism. Using the ionizing and non-ionizing energy loss profiles resulting from simulations based on the binary collision approximation and on the electrostatic/transport parameters of the diode under study as input, the model is able to accurately reproduce the experimental CCE degradation curves without introducing any phenomenological additional term or formula. Although limited to low level of damage, the model is quite general, including the displacement damage approach as a special case and can be applied to any semiconductor device. It provides a method to measure the capture coefficients of the radiation induced recombination centres. They can be considered indexes, which can contribute to assessing the relative radiation hardness of semiconductor materials.

  8. Complementary charge islands structure for a high voltage device of partial-SOI*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Lijuan; Hu Shengdong; Zhang Bo; Li Zhaoji

    2011-01-01

    A new partial-SOI (PSOI) high voltage device structure named CNCI PSOI (complementary n+-charge islands PSOI) is proposed. CNCI PSOI is characterized by equidistant high concentration n+-regions on the top and bottom interfaces of a dielectric buried layer of a PSOI device. When a high voltage is applied to the device, complementary holes and electron islands are formed on the two n+-regions on the top and bottom interfaces, therefore effectively enhancing the electric field of the dielectric buried layer (EI) and increasing the breakdown voltage (BV), alleviating the self-heating effect (SHE) by the silicon window under the source. An analytical model of the vertical interface electric field for the CNCI PSOI is presented and the analytical results are in good agreement with the 2D simulation results. BV and E1 of the CNCI PSOI LDMOS increase to 591 V and 512 V/μm from 216 V and 81.4 V/μm of the conventional PSOI with a lower SHE, respectively. The influence of structure parameters on the device characteristics is analyzed for the proposed device in detail.

  9. Spin Polarized Photons from Axially Charged Plasma at Weak Coupling: Complete Leading Order

    CERN Document Server

    Mamo, Kiminad A

    2015-01-01

    In the presence of (approximately conserved) axial charge in the QCD plasma at finite temperature, the emitted photons are spin-aligned, which is a unique P- and CP-odd signature of axial charge in the photon emission observables. We compute this "P-odd photon emission rate" in weak coupling regime at high temperature limit to complete leading order in the QCD coupling constant: the leading log as well as the constant under the log. As in the P-even total emission rate in the literature, the computation of P-odd emission rate at leading order consists of three parts: 1) Compton and Pair Annihilation processes with hard momentum exchange, 2) soft t- and u-channel contributions with Hard Thermal Loop re-summation, 3) Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) re-summation of collinear Bremstrahlung and Pair Annihilation. We present analytical and numerical evaluations of these contributions to our P-odd photon emission rate observable.

  10. Spin polarized photons from an axially charged plasma at weak coupling: Complete leading order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Kiminad A.; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2016-03-01

    In the presence of (approximately conserved) axial charge in the QCD plasma at finite temperature, the emitted photons are spin aligned, which is a unique P - and C P -odd signature of axial charge in the photon emission observables. We compute this "P -odd photon emission rate" in a weak coupling regime at a high temperature limit to complete leading order in the QCD coupling constant: the leading log as well as the constant under the log. As in the P -even total emission rate in the literature, the computation of the P -odd emission rate at leading order consists of three parts: (1) Compton and pair annihilation processes with hard momentum exchange, (2) soft t - and u -channel contributions with hard thermal loop resummation, (3) Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal resummation of collinear bremsstrahlung and pair annihilation. We present analytical and numerical evaluations of these contributions to our P -odd photon emission rate observable.

  11. Strong coupling critique of spin fluctuation driven charge order in underdoped cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vivek; Norman, M. R.

    2015-08-01

    Charge order has emerged as a generic feature of doped cuprates, leading to important questions about its origin and its relation to superconductivity. Recent experiments on two classes of hole doped cuprates indicate a novel d -wave symmetry for the order. These were motivated by earlier spin fluctuation theoretical studies based on an expansion about hot spots in the Brillouin zone that indicated such an order would be competitive with d -wave superconductivity. Here, we reexamine this problem by solving strong coupling equations in the full Brillouin zone for experimentally relevant parameters. We find that bond-oriented order, as seen experimentally, is strongly suppressed. We also include coupling to B1 g phonons and do not see any qualitative change. Our results argue against an itinerant model for the charge order, implying instead that such order is likely due to Coulombic phase separation of the doped holes.

  12. Ultrasonic testing device for pipes with an acoustic coupling liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    System for the ultrasonic testing of tubes comprising: a probe consisting of an ultrasonic transducer integral with a mirror receiving the ultrasonic wave emitted by the transducer and centred according to the axis of the probe, a mechanism to move the probe inside the tube under inspection, facilities for detecting ultrasonic echoes returned by the tube. It also features facilities for introducing an acoustic coupling liquid in the capacity included between the tube, the transducer and the mirror when the probe enters the tube being tested as well as for drawing off this liquid when the probe is withdrawn from the tube. These facilities mainly include a soft bag tank filled with the liquid and located at the lower part of the probe and communicating with the capacity to be filled with the liquid. This bag becomes flat when entering the tube after the probe and thus pushes part of the liquid it contains towards this capacity. This liquid assembles again by gravity in the bag when it leaves the tube being tested and returns to its usual shape

  13. A low-power bidirectional telemetry device with a near-field charging feature for a cardiac microstimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuenn-Yuh Lee; Chih-Jen Cheng; Ming-Chun Liang

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, wireless telemetry using the near-field coupling technique with round-wire coils for an implanted cardiac microstimulator is presented. The proposed system possesses an external powering amplifier and an internal bidirectional microstimulator. The energy of the microstimulator is provided by a rectifier that can efficiently charge a rechargeable device. A fully integrated regulator and a charge pump circuit are included to generate a stable, low-voltage, and high-potential supply voltage, respectively. A miniature digital processor includes a phase-shift-keying (PSK) demodulator to decode the transmission data and a self-protective system controller to operate the entire system. To acquire the cardiac signal, a low-voltage and low-power monitoring analog front end (MAFE) performs immediate threshold detection and data conversion. In addition, the pacing circuit, which consists of a pulse generator (PG) and its digital-to-analog (D/A) controller, is responsible for stimulating heart tissue. The chip was fabricated by Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) with 0.35-μm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology to perform the monitoring and pacing functions with inductively powered communication. Using a model with lead and heart tissue on measurement, a -5-V pulse at a stimulating frequency of 60 beats per minute (bpm) is delivered while only consuming 31.5 μW of power. PMID:23851950

  14. Self-consistent coupling of atomic orbitals to a moving charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe the time evolution of hydrogenic orbitals perturbed by a moving charge. Starting with the equation for an atom interacting with a charge, the authors use an eikonal representation of the total wave-function, followed by an eikonal approximation, to derive coupled differential equations for the temporal change of the orbitals and the charge's trajectory. The orbitals are represented by functions with complex exponents changing with time, describing electronic density and flux changes. For each orbital, they solve a set of six coupled differential equations; two of them are derived with a time-dependent variational procedure for the real and imaginary parts of the exponents, and the other four are the Hamilton equations of the positions and momenta of the moving charge. The molecular potentials are derived from the exact expressions for the electronic energies. Results of calculations for 1s and 2s orbitals show large variation of the real exponent parts over time, with respect to asymptotic values, and that imaginary parts remain small

  15. Charge Behaviors around Oxide Device/Pseudo-Physiological Solution Interface with Molecular Dynamic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Yuki; Shibuta, Yasushi; Sakata, Toshiya

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the charge behaviors of ions and water molecules at the oxide device/pseudo-physiological solution interface by use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations because the detection principle of semiconductor-based biosensors is based on the detection of charge density changes at the oxide sensing surface in physiological environments. In particular, we designed an alpha-quartz (100) surface with some charges corresponding to pH=5.5 so that the ionic behaviors for 500 mM each of Na+ and Cl- around the interface were calculated under the surface condition with charges, considering a real system. As a result of the simulation, we defined the region of Debye length from the calculated potential distribution, in which some parameters such as diffusion coefficient and the vibration of water molecules around the interface differed from those of the bulk solution. The elucidation of the solid/liquid interfacial behaviors by the simulation technique should deepen our understanding of the detection principle of semiconductor-based biosensors and will give guidelines for the design of a bio-interface in the field of biosensing technology, because they cannot be demonstrated experimentally.

  16. Observation of visible forbidden lines from highly charged tungsten ions at the large helical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.; Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H. A.; Ding, X. B.; Sudo, S.; Suzuki, C.; Tamura, N.; Nakamura, N.; Watanabe, H.; Koike, F.

    2013-09-01

    Visible line emission from highly charged tungsten ions has been observed at the large helical device (LHD) using a tracer encapsulated solid pellet. One of the measured lines is assigned to a magnetic-dipole (M1) line of the ground-term fine-structure transition of W26+. The other line is unidentified but probably due to a highly charged tungsten ion. Photon emission was observed at 40 lines of sight divided along the vertical direction of a horizontally elongated poloidal cross section of the LHD plasma. The line-integrated intensity of the M1 line along each line of sight indicates a peaked profile at the plasma center where the electron temperatures are high enough so that tungsten ions are highly ionized.

  17. Performance of new generation swept charge devices for lunar x-ray spectroscopy on Chandrayaan-2

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, P. H.; Gow, J. P. D.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Anand, M; Pool, P.; Sreekumar, P.; Narendranath, S

    2012-01-01

    The Chandrayaan-2 Large Area Soft X-ray spectrometer (CLASS) is due to be launched by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) in 2014. It will map the elemental composition of the lunar surface, building on the Chandrayaan-1 X-ray spectrometer (C1XS) heritage. CLASS will use an array of e2v technologies CCD236 swept charge devices (SCD) providing an active detector area of approximately 64 cm2, almost three times the active area of C1XS which used the first generation of SCD, the CCD54....

  18. Interfacial charge transfer behavior of conducting polymers as contact electrode for semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakita, Jin; Fujikawa, Yuki; Nagata, Takahiro; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-04-01

    As an alternative contact electrode material to metals, which is necessary for downsized semiconductor devices in 10 nm processes, an intrinsically conducting polymer was studied in terms of its interfacial charge-transfer behavior with an inorganic semiconductor. Polypyrrole as the conducting polymer was formed using an electrochemical technique on an oxide semiconductor and its electronic properties were evaluated using scanning probe microscopy. The experimental results showed that an ohmic contact was observed dynamically at local positions, although a Schottky barrier was expected in the static electronic state over the measurement area. From this research, the conducting polymer was found to be promising as a contact electrode.

  19. A paper based microfluidic device for easy detection of uric acid using positively charged gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Hens, Abhiram; Arun, Ravi Kumar; Chatterjee, Monosree; Mahato, Kuldeep; Layek, Keya; Chanda, Nripen

    2015-03-21

    A paper based microfluidic device is fabricated that can rapidly detect very low concentrations of uric acid (UA) using 3,5,3',5'-tetramethyl benzidine (TMB), H2O2 and positively charged gold nanoparticles ((+)AuNPs). In the presence of (+)AuNPs, H2O2 reacts with TMB to produce a bluish-green colour which becomes colourless on reaction with UA. This colorimetric method can detect as low as 8.1 ppm of UA within <20 minutes on white filter paper. This technique provides an alternative way for UA detection. PMID:25655365

  20. Trapping and Driving Individual Charged Micro-particles in Fluid with an Electrostatic Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjing Xu; Zijing Lei; Jingkun Guo; Jie Huang; Wei Wang; Uta Reibetanz; Shengyong Xu

    2016-01-01

    A variety of micro-tweezers techniques, such as optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, and dielectrophoresis technique, have been applied intensively in precise characterization of micro/nanoparticles and bio-molecules. They have contributed remarkably in better understanding of working mechanisms of individual sub-cell organelles, proteins, and DNA. In this paper, we present a controllable electrostatic device embedded in a microchannel, which is capable of driving, trapping, and releasing charged micro-particles suspended in microfluid, demonstrating the basic concepts of electrostatic tweezers. Such a device is scalable to smaller size and offers an alternative to currently used micro-tweezers for application in sorting, selecting, manipulating, and analyzing individual micro/nanoparticles. Furthermore, the system offers the potential in being combined with dielectrophoresis and other techniques to create hybrid micro-manipulation systems.

  1. Study on the photosensitive properties of the charge-coupled matrix as the element for measuring instruments of nuclear-physical experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main characteristics (sensitivity linearity, dynamical range and time of keeping the analogue signal) of the photomatrix assembled on charge-coupled devices (CCD) are investigated. The matrix comprising 144x232 elements have been used as a photosensitive element. The flowsheet of the bench for investigating CCD characteristics is presented. It is stated on the base of the results obtained that the dynamical range of the matrix on the CCD equals 100. Time of keeping analogue signal makes up dozens of milliseconds. Application matrix CCD with optical data input permits to decrease instrument expenditures by 100. The results obtained are the basis for development of measuring technique of nuclear-physical experiment on charge-coupled instruments

  2. Tuning Charge and Correlation Effects for a Single Molecule on a Graphene Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Lu, Jiong; Lischner, Johannes; Omrani, Arash A.; Riss, Alexander; Karrasch, Christoph; Jung, Han Sae; Khajeh, Ramin; Wong, Dillon; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Michael F.

    Controlling electronic devices down to the single molecule level is a grand challenge of nanotechnology. Single-molecules have been integrated into devices capable of tuning electronic response, but a drawback for these systems is that their microscopic structure remains unknown due to inability to image molecules in the junction region. Here we present a combined STM and nc-AFM study demonstrating gate-tunable control of the charge state of individual F4TCNQ molecules at the surface of a graphene field effect transistor. This is different from previous studies in that the Fermi level of the substrate was continuously tuned across the molecular orbital energy level. Using STS we have determined the resulting energy level evolution of the LUMO, its associated vibronic modes, and the graphene Dirac point (ED). We show that the energy difference between ED and the LUMO increases as EF is moved away from ED due to electron-electron interactions that renormalize the molecular quasiparticle energy. This is attributed to gate-tunable image-charge screening in graphene and corroborated by ab initio calculations.

  3. Controlling charge carrier injection in organic electroluminescent devices via ITO substrate modification

    CERN Document Server

    Day, S

    2001-01-01

    and the ITO substrate was found to shift the work function of the electrode, and so modify the barrier to hole injection. Scanning Kelvin probe measurements show that the ITO work function is increased by 0.25 eV with a film of TNAP, while a C sub 6 sub 0 film is found to reduce the work function by a comparable amount. The former has been attributed to a charge-transfer effect resulting in Fermi level alignment between the ITO and the TNAP layer, however the latter is believed to result from both charge transfer and a covalent interaction between C sub 6 sub 0 and ITO. The performance of devices incorporating these modified ITO electrode are rationalised in terms of the work function modification, film thicknesses and the hole transport properties of the two films. Competition between the induced work function change and the increasingly significant tunnelling barrier with thickness means that device performance is not as good as that provided by the SAMs. Direct processing of the ITO substrate has also been...

  4. Anti-Rolling Suspension for an Automobile by Coupled Electromagnetic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ryuzo; Suda, Yoshihiro; Nakano, Kimihiko

    Nowadays, various suspension control technologies have been developed such as active suspensions, semi-active suspensions and active stabilizers. As an alternative to a hydraulic actuator for suspension, electromagnetic devices have been developed. Electromagnetic devices are attracting much interest due to their high responsiveness, controllability, energy saving performance, and so on. Besides these advantages, electromagnetic devices can be connected to each other very easily. Therefore, the authors focus on this characteristic of the electromagnetic device and propose two methods to use coupled electromagnetic devices as an anti-rolling control device as well as vertical shock absorbers. The automobile experiences anti-rolling effects, such as roll damping and roll stabilization, without affecting the bouncing motion. Through basic experiments with two motors and control circuits, the performance of the proposed system is examined. The results indicate the coupled electromagnetic devices can be operated as a variable roll damper or a roll stabilizer. Numerical simulations of the turning automobile are carried out, and the results indicate the proposed system is effective.

  5. A “wire” signal smoothing device for laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel signal smoothing device for laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was developed. The “wire” signal smoothing device consists of a copper cylinder filled with steel wire, with an internal volume of approx. 94 cm3. The effectiveness of the “wire” signal smoothing device was evaluated with respect to both signal stability and decay time. With the developed “wire” smoothing device, no oscillation of the signal intensity was observed, even at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. This finding indicates that this device is well suited for routine optimization of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The signal stability was improved by a factor of 11 compared to the absence of a signal smoothing device at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Another significant advantage of the “wire” smoothing device is that the signal decay time is similar to that without the signal smoothing device. These properties cause the “wire” smoothing device to be well suited for low repetition rate laser ablation analysis, which provides smaller elemental fractionation and better spatial resolution. The proposed “wire” signal smoothing device has been successfully used for high depth resolution zircon dating. - Highlights: ► The wire stabilizer is able to provide smooth signals at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. ► The signal decay time is similar to that in the absence of a signal stabilizer. ► The wire stabilizer has been successfully used for zircon dating.

  6. Strong Ferromagnetically-Coupled Spin Valve Sensor Devices for Droplet Magnetofluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gungun Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a magnetofluidic device with integrated strong ferromagnetically-coupled and hysteresis-free spin valve sensors for dynamic monitoring of ferrofluid droplets in microfluidics. The strong ferromagnetic coupling between the free layer and the pinned layer of spin valve sensors is achieved by reducing the spacer thickness, while the hysteresis of the free layer is eliminated by the interplay between shape anisotropy and the strength of coupling. The increased ferromagnetic coupling field up to the remarkable 70 Oe, which is five-times larger than conventional solutions, brings key advantages for dynamic sensing, e.g., a larger biasing field giving rise to larger detection signals, facilitating the operation of devices without saturation of the sensors. Studies on the fundamental effects of an external magnetic field on the evolution of the shape of droplets, as enabled by the non-visual monitoring capability of the device, provides crucial information for future development of a magnetofluidic device for multiplexed assays.

  7. Impact of photon recycling and luminescence coupling in III-V photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A. W.; Höhn, O.; Micha, D. N.; Wagner, L.; Helmers, H.; Bett, A. W.; Dimroth, F.

    2015-03-01

    Single junction photovoltaic devices composed of direct bandgap III-V semiconductors such as GaAs can exploit the effects of photon recycling to achieve record-high open circuit voltages. Modeling such devices yields insight into the design and material criteria required to achieve high efficiencies. For a GaAs cell to reach 28 % efficiency without a substrate, the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetimes of the electrons and holes must be longer than 3 μs and 100 ns respectively in a 2 μm thin active region coupled to a very high reflective (>99%) rear-side mirror. The model is generalized to account for luminescence coupling in tandem devices, which yields direct insight into the top cell's non-radiative lifetimes. A heavily current mismatched GaAs/GaAs tandem device is simulated and measured experimentally as a function of concentration between 3 and 100 suns. The luminescence coupling increases from 14 % to 33 % experimentally, whereas the model requires an increasing SRH lifetime for both electrons and holes to explain these experimental results. However, intermediate absorbing GaAs layers between the two sub-cells may also increasingly contribute to the luminescence coupling as a function of concentration.

  8. Detection of charged particles and X-rays by scintillator layers coupled to amorphous silicon photodiode arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n diodes with transparent metallic contacts are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. When coupled to a suitable scintillator using CsI(Tl) as the scintillator we show a capability to detect minimum ionizing particles with S/N ∼20. We demonstrate such an arrangement by operating a p-i-n diode in photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). Moreover, we show that a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3-8 higher light sensitivity for shaping times of 1 μs. n-i-n devices have similar optical gain as the p-i-n photoconductor for short integrating times ( < 10μs). However, n-i-n devices exhibit much higher gain for a long term integration (10ms) than the p-i-n ones. High sensitivity photosensors are very desirable for X-ray medical imaging because radiation exposure dose can be reduced significantly. The scintillator CsI layers we made have higher spatial resolution than the Kodak commercial scintillator screens due to their internal columnar structure which can collimate the scintillation light. Evaporated CsI layers are shown to be more resistant to radiation damage than the crystalline bulk CsI(Tl)

  9. Surface plasmon coupled metal enhanced spectral and charge transport properties of poly(3,3'''-dialkylquarterthiophene) Langmuir Schaefer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rajiv K.; Yadav, Swatantra K.; Upadhyay, Chandan; Prakash, Rajiv; Mishra, Hirdyesh

    2015-03-01

    The coupling of organic molecule excitons with metal nano-structure surface plasmons can improve the performance of optoelectronic devices. This paper presents the effect of localized silver metal surface plasmons on spectral as well as charge transport properties of ordered molecular Langmuir Schaefer (LS) films of a fluorescent conducting multifunctional organic polymer: poly (3,3'''-dialkylquarterthiophene) [PQT-12]. The stability and thickness of the PQT-12 LS film were studied by the pressure vs. area isotherm curve. Atomic force microscopy images indicate the formation of a smooth ordered polymer thin LS film of PQT-12 over silver nanostructure island films [SNIF] (~40 to 50 nm in size). Raman, electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral measurements of the PQT-12 LS film, near SNIF i.e. the near field, show a plasmon coupled enhancement of ~13 fold in the intensity of Raman bands along with a two-fold enhancement in the absorption band (531 nm) and a six-fold enhancement in the fluorescence band (665 nm) coupled with a decrease in fluorescence decay time with improved photostability as compared to an identical control sample containing no SNIF i.e. the far field condition. These results indicate the formation of a plasmon coupled unified fluorophore system due to adsorption of the PQT-12 LS film over SNIF. The effect of plasmonic coupling is also studied by applying an electric field in sandwiched structures of Al/PQT-12 LS/SNIF/ITO with respect to Al/PQT-12 LS/ITO. Nearly three orders of magnitude enhancement in the current density (J-V plot) of the PQT-12 LS film is observed in the presence of SNIF, which further increases, on illuminating the film by green laser light [532 nm], while the fluorescence intensity and decay time decrease. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements of SNIF also show a red shift in 3d3/2 and 3d5/2 transitions of silver in the PQT-12 coated LS film, which indicates partial charge transfer from the PQT-12 polymer backbone

  10. Electric Dipole Moments of Charged Leptons from Their Majorana-type Yukawa Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    The electric dipole moments (EDMs) of charged leptons are significantly suppressed in standard model. It has been found previously that they are even more severely suppressed in seesaw type models by powers of tiny neutrino masses as far as a leptonic CP source is concerned. We investigate whether a Majorana-type Yukawa coupling between charged leptons and a doubly charged scalar can contribute significantly to their EDMs. An observable EDM would then help unravel the Majorana nature of neutrinos by a lepton number conserving quantity. We find that the EDMs are indeed parametrically large, of the form d_\\alpha\\propto em_\\alpha(m^2_\\beta-m^2_\\gamma)/m^4 up to logarithms, where m_\\alpha and m are respectively the masses of charged leptons and the scalar. And they satisfy a sum rule to good precision, d_e/m_e+d_\\mu/m_\\mu+d_\\tau/m_\\tau=0. With the most stringent constraints from lepton flavor violating transitions taken into account, their values are still much larger than the mentioned previous results. Unfortun...

  11. Multiple-receptor wireless power transfer for magnetic sensors charging on Mars via magnetic resonant coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunhua; Chau, K. T.; Zhang, Zhen; Qiu, Chun; Lin, Fei; Ching, T. W.

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a new idea for magnetic sensors charging on Mars, which aims to effectively transmit energy from Mars Rover to distributed magnetic sensors. The key is to utilize wireless power transfer (WPT) to enable multiple receptors extracting energy from the source via magnetic resonant coupling. Namely, the energy transmitter is located on the Mars Rover, whereas the energy receptor is installed in the magnetic sensor. In order to effectively transfer the power, a resonator is installed between the transmitter and the receptors. Based on the proposed idea, the system topology, operation principle, and simulation results are developed. By performing finite element magnetic field analysis, the output power and efficiency of the proposed WPT system are evaluated. It confirms that the Mars Rover carrying with the energy transmitter is capable of loitering around the resonator, while the magnetic sensors on the receptors can be simultaneously charged according to energy-on-demand.

  12. 2-Dimensional coupled algorithm for simulating dose-rate transient effects of semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most commercial semiconductor simulators introduce an analytical equation to calculate the energy deposited by particles or gamma ray when simulating radiation effects of semiconductor devices. However, this method is insufficient as the size of devices becomes smaller and smaller. In order to solve the limitation of analytical method, this paper presents a 2-dimensional algorithm for calculating dose-rate transient response of semiconductor devices by coupling Finite Volume method with Monte Carlo method, which is used to trace the history of particles and generate the distribution of deposited energy. An integrated program is established by combining an open source semiconductor simulator named GSS and a Monte Carlo code. And the computational results for two reverse biased diodes with different structures are compared with MEDICI's and Enlow's theoretical photocurrent model. It shows that the coupled algorithm is consistent with traditional analytical method and Enlow's model. (author)

  13. Energy loss and charge state distribution of calcium ions in dense moderately coupled carbon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the interaction of swift calcium ions (Energy: 3.5 MeV/u) with a dense and moderately coupled carbon plasma (Coupling parameter: Γ=0.1-0.5) is investigated. The plasma state is generated by heating a thin carbon foil volumetrically by thermal X-ray radiation. The thermal X-ray radiation itself is generated by the conversion of a high energy laser beam in a hohlraum cavity. Compared to earlier ion stopping experiments the electron density and the plasma coupling parameter could be increased by an order of magnitude. This work provides the first time experimental energy loss and charge state distribution data in this moderately coupled interaction regime. The thesis consists of a theoretical part where the ion beam plasma interaction is studied for a broad range of plasma parameters and an experimental part where the ion beam interaction with the hohlraum plasma target is measured. All the described experiments were carried out at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. This facility offers the unique possibility to combine a heavy ion beam from an accelerator with a high energy laser beam in one interaction chamber. An intense laser pulse (150 J of laser energy in 1 ns at λL=527 nm) is focused inside a 600 μm diameter spherical cavity and generates a hot gold plasma that emits X-rays. The absorbed and reemitted radiation establishes a spatially uniform temperature distribution in the cavity and serves as an intense, isotropic X-ray source with a quasi-thermal spectral distribution. These thermal X-rays with a radiation temperature of Tr=98±6 eV then propagate into a secondary cylindrical hohlraum (diameter: 1000 μm, length: 950 μm) where they volumetrically heat two thin carbon foils to the plasma state. The radiation temperature in the secondary hohlraum is Tr=33±5 eV. This indirect laser heating scheme has the advantage that the whole sample volume is instantaneously heated and that the plasma is inertially and

  14. Modeling of beam customization devices in the pencil beam splitting algorithm for heavy charged particle radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Broad-beam-delivery methods use multiple devices to form a conformal field of heavy charged particles. To overcome an intrinsic difficulty of pencil-beam algorithms in dealing with fine lateral structure, we applied the pencil-beam-splitting algorithm to a beam-customization system conprised of multiple collimators and a range compensating filter. The pencil beams were initially defined at the range compensating filter with angular acceptance correction for the upstream collimators followed by the range compensation effects. They were individually transported with possible splitting near the downstream collimator edges. The dose distribution was calculated and compared with existing experimental data. The penumbra sizes for various collimator edges agreed between them to a submillimeter level. This beam-customization model will complete an accurate and efficient dose-calculation algorithm for treatment planning.

  15. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Graphene as Charge Storage Layer in Flash Memory Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a flash memory device with chemical-vapor-deposited graphene as a charge trapping layer. It was found that the average RMS roughness of block oxide on graphene storage layer can be significantly reduced from 5.9 nm to 0.5 nm by inserting a seed metal layer, which was verified by AFM measurements. The memory window is 5.6 V for a dual sweep of ±12 V at room temperature. Moreover, a reduced hysteresis at the low temperature was observed, indicative of water molecules or −OH groups between graphene and dielectric playing an important role in memory windows.

  16. The effect of protons on the performance of second generation Swept Charge Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gow, Jason P.D., E-mail: j.p.d.gow@open.ac.uk [e2v Centre for Electronic Imaging, Planetary and Space Sciences Research Institute, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Holland, Andrew D. [e2v Centre for Electronic Imaging, Planetary and Space Sciences Research Institute, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Pool, Peter J. [e2v Technologies PLC, 106 Waterhouse Lance, Chelmsford, Essex CM1 2QU (United Kingdom); Smith, David R. [Centre for Sensors and Instrumentation, School of Engineering and Design, Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-11

    The e2v technologies Swept Charge Device (SCD) was developed as a large area detector for X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis, achieving near Fano-limited spectroscopy at -15 Degree-Sign C. The SCD was flown in the XRF instruments onboard the European Space Agency's SMART-1 and the Indian Space Research Organisation's Chandrayaan-1 lunar missions. The second generation SCD, proposed for use in the soft X-ray Spectrometer on the Chandrayaan-2 lunar orbiter and the soft X-ray imager on China's HXMT mission, was developed, in part, using the findings of the radiation damage studies performed for the Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer. This paper discusses the factor of two improvements in radiation tolerance achieved in the second generation SCD, the different SCD sizes produced and their advantages for future XRF instruments, for example through reduced shielding mass or higher operating temperatures.

  17. Asymmetric flows over symmetric surfaces: capacitive coupling in induced-charge electro-osmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report curious asymmetric induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) flows over a symmetric, planar gate electrode under applied ac electric fields, whereas symmetric, counter-rotating rolls are expected. Furthermore, the asymmetric component of the flow is consistently directed towards the grounded electrode. We propose that capacitive coupling of the gate electrode to the microscope stage-a comparatively large equipotential surface that acts effectively as a ground-is responsible for this symmetry breaking. This stray capacitance drives the formation of a double layer whose zeta potential is proportional to the potential drop from the electrolyte directly above the gate electrode to the external stage. Therefore, the charge in this 'stray' double layer varies in phase with the driving field, resulting in a rectified, steady flow as with standard ICEO. We experimentally vary the stray capacitance, the electric potential of the stage and the location of the gate electrode, and find that the effect on the stray flow is qualitatively consistent with the predictions of the proposed mechanism. In the process, we demonstrate that capacitive coupling offers an additional means of manipulating fluid flow over a polarizable surface.

  18. Coupling Electric Vehicles and Power Grid through Charging-In-Motion and Connected Vehicle Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jan-Mou [ORNL; Jones, Perry T [ORNL; Onar, Omer C [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A traffic-assignment-based framework is proposed to model the coupling of transportation network and power grid for analyzing impacts of energy demand from electric vehicles on the operation of power distribution. Although the reverse can be investigated with the proposed framework as well, electricity flowing from a power grid to electric vehicles is the focus of this paper. Major variables in transportation network (including link flows) and power grid (including electricity transmitted) are introduced for the coupling. Roles of charging-in-motion technology and connected vehicle technology have been identified in the framework of supernetwork. A linkage (i.e. individual energy demand) between the two networks is defined to construct the supernetwork. To determine equilibrium of the supernetwork can also answer how many drivers are going to use the charging-in-motion services, in which locations, and at what time frame. An optimal operation plan of power distribution will be decided along the determination simultaneously by which we have a picture about what level of power demand from the grid is expected in locations during an analyzed period. Caveat of the framework and possible applications have also been discussed.

  19. Regular electrically charged structures in Nonlinear Electrodynamics coupled to General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Dymnikova, I

    2004-01-01

    We address the question of existence of regular spherically symmetric electrically charged solutions in Nonlinear Electrodynamics coupled to General Relativity. Stress-energy tensor of the electromagnetic field has the algebraic structure $T_0^0=T_1^1$. In this case the Weak Energy Condition leads to the de Sitter asymptotic at approaching a regular center. In de Sitter center of an electrically charged NED structure, electric field, geometry and stress-energy tensor are regular without Maxwell limit which is replaced by de Sitter limit: energy density of a field is maximal and gives an effective cut-off on self-energy density, produced by NED coupled to gravity and related to cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. Regular electric solutions satisfying WEC, suffer from one cusp in the Lagrangian ${\\cal L}(F)$, which creates the problem in an effective geometry whose geodesics are world lines of NED photons. We investigate propagation of photons and show that their world lines never terminate which suggests absence ...

  20. Ohmic contact and space-charge-limited current in molybdenum oxide modified devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Zhaoyue; Deng, Zhenbo; Zheng, Jianjie; Zou, Ye; Chen, Zheng; Xu, Denghui; Wang, Yongsheng

    2009-10-01

    The effect of indium-tin oxide (ITO) surface treatment on hole injection of devices with molybdenum oxide (MoO 3) as a buffer layer on ITO was studied. The Ohmic contact is formed at the metal/organic interface due to high work function of MoO 3. Hence, the current is due to space charge limited when ITO is positively biased. The hole mobility of N, N‧-bis-(1-napthyl)-N, N‧-diphenyl-1, 1‧biphenyl-4, 4‧-diamine (NPB) at various thicknesses (100-400 nm) has been estimated by using space-charge-limited current measurements. The hole mobility of NPB, 1.09×10 -5 cm 2/V s at 100 nm is smaller than the value of 1.52×10 -4 cm 2/V s at 400 nm at 0.8 MV/cm, which is caused by the interfacial trap states restricted by the surface interaction. The mobility is hardly changed with NPB thickness for the effect of interfacial trap states on mobility which can be negligible when the thickness is more than 300 nm.

  1. Rational design of charge transport molecules for blue organic light emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmaperuma, Asanga; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Koech, Phillip; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James; Gaspar, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The efficiency and stability of blue OLEDs continue to be the primary roadblock to developing organic solid-state white lighting as well as power efficient displays. It is generally accepted that such high quantum efficiency can be achieved with the use of organometallic phosphor doped OLEDs. The transport layers can be designed to increase the carrier density as a way to reduce the drive voltage. We have developed a comprehensive library of charge transporting molecules using combination of theoretical modeling and experimental evidence. Our work focuses on using chemical structure design and computational methods to develop host, transport, emitter, and blocking materials for high efficiency blue OLEDs, along with device architectures to take advantage of these new materials. Through chemical modification of materials we are able to influence both the charge balance and emission efficiency of OLEDs, and understand the influence of the location of photon emission in OLEDs as a function of minor chemical modifications of host and electron transport materials. Design rules, structure-property relationships and results from state of the art OLEDs will be presented.

  2. Non-reciprocal few-photon devices based on chiral waveguide-emitter couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Ballestero, C; Vidal, F J Garcia; Gonzalez-Tudela, A

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of designing efficient, non reciprocal few-photon devices by exploiting the chiral coupling between two waveguide modes and a single quantum emitter. We show how this system can induce non-reciprocal photon transport at the single-photon level and act as an optical diode. Afterwards, we also show how the same system shows a transistor-like behaviour for a two-photon input. The efficiency in both cases is shown to be large for feasible experimental implementations. Our results illustrate the potential of chiral waveguide-emitter couplings for applications in quantum circuitry.

  3. Diffusion model for charge transfer from a photosynthetic reaction center to an electrode in a photovoltaic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takshi, Arash [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Advanced Materials and Process Engineering Lab, University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)], E-mail: arasht@ece.ubc.ca; Madden, John D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Advanced Materials and Process Engineering Lab, University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Beatty, J. Thomas [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3 (Canada)

    2009-05-30

    In spite of a high quantum efficiency in the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (RC) the overall efficiency in a RC-based photovoltaic device is very poor partly because of an inefficient collection of charges by electrodes. To explain charge transport between the RC and an electrode a diffusion model is proposed. The numerical solution of the diffusion process describes the measured photocurrent well. An approximation of the initial condition is also made to obtain analytical expressions for the photocurrent. The model suggests that the slow transient response of the photocurrent is due to the diffusion in a biological photovoltaic device.

  4. Diffusion model for charge transfer from a photosynthetic reaction center to an electrode in a photovoltaic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of a high quantum efficiency in the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (RC) the overall efficiency in a RC-based photovoltaic device is very poor partly because of an inefficient collection of charges by electrodes. To explain charge transport between the RC and an electrode a diffusion model is proposed. The numerical solution of the diffusion process describes the measured photocurrent well. An approximation of the initial condition is also made to obtain analytical expressions for the photocurrent. The model suggests that the slow transient response of the photocurrent is due to the diffusion in a biological photovoltaic device.

  5. Impact of continuing scaling on the device performance of 3D cylindrical junction-less charge trapping memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinkai, Li; Zongliang, Huo; Lei, Jin; Dandan, Jiang; Peizhen, Hong; Qiang, Xu; Zhaoyun, Tang; Chunlong, Li; Tianchun, Ye

    2015-09-01

    This work presents a comprehensive analysis of 3D cylindrical junction-less charge trapping memory device performance regarding continuous scaling of the structure dimensions. The key device performance, such as program/erase speed, vertical charge loss, and lateral charge migration under high temperature are intensively studied using the Sentaurus 3D device simulator. Although scaling of channel radius is beneficial for operation speed improvement, it leads to a retention challenge due to vertical leakage, especially enhanced charge loss through TPO. Scaling of gate length not only decreases the program/erase speed but also leads to worse lateral charge migration. Scaling of spacer length is critical for the interference of adjacent cells and should be carefully optimized according to specific cell operation conditions. The gate stack shape is also found to be an important factor affecting the lateral charge migration. Our results provide guidance for high density and high reliability 3D CTM integration. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61474137, 61176073, 61306107).

  6. Investigation of charge trapping mechanism for nanocrystal-based organic nonvolatile floating gate memory devices by band structure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lim, Ki-Tae; Park, Eung-Kyu; Shin, Ha-Chul; Kim, Chung Soo; Park, Kee-Chan; Ahn, Joung-Real; Bang, Jin Ho; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the charge trapping mechanism and electrical performance of CdSe nanocrystals, such as nanoparticles and nanowires in organic floating gate memory devices. Despite of same chemical component, each nanocrystals show different electrical performances with distinct trapping mechanism. CdSe nanoparticles trap holes in the memory device; on the contrary, nanowires trap electrons. This phenomenon is mainly due to the difference of energy band structures between nanoparticles and nanowires, measured by the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Also, we investigated the memory performance with C- V characteristics, charging and discharging phenomena, and retention time. The nanoparticle based hole trapping memory device has large memory window while the nanowire based electron trapping memory shows a narrow memory window. In spite of narrow memory window, the nanowire based memory device shows better retention performance of about 55% of the charge even after 104 sec of charging. The contrasting performance of nanoparticle and nanowire is attributed to the difference in their energy band and the morphology of thin layer in the device. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Interplay of Rashba spin orbit coupling and disorder in the conductance properties of a four terminal junction device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Sudin; Basu, Saurabh

    2016-04-01

    We report a thorough theoretical investigation on the quantum transport of a disordered four terminal device in the presence of Rashba spin orbit coupling (RSOC) in two dimensions. Specifically we compute the behaviour of the longitudinal (charge) conductance, spin Hall conductance and spin Hall conductance fluctuation as a function of the strength of disorder and Rashba spin orbit interaction using the Landauer Büttiker formalism via Green's function technique. Our numerical calculations reveal that both the conductances diminish with disorder. At smaller values of the RSOC parameter, the longitudinal and spin Hall conductances increase, while both vanish in the strong RSOC limit. The spin current is more drastically affected by both disorder and RSOC than its charge counterpart. The spin Hall conductance fluctuation does not show any universality in terms of its value and it depends on both disorder as well as on the RSOC strength. Thus the spin Hall conductance fluctuation has a distinct character compared to the fluctuation in the longitudinal conductance. Further one parameter scaling theory is studied to assess the transition to a metallic regime as claimed in literature and we find no confirmation about the emergence of a metallic state induced by RSOC.

  8. Charge transport in organic multi-layer devices under electric and optical fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, June Hyoung

    2007-12-01

    Charge transport in small organic molecules and conjugated conducting polymers under electric or optical fields is studied by using field effect transistors and photo-voltaic cells with multiple thin layers. With these devices, current under electric field, photo-current under optical field, and luminescence of optical materials are measured to characterize organic and polymeric materials. For electric transport studies, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped by polystyrenesulfonic acid is used, which is conductive with conductivity of approximately 25 S/cm. Despite their high conductance, field effect transistors based on the films are successfully built and characterized by monitoring modulations of drain current by gate voltage and IV characteristic curves. Due to very thin insulating layers of poly(vinylphenol), the transistors are relative fast under small gate voltage variation although heavy ions are involved in charge transport. In IV characteristic curves, saturation effects can be observed. Analysis using conventional field effect transistor model indicates high mobility of charge carriers, 10 cm2/V·sec, which is not consistent with the mobility of the conducting polymer. It is proposed that the effect of a small density of ions injected via polymer dielectric upon application of gate voltage and the ion compensation of key hopping sites accounts for the operation of the field effect transistors. For the studies of transport under optical field, photovoltaic cells with 3 different dendrons, which are efficient to harvest photo-excited electrons, are used. These dendrons consist of two electron-donors (tetraphenylporphyrin) and one electron-accepter (naphthalenediimide). Steady-state fluorescence measurements show that inter-molecular interaction is dominant in solid dendron film, although intra-molecular interaction is still present. Intra-molecular interaction is suggested by different fluorescence lifetimes between solutions of donor and dendrons. This

  9. The self-force on a non-minimally coupled static scalar charge outside a Schwarzschild black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Demian H J; Tsokaros, Antonios A; Wiseman, Alan G [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

    2007-03-07

    The finite part of the self-force on a static, non-minimally coupled scalar test charge outside a Schwarzschild black hole is zero. This result is determined from the work required to slowly raise or lower the charge through an infinitesimal distance. Unlike similar force calculations for minimally-coupled scalar charges or electric charges, we find that we must account for a flux of field energy that passes through the horizon and changes the mass and area of the black hole when the charge is displaced. This occurs even for an arbitrarily slow displacement of the non-minimally coupled scalar charge. For a positive coupling constant, the area of the hole increases when the charge is lowered and decreases when the charge is raised. The fact that the self-force vanishes for a static, non-minimally coupled scalar charge in Schwarzschild spacetime agrees with a simple prediction of the Quinn-Wald axioms. However, Zel'nikov and Frolov computed a non-vanishing self-force for a non-minimally coupled charge. Our method of calculation closely parallels the derivation of Zel'nikov and Frolov, and we show that their omission of this unusual flux is responsible for their (incorrect) result. When the flux is accounted for, the self-force vanishes. This correction eliminates a potential counter example to the Quinn-Wald axioms. The fact that the area of the black hole changes when the charge is displaced brings up two interesting questions that did not arise in similar calculations for static electric charges and minimally coupled scalar charges. (1) How can we reconcile a decrease in the area of the black hole horizon with the area theorem which concludes that {delta}Area{sub horizon} {>=} 0? The key hypothesis of the area theorem is that the stress-energy tensor must satisfy a null-energy condition T{sup {alpha}}{sup {beta}}l{sub {alpha}}l{sub {beta}} {>=} 0 for any null vector l{sub {alpha}}. We explicitly show that the stress-energy associated with a non

  10. Artificial Synaptic Devices Based on Natural Chicken Albumen Coupled Electric-Double-Layer Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guodong; Feng, Ping; Wan, Xiang; Zhu, Liqiang; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Recent progress in using biomaterials to fabricate functional electronics has got growing attention for the new generation of environmentally friendly and biocompatible electronic devices. As a kind of biological material with rich source, proteins are essential natural component of all organisms. At the same time, artificial synaptic devices are of great significance for neuromorphic systems because they can emulate the signal process and memory behaviors of biological synapses. In this report, natural chicken albumen with high proton conductivity was used as the coupling electrolyte film for organic/inorganic hybrid synaptic devices fabrication. Some important synaptic functions including paired-pulse facilitation, dynamic filtering, short-term to long-term memory transition and spatial summation and shunting inhibition were successfully mimicked. Our results are very interesting for biological friendly artificial neuron networks and neuromorphic systems.

  11. Artificial Synaptic Devices Based on Natural Chicken Albumen Coupled Electric-Double-Layer Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guodong; Feng, Ping; Wan, Xiang; Zhu, Liqiang; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in using biomaterials to fabricate functional electronics has got growing attention for the new generation of environmentally friendly and biocompatible electronic devices. As a kind of biological material with rich source, proteins are essential natural component of all organisms. At the same time, artificial synaptic devices are of great significance for neuromorphic systems because they can emulate the signal process and memory behaviors of biological synapses. In this report, natural chicken albumen with high proton conductivity was used as the coupling electrolyte film for organic/inorganic hybrid synaptic devices fabrication. Some important synaptic functions including paired-pulse facilitation, dynamic filtering, short-term to long-term memory transition and spatial summation and shunting inhibition were successfully mimicked. Our results are very interesting for biological friendly artificial neuron networks and neuromorphic systems. PMID:27008981

  12. Tunneling in Systems of Coupled Dopant-Atoms in Silicon Nano-devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Daniel; Samanta, Arup; Tyszka, Krzysztof; Anh, Le The; Muruganathan, Manoharan; Mizuno, Takeshi; Jablonski, Ryszard; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Tabe, Michiharu

    2015-12-01

    Following the rapid development of the electronics industry and technology, it is expected that future electronic devices will operate based on functional units at the level of electrically active molecules or even atoms. One pathway to observe and characterize such fundamental operation is to focus on identifying isolated or coupled dopants in nanoscale silicon transistors, the building blocks of present electronics. Here, we review some of the recent progress in the research along this direction, with a focus on devices fabricated with simple and CMOS-compatible-processing technology. We present results from a scanning probe method (Kelvin probe force microscopy) which show direct observation of dopant-induced potential modulations. We also discuss tunneling transport behavior based on the analysis of low-temperature I-V characteristics for devices representative for different regimes of doping concentration, i.e., different inter-dopant coupling strengths. This overview outlines the present status of the field, opening also directions toward practical implementation of dopant-atom devices. PMID:26403925

  13. Distributed and coupled 2D electro-thermal model of power semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkacem, Ghania; Lefebvre, Stéphane; Joubert, Pierre-Yves; Bouarroudj-Berkani, Mounira; Labrousse, Denis; Rostaing, Gilles

    2014-05-01

    The development of power electronics in the field of transportations (automotive, aeronautics) requires the use of power semiconductor devices providing protection and diagnostic functions. In the case of series protections power semiconductor devices which provide protection may operate in shortcircuit and act as a current limiting device. This mode of operations is very constraining due to the large dissipation of power. In these particular conditions of operation, electro-thermal models of power semiconductor devices are of key importance in order to optimize their thermal design and increase their reliability. The development of such an electro-thermal model for power MOSFET transistors based on the coupling between two computation softwares (Matlab and Cast3M) is described in this paper. The 2D electro-thermal model is able to predict (i) the temperature distribution on chip surface well as in the volume under short-circuit operations, (ii) the effect of the temperature on the distribution of the current flowing within the die and (iii) the effects of the ageing of the metallization layer on the current density and the temperature. In this paper, the electrical and thermal models are described as well as the implemented coupling scheme.

  14. Tunneling in Systems of Coupled Dopant-Atoms in Silicon Nano-devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Daniel; Samanta, Arup; Tyszka, Krzysztof; Anh, Le The; Muruganathan, Manoharan; Mizuno, Takeshi; Jablonski, Ryszard; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Tabe, Michiharu

    2015-09-01

    Following the rapid development of the electronics industry and technology, it is expected that future electronic devices will operate based on functional units at the level of electrically active molecules or even atoms. One pathway to observe and characterize such fundamental operation is to focus on identifying isolated or coupled dopants in nanoscale silicon transistors, the building blocks of present electronics. Here, we review some of the recent progress in the research along this direction, with a focus on devices fabricated with simple and CMOS-compatible-processing technology. We present results from a scanning probe method (Kelvin probe force microscopy) which show direct observation of dopant-induced potential modulations. We also discuss tunneling transport behavior based on the analysis of low-temperature I- V characteristics for devices representative for different regimes of doping concentration, i.e., different inter-dopant coupling strengths. This overview outlines the present status of the field, opening also directions toward practical implementation of dopant-atom devices.

  15. Charge-flux qubit coupled to a tank circuit in strong low-frequency electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A superconducting charge-phase qubit and a coupled high-quality tank circuit in low-frequency electric field have been studied. A fine structure of the multiphoton resonance lines and quantum interference effects associated with excitation of the quasi-two-level system due to the Landau-Zener-Schtukelberg tunneling have been observed. The results obtained us-ing various parameters of the measuring circuit for multiphoton resonance excitations and low-frequency oscillations of average population of quantum levels were compared. The mechanism responsible for the fine structure of resonance lines is considered. The method of measuring the impedance introduced in the tank circuit by oscillations of supercurrent in the qubit and the principal sources of the decoherence are dis-cussed

  16. Precision determination of the $\\pi N$ scattering lengths and the charged $\\pi NN$ coupling constant

    CERN Document Server

    Ericson, Torleif Eric Oskar; Thomas, A W

    2000-01-01

    We critically evaluate the isovector GMO sumrule for the charged $\\pi N N$ coupling constant using recent precision data from $\\pi ^-$p and $\\pi^-$d atoms and with careful attention to systematic errors. From the $\\pi ^-$d scattering length we deduce the pion-proton scattering lengths ${1/2}(a_{\\pi ^-p}+a_{\\pi ^-n})=(-20\\pm 6$(statistic)$ \\pm 10$ (systematic))~$\\cdot 10^{-4}m_{\\pi_c}^{-1}$ and ${1/2}(a_{\\pi ^-p}-a_{\\pi ^-n})=(903 \\pm 14)\\cdot 10^{-4}m_{\\pi_c}^{-1}$. From this a direct evaluation gives $g^2_c(GMO) =14.20\\pm 0.07$(statistic)$\\pm 0.13$(systematic) or $f^2_c= 0.0786\\pm 0.0008$.

  17. Entropy Squeezing in Coupled Field-Superconducting Charge Qubit with Intrinsic Decoherence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Xue-Qun; SHAO Bin; ZOU Jian

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the entropy squeezing in the system of a superconducting charge qubit coupled to a single mode field. We find an exact solution of the Milburn equation for the system and discuss the influence of intrinsic decoherence on entropy squeezing. As a comparison, we also consider the variance squeezing. Our results show that in the absence of the intrinsic decoherence both entropy and variance squeezings have the same periodic properties of time,and occur at the same range of time. However, when the intrinsic decoherence is considered, we find that as the time going on the entropy squeezing disappears fast than the variance squeezing, there exists a range of time where entropy squeezing can occur but variance squeezing cannot.

  18. Penrose process in a charged axion-dilaton coupled black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguly, Chandrima [University of Cambridge, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Cambridge (United Kingdom); SenGupta, Soumitra [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Department of Theoretical Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2016-04-15

    Using the Newman-Janis method to construct the axion-dilaton coupled charged rotating black holes, we show that the energy extraction from such black holes via the Penrose process takes place from the axion/Kalb-Ramond field energy responsible for rendering the angular momentum to the black hole. Determining the explicit form for the Kalb-Ramond field strength, which is argued to be equivalent to spacetime torsion, we demonstrate that at the end of the energy extraction process, the spacetime becomes torsion free with a spherically symmetric non-rotating black hole remnant. In this context, applications to physical phenomena, such as the emission of neutral particles in astrophysical jets, are also discussed. It is seen that the infalling matter gains energy from the rotation of the black hole, or equivalently from the axion field, and that it is ejected as a highly collimated astrophysical jet. (orig.)

  19. Large-voltage behavior of charge transport characteristics in nanosystems with weak electron–vibration coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Novotný

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We study analytically the Full Counting Statistics of the charge transport through a nanosystem consisting of a few electronic levels weakly coupled to a discrete vibrational mode. In the limit of large transport voltage bias the cumulant generating function can be evaluated explicitly based solely on the intuitive physical arguments and classical master equation description of the vibration mode. We find that for the undamped vibrational modes mutual dynamical interplay between electronic and vibronic degrees of freedom leads to strongly nonlinear (in voltage transport characteristics of the nanosystem. In particular, we find that for large voltages the k-th cumulant of the current grows as V2k to be contrasted with the linear dependence in case of more strongly externally damped and thus thermalized vibrational modes.

  20. Two-dimensional fluid modelling of charged particle transport in radio-frequency capacitively coupled discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the formulation and updates some numerical procedures usually adopted in two-dimensional, time-dependent fluid models to study the transport of charged particles in radio-frequency capacitively coupled discharges. The description of charged particle transport is made by solving the continuity and momentum transfer equations for electrons and ions, coupled with Poisson's equation and the electron mean energy transport equations. Inertia terms are considered in the ion momentum transfer equations, by generalizing the earlier definition of effective electric field. The electron mean energy equations are written using specific energy transport parameters, deduced from integration over the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The model adopts the local mean energy approximation, i.e. it computes the electron transport parameters as a function of the electron mean energy, using either a homogeneous, two-term Boltzmann equation solver or a Maxwellian EEDF. More appropriate boundary conditions for the electron and ion fluxes are used successfully. The model is solved for a GEC Cell reactor type (with 6.4 cm radius and 3.2 cm interelectrode distance) operating at frequency 13.56 MHz, pressures between 10 mTorr and 10 Torr and applied voltages from 100 to 500 V, in electropositive (helium) and electronegative (silane-hydrogen) gases or gas mixtures. The ion kinetics in silane and hydrogen is updated with respect to previous works, by further considering SiH2+, H+ and H3+ ions. In general, simulation results for some typical electrical parameters are closer to experimental measurements available than calculations reported in previous works

  1. The all particle method: Coupled neutron, photon, electron, charged particle Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time a Monte Carlo transport computer code is being designed and implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to include the transport of: neutrons, photons, electrons and light charged particles as well as the coupling between all species of particles, e.g., photon induced electron emission. Since this code is being designed to handle all particles this approach is called the ''All Particle Method''. The code is designed as a test bed code to include as many different methods as possible (e.g., electron single or multiple scattering) and will be data driven to minimize the number of methods and models ''hard wired'' into the code. This approach will allow changes in the Livermore nuclear and atomic data bases, used to described the interaction and production of particles, to be used to directly control the execution of the program. In addition this approach will allow the code to be used at various levels of complexity to balance computer running time against the accuracy requirements of specific applications. This paper describes the current design philosophy and status of the code. Since the treatment of neutrons and photons used by the All Particle Method code is more or less conventional, emphasis in this paper is placed on the treatment of electron, and to a lesser degree charged particle, transport. An example is presented in order to illustrate an application in which the ability to accurately transport electrons is important. 21 refs., 1 fig

  2. Analytic Couple Modeling Introducing Device Design Factor, Fin Factor, Thermal Diffusivity Factor, and Inductance Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    A set of convenient thermoelectric device solutions have been derived in order to capture a number of factors which are previously only resolved with numerical techniques. The concise conversion efficiency equations derived from governing equations provide intuitive and straight-forward design guidelines. These guidelines allow for better device design without requiring detailed numerical modeling. The analytical modeling accounts for factors such as i) variable temperature boundary conditions, ii) lateral heat transfer, iii) temperature variable material properties, and iv) transient operation. New dimensionless parameters, similar to the figure of merit, are introduced including the device design factor, fin factor, thermal diffusivity factor, and inductance factor. These new device factors allow for the straight-forward description of phenomenon generally only captured with numerical work otherwise. As an example a device design factor of 0.38, which accounts for thermal resistance of the hot and cold shoes, can be used to calculate a conversion efficiency of 2.28 while the ideal conversion efficiency based on figure of merit alone would be 6.15. Likewise an ideal couple with efficiency of 6.15 will be reduced to 5.33 when lateral heat is accounted for with a fin factor of 1.0.

  3. Effects of traps and polarization charges on device performance of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, A. SH.; Ghazai, Alaa J.; Salman, Emad A.; Hassan, Z.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the simulated electrical characteristics of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) by using ISE TCAD software. The effects of interface traps, bulk traps and polarization charges are investigated. It was observed that the role and dynamic of traps affect the device performance which requires a precondition to calculate the DC characteristics that are in agreement with the experimental data. On the other hand, polarization charges lead to quantum confinement of the electrons in the channel and form two-dimensional electron gas. The electron quantization leads to increasing the drain current and shift in the threshold voltage. The device performance can be improved by optimizing the fixed interface charge and thus reducing the bulk traps to enhance the DC characteristics.

  4. Cavity Photons as a Probe for Charge Relaxation Resistance and Photon Emission in a Quantum Dot Coupled to Normal and Superconducting Continua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhat, L. E.; Viennot, J. J.; Dartiailh, M. C.; Desjardins, M. M.; Kontos, T.; Cottet, A.

    2016-04-01

    Microwave cavities have been widely used to investigate the behavior of closed few-level systems. Here, we show that they also represent a powerful probe for the dynamics of charge transfer between a discrete electronic level and fermionic continua. We have combined experiment and theory for a carbon nanotube quantum dot coupled to normal metal and superconducting contacts. In equilibrium conditions, where our device behaves as an effective quantum dot-normal metal junction, we approach a universal photon dissipation regime governed by a quantum charge relaxation effect. We observe how photon dissipation is modified when the dot admittance turns from capacitive to inductive. When the fermionic reservoirs are voltage biased, the dot can even cause photon emission due to inelastic tunneling to/from a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer peak in the density of states of the superconducting contact. We can model these numerous effects quantitatively in terms of the charge susceptibility of the quantum dot circuit. This validates an approach that could be used to study a wide class of mesoscopic QED devices.

  5. Atomic-layer deposited IrO2 nanodots for charge-trap flash-memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge-trap flash- (CTF) memory structures have been fabricated by employing IrO2 nanodots (NDs) grown by atomic-layer deposition. A band of isolated IrO2NDs of about 3 nm lying almost parallel to Si/SiO2 interface is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The memory device with IrO2NDs shows much larger capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis and memory window compared with the control sample without IrO2NDs. After annealing at 800 deg. C for 20 min, the ND device shows almost no change in the width of C-V hysteresis and the ND distribution. These results indicate that the IrO2NDs embedded in SiO2 can be utilized as thermally stable, discrete charge traps, promising for metal oxide-ND-based CTF memory devices

  6. Extreme Contrast Ratio Imaging of Sirius with a Charge Injection Device

    CERN Document Server

    Batcheldor, D; Bahr, C; Jenne, J; Ninkov, Z; Bhaskaran, S; Chapman, T

    2015-01-01

    The next fundamental steps forward in understanding our place in the universe could be a result of advances in extreme contrast ratio (ECR) imaging and point spread function (PSF) suppression. For example, blinded by quasar light we have yet to fully understand the processes of galaxy formation and evolution, and there is an ongoing race to obtain a direct image of an exoearth lost in the glare of its host star. To fully explore the features of these systems we must perform observations in which contrast ratios of at least one billion can be regularly achieved with sub 0.1" inner working angles. Here we present the details of a latest generation 32-bit charge injection device (CID) that could conceivably achieve contrast ratios on the order of one billion. We also demonstrate some of its ECR imaging abilities for astronomical imaging. At a separation of two arc minutes, we report a direct contrast ratio of Delta(m_v)=18.3, log(CR)=7.3, or 1 part in 20 million, from observations of the Sirius field. The atmosp...

  7. TRAK_RF - Electromagnetic Field and Charged Particle Simulations in RF Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Stanley; Rees, Daniel

    1997-05-01

    An integrated software system has been developed to model electromagnetic fields and charged particle orbits in high-power RF devices. The primary application is simulation of electron multipactoring in linac vacuum windows for Accelerator Production of Tritium(G. Lawrence, et.al., Conventional and Superconducting RF Linac Design for the APT Project, in Proc. 1996 Int'l. Linear Acc. Conf. (Geneva, 1996), to be published.). The finite-element frequency-domain field solver can determine resonant fields such as cutoff and propagating modes of waveguides and TE(mnp) and TM(mnp) modes of cylindrical structures. In contrast to codes like Superfish, TRAK_RF makes direct determinations of power dissipation and phase shifts resulting ffrom lossy materials and walls. Furthermore, the program can handle scattering solutions, simulating free-space conditions with resistive termination boundary layers. TRAK_RF has advanced particle tracking capabilities to investigate a variety of innovative window designs. The program can simutaneously apply three numerical solutions for electrostatic, magnetostatic and electromagnetic fields on independent conformal triangular meshes. The finite-element method allows an unambiguous determination of particle collisions with material surfaces. It is possible to define up to 32 material types with energy-dependent secondary emission coefficients. TRAK_RF has a versatile automatic mesh generator with an interactive drafting utility for boundary input. Other applications include cavity design, radar and communications, microwave systems, and beam optics in RF accelerators.

  8. Charge pumping at radio frequencies [MOSFET device interface state density measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Sasse, G.T.; Vries, de, P.M.; Schmitz, J

    2005-01-01

    In this work, for the first time, charge pump results are shown that are obtained at frequencies in the GHz range. A comparison is made with charge pump results at lower frequencies. A very good agreement is seen between the low frequency charge pump data and the RF charge pump data. Measurement results on dielectrics that suffer from a high leakage current show that a charge pump current can be measured at frequencies above 500 MHz. At lower frequencies the charge pump current is completely ...

  9. Magnetic dipolar coupling and collective effects for binary information codification in cost-effective logic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiolerio, Alessandro; Allia, Paolo; Graziano, Mariagrazia

    2012-09-01

    Physical limitations foreshadow the eventual end to traditional Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) scaling. Therefore, interest has turned to various materials and technologies aimed to succeed to traditional CMOS. Magnetic Quantum dot Cellular Automata (MQCA) are one of these technologies. Working MQCA arrays require very complex techniques and an excellent control on the geometry of the nanomagnets and on the quality of the magnetic thin film, thus limiting the possibility for MQCA of representing a definite solution to cost-effective, high density and low power consumption device demand. Counter-intuitively, moving towards bigger sizes and lighter technologies it is still possible to develop multi-state logic devices, as we demonstrated, whose main advantage is cost-effectiveness. Applications may be seen in low cost logic devices where integration and computational power are not the main issue, eventually using flexible substrates and taking advantage of the intrinsic mechanical toughness of systems where long range interactions do not need wirings. We realized cobalt micrometric MQCA arrays by means of Electron Beam Lithography, exploiting cost-effective processes such as lift-off and RF sputtering that usually are avoided due to their low control on array geometry and film roughness. Information relative to the magnetic configuration of MQCA elements including their eventual magnetic interactions was obtained from Magnetic Force Microscope (MFM) images, enhanced by means of a numerical procedure and presented in differential maps. We report the existence of bi-stable magnetic patterns, as detected by MFM while sampling the z-component of magnetic induction field, arising from dipolar inter-element magnetostatic coupling, able to store and propagate binary information. This is achieved despite the array quality and element magnetic state, which are low and multi-domain, respectively. We discuss in detail shape, inter-element spacing and dot profile

  10. Atomic-orbital close-coupling calculations of charge exchange and ionisation in collisions of H(1s) and highly charged neon and argon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic-orbital close-coupling calculations of neon and argon ions colliding with H(1s) will be presented. The high principal quantum numbers n that need to be included in the expansion of the wavefunction of the active electron in the ion center make very large basis sets necessary. The resulting state resolved charge exchange and ionisation cross sections are of special interest for nuclear fusion research.

  11. Switch programming of reflectivity control devices for the coupled dynamics of a solar sail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tianjian; Gong, Shengping; Mu, Junshan; Li, Junfeng; Wang, Tianshu; Qian, Weiping

    2016-03-01

    As demonstrated in the Interplanetary Kite-craft Accelerated by Radiation Of the Sun (IKAROS), reflectivity control devices (RCDs) are switched on or off independently with each other, which has nevertheless been ignored by many previous researches. This paper emphasizes the discrete property of RCDs, and aims to obtain an appropriate switch law of RCDs for a rigid spinning solar sail. First, the coupled attitude-orbit dynamics is derived from the basic solar force and torque model into an underdetermined linear system with a binary set constraint. Subsequently, the coupled dynamics is reformulated into a constrained quadratic programming and a basic gradient projection method is designed to search for the optimal solution. Finally, a circular sail flying in the Venus rendezvous mission demonstrates the model and method numerically, which illustrates approximately 103 km terminal position error and 0.5 m/s terminal velocity error as 80 independent RCDs are switched on or off appropriately.

  12. Characterization of Charge-Carrier Transport in Semicrystalline Polymers: Electronic Couplings, Site Energies, and Charge-Carrier Dynamics in Poly(bithiophene- alt -thienothiophene) [PBTTT

    KAUST Repository

    Poelking, Carl

    2013-01-31

    We establish a link between the microscopic ordering and the charge-transport parameters for a highly crystalline polymeric organic semiconductor, poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT). We find that the nematic and dynamic order parameters of the conjugated backbones, as well as their separation, evolve linearly with temperature, while the side-chain dynamic order parameter and backbone paracrystallinity change abruptly upon the (also experimentally observed) melting of the side chains around 400 K. The distribution of site energies follows the behavior of the backbone paracrystallinity and can be treated as static on the time scale of a single-charge transfer reaction. On the contrary, the electronic couplings between adjacent backbones are insensitive to side-chain melting and vary on a much faster time scale. The hole mobility, calculated after time-averaging of the electronic couplings, reproduces well the value measured in a short-channel thin-film transistor. The results underline that to secure efficient charge transport in lamellar arrangements of conjugated polymers: (i) the electronic couplings should present high average values and fast dynamics, and (ii) the energetic disorder (paracrystallinity) should be small. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  13. Optically enhanced charge transfer between C60 and single-wall carbon nanotubes in hybrid electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher S.; Liu, Guoquan; Chen, Yabin; Robertson, Alex W.; He, Kuang; Porfyrakis, Kyriakos; Zhang, Jin; Briggs, G. Andrew D.; Warner, Jamie H.

    2013-12-01

    In this article we probe the nature of electronic interactions between the components of hybrid C60-carbon nanotube structures. Utilizing an aromatic mediator we selectively attach C60 molecules to carbon nanotube field-effect transistor devices. Structural characterization via atomic force and transmission electron microscopy confirm the selectivity of this attachment. Charge transfer from the carbon nanotube to the C60 molecules is evidenced by a blue shift of the Raman G+ peak position and increased threshold voltage of the transistor transfer characteristics. We estimate this charge transfer to increase the device density of holes per unit length by up to 0.85 nm-1 and demonstrate further optically enhanced charge transfer which increases the hole density by an additional 0.16 nm-1.In this article we probe the nature of electronic interactions between the components of hybrid C60-carbon nanotube structures. Utilizing an aromatic mediator we selectively attach C60 molecules to carbon nanotube field-effect transistor devices. Structural characterization via atomic force and transmission electron microscopy confirm the selectivity of this attachment. Charge transfer from the carbon nanotube to the C60 molecules is evidenced by a blue shift of the Raman G+ peak position and increased threshold voltage of the transistor transfer characteristics. We estimate this charge transfer to increase the device density of holes per unit length by up to 0.85 nm-1 and demonstrate further optically enhanced charge transfer which increases the hole density by an additional 0.16 nm-1. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: AFM line scans of the substrate before and after functionalization; scheme for measuring amorphous carbon coverage from TEM images; diameter comparisons of ac-TEM image and simulation of C60 molecule; Raman spectra D peak comparison; optical response of transfer properties of pristine devices; comparison between swept and pulsed Vg measurements

  14. Extreme Contrast Ratio Imaging of Sirius with a Charge Injection Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batcheldor, D.; Foadi, R.; Bahr, C.; Jenne, J.; Ninkov, Z.; Bhaskaran, S.; Chapman, T.

    2016-02-01

    The next fundamental steps forward in understanding our place in the universe could be a result of advances in extreme contrast ratio (ECR) imaging and point-spread function (PSF) suppression. For example, blinded by quasar light we have yet to fully understand the processes of galaxy and star formation and evolution, and there is an ongoing race to obtain a direct image of an exo-Earth lost in the glare of its host star. To fully explore the features of these systems, we must perform observations in which contrast ratios (CRs) of at least one billion can be regularly achieved with sub 0.″1 inner working angles. Here, we present the details of a latest-generation 32-bit charge injection device (CID) that could conceivably achieve CRs on the order of one billion. We also demonstrate some of its ECR imaging abilities for astronomical imaging. At a separation of two arcminutes, we report a direct CR of {{Δ }}{m}v=18.3,{log}({CR})=7.3, or 1 part in 20 million, from observations of the Sirius field. The atmospheric conditions present during the collection of this data prevented less modest results, and we expect to be able to achieve higher CRs, with improved inner working angles, simply by operating a CID at a world-class observing site. However, CIDs do not directly provide any PSF suppression. Therefore, combining CID imaging with a simple PSF suppression technique like angular differential imaging could provide a cheap and easy alternative to the complex ECR techniques currently being employed.

  15. Searching for the dual of the Maxwell-Chern-Simons model minimally coupled to dynamical U(1) charged matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of dual equivalence between the self-dual and the Maxwell-Chern-Simons (MCS) models when the latter is coupled to dynamical, U(1) fermionic charged matter is examined. The proper coupling in the self-dual model is then disclosed using the iterative gauge embedding approach. We found that the self-dual potential needs to couple directly to the Chern kernel of the source in order to establish this equivalence besides the need for a self-interaction term to render the matter sector unchanged

  16. Electronic coupling effects and charge transfer between organic molecules and metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forker, Roman

    2010-07-01

    We employ a variant of optical absorption spectroscopy, namely in situ differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), for an analysis of the structure-properties relations of thin epitaxial organic films. Clear correlations between the spectra and the differently intense coupling to the respective substrates are found. While rather broad and almost structureless spectra are obtained for a quaterrylene (QT) monolayer on Au(111), the spectral shape resembles that of isolated molecules when QT is grown on graphite. We even achieve an efficient electronic decoupling from the subjacent Au(111) by inserting an atomically thin organic spacer layer consisting of hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC) with a noticeably dissimilar electronic behavior. These observations are further consolidated by a systematic variation of the metal substrate (Au, Ag, and Al), ranging from inert to rather reactive. For this purpose, 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) is chosen to ensure comparability of the molecular film structures on the different metals, and also because its electronic alignment on various metal surfaces has previously been studied with great intensity. We present evidence for ionized PTCDA at several interfaces and propose the charge transfer to be related to the electronic level alignment governed by interface dipole formation on the respective metals. (orig.)

  17. Ground state of charged Base and Fermi fluids in strong coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ground state and excited states of the charged Bose gas were studied (wave function, equation of state, thermodynamics, application of Feynman theory). The ground state of the charged Fermi gas was also investigated together with the miscibility of charged Bose and Fermi gases at 0 deg K (bosons-bosons, fermions-bosons and fermions-fermions)

  18. Direct coupling between charge current and spin polarization by extrinsic mechanisms in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunli; Chong, Y. D.; Cazalilla, Miguel A.

    2016-08-01

    Spintronics—the all-electrical control of the electron spin for quantum or classical information storage and processing—is one of the most promising applications of the two-dimensional material graphene. Although pristine graphene has negligible spin-orbit coupling (SOC), both theory and experiment suggest that SOC in graphene can be enhanced by extrinsic means, such as functionalization by adatom impurities. We present a theory of transport in graphene that accounts for the spin-coherent dynamics of the carriers, including hitherto-neglected spin precession processes taking place during resonant scattering in the dilute impurity limit. We uncover an "anisotropic spin precession" (ASP) scattering process in graphene, which contributes a large current-induced spin polarization and modifies the standard spin Hall effect. ASP scattering arises from two dimensionality and extrinsic SOC, and apart from graphene, it can be present in other 2D materials or in the surface states of 3D materials with a fluctuating SOC. Our theory also yields a comprehensive description of the spin relaxation mechanisms present in adatom-decorated graphene, including Elliot-Yafet and D'yakonov-Perel relaxation rates, the latter of which can become an amplification process in a certain parameter regime of the SOC disorder potential. Our work provides theoretical foundations for designing future graphene-based integrated spintronic devices.

  19. Magnetic dipolar coupling and collective effects for binary information codification in cost-effective logic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical limitations foreshadow the eventual end to traditional Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) scaling. Therefore, interest has turned to various materials and technologies aimed to succeed to traditional CMOS. Magnetic Quantum dot Cellular Automata (MQCA) are one of these technologies. Working MQCA arrays require very complex techniques and an excellent control on the geometry of the nanomagnets and on the quality of the magnetic thin film, thus limiting the possibility for MQCA of representing a definite solution to cost-effective, high density and low power consumption device demand. Counter-intuitively, moving towards bigger sizes and lighter technologies it is still possible to develop multi-state logic devices, as we demonstrated, whose main advantage is cost-effectiveness. Applications may be seen in low cost logic devices where integration and computational power are not the main issue, eventually using flexible substrates and taking advantage of the intrinsic mechanical toughness of systems where long range interactions do not need wirings. We realized cobalt micrometric MQCA arrays by means of Electron Beam Lithography, exploiting cost-effective processes such as lift-off and RF sputtering that usually are avoided due to their low control on array geometry and film roughness. Information relative to the magnetic configuration of MQCA elements including their eventual magnetic interactions was obtained from Magnetic Force Microscope (MFM) images, enhanced by means of a numerical procedure and presented in differential maps. We report the existence of bi-stable magnetic patterns, as detected by MFM while sampling the z-component of magnetic induction field, arising from dipolar inter-element magnetostatic coupling, able to store and propagate binary information. This is achieved despite the array quality and element magnetic state, which are low and multi-domain, respectively. We discuss in detail shape, inter-element spacing and dot profile

  20. Design of low noise, high performance X-ray charge-coupled-device cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, J. P.; Luppino, Gerard A.; Ricker, George R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes some of the critical details of the MIT X-ray CCD camera design. Special attention is given to those portions of the system that deviate from conventional practice in the design of CCD cameras. Furthermore, an attempt has been made to generalize the design so that both optical and X-ray requirements can be satisfied whenever possible. Currently, noise levels of less than 8 electrons rms are routinely achieved with this design, and even lower levels (less than 5 electrons) should be realizable.

  1. X-ray acquisition and electronic digital readout by charge coupled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray imaging adapted to laser-matter interaction experiments consists in recording plasma images from its X-ray emission; these phenomena have between 100 ps and some nanoseconds duration. Investigation of the laser-driven plasma may require the formation and the detection of two-dimensional images formed by X-ray microscopes or spectrometers in the soft X-ray range (from about 50 eV to some keV). To reach that purpose, we have developed and tested two opto-electronic chains. The first one is built around a small image converter tube with a soft X-ray photocathode and P20 phosphor screen deposited on a fiber optic plate; the electronic image appearing on the screen is read by a C.C.D. working in the visible spectral range. The second one, designed to work below 100eV is realized with a very thin phosphor screen deposited on the fiber optic input of a visible microchannel image intensifier; the output image is then read by a C.C.D. in the same manner than previously

  2. Modeling Improvements for Air Source Heat Pumps using Different Expansion Devices at Varied Charge Levels Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Bo [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes steady-state performance simulations performed on a 3-ton R-22 split heat pump in heating mode. In total, 150 steady-state points were simulated, which covers refrigerant charge levels from 70 % to 130% relative to the nominal value, the outdoor temperatures at 17 F (-8.3 C), 35 F (1.7 C) and 47 F (8.3 C), indoor air flow rates from 60% to 150% of the rated air flow rate, and two types of expansion devices (fixed orifice and thermostatic expansion valve). A charge tuning method, which is to calibrate the charge inventory model based on measurements at two operation conditions, was applied and shown to improve the system simulation accuracy significantly in an extensive range of charge levels. In addition, we discuss the effects of suction line accumulator in modeling a heat pump system using either a fixed orifice or thermal expansion valve. Last, we identify the issue of refrigerant mass flow mal-distribution at low charge levels and propose an improved modeling approach.

  3. Monitoring North Sea oil production discharges using passive sampling devices coupled with in vitro bioassay techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Christopher; Farmen, Eivind; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2010-09-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and polar organic integrative chemical samplers (POCIS) were deployed in vicinity of an offshore oil production platform discharging production water (produced water) to the North Sea. Extracts from SPMDs and POCIS were subjected to chemical analysis for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylphenols (APs) respectively, and also assessed for acute toxicity (cytotoxicity), estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated production of vitellogenin (Vtg) and induction of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in primary hepatocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Chemical analysis of the extracts revealed a gradient of exposure away from the platform for low molecular weight PAH and AP, whereas no exposure gradient was apparent for high molecular weight PAH, as expected. These data coupled with earlier work allowed a tentative general exposure scenario to be determined. The passive sampler extracts also caused modulation of the bioassay toxicity endpoints, although a clear gradient of response relative to the discharge point could not be identified. PMID:20683536

  4. SIMULATION STUDY OF LONGITUDINAL FORCES IN THE COUPLING DEVICE OF HEAVY FREIGHT TRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Stokłosa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available On the LHS line (Broad-gauge Metallurgical Line, far out West of the railway line with a gauge of 1520 mm, heavy goods trains for a gross weight 5500 tons and a length of 850 m are operated. The article presents the results of a simulation study of the forces that occur in the automatic coupling device of SA-3 type of Russian production train consisting of 60 coal wagons of Russian construction of gross mass 91 tons each. The train moves on the 1520 mm gauge tracks curve S type (the radius of curvature of curves 300 m. Simulation studies were conducted using the Train Module of program to dynamic study multi-elements systems of Universal Mechanism UM 6.0.

  5. Measurements of Ion Selective Containment on the RF Charge Breeder Device BRIC

    CERN Document Server

    Variale, Vincenzo; Batazova, Marina; Boggia, Antonio; Clauser, Tarcisio; Kuznetsov, Gennady I; Rainò, Antonio; Shiyankov, Sergey; Skarbo, Boris A; Valentino, Vincenzo; Verrone, Grazia

    2005-01-01

    The "charge state breeder" BRIC (BReeding Ion Charge) is based on an EBIS source and it is designed to accept Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) with charge +1, in a slow injection mode, to increase their charge state up to +n. BRIC has been developed at the INFN section of Bari (Italy) during these last 3 years with very limited funds. Now, it has been assembled at the LNL (Italy) where are in progress the first tests as stand alone source. The new feature of BRIC, with respect to the classical EBIS, is given by the insertion, in the ion drift chamber, of a Radio Frequency (RF) Quadrupole aiming to filtering the unwanted elements and then making a more efficient containment of the wanted ions. In this contribution, the measurements of the selective effect on the ion charge state containement of the RF quadrupole field, applied on the ion chamber, will be reported and discussed. The ion charge state analisys of the ions trapped in BRIC seem confirm, as foreseen by simulation results carried out previously, that the s...

  6. Measurement of charged current triple gauge boson couplings using W pairs at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Caron, B; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Csilling, Akos; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Fürtjes, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harin-Dirac, M; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Hensel, C; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karapetian, G V; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klein, K; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kormos, L L; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Leins, A; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Polok, J; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Roscoe, K; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Taylor, R J; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2004-01-01

    Triple gauge boson couplings are measured from W-pair and single photon events recorded by the OPAL detector at LEP at center-of-mass energies between 183 - 209 GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 680 inverse picobarns. Only CP-conserving couplings are considered and SU(2)xU(1) relations between the WWZ and the WWgamma couolings are used, resulting in four independent couplings. Each coupling is determined in a separate fit, assuming the other couplings to take their Standard Model values. Fits are also done allowing some of the couplings to vary simultaneously. The results are compared with the Standard Model predictions.

  7. A new pathway of Saturnian ring-ionosphere coupling via charged nanograins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chin-Min; Ip, Wing-Huen, E-mail: wingip@astro.ncu.edu.tw [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 32001, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-01

    From a re-examination of the trajectories of small charged grains in the vicinity of the Saturnian rings, it is shown that the orbital motion of positively charged grains with a charge-to-mass ratio on the order of 10{sup –6} e amu{sup –1} could allow the injection of water material into the equatorial atmosphere. Thus, a mechanism of ionospheric depletion in the equatorial region is provided, as indicated by the Cassini radio occultation measurements.

  8. Coupling between pore formation and phase separation in charged lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeno, Hiroki; Ito, Hiroaki; Higuchi, Yuji; Hamada, Tsutomu; Shimokawa, Naofumi; Takagi, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the effect of charge on the membrane morphology of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) composed of various mixtures containing charged lipids. We observed the membrane morphologies by fluorescent and confocal laser microscopy in lipid mixtures consisting of a neutral unsaturated lipid [dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC)], a neutral saturated lipid [dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)], a charged unsaturated lipid [dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOP G(-)) ], a charged saturated lipid [dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPP G(-)) ], and cholesterol (Chol). In binary mixtures of neutral DOPC-DPPC and charged DOPC -DPP G(-) , spherical vesicles were formed. On the other hand, pore formation was often observed with GUVs consisting of DOP G(-) and DPPC. In a DPPC-DPPG(-) -Chol ternary mixture, pore-formed vesicles were also frequently observed. The percentage of pore-formed vesicles increased with the DPP G(-) concentration. Moreover, when the head group charges of charged lipids were screened by the addition of salt, pore-formed vesicles were suppressed in both the binary and ternary charged lipid mixtures. We discuss the mechanisms of pore formation in charged lipid mixtures and the relationship between phase separation and the membrane morphology. Finally, we reproduce the results seen in experimental systems by using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations.

  9. Single Charge Current in a Normal Mesoscopic Region Attached to Superconductor Leads via a Coupled Poisson Nonequilibrium Green Function Formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We study the I-V characteristic of mesoscopic systems or quantum dot (QD) attached to a pair of superconducting leads. Interaction effects in the QD are considered through the charging energy of the QD; that is, the treatment of current transport under a voltage bias is performed within a coupled Poisson nonequilibrium Green function (PNEGF) formalism. We derive the expression for the current in full generality but consider only the regime where transport occurs only via a single particle current. We show for this case and for various charging energies values U 0 and associated capacitances of the QD the effect on the I-V characteristic. Also the influence of the coupling constants on the I-V characteristic is investigated. Our approach puts forward a novel interpretation of experiments in the strong Coulomb regime. PMID:24977220

  10. Hybrid quantum nanophotonic devices for coupling to rare-earth ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazono, Evan; Hartz, Alex; Zhong, Tian; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    With an assortment of narrow line-width transitions spanning the visible and IR spectrum and long spin coherence times, rare-earth doped crystals are the leading material system for solid-state quantum memories. Integrating these materials in an on-chip optical platform would create opportunities for highly integrated light-matter interfaces for quantum communication and quantum computing. Nano-photonic resonators with high quality factors and small mode volumes are required for efficient on-chip coupling to the small dipole moment of rare-earth ion transitions. However, direct fabrication of optical cavities in these crystals with current nanofabrication techniques is difficult and unparallelized, as either exotic etch chemistries or physical milling processes are required. We fabricated hybrid devices by mechanically transferring a nanoscale membrane of gallium arsenide (GaAs) onto a neodymium-doped yttrium silicon oxide (Y2SiO5) crystal and then using electron beam lithography and standard III-V dry etching to pattern nanobeam photonic crystal cavities and ring resonator cavities, a technique that is easily adapted to other frequency ranges for arbitrary dopants in any rare earth host system. Single crystalline GaAs was chosen for its low loss and high refractive index at the transition wavelength. We demonstrated the potential to evanescently couple between the cavity field and the 883 nm 4I9/2- 4F3/2 transition of nearby neodymium impurities in the host crystal by examining transmission spectra through a waveguide coupled to the resonator with a custom-built confocal microscope. The prospects and requirements for using this system for scalable quantum networks are discussed.

  11. Charge, current and spin densities of a two-electron system in Russell-Saunders spin-orbit coupled eigenstates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuel, K.; de Châtel, P. F.; Amani, Salah

    2002-04-01

    Charge, current and spin densities are calculated for a two-electron system, maintaining the explicit form of the wave functions, in terms of Slater determinants. The two-electron Russell-Saunders spin-orbit coupled eigenstates | L, S, J, MJ> are expressed as four-component spinors, and the operators of the above densities as 4×4 matrices. The contributions of various one-electron states to these densities are identified.

  12. Sensor-actuator coupled device for active tracheal tube using solid polymer electrolyte membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Tadashi; Nakamura, Taro; Mukai, Toshiharu; Asaka, Kinji

    2007-04-01

    A sensor-actuator coupled device was developed using solid polymer electrolyte membrane (SPM) as an active tracheal tube for ventilator. Active tracheal tube is a novel type of tube for ventilator that removes patient's phlegm automatically upon sensing the narrowing of trachea by phlegm. This type of active tube is extremely useful in clinical settings as currently the sole measure to remove phlegm from patient's tube is to do it manually by a nurse every few hours. As SPM works both as a sensor and an actuator, an effective compact device was developed. SPM based sensor-actuator coupled device was fabricated with modified gold plating method. Prepared SPM was fixed as an array on a plastic pipe of diameter 22 mm and was connected to a ventilator circuit and driven by a ventilator with a volume control ventilation (VCV) mode. SPM was connected both to a sensing unit and an actuation unit. Generated voltage developed by the membrane with the setting of the maximum pressure from 5 cmH IIO to 20 cmH IIO was in order of several hundred μV. SPM sensor demonstrated a biphasic response to the ventilator flow. The sensor data showed nearly linearly proportional voltage development to the intra-tracheal pressure. The sensed signal was filtered and digitized with an A/D converting unit on a PC board. A real time operating program was used to detect the sensed signal that indicates the narrowing of trachea. The program then activated a driving signal to control the actuation of the membrane. The signal was sent to a D/A converting unit. The output of the D/A unit was sent to an amplifier and the galvanostat unit which drives the membrane with constant current regardless of the change in the load. It was demonstrated that the sensor-actuator unit detects the narrowing of trachea within several hundreds milli-seconds and responds by actuating the same membrane with the driving voltage of 3-4 V and driving current of several hundred milli-ampere for each membrane. SPM array

  13. Single-event phenomena on recent semiconductor devices. Charge-type multiple-bit upsets in high integrated memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makihara, Akiko; Shindou, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Norio; Kuboyama, Satoshi; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency, Tokyo (Japan); Ohshima, Takeshi; Hirao, Toshio; Itoh, Hisayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-02-01

    High integrated memories are used in solid state data recorder (SSDR) of the satellite for accumulating observation data. Single event upset phenomena which turn over an accumulated data in the memory cells are caused by heavy ion incidence. Studies on single-bit upset and multiple-bit upset phenomena in the high integrated memory cells are in progress recently. 16 Mbit DRAM (Dynamic Random Access Memories) and 64 Mbit DRAM are irradiated by heavy ion species, such as iodine, bromine and nickel, in comparison with the irradiation damage in the cosmic environment. Data written on the memory devices are read out after the irradiation. The memory cells in three kinds of states, all of charged state, all of discharged state, and an alternative state of charge and discharge, are irradiated for sorting out error modes caused by heavy ion incidence. The soft error in a single memory cells is known as a turn over from charged state to discharged state. Electrons in electron-hole pair generated by heavy ion incidence are captured in a diffusion region between capacitor electrodes of semiconductor. The charged states in the capacitor electrodes before the irradiation are neutralized and changed to the discharged states. According to high integration of the memories, many of the cells are affected by a single ion incidence. The multiple-bit upsets, however, are generated in the memory cells of discharged state before the irradiation, also. The charge-type multiple-bit upsets is considered as that error data are written on the DRAM during refresh cycle of a sense-up circuit and a pre-charge circuit which control the DRAM. (M. Suetake)

  14. Combustion device for the combustion of gases generated by charging the chambers of a coke oven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregor, K.

    1976-09-02

    Compared to other types of the device, the proposed combustion device is said to be constructed relatively simple and to be reliable in operation. The device is characterized essentially by the fact that the mixing tube ends in an end burner, i.e. the end burner is designed as a cut end (at about 45/sup 0/) of the mixing tube, that the fuel supply is also designed as fuel supply tube ending in the mixing tube at an acute angle and by the fact that the burner tube is designed as a separate flame feed tube, and that the lanciform mixing tube projects into the burner tube.

  15. Noise coupling between through-silicon vias and active devices for 20/14-nm technology nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runiu FANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although a through-silicon via (TSV is widely used in three-dimensional integrated circuit systems, one of its major design challenges is noise coupling between TSVs and active devices. This paper investigates noise coupling between TSVs and active devices for 20/14-nm technology nodes. The effect of variations of structural parameters on noise coupling was examined using a three-dimensional full-wave electromagnetic field solver and its result was explained. Additionally, transient analysis on coupling noise was conducted with Synopsys TCAD. Furthermore, a combined strategy employing doped signal TSVs and ‘bare’ ground TSVs was proposed and compared with conventional signal/ground schemes. Demonstrated to improve noise isolation effectively, the proposed strategy is inherently advantageous to circuits of advanced technology nodes compared with other noise isolation schemes, for it demands no modification of the original circuit design, placement and routing.

  16. Generation and characterization of a perfect vortex beam with a large topological charge through a digital micromirror device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Fang, Zhao-Xiang; Ren, Yu-Xuan; Gong, Lei; Lu, Rong-De

    2015-09-20

    Optical vortices are associated with a spatial phase singularity. Such a beam with a vortex is valuable in optical microscopy, hyper-entanglement, and optical levitation. In these applications, vortex beams with a perfect circle shape and a large topological charge are highly desirable. But the generation of perfect vortices with high topological charges is challenging. We present a novel method to create perfect vortex beams with large topological charges using a digital micromirror device (DMD) through binary amplitude modulation and a narrow Gaussian approximation. The DMD with binary holograms encoding both the spatial amplitude and the phase could generate fast switchable, reconfigurable optical vortex beams with significantly high quality and fidelity. With either the binary Lee hologram or the superpixel binary encoding technique, we were able to generate the corresponding hologram with high fidelity and create a perfect vortex with topological charge as large as 90. The physical properties of the perfect vortex beam produced were characterized through measurements of propagation dynamics and the focusing fields. The measurements show good consistency with the theoretical simulation. The perfect vortex beam produced satisfies high-demand utilization in optical manipulation and control, momentum transfer, quantum computing, and biophotonics. PMID:26406501

  17. A comprehensive study of charge trapping in organic field-effect devices with promising semiconductors and different contact metals by displacement current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic and comprehensive study on the charge-carrier injection and trapping behavior was performed using displacement current measurements in long-channel capacitors based on four promising small-molecule organic semiconductors (pentacene, DNTT, C10-DNTT and DPh-DNTT). In thin-film transistors, these semiconductors showed charge-carrier mobilities ranging from 1.0 to 7.8 cm2 V−1 s−1. The number of charges injected into and extracted from the semiconductor and the density of charges trapped in the device during each measurement were calculated from the displacement current characteristics and it was found that the density of trapped charges is very similar in all devices and of the order 1012 cm−2, despite the fact that the four semiconductors show significantly different charge-carrier mobilities. The choice of the contact metal (Au, Ag, Cu, Pd) was also found to have no significant effect on the trapping behavior. (paper)

  18. Electronic couplings for molecular charge transfer: Benchmarking CDFT, FODFT, and FODFTB against high-level ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a database (HAB11) of electronic coupling matrix elements (Hab) for electron transfer in 11 π-conjugated organic homo-dimer cations. High-level ab inito calculations at the multireference configuration interaction MRCI+Q level of theory, n-electron valence state perturbation theory NEVPT2, and (spin-component scaled) approximate coupled cluster model (SCS)-CC2 are reported for this database to assess the performance of three DFT methods of decreasing computational cost, including constrained density functional theory (CDFT), fragment-orbital DFT (FODFT), and self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding (FODFTB). We find that the CDFT approach in combination with a modified PBE functional containing 50% Hartree-Fock exchange gives best results for absolute Hab values (mean relative unsigned error = 5.3%) and exponential distance decay constants β (4.3%). CDFT in combination with pure PBE overestimates couplings by 38.7% due to a too diffuse excess charge distribution, whereas the economic FODFT and highly cost-effective FODFTB methods underestimate couplings by 37.6% and 42.4%, respectively, due to neglect of interaction between donor and acceptor. The errors are systematic, however, and can be significantly reduced by applying a uniform scaling factor for each method. Applications to dimers outside the database, specifically rotated thiophene dimers and larger acenes up to pentacene, suggests that the same scaling procedure significantly improves the FODFT and FODFTB results for larger π-conjugated systems relevant to organic semiconductors and DNA

  19. Effects of Electron-Transfer Coupled with Collision-Induced Dissociation (ET/CID) on Doubly Charged Peptides and Phosphopeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chih-Wei; Lai, Chien-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) is a useful peptide fragmentation technique that can be applied to investigate post-translational modifications (PTMs), the sequencing of highly hydrophilic peptides, and the identification of large peptides and even intact proteins. In contrast to traditional fragmentation methods, such as collision-induced dissociation (CID), ETD produces c- and z·-type product ions by randomly cleaving the N-Cα bonds. The disappointing fragmentation efficiency of ETD for doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptide ions has been improved by ETcaD (supplemental activation). However, the ETD data derived from most database search algorithms yield low confidence scores due to the presence of unreacted precursors and charge-reduced ions within MS/MS spectra. In this work, we demonstrate that eight out of ten standard doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides can be effortlessly identified by electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) using the SEQUEST algorithm without further spectral processing. ET/CID was performed with the further dissociation of the charge-reduced ions isolated from ETD ion/ion reactions. ET/CID had high fragmentation efficiency, which elevated the confidence scores of doubly charged peptide and phosphospeptide sequencing. ET/CID was found to be an effective fragmentation strategy in "bottom-up" proteomic analysis.

  20. Correlation of charge extraction properties and short circuit current in various organic binary and ternary blend photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, T.B.; Chen, Xiwen; Ehlig, Tino; Kemppinen, Peter; Chen, Ming; Watkins, Scott E.; Winzenberg, Kevin N. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton South, Victoria (Australia); Wong, Wallace W.H.; Jones, David J. [University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Bio21 Institute, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Holdcroft, Steven [Simon Fraser University, Dept. of Chemistry, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); Holmes, Andrew B. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton South, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, School of Chemistry, Bio21 Institute, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

    2012-09-15

    Charge extraction properties of various binary and ternary blends of organic photovoltaic devices covering both polymers and small molecules are studied. Due to their bipolar nature, both slow and fast carrier mobilities are identified from the extraction current transient. The equilibrium carrier concentration is also estimated for each of the blend films. The product of the slow carrier mobility and equilibrium concentration spreading two orders of magnitude can be used to estimate the short circuit current density. A good agreement between the estimated and measured short circuit current density is obtained with the accuracy reliant on the estimation of the slowest carrier mobility. This simplistic approach will be very useful to predict the short circuit current density for devices based on new materials. (orig.)

  1. Transistor memory devices with large memory windows, using multi-stacking of densely packed, hydrophobic charge trapping metal nanoparticle array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic field-effect transistor (OFET) memories have rapidly evolved from low-cost and flexible electronics with relatively low-memory capacities to memory devices that require high-capacity memory such as smart memory cards or solid-state hard drives. Here, we report the high-capacity OFET memories based on the multilayer stacking of densely packed hydrophobic metal NP layers in place of the traditional transistor memory systems based on a single charge trapping layer. We demonstrated that the memory performances of devices could be significantly enhanced by controlling the adsorption isotherm behavior, multilayer stacking structure and hydrophobicity of the metal NPs. For this study, tetraoctylammonium (TOA)-stabilized Au nanoparticles (TOA-AuNPs) were consecutively layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with an amine-functionalized poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (PAD). The formed (PAD/TOA-AuNP)n films were used as a multilayer stacked charge trapping layer at the interface between the tunneling dielectric layer and the SiO2 gate dielectric layer. For a single AuNP layer (i.e. PAD/TOA-AuNP)1) with a number density of 1.82 × 1012 cm−2, the memory window of the OFET memory device was measured to be approximately 97 V. The multilayer stacked OFET memory devices prepared with four AuNP layers exhibited excellent programmable memory properties (i.e. a large memory window (ΔVth) exceeding 145 V, a fast switching speed (1 μs), a high program/erase (P/E) current ratio (greater than 106) and good electrical reliability) during writing and erasing over a relatively short time scale under an operation voltage of 100 V applied at the gate. (paper)

  2. Development of nanomanipulator using a high-speed atomic force microscope coupled with a haptic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, F., E-mail: tmfiwat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Ohashi, Y.; Ishisaki, I. [Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Picco, L.M. [H Will Physics Laboratory and IRC in Nanotechnology, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Ushiki, T. [Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University, Asahimachidori, Niigata, 951-8122 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has been widely used for surface fabrication and manipulation. However, nanomanipulation using a conventional AFM is inefficient because of the sequential nature of the scan-manipulation scan cycle, which makes it difficult for the operator to observe the region of interest and perform the manipulation simultaneously. In this paper, a nanomanipulation technique using a high-speed atomic force microscope (HS-AFM) is described. During manipulation using the AFM probe, the operation is periodically interrupted for a fraction of a second for high-speed imaging that allows the topographical image of the manipulated surface to be periodically updated. With the use of high-speed imaging, the interrupting time for imaging can be greatly reduced, and as a result, the operator almost does not notice the blink time of the interruption for imaging during the manipulation. This creates a more intuitive interface with greater feedback and finesse to the operator. Nanofabrication under real-time monitoring was performed to demonstrate the utility of this arrangement for real-time nanomanipulation of sample surfaces under ambient conditions. Furthermore, the HS-AFM is coupled with a haptic device for the human interface, enabling the operator to move the HS-AFM probe to any position on the surface while feeling the response from the surface during the manipulation. - Highlights: • A nanomanipulater based on a high-speed atomic force microscope was developped. • High-speed imaging provides a valuable feedback during the manipulation operation. • Operator can feel the response from the surface via a haptic device during manipulation. • Nanofabrications under real-time monitoring were successfully performed.

  3. Test of charge injection device, phase 1. [prospective star tracker application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradinger, A.; Sayles, M. B.; Peters, D.; Buckley, P.

    1981-01-01

    A computer-controlled automatic facility containing two interactive microprocessors, peripherals, and an optical bench was used to obtain device characteristics for use in evaluating CID's as the sensor element in a prospective star tracker application. Each of the ST-256 chips tested contains a 256 x 256 pixel element array with 65536 picture elements. Two ST-256 devices were tested at 20 C under light levels of 10%, 0.1%, and 0.01% saturation, and in darkness. The saturation level was established at 0.95 microwatts sq cm as measured by the radiometeric sensor. Two test runs under each condition were performed for each chip. Two complete sets of data for each of the devices were thus obtained. A separate data field was used to store the results of each test condition. Repetitive runs of a test condition were stored sequentially in the same file. Examination of the data using print-outs is shown in examples.

  4. Real space Eliashberg approach to charge order of electrons coupled to dynamic antiferromagnetic fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Johannes; Sachdev, Subir(Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA)

    2015-01-01

    We study charge ordered solutions for fermions on a square lattice interacting with dynamic antiferromagnetic fluctuations. Our approach is based on real space Eliashberg equations which are solved self-consistently. We first show that the antiferromagnetic fluctuations can induce arc features in the spectral functions, as spectral weight is suppressed at the hot spots; however, no real pseudogap is generated. At low temperature spontaneous charge order with a $d$-form factor can be stabilize...

  5. Coupling of mass and charge distributions for low excited nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simple model for calculation of charge distributions of fission fragments for low exited nuclear fission from experimental mass distributions is offered. The model contains two parameters, determining amplitude of even-odd effect of charge distributions and its dependence on excitation energy. Results for reactions 233U(nth,f), 235U(nth,f), 229Th(nth,f), 249Cf(nth,f) are spent

  6. Scalar field as an intrinsic time measure in coupled dynamical matter-geometry systems. II. Electrically charged gravitational collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakonieczna, Anna; Yeom, Dong-han

    2016-05-01

    Investigating the dynamics of gravitational systems, especially in the regime of quantum gravity, poses a problem of measuring time during the evolution. One of the approaches to this issue is using one of the internal degrees of freedom as a time variable. The objective of our research was to check whether a scalar field or any other dynamical quantity being a part of a coupled multi-component matter-geometry system can be treated as a `clock' during its evolution. We investigated a collapse of a self-gravitating electrically charged scalar field in the Einstein and Brans-Dicke theories using the 2+2 formalism. Our findings concentrated on the spacetime region of high curvature existing in the vicinity of the emerging singularity, which is essential for the quantum gravity applications. We investigated several values of the Brans-Dicke coupling constant and the coupling between the Brans-Dicke and the electrically charged scalar fields. It turned out that both evolving scalar fields and a function which measures the amount of electric charge within a sphere of a given radius can be used to quantify time nearby the singularity in the dynamical spacetime part, in which the apparent horizon surrounding the singularity is spacelike. Using them in this respect in the asymptotic spacetime region is possible only when both fields are present in the system and, moreover, they are coupled to each other. The only nonzero component of the Maxwell field four-potential cannot be used to quantify time during the considered process in the neighborhood of the whole central singularity. None of the investigated dynamical quantities is a good candidate for measuring time nearby the Cauchy horizon, which is also singular due to the mass inflation phenomenon.

  7. Peculiarities of charge transport in a semiconductor gas discharge electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The memory effect in planar semiconductor gas discharge system at different pressures (15-760) and interelectrode distance (60-445 μm) were experimentally studied. The study was performed on the bases of current-voltage characteristic (CVC) measurements with the time lag of several hours of afterglow periods. The influence of the active space-charge remaining from previous discharge on the breakdown voltage has been analyzed using the CVC method for different conductivity of semiconductor GaAs photocathode. On the other hand, the CVC data for subsequent dates present a correlation of memory effect and hysteresis behaviour. The explanation of such relation is based on the influence of long-lived active charges on the electronic transport mechanism of semiconductor material

  8. Charge Transport and Electrical Properties of Spin Crossover Materials: Towards Nanoelectronic and Spintronic Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Constantin LEFTER; Davesne, Vincent; Salmon, Lionel; Molnar, Gabor; Demont, Philippe; Rotaru, Aurelian; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2016-01-01

    International audience In this paper, we present a comprehensive review of research on electrical and charge transport properties of spin crossover complexes. This includes both the effect of spin-state switching on the dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of the material and vice versa the influence of an applied electrical field (or current) on the spin-state of the system. The survey covers different size scales from bulk materials and thin films to nanoparticles and sing...

  9. Electronic State-Resolved Electron-Phonon Coupling in an Organic Charge Transfer Material from Broadband Quantum Beat Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rury, Aaron S; Sorenson, Shayne; Driscoll, Eric; Dawlaty, Jahan M

    2015-09-17

    The coupling of electron and lattice phonon motion plays a fundamental role in the properties of functional organic charge-transfer materials. In this Letter we extend the use of ultrafast vibrational quantum beat spectroscopy to directly elucidate electron-phonon coupling in an organic charge-transfer material. As a case study, we compare the oscillatory components of the transient reflection (TR) of a broadband probe pulse from single crystals of quinhydrone, a 1:1 cocrystal of hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone, after exciting nonresonant impulsive stimulated Raman scattering and resonant electronic transitions using ultrafast pulses. Spontaneous resonance Raman spectra confirm the assignment of these oscillations as coherent lattice phonon excitations. Fourier transforms of the vibrational quantum beats in our broadband TR measurements allow construction of spectra that we show report the ability of these phonons to directly modulate the electronic structure of quinhydrone. These results demonstrate how coherent ultrafast processes can characterize the complex interplay of charge transfer and lattice motion in materials of fundamental relevance to chemistry, materials sciences, and condensed matter physics. PMID:26722724

  10. 3-D pore-scale resolved model for coupled species/charge/fluid transport in a vanadium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) has emerged as a viable grid-scale energy storage technology that offers cost-effective energy storage solutions for renewable energy applications. In this paper, a novel methodology is introduced for modeling of the transport mechanisms of electrolyte flow, species and charge in the VRFB at the pore scale of the electrodes; that is, at the level where individual carbon fiber geometry and electrolyte flow are directly resolved. The detailed geometry of the electrode is obtained using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and calibrated against experimentally determined pore-scale characteristics (e.g., pore and fiber diameter, porosity, and surface area). The processed XCT data is then used as geometry input for modeling of the electrochemical processes in the VRFB. The flow of electrolyte through the pore space is modeled using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) while the finite volume method (FVM) is used to solve the coupled species and charge transport and predict the performance of the VRFB under various conditions. An electrochemical model using the Butler–Volmer equations is used to provide species and charge coupling at the surfaces of the carbon fibers. Results are obtained for the cell potential distribution, as well as local concentration, overpotential and current density profiles under galvanostatic discharge conditions. The cell performance is investigated as a function of the electrolyte flow rate and external drawing current. The model developed here provides a useful tool for building the structure–property–performance relationship of VRFB electrodes.

  11. Electrochemical studies of excited charge carriers with thin platinum film electronic devices in sulfuric and hydrochloric solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerstel, Damian; Scheele, Michael; Barmscheid, Andreas; Stella, Kevin; Diesing, Detlef [Fakultaet fuer Chemie, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, D-45117 Essen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Excited charge carriers induced by chemical processes like the adsorption or desorption of atomic hydrogen at metal surfaces have already been investigated under UHV conditions. These carriers can be detected by systems with an internal electric barrier, like MIM-(metal-insulator-metal), MIS- (metal-insulator-semiconductor) or MS- (metal-semiconductor) sensors. The internal barrier inside the sensors separates ground state carriers from excited carriers. It is an open question, whether electrochemical reactions on metal surfaces also evoke hot charge carriers. We study the electrochemical deposition of hydrogen (via H{sub upd}) on platinum and the oxidation of platinum in sulfuric and hydrochloric solution. As sensors Pt-TaOx-Ta, Pt-SiOx-Si and Pt-Si-sensors were used with 10-30 nm thick Pt films. By electrochemical cyclovoltametry and simultaneous recording of the current at the tantalum or silicon back electrode it is possible to detect voids (down to a fraction of 10{sup -3}) in the thin platinum film. 30 nm thick platinum films were found to cover the underlying layer completely. In this case the devices can be used to monitor deviations from the electronic equilibrium since excited carriers cause a device current through the internal barrier. Deviations from the electronic ground state were found in the case of the H{sub upd} formation.

  12. Thin-Film Ferro Electric-Coupled Microstripline Phase Shifters With Reduced Device Hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Romanofsky, Robert; Mueller, Carl H.; VanKeuls, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with the performance of coupled microstripline phase shifters (CMPS) fabricated using BaxSr 1 -xTiO 3 (BST) ferroelectric thin films. The CMPS were fabricated using commercially available pulsed laser deposition BST films with Ba:Sr ratios of 30:70 and 20:80. Microwave characterization of these CMPS was performed at upper Kuband frequencies, particularly at frequencies near 16 and 18 GHz. X-ray diffraction studies indicate that the 30:70 films exhibit almost a 1:1 ratio between the in-plane and out-of-plane lattice parameters, suggesting that their cubics create strain -free films suitable for producing CMPS devices with reduced hysteresis in the paraelectric state. The quality of performance of the CMPS was studied based on their relative phase shift and insertion loss within the DC bias range of 0 to 400 V (i.e., E-field ranges within 0 to 53 V/micron). The performance of the CMPS was tested as a function of temperature to investigate their operation in the paraelectric, as well as in the ferroelectric, state (i.e., above and below the Curie temperature, respectively). The novel behavior discussed here is based on the experimental observation of the CMPS. This behavior, observed for the aforementioned cation ratio, highlights the relevance of good crystalline structure for high-quality CMPS.

  13. Scalar field as an intrinsic time measure in coupled dynamical matter-geometry systems. II. Electrically charged gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Nakonieczna, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the dynamics of gravitational systems, especially in the regime of quantum gravity, poses a problem of measuring time during the evolution. One of the approaches to this issue is using one of the internal degrees of freedom as a time variable. The objective of our research was to check whether a scalar field or any other dynamical quantity being a part of a coupled multi-component matter-geometry system can be treated as a `clock' during its evolution. We investigated a collapse of a self-gravitating electrically charged scalar field in the Einstein and Brans-Dicke theories using the 2+2 formalism. Our findings concentrated on the spacetime region of high curvature existing in the vicinity of the emerging singularity, which is essential for the quantum gravity applications. We investigated several values of the Brans-Dicke coupling constant and the coupling between the Brans-Dicke and the electrically charged scalar fields. It turned out that both evolving scalar fields and a function which meas...

  14. High performance AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with large electromechanical coupling coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenbo; He, Xingli; Ye, Zhi, E-mail: yezhi@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jl2@bolton.ac.uk; Wang, Xiaozhi [Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University and Cyrus Tang Centre for Sensor Materials and Applications, 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Mayrhofer, Patrick M.; Gillinger, Manuel; Bittner, Achim; Schmid, Ulrich [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse, 7/2/366-MST, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Luo, J. K., E-mail: yezhi@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jl2@bolton.ac.uk [Institute of Renewable Energy Environmental Technology, University of Bolton, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5AB (United Kingdom); Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University and Cyrus Tang Centre for Sensor Materials and Applications, 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2014-09-29

    AlN and AlScN thin films with 27% scandium (Sc) were synthesized by DC magnetron sputtering deposition and used to fabricate surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. Compared with AlN-based devices, the AlScN SAW devices exhibit much better transmission properties. Scandium doping results in electromechanical coupling coefficient, K{sup 2}, in the range of 2.0% ∼ 2.2% for a wide normalized thickness range, more than a 300% increase compared to that of AlN-based SAW devices, thus demonstrating the potential applications of AlScN in high frequency resonators, sensors, and high efficiency energy harvesting devices. The coupling coefficients of the present AlScN based SAW devices are much higher than that of the theoretical calculation based on some assumptions for AlScN piezoelectric material properties, implying there is a need for in-depth investigations on the material properties of AlScN.

  15. Probing Charged Higgs Boson Couplings at the FCC-hh Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Cakir, I T; Saygin, H; Senol, A; Cakir, O

    2015-01-01

    Many of the new physics models predicts a light Higgs boson similar to the Higgs boson of the Standard Model (SM) and also extra scalar bosons. Beyond the search channels for a SM Higgs boson, the future collider experiments will explore additional channels that are specific to extended Higgs sectors. We study the charged Higgs boson production within the framework of two Higgs doublet models (THDM) in the proton-proton collisions at the FCC-hh collider. With an integrated luminosity of 500 fb$^{-1}$ at very high energy frontier, we obtain a significant coverage of the parameter space and distinguish the charged Higgs-top-bottom interaction within the THDM or other new physics models with charged Higgs boson mass up to 1 TeV.

  16. Probing charged Higgs boson couplings at a future circular hadron collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćakır, I. T.; Kuday, S.; Saygın, H.; Şenol, A.; ćakır, O.

    2016-07-01

    Many of the new physics models predict a light Higgs boson similar to the Higgs boson of the Standard Model (SM) and also extra scalar bosons. Beyond the search channels for a SM Higgs boson, the future collider experiments will explore additional channels that are specific to extended Higgs sectors. We study the charged Higgs boson production within the framework of two Higgs doublet models (THDM) in the proton-proton collisions at a future circular hadron collider (FCC-hh). With an integrated luminosity of Lint=500 fb-1 at very high energy frontier (√{s }=100 TeV ), we obtain a significant coverage of the parameter space and distinguish the charged Higgs-top-bottom interaction within the THDM or other new physics models with charged Higgs boson mass up to 1.5 TeV.

  17. Coupled quantum-classical method for long range charge transfer: relevance of the nuclear motion to the quantum electron dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge and excitonic-energy transfer phenomena are fundamental for energy conversion in solar cells as well as artificial photosynthesis. Currently, much interest is being paid to light-harvesting and energy transduction processes in supramolecular structures, where nuclear dynamics has a major influence on electronic quantum dynamics. For this reason, the simulation of long range electron transfer in supramolecular structures, under environmental conditions described within an atomistic framework, has been a difficult problem to study. This work describes a coupled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method that aims at describing long range charge transfer processes in supramolecular systems, taking into account the atomistic details of large molecular structures, the underlying nuclear motion, and environmental effects. The method is applied to investigate the relevance of electron–nuclei interaction on the mechanisms for photo-induced electron–hole pair separation in dye-sensitized interfaces as well as electronic dynamics in molecular structures. (paper)

  18. Precision matched solution of the coupled beam envelope equations for a periodic quadrupole lattice with space charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward P.

    2002-02-01

    The coupled Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (K-V) envelope equations for a charged particle beam transported by a periodic system of quadrupoles with self-consistent space charge force have previously been solved by various approximate methods, with accuracy ranging from 1% to 10%. A new method of solution is introduced here, which is based on a double expansion of the beam envelope functions in powers of the focal strength and either the beam's emittance or its dimensionless perveance. This method results in accuracy better than 0.1% for typical lattice and beam parameters when carried through one consistent level of approximation higher than employed in previous work. Several useful quantities, such as the values of the undepressed tune and the beam's perveance in the limit of vanishing emittance, are represented by very rapidly converging power series in the focal strength, with accuracy of .01% or better.

  19. Coupled quantum-classical method for long range charge transfer: relevance of the nuclear motion to the quantum electron dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Robson; Hoff, Diego A; Rego, Luis G C

    2015-04-10

    Charge and excitonic-energy transfer phenomena are fundamental for energy conversion in solar cells as well as artificial photosynthesis. Currently, much interest is being paid to light-harvesting and energy transduction processes in supramolecular structures, where nuclear dynamics has a major influence on electronic quantum dynamics. For this reason, the simulation of long range electron transfer in supramolecular structures, under environmental conditions described within an atomistic framework, has been a difficult problem to study. This work describes a coupled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method that aims at describing long range charge transfer processes in supramolecular systems, taking into account the atomistic details of large molecular structures, the underlying nuclear motion, and environmental effects. The method is applied to investigate the relevance of electron-nuclei interaction on the mechanisms for photo-induced electron-hole pair separation in dye-sensitized interfaces as well as electronic dynamics in molecular structures. PMID:25767107

  20. Conserved charges for black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics in AdS space

    CERN Document Server

    Miskovic, Olivera

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by possible applications within the framework of anti-de Sitter gravity/Conformal Field Theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence, charged black holes with AdS asymptotics, which are solutions to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in D dimensions, and whose electric field is described by a nonlinear electrodynamics (NED) are studied. For a topological static black hole ansatz, the field equations are exactly solved in terms of the electromagnetic stress tensor for an arbitrary NED Lagrangian, in any dimension D and for arbitrary positive values of Gauss-Bonnet coupling. In particular, this procedure reproduces the black hole metric in Born-Infeld and conformally invariant electrodynamics previously found in the literature. Altogether, it extends to D>4 the four-dimensional solution obtained by Soleng in logarithmic electrodynamics, which comes from vacuum polarization effects. Fall-off conditions for the electromagnetic field that ensure the finiteness of the electric charge are also discussed. The black hole mass...

  1. Charge Transport Modulation and Optical Absorption Switching in Organic Electronic Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Organic electronics has evolved into a well-established research field thanks to major progresses in material sciences during recent decades. More attention was paid to this research field when “the discovery and development of conductive polymers” was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2000. Electronic devices that rely on tailor-made material functionalities, the ability of solution processing and low-cost manufacturing on flexible substrates by traditional printing techniques are amon...

  2. Remarkable charge-trapping efficiency of the memory device with (TiO2)0.8(Al2O3)0.1 composite charge-storage dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, K.; Ou, X.; Lan, X. X.; Cao, Z. Y.; Liu, X. J.; Lu, W.; Gong, C. J.; Xu, B.; Li, A. D.; Xia, Y. D.; Yin, J.; Liu, Z. G.

    2014-06-01

    A memory device p-Si/SiO2/(TiO2)0.8(Al2O3)0.1(TAO-81)/Al2O3/Pt was fabricated, in which a composite of two high-k dielectrics with a thickness of 1 nm was employed as the charge-trapping layer to enhance the charge-trapping efficiency of the memory device. At an applied gate voltage of ±9 V, TAO-81 memory device shows a memory window of 8.83 V in its C-V curve. It also shows a fast response to a short voltage pulse of 10-5 s. The charge-trapping capability, the endurance, and retention characteristics of TAO-81 memory device can be improved by introducing double TAO-81 charge-trapping layers intercalated by an Al2O3 layer. The charge-trapping mechanism in the memory device is mainly ascribed to the generation of the electron-occupied defect level in the band gap of Al2O3 induced by the inter-diffusion between TiO2 and Al2O3.

  3. Communication: CDFT-CI couplings can be unreliable when there is fractional charge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavros, Michael G; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-12-21

    Constrained density functional theory with configuration interaction (CDFT-CI) is a useful, low-cost tool for the computational prediction of electronic couplings between pseudo-diabatic constrained electronic states. Such couplings are of paramount importance in electron transfer theory and transition state theory, among other areas of chemistry. Unfortunately, CDFT-CI occasionally fails significantly, predicting a coupling that does not decay exponentially with distance and/or overestimating the expected coupling by an order of magnitude or more. In this communication, we show that the eigenvalues of the difference density matrix between the two constrained states can be used as an a priori metric to determine when CDFT-CI are likely to be reliable: when the eigenvalues are near 0 or ±1, transfer of a whole electron is occurring, and CDFT-CI can be trusted. We demonstrate the utility of this metric with several illustrative examples. PMID:26696039

  4. Communication: CDFT-CI couplings can be unreliable when there is fractional charge transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constrained density functional theory with configuration interaction (CDFT-CI) is a useful, low-cost tool for the computational prediction of electronic couplings between pseudo-diabatic constrained electronic states. Such couplings are of paramount importance in electron transfer theory and transition state theory, among other areas of chemistry. Unfortunately, CDFT-CI occasionally fails significantly, predicting a coupling that does not decay exponentially with distance and/or overestimating the expected coupling by an order of magnitude or more. In this communication, we show that the eigenvalues of the difference density matrix between the two constrained states can be used as an a priori metric to determine when CDFT-CI are likely to be reliable: when the eigenvalues are near 0 or ±1, transfer of a whole electron is occurring, and CDFT-CI can be trusted. We demonstrate the utility of this metric with several illustrative examples

  5. Electron-phonon coupling in crystalline organic semiconductors: Microscopic evidence for nonpolaronic charge carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Vukmirovic N.; Bruder C.; Stojanovic V.M.

    2012-01-01

    We consider electron(hole)-phonon coupling in crystalline organic semiconductors, using naphthalene for our case study. Employing a first-principles approach, we compute the changes in the self-consistent Kohn-Sham potential corresponding to different phonon modes and go on to obtain the carrier-phonon coupling matrix elements (vertex functions). We then evaluate perturbatively the quasiparticle spectral residues for electrons at the bottom of the lowest-unoccupied- (LUMO) and holes at the to...

  6. A new spectrometer using multiple gratings with a two-dimensional charge-coupled diode array detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new spectrometer with no moving parts uses a two-dimensional Si-based charge-coupled diode (CCD) array detector and an integrated grating consisting of three subgratings. The effective spectral range imaged on the detector is magnified threefold. The digitized spectral image in the 200-1000 nm wavelength range can be measured quickly. The nonlinear relationship between CCD pixel position and wavelength is corrected with multiple polynomial functions in the calibration procedure, which fits the data using a mathematical pattern-analysis method. The instrument can be applied for rapid spectroscopic data analyses in many types of photoelectronic experiments and routine testing

  7. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR DYNAMIC INITIAL SHOCK PARAMETERS OF COUPLING CHARGE ON BOREHOLE WALL UNDER THE ACTION OF HIGH EXPLOSIVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪芝芳; 李玉民

    1996-01-01

    According to detonation theory and hydrodynamic principle, a physical model has been set up in this paper. Based on the model a methodology for calculating dynamic initial shock parameters such as shock pressure p,,, shock wave velosity Dm etc. of coupling charge on borehole wall has ben developed. The shock parameters have been calculated when high explosives works on granite, limestone and marble respectively. The magnitude of every parameter on borehole wall has been obtained from ignited dot to the end of borehole along axial direction. Some important conclusions are also gained.

  8. Ablation range of focusing delivery devices coupled to pulsed CO2 lasers: implications for intracorporeal application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; van Swol, Christiaan F. P.

    1996-05-01

    For intracorporeal CO2 laser surgery, the laser beam is usually delivered through long focal length optics coupled to an operating microscope or an endoscope. While the target tissue is in focus for viewing, the power density in the spot of the beam can be affected by defocusing or irradiating tissue under a small angle of incidence. When the beam is used to drill a channel (e.g. transmyocardial revascularization, TMR), the power density along the beam will determine the shape of the channel. The area for effective ablation was studied for an ultra-pulsed CO2 laser beam in combination with devices accommodating optics with focal lengths of 120 to 450 mm. The position of the ablation threshold along the waist of the beam in water and crater depths in (model) tissue were determined in relation to pulse energy (1 to 250 mJ) and angle of incidence. The crater formation during ablation of the model tissue and lateral thermal effects were recorded using fast photography and a thermal-imaging method based on Schlieren techniques. Using Gaussian beam theory, the ablation area in the beam of these optical systems was calculated. For the highest energies, the ablation area extended over a length up to 60 mm resulting in the formation of channels of similar length within several pulses. In the waist of the beam, the channels were only 100 - 300 micrometers with minimal thermal effects laterally. Away from the focus, more pulses were needed, larger diameter channels were formed and thermal effects became more pronounced. The theoretical predicted ablation area was in correspondence with of the measurements. For the beam delivery devices studied, tissue effects are along the `depth of focus' of viewing due to the relatively long `ablation waist' of the focused laser beam. However, for superficial applications, the depth of the narrow ablation craters is hard to appreciate and tissues in the depth can easily be perforated. Ablation is more controlled using larger spot sizes (> 0

  9. Mass-charge-heat coupled transfers in a single cell of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell; Transferts couples masse-charge-chaleur dans une cellule de pile a combustible a membrane polymere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramousse, J.

    2005-11-15

    Understanding and modelling of coupled mass, charges and heat transfers phenomena are fundamental to analyze the electrical behaviour of the system. The aim of the present model is to describe electrical performances of a PEFMC according to the fluidic and thermal operating conditions. The water content of the membrane and the water distribution in the single cell are estimated according to the coupled simulations of mass transport in the thickness of the single cell and in the feeding channels of the bipolar plates. A microscopic model of a Gas Diffusion Electrode is built up to describe charges transfer phenomena occurring at the electrodes. Completed by a study of heat transfer in the Membrane Electrode Assembly, conditions and preferential sites of water vapor condensation can be highlighted. A set of measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of carbon felts used in fuel cells as porous backing layers have also been performed. Although the value of this parameter is essential for the study of heat transfer, it is still under investigation because of the strong thermal anisotropy of the medium. (author)

  10. Effects of electronic coupling and electrostatic potential on charge transport in carbon-based molecular electronic junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Summary Molecular junctions consisting of 2–20 nm thick layers of organic oligomers oriented between a conducting carbon substrate and a carbon/gold top contact have proven to be reproducible and reliable, and will soon enter commercial production in audio processing circuits. The covalent, conjugated bond between one or both sp2-hybridized carbon contacts and an aromatic molecular layer is distinct from the more common metal/molecule or silicon/molecule structures in many reported molecular junctions. Theoretical observations based on density functional theory are presented here, which model carbon-based molecular junctions as single molecules and oligomers between fragments of graphene. Electronic coupling between the molecules and the contacts is demonstrated by the formation of hybrid orbitals in the model structure, which have significant electron density on both the graphene and the molecule. The energies of such hybrid orbitals correlate with tunneling barriers determined experimentally, and electronic coupling between the two graphene fragments in the model correlates with experimentally observed attenuation of transport with molecular layer thickness. Electronic coupling is affected significantly by the dihedral angle between the planes of the graphene and the molecular π-systems, but is absent only when the two planes are orthogonal. Coupling also results in partial charge transfer between the graphene contacts and the molecular layer, which results in a shift in electrostatic potential which affects the observed tunneling barrier. Although the degree of partial charge transfer is difficult to calculate accurately, it does provide a basis for the “vacuum level shift” observed in many experiments, including transport and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular layers on conductors. PMID:26925350

  11. Electronic couplings for molecular charge transfer: Benchmarking CDFT, FODFT, and FODFTB against high-level ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubas, Adam; Blumberger, Jochen, E-mail: j.blumberger@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hoffmann, Felix [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lehrstuhl für Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Heck, Alexander; Elstner, Marcus [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Fritz-Haber-Weg 6, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Oberhofer, Harald [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Munich, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2014-03-14

    We introduce a database (HAB11) of electronic coupling matrix elements (H{sub ab}) for electron transfer in 11 π-conjugated organic homo-dimer cations. High-level ab inito calculations at the multireference configuration interaction MRCI+Q level of theory, n-electron valence state perturbation theory NEVPT2, and (spin-component scaled) approximate coupled cluster model (SCS)-CC2 are reported for this database to assess the performance of three DFT methods of decreasing computational cost, including constrained density functional theory (CDFT), fragment-orbital DFT (FODFT), and self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding (FODFTB). We find that the CDFT approach in combination with a modified PBE functional containing 50% Hartree-Fock exchange gives best results for absolute H{sub ab} values (mean relative unsigned error = 5.3%) and exponential distance decay constants β (4.3%). CDFT in combination with pure PBE overestimates couplings by 38.7% due to a too diffuse excess charge distribution, whereas the economic FODFT and highly cost-effective FODFTB methods underestimate couplings by 37.6% and 42.4%, respectively, due to neglect of interaction between donor and acceptor. The errors are systematic, however, and can be significantly reduced by applying a uniform scaling factor for each method. Applications to dimers outside the database, specifically rotated thiophene dimers and larger acenes up to pentacene, suggests that the same scaling procedure significantly improves the FODFT and FODFTB results for larger π-conjugated systems relevant to organic semiconductors and DNA.

  12. Effects of electronic coupling and electrostatic potential on charge transport in carbon-based molecular electronic junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. McCreery

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular junctions consisting of 2–20 nm thick layers of organic oligomers oriented between a conducting carbon substrate and a carbon/gold top contact have proven to be reproducible and reliable, and will soon enter commercial production in audio processing circuits. The covalent, conjugated bond between one or both sp2-hybridized carbon contacts and an aromatic molecular layer is distinct from the more common metal/molecule or silicon/molecule structures in many reported molecular junctions. Theoretical observations based on density functional theory are presented here, which model carbon-based molecular junctions as single molecules and oligomers between fragments of graphene. Electronic coupling between the molecules and the contacts is demonstrated by the formation of hybrid orbitals in the model structure, which have significant electron density on both the graphene and the molecule. The energies of such hybrid orbitals correlate with tunneling barriers determined experimentally, and electronic coupling between the two graphene fragments in the model correlates with experimentally observed attenuation of transport with molecular layer thickness. Electronic coupling is affected significantly by the dihedral angle between the planes of the graphene and the molecular π-systems, but is absent only when the two planes are orthogonal. Coupling also results in partial charge transfer between the graphene contacts and the molecular layer, which results in a shift in electrostatic potential which affects the observed tunneling barrier. Although the degree of partial charge transfer is difficult to calculate accurately, it does provide a basis for the “vacuum level shift” observed in many experiments, including transport and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular layers on conductors.

  13. Hypervelocity dust impact craters on photovoltaic devices imaged by ion beam induced charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypervelocity dust has a speed of greater than 5 km/s and is a significant problem for equipment deployed in space such as satellites because of impacts that damage vulnerable components. Photovoltaic (PV) arrays are especially vulnerable because of their large surface area and the performance can be degraded owing to the disruption of the structure of the junction in the cells making up the array. Satellite PV arrays returned to Earth after service in orbit reveal a large number of craters larger than 5 μm in diameter arising from hypervelocity dust impacts. Extensive prior work has been done on the analysis of the morphology of craters in PV cells to understand the origin of the micrometeoroid that caused the crater and to study the corresponding mechanical damage to the structure of the cell. Generally, about half the craters arise from natural micrometeoroids, about one third from artificial Al-rich debris, probably from solid rocket exhausts, and the remainder from miscellaneous sources both known and unknown. However to date there has not been a microscopic study of the degradation of the electrical characteristics of PV cells exposed to hypervelocity dust impacts. Here we present an ion beam induced charge (IBIC) pilot study by a 2 MeV He microbeam of craters induced on a Hamamatsu PIN diode exposed to artificial hypervelocity Al dust from a dust accelerator. Numerous 5–30 μm diameter craters were identified and the charge collection efficiency of the crater and surrounds mapped with IBIC with bias voltages between 0 and 20 V. At highest bias, it was found the efficiency of the crater had been degraded by about 20% compared to the surrounding material. The speed distribution achieved in the Al dust accelerator was peaked at about 4 km/s compared to 11–68 km/s for dust encountered in low Earth orbit. We are able to extrapolate the charge collection efficiency degradation rate of unbiased cells in space based on our current measurements and the

  14. Hypervelocity dust impact craters on photovoltaic devices imaged by ion beam induced charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Changyi [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Wu, Yiyong; Lv, Gang [National Key Laboratory of Materials Behavior and Evaluation Technology in Space Environments, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Rubanov, Sergey [Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Jamieson, David N., E-mail: d.jamieson@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2015-04-01

    Hypervelocity dust has a speed of greater than 5 km/s and is a significant problem for equipment deployed in space such as satellites because of impacts that damage vulnerable components. Photovoltaic (PV) arrays are especially vulnerable because of their large surface area and the performance can be degraded owing to the disruption of the structure of the junction in the cells making up the array. Satellite PV arrays returned to Earth after service in orbit reveal a large number of craters larger than 5 μm in diameter arising from hypervelocity dust impacts. Extensive prior work has been done on the analysis of the morphology of craters in PV cells to understand the origin of the micrometeoroid that caused the crater and to study the corresponding mechanical damage to the structure of the cell. Generally, about half the craters arise from natural micrometeoroids, about one third from artificial Al-rich debris, probably from solid rocket exhausts, and the remainder from miscellaneous sources both known and unknown. However to date there has not been a microscopic study of the degradation of the electrical characteristics of PV cells exposed to hypervelocity dust impacts. Here we present an ion beam induced charge (IBIC) pilot study by a 2 MeV He microbeam of craters induced on a Hamamatsu PIN diode exposed to artificial hypervelocity Al dust from a dust accelerator. Numerous 5–30 μm diameter craters were identified and the charge collection efficiency of the crater and surrounds mapped with IBIC with bias voltages between 0 and 20 V. At highest bias, it was found the efficiency of the crater had been degraded by about 20% compared to the surrounding material. The speed distribution achieved in the Al dust accelerator was peaked at about 4 km/s compared to 11–68 km/s for dust encountered in low Earth orbit. We are able to extrapolate the charge collection efficiency degradation rate of unbiased cells in space based on our current measurements and the

  15. Water and sludge treatment device provided with a system for irradiating by accelerated charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment system for a fluid made up of water and sludge, provided with a system for irradiating the fluid by a beam of accelerated charged particles comprising means for obtaining a constant flow of the fluid to be treated, facilities for monitoring this flow, an irradiation channel located on the path of the beam, in which the fluid to be treated can flow, a portion of this channel having at least one window transparent to the beam of accelerated particles. A safety system associated with the system for monitoring the characteristics of the beam and with the system for monitoring the flow of the fluid to be treated, stops the flow of the fluid and the recycling of the fluid defectively treated

  16. Conformally coupled scalar black holes admit a flat horizon due to axionic charge

    CERN Document Server

    Bardoux, Yannis; Charmousis, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Static, charged black holes in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and with a planar horizon are found in four dimensions. The solutions have scalar secondary hair. We claim that these constitute the planar version of the Martinez-Troncoso-Zanelli black holes, only known up to now for a curved event horizon in four dimensions. Their planar version is rendered possible due to the presence of two, equal and homogeneously distributed, axionic charges dressing the flat horizon. The solutions are presented in the conformal and minimal frame and their basic properties and thermodynamics analysed. Entertaining recent applications to holographic superconductors, we expose two branches of solutions: the undressed axionic Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS black hole, and the novel black hole carrying secondary hair. We show that there is a critical temperature at which the (bald) axionic Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS black hole undergoes a second order phase transition to the hairy black hole spontaneously acquiring scalar ...

  17. Virtual charge state separator as an advanced tool coupling measurements and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaramyshev, S.; Vormann, H.; Adonin, A.; Barth, W.; Dahl, L.; Gerhard, P.; Groening, L.; Hollinger, R.; Maier, M.; Mickat, S.; Orzhekhovskaya, A.

    2015-05-01

    A new low energy beam transport for a multicharge uranium beam will be built at the GSI High Current Injector (HSI). All uranium charge states coming from the new ion source will be injected into GSI heavy ion high current HSI Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), but only the design ions U4 + will be accelerated to the final RFQ energy. A detailed knowledge about injected beam current and emittance for pure design U4 + ions is necessary for a proper beam line design commissioning and operation, while measurements are possible only for a full beam including all charge states. Detailed measurements of the beam current and emittance are performed behind the first quadrupole triplet of the beam line. A dedicated algorithm, based on a combination of measurements and the results of advanced beam dynamics simulations, provides for an extraction of beam current and emittance values for only the U4 + component of the beam. The proposed methods and obtained results are presented.

  18. Study of charge-phase diagrams for coupled system of Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdipour, M.; Shukrinov, Y. U. M.

    2010-11-01

    Dynamics of stacked intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) in the high-Tc superconductors is theoretically investigated. We calculate the current-voltage characteristics (CVC) of IJJ and study the breakpoint region on the outermost branch of the CVC for the stacks with 9 IJJ. A method for investigation of the fine structure in CVC of IJJ based on the recording the "phase-charge" diagrams is suggested. It is demonstrated that this method reflects the main features of the breakpoint region.

  19. Study of charge-phase diagrams for coupled system of Josephson junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdipour, M.; Shukrinov, Yu M.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamics of stacked intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) in the high-Tc superconductors is theoretically investigated. We calculate the current-voltage characteristics (CVC) of IJJ and study the breakpoint region on the outermost branch of the CVC for the stacks with 9 IJJ. A method for investigation of the fine structure in CVC of IJJ based on the recording the "phase-charge" diagrams is suggested. It is demonstrated that this method reflects the main features of the breakpoint region.

  20. Thermodynamics of charged rotating dilaton black branes coupled to logarithmic nonlinear electrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Sheykhi, A.; Dehghani, M. H.; Zangeneh, M. Kord

    2016-01-01

    We construct a new class of charged rotating black brane solutions in the presence of logarithmic nonlinear electrodynamics with complete set of the rotation parameters in arbitrary dimensions. The topology of the horizon of these rotating black branes are flat, while, due to the presence of the dilaton field the asymptotic behaviour of them are neither flat nor (anti)-de Sitter [(A)dS]. We investigate the physical properties of the solutions. The mass and angular momentum of the spacetime ar...

  1. A Generalized Boltzmann Fokker-Planck Method for Coupled Charged Particle Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prinja, Anil K

    2012-01-09

    The goal of this project was to develop and investigate the performance of reduced-physics formulations of high energy charged particle (electrons, protons and heavier ions) transport that are computationally more efficient than not only analog Monte Carlo methods but also the established condensed history Monte Carlo technique. Charged particles interact with matter by Coulomb collisions with target nuclei and electrons, by bremsstrahlung radiation loss and by nuclear reactions such as spallation and fission. Of these, inelastic electronic collisions and elastic nuclear collisions are the dominant cause of energy-loss straggling and angular deflection or range straggling of a primary particle. These collisions are characterized by extremely short mean free paths (sub-microns) and highly peaked, near-singular differential cross sections about forward directions and zero energy loss, with the situation for protons and heavier ions more extreme than for electrons. For this reason, analog or truephysics single-event Monte Carlo simulation, while possible in principle, is computationally prohibitive for routine calculation of charged particle interaction phenomena.

  2. Charge-injection-device performance in the high-energy-neutron environment of laser-fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge-injection devices (CIDs) are being used to image x rays in laser-fusion experiments on the University of Rochester's OMEGA Laser System. The CID cameras are routinely used up to the maximum neutron yields generated (∼1014 DT). The detectors are deployed in x-ray pinhole cameras and Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes. The neutron fluences ranged from ∼107 to ∼109 neutrons/cm2 and useful x-ray images were obtained even at the highest fluences. It is intended to use CID cameras at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a supporting means of recording x-ray images. The results of this work predict that x-ray images should be obtainable on the NIF at yields up to ∼1015, depending on distance and shielding.

  3. Restoring interlayer Josephson coupling in La1.885Ba0.115CuO4 by charge transfer melting of stripe order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, V.; Mankowsky, R.; Petrich, M.; Bromberger, H.; Cavill, S. A.; Möhr-Vorobeva, E.; Nicoletti, D.; Laplace, Y.; Gu, G. D.; Hill, J. P.; Först, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Dhesi, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    We show that disruption of charge-density-wave (stripe) order by charge transfer excitation, enhances the superconducting phase rigidity in La1.885Ba0.115CuO4 . Time-resolved resonant soft x-ray diffraction demonstrates that charge order melting is prompt following near-infrared photoexcitation whereas the crystal structure remains intact for moderate fluences. THz time-domain spectroscopy reveals that, for the first 2 ps following photoexcitation, a new Josephson plasma resonance edge, at higher frequency with respect to the equilibrium edge, is induced indicating enhanced superconducting interlayer coupling. The fluence dependence of the charge-order melting and the enhanced superconducting interlayer coupling are correlated with a saturation limit of ˜0.5 mJ /cm2 . Using a combination of x-ray and optical spectroscopies we establish a hierarchy of timescales between enhanced superconductivity, melting of charge order, and rearrangement of the crystal structure.

  4. Study and Test of Cold Storage Heat Recovery Heat Pump Coupled Solar Drying Device

    OpenAIRE

    Min Li; Xiao-Qiang Jiang; Bao-Chuan Wu

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we design the recovery of a heat pump combined solar drying device. Then, with this device, drying experiments of aquatic product, tilapia, were conducted, indicating that the newly designed device functions are well in temperature adjusting and controlling performance and showing that drying time is closely related to energy consumption and drying conditions. Heat recovery heat pump combined solar energy drier can improve the drying quality of aquatic products, but also can gr...

  5. A Microscopic Capacitor Model of Voltage Coupling in Membrane Proteins: Gating Charge Fluctuations in Ci-VSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ilsoo; Warshel, Arieh

    2016-01-28

    The voltage sensitivity of membrane proteins is reflected in the response of the voltage sensing domains (VSDs) to the changes in membrane potential. This response is implicated in the displacement of positively charged residues, associated with the conformational changes of VSDs. The displaced charges generate nonlinear (i.e., voltage-dependent) capacitance current called the gating current (and its corresponding gating charge), which is a key experimental quantity that characterizes voltage activation in VSMP. However, the relevant theoretical/computational approaches, aimed to correlate the structural information on VSMP to electrophysiological measurements, have been rather limited, posing a broad challenge in computer simulations of VSMP. Concomitant with the development of our coarse-graining (CG) model of voltage coupling, we apply our theoretical framework for the treatments of voltage effects in membrane proteins to modeling the VSMP activation, taking the VSDs (Ci-VSD) derived from the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP) as a model system. Our CG model reproduces the observed gating charge of Ci-VSD activation in several different perspectives. In particular, a new closed-form expression of the gating charge is evaluated in both nonequilibrium and equilibrium ways, while considering the fluctuation-dissipation relation that connects a nonequilibrium measurement of the gating charge to an equilibrium measurement of charge fluctuations (i.e., the voltage-independent linear component of membrane capacitance). In turn, the expression uncovers a novel link that connects an equilibrium measurement of the voltage-independent linear capacitance to a nonequilibrium measurement of the voltage-dependent nonlinear capacitance (whose integral over voltage is equal to the gating charge). In addition, our CG model yields capacitor-like voltage dependent free energy parabolas, resulting in the free energy difference and the free energy barrier for

  6. On chip complex signal processing devices using coupled phononic crystal slab resonators and waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Mohammadi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report the evidence for the possibility of achieving complex signal processing functionalities such as multiplexing/demultiplexing at high frequencies using phononic crystal (PnC slabs. It is shown that such functionalities can be obtained by appropriate cross-coupling of PnC resonators and waveguides. PnC waveguides and waveguide-based resonators are realized and cross-coupled through two different methods of mechanical coupling (i.e., direct coupling and side coupling. Waveguide-based PnC resonators are employed because of their high-Q, compactness, large spurious-free spectral ranges, and the possibility of better control over coupling to PnC waveguides. It is shown that by modifying the defects in the formation of the resonators, the frequency of the resonance can be tuned.

  7. Electronic Coupling Effects and Charge Transfer between Organic Molecules and Metal Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Forker, Roman

    2010-01-01

    We employ a variant of optical absorption spectroscopy, namely in situ differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), for an analysis of the structure-properties relations of thin epitaxial organic films. Clear correlations between the spectra and the differently intense coupling to the respective substrates are found. While rather broad and almost structureless spectra are obtained for a quaterrylene (QT) monolayer on Au(111), the spectral shape resembles that of isolated molecules when QT is ...

  8. Impact of photon recycling and luminescence coupling on III-V single and dual junction photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alexandre W.; Höhn, Oliver; Micha, Daniel N.; Wagner, Lukas; Helmers, Henning; Bett, Andreas W.; Dimroth, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Modeling single junction solar cells composed of III-V semiconductors such as GaAs with the effects of photon recycling yields insight into design and material criteria required for high efficiencies. For a thin-film single junction GaAs cell to reach 28.5% efficiency, simulation results using a recently developed model which accounts for photon recycling indicate that Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetimes of electrons and holes must be longer than 3 and 1 μs, respectively, in a 2-μm thin active region, and that the native substrate must be removed such that the cell is coupled to a highly reflective rear-side mirror. The model is generalized to account for luminescence coupling in tandem devices, which yields direct insight into the top cell's nonradiative lifetimes. A heavily current mismatched GaAs/GaAs tandem device is simulated and measured experimentally as a function of concentration between 3 and 100 suns. The luminescence coupling increases from 14% to 33% experimentally, whereas the model requires increasing electron and hole SRH lifetimes to explain these results. This could be an indication of the saturating defects which mediate the SRH process. However, intermediate GaAs layers between the two subcells may also contribute to the luminescence coupling as a function of concentration.

  9. Design of Static Wireless Charging System for Electric Vehicles with Focus on Magnetic Coupling and Emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Tushar

    summarizes the research findings of the study. Wireless charging system as per state of art design approach consists of four major blocks: primary power electronics, inductors, secondary power electronics including load and resonant circuits (capacitors). The first contribution of this project is addition of...... as an equivalent power source and transmission system including the load similar to other electric system like grids. Secondly, design parameters of output power, circuit efficiency and voltage or current stress across resonant components can be expressed as simple functions of the five blocks...... emissions as a design parameter for the primary power electronics, secondary power electronics with load and capacitors in addition to the inductor design. For development of the analytical method, space variation of the magnetic emissions is studied first in the project and results show that ratio of...

  10. Atmospheric Lithosphere-Ionosphere Charge Exchange (ALICE) for coupling between earthquake regions, clouds and the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Giles; Aplin, Karen; Rycroft, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric Lithosphere-Ionosphere Charge Exchange (ALICE) has been proposed as a mechanism to link seismic activity and ionospheric changes detected overhead, which has been observed in data obtained by the DEMETER spacecraft. The ALICE mechanism can explain changes in the natural extremely low frequency (ELF) radio noise observed by DEMETER nocturnally before major earthquakes. ALICE operates through the vertical fair weather current density of global atmospheric electricity, through the modification of surface layer ionisation rates and the associated current flow to the ionosphere. These ideas are extended here to include possible effects on layer clouds through which the current density passes. Specifically, we estimate possible layer cloud changes for changes in surface layer ionisation known in some earthquakes.

  11. Late-time decay of coupled electromagnetic and gravitational perturbations outside extremal charged black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Sela, Orr

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we employ the results of a previous paper on the late-time decay of scalar-field perturbations of an extreme Reissner-Nordstrom black hole, in order to find the late-time decay of coupled electromagnetic and gravitational perturbations of this black hole. We explicitly write the late-time tails of Moncrief's gauge invariant variables and of the perturbations of the metric tensor and the electromagnetic field tensor in the Regge-Wheeler gauge. We discuss some of the consequences of the results and relations to previous works.

  12. Application of charge-injection devices for digital X-ray imaging using a planar gas-type X-ray detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, K.; Shin, J.; Yun, M.; Park, H.; Park, J.; Nam, S.

    2012-07-01

    We have developed a planar gas-type detector, based on a charge injection device; this device can be used for digital X-ray imaging. Previously, in order to obtain X-ray images, a planar gas-type detector utilized a line-scanning module based on a one-dimensional readout system; however, that technology suffered from a limitation such as a long readout time, not suitable for a fluoroscopy or a moving imaging acquisition. In this study, a readout module based on charge-injection devices was used in conjunction with the planar gas-type detector to acquire signals and two-dimensional digital images. In the original design, two orthogonally cross-shaped top electrodes, called X address and Y address, played important roles in transferring and collecting the generated charges using electrical potential. During the optimization process, the shape of these top electrodes was modified into a honeycomb shape to increase the efficacy of charge collection. A mixture of gas and dielectric layers were selected to make an efficient gas-type detector for digital X-ray imaging. From the result, the electrical properties of the detector were investigated and the effectiveness of its geometrical design was proved. Measurements demonstrated the linearity of X-ray detection, and the successful movement and collection of charge using electrical potential. Thus, this modified planar gas-type detector and charge readout module using a charge-injection device made it possible to obtain two-dimensional images without using a scanning mode.

  13. The coupling of surface charge and boundary slip at the solid-liquid interface and their combined effect on fluid drag: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Dalei; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-09-15

    Fluid drag of micro/nano fluidic systems has inspired wide scientific interest. Surface charge and boundary slip at the solid-liquid interface are believed to affect fluid drag. This review summarizes the recent studies on the coupling of surface charge and slip, and their combined effect on fluid drag at micro/nano scale. The effect of pH on surface charge of borosilicate glass and silica surfaces in deionized (DI) water and saline solution is discussed using a method based on colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). The boundary slip of various oil-solid interfaces are discussed for samples with different degrees of oleophobicity prepared by nanoparticle-binder system. By changing the pH of solution or applying an electric field, effect of surface charge on slip of a smooth hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) in DI water and saline solution is studied. A theoretical model incorporating the coupling relationship between surface charge and slip is used to discuss the combined effect of surface charge-induced electric double layer (EDL) and slip on fluid drag of pressure-driven flow in a one-dimensional parallel-plates microchannel. A theoretical method is used to reduce the fluid drag. The studies show that the increasing magnitude of surface charge density leads to a decrease in slip length. The surface charge results in a larger fluid drag, and the coupling of surface charge and slip can further increase the fluid drag. Surface charge-induced EDLs with asymmetric zeta potentials can effectively reduce the fluid drag. PMID:26021432

  14. Precision determination of the πN scattering lengths and the charged πNN coupling constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We critically evaluate the isovector GMO sumrule for the charged πNN coupling constant using recent precision data from π-p and π-d atoms and with careful attention to systematic errors. From the π-d scattering length we deduce the pion-proton scattering lengths ((1)/(2))(aπ-p + aπ-n) = (-20 ± 6(statistic)±10 (systematic) ·10-4m-1πc and ((1)/(2))(aπ-p - aπ-n) = (903 ± 14) · 10-4m-1πc. From this a direct evaluation gives g2c(GMO)/4π = 14.20 ± 0.07 (statistic)±0.13(systematic) or f2c/4π = 0.0786 ± 0.0008

  15. Relativistic mean field theory with density dependent coupling constants for nuclear matter and finite nuclei with large charge asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Typel, S.; Wolter, H.H. [Sektion Physik, Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear matter and ground state properties for (proton and neutron) semi-closed shell nuclei are described in relativistic mean field theory with coupling constants which depend on the vector density. The parametrization of the density dependence for {sigma}-, {omega}- and {rho}-mesons is obtained by fitting to properties of nuclear matter and some finite nuclei. The equation of state for symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter is discussed. Finite nuclei are described in Hartree approximation, including a charge and an improved center-of-mass correction. Pairing is considered in the BCS approximation. Special attention is directed to the predictions for properties at the neutron and proton driplines, e.g. for separation energies, spin-orbit splittings and density distributions. (orig.)

  16. Chern-Simons vortices in the condensate of nonrelativistic bosons coupled to a uniform background electric charge density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackiw-Pi's model of the self-gravitating gas of nonrelativistic bosons coupled to the Chern-Simons gauge field is known to exhibit asymptotically vanishing, lump-like soliton solutions. We show that in order to extend this model to include the case of repulsive gases where the matter field approaches nonzero values at infinities, one has to add, for instance, the background electric charge. Reformulating the model arising in this way as a constrained Hamiltonian system allows to find the self-duality limit in the pure Chern-Simons and in the mixed Chern-Simons-Maxwell cases. We prove that the linear momentum of the topologically nontrivial configuration can only be defined as a translationally noninvariant quantity and the algebra is spontaneously broken {Px, Py}=2πρ0n. 22 refs., 2 figs

  17. Linear and third- and fifth-order nonlinear spectroscopies of a charge transfer system coupled to an underdamped vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study hole, electron, and exciton transports in a charge transfer system in the presence of underdamped vibrational motion. We analyze the signature of these processes in the linear and third-, and fifth-order nonlinear electronic spectra. Calculations are performed with a numerically exact hierarchical equations of motion method for an underdamped Brownian oscillator spectral density. We find that combining electron, hole, and exciton transfers can lead to non-trivial spectra with more structure than with excitonic coupling alone. Traces taken during the waiting time of a two-dimensional (2D) spectrum are dominated by vibrational motion and do not reflect the electron, hole, and exciton dynamics directly. We find that the fifth-order nonlinear response is particularly sensitive to the charge transfer process. While third-order 2D spectroscopy detects the correlation between two coherences, fifth-order 2D spectroscopy (2D population spectroscopy) is here designed to detect correlations between the excited states during two different time periods

  18. Design and characteristic investigations of superconducting wireless power transfer for electric vehicle charging system via resonance coupling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using strongly coupled electromagnetic resonators is a recently explored technique to realize the large power delivery and storage without any cable or wire, this technique is required for diffusion of electric vehicles (EVs) since it makes possible a convenient charging system. Typically, since the normal conducting coils are used as a transmitting coil in the CPT system, there is limited to deliver the large power promptly in the contactless EV charging system. From this reason, we proposed the combination CPT technology with HTS transmitting antenna, it is called as, superconducting contactless power transfer for EV (SUWPT4EV) system. As the HTS coil has an enough current density, it can deliver a mass amount of electric energy in spite of a small scale antenna. The SUCPT4EV system has been expected as a noble option to improve the transfer efficiency of large electric power. Such a system consists of two resonator coils; HTS transmitting antenna (Tx) coil and normal conducting receiver (Rx) coil. Especially, the impedance matching for each resonator is a sensitive and plays an important role to improve transfer efficiency as well as delivery distance. In this study, we examined the improvement of transmission efficiency and properties for HTS and copper antennas, respectively, within 45 cm distance. Thus, we obtained improved transfer efficiency with HTS antenna over 15% compared with copper antenna. In addition, we achieved effective impedance matching conditions between HTS antenna and copper receiver at radio frequency (RF) power of 370 kHz

  19. Spin-orbit-coupling induced torque in ballistic domain walls: Equivalence of charge-pumping and nonequilibrium magnetization formalisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhe; Kelly, Paul J.

    2016-06-01

    To study the effect of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) on spin-transfer torque in magnetic materials, we have implemented two theoretical formalisms that can accommodate SOC. Using the "charge-pumping" formalism, we find two contributions to the out-of-plane spin-transfer torque parameter β in ballistic Ni domain walls (DWs). For short DWs, the nonadiabatic reflection of conduction electrons caused by the rapid spatial variation of the exchange potential results in an out-of-plane torque that increases rapidly with decreasing DW length. For long DWs, the Fermi level conduction channel anisotropy that gives rise to an intrinsic DW resistance in the presence of SOC leads to a linear dependence of β on the DW length. To understand this counterintuitive divergence of β in the long DW limit, we use the "nonequilibrium magnetization" formalism to examine the spatially resolved spin-transfer torque. The SOC-induced out-of-plane torque in ballistic DWs is found to be quantitatively consistent with the values obtained using the charge-pumping calculations, indicating the equivalence of the two theoretical methods.

  20. Conserved charges for black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics in AdS space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišković, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by possible applications within the framework of anti-de Sitter gravity/conformal field theory correspondence, charged black holes with AdS asymptotics, which are solutions to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in D dimensions, and whose electric field is described by nonlinear electrodynamics are studied. For a topological static black hole ansatz, the field equations are exactly solved in terms of the electromagnetic stress tensor for an arbitrary nonlinear electrodynamic Lagrangian in any dimension D and for arbitrary positive values of Gauss-Bonnet coupling. In particular, this procedure reproduces the black hole metric in Born-Infeld and conformally invariant electrodynamics previously found in the literature. Altogether, it extends to D>4 the four-dimensional solution obtained by Soleng in logarithmic electrodynamics, which comes from vacuum polarization effects. Falloff conditions for the electromagnetic field that ensure the finiteness of the electric charge are also discussed. The black hole mass and vacuum energy as conserved quantities associated to an asymptotic timelike Killing vector are computed using a background-independent regularization of the gravitational action based on the addition of counterterms which are a given polynomial in the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures.

  1. Conserved charges for black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics in AdS space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motivated by possible applications within the framework of anti-de Sitter gravity/conformal field theory correspondence, charged black holes with AdS asymptotics, which are solutions to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in D dimensions, and whose electric field is described by nonlinear electrodynamics are studied. For a topological static black hole ansatz, the field equations are exactly solved in terms of the electromagnetic stress tensor for an arbitrary nonlinear electrodynamic Lagrangian in any dimension D and for arbitrary positive values of Gauss-Bonnet coupling. In particular, this procedure reproduces the black hole metric in Born-Infeld and conformally invariant electrodynamics previously found in the literature. Altogether, it extends to D>4 the four-dimensional solution obtained by Soleng in logarithmic electrodynamics, which comes from vacuum polarization effects. Falloff conditions for the electromagnetic field that ensure the finiteness of the electric charge are also discussed. The black hole mass and vacuum energy as conserved quantities associated to an asymptotic timelike Killing vector are computed using a background-independent regularization of the gravitational action based on the addition of counterterms which are a given polynomial in the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures.

  2. Thermodynamics of charged rotating dilaton black branes coupled to logarithmic nonlinear electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sheykhi, A; Zangeneh, M Kord

    2016-01-01

    We construct a new class of charged rotating black brane solutions in the presence of logarithmic nonlinear electrodynamics with complete set of the rotation parameters in arbitrary dimensions. The topology of the horizon of these rotating black branes are flat, while, due to the presence of the dilaton field the asymptotic behaviour of them are neither flat nor (anti)-de Sitter [(A)dS]. We investigate the physical properties of the solutions. The mass and angular momentum of the spacetime are obtained by using the counterterm method inspired by AdS/CFT correspondence. We derive temperature, electric potential and entropy associated with the horizon and check the validity of the first law of thermodynamics on the black brane horizon. We study thermal stability of the solutions in both canonical and grand canonical ensemble and disclose the effects of the rotation parameter, nonlinearity of electrodynamics and dilaton field on the thermal stability conditions. We find the solutions are thermally stable for $\\a...

  3. Correlation between charge transfer and exchange coupling in carbon-based magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several forms of carbon-based magnetic materials, i.e. single radicals, radical dimers, and alternating stacks of radicals and diamagnetic molecules, have been investigated using density-functional theory with dispersion correction and full geometry optimization. Our calculated results demonstrate that the C31H15 (R4) radical has a spin of ½. However, in its [R4]2 dimer structure, the net spin becomes zero due to antiferromagnetic spin-exchange between radicals. To avoid antiferromagnetic spin-exchange of identical face-to-face radicals, eight alternating stacks, R4/D2m/R4 (with m = 3-10), were designed. Our calculated results show that charge transfer (Δn) between R4 radicals and the diamagnetic molecule D2m occurs with a mechanism of spin exchange (J) in stacks. The more electrons that transfer from R4 to D2m, the stronger the ferromagnetic spin-exchange in stacks. In addition, our calculated results show that Δn can be tailored by adjusting the electron affinity (Ea) of D2m. The correlation between Δn, Ea, m, and J is discussed. These results give some hints for the design of new ferromagnetic carbon-based materials

  4. Correlation between charge transfer and exchange coupling in carbon-based magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Anh Tuan, E-mail: tuanna@hus.edu.vn [Faculty of Physics, VNU University of Science, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Ha Noi (Viet Nam); Science and Technology Department, Vietnam National University, Hanoi, 144 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1, Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1292 Japan (Japan); Nguyen, Van Thanh; Nguyen, Huy Sinh [Faculty of Physics, VNU University of Science, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Ha Noi (Viet Nam); Pham, Thi Tuan Anh [Faculty of Physics, VNU University of Science, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Ha Noi (Viet Nam); Faculty of Science, College of Hai Duong, Nguyen Thi Due, Hai Duong (Viet Nam); Do, Viet Thang [Faculty of Physics, VNU University of Science, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Ha Noi (Viet Nam); Faculty of Science, Haiphong University, 171 Phan Dang Luu, Kien An, Hai Phong (Viet Nam); Dam, Hieu Chi [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1, Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1292 Japan (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Several forms of carbon-based magnetic materials, i.e. single radicals, radical dimers, and alternating stacks of radicals and diamagnetic molecules, have been investigated using density-functional theory with dispersion correction and full geometry optimization. Our calculated results demonstrate that the C{sub 31}H{sub 15} (R{sub 4}) radical has a spin of ½. However, in its [R{sub 4}]{sub 2} dimer structure, the net spin becomes zero due to antiferromagnetic spin-exchange between radicals. To avoid antiferromagnetic spin-exchange of identical face-to-face radicals, eight alternating stacks, R{sub 4}/D{sub 2m}/R{sub 4} (with m = 3-10), were designed. Our calculated results show that charge transfer (Δn) between R{sub 4} radicals and the diamagnetic molecule D{sub 2m} occurs with a mechanism of spin exchange (J) in stacks. The more electrons that transfer from R{sub 4} to D{sub 2m}, the stronger the ferromagnetic spin-exchange in stacks. In addition, our calculated results show that Δn can be tailored by adjusting the electron affinity (E{sub a}) of D{sub 2m}. The correlation between Δn, E{sub a}, m, and J is discussed. These results give some hints for the design of new ferromagnetic carbon-based materials.

  5. Correlation between charge transfer and exchange coupling in carbon-based magnetic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh Tuan Nguyen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Several forms of carbon-based magnetic materials, i.e. single radicals, radical dimers, and alternating stacks of radicals and diamagnetic molecules, have been investigated using density-functional theory with dispersion correction and full geometry optimization. Our calculated results demonstrate that the C31H15 (R4 radical has a spin of ½. However, in its [R4]2 dimer structure, the net spin becomes zero due to antiferromagnetic spin-exchange between radicals. To avoid antiferromagnetic spin-exchange of identical face-to-face radicals, eight alternating stacks, R4/D2m/R4 (with m = 3-10, were designed. Our calculated results show that charge transfer (Δn between R4 radicals and the diamagnetic molecule D2m occurs with a mechanism of spin exchange (J in stacks. The more electrons that transfer from R4 to D2m, the stronger the ferromagnetic spin-exchange in stacks. In addition, our calculated results show that Δn can be tailored by adjusting the electron affinity (Ea of D2m. The correlation between Δn, Ea, m, and J is discussed. These results give some hints for the design of new ferromagnetic carbon-based materials.

  6. Evidence of phonon mediated coupling between charge transfer and ligand field excitons in Sr$_2$CuO$_2$Cl$_2$

    OpenAIRE

    Lövenich, R.; Schumacher, A. B.; Dodge, J. S.; Chemla, D. S.; Miller, L.L.

    2001-01-01

    We present a comparative experimental and theoretical investigation of the two--dimensional charge-transfer gap in the strongly correlated material Sr$_2$CuO$_2$Cl$_2$. We observe an Urbach behaviour in the absorption profile over a surprisingly wide range of energies and temperatures. We present a model that accounts for phonon scattering to infinite order and which allows us to explain the data accurately by assuming coupling of the charge transfer gap exciton to lower energy electronic exc...

  7. A methodology for coupling a visual enhancement device to human visual attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic, Aleksandar; Black, John A., Jr.; Panchanathan, Sethuraman

    2009-02-01

    The Human Variation Model views disability as simply "an extension of the natural physical, social, and cultural variability of mankind." Given this human variation, it can be difficult to distinguish between a prosthetic device such as a pair of glasses (which extends limited visual abilities into the "normal" range) and a visual enhancement device such as a pair of binoculars (which extends visual abilities beyond the "normal" range). Indeed, there is no inherent reason why the design of visual prosthetic devices should be limited to just providing "normal" vision. One obvious enhancement to human vision would be the ability to visually "zoom" in on objects that are of particular interest to the viewer. Indeed, it could be argued that humans already have a limited zoom capability, which is provided by their highresolution foveal vision. However, humans still find additional zooming useful, as evidenced by their purchases of binoculars equipped with mechanized zoom features. The fact that these zoom features are manually controlled raises two questions: (1) Could a visual enhancement device be developed to monitor attention and control visual zoom automatically? (2) If such a device were developed, would its use be experienced by users as a simple extension of their natural vision? This paper details the results of work with two research platforms called the Remote Visual Explorer (ReVEx) and the Interactive Visual Explorer (InVEx) that were developed specifically to answer these two questions.

  8. Multi-Stimuli-Responsive Charge-Transfer Hydrogel for Room-Temperature Organic Ferroelectric Thin-Film Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandeeswar, Makam; Senanayak, Satyaprasad P; Narayan, K S; Govindaraju, T

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of designing programmable thin-film supramolecular structures with spontaneous polarization widens the utility of facile supramolecular chemistry. Although a range of low molecular mass molecular single crystals has been shown to exhibit ferroelectric polarization, demonstration of stimuli-responsive, thin-film, solution-processable supramolecular ferroelectric materials is rare. We introduce aromatic π-electron donor-acceptor molecular systems responsive to multiple stimuli that undergo supramolecular chiral mixed-stack charge-transfer (CT) coassembly through the tweezer-inclusion-sandwich process supported by hydrogen-bonding interactions. The structural synergy originating from hydrogen-bonding and chiral CT interactions resulted in the development of spontaneous unidirectional macroscopic polarization in the crystalline nanofibrous hydrogel network, under ambient conditions. Moreover, the tunability of these interactions with optical, mechanical, thermal, and electrical stimuli allowed the design of multistate thin-film memory devices. Our design strategy of the supramolecular motif is expected to help the development of new molecular engineering strategies for designing potentially useful smart multicomponent organic electronics. PMID:27305598

  9. Preparation of Entanglement and Schrodinger Cat States of Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices Qubits via Coupling to a Microwave Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Sheng-Chang; YANG Wen-Xing; DUAN Wen-Shan

    2008-01-01

    An alternative scheme is proposed for the generation of n-qubit W states of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID) in cavity QED. In this scheme, Raman coupling of two lower flux states of SQUID system is achieved via a microwave pulse and the cavity mode. Conditioned on no photon leakage from the cavity, the n-qubit W state can be generated whether the effective coupling parameters of the SQUID to cavity mode and classical microwave fields are the same or different. Our strictly numerical simulations of the time evolution of the system including decay show that the success probability of our scheme is almost unity and the interaction time is on the order of 10-9 s. The scheme can also be used to generate the Schrfdinger cat states of multi-SQUID.

  10. 49 CFR 393.70 - Coupling devices and towing methods, except for driveaway-towaway operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... that tows it. (b) Fifth wheel assemblies—(1) Mounting—(i) Lower half. The lower half of a fifth wheel... equipped with a tow-bar and a means of attaching the tow-bar to the towing and towed vehicles. The tow-bar... strength and rigidity of the frame to prevent its undue distortion. (d) Safety devices in case of...

  11. Coupling element antenna with slot tuning for handheld devices at LTE frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrio, Samantha Caporal Del; Pelosi, Mauro; Franek, Ondrej; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2012-01-01

    Tunable antennas are a promising way to overcome bandwidth limitations for the new communication standards. Since it is the chassis that resonates in the low frequencies, its tuning is pertinent and allows for more compact size designs. This paper proposes a coupling element based antenna. A reco...

  12. Nanotribology-based novel characterization techniques for the dielectric charging failure mechanism in electrostatically actuated NEMS/MEMS devices using force-distance curve measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Usama; Bhushan, Bharat; Papaioannou, George; Coccetti, Fabio; Pons, Patrick; Plana, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The work presents a comprehensive package of novel nanoscale characterization techniques to study dielectric charging in electrostatic nano- and microelectromechanical systems (NEMS and MEMS). The proposed assessment methodologies are based on the force-distance curve (FDC) measurements performed using an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure, for the first time, the induced surface potential and adhesive force over charged dielectric films. They were employed to study plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride films for application in electrostatic capacitive RF MEMS switches. Three different techniques were introduced including the application of FDC measurements to study charging in bare SiN(x) films, metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors, and MEMS switches. The results from the three methods were correlated and compared with the published data from other characterization techniques, mainly charge/discharge current transient (C/DCT) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). The unique advantages of the proposed FDC-based characterization techniques are twofold. First, they can measure the multiphysics coupling between the dielectric charging phenomenon and tribological issues at the interface between the switch bridge and the dielectric surface. Second, the FDC-based techniques can measure larger levels of induced surface potential over charged dielectric films which results from the high electric field normally used to actuate MEMS switches. Based on the proposed FDC techniques, the influence of several parameters on dielectric charging/discharging processes was investigated: the dielectric film thickness, deposition conditions, substrate, and electrical stress conditions. PMID:21962432

  13. Inertia-Centric Stability Analysis of a Planar Uniform Dust Molecular Cloud with Weak Neutral-Charged Dust Frictional Coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper adopts an inertia-centric evolutionary model to study the excitation mechanism of new gravito-electrostatic eigenmode structures in a one-dimensional (1-D) planar self-gravitating dust molecular cloud (DMC) on the Jeans scale. A quasi-neutral multi-fluid consisting of warm electrons, warm ions, neutral gas and identical inertial cold dust grains with partial ionization is considered. The grain-charge is assumed not to vary at the fluctuation evolution time scale. The neutral gas particles form the background, which is weakly coupled with the collapsing grainy plasma mass. The gravitational decoupling of the background neutral particles is justifiable for a higher inertial mass of the grains with higher neutral population density so that the Jeans mode frequency becomes reasonably large. Its physical basis is the Jeans assumption of a self-gravitating uniform medium adopted for fiducially analytical simplification by neglecting the zero-order field. So, the equilibrium is justifiably treated initially as “homogeneous”. The efficacious inertial role of the thermal species amidst weak collisions of the neutral-charged grains is taken into account. A standard multiscale technique over the gravito-electrostatic equilibrium yields a unique pair of Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations. It is integrated numerically by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method with multi-parameter variation for exact shape analyses. Interestingly, the model is conducive for the propagation of new conservative solitary spectral patterns. Their basic physics, parametric features and unique characteristics are discussed. The results go qualitatively in good correspondence with the earlier observations made by others. Tentative applications relevant to space and astrophysical environments are concisely highlighted. (basic plasma phenomena)

  14. Nanocellulose-based Translucent Diffuser for Optoelectronic Device Applications with Dramatic Improvement of Light Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Tassi, Nancy G; Zhu, Hongli; Fang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Liangbing

    2015-12-01

    Nanocellulose is a biogenerated and biorenewable organic material. Using a process based on 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)/NaClO/NaBr system, a highly translucent and light-diffusive film consisting of many layers of nanocellulose fibers and wood pulp microfibers was made. The film demonstrates a combination of large optical transmittance of ∼90% and tunable diffuse transmission of up to ∼78% across the visible and near-infrared spectra. The detailed characterizations of the film indicate the combination of high optical transmittance and haze is due to the film's large packing density and microstructured surface. The superior optical properties make the film a translucent light diffuser and applicable for improving the efficiencies of optoelectronic devices such as thin-film silicon solar cells and organic light-emitting devices. PMID:26572592

  15. Reliability study of opto-coupled semiconductor devices and Light Emitting Diodes (LED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, R. C.; Weissflug, V. A.; Sisul, E. V.

    1977-01-01

    Opto-coupler and light emitting diode (LED) failure mechanisms and associated activation energies were determind from the results of environmental and accelerated lift tests of over 2,400 devices. The evaluation program included LED phototransistor opto-couplers from three sources, LED photoamplifier opto-couplers from a single source, and discrete infrared emitting LEDs from two sources. Environmental tests to evaluate device mechanical integrity included power cycling (10,000 cycles), temperature cycling (500 cycles) and a sequence of monitored shock, monitored vibration and constant acceleration. Multiple temperature operating life tests were conducted at ambient temperatures between 25 C and 200 C. Opto-couplers were operated in both the 'on' and 'off' states during life testing.

  16. GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based non-volatile flash memory devices with InAs quantum dots as charge storage nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultra-thin InP passivated GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based non-volatile flash memory devices were fabricated using InAs quantum dots (QDs) as charge storing elements by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique to study the efficacy of the QDs as charge storage elements. The grown QDs were embedded between two high-k dielectric such as HfO2 and ZrO2, which were used for tunneling and control oxide layers, respectively. The size and density of the QDs were found to be 5 nm and 1.8×1011 cm−2, respectively. The device with a structure Metal/ZrO2/InAs QDs/HfO2/GaAs/Metal shows maximum memory window equivalent to 6.87 V. The device also exhibits low leakage current density of the order of 10−6 A/cm2 and reasonably good charge retention characteristics. The low value of leakage current in the fabricated memory device is attributed to the Coulomb blockade effect influenced by quantum confinement as well as reduction of interface trap states by ultra-thin InP passivation on GaAs prior to HfO2 deposition

  17. GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based non-volatile flash memory devices with InAs quantum dots as charge storage nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Sk Masiul, E-mail: masiulelt@gmail.com; Chowdhury, Sisir; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Nagabhushan, B.; Banerji, P. [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Chakraborty, S. [Applied Materials Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Sector-I, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Mukherjee, Rabibrata [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Ultra-thin InP passivated GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor based non-volatile flash memory devices were fabricated using InAs quantum dots (QDs) as charge storing elements by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique to study the efficacy of the QDs as charge storage elements. The grown QDs were embedded between two high-k dielectric such as HfO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}, which were used for tunneling and control oxide layers, respectively. The size and density of the QDs were found to be 5 nm and 1.8×10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}, respectively. The device with a structure Metal/ZrO{sub 2}/InAs QDs/HfO{sub 2}/GaAs/Metal shows maximum memory window equivalent to 6.87 V. The device also exhibits low leakage current density of the order of 10{sup −6} A/cm{sup 2} and reasonably good charge retention characteristics. The low value of leakage current in the fabricated memory device is attributed to the Coulomb blockade effect influenced by quantum confinement as well as reduction of interface trap states by ultra-thin InP passivation on GaAs prior to HfO{sub 2} deposition.

  18. Low Damage, High Anisotropy Inductively Coupled Plasma for Gallium Nitride based Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Youssef H.

    2013-05-27

    Group III-nitride semiconductors possess unique properties, which make them versatile materials for suiting many applications. Structuring vertical and exceptionally smooth GaN profiles is crucial for efficient optical device operation. The processing requirements for laser devices and ridge waveguides are stringent as compared to LEDs and other electronic devices. Due to the strong bonding and chemically inert nature of GaN, dry etching becomes a critical fabrication step. The surface morphology and facet etch angle are analyzed using SEM and AFM measurements. The influence of different mask materials is also studied including Ni as well as a SiO2 and resist bilayer. The high selectivity Ni Mask is found to produce high sidewall angles ~79°. Processing parameters are optimized for both the mask material and GaN in order to achieve a highly anisotropic, smooth profile, without resorting to additional surface treatment steps. An optimizing a SF6/O2 plasma etch process resulted in smooth SiO2 mask sidewalls. The etch rate and GaN surface roughness dependence on the RF power was also examined. Under a low 2mTorr pressure, the RF and ICP power were optimized to 150W and 300W respectively, such that a smooth GaN morphology and sidewalls was achieved with reduced ion damage. The The AFM measurements of the etched GaN surface indicate a low RMS roughness ranging from 4.75 nm to 7.66 nm.

  19. Application of a particle separation device to reduce inductively coupled plasma-enhanced elemental fractionation in laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particle size distribution of laser ablation aerosols are a function of the wavelength, the energy density and the pulse duration of the laser, as well as the sample matrix and the gas environment. Further the size of the particles affects the vaporization and ionization efficiency in the inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Some matrices produce large particles, which are not completely vaporized and ionized in the ICP. The previous work has shown that analytical results such as matrix-independent calibration, accuracy and precision can be significantly influenced by the particle sizes of the particles. To minimize the particle size related incomplete conversion of the sample to ions in the ICP a particle separation device was developed, which allows effective particle separation using centrifugal forces in a thin coiled tube. In this device, the particle cut-off size is varied by changing the number of turns in the coil, as well as by changing the gas flow and the tube diameter. The interaction of the laser with the different samples leads to varying particle size distributions. When carrying out quantitative analysis with non-matrix matched calibration reference materials, it was shown that different particle cut-off sizes were required depending on the ICP conditions and the instrument used for analysis. Various sample materials were investigated in this study to demonstrate the applicability of the device. For silicate matrices, the capability of the ICP to produce ions was significantly reduced for particles larger than 0.5 μm, and was dependent on the element monitored. To reduce memory effects caused by the separated particles, a washout procedure was developed, which additionally allowed the analysis of the trapped particles. These results clearly demonstrate the very important particle size dependent ICP-MS signal response and the potential of the described particle size based separator for the reduction of ICP induced elemental fractionation

  20. Disrupted coupling of gating charge displacement to Na+ current activation for DIIS4 mutations in hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Wentao; Rybalchenko, Volodymyr; Cannon, Stephen C

    2014-08-01

    Missense mutations at arginine residues in the S4 voltage-sensor domains of NaV1.4 are an established cause of hypokalemic periodic paralysis, an inherited disorder of skeletal muscle involving recurrent episodes of weakness in conjunction with low serum K(+). Expression studies in oocytes have revealed anomalous, hyperpolarization-activated gating pore currents in mutant channels. This aberrant gating pore conductance creates a small inward current at the resting potential that is thought to contribute to susceptibility to depolarization in low K(+) during attacks of weakness. A critical component of this hypothesis is the magnitude of the gating pore conductance relative to other conductances that are active at the resting potential in mammalian muscle: large enough to favor episodes of paradoxical depolarization in low K(+), yet not so large as to permanently depolarize the fiber. To improve the estimate of the specific conductance for the gating pore in affected muscle, we sequentially measured Na(+) current through the channel pore, gating pore current, and gating charge displacement in oocytes expressing R669H, R672G, or wild-type NaV1.4 channels. The relative conductance of the gating pore to that of the pore domain pathway for Na(+) was 0.03%, which implies a specific conductance in muscle from heterozygous patients of ∼ 10 µS/cm(2) or 1% of the total resting conductance. Unexpectedly, our data also revealed a substantial decoupling between gating charge displacement and peak Na(+) current for both R669H and R672G mutant channels. This decoupling predicts a reduced Na(+) current density in affected muscle, consistent with the observations that the maximal dV/dt and peak amplitude of the action potential are reduced in fibers from patients with R672G and in a knock-in mouse model of R669H. The defective coupling between gating charge displacement and channel activation identifies a previously unappreciated mechanism that contributes to the reduced

  1. Thermodynamics of Charged Kalb Ramond AdS black hole in presence of Gauss-Bonnet coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, Sayantan

    2013-01-01

    We study the role of the Gauss-Bonnet corrections to the gravity action on the charged AdS black hole in presence of rank 3 antisymmetric Kalb Ramond tensor field strength. Analyzing the branch singularity and the killing horizon, we explicitly derive various thermodynamic parameters and study their behaviour in presence of five dimensional Gauss-Bonnet coupling in AdS space-time. The possibility of a second order phase transition is explored in the light of AdS/CMT correspondence and various critical exponents associated with the discontinuities of the various thermodynamic parameters are determined. We further comment on the universality of the well known Rushbrooke Josephson scaling law and derive a relation between the degree of homogeneity appearing in various free energies and the critical exponents by homogeneous hypothesis test. By making use of the constraints appearing from Hawking temperature and Gauss-Bonnet extended gravity version of Kubo formula we introduce a bound on the five dimensional Gaus...

  2. Geometrical modification transfer between specific meshes of each coupled physical codes. Application to the Jules Horowitz research reactor experimental devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CEA develops and uses scientific software, called physical codes, in various physical disciplines to optimize installation and experimentation costs. During a study, several physical phenomena interact, so a code coupling and some data exchanges between different physical codes are required. Each physical code computes on a particular geometry, usually represented by a mesh composed of thousands to millions of elements. This PhD Thesis focuses on the geometrical modification transfer between specific meshes of each coupled physical code. First, it presents a physical code coupling method where deformations are computed by one of these codes. Next, it discusses the establishment of a model, common to different physical codes, grouping all the shared data. Finally, it covers the deformation transfers between meshes of the same geometry or adjacent geometries. Geometrical modifications are discrete data because they are based on a mesh. In order to permit every code to access deformations and to transfer them, a continuous representation is computed. Two functions are developed, one with a global support, and the other with a local support. Both functions combine a simplification method and a radial basis function network. A whole use case is dedicated to the Jules Horowitz reactor. The effect of differential dilatations on experimental device cooling is studied. (author)

  3. Efficient charge transfer and field-induced tunneling transport in hybrid composite device of organic semiconductor and cadmium telluride quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature and photo-dependent current–voltage characteristics are investigated in thin film devices of a hybrid-composite comprising of organic semiconductor poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) and cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs). A detailed study of the charge injection mechanism in ITO/PEDOT:PSS-CdTe QDs/Al device exhibits a transition from direct tunneling to Fowler–Nordheim tunneling with increasing electric field due to formation of high barrier at the QD interface. In addition, the hybrid-composite exhibits a huge photoluminescence quenching compared to aboriginal CdTe QDs and high increment in photoconductivity (∼ 400%), which is attributed to the charge transfer phenomena. The effective barrier height (ΦB ≈ 0.68 eV) is estimated from the transition voltage and the possible origin of its variation with temperature and photo-illumination is discussed

  4. Efficient charge transfer and field-induced tunneling transport in hybrid composite device of organic semiconductor and cadmium telluride quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varade, Vaibhav, E-mail: vaibhav.tvarade@gmail.com; Jagtap, Amardeep M.; Koteswara Rao, K. S. R.; Ramesh, K. P.; Menon, R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Anjaneyulu, P. [Department of Physics, Gitam University, Hyderabad 502329 (India)

    2015-06-07

    Temperature and photo-dependent current–voltage characteristics are investigated in thin film devices of a hybrid-composite comprising of organic semiconductor poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) and cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs). A detailed study of the charge injection mechanism in ITO/PEDOT:PSS-CdTe QDs/Al device exhibits a transition from direct tunneling to Fowler–Nordheim tunneling with increasing electric field due to formation of high barrier at the QD interface. In addition, the hybrid-composite exhibits a huge photoluminescence quenching compared to aboriginal CdTe QDs and high increment in photoconductivity (∼ 400%), which is attributed to the charge transfer phenomena. The effective barrier height (Φ{sub B} ≈ 0.68 eV) is estimated from the transition voltage and the possible origin of its variation with temperature and photo-illumination is discussed.

  5. A concept for a magnetic field detector underpinned by the nonlinear dynamics of coupled multiferroic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiferroic (MF) composites, in which magnetic and ferroelectric orders coexist, represent a very attractive class of materials with promising applications in areas, such as spintronics, memories, and sensors. One of the most important multiferroics is the perovskite phase of bismuth ferrite, which exhibits weak magnetoelectric properties at room temperature; its properties can be enhanced by doping with other elements such as dysprosium. A recent paper has demonstrated that a thin film of Bi0.7Dy0.3FeO3 shows good magnetoelectric coupling. In separate work it has been shown that a carefully crafted ring connection of N (N odd and N ≥ 3) ferroelectric capacitors yields, past a critical point, nonlinear oscillations that can be exploited for electric (E) field sensing. These two results represent the starting point of our work. In this paper the (electrical) hysteresis, experimentally measured in the MF material Bi0.7Dy0.3FeO3, is characterized with the applied magnetic field (B) taken as a control parameter. This yields a “blueprint” for a magnetic (B) field sensor: a ring-oscillator coupling of N = 3 Sawyer-Tower circuits each underpinned by a mutliferroic element. In this configuration, the changes induced in the ferroelectric behavior by the external or “target” B-field are quantified, thus providing a pathway for very low power and high sensitivity B-field sensing

  6. Re-evaluation of interferences of doubly charged ions of heavy rare earth elements on Sr isotopic analysis using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We re-evaluate the interference of doubly charged heavy rare earth elements during Sr isotopic analysis using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). A series of mixed solutions of standard reference material SRM 987, rare earth elements, and Sr separated from rock reference materials are measured to assess the influence of isobaric interferences on the MC-ICP-MS analysis of Sr isotopes. After sample dissolution, conventional cation-exchange chromatography is employed for Sr purification of rock reference materials prior to MC-ICP-MS measurement. It has been demonstrated that if the natural abundances of Er and Yb are used to correct for doubly charged ion interferences on Sr, an overcorrection results. In contrast, the use of measured doubly charged ion ratios results in an accurate and precise correction of isobaric interference. This finding is confirmed by analytical results for several certified reference materials from mafic (basaltic) to felsic (granitic) silicate rocks. It is noteworthy that, because Er is more prone to doubly charged ion formation, it dominates over Yb doubly charged ions as an interference source. - Highlights: • We re-investigated interference of doubly charged HREE ion on Sr isotope. • Natural abundance of Er and Yb to correct the interference leads to an overcorrection. • Er is more prone to doubly charged ion formation than Yb

  7. Optimization of light out-coupling in optoelectronic devices using nanostructured surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Argyraki, Aikaterini;

    to fully explore the potential of this new light sources, huge amount of effort has been made to enhance the light extraction efficiency, which is usually very low due to the large refractive index difference between the semiconductor material s and the air, thus is very crucial in order to imp rove...... nanostructuring. As active material for LEDs, GaN also has high refractive index of 2. 4 . So, it is also very important to ext ract more light out by roughening the surface. For GaN, the self - assembly method was applied. The same transmittance enhancement (15~20%) is demonstrated, similar to SiC. In addition...... the overall efficiency of the LEDs. In this paper we have developed various methods for two important semiconductors: silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN), and demonstrated enormous extraction efficiency enhancement. SiC is an important su bstrate for LED devices. It has refractive index of...

  8. Study of Interface Charge Densities for ZrO2 and HfO2 Based Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Maity

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A thickness-dependent interfacial distribution of oxide charges for thin metal oxide semiconductor (MOS structures using high-k materials ZrO2 and HfO2 has been methodically investigated. The interface charge densities are analyzed using capacitance-voltage (C-V method and also conductance (G-V method. It indicates that, by reducing the effective oxide thickness (EOT, the interface charge densities (Dit increases linearly. For the same EOT, Dit has been found for the materials to be of the order of 1012 cm−2 eV−1 and it is originated to be in good agreement with published fabrication results at p-type doping level of 1×1017 cm−3. Numerical calculations and solutions are performed by MATLAB and device simulation is done by ATLAS.

  9. Study of ICRF wave propagation and plasma coupling efficiency in a linear magnetic mirror device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, S.Y.

    1991-07-01

    Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) wave propagation in an inhomogeneous axial magnetic field in a cylindrical plasma-vacuum system has historically been inadequately modelled. Previous works either sacrifice the cylindrical geometry in favor of a simpler slab geometry, concentrate on the resonance region, use a single mode to represent the entire field structure, or examine only radial propagation. This thesis performs both analytical and computational studies to model the ICRF wave-plasma coupling and propagation problem. Experimental analysis is also conducted to compare experimental results with theoretical predictions. Both theoretical as well as experimental analysis are undertaken as part of the thesis. The theoretical studies simulate the propagation of ICRF waves in an axially inhomogeneous magnetic field and in cylindrical geometry. Two theoretical analysis are undertaken - an analytical study and a computational study. The analytical study treats the inhomogeneous magnetic field by transforming the (r,z) coordinate into another coordinate system ({rho},{xi}) that allows the solution of the fields with much simpler boundaries. The plasma fields are then Fourier transformed into two coupled convolution-integral equations which are then differenced and solved for both the perpendicular mode number {alpha} as well as the complete EM fields. The computational study involves a multiple eigenmode computational analysis of the fields that exist within the plasma-vacuum system. The inhomogeneous axial field is treated by dividing the geometry into a series of transverse axial slices and using a constant dielectric tensor in each individual slice. The slices are then connected by longitudinal boundary conditions.

  10. Study of ICRF wave propagation and plasma coupling efficiency in a linear magnetic mirror device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) wave propagation in an inhomogeneous axial magnetic field in a cylindrical plasma-vacuum system has historically been inadequately modelled. Previous works either sacrifice the cylindrical geometry in favor of a simpler slab geometry, concentrate on the resonance region, use a single mode to represent the entire field structure, or examine only radial propagation. This thesis performs both analytical and computational studies to model the ICRF wave-plasma coupling and propagation problem. Experimental analysis is also conducted to compare experimental results with theoretical predictions. Both theoretical as well as experimental analysis are undertaken as part of the thesis. The theoretical studies simulate the propagation of ICRF waves in an axially inhomogeneous magnetic field and in cylindrical geometry. Two theoretical analysis are undertaken - an analytical study and a computational study. The analytical study treats the inhomogeneous magnetic field by transforming the (r,z) coordinate into another coordinate system (ρ,ξ) that allows the solution of the fields with much simpler boundaries. The plasma fields are then Fourier transformed into two coupled convolution-integral equations which are then differenced and solved for both the perpendicular mode number α as well as the complete EM fields. The computational study involves a multiple eigenmode computational analysis of the fields that exist within the plasma-vacuum system. The inhomogeneous axial field is treated by dividing the geometry into a series of transverse axial slices and using a constant dielectric tensor in each individual slice. The slices are then connected by longitudinal boundary conditions

  11. Effects of the charge-transfer reorganization energy on the open-circuit voltage in small-molecular bilayer organic photovoltaic devices: comparison of the influence of deposition rates of the donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih-Chien; Su, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Wen-Chang

    2016-05-14

    The theoretical maximum of open-circuit voltage (VOC) of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices has yet to be determined, and its origin remains debated. Here, we demonstrate that VOC of small-molecule OPV devices can be improved by controlling the deposition rate of a donor without changing the interfacial energy gap at the donor/acceptor interface. The measurement of external quantum efficiency and electroluminescence spectra facilitates the observation of the existence of charge transfer (CT) states. A simplified approach by reusing the reciprocity relationship for obtaining the properties of the CT states is proposed without introducing complex techniques. We compare experimental and fitting results and propose that reorganization energy is the primary factor in determining VOC instead of either the CT energy or electronic coupling term in bilayer OPV devices. Atomic force microscopy images indicate a weak molecular aggregation when a higher deposition rate is used. The results of temperature-dependent measurements suggest the importance of molecular stacking for the CT properties. PMID:27095179

  12. Analysis of the kinestatic charge detection system as a high detective quantum efficiency electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megavoltage x-ray imaging suffers from reduced image quality due to low differential x-ray attenuation and large Compton scatter compared with kilovoltage imaging. Notwithstanding this, electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are now widely used in portal verification in radiotherapy as they offer significant advantages over film, including immediate digital imaging and superior contrast range. However video-camera-based EPIDs (VEPIDs) are limited by problems of low light collection efficiency and significant light scatter, leading to reduced contrast and spatial resolution. Indirect and direct detection-based flat-panel EPIDs have been developed to overcome these limitations. While flat-panel image quality has been reported to exceed that achieved with portal film, these systems have detective quantum efficiency (DQE) limited by the thin detection medium and are sensitive to radiation damage to peripheral read-out electronics. An alternative technology for high-quality portal imaging is presented here: kinesatic charge detection (KCD). The KCD is a scanning tri-electrode ion-chamber containing high-pressure noble gas (xenon at 100 atm) used in conjunction with a strip-collimated photon beam. The chamber is scanned across the patient, and an external electric field is used to regulate the cation drift velocity. By matching the scanning velocity with that of the cation (i.e., ion) drift velocity, the cations remain static in the object frame of reference, allowing temporal integration of the signal. The KCD offers several advantages as a portal imaging system. It has a thick detector geometry with an active detection depth of 6.1 cm, compared to the sub-millimeter thickness of the phosphor layer in conventional phosphor screens, leading to an order of magnitude advantage in quantum efficiency (>0.3). The unique principle of kinestatis and the use of the scanning strip-collimated x-ray beam provide further integration of charges in time, reduced scatter, and a

  13. CP-odd contributions to the $ZZ^\\ast\\gamma$, $ZZ\\gamma^\\ast$, and $ZZZ^\\ast$ vertices induced by nondiagonal charged scalar boson couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Moyotl, A; Tavares-Velasco, G

    2015-01-01

    In models with extended scalar sectors with several Higgs multiplets, such as Higgs triplet models, the $Z$ gauge boson can have nondiagonal couplings to charged Higgs bosons. In a model-independent way, we study the potential contributions arising from such theories to the CP-violating trilinear neutral gauge boson couplings $ZZ^*\\gamma$, $ZZ\\gamma^*$, and $ZZZ^*$, which are parametrized by four form factors: $h^Z_{1,2}$, $f_4^\\gamma$, and $f_4^Z$, respectively. Such form factors can only be induced if there are at least two nondegenerate charged Higgs scalars and an imaginary phase in the coupling constants. For the masses of the charged scalar bosons we consider values above 300 GeV and find that the form factors can reach the following orders of magnitude: $|h_1^Z|\\sim 10^{-5}-10^{-4}$, $|h_2^Z|\\sim 10^{-7}-10^{-6}$, $|f_4^\\gamma|\\sim 10^{-5}-10^{-3}$ and $|f_4^Z|\\sim 10^{-6}-10^{-5}$, though there could be an additional suppression factor arising from the coupling constants. We also find that the form fa...

  14. Study of the Pion-Nucleon Coupling Constant Charge Dependence on the Basis of the Low-Energy Data on Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Babenko, V A

    2016-01-01

    We study relationship between the physical quantities that characterize pion-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon interaction on the basis of the fact that nuclear forces in the nucleon-nucleon system at low energies are mainly determined by the one-pion exchange mechanism. By making use of the recommended proton-proton low-energy scattering parameters, we obtain the following value for the charged pion-nucleon coupling constant g$_{\\pi ^{\\pm }}^{2}/4\\pi =14.55(13)$. Calculated value of this quantity is in excellent agreement with the experimental result g$_{\\pi ^{\\pm }}^{2}/4\\pi =14.52(26)$ of the Uppsala Neutron Research Group. At the same time, the obtained value of the charged pion-nucleon coupling constant differs markedly from the value of the neutral pion-nucleon coupling constant g$_{\\pi ^{0}}^{2}/4\\pi =13.55(13)$. Thus, our results show considerable charge splitting of the pion-nucleon coupling constant.

  15. Unconventional Geometric Phase-Shift Gates Based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices Coupled to a Single-Mode Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ke-Hui; ZHOU Zheng-Wei; GUO Guang-Can

    2006-01-01

    We present a scheme to realize geometric phase-shift gate for two superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits coupled to a single-mode microwave field. The geometric phase-shift gate operation is performed transitions during the gate operation. Thus, the docoherence due to energy spontaneous emission based on the levels of SQUIDs are suppressed. The gate is insensitive to the cavity decay throughout the operation since the cavity mode is displaced along a circle in the phase space, acquiring a phase conditional upon the two lower flux states of the SQUID qubits, and the cavity mode is still in the original vacuum state. Based on the SQUID qubits interacting with the cavity mode, our proposed approach may open promising prospects for quantum logic in SQUID-system.

  16. Charge transport studies in donor-acceptor block copolymer PDPP-TNT and PC71BM based inverted organic photovoltaic devices processed in room conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diketopyrrolopyrole-naphthalene polymer (PDPP-TNT), a donor-acceptor co-polymer, has shown versatile behavior demonstrating high performances in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. In this paper we report investigation of charge carrier dynamics in PDPP-TNT, and [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) bulk-heterojunction based inverted OPV devices using current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics, space charge limited current (SCLC) measurements, capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics, and impedance spectroscopy (IS). OPV devices in inverted architecture, ITO/ZnO/PDPP-TNT:PC71BM/MoO3/Ag, are processed and characterized at room conditions. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of these devices are measured ∼3.8%, with reasonably good fill-factor 54.6%. The analysis of impedance spectra exhibits electron’s mobility ∼2 × 10−3 cm2V−1s−1, and lifetime in the range of 0.03-0.23 ms. SCLC measurements give hole mobility of 1.12 × 10−5 cm2V−1s−1, and electron mobility of 8.7 × 10−4 cm2V−1s−1

  17. Charge transport studies in donor-acceptor block copolymer PDPP-TNT and PC71BM based inverted organic photovoltaic devices processed in room conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Shashi B.; Singh, Samarendra P., E-mail: samarendra.singh@snu.edu.in [Department of Physics, Shiv Nadar University, Gautam Buddha Nagar, Uttar Pradesh, India-201307 (India); Sonar, Prashant [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia-4001 (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Diketopyrrolopyrole-naphthalene polymer (PDPP-TNT), a donor-acceptor co-polymer, has shown versatile behavior demonstrating high performances in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. In this paper we report investigation of charge carrier dynamics in PDPP-TNT, and [6,6]-phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) bulk-heterojunction based inverted OPV devices using current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics, space charge limited current (SCLC) measurements, capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics, and impedance spectroscopy (IS). OPV devices in inverted architecture, ITO/ZnO/PDPP-TNT:PC71BM/MoO{sub 3}/Ag, are processed and characterized at room conditions. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of these devices are measured ∼3.8%, with reasonably good fill-factor 54.6%. The analysis of impedance spectra exhibits electron’s mobility ∼2 × 10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}, and lifetime in the range of 0.03-0.23 ms. SCLC measurements give hole mobility of 1.12 × 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}, and electron mobility of 8.7 × 10{sup −4} cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}.

  18. Charge transport studies in donor-acceptor block copolymer PDPP-TNT and PC71BM based inverted organic photovoltaic devices processed in room conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shashi B.; Sonar, Prashant; Singh, Samarendra P.

    2015-07-01

    Diketopyrrolopyrole-naphthalene polymer (PDPP-TNT), a donor-acceptor co-polymer, has shown versatile behavior demonstrating high performances in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. In this paper we report investigation of charge carrier dynamics in PDPP-TNT, and [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) bulk-heterojunction based inverted OPV devices using current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics, space charge limited current (SCLC) measurements, capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics, and impedance spectroscopy (IS). OPV devices in inverted architecture, ITO/ZnO/PDPP-TNT:PC71BM/MoO3/Ag, are processed and characterized at room conditions. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of these devices are measured ˜3.8%, with reasonably good fill-factor 54.6%. The analysis of impedance spectra exhibits electron's mobility ˜2 × 10-3 cm2V-1s-1, and lifetime in the range of 0.03-0.23 ms. SCLC measurements give hole mobility of 1.12 × 10-5 cm2V-1s-1, and electron mobility of 8.7 × 10-4 cm2V-1s-1.

  19. Dephasing in an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer containing a lateral double quantum dot induced by coupling with a quantum dot charge sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We theoretically investigated the dephasing in an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer containing a lateral double quantum dot induced by coupling with a quantum dot charge sensor. We employed the interpolative second-order perturbation theory to include the charge sensing Coulomb interaction. It is shown that the visibility of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillation of the linear conductance decreases monotonically as the sensing Coulomb interaction increases. In particular, for a weak sensing interaction regime, the visibility decreases parabolically, and it behaves linearly for a strong sensing interaction regime.

  20. Plasma Characteristics Using Superimposed Dual Frequency Inductively Coupled Plasma Source for Next Generation Device Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Min; Lee, Chul Hee; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kyong Nam

    2015-11-01

    U-shaped inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source was investigated as a linear plasma source for the next generation roll-to-toll flexible display processing. For the radio frequency power to the source, the dual frequency composed of 13.56 MHz and 2 MHz was used and the effect of dual frequency to the U-shaped ICP source on the plasma density, electron temperature, and plasma uniformity was investigated. As the operating condition, 200 mTorr Ar was used without operating turbo pumps. The use of superimposed dual frequency composed of 13.56 MHz + 2 MHz instead the single frequency of 13.56 MHz increased the plasma density slightly at the same total power. In addition, the addition of 2 MHz rf power to 0.4 kW while maintaining 1 kW 13.56 MHz rf power not only decreased electron temperature but also improved both the plasma uniformity and the process uniformity measured by photoresist etching. Therefore, by using the dual frequency to the U-shaped ICP source, not only the plasma density but also plasma uniformity could be improved in addition to the decrease of possible damage to the substrate. PMID:26726573

  1. Expressions for Form Factors for Inelastic Scattering and Charge Exchange in Plane-Wave, Distorted-Wave, and Coupled-Channels Reaction Formalisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, F S

    2006-09-25

    This document is intended to facilitate calculation of inelastic scattering and charge-exchange cross sections in a variety of reaction models, including the plane-wave and distorted-wave approximations and the full coupled-channels treatments. Expressions are given for the coupling potentials between the relevant channels in both coordinate and momentum space. In particular, it is expected that the plane-wave calculations should be useful as a check on the correctness of coupled-channels calculations. The Fourier transform methods used to calculate the plane-wave approximation cross sections are also intended to be used to generate the transition potentials for coupled-channels codes, using a folding model with local effective interactions. Specific expressions are given for calculating transition densities for the folding model in the random phase approximation (RPA).

  2. Inductively coupled plasma etching for phase-change material with superlattice-like structure in phase change memory device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase change material with superlattice-like structure (SLL) is one of the most emerging materials for phase change memory device. A rough etching profile, isotropic, and serious surface damage limit the application of the conventional lift-off process. A well controlled etching process to achieve high etch rate, smooth surface, vertical and nanometer-sized pattern for SLL is required for the mass production of the phase change memory devices. In this study, the etch rates, surface roughness and sidewall angles of SLL GeTe/Sb2Te3 films were investigated by the inductively coupled plasma etching process with various etch parameters including gas ratio, chamber pressure, bias power and coil radio frequency (RF) power. The etch selectivity of SLL to SiO2 and to photo-resist were characterized. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of etched surfaces confirmed the etch mechanism of the SLL films in Cl2/Ar chemistry. 86 nm-sized patterns of SLL were fabricated using optimized etching parameters. In addition, an etched SLL film was integrated into a “T” type PCRAM cell, with a 50 nm feature size. This cell operated successfully and a RESET current of only 145 μA was obtained.

  3. A three-dimensional numerical modeling of thermoelectric device with consideration of coupling of temperature field and electric potential field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoelectric devices (TEs) can achieve direct conversion of heat and electricity by semiconductor materials, coupling of heat transfer and electric conduction is important to accurately predict the performance of TEs. This paper develops a general, three-dimensional numerical model of TEs with consideration of coupling of temperature field and electric potential field. The model is used to figure out the performance of thermoelectric coolers (TECs) with the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity, electric conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient of semiconductor materials. A miniature TEC is considered and Bi2(Te0.94Se0.06)3 and (Bi0.25Sb0.75)Te3 are selected as the n-type and p-type thermoelectric materials, respectively. The effect of parameters such as the temperature difference and the current is investigated under conditions of variable material properties as well as radiation and convection heat transfer occurred between the TEC and the ambient gas. The results show that the variable properties and the heat losses to the ambient gas have significant effects on the cooling capacity and the coefficient of performance (COP) of the TEC. Three-dimensional temperature distributions within the semiconductors is observed under convective boundary condition and it becomes remarkable at large temperature differences and high currents. -- Highlights: ► A general, three-dimensional numerical model of TEs was developed. ► Coupling of temperature field and electric potential field was taken into account. ► The temperature-dependent properties and convection boundary condition was discussed. ► The properties and the heat losses have significant effects on the TEC performance.

  4. Valence Band Dependent Charge Transport in Bulk Molecular Electronic Devices Incorporating Highly Conjugated Multi-[(Porphinato)Metal] Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Robert C; Wang, Ruobing; Rawson, Jeff; Therien, Michael J; You, Wei

    2016-02-24

    Molecular electronics offers the potential to control device functions through the fundamental electronic properties of individual molecules, but realization of such possibilities is typically frustrated when such specialized molecules are integrated into a larger area device. Here we utilize highly conjugated (porphinato)metal-based oligomers (PM(n) structures) as molecular wire components of nanotransfer printed (nTP) molecular junctions; electrical characterization of these "bulk" nTP devices highlights device resistances that depend on PM(n) wire length. Device resistance measurements, determined as a function of PM(n) molecular length, were utilized to evaluate the magnitude of a phenomenological β corresponding to the resistance decay parameter across the barrier; these data show that the magnitude of this β value is modulated via porphyrin macrocycle central metal atom substitution [β(PZn(n); 0.065 Å(-1)) < β(PCu(n); 0.132 Å(-1)) < β(PNi(n); 0.176 Å(-1))]. Cyclic voltammetric data, and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic studies carried out at gold surfaces, demonstrate that these nTP device resistances track with the valence band energy levels of the PM(n) wire, which were modulated via porphyrin macrocycle central metal atom substitution. This study demonstrates the ability to fabricate "bulk" and scalable electronic devices in which function derives from the electronic properties of discrete single molecules, and underscores how a critical device function--wire resistance--may be straightforwardly engineered by PM(n) molecular composition. PMID:26829704

  5. The method of canonical transformations applied to the motion of a charge coupled to the electromagnetic field in the non-relativistic approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of canonical transformations extended to dissipative Hamiltonian systems in a previous article is here applied to the behaviour of an extended charge coupled to the em field which is deductible from a Lagrangian function explicitly dependent on time. The generating function of a transformation which decouples the variables of the system is given, for an elastic applied force, and hence the constants in motion are found by a general method. Some limit cases are examined. (auth)

  6. Imaging and nondispersive spectroscopy of soft X rays using a laboratory X-ray charge-coupled-device system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luppino, Gerard A.; Doty, John P.; Ricker, George R.; Vallerga, John V.; Ceglio, Natale M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a laboratory instrument for imaging and nondispersive spectroscopy of soft X-rays (300 eV to 10 keV) utilizing a virtual-phase CCD. This instrument has achieved a spatial resolution of 22 microns (limited by pixel size) with an overall array area of 584 x 390 pixels. It has achieved an energy resolution of about 140 eV FWHM for single-pixel Fe-55 X-ray events (5.9 keV) with the CCD operated at -30 C. The CCD has been operated in photon-counting mode at room temperature, and X-ray spectra with an energy resolution of about 450 eV at 5.9 keV have been obtained. The low energy X-ray sensitivity of the CCD also has been demonstrated by detecting carbon K-alpha X-rays (277eV).

  7. Long-path measurement of atmospheric NO2 with an obstruction flashlight and a charge-coupled-device spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Yotsumi; Kuze, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Nobuo

    2003-07-20

    A novel method of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) is proposed and demonstrated to monitor the concentration of atmospheric pollutant gas. In contrast to conventional DOAS measurements with continuous light sources, the present method relies on white flashlights such as aviation obstruction lights that are generally installed on tall constructions. A simple detection system is devised by means of a telescope and a compact CCD spectrometer. A path length of 5.5 km allows us to measure atmospheric NO2 concentration with a detection limit of approximately 1 part per billion. We also discuss the possibility of deriving the aerosol optical thickness through the horizontal atmosphere from this pulsed DOAS measurement. PMID:12921286

  8. Methodology toward 3D micro X-ray fluorescence imaging using an energy dispersive charge-coupled device detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrevoet, Jan; Vekemans, Bart; Tack, Pieter; De Samber, Björn; Schmitz, Sylvia; Brenker, Frank E; Falkenberg, Gerald; Vincze, Laszlo

    2014-12-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) methodology based on a novel 2D energy dispersive CCD detector has been developed and evaluated at the P06 beamline of the Petra-III storage ring (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. This method is based on the illumination of the investigated sample cross-section by a horizontally focused beam (vertical sheet beam) while fluorescent X-rays are detected perpendicularly to the sheet beam by a 2D energy dispersive (ED) CCD detector allowing the collection of 2D cross-sectional elemental images of a certain depth within the sample, limited only by signal self-absorption effects. 3D elemental information is obtained by a linear scan of the sample in the horizontal direction across the vertically oriented sheet beam and combining the detected cross-sectional images into a 3D elemental distribution data set. Results of the 3D μXRF analysis of mineral inclusions in natural deep Earth diamonds are presented to illustrate this new methodology. PMID:25346101

  9. Effect of Molecular Coupling on Ultrafast Electron-Transfer and Charge-Recombination Dynamics in a Wide-Gap ZnS Nanoaggregate Sensitized by Triphenyl Methane Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Tushar; Maity, Partha; Dana, Jayanta; Ghosh, Hirendra N

    2016-03-01

    Wide-band-gap ZnS nanocrystals (NCs) were synthesized, and after sensitizing the NCs with series of triphenyl methane (TPM) dyes, ultrafast charge-transfer dynamics was demonstrated. HRTEM images of ZnS NCs show the formation of aggregate crystals with a flower-like structure. Exciton absorption and lumimescence, due to quantum confinement of the ZnS NCs, appear at approximately 310 and 340 nm, respectively. Interestingly, all the TPM dyes (pyrogallol red, bromopyrogallol red, and aurin tricarboxylic acid) form charge-transfer complexes with the ZnS NCs, with the appearance of a red-shifted band. Electron injection from the photoexcited TPM dyes into the conduction band of the ZnS NCs is shown to be a thermodynamically viable process, as confirmed by steady-state and time-resolved emission studies. To unravel charge-transfer (both electron injection and charge recombination) dynamics and the effect of molecular coupling, femtosecond transient absorption studies were carried out in TPM-sensitized ZnS NCs. The electron-injection dynamics is pulse-width-limited in all the ZnS/TPM dye systems, however, the back electron transfer differs, depending on the molecular coupling of the sensitizers (TPM dyes). The detailed mechanisms for the above-mentioned processes are discussed. PMID:26548569

  10. Charge and spin transport in single and packed ruthenium-terpyridine molecular devices: Insight from first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morari, C; Buimaga-Iarinca, L; Rungger, I; Sanvito, S; Melinte, S; Rignanese, G-M

    2016-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the electronic and transport properties of rutheniumterpyridine molecules sandwiched between two Au(111) electrodes. We analyse both single and packed molecular devices, more amenable to scaling and realistic integration approaches. The devices display all together robust negative differential resistance features at low bias voltages. Remarkably, the electrical control of the spin transport in the studied systems implies a subtle distribution of the magnetisation density within the biased devices and highlights the key role of the Au(111) electrical contacts. PMID:27550064

  11. Charge and spin transport in single and packed ruthenium-terpyridine molecular devices: Insight from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morari, C.; Buimaga-Iarinca, L.; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.; Melinte, S.; Rignanese, G.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the electronic and transport properties of rutheniumterpyridine molecules sandwiched between two Au(111) electrodes. We analyse both single and packed molecular devices, more amenable to scaling and realistic integration approaches. The devices display all together robust negative differential resistance features at low bias voltages. Remarkably, the electrical control of the spin transport in the studied systems implies a subtle distribution of the magnetisation density within the biased devices and highlights the key role of the Au(111) electrical contacts. PMID:27550064

  12. Charge-flow structures as polymeric early-warning fire alarm devices. M.S. Thesis; [metal oxide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechen, C. M.; Senturia, S. D.

    1977-01-01

    The charge-flow transistor (CFT) and its applications for fire detection and gas sensing were investigated. The utility of various thin film polymers as possible sensing materials was determined. One polymer, PAPA, showed promise as a relative humidity sensor; two others, PFI and PSB, were found to be particularly suitable for fire detection. The behavior of the charge-flow capacitor, which is basically a parallel-plate capacitor with a polymer-filled gap in the metallic tip electrode, was successfully modeled as an RC transmission line. Prototype charge-flow transistors were fabricated and tested. The effective threshold voltage of this metal oxide semiconductor was found to be dependent on whether surface or bulk conduction in the thin film was dominant. Fire tests with a PFI-coated CFT indicate good sensitivity to smouldering fires.

  13. Single photon emission of a charge-tunable GaAs/Al0.25Ga0.75As droplet quantum dot device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we report the fabrication of a charge-tunable GaAs/Al0.25Ga0.75As quantum dot (QD) device containing QDs deposited by modified droplet epitaxy producing almost strain and composition gradient free QDs. We obtained a QD density in the low 109 cm−2 range that enables us to perform spectroscopy on single droplet QDs showing linewidths as narrow as 40 μeV. The integration of the QDs into a Schottky diode allows us to controllably charge a single QD with up to four electrons, while non-classical photoluminescence is proven by photon auto-correlation measurements showing photon-antibunching (g(2)(0) = 0.05).

  14. Coupling of charge and lattice degrees of freedoms in θ-type BEDT-TTF compound probed by low-temperature heat capacity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimoto, Ryo [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama 1-1, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Takane, Yoshiharu [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan); Hino, Kosei; Yamashita, Satoshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama 1-1, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Nakazawa, Yasuhiro, E-mail: nakazawa@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama 1-1, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Thermodynamic investigations by heat capacity measurements at low temperature between 700 mK and 60 K with magnetic fields up to 8 T for θ-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}RbZn(SCN){sub 4} and θ-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}CsZn(SCN){sub 4}, where BEDT-TTF is bisethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene are performed. In θ-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}RbZn(SCN){sub 4}, the inter-site Coulomb repulsion produces a charge ordered ground state in the case of slow cooling while a kind of charge cluster glass state appears in rapidly cooled case. The observed finite γ term of 14.8 mJK{sup −2} mol{sup −1} for the rapidly cooled sample demonstrates that the electron density of states remains as metal-like clusters which are localized in the short-range scale. We also discuss the enhancement of the lattice heat capacity and appearance of a kind of Boson peak structure in C{sub p} even in a regular crystal lattice in θ-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}CsZn(SCN){sub 4.} The low energy phonon modes produced by enhanced charge fluctuations due to the inter-site Coulomb repulsion are the main course of these unusual lattice properties. The features reported here suggest that the coupling of charge degrees of freedom with lattices is important for the systems which do not form rigid charge ordered structures.

  15. Coupling of charge and lattice degrees of freedoms in θ-type BEDT-TTF compound probed by low-temperature heat capacity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic investigations by heat capacity measurements at low temperature between 700 mK and 60 K with magnetic fields up to 8 T for θ-(BEDT-TTF)2RbZn(SCN)4 and θ-(BEDT-TTF)2CsZn(SCN)4, where BEDT-TTF is bisethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene are performed. In θ-(BEDT-TTF)2RbZn(SCN)4, the inter-site Coulomb repulsion produces a charge ordered ground state in the case of slow cooling while a kind of charge cluster glass state appears in rapidly cooled case. The observed finite γ term of 14.8 mJK−2 mol−1 for the rapidly cooled sample demonstrates that the electron density of states remains as metal-like clusters which are localized in the short-range scale. We also discuss the enhancement of the lattice heat capacity and appearance of a kind of Boson peak structure in Cp even in a regular crystal lattice in θ-(BEDT-TTF)2CsZn(SCN)4. The low energy phonon modes produced by enhanced charge fluctuations due to the inter-site Coulomb repulsion are the main course of these unusual lattice properties. The features reported here suggest that the coupling of charge degrees of freedom with lattices is important for the systems which do not form rigid charge ordered structures

  16. 1D versus 3D quantum confinement in 1–5 nm ZnO nanoparticle agglomerations for application in charge-trapping memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2016-07-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted considerable interest from industry and researchers due to their excellent properties with applications in optoelectronic devices, sunscreens, photocatalysts, sensors, biomedical sciences, etc. However, the agglomeration of NPs is considered to be a limiting factor since it can affect the desirable physical and electronic properties of the NPs. In this work, 1–5 nm ZnO NPs deposited by spin- and dip-coating techniques are studied. The electronic and physical properties of the resulting agglomerations of NPs are studied using UV–vis–NIR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their application in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) memory devices is analyzed. The results show that both dip- and spin-coating techniques lead to agglomerations of the NPs mostly in the horizontal direction. However, the width of the ZnO clusters is larger with dip-coating which leads to 1D quantum confinement, while the smaller ZnO clusters obtained by spin-coating enable 3D quantum confinement in ZnO. The ZnO NPs are used as the charge-trapping layer of a MOS-memory structure and the analysis of the high-frequency C–V measurements allow further understanding of the electronic properties of the ZnO agglomerations. A large memory window is achieved in both devices which confirms that ZnO NPs provide large charge-trapping density. In addition, ZnO confined in 3D allows for a larger memory window at lower operating voltages due to the Poole–Frenkel charge-emission mechanism.

  17. 1D versus 3D quantum confinement in 1-5 nm ZnO nanoparticle agglomerations for application in charge-trapping memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2016-07-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted considerable interest from industry and researchers due to their excellent properties with applications in optoelectronic devices, sunscreens, photocatalysts, sensors, biomedical sciences, etc. However, the agglomeration of NPs is considered to be a limiting factor since it can affect the desirable physical and electronic properties of the NPs. In this work, 1-5 nm ZnO NPs deposited by spin- and dip-coating techniques are studied. The electronic and physical properties of the resulting agglomerations of NPs are studied using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their application in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) memory devices is analyzed. The results show that both dip- and spin-coating techniques lead to agglomerations of the NPs mostly in the horizontal direction. However, the width of the ZnO clusters is larger with dip-coating which leads to 1D quantum confinement, while the smaller ZnO clusters obtained by spin-coating enable 3D quantum confinement in ZnO. The ZnO NPs are used as the charge-trapping layer of a MOS-memory structure and the analysis of the high-frequency C-V measurements allow further understanding of the electronic properties of the ZnO agglomerations. A large memory window is achieved in both devices which confirms that ZnO NPs provide large charge-trapping density. In addition, ZnO confined in 3D allows for a larger memory window at lower operating voltages due to the Poole-Frenkel charge-emission mechanism. PMID:27232717

  18. Simulation of the influence of the low-intensity space ionizing radiation on the charge state of MIS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model describing the space-time evolution of the charge appearing in the dielectric of MIS under ionizing gamma radiation is considered. The solution of the equation system is obtained by the difference method. Numerical simulation results arc presented. (authors)

  19. Theory of coupled whistler-electron temperature gradient mode in high beta plasma: Application to linear plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.; Jha, R.; Mattoo, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2011-10-15

    This paper presents a theory of coupled whistler (W) and electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode using two-fluid model in high beta plasma. Non-adiabatic ion response, parallel magnetic field perturbation ({delta}B{sub z}), perpendicular magnetic flutter ({delta}B{sub perpendicular}), and electron collisions are included in the treatment of theory. A linear dispersion relation for whistler-electron temperature gradient (W-ETG) mode is derived. The numerical results obtained from this relation are compared with the experimental results observed in large volume plasma device (LVPD) [Awasthi et al., Phys. Plasma 17, 42109 (2010)]. The theory predicts that the instability grows only where the temperature gradient is finite and the density gradient flat. For the parameters of the experiment, theoretically estimated frequency and wave number of W-ETG mode match with the values corresponding to the peak in the power spectrum observed in LVPD. By using simple mixing length argument, estimated level of fluctuations of W-ETG mode is in the range of fluctuation level observed in LVPD.

  20. Charged Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Gabadadze, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    We consider Bose-Einstein condensation of massive electrically charged scalars in a uniform background of charged fermions. We focus on the case when the scalar condensate screens the background charge, while the net charge of the system resides on its boundary surface. A distinctive signature of this substance is that the photon acquires a Lorentz-violating mass in the bulk of the condensate. Due to this mass, the transverse and longitudinal gauge modes propagate with different group velocities. We give qualitative arguments that at high enough densities and low temperatures a charged system of electrons and helium-4 nuclei, if held together by laboratory devices or by force of gravity, can form such a substance. We briefly discuss possible manifestations of the charged condensate in compact astrophysical objects.

  1. Process for charging a container with reactor fuel rods or absorber rods, and device for implementation of the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the optimum utilisation of the vessel volume, a vessel is charged with fuel rods whose longitudinal axes are parallel to one another by first loading the vessel with imitation rods adapted in size to the real ones packed together closely in the same way as the real ones. The imitation rods are replaced by the real ones when the latter are inserted into the planned closely-packed arrangement in an axial direction. (orig./HP)

  2. Role of Contact and Contact Mo dification on Photo-resp onse in a Charge Transfer Complex Single Nanowire Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rabaya Basori∗; A. K. Raychaudhuri

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of obtaining large photoresponse in metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) type single nanowire device where one contact can be blocking type. We showed that suitable modifi-cation of the blocking contact by deposition of a capping metal using focused electron beam (FEB) can lead to considerable enhancement of the photoresponse. The work was done in a single Cu:TCNQ nanowire device fabricated by direct growth of nanowires (NW) from pre-patterned Cu electrode which makes the contact ohmic with the other contact made from Au. Analysis of the data shows that the large photoresponse of the devices arises predominantly due to reduction of the barriers at the Au/NW blocking contact on illumination. This is caused by the diffusion of the photo generated carriers from the nanowires to the contact region. When the barrier height is further reduced by treating the contact with FEB deposited Pt, this results in a large enhancement in the device photoresponse.

  3. Final charged-lepton angular distribution and possible anomalous top-quark couplings in pp→tt{sup ¯}X→ℓ{sup +}X{sup ′}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hioki, Zenrō, E-mail: hioki@tokushima-u.ac.jp [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8502 (Japan); Ohkuma, Kazumasa, E-mail: ohkuma@ice.ous.ac.jp [Department of Information and Computer Engineering, Okayama University of Science, Okayama 700-0005 (Japan)

    2014-09-07

    Possible anomalous (or nonstandard) top-quark interactions with the gluon and those with the W boson induced by SU(3)×SU(2)×U(1) gauge-invariant dimension-6 effective operators are studied in pp→tt{sup ¯}X→ℓ{sup +}X{sup ′} (ℓ=e or μ) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The final charged-lepton (ℓ{sup +}) angular distribution is first computed for nonvanishing nonstandard top-gluon and top-W couplings with a cut on its transverse momentum. The optimal-observable procedure is then applied to this distribution in order to estimate the expected statistical uncertainties in measurements of those couplings that contribute to this process in the leading order.

  4. Thallium-doped BaFe2As2 crystals: The unusual competition between magneto-elastic coupling and charge doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefat, Athena; Li, Li; Cao, Huibo; Sales, Brian; McGuire, Michael; Custelcean, Radu; Parker, David

    We partially substitute thallium for barium and report the effects of interlayer coupling in Ba1-xTlxFe2As2 crystals. We demonstrate the unusual competition between magneto-elastic coupling and charge doping in an iron-arsenide material, whereby TN temperature rises in BaFe2As2, and then falls with additional Tl-doping. Evidence from temperature-dependent bulk thermodynamic and transport properties, and neutron diffraction results will be presented. Using LDA, we illustrate that small changes related to 3 d transition-metal state can have profound effects on magnetism. The work is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, BES, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, and Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division. The work at ORNL's HFIR is sponsored by the Scientific User Facilities Division.

  5. Energy loss and charge state distribution of calcium ions in dense moderately coupled carbon plasma; Energieverlust und Ladungsverteilung von Calciumionen in dichtem, schwach gekoppeltem Kohlenstoffplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortner, Alex

    2015-07-15

    In this thesis the interaction of swift calcium ions (Energy: 3.5 MeV/u) with a dense and moderately coupled carbon plasma (Coupling parameter: Γ=0.1-0.5) is investigated. The plasma state is generated by heating a thin carbon foil volumetrically by thermal X-ray radiation. The thermal X-ray radiation itself is generated by the conversion of a high energy laser beam in a hohlraum cavity. Compared to earlier ion stopping experiments the electron density and the plasma coupling parameter could be increased by an order of magnitude. This work provides the first time experimental energy loss and charge state distribution data in this moderately coupled interaction regime. The thesis consists of a theoretical part where the ion beam plasma interaction is studied for a broad range of plasma parameters and an experimental part where the ion beam interaction with the hohlraum plasma target is measured. All the described experiments were carried out at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. This facility offers the unique possibility to combine a heavy ion beam from an accelerator with a high energy laser beam in one interaction chamber. An intense laser pulse (150 J of laser energy in 1 ns at λ{sub L}=527 nm) is focused inside a 600 μm diameter spherical cavity and generates a hot gold plasma that emits X-rays. The absorbed and reemitted radiation establishes a spatially uniform temperature distribution in the cavity and serves as an intense, isotropic X-ray source with a quasi-thermal spectral distribution. These thermal X-rays with a radiation temperature of T{sub r}=98±6 eV then propagate into a secondary cylindrical hohlraum (diameter: 1000 μm, length: 950 μm) where they volumetrically heat two thin carbon foils to the plasma state. The radiation temperature in the secondary hohlraum is T{sub r}=33±5 eV. This indirect laser heating scheme has the advantage that the whole sample volume is instantaneously heated and that the plasma is

  6. Device for the automatic centring and coupling up of a transport container for barrels with radio-active contents at the opening of a store

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The container is set on the filling opening from above. The unloading slide at the bottom of the container, which can drive out sideways, is coupled up to the screening device closing the opening, driven out sideways and the barrel is lowered from above into the opening of the store. The container is turned to the correct position by two centring pieces situated on its outside. The particular advantage of the new device is that no staff is required for these processes, and the dwell time of staff in rooms exposed to radiation is reduced to a minimum. (orig./HP)

  7. Constraints on anomalous charged current couplings, tau neutrino mass and fourth generation mixing from tau leptonic branching fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use recent experimental measurements of tau branching fractions to determine the weak charged current magnetic and electric dipole moments of the tau and the Michel parameter η with unprecedented precision. These results are then used to constrain the tau compositeness scale and the allowed parameter space for Higgs doublet models. We also present new constraints on the mass of the tau neutrino and its mixing with a fourth generation neutrino

  8. Analysis of pharmaceutical impurities using multi-heartcutting 2D LC coupled with UV-charged aerosol MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kelly; Li, Yi; Tsang, Midco; Chetwyn, Nik P

    2013-09-01

    To overcome challenges in HPLC impurity analysis of pharmaceuticals, we developed an automated online multi-heartcutting 2D HPLC system with hyphenated UV-charged aerosol MS detection. The first dimension has a primary column and the second dimension has six orthogonal columns to enhance flexibility and selectivity. The two dimensions were interfaced by a pair of switching valves equipped with six trapping loops that allow multi-heartcutting of peaks of interest in the first dimension and also allow "peak parking." The hyphenated UV-charged aerosol MS detection provides comprehensive detection for compounds with and without UV chromophores, organics, and inorganics. It also provides structural information for impurity identification. A hidden degradation product that co-eluted with the drug main peak was revealed by RP × RP separation and thus enabled the stability-indicating method development. A poorly retained polar component with no UV chromophores was analyzed by RP × hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography separation with charged aerosol detection. Furthermore, using this system, the structures of low-level impurities separated by a method using nonvolatile phosphate buffer were identified and tracked by MS in the second dimension. PMID:23821312

  9. Metal-insulator transition caused by coupling to localized charge-frustrated systems under ice-rule local constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Hiroaki; Udagawa, Masafumi; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2011-03-01

    We report the results of our theoretical and numerical study on electronic and transport properties of fermion systems with charge frustration. We consider an extended Falicov-Kimball model in which itinerant spinless fermions interact repulsively by U with localized particles whose distribution satisfies a local constraint under geometrical frustration, the so-called ice rule. Electronic states of the itinerant fermions are studied by approximating the statistical average by the arithmetic mean over different configurations of localized particles under the constraint. We numerically calculate the density of states, optical conductivity, and inverse participation ratio for models on the pyrochlore, checkerboard, and kagome lattices, and discuss the nature of metal-insulator transitions at commensurate fillings. The results are compared with exact solutions for models on Husimi cacti as well as with numerical results for completely random distributions of localized particles. As a result, we show that the ice-rule local constraint leads to several universal features in the electronic structure common to different lattice structures; a charge gap opens at a considerably small U compared to the bandwidth, and the energy spectrum approaches a characteristic form in the large-U limit, that is, the noninteracting tight-binding form in one dimension or a δ-functional peak. In the large-U region, the itinerant fermions are confined in the macroscopically degenerate ice-rule configurations, which consist of a bunch of one-dimensional loops: We call this insulating state the charge ice. On the other hand, transport properties are much affected by the geometry and dimensionality of the lattices; e.g., the pyrochlore lattice model exhibits a transition from a metallic to the charge-ice insulating state with increasing U, while the checkerboard lattice model appears to show Anderson localization before opening a gap. Meanwhile, in the kagome lattice case, we do not obtain

  10. Characterization of CdTe Sensors with Schottky Contacts Coupled to Charge-Integrating Pixel Array Detectors for X-Ray Science

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Julian; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Weiss, Joel T; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Ruff, Jacob P C; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-01-01

    Pixel Array Detectors (PADs) consist of an x-ray sensor layer bonded pixel-by-pixel to an underlying readout chip. This approach allows both the sensor and the custom pixel electronics to be tailored independently to best match the x-ray imaging requirements. Here we present characterizations of CdTe sensors hybridized with two different charge-integrating readout chips, the Keck PAD and the Mixed-Mode PAD (MM-PAD), both developed previously in our laboratory. The charge-integrating architecture of each of these PADs extends the instantaneous counting rate by many orders of magnitude beyond that obtainable with photon counting architectures. The Keck PAD chip consists of rapid, 8-frame, in-pixel storage elements with framing periods $<$150 ns. The second detector, the MM-PAD, has an extended dynamic range by utilizing an in-pixel overflow counter coupled with charge removal circuitry activated at each overflow. This allows the recording of signals from the single-photon level to tens of millions of x-rays/...

  11. Interfacial Charge Transfer in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Using SCN-Free Terpyridine-Coordinated Ru Complex Dye and Co Complex Redox Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Takahiro; Masaki, Naruhiko; Nishikawa, Masahiro; Tamura, Rei; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Mutsumi; Mori, Shogo

    2016-07-01

    The efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using Ru complex dyes and Co complex redox couples has been increased with a strategy to prevent charge recombination via the addition of bulky or lengthy peripheral units to the dyes. However, despite the efforts, most of the DSSCs are still suffering from nonunity quantum efficiency and fast recombination. We examine the effect of SCN ligand, which has been used for many Ru complex dyes and could attract positively charged Co complexes. We find that replacing the ligands with 2,6-bis(2'-(4'-trifluoromethyl)pyrazolyl)pyridine increases the quantum efficiency and electron lifetime. With the combination of the replacement of SCN ligands and the addition of bulky moiety, ∼80% external quantum efficiency is achieved. These suggest that not only the addition of a blocking effect but also the reduction of electrostatic and dispersion forces between dyes and Co complexes are essential to control the charge separation and recombination processes. PMID:27328462

  12. Oxide Charge Engineering of Atomic Layer Deposited AlOxNy/Al2O3 Gate Dielectrics: A Path to Enhancement Mode GaN Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negara, M A; Kitano, M; Long, R D; McIntyre, P C

    2016-08-17

    Nitrogen incorporation to produce negative fixed charge in Al2O3 gate insulator layers is investigated as a path to achieve enhancement mode GaN device operation. A uniform distribution of nitrogen across the resulting AlOxNy films is obtained using N2 plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD). The flat band voltage (Vfb) increases to a significantly more positive value with increasing nitrogen concentration. Insertion of a 2 nm thick Al2O3 interlayer greatly decreases the trap density of the insulator/GaN interface, and reduces the voltage hysteresis and frequency dispersion of gate capacitance compared to single-layer AlOxNy gate insulators in GaN MOSCAPs. PMID:27459343

  13. Assessment of Electromagnetic Interference with Active Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs Caused by the Qi A13 Design Wireless Charging Board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Seckler

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic interference is a concern for people wearing cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs. The aim of this study was to assess the electromagnetic compatibility between CIEDs and the magnetic field of a common wireless charging technology. To do so the voltage induced in CIEDs by Qi A13 design magnetic fields were measured and compared with the performance limits set by ISO 14117. In order to carry this out a measuring circuit was developed which can be connected with unipolar or bipolar pacemaker leads. The measuring system was positioned at the four most common implantation sites in a torso phantom filled with physiological saline solution. The phantom was exposed by using Helmholtz coils from 5 µT to 27 µT with 111 kHz sine‑bursts or by using a Qi A13 design wireless charging board (Qi‑A13‑Board in two operating modes “power transfer” and “pinging”. With the Helmholtz coils the lowest magnetic flux density at which the performance limit was exceeded is 11 µT. With the Qi‑A13‑Board in power transfer mode 10.8% and in pinging mode 45.7% (2.2% at 10 cm distance of the performance limit were reached at maximum. In neither of the scrutinized cases, did the voltage induced by the Qi‑A13‑Board exceed the performance limits.

  14. A new numerical description of the interaction of an ion beam with a magnetized plasma in an ECR-based charge breeding device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatà, A.; Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Celona, L.

    2016-08-01

    The ion beam-plasma interaction is a relevant topic in several fields of plasma physics, from fusion devices to modern ion sources. This paper discusses the numerical modelling of the whole beam-plus-plasma-target system in case of 1+  ions entering an ECR-based charge breeder (ECR-CB). The model is able to reproduce the ion capture and the creation of the first charge states in the selected physics case, i.e. the interaction of a 85Rb1+ ions with the plasma of the 14.5 GHz PHOENIX ECR-CB installed at the Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie (LPSC) of Grenoble. The results show that a very narrow window of physical parameters for both the beam (energy and energy spread especially) and plasma (ion temperature, density, density structural distribution, self-generated ambipolar fields) exists which is able to reproduce very well the experimental results, providing an exhaustive picture of the involved phenomena. Possible non-linear interactions and the role played by the eventual onset of instabilities are also discussed.

  15. Assessment of Electromagnetic Interference with Active Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) Caused by the Qi A13 Design Wireless Charging Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckler, Tobias; Jagielski, Kai; Stunder, Dominik

    2015-06-01

    Electromagnetic interference is a concern for people wearing cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). The aim of this study was to assess the electromagnetic compatibility between CIEDs and the magnetic field of a common wireless charging technology. To do so the voltage induced in CIEDs by Qi A13 design magnetic fields were measured and compared with the performance limits set by ISO 14117. In order to carry this out a measuring circuit was developed which can be connected with unipolar or bipolar pacemaker leads. The measuring system was positioned at the four most common implantation sites in a torso phantom filled with physiological saline solution. The phantom was exposed by using Helmholtz coils from 5 µT to 27 µT with 111 kHz sine‑bursts or by using a Qi A13 design wireless charging board (Qi‑A13‑Board) in two operating modes "power transfer" and "pinging". With the Helmholtz coils the lowest magnetic flux density at which the performance limit was exceeded is 11 µT. With the Qi‑A13‑Board in power transfer mode 10.8% and in pinging mode 45.7% (2.2% at 10 cm distance) of the performance limit were reached at maximum. In neither of the scrutinized cases, did the voltage induced by the Qi‑A13‑Board exceed the performance limits. PMID:26024360

  16. Three dimensional modeling of an solid oxide fuel cell coupling charge transfer phenomena with transport processes and heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel cells are promising for future energy systems, because they are energy efficient and able to use renewable fuels. However, there is still a need for improvement and a fully coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach based on the finite element method, in three-dimensions, is developed to describe an anode-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Governing equations are solved for electron, ion, heat, gas-phase species and momentum transport, and implemented and coupled to kinetics describing electrochemical reactions. It is shown that the heat generation due to the electrochemical reactions results in an increased temperature distribution and further current density along the main flow direction. This increase is limited due to the consumption of electrochemical reactants within the cell. For cases with a high current density generation, the resistance to electron transport and the oxygen gas-phase flow is high for positions (within the cathode) under the interconnect ribs, which gives a high current density gradient in the direction normal to the electrode/electrolyte interface. The increase in the current density is accelerated by an increased temperature along the main flow direction, due to the strong coupling between the local current density and the local temperature. It is shown that an increase of the anode active area-to-volume ratio with a factor of two transfers around 20 mV of (activation) polarization from the anode to the cathode side, for the case investigated in this study

  17. Charge transfer and electron-phonon coupling in monolayer FeSe on Nb-doped SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuanjun; Millis, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Monolayer films of FeSe grown on SrTiO3 substrates are electron doped relative to bulk and exhibit a significantly higher superconducting transition temperature. An interaction of electrons in the FeSe layer with SrTiO3 phonons has been suggested. We present density functional calculations and a modified Schottky model incorporating the strong paraelectricity of SrTiO3, which demonstrate that the doping may be due to charge transfer from SrTiO3 impurity bands driven by work-function mismatch. Physically relevant levels of Nb doping are shown to lead to doping of the FeSe compatible with observation. The coupling of electrons in FeSe to polar phonons in the depletion region of the SrTiO3 is calculated. An electron-phonon coupling strength λ=-∂ ReΣ /∂ ω | ω =0˜0.4 is found; the coupling to long-wavelength phonons is found to be dominant.

  18. Strong electron-lattice coupling as the mechanism behind charge densiy wave transformations in transition-metal-dichalkogenides

    OpenAIRE

    Gor'kov, Lev P.

    2011-01-01

    We consider single band of conduction electrons interacting with displacements of the transitional ions.In the classical regime strong coupling transforms the harmonic elastic energy for an ion to the one of the well with two deep minima,so that the system is described in terms of Ising spins. Inter-site interactions via the exchange by electrons order spins at lower temperatures. Extention to the quantum regime is discussed. Below the CDW-transition the energy spectrum of electrons remains m...

  19. Multistable Natures and Photo-Induced Charge-Separation in Hole-Doped States of Strongly Coupled Electron-Phonon Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitoshi, Nitta; Masato, Suzuki; Takeshi, Iida

    We investigate the effects of hole doping in the charge-density wave (CDW) state that has the strong electron-phonon (e-p) coupling, using the two-dimensional molecular crystal model. In calculations, we use the mean-filed theory for the interelectronic interactions and the adiabatic approximation for phonons. On the basis of this theory, we calculate e-p states of doped ground states for various values of the doping concentration of holes. From the calculated results, it is found that a multistable nature appears in the doped e-p states just before the CDW-metal phase transition. In order to see the effects of the photoexcitation in the hole-doped states, we also investigate the exciton states taking into account the electron-hole correlation. Results calculated here indicate that the separation of electron and hole occurs in the photoexcited states as a consequence of the energy relaxation of excitons.

  20. High-frequency charged particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device is refered to technical physics and may be used as a source of accelerated particles for irradiation of different objects in industry and agriculture. The device is aimed at increase of the power and enhancement of stability of the accelerator operation and decrease of its dimensions. High-frequency accelerator is composed of an accelerating cavity resonator a charged particle source and HF power supply. The aim is attained by the fact, that HF power source anode is made as one of coupling capasitor plates, the second plate of which is the nearest to anode HF power supply grid. The coupling capacitor plalte functional union with the HF power supply electrodes (anode and grid) reduces to spirious inductances of HF power supply circuit to minimum. Besides, the accelerator structure is simplified, as additional cooling system for the charged particle source is not necessary

  1. Target protein separation and preparation by free-flow electrophoresis coupled with charge-to-mass ratio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qiao-Yi; Guo, Chen-Gang; Yan, Jian; Zhang, Qiang; Xie, Hai-Yang; Jahan, Sharmin; Fan, Liu-Yin; Xiao, Hua; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2015-06-01

    Herein, a novel strategy was developed to separate and prepare target protein from complex sample by free-flow electrophoresis (FFE), which mainly based on the charge-to-mass ratio (C/M) analysis of proteins. The C/M values of three model proteins, namely Cytochrome C (Cyt C), myoglobin (Mb) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were analyzed under different pH and the separation of these proteins was predicted by CLC Protein Workbench software. Series of experiments were performed to validate the proposed method. The obtained data showed high accordance with our prediction. In addition, the chamber buffer (CB) of FFE system was optimized to improve the resolution of separation. Meanwhile, in order to evaluate the analytical performance of the proposed method, Cyt C was extracted from swine heart and further separated by FFE based on C/M analysis. Results showed that Cyt C was completely separated from the crude sample and a purity of 96.9% was achieved. The activity of prepared Cyt C was 98.3%, which indicate that the proposed method is promising in a wide variety of research areas where the native properties of proteins should be maintained for downstream analysis. PMID:25890440

  2. Design of a 4D Emittance Measurement Device for High Charge State ECR Ion Sources%高电荷态ECR离子源引出束流4D发射度测量仪设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵阳阳; 赵红卫; 孙良亭; 杨尧; 王云; 曹云

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of on-line beam quality diagnostics and transverse emittance coupling investigation of the ion beams delivered by an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source, a real-time 4D Pepper Pot type emittance scanner is under development at IMP(Institute of Moden Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences). The high charge state ECR ion source at IMP could produce CW or pulsed heavy ion beam intensities in the range of 1 eµA∼1 emA with the kinetic energy of 10∼35 keV/q, which needs the design of the Pepper Pot scanner to be optimized accordingly. The Pepper Pot scanner has many features, such as very short response time and wide dynamic working range that the device could be applied. Since intense heavy ion beam bombardment is expected for this device, the structure and the material selection for the device is specially considered during the design, and a feasible solution to analyze the pictures acquired after the data acquisition is also made.%为了进一步探究高电荷态电子回旋共振(ECR)离子源引出束流品质和横向相空间耦合情况,根据中国科学院近代物理研究所高电荷态离子源引出束流发射度测量需求,针对束流流强为1 eµA∼1 emA,能量范围为10∼35 keV/q的直流或脉冲高电荷态重离子束,设计了一台实时四维Pepper-pot发射度测量仪。该Pepper-pot型发射度测量仪具有响应时间快和工作范围宽等特点。针对强流重离子束诊断的特点,在结构与材料选择上做了设计与优化,并对获得图像的处理方法提出了具体的解决办法。

  3. X-ray and charged particle detection with CsI(Tl) layer coupled to a-Si:H photodiode layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact real-time X-ray and charged particle imager with digitized position output can built either by coupling a fast scintillator to a photodiode array or by forming one on a photodiode array directly. CsI(Tl) layers 100--1000μm thick were evaporated on glass substrates from a crystal CsI(Tl). When coupled to a crystalline Si or amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photodiode and exposed to calibrated X-ray pulses, their light yields and speed were found to be comparable to those of a crystal CsI(Tl). Single β particle detection was demonstrated with this combination. The light spread inside evaporated CsI(Tl) was suppressed by its columnar structure. Scintillation detection gives much larger signals than direct X-ray detection due to the increased energy deposition in the detector material. Fabrication of monolithic type X-ray sensors consisting of CsI + a-Si:H photodiodes is discussed. 20 refs., 16 figs

  4. Ablation of intervertebral discs in dogs using a MicroJet-assisted dye-enhanced injection device coupled with the diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Kenneth E.; Henry, George A.; Dickey, D. Thomas; Stair, Ernest L.; Powell, Ronald; Schafer, Steven A.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Frederickson, Christopher J.; Hayes, Donald J.; Wallace, David B.

    1998-07-01

    Use of holmium laser energy for vaporization/coagulation of the nucleus pulposus in canine intervertebral discs has been previously reported and is currently being applied clinically in veterinary medicine. The procedure was originally developed in the canine model and intended for potential human use. Since the pulsed (15 Hz) holmium laser energy exerts photomechanical and photothermal effects, the potential for extrusion of additional disc material to the detriment of the patient is possible using the procedure developed for the dog. To reduce this potential complication, use of diode laser (805 nm - CW mode) energy, coupled with indocyanine green (ICG) as a selective laser energy absorber, was formulated as a possible alternative. Delivery of the ICG and diode laser energy was through a MicroJet device that could dispense dye interactively between individual laser 'shots.' Results have shown that it is possible to selectively ablate nucleus pulposus in the canine model using the device described. Acute observations (gross and histopathologic) illustrate that accurate placement of the spinal needle before introduction of the MicroJet device is critically dependent on the expertise of the interventional radiologist. In addition, the success of the overall technique depends on consistent delivery of both ICG and diode laser energy. Minimizing tissue carbonization on the tip of the MicroJet device is also of crucial importance for effective application of the technique in clinical veterinary medicine.

  5. Fabrication of two-color surface emitting device of a coupled vertical cavity structure with InAs quantum dots formed by wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Hiroto; Lu, Xiangmeng; Kumagai, Naoto; Kitada, Takahiro; Isu, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    We fabricated a two-color surface emitting device of a coupled cavity structure, which is applicable to terahertz light source. GaAs/AlGaAs vertical multilayer cavity structures were grown on (001) and (113)B GaAs substrates and the coupled multilayer cavity structure was fabricated by wafer bonding them. The top cavity contains self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) as optical gain materials for two-color emission of cavity-mode lights. The bonding position was optimized for the equivalent intensity of two-color emission. We formed a current injection structure, and two-color emission was observed by current injection, although no lasing was observed.

  6. Light coupling between vertical III-As nanowires and planar Si photonic waveguides for the monolithic integration of active optoelectronic devices on a Si platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntoni, Ivano; Geelhaar, Lutz; Bruns, Jürgen; Riechert, Henning

    2016-08-01

    We present a new concept for the optical interfacing between vertical III-As nanowires and planar Si waveguides. The nanowires are arranged in a two-dimensional array which forms a grating structure on top of the waveguide. This grating enables light coupling in both directions between the components made from the two different material classes. Numerical simulations show that this concept permits a light extraction efficiency from the waveguide larger than 45% and a light insertion efficiency larger than 35%. This new approach would allow the monolithic integration of nanowire-based active optoelectronics devices, like photodetectors and light sources, on the Si photonics platform. PMID:27505805

  7. Inducing Strong Nonlinearities in a High-$Q$ System: Coupling of a Bulk Acoustic Wave Quartz Resonator to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    CERN Document Server

    Goryachev, Maxim; Galliou, Serge; Tobar, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    A system consisting of a SQUID amplifier coupled to a Bulk Acoustic Wave resonator is investigated experimentally from the small to large signal regimes. Both parallel and series connection topologies of the system are verified. The study reveals significant non-Duffing response that is associated with the nonlinear characteristics of Josephson junctions. The nonlinearity provides quasi-periodic structure of the spectrum in both incident power and frequency. The result gives an insight into the open loop behaviour of a future Cryogenic Quartz Oscillator operating with a SQUID amplifier as the active device.

  8. ZnO/AlN diamond layered structure for SAW devices combining higl velocity and high electromechanical coupling coefficient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    El Hakiki, M.; Elmazria, O.; Assouar, M.B.; Mortet, V.; Le Brizoual, L.; Vaněček, Milan; Alnot, P.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 14, - (2005), s. 1175-1178. ISSN 0925-9635 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) HPRN-CT-1999-00139 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : aluminium nitride * zinc oxide * diamond * surface acoustic wave devices Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.988, year: 2005

  9. Development and Evaluation of an Externally Air-Cooled Low-Flow torch and the Attenuation of Space Charge and Matrix Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praphairaksit, N.

    2000-09-12

    An externally air-cooled low-flow torch has been constructed and successfully demonstrated for applications in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The torch is cooled by pressurized air flowing at {approximately}70 L/min through a quartz air jacket onto the exterior of the outer tube. The outer gas flow rate and operating RF forward power are reduced considerably. Although plasmas can be sustained at the operating power as low as 400 W with a 2 L/min of outer gas flow, somewhat higher power and outer gas flows are advisable. A stable and analytical useful plasma can be obtained at 850 W with an outer gas flow rate of {approximately}4 L/min. Under these conditions, the air-cooled plasma produces comparable sensitivities, doubly charged ion ratios, matrix effects and other analytical merits as those produced by a conventional torch while using significantly less argon and power requirements. Metal oxide ion ratios are slightly higher with the air-cooled plasma but can be mitigated by reducing the aerosol gas flow rate slightly with only minor sacrifice in analyte sensitivity. A methodology to alleviate the space charge and matrix effects in ICP-MS has been developed. A supplemental electron source adapted from a conventional electron impact ionizer is added to the base of the skimmer. Electrons supplied from this source downstream of the skimmer with suitable amount and energy can neutralize the positive ions in the beam extracted from the plasma and diminish the space charge repulsion between them. As a result, the overall ion transmission efficiency and consequent analyte ion sensitivities are significantly improved while other important analytical aspects, such as metal oxide ion ratio, doubly charged ion ratio and background ions remain relatively unchanged with the operation of this electron source. This technique not only improves the ion transmission efficiency but also minimizes the matrix effects drastically. The matrix-induced suppression

  10. An Imagination of Developing Mobile Reading Devices Charging Service in Library%图书馆开展移动阅读设备充电服务的设想

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王阳

    2015-01-01

    At present, the widespread use of mobile reading devices makes readers’ reading way be changed completely. However, the congenital deficient of mobile reading devices in cruising ability brings about certain difficulties for the readers’ reading. This paper expounds the necessity of developing the charging service for mobile reading devices in library, analyzes the feasibility of developing the charging service for mobile reading devices in library, and puts forward some matters needing attention in developing the charging service for mobile reading devices in library.%当前,移动阅读设备的普遍使用使读者阅读方式发生了彻底的变化。但移动阅读设备电力续航能力的先天不足给读者阅读带来了一定的困难。阐述了图书馆开展移动阅读设备充电服务的必要性,分析了图书馆开展移动阅读设备充电服务的可行性,提出了图书馆开展移动阅读设备充电服务的注意事项。

  11. The effects of cage design on airborne allergens and endotoxin in animal rooms: high-volume measurements with an ion-charging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts-Mills, James; Custis, Natalie; Kenney, Alice; Tsay, Amy; Chapman, Martin; Feldman, Sanford; Platts-Mills, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    Respiratory symptoms related to both endotoxins and animal allergens continue to be an important cause of occupational disease for animal technicians and scientists working with rodents. Better sampling methods for airborne allergens and endotoxin are needed to help standardize compliance with federal occupational health regulations. Using an ion-charging device, we sampled 20 mouse rooms and four rat rooms at the University of Virginia, along with 43 domestic living rooms in houses in the Charlottesville area with at least one cat or dog. The use of filter tops on cages corresponds to a 50-fold reduction in mean levels of both airborne allergens (P < 0.001) and endotoxin (P < 0.001). The use of vented cages with filtered exhaust ports was associated with additional reductions. However, the mean airborne endotoxin level in all rooms using filter tops without a filtered exhaust port on the cages was significantly lower (P = 0.003) than the level in domestic living rooms. Our results for maximum airborne allergens or endotoxin are comparable with previous reports. However, the sensitivity of the technique allows an accurate assessment of low-level exposure, which makes it possible to evaluate the effect of cage designs. In addition, this approach allows direct comparison with results for airborne allergen and endotoxin in domestic homes. The results could allow a more consistent approach to the application of occupational health guidelines. PMID:15773770

  12. Conceptual design of a device for charging PIG's batteries, using the hydraulic energy from the flow in pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Ricardo E.; Dutra, Max S. [Alberto Luiz Coimbra Institute for Graduate and Research Studies (COPPE-UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Mechanical Engineering Program], e-mail: rramirez@ufrj.br, e-mail: max@mecanica.coppe.ufrj.br

    2009-07-01

    Some actual projects deal with development of PIGs with speed control for liquid pipelines, with the possibility of controlled displacement including counter flow locomotion, in order to inspect and service in 'unpiggable lines' and flexible lines. In this case, it is normal to carry energy consumption greater than the energy disposable in the batteries. This work proposes a device composed by a turbine and an electric generator; presents a preliminary mechanical design of the turbine for the specific requirements of the application like internal pressure inside the line, a range of relative velocities between the PIG and the pipeline and adequate material for the environmental conditions. One of the priority requirements is that the geometric form of the turbine and generator mate with a proposed form of the PIG minimizing the pressure drop in the line for the different work conditions. The electric design defines the magnets characteristics, geometric forms, dimensions and number of turns to obtain the required voltage and power for charging a nominal pack of batteries. (author)

  13. Efficiency Enhancement of Tandem Organic Light-Emitting Devices Fabricated Utilizing an Organic BEDT-TTF and HAT-CN Charge Generation Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hun; Kim, Tae Whan

    2015-10-01

    The electrical and optical properties of tandem organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) fabricated utilizing an organic bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene (BEDT-TTF) and 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylenehexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) charge generation layer (CGL) were investigated to enhance their efficiency. While the operating voltage of the tandem OLEDs with a BEDT-TTF and HAT-CN CGL at 50 mA/cm2 was 11.2 V lower than that of the tandem OLEDs without a CGL, the current efficiency of the tandem OLEDs with a BEDT-TTF and a HAT-CN CGL at 50 mA/cm2 was 0.8 cd/A higher than that of the tandem OLEDs without a CGL. An increase in the current efficiency and a decrease in the operating voltage of the tandem OLEDs with a BEDT-TTF and an HAT-CN CGL were attributed to the enhancement of the electron injection due to its existence in the highest occupied molecular orbital level of the BEDT-TTF between the HAT-CN and the tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum layer. PMID:26726464

  14. Luminance Mechanisms of White Organic Light-Emitting Devices Fabricated Utilizing a Charge Generation Layer with a Light-Emitting Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K H; Jeon, Y P; Choo, D C; Kim, T W

    2015-07-01

    The luminance mechanisms of the white organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDs) with a charge generation layer (CGL) consisting of a tungsten oxide layer and a 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyltetracene (rubrene) doped N,N',-bis-(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl1-1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPB) layer were investigated. Current densities and luminances of the WOLEDs increased with increasing a rubrene doping concentration because the formation of excitons in the rubrene-doped NPB layer increased due to the more exciton trapping in rubrene molecules and the delay of the electron injection due to the insertion of the litium qunolate layer. The yellow light emitted from the rubrene-doped NPB layer in the CGL combined with the blue light from the main emitting layer of the WOLEDs, resulting in the emission of the white light. The ratio between the yellow and the blue color peak intensities of the electroluminescence spectra for the WOLEDs was controlled by the rubrene doping concentration. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of the fabricated WOLED were (0.31, 0.42) at 740.7 cd/m2, indicative of white emission color. PMID:26373110

  15. Modeling Charge Collection in Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardage, Donna (Technical Monitor); Pickel, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    A detector array charge collection model has been developed for use as an engineering tool to aid in the design of optical sensor missions for operation in the space radiation environment. This model is an enhancement of the prototype array charge collection model that was developed for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) program. The primary enhancements were accounting for drift-assisted diffusion by Monte Carlo modeling techniques and implementing the modeling approaches in a windows-based code. The modeling is concerned with integrated charge collection within discrete pixels in the focal plane array (FPA), with high fidelity spatial resolution. It is applicable to all detector geometries including monolithc charge coupled devices (CCDs), Active Pixel Sensors (APS) and hybrid FPA geometries based on a detector array bump-bonded to a readout integrated circuit (ROIC).

  16. Query Processing For The Internet-of-Things: Coupling Of Device Energy Consumption And Cloud Infrastructure Billing

    OpenAIRE

    Renna, Francesco; Doyle, Joseph; Giotsas, Vasileios; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Audio/visual recognition and retrieval applications have recently garnered significant attention within Internet-of-Things (IoT) oriented services, given that video cameras and audio processing chipsets are now ubiquitous even in low-end embedded systems. In the most typical scenario for such services, each device extracts audio/visual features and compacts them into feature descriptors, which comprise media queries. These queries are uploaded to a remote cloud computing service that performs...

  17. High-rate production of functional nanostructured films and devices by coupling flame spray pyrolysis with supersonic expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication of functional thin films and devices by direct deposition of nanoparticles from the gas phase is a promising approach enabling, for instance, the integration of complex analytical and sensing capabilities on microfabricated platforms. Aerosol-based techniques ensure large-scale nanoparticle production and they are potentially suited for this goal. However, they are not adequate in terms of fine control over the lateral resolution of the coatings, mild processing conditions (avoiding high temperature and aggressive chemicals), low contamination and compatibility with microfabrication processes. Here we report the high-rate and efficient production of functional nanostructured films by nanoparticle assembling obtained by the combination of flame spray pyrolysis and supersonic expansion. Our approach merges the advantages of flame spray pyrolysis for bulk nanopowders such as process stability and wide material library availability with those of supersonic cluster beam deposition in terms of lateral resolution and of direct integration of nanomaterials on devices. We efficiently produced nanostructured films and devices (such as gas sensors) using metal oxide, pure noble metal and oxide-supported noble metal nanoparticles. (paper)

  18. A direct coupling between the semiconductor equations describing a GaInP/GaAs HBT in a circuit simulator for the co-design of microwave devices and circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Sommet, R.; Perreai, Y.; R. Quere

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the direct coupling between a physical device simulator and a circuit simulator based on the Harmonic Balance (Hit) technique. The semiconductor device equations adopted concern a GaInP/GaAs HBT for power applications. A full computation of the Jacobian matrix for convergence improvement has been implemented. It provides us with a powerful tool for the codesign of devices and circuits which has been successfully tested to simulate the power transfer characteristic of a de...

  19. The influence of interlayer exchange coupling in giant-magnetoresistive devices on spin diode effect in wide frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziętek, Sławomir, E-mail: zietek@agh.edu.pl; Skowroński, Witold; Wiśniowski, Piotr; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Stobiecki, Tomasz [Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Ogrodnik, Piotr [Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Barnaś, Józef [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-09-21

    Spin diode effect in a giant magnetoresistive strip is measured in a broad frequency range, including resonance and off-resonance frequencies. The off-resonance dc signal is relatively strong and also significantly dependent on the exchange coupling between magnetic films through the spacer layer. The measured dc signal is described theoretically by taking into account magnetic dynamics induced by Oersted field created by an ac current flowing through the system.

  20. The influence of interlayer exchange coupling in giant-magnetoresistive devices on spin diode effect in wide frequency range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spin diode effect in a giant magnetoresistive strip is measured in a broad frequency range, including resonance and off-resonance frequencies. The off-resonance dc signal is relatively strong and also significantly dependent on the exchange coupling between magnetic films through the spacer layer. The measured dc signal is described theoretically by taking into account magnetic dynamics induced by Oersted field created by an ac current flowing through the system