WorldWideScience

Sample records for characterizing aquifer heterogeneity

  1. Characterizing Heterogeneity in Infiltration Rates During Managed Aquifer Recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawer, Chloe; Parsekian, Andrew; Pidlisecky, Adam; Knight, Rosemary

    2016-11-01

    Infiltration rate is the key parameter that describes how water moves from the surface into a groundwater aquifer during managed aquifer recharge (MAR). Characterization of infiltration rate heterogeneity in space and time is valuable information for MAR system operation. In this study, we utilized fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) observations and the phase shift of the diurnal temperature signal between two vertically co-located fiber optic cables to characterize infiltration rate spatially and temporally in a MAR basin. The FO-DTS measurements revealed spatial heterogeneity of infiltration rate: approximately 78% of the recharge water infiltrated through 50% of the pond bottom on average. We also introduced a metric for quantifying how the infiltration rate in a recharge pond changes over time, which enables FO-DTS to be used as a method for monitoring MAR and informing maintenance decisions. By monitoring this metric, we found high-spatial variability in how rapidly infiltration rate changed during the test period. We attributed this variability to biological pore clogging and found a relationship between high initial infiltration rate and the most rapid pore clogging. We found a strong relationship (R2  = 0.8) between observed maximum infiltration rates and electrical resistivity measurements from electrical resistivity tomography data taken in the same basin when dry. This result shows that the combined acquisition of DTS and ERT data can improve the design and operation of a MAR pond significantly by providing the critical information needed about spatial variability in parameters controlling infiltration rates. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  2. Changing the scale of hydrogeophysical aquifer heterogeneity characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Daniel; Tremblay, Laurie; Ruggeri, Paolo; Brunet, Patrick; Fabien-Ouellet, Gabriel; Gloaguen, Erwan; Holliger, Klaus; Irving, James; Molson, John; Lefebvre, Rene

    2015-04-01

    Contaminant remediation and management require the quantitative predictive capabilities of groundwater flow and mass transport numerical models. Such models have to encompass source zones and receptors, and thus typically cover several square kilometers. To predict the path and fate of contaminant plumes, these models have to represent the heterogeneous distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K). However, hydrogeophysics has generally been used to image relatively restricted areas of the subsurface (small fractions of km2), so there is a need for approaches defining heterogeneity at larger scales and providing data to constrain conceptual and numerical models of aquifer systems. This communication describes a workflow defining aquifer heterogeneity that was applied over a 12 km2 sub-watershed surrounding a decommissioned landfill emitting landfill leachate. The aquifer is a shallow, 10 to 20 m thick, highly heterogeneous and anisotropic assemblage of littoral sand and silt. Field work involved the acquisition of a broad range of data: geological, hydraulic, geophysical, and geochemical. The emphasis was put on high resolution and continuous hydrogeophysical data, the use of direct-push fully-screened wells and the acquisition of targeted high-resolution hydraulic data covering the range of observed aquifer materials. The main methods were: 1) surface geophysics (ground-penetrating radar and electrical resistivity); 2) direct-push operations with a geotechnical drilling rig (cone penetration tests with soil moisture resistivity CPT/SMR; full-screen well installation); and 3) borehole operations, including high-resolution hydraulic tests and geochemical sampling. New methods were developed to acquire high vertical resolution hydraulic data in direct-push wells, including both vertical and horizontal K (Kv and Kh). Various data integration approaches were used to represent aquifer properties in 1D, 2D and 3D. Using relevant vector machines (RVM), the mechanical and

  3. Improved characterization of heterogeneous permeability in saline aquifers from transient pressure data during freshwater injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter K.; Lee, Jonghyun; Fu, Xiaojing; Lee, Seunghak; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Juanes, Ruben

    2017-05-01

    Managing recharge of freshwater into saline aquifers requires accurate estimation of the heterogeneous permeability field for maximizing injection and recovery efficiency. Here we present a methodology for subsurface characterization in saline aquifers that takes advantage of the density difference between the injected freshwater and the ambient saline groundwater. We combine high-resolution forward modeling of density-driven flow with an efficient Bayesian geostatistical inversion algorithm. In the presence of a density difference between the injected and ambient fluids due to differences in salinity, the pressure field is coupled to the spatial distribution of salinity. This coupling renders the pressure field transient: the time evolution of the salinity distribution controls the density distribution which then leads to a time-evolving pressure distribution. We exploit this coupling between pressure and salinity to obtain an improved characterization of the permeability field without multiple pumping tests or additional salinity measurements. We show that the inversion performance improves with an increase in the mixed convection ratio—the relative importance between viscous forces from injection and buoyancy forces from density difference. Our work shows that measuring transient pressure data at multiple sampling points during freshwater injection into saline aquifers can be an effective strategy for aquifer characterization, key to the successful management of aquifer recharge.

  4. Characterizing flow pathways in a sandstone aquifer: Tectonic vs sedimentary heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, G.; West, L. J.; Mountney, N. P.

    2016-11-01

    Sandstone aquifers are commonly assumed to represent porous media characterized by a permeable matrix. However, such aquifers may be heavy fractured when rock properties and timing of deformation favour brittle failure and crack opening. In many aquifer types, fractures associated with faults, bedding planes and stratabound joints represent preferential pathways for fluids and contaminants. In this paper, well test and outcrop-scale studies reveal how strongly lithified siliciclastic rocks may be entirely dominated by fracture flow at shallow depths (≤ 180 m), similar to limestone and crystalline aquifers. However, sedimentary heterogeneities can primarily control fluid flow where fracture apertures are reduced by overburden pressures or mineral infills at greater depths. The Triassic St Bees Sandstone Formation (UK) of the East Irish Sea Basin represents an optimum example for study of the influence of both sedimentary and tectonic aquifer heterogeneities in a strongly lithified sandstone aquifer-type. This fluvial sedimentary succession accumulated in rapidly subsiding basins, which typically favours preservation of complete depositional cycles including fine grained layers (mudstone and silty sandstone) interbedded in sandstone fluvial channels. Additionally, vertical joints in the St Bees Sandstone Formation form a pervasive stratabound system whereby joints terminate at bedding discontinuities. Additionally, normal faults are present through the succession showing particular development of open-fractures. Here, the shallow aquifer (depth ≤ 180 m) was characterized using hydro-geophysics. Fluid temperature, conductivity and flow-velocity logs record inflows and outflows from normal faults, as well as from pervasive bed-parallel fractures. Quantitative flow logging analyses in boreholes that cut fault planes indicate that zones of fault-related open fractures characterize 50% of water flow. The remaining flow component is dominated by bed-parallel fractures

  5. A Review of the Multilevel Slug Test for Characterizing Aquifer Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Shyun Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available All aquifers are heterogeneous to a certain degree. The spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity K(x, y, z, or aquifer heterogeneity, significantly influences the groundwater flow movement and associated solute transport. Of particular importance in designing an in-situ remediation plan is a knowledge of low-K layers because they are less accessible to remedial agents and form a bottleneck in remediation. The characterization of aquifer heterogeneity is essential to the solution of many practical and scientific groundwater problems. This article reviews the field technique using the multilevel slug test (MLST, which determines a series of K estimates at depths of interest in a well by making use of a double-packer system. The K(z obtained manifests the vertical variation of hydraulic conductivity in the vicinity of the test well, and the combination of K(z from different wells gives rise to a three-dimensional description of K(x, y, z. The MLST response is rather sensitive to hydraulic conductivity variation; e.g., it is oscillatory for highly permeable conditions (K > 5 × 10-4 m s-1 and a nonoscillatory for K < 5 × 10-4 m s-1. In this article we discuss the instrumentation of the double-packer system, the implementation of the depth-specific slug test, the data analysis methods for a spectrum of response characteristics usually observed in the field, and field applications of the MLST.

  6. Heterogeneity and Stream-Aquifer Interaction in an Unconsolidated Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwee, C. D.; Healey, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    In north central Kansas the Republican River and its associated alluvial sediments are important regional surface and groundwater supplies. A test site, adjacent to the Republican River, has been established within the porous alluvial sediments to study stream-aquifer interaction and aquifer heterogeneity. This is potentially important research for understanding how to maintain a desired stream flow in the presence of withdrawals from the stream and the aquifer. The site installation consists of seven observation wells located along a line perpendicular to the river channel and centered about a productive irrigation well. In addition to water level data, several geophysical techniques (direct push electrical conductivity, ground penetrating radar, and shallow seismic methods) have been used at this site to characterize the aquifer. The results of the geophysical methods are reported in another paper at this meeting. Water level data collected over a two-week period shows two consecutive irrigation cycles. Each cycle consists of two days of intensive pumping followed by five days of recovery. Several significant elements of stream-aquifer systems can be seen in the data. The water level data demonstrates a regional water level decline in the alluvium that mimics stream gage data located up and down stream from the site, thereby confirming stream-aquifer interaction. Most of the observation wells located symmetrically around the irrigation well show the normal asymmetry expected for a river acting as a specified head boundary. However, heterogeneity causes one pair of symmetric wells to behave differently. Hydraulic data analysis with an automated program (SuprPumpII) demonstrates a degree of heterogeneity within the alluvial sediments not evident from descriptive geologic drilling logs or geophysical logs. A time-drawdown plot of a symmetric pair of observation wells, 310W and 310E, shows an atypical response of the aquifer during early pumping times due to

  7. A frequency domain analysis to characterize heterogeneity and recharge mechanisms in a fractured crystalline-rock aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Martinez, J.; Longuevergne, L.; Le Borgne, T.; Davy, P.; Bour, O.; Goderniaux, P.; Russian, A.; Thomas, Z.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate aquifer behavior and recharge mechanisms in fracture media using a frequency domain approach. Main interest was the quantification of aquifer characteristic time response, storativity and estimation of heterogeneity and connectivity impact on well behavior on a wide range of temporal scales from 1 day to 8 years. Transfer Functions were calculated for a fractured crystalline-rock aquifer system located in Ploemeur (S of Brittany, France). Recharge, first calculated as effective rainfall, and groundwater level fluctuations (tide effects removed) were used as input and output functions, respectively. The Transfer Function quantifies the ratio of amplitudes of the input and output in the frequency domain. The obtained transfer functions are typically constant at low frequency and decay with frequency for mid and high frequencies. Classical behavior models for interpreting transfer functions are the linear and Dupuit models, plus combination with fast flow component. For linear and Dupuit models, the transfer function |H(ω)|2 scales respectively as |H(ω)|2 ~ ω-2, and |H(ω)|2 ~ ω-1 for high frequencies. The transfer functions obtained for the fractured rock aquifer of Ploemeur do not follow these scaling. Instead, they scale as |H(ω)|2 ~ ω-β, with β=0.7. This suggests that the heterogeneity at different scales in this fractured system involves a variety of transfer processes that cannot be represented by classical models. We discuss the relevance of alternative dual-permeability and multi-permeability models for modeling the rainfall-hydraulic head response in this fractured media. We analyze the variability of the response (characteristic time, amplitude and asymptotic log-log slope) for wells intersecting the main fracture zone, intersecting secondary fracture zones or located in weathered rock.

  8. Interests of long-term hydrogeological observatories for characterizing and modelling heterogeneous groundwater systems at multiple temporal and spatial scales: the example of Ploemeur, a crystalline rock aquifer (Brittany).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bour, Olivier; Longuervergne, Laurent; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Lavenant, Nicolas; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Schuite, Jonathan; Labasque, Thierry; Aquilina, Luc; Davy, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Characterizing groundwater flows and surface interactions in heterogeneous groundwater systems such as crystalline fractured rock is often extremely complex. In particular, hydraulic properties are highly variable while groundwater chemical properties may vary both in space and time, especially due to the impact of groundwater abstraction. Here, we show the interest of hydrological observatories and long-term monitoring for characterizing hydrological processes occurring in a crystalline rock aquifer. We present results from the site of Ploemeur (French Brittany) that belongs to the network of hydrogeological sites H+ and the research infrastructure OZCAR, and where interdisciplinary and integrated research at multiple temporal and spatial scales has been developed for almost twenty years. This outstandingly heterogeneous crystalline rock aquifer is also used for groundwater supply since 1991. In particular, we show how cross-borehole flowmeter tests, pumping tests and a frequency domain analysis of groundwater levels allow quantifying the hydraulic properties of the aquifer at different scales. In addition, groundwater temperature evolution was used as an excellent tracer for characterizing groundwater flow. At the site scale, measurements of ground surface deformation through long-base tiltmeters provide robust estimates of aquifer storage and allow identifying the active structures, including those acting during recharge process. Finally, a numerical model of the watershed scale that combines hydraulic data and groundwater ages confirms the geometry of this complex aquifer and the consistency of the different datasets. In parallel, this hydrological observatory is also used for developing hydrogeophysical methods and to characterize groundwater transport and biogeochemical reactivity in the sub-surface. The Ploemeur hydrogeological observatory is a good example of the interest of focusing research activities on a site during long-term as it provides a thorough

  9. Characterization of a heterogeneous DNAPL source zone in the Borden aquifer using partitioning and interfacial tracers: Residual morphologies and background sorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Niels; Cho, Jaehyun; Parker, Beth L.; Annable, Michael D.

    2010-06-01

    A partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) was performed in the Borden sand aquifer to characterize an aged heterogeneous DNAPL source zone. This zone evolved during 5 years of natural groundwater flow following the infiltration of 50 L chlorinated solvents DNAPL. To assess the lateral variability of remaining DNAPL mass and morphology, four sweepzones were analyzed. The low saturation residual nature of the source zone required correction of tracer breakthrough data for natural background sorption. Corrected estimates of the DNAPL percentage remaining (total 13.2-16.6%), average saturation (0.05-0.18%) and distribution across the sweepzones were in good agreement with previous findings based on detailed transect monitoring, core analyses and ground-penetrating radar reflection. Using a newly defined metric "average spherical radius equivalent (ASRE)", sweepzone estimates of the average size of DNAPL presence indicated the dominance of single pore DNAPL blobs and suggested the absence of DNAPL pools. Tracer tests indicated that DNAPL presence in the most DNAPL depleted sweepzone was potentially overestimated due to increased sediment sorption by residualized Sudan IV that was added to the DNAPL infiltrate. As hydrophobic compounds are normally present in spent solvent DNAPL, this suggests that additional sorption needs to be considered when using PITTs to characterize aged DNAPL source zones.

  10. Exploring the worth of geophysical data for characterizing three dimensional transport and heterogeneity in laboratory aquifer experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, R. L.; Reed, P. M.; Singha, K.

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluates how geophysical data and tracer concentration time series data can be combined effectively to infer hydraulic properties of a laboratory aquifer tank experiment. The tank's dimensions are 73 cm x 71 cm x 70 cm with a 20 cm fine sand cube placed in the center of the tank, within a larger cube of coarser sand. A series of three experiments are conducted within the tank: (1) lateral extent experiments, (2) concentration experiments, and (3) sampling configuration experiments. The set of lateral extent experiments examine how sensitive geophysical data is to the lateral extent of the tracer injection. The concentration experiments examine how sensitive geophysical data is to the level of concentration injected into the tank. Finally, the sample configuration experiments examine how the length of the geophysical sequence affects the balance between data resolution and temporal smearing of geophysical data. The geophysical data is analyzed using both moment analysis of tomograms and the time series data is analyzed using root mean square error (RMSE) and transformed root mean square error (TRMSE) metrics. The metrics are then compared with modeled data to determine the bias between prediction and observation data. In the end, our results show that geophysical data can be used effectively to incorporate hydrological properties, with a few caveats. The primary contribution of this work is to clarify the effect that experimental design decisions for geophysics (location of electrodes, sequence of electrodes, etc.) have on our ability to describe aquifer properties and evaluate tracer transport.

  11. The impact of aquifer heterogeneity on the performance of aquifer thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, W.T.; Valstar, J.R.; Gaans, van P.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity in hydraulic properties of the subsurface is not accounted for in current design calculations of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). However, the subsurface is heterogeneous and thus affects the heat distribution around ATES wells. In this paper, the influence of heterogeneity on

  12. Maximizing the value of pressure data in saline aquifer characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seonkyoo; Williams, John R.; Juanes, Ruben; Kang, Peter K.

    2017-11-01

    The injection and storage of freshwater in saline aquifers for the purpose of managed aquifer recharge is an important technology that can help ensure sustainable water resources. As a result of the density difference between the injected freshwater and ambient saline groundwater, the pressure field is coupled to the spatial salinity distribution, and therefore experiences transient changes. The effect of variable density can be quantified by the mixed convection ratio, which is a ratio between the strength of two convection processes: free convection due to the density differences and forced convection due to hydraulic gradients. We combine a density-dependent flow and transport simulator with an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to analyze the effects of freshwater injection rates on the value-of-information of transient pressure data for saline aquifer characterization. The EnKF is applied to sequentially estimate heterogeneous aquifer permeability fields using real-time pressure data. The performance of the permeability estimation is analyzed in terms of the accuracy and the uncertainty of the estimated permeability fields as well as the predictability of breakthrough curve arrival times in a realistic push-pull setting. This study demonstrates that injecting fluids at a rate that balances the two characteristic convections can maximize the value of pressure data for saline aquifer characterization.

  13. Estimating flow using tracers and hydraulics in synthetic heterogeneous aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocque, Marie; Cook, Peter G; Haaken, Klaus; Simmons, Craig T

    2009-01-01

    Regional ground water flow is most usually estimated using Darcy's law, with hydraulic conductivities estimated from pumping tests, but can also be estimated using ground water residence times derived from radioactive tracers. The two methods agree reasonably well in relatively homogeneous aquifers but it is not clear which is likely to produce more reliable estimates of ground water flow rates in heterogeneous systems. The aim of this paper is to compare bias and uncertainty of tracer and hydraulic approaches to assess ground water flow in heterogeneous aquifers. Synthetic two-dimensional aquifers with different levels of heterogeneity (correlation lengths, variances) are used to simulate ground water flow, pumping tests, and transport of radioactive tracers. Results show that bias and uncertainty of flow rates increase with the variance of the hydraulic conductivity for both methods. The bias resulting from the nonlinearity of the concentration-time relationship can be reduced by choosing a tracer with a decay rate similar to the mean ground water residence time. The bias on flow rates estimated from pumping tests is reduced when performing long duration tests. The uncertainty on ground water flow is minimized when the sampling volume is large compared to the correlation length. For tracers, the uncertainty is related to the ratio of correlation length to the distance between sampling wells. For pumping tests, it is related to the ratio of correlation length to the pumping test's radius of influence. In regional systems, it may be easier to minimize this ratio for tracers than for pumping tests. Copyright © 2009 The Author(s). Journal Compilation © 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  14. Accounting for aquifer heterogeneity from geological data to management tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Martin; Martel, Richard; Gloaguen, Erwan

    2013-01-01

    A nested workflow of multiple-point geostatistics (MPG) and sequential Gaussian simulation (SGS) was tested on a study area of 6 km(2) located about 20 km northwest of Quebec City, Canada. In order to assess its geological and hydrogeological parameter heterogeneity and to provide tools to evaluate uncertainties in aquifer management, direct and indirect field measurements are used as inputs in the geostatistical simulations to reproduce large and small-scale heterogeneities. To do so, the lithological information is first associated to equivalent hydrogeological facies (hydrofacies) according to hydraulic properties measured at several wells. Then, heterogeneous hydrofacies (HF) realizations are generated using a prior geological model as training image (TI) with the MPG algorithm. The hydraulic conductivity (K) heterogeneity modeling within each HF is finally computed using SGS algorithm. Different K models are integrated in a finite-element hydrogeological model to calculate multiple transport simulations. Different scenarios exhibit variations in mass transport path and dispersion associated with the large- and small-scale heterogeneity respectively. Three-dimensional maps showing the probability of overpassing different thresholds are presented as examples of management tools. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  15. Aquifer characterization and groundwater potential assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... integrated electrical resistivity and borehole lithologic logs with a view to characterizing the aquifer and assessing the groundwater potential. One hundred and four Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES) were quantitatively interpreted using the partial curve matching technique and computer assisted 1-D forward modeling.

  16. The influence of riverbed heterogeneity patterns on river-aquifer exchange fluxes under different connection regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Q.; Kurtz, W.; Schilling, O. S.; Brunner, P.; Vereecken, H.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.

    2017-11-01

    Riverbed hydraulic conductivity (K) is a critical parameter for the prediction of exchange fluxes between a river and an aquifer. In this study, the role of heterogeneity patterns was explored using the fully integrated hydrological model HydroGeoSphere simulating complex, variably saturated subsurface flow. A synthetic 3-D river-aquifer reference model was constructed with a heterogeneous riverbed using non-multi-Gaussian patterns in the form of meandering channels. Data assimilation was used to test the ability of different riverbed K patterns to reproduce hydraulic heads, riverbed K and river-aquifer exchange fluxes. Both fully saturated as well as variably saturated conditions underneath the riverbed were tested. The data assimilation experiments with the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) were carried out for four types of geostatistical models of riverbed K fields: (i) spatially homogeneous, (ii) heterogeneous with multi-Gaussian distribution, (iii) heterogeneous with non-multi-Gaussian distribution (channelized structures) and (iv) heterogeneous with non-multi-Gaussian distribution (elliptic structures). For all data assimilation experiments, state variables and riverbed K were updated by assimilating hydraulic heads. For saturated conditions, heterogeneous geostatistical models allowed a better characterization of net exchange fluxes than a homogeneous approximation. Among the three heterogeneous models, the performance of non-multi-Gaussian models was superior to the performance of the multi-Gaussian model, but the two tested non-multi-Gaussian models showed only small differences in performance from one another. For the variably saturated conditions both the multi-Gaussian model and the homogeneous model performed clearly worse than the two non-multi-Gaussian models. The two non-multi-Gaussian models did not show much difference in performance. This clearly shows that characterizing heterogeneity of riverbed K is important. Moreover, particularly under

  17. Prediction of solute transport in a heterogeneous aquifer utilizing hydraulic conductivity and specific storage tomograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, S.; Brauchler, R.; Hu, R.; Hu, L.; Schmidt, S.; Ptak, T.; Bayer, P.

    2015-07-01

    A sequential procedure of hydraulic tomographical inversion is applied to characterize at high resolution the spatial heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity and specific storage at the field test site Stegemühle, Germany. The shallow aquifer at this site is examined by five short-term multilevel pumping tests with 30 pumping-observation pairs between two wells. Utilizing travel time diagnostics of the recorded pressure response curves, fast eikonal-based inversion is shown to deliver insight into the sedimentary structures. Thus, the structural information from the generated travel time tomogram is exploited to constrain full calibration of the pressure response curves. Based on lateral extrapolation from the measured inter-well profile, a three-dimensional reconstruction of the aquifer is obtained. It is demonstrated that calibration of spatially variable specific storage in addition to hydraulic conductivity can improve the fitting of the model while the structural features are only slightly changed. At the field site, two tracer tests with uranine and sodium-naphthionate were also performed and their concentrations were monitored for 2 months. The measured tracer breakthrough curves are employed for independent validation of the hydraulic tomographical reconstruction. It is demonstrated that major features of the observed solute transport can be reproduced, and structures relevant for macrodispersive tracer spreading could be resolved. However, for the mildly heterogeneous aquifer, the tracer breakthrough curves can also be approximated by a simplified homogeneous model with higher dispersivity. Therefore, improved validation results that capture specific characteristics of the breakthrough curves would require additional hydraulic measurements.

  18. Identifying the influential aquifer heterogeneity factor on nitrate reduction processes by numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, E.; He, W.; Savoy, H.; Dietrich, P.; Kolditz, O.; Rubin, Y.; Schüth, C.; Kalbacher, T.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrate reduction reactions in groundwater systems are strongly influenced by various aquifer heterogeneity factors that affect the transport of chemical species, spatial distribution of redox reactive substances and, as a result, the overall nitrate reduction efficiency. In this study, we investigated the influence of physical and chemical aquifer heterogeneity, with a focus on nitrate transport and redox transformation processes. A numerical modeling study for simulating coupled hydrological-geochemical aquifer heterogeneity was conducted in order to improve our understanding of the influence of the aquifer heterogeneity on the nitrate reduction reactions and to identify the most influential aquifer heterogeneity factors throughout the simulation. Results show that the most influential aquifer heterogeneity factors could change over time. With abundant presence of electron donors in the high permeable zones (initial stage), physical aquifer heterogeneity significantly influences the nitrate reduction since it enables the preferential transport of nitrate to these zones and enhances mixing of reactive partners. Chemical aquifer heterogeneity plays a comparatively minor role. Increasing the spatial variability of the hydraulic conductivity also increases the nitrate removal efficiency of the system. However, ignoring chemical aquifer heterogeneity can lead to an underestimation of nitrate removals in long-term behavior. With the increase of the spatial variability of the electron donor, i.e. chemical heterogeneity, the number of the ;hot spots; i.e. zones with comparably higher reactivity, should also increase. Hence, nitrate removal efficiencies will also be spatially variable but overall removal efficiency will be sustained if longer time scales are considered and nitrate fronts reach these high reactivity zones.

  19. Use of time series and harmonic constituents of tidal propagation to enhance estimation of coastal aquifer heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joseph D.; White, Jeremy T.; Langevin, Christian D.

    2010-01-01

    A synthetic two‐dimensional model of a horizontally and vertically heterogeneous confined coastal aquifer system, based on the Upper Floridan aquifer in south Florida, USA, subjected to constant recharge and a complex tidal signal was used to generate 15‐minute water‐level data at select locations over a 7‐day simulation period.   “Observed” water‐level data were generated by adding noise, representative of typical barometric pressure variations and measurement errors, to 15‐minute data from the synthetic model. Permeability was calibrated using a non‐linear gradient‐based parameter inversion approach with preferred‐value Tikhonov regularization and 1) “observed” water‐level data, 2) harmonic constituent data, or 3) a combination of “observed” water‐level and harmonic constituent data.    In all cases, high‐frequency data used in the parameter inversion process were able to characterize broad‐scale heterogeneities; the ability to discern fine‐scale heterogeneity was greater when harmonic constituent data were used.  These results suggest that the combined use of highly parameterized‐inversion techniques and high frequency time and/or processed‐harmonic constituent water‐level data could be a useful approach to better characterize aquifer heterogeneities in coastal aquifers influenced by ocean tides.

  20. Adaptive Sparse Recovery of Aquifer Heterogeneity under Variogram Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour, B.; Mohammad khaninezhad, M.

    2012-12-01

    Predictive flow and transport models are often constructed by adopting imperfect modeling assumptions and interpretations to interpolate between limited available data. The interpolation process can introduce significant subjectivity and uncertainty in the generated models. Since the geologic continuity model controls aquifer connectivity and fluid flow and displacement behavior any error is specifying it can lead to substantial bias in predicting flow and transport behavior. In subsurface modeling, it is common to generate, from scattered data, a single variogram model to describe the anisotropy and heterogeneity in hydraulic property distributions, such as permeability or porosity. In many cases, the model calibration process is constrained to reproduce the adopted variogram model, which can be an advantage if the model is reliable or a significant liability if it is incorrect. We discuss a novel method for integrating dynamic flow measurements, in addition to static data, to concurrently identify a consistent variogram model and estimate aquifer hydraulic property distributions. Using the recent developments in sparse signal recovery and compressed sensing, we develop a novel inversion framework that can integrate the dynamic flow data to detect and eliminate inconsistent prior variogram models while promoting consistent models. Our formulation begins by generating a diverse set of aquifer model realizations that come from different prior variogram models and cover a wide range of variability. We search for a solution as a linear combination of these model realizations by then implementing an adaptive iterative sparse reconstruction algorithm. The solution method adaptively identifies inconsistent samples in the initial geologic dictionary and replaces them with new components from the more consistent variograms. The sparsity-promoting model calibration process has a selection property that heavily penalizes inconsistent models in the dictionary and promotes

  1. Efficiency of joint use of MRS and VES to characterize coastal aquifer in Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouillamoz, J. M.; Chatenoux, B.; Mathieu, F.; Baltassat, J. M.; Legchenko, A.

    2007-02-01

    The productivity and the water quality of coastal aquifers can be highly heterogeneous in a complex environment. The characterization of these aquifers can be improved by hydrogeological and complementary geophysical surveys. Such an integrated approach is developed in a non-consolidated coastal aquifer in Myanmar (previously named Burma). A preliminary hydrogeological survey is conducted to know better the targeted aquifers. Then, 25 sites are selected to characterize aquifers through borehole drillings and pumping tests implementation. In the same sites, magnetic resonance soundings (MRS) and vertical electrical soundings (VES) are carried out. Geophysical results are compared to hydrogeological data, and geophysical parameters are used to characterize aquifers using conversion equations. Finally, combining the analysis of technical and economical impacts of geophysics, a methodology is proposed to characterize non-consolidated coastal aquifers. Depth and thickness of saturated zone is determined by means of MRS in 68% of the sites (evaluated with 34 soundings). The average accuracy of confined storativity estimated with MRS is ± 6% (evaluated over 7 pumping tests) whereas the average accuracy of transmissivity estimation with MRS is ± 45% (evaluated using 15 pumping tests). To reduce uncertainty in VES interpretation, the aquifer geometry estimated with MRS is used as a fixed parameter in VES inversion. The accuracy of groundwater electrical conductivity evaluation from 15 VES is enough to estimate the risk of water salinity. In addition, the maximum depth of penetration of the MRS depends on the rocks' electrical resistivity and is between 20 and 80 m at the study area.

  2. Hydrodynamic characterization of the Paleocene aquifer in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The intense exploitation of shallow aquifers in the coastal basin of Togo provokes a rapid depletion of these reservoirs. The confined paleocene aquifer represents potential reserves that are yet little exploited. This paper presents the hydrodynamic characterization of this aquifer. Piezometric data established from 80 wells ...

  3. Stochastic analysis of the hydraulic conductivity estimated for a heterogeneous aquifer via numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to evaluate the impacts of the average hydraulic conductivity of the heterogeneous aquifer on the estimated hydraulic conductivity using the observations from pumping tests. The results of aquifer tests conducted at a karst aquifer are first introduced. A MODFLOW groundwater flow model was developed to perform numerical pumping tests, and the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K field was generated using the Monte Carlo method. The K was estimated by the Theis solution for an unconfined aquifer. The effective hydraulic conductivity (Ke was calculated to represent the hydraulic conductivity of a heterogeneous aquifer. The results of numerical simulations demonstrate that Ke increase with the mean of hydraulic conductivity (EK, and decrease with the coefficient of variation of the hydraulic conductivity (Cv. The impact of spatial variability of K on the estimated Ke at two observation wells with smaller EK is less significant compared to the cases with larger EK.

  4. Modelling and monitoring of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage : impacts of soil heterogeneity, thermal interference and bioremediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, W.T.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and monitoring of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Impacts of heterogeneity, thermal interference and bioremediation Wijbrand Sommer
    PhD thesis, Wageningen University, Wageningen, NL (2015)
    ISBN 978-94-6257-294-2 Abstract Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is

  5. Analytical solutions for whirling groundwater flow in two-dimensional heterogeneous anisotropic aquifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemker, K.; Bakker, M.

    2006-01-01

    Analytical solutions are derived for steady state groundwater flow in a heterogeneous, anisotropic, semiconfined aquifer. The aquifer consists of a number of horizontal layers, while each layer consists of a number of homogeneous cells with different hydraulic conductivity tensors. An exact solution

  6. Effects of aquifer heterogeneity and reaction mechanism uncertainty on a reactive barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eykholt, G R; Elder, C R; Benson, C H

    1999-08-12

    This paper addresses impacts of aquifer heterogeneity and reaction mechanism uncertainty on permeable reactive barrier (PRB) performance and describes modeling tools and preliminary guidelines for risk-based design of reactive barriers at heterogeneous sites. A braided stream aquifer was generated stochastically, using a fixed correlation structure and four levels of variability in the hydraulic conductivity field. A vertical, homogeneous barrier was placed in the aquifer. Based on a deterministic design, the size of the PRB for uniform conditions was considered conservative (factor of safety=3.3). Monte Carlo simulation was used to model cis 1,2-DCE reduction by iron metal with uncertainty in the reaction mechanism rate constants. These results were combined with flow and particle tracking results to predict the spatial distribution and flow-averaged concentrations of cis 1,2-DCE and vinyl chloride at the exit face of the PRB. Evaluated on a risk basis, the deterministic design method was found to be unconservative for more heterogeneous aquifers. Uncertainty in the reaction mechanism accentuated the negative effects of aquifer heterogeneity. Several compensating factors that may reduce the vulnerability of reactive barriers to aquifer heterogeneity are discussed.

  7. Quasi-steady state conditions in heterogeneous aquifers during pumping tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Yuanyuan; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J.; Shi, Liangsheng; Huang, Shao-Yang; Wang, Wenke; Wen, Jet-Chau

    2017-08-01

    Classical Thiem's well hydraulic theory, other aquifer test analyses, and flow modeling efforts often assume the existence of ;quasi-steady; state conditions. That is, while drawdowns due to pumping continue to grow, the hydraulic gradient in the vicinity of the pumping well does not change significantly. These conditions have built upon two-dimensional and equivalent homogeneous conceptual models, but few field data have been available to affirm the existence of these conditions. Moreover, effects of heterogeneity and three-dimensional flow on this quasi-steady state concept have not been thoroughly investigated and discussed before. In this study, we first present a quantitative definition of quasi-steady state (or steady-shape conditions) and steady state conditions based on the analytical solution of two- or three-dimensional flow induced by pumping in unbounded, homogeneous aquifers. Afterward, we use a stochastic analysis to investigate the influence of heterogeneity on the quasi-steady state concept in heterogeneous aquifers. The results of the analysis indicate that the time to reach an approximate quasi-steady state in a heterogeneous aquifer could be quite different from that estimated based on a homogeneous model. We find that heterogeneity of aquifer properties, especially hydraulic conductivity, impedes the development of the quasi-steady state condition before the flow reaching steady state. Finally, 280 drawdown-time data from the hydraulic tomographic survey conducted at a field site corroborate our finding that the quasi-steady state condition likely would not take place in heterogeneous aquifers unless pumping tests last a long period. Research significance (1) Approximate quasi-steady and steady state conditions are defined for two- or three-dimensional flow induced by pumping in unbounded, equivalent homogeneous aquifers. (2) Analysis demonstrates effects of boundary condition, well screen interval, and heterogeneity of parameters on the

  8. Characterizing flow pathways in a sandstone aquifer at multiple depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Giacomo; West, Jared; Mountney, Nigel

    2017-04-01

    Sandstone aquifers are commonly assumed to represent porous media characterized by a permeable matrix. However, such aquifers may be heavily fractured where rock properties and timing of deformation favour brittle failure and crack opening. In many aquifer types, fractures associated with faults, bedding planes and stratabound joints represent preferential pathways for fluids and contaminants. This presentation reports well-test results and outcrop-scale studies that reveal how strongly lithified siliciclastic rocks may be entirely dominated by fracture flow at shallow depths (≤ 150 m), similar to limestone and crystalline aquifers. The Triassic St Bees Sandstone Formation of the UK East Irish Sea Basin represents an optimum succession for study of the influence of both sedimentary and tectonic aquifer heterogeneities in a strongly lithified sandstone aquifer-type. This sedimentary succession of fluvial origin accumulated in rapidly subsiding basins, which typically favour preservation of complete depositional cycles, including fine-grained mudstone and silty sandstone layers of floodplain origin interbedded with sandstone-dominated fluvial channel deposits. Vertical joints in the St Bees Sandstone Formation form a pervasive stratabound system whereby joints terminate at bedding-parallel discontinuities. Additionally, normal faults are present through the succession and record development of open-fractures in their damage zones. Here, the shallow aquifer (depth ≤150 m BGL) was characterized in outcrop and well tests. Fluid temperature, conductivity and flow-velocity logs record inflows and outflows from normal faults, as well as from pervasive bed-parallel fractures. Quantitative flow logging analyses in boreholes that cut fault planes indicate that zones of fault-related open fractures typically represent ˜ 50% of well transmissivity. The remaining flow component is dominated by bed-parallel fractures. However, such sub-horizontal fractures become the

  9. Aquifers Characterization and Productivity in Ellala Catchment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aquifers developed in the different rocks are mainly due to secondary processes such as weathering, fracturing and karstification. The degree of variations in the groundwater productivity is mainly linked with the variations in the effect of these processes in the respective rock. Hydrodynamic analyses of the aquifers reveal ...

  10. Experimental and numerical study for seawater intrusion remediation in heterogeneous coastal aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdelkader T

    2017-08-01

    The contamination of fresh groundwater by saltwater intrusion (SWI) becomes a worldwide alarming problem, which threatens all countries depending on groundwater abstraction from coastal areas. Various control and treatment strategies have been suggested to prevent SWI. The construction of subsurface physical barriers is one of the most practical implementation methods to prevent SWI. In this work, the use of subsurface dam as a remediation and protection tool was investigated in a heterogeneous aquifer via lab scale experiments and numerical simulation. The experiments depended on a novel automated imaged analysis method for SWI measurements. Glass beads of different grain sizes were used in sandbox experiments. The simulation works adopted the SEAWAT code for validation of the experimental results and making numerical sensitivity analyses for affecting parameters. Results proved the significant impact of using sub water dams with heterogonous aquifers. The remediation impacts of the dam was captured clearly in preventing and backwashing of the existed SWI. The results revealed also that the heterogeneous aquifers with high permeability in the bottom boundary behave closer to the homogenous aquifers in SWI than those having low hydraulic conductivity in the bottom. Sensitivity analyses results showed that the closer dam to seawater boundary led to the quicker and more effective backwashing process. Results exhibited also that the dam height with 50% of the aquifer dam has the ability to hold the seawater so long as the hydraulic gradient is high and dams with 67% of aquifer height prevent the saltwater intrusion completely. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stochastic analysis of field-scale heat advection in heterogeneous aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-M. Chang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the analogy between the solute and heat transport processes, it can be expected that the rate of growth of the spatial second moments of the heat flux in a heterogeneous aquifer over relatively large space scales is greater than that predicted by applying the classical heat transport model. The motivation of stochastic analysis of heat transport at the field scale is therefore to quantify the enhanced growth of the field-scale second moments caused by the spatially varying specific discharge field. Within the framework of stochastic theory, an effective advection-dispersion equation containing effective parameters (namely, the macrodispersion coefficients is developed to model the mean temperature field. The rate of growth of the field-scale spatial second moments of the mean temperature field in the principal coordinate directions is described by the macrodispersion coefficient. The variance of the temperature field is also developed to characterize the reliability to be anticipated in applying the mean heat transport model. It is found that the heterogeneity of the medium and the correlation length of the log hydraulic conductivity are important in enhancing the field-scale heat advection, while the effective thermal conductivity plays the role in reducing the field-scale heat advection.

  12. Inferring the heterogeneity, transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity of crystalline aquifers from a detailed water-table map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewandel, Benoît; Jeanpert, Julie; Ladouche, Bernard; Join, Jean-Lambert; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Estimating the transmissivity or hydraulic conductivity field to characterize the heterogeneity of a crystalline aquifer is particularly difficult because of the wide variations of the parameters. We developed a new approach based on the analysis of a dense network of water-table data. It is based on the concept that large-scale variations in hydraulic head may give information on large-scale aquifer parameters. The method assumes that flux into the aquifer is mainly sub-horizontal and that the water table is mostly controlled by topography, rather than recharge. It is based on an empirical statistical relationship between field data on transmissivity and the inverse slope values of a topography-reduced water-table map. This relationship is used to compute a transmissivity map that must be validated with field measurements. The proposed approach can provide a general pattern of transmissivity, or hydraulic conductivity, but cannot correctly reproduce strong variations at very local scale (less than10 m), and will face of some uncertainties where vertical flows cannot be neglected. The method was tested on a peridotite (ultramafic rock) aquifer of 3.5 km2 in area located in New Caledonia. The resulting map shows transmissivity variations over about 5 orders of magnitude (average LogT: -5.2 ± 0.7). Comparison with a map based on measured water-level data (n = 475) shows that the comparison between LogT-computed values and LogT data deduced from 28 hydraulic tests is estimated with an error less than 20% in 71% of cases (LogT ± 0.4), and with an error less than 10% (LogT ± 0.2 on average) in 39% of cases. From this map a hydraulic-conductivity map has been computed showing values ranging over 8 orders of magnitude. The repeatability of the approach was tested on a second data set of hydraulic-head measurements (n = 543); the mean deviation between both LogT maps is about 11%. These encouraging results show that the method can give valuable parameter estimates, and

  13. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  14. Hydrochemical characterization of groundwater aquifer using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrochemical data analysis revealed four sources of solutes. The processes responsible for their enrichment include: chemical weathering, leaching of the overlying sediments, domestic activities, climatic condition and the flow pattern of the aquifer. The factors have contributed to the changes of the groundwater chemistry ...

  15. A Groundwater Database for site and process studies in heterogeneous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, J.; de Dreuzy, J.; Le Borgne, T.; Gautier, S.; Battais, A.; Davy, P.

    2008-12-01

    To provide a link between experimentalists and modellers, we have developed a site-oriented groundwater database suitable for modelling purpose at the field scale, i.e. for studies dedicated to aquifer and/or process characterization. The database has been developed in the framework of the H+ observatory (http://hplus.ore.fr/index.php?lang=en&). The H+ observatory is a network of experimental sites providing data - including chronicles or data on long term experiments - relevant to the understanding of the water cycle and of the travelling of solute elements in aquifers. Although the database has been developed within the H+ project, it has been designed to be applicable to a wide variety of hydrogeological site settings. There is a real need to develop such databases that collect a large amount of data of various types. This is particularly true in heterogeneous system, where the variations of the physical and chemical properties within the aquifer may lead to a great spatial variability of the parameters measured. As a consequence, in order to constrain the variability of the system and be able to model flow and transport, it is common to acquire a large amount of data, at different scales and of various types. Typical data include borehole geophysics and geology, hydraulic tests and monitoring, chemical monitoring, meteorological data and subsurface measurements. The need of well-designed and sustainable databases is reinforced by the long duration of site studies. Such long-term studies are motivated by the necessity to assess the long-term environmental evolutions of the systems, by the complexity of the medium that requires sometimes several years of studies with different field teams involved and finally because site modelling is an iterative process that involves data acquisition and modelling phases. The existence and the use of sustainable databases enforce the use of standards for the data and guarantee the data consistency on long period of times. The

  16. Evaluation of aquifer heterogeneity effects on river flow loss using a transition probability framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, Nicholas B.; Vogler, Eric T.; Weissmann, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    River-aquifer exchange is considered within a transition probability framework along the Rio Grande in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to provide a stochastic estimate of aquifer heterogeneity and river loss. Six plausible hydrofacies configurations were determined using categorized drill core and wetland survey data processed through the TPROGS geostatistical package. A base case homogeneous model was also constructed for comparison. River loss was simulated for low, moderate, and high Rio Grande stages and several different riverside drain stage configurations. Heterogeneity effects were quantified by determining the mean and variance of the K field for each realization compared to the root-mean-square (RMS) error of the observed groundwater head data. Simulation results showed that the heterogeneous models produced smaller estimates of loss than the homogeneous approximation. Differences between heterogeneous and homogeneous model results indicate that the use of a homogeneous K in a regional-scale model may result in an overestimation of loss but comparable RMS error. We find that the simulated river loss is dependent on the aquifer structure and is most sensitive to the volumetric proportion of fines within the river channel.

  17. Evaluation of aquifer heterogeneity effects on river flow loss using a transition probability framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, N.B.; Vogler, E.T.; Weissmann, G.S.

    2010-01-01

    River-aquifer exchange is considered within a transition probability framework along the Rio Grande in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to provide a stochastic estimate of aquifer heterogeneity and river loss. Six plausible hydrofacies configurations were determined using categorized drill core and wetland survey data processed through the TPROGS geostatistical package. A base case homogeneous model was also constructed for comparison. River loss was simulated for low, moderate, and high Rio Grande stages and several different riverside drain stage configurations. Heterogeneity effects were quantified by determining the mean and variance of the K field for each realization compared to the root-mean-square (RMS) error of the observed groundwater head data. Simulation results showed that the heterogeneous models produced smaller estimates of loss than the homogeneous approximation. Differences between heterogeneous and homogeneous model results indicate that the use of a homogeneous K in a regional-scale model may result in an overestimation of loss but comparable RMS error. We find that the simulated river loss is dependent on the aquifer structure and is most sensitive to the volumetric proportion of fines within the river channel. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Influence of confining layers' heterogeneity on the barometric response functions in semi-confined aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redaelli, Marco; Perulero Serrano, Raul

    2017-04-01

    It has been shown that Barometric Response Functions (BRFs) can provide a useful tool for detecting the occurrence of highly conducive bodies which span across aquifer confining layers and can potentially give rise to pathways for pollutant migration (Hussein et al 2013, Odling et al 2015). Analytical models employed to estimate BRFs from geological system properties assume homogeneity within the aquifer and its confining layer. These assumptions are rarely satisfied in practice. Our study focusses on the impact on predicted BRFs of heterogeneous distribution of high conductivity geomaterials within the confining layer. The work is grounded on a suite of three-dimensional, transient numerical computations of groundwater flow in a confining layer-aquifer system for i) a perfectly homogeneous two-layer setting where a single highly conducive block is fully penetrating the confining layer and ii) a heterogeneous two-layer system where hydraulic conductivity in the confining layer is modelled as a stochastic process. Our numerical results are interpreted through a comparison against those associated with an analytical model which assumes system homogeneity. Monitoring points located in the middle of the modelled aquifer domain, mimicking screened boreholes in field conditions, are used to extract water level records. The output is used to obtain the corresponding BRFs (in terms of gain and phase components) and compared vis-a-vis the selected analytical solution. The results show a wide variety of BRF responses, especially in the gain component, which vary from almost confined to unconfined scenarios. Our simulations show that the BRFs are a viable tool to improve understanding of the degree of spatial continuity within low permeability heterogeneous geological materials such as glacial till which is frequently found overlying water bearing units across the UK and other localities worldwide. As such, it has the potential to improve groundwater vulnerability assessment

  19. Numerical Characterization of Concrete Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roque Luiz Pitangueira

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a finite element model including both material heterogeneity and size effects is presented. The concrete is considered as a statistical combination of constituent phase with different properties (aggregate, mortar and interface material. The material point response is based on a combination of the random occurrence of the solid phases in the structural volume as well as on the differences of structural response due to the size effect. Such combination allows for higher or lower heterogeneity corresponding to smaller or larger structural size. Simulations of the material heterogeneity and associated size effect in a computationally efficient and simple manner show good qualitative agreement with available experimental results for the three-point bending and Brazilian split tests.

  20. Stochastic analysis of the efficiency of coupled hydraulic-physical barriers to contain solute plumes in highly heterogeneous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedretti, Daniele; Masetti, Marco; Beretta, Giovanni Pietro

    2017-10-01

    The expected long-term efficiency of vertical cutoff walls coupled to pump-and-treat technologies to contain solute plumes in highly heterogeneous aquifers was analyzed. A well-characterized case study in Italy, with a hydrogeological database of 471 results from hydraulic tests performed on the aquifer and the surrounding 2-km-long cement-bentonite (CB) walls, was used to build a conceptual model and assess a representative remediation site adopting coupled technologies. In the studied area, the aquifer hydraulic conductivity Ka [m/d] is log-normally distributed with mean E (Ya) = 0.32 , variance σYa2 = 6.36 (Ya = lnKa) and spatial correlation well described by an exponential isotropic variogram with integral scale less than 1/12 the domain size. The hardened CB wall's hydraulic conductivity, Kw [m/d], displayed strong scaling effects and a lognormal distribution with mean E (Yw) = - 3.43 and σYw2 = 0.53 (Yw =log10Kw). No spatial correlation of Kw was detected. Using this information, conservative transport was simulated across a CB wall in spatially correlated 1-D random Ya fields within a numerical Monte Carlo framework. Multiple scenarios representing different Kw values were tested. A continuous solute source with known concentration and deterministic drains' discharge rates were assumed. The efficiency of the confining system was measured by the probability of exceedance of concentration over a threshold (C∗) at a control section 10 years after the initial solute release. It was found that the stronger the aquifer heterogeneity, the higher the expected efficiency of the confinement system and the lower the likelihood of aquifer pollution. This behavior can be explained because, for the analyzed aquifer conditions, a lower Ka generates more pronounced drawdown in the water table in the proximity of the drain and consequently a higher advective flux towards the confined area, which counteracts diffusive fluxes across the walls. Thus, a higher σYa2 results

  1. Numerical Characterization of Concrete Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Pitangueira, Roque Luiz; Silva, Raul Rosas e

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a finite element model including both material heterogeneity and size effects is presented. The concrete is considered as a statistical combination of constituent phase with different properties (aggregate, mortar and interface material). The material point response is based on a combination of the random occurrence of the solid phases in the structural volume as well as on the differences of structural response due to the size effect. Such combination allows for higher or lowe...

  2. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C.T.; Böhlke, J.K.; Bekins, B.A.; Phillips, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field-scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local-scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O 2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample-based estimates of "apparent" parameters with "true" (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non-Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2 threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport. ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Heat and solute tracers: how do they compare in heterogeneous aquifers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Dylan J; Simmons, Craig T; Werner, Adrian D; Graf, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    A comparison of groundwater velocity in heterogeneous aquifers estimated from hydraulic methods, heat and solute tracers was made using numerical simulations. Aquifer heterogeneity was described by geostatistical properties of the Borden, Cape Cod, North Bay, and MADE aquifers. Both heat and solute tracers displayed little systematic under- or over-estimation in velocity relative to a hydraulic control. The worst cases were under-estimates of 6.63% for solute and 2.13% for the heat tracer. Both under- and over-estimation of velocity from the heat tracer relative to the solute tracer occurred. Differences between the estimates from the tracer methods increased as the mean velocity decreased, owing to differences in rates of molecular diffusion and thermal conduction. The variance in estimated velocity using all methods increased as the variance in log-hydraulic conductivity (K) and correlation length scales increased. The variance in velocity for each scenario was remarkably small when compared to σ2 ln(K) for all methods tested. The largest variability identified was for the solute tracer where 95% of velocity estimates ranged by a factor of 19 in simulations where 95% of the K values varied by almost four orders of magnitude. For the same K-fields, this range was a factor of 11 for the heat tracer. The variance in estimated velocity was always lowest when using heat as a tracer. The study results suggest that a solute tracer will provide more understanding about the variance in velocity caused by aquifer heterogeneity and a heat tracer provides a better approximation of the mean velocity. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  4. Hydrogeologic Heterogeneity Enhances the Transfer of Salt Toward the High-Quality Deep Aquifers of the Western San Joaquin Valley (CA, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henri, C. V.; Harter, T.; Zhang, H.

    2016-12-01

    Increasing anthropogenic and drought stresses lead salinity to be of serious concern within regard to with the sustainability of regional groundwater quality. Agricultural basins of the Central Valley, CA (USA) are, and will continue to be, impacted by salinity issues in the coming future decades and or centuries. The aquifer system below the Western San Joaquin Valley is characterized by a shallow unconfined aquifer with high salinity overlying high quality semi-confined and deeper confined aquifers. A key challenge in the area is to predict if, when and how water traveling from the the low-quality shallow groundwater will reach and degrade the deeper semi-confined and confined aquifers. Previous studies, accounting for a simplified description of the aquifer hydraulic properties in their flow model, concluded that saline shallow groundwater would need 200-400 years to reach the semi-confined aquifer and 250-600 years to impact the deeper confined aquifer. However, well known heterogeneities in aquifer hydraulic properties significantly impact contaminant transport due to preferential flow paths and increased dispersion. Our study aims to (1) better understand the impact of heterogeneous hydraulic properties on the distribution of travel times from non-point source contamination, and (2) reassess the temporal scale of salt transfer into the deeper aquifers of the Western San Joaquin Valley. A detailed non-stationary geostatistical model was developed to describe the spatial variability of hydrofacies in great detail at the basin scale. The hydraulic properties corresponding to each hydrofacies are then calibrated in order to reproduce water fluxes previously modeled and calibrated. Subsequently, we use the random-walk particle tracking method to simulate the advective-dispersive transport of salt throughout the study area from a non-point source zone represented by the entire top layer of the model. The flux concentrations of solute crossing a series of monitoring

  5. Solute transport in a heterogeneous aquifer: a search for nonlinear deterministic dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sivakumar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of a nonlinear deterministic framework for understanding the dynamic nature of solute transport processes in subsurface formations is investigated. Time series of solute particle transport in a heterogeneous aquifer medium, simulated using an integrated probability/Markov chain (TP/MC model, groundwater flow model, and particle transport model, are studied. The correlation dimension method, a popular nonlinear time series analysis technique, is used to identify nonlinear determinism. Sensitivity of the solute transport dynamics to the four hydrostratigraphic parameters involved in the TP/MC model: (1 number of facies; (2 volume proportions of facies; (3 mean lengths (and thereby anisotropy ratio of mean length of facies; and (4 juxtapositional tendencies (i.e. degree of entropy among the facies is also studied. The western San Joaquin Valley aquifer system in California is considered as a reference system. The results indicate, in general, the nonlinear deterministic nature of solute transport dynamics (dominantly governed by only a very few variables, on the order of 3, even though more complex behavior is possible under certain (extreme hydrostratigraphic conditions. The sensitivity analysis reveals: (1 the importance of the hydrostratigraphic parameters (in particular, volume proportions of facies and mean lengths in representing aquifer heterogeneity; and (2 the ability of the correlation dimension method in capturing the (extent of complexity of the underlying dynamics. Verification and confirmation of the present results through use of other nonlinear deterministic techniques and assessment of their reliability for a wide range of solute transport scenarios are recommended.

  6. Influence of the heterogeneity on the hydraulic conductivity of a real aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmine, Fallico; Aldo Pedro, Ferrante; Chiara, Vita Maria; Bartolo Samuele, De

    2010-05-01

    Many factors influence the flux in the porous media therefore the values of the representative parameters of the aquifer such as the hydraulic conductivity (k). A lot of studies have shown that this parameter increases with the portion of the aquifer tested. The main cause of this behaviour is the heterogeneity in the aquifer (Sànchez-Vila et al., 1996). It was also verified that the scale dependence of hydraulic conductivity does not depend on the specific method of measurement (Schulze-Makuch and Cherkauer, 1998). An experimental approach to study this phenomenon is based on sets of measurements carried out at different scales. However, one should consider that for the lower scale values k can be determined by direct measurements, performed in the laboratory using samples of different dimensions; whyle, for the large scales the measurement of the hydraulic conductivity requires indirect methods (Johnson and Sen, 1988; Katz and Thompson, 1986; Bernabé and Revil, 1995). In this study the confined aquifer of Montalto Uffugo test field was examined. This aquifer has the geological characteristics of a recently formed valley, with conglomeratic and sandy alluvial deposits; specifically the layer of sands and conglomerates, with a significant percentage of silt at various levels, lies about 55-60 m below the ground surface, where there is a heavy clay formation. Moreover in the test field, for the considered confined aquifer, there are one completely penetrating well, five partially penetrating wells and two completely penetrating piezometers. Along two vertical lines a series of cylindrical samples (6.4 cm of diameter and 15 cm of head) were extracted and for each one of them the k value was measured in laboratory by direct methods, based on the use of flux cells. Also indirect methods were used; in fact, a series of slug tests was carried out, determining the corresponding k values and the radius of influence (R). Moreover another series of pumping tests was

  7. Variable-density effects on the worth of pressure data for characterizing aquifer permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seonkyoo; Kang, Peter; Williams, John

    2017-04-01

    We investigate variable-density effects on the worth of pressure data for estimating aquifer permeability. In variable-density flow and transport in porous media, the pressure distribution is transient even without changes in boundary conditions because the variable-density gradient itself can induce gravity currents. This means that the transient pressure distribution is implicitly coupled with additional information from the variable-density gradient, and consequently the data can be more informative than in density invariant cases for aquifer characterization. To systematically investigate the informativeness of the transient pressure data, we analyze the performance of permeability characterization employing the pressure data under various levels of variable-density effects. The variable-density effects can be controlled by a mixed convection ratio, which is a ratio between two characteristic convections: free convection due to a density gradient and forced convection due to a hydraulic gradient. A 2D density-dependent flow and transport model is established to simulate a coastal aquifer system where density flow occurs due to density difference between saline seawater and fresh water. An ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with convariance localization and inflation is used to sequentially estimate heterogeneous aquifer permeability fields by conditioning on real-time pressure head data. The performance of the permeability estimation is analyzed in terms of accuracy of estimated permeability fields, and predictability of arrival times of breakthrough curves in a push-pull setting. The analysis shows that the accuracy and predictability of the inverse estimation can be most improved when the free convection is balanced with the forced convection, which corresponds to the mixed convection ratio being one. This demonstrates that the pressure data is most informative for characterizing aquifer permeability fields when the two characteristic convections are balanced.

  8. Spatial connectivity in a highly heterogeneous aquifer: From cores to preferential flow paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, M.; Zheng, C.; Wilson, C.; Tick, G.R.; Liu, Gaisheng; Gorelick, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates connectivity in a small portion of the extremely heterogeneous aquifer at the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Columbus, Mississippi. A total of 19 fully penetrating soil cores were collected from a rectangular grid of 4 m by 4 m. Detailed grain size analysis was performed on 5 cm segments of each core, yielding 1740 hydraulic conductivity (K) estimates. Three different geostatistical simulation methods were used to generate 3-D conditional realizations of the K field for the sampled block. Particle tracking calculations showed that the fastest particles, as represented by the first 5% to arrive, converge along preferential flow paths and exit the model domain within preferred areas. These 5% fastest flow paths accounted for about 40% of the flow. The distribution of preferential flow paths and particle exit locations is clearly influenced by the occurrence of clusters formed by interconnected cells with K equal to or greater than the 0.9 decile of the data distribution (10% of the volume). The fraction of particle paths within the high-K clusters ranges from 43% to 69%. In variogram-based K fields, some of the fastest paths are through media with lower K values, suggesting that transport connectivity may not require fully connected zones of relatively homogenous K. The high degree of flow and transport connectivity was confirmed by the values of two groups of connectivity indicators. In particular, the ratio between effective and geometric mean K (on average, about 2) and the ratio between the average arrival time and the arrival time of the fastest particles (on average, about 9) are consistent with flow and advective transport behavior characterized by channeling along preferential flow paths. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Variations in hydraulic conductivity with scale of measurement during aquifer tests in heterogeneous, porous carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Cherkauer, Douglas S.

    Previous studies have shown that hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer seems to increase as the portion of the aquifer tested increases. To date, such studies have all relied on different methods to determine hydraulic conductivity at each scale of interest, which raises the possibility that the observed increase in hydraulic conductivity is due to the measurement method, not to the scale. This study analyzes hydraulic conductivity with respect to scale during individual aquifer tests in porous, heterogeneous carbonate rocks in southeastern Wisconsin, USA. Results from this study indicate that hydraulic conductivity generally increases during an individual test as the volume of aquifer impacted increases, and the rate of this increase is the same as the rate of increase determined by using different measurement methods. Thus, scale dependence of hydraulic conductivity during single tests does not depend on the method of measurement. This conclusion is supported by 22 of 26 aquifer tests conducted in porous-flow-dominated carbonate units within the aquifer. Instead, scale dependency is probably caused by heterogeneities within the aquifer, a conclusion supported by digital simulation. All of the observed types of hydraulic-conductivity variations with scale during individual aquifer tests can be explained by a conceptual model of a simple heterogeneous aquifer composed of high-conductivity zones within a low-conductivity matrix. Résumé Certaines études ont montré que la conductivité hydraulique d'un aquifère semble augmenter en même temps que la partie testée de l'aquifère s'étend. Jusqu'à présent, ces études ont toutes reposé sur des méthodes de détermination de la conductivité hydraulique différentes pour chaque niveau d'échelle, ce qui a conduit à penser que l'augmentation observée de la conductivité hydraulique pouvait être due aux méthodes de mesure et non à l'effet d'échelle. Cette étude analyse la conductivité hydraulique par

  10. Aquifer characterization using audiomagnetotelluric data (Majorca Island, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, C.; Marcuello, A.; Ledo, J. J.; Queralt, P.; Plata, J. L.

    2003-04-01

    The Llucmajor aquifer system (southern Majorca, Spain) presents a zone with hydrothermal evidences whose origin was not well known. As hypothesis, a simple model with two aquifers was proposed: An upper and unconfined aquifer, and a deeper and confined one. The former is currently exploited, and the latter would supply the warm water. In order to verify this hypothesis and to locate the best emplacement for an exploratory well, an audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) survey was carried out in this area. The survey consisted of 42 sites covering an area of 10 km2. This method was suggested since the high resistive structures on the surface do not permit the DC methods to penetrate. The fieldwork allowed us to characterize the geoelectrical properties of the main subsurface structures up to 400 m depth. Three main geoelectrical structures were identified: a shallow high resistive media with an averaged thickness of 150 m; below of it, a low resistive layer of variable thickness, and a deeper resistive medium. The resistive structures were associated to aquifer units, and the conductive one, to the confining unit. The area for the location of the well was suggested where the deeper resistive medium was shallower and the confining unit was thinner. The exploratory well was recently done and reached 530 m depth. The preliminary geological information of the well agreed with the geoelectrical image determined by the AMT data. The well data allowed us to relate the lithology with the geoelectrical properties of the model.

  11. Characterization of an alluvial aquifer with thermal tracer tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Bayer, Peter

    2017-04-01

    In the summer of 2015, a series of thermal tracer tests was performed at the Widen field site in northeast Switzerland. At this site numerous hydraulic, tracer, geophysical and hydrogeophysical field tests have been conducted in the past to investigate a shallow alluvial aquifer. The goals of the campaign in 2015 were to design a cost-effective thermal tracer tomography setup and to validate the concept of travel time-based thermal tracer tomography under field conditions. Thermal tracer tomography uses repeated thermal tracer injections with different injection depths and distributed temperature measurements to map the hydraulic conductivity distribution of a heterogeneous aquifer. The tracer application was designed with minimal experimental time and cost. Water was heated in inflatable swimming pools using direct sunlight of the warm summer days, and it was injected as low temperature pulses in a well. Because of the small amount of injected heat, no long recovery times were required between the repeated heat tracer injections and every test started from natural thermal conditions. At Widen, four thermal tracer tests were performed during a period of three days. Temperatures were measured in one downgradient well using a distributed temperature measurement system installed at seven depth points. Totally 12 temperature breakthrough curves were collected. Travel time based tomographic inversion assumes that thermal transport is dominated by advection and the travel time of the thermal tracer can be related to the hydraulic conductivities of the aquifer. This assumption is valid in many shallow porous aquifers where the groundwater flow is fast. In our application, the travel time problem was treated by a tomographic solver, analogous to seismic tomography, to derive the hydraulic conductivity distribution. At the test site, a two-dimensional cross-well hydraulic conductivity profile was reconstructed with the travel time based inversion. The reconstructed profile

  12. Polynomial Chaos Expansion for Global Sensitivity Analysis applied to a model of radionuclide migration in randomly heterogeneous aquifers

    OpenAIRE

    Ciriello, V.; Di Federico, V.; Riva, M; Cadini, F.; De Sanctis, J.; Zio, Enrico; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    International audience; We perform Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) through Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE) on a contaminant transport model for the assessment of radionuclide concentration at a given control location in a heterogeneous aquifer, following a release from a near surface repository of radioactive waste. The aquifer hydraulic conductivity is modeled as a stationary stochastic process in space. We examine the uncertainty in the first two (ensemble) moments of the peak concentrat...

  13. Aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This map layer contains the shallowest principal aquifers of the conterminous United States, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, portrayed as polygons....

  14. Identifying functional zones of denitrification in heterogeneous aquifer systems by numerical simulations - a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, E.; Kalbacher, T.; He, W.; Shao, H.; Schueth, C.; Kolditz, O.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate contamination in shallow groundwater is still one of the common problems in many countries. Because of its high solubility and anionic nature, nitrate can easily leach through soil and persist in groundwater for decades. High nitrate concentration has been suggested as a major cause of accelerated eutrophication, methemoglobinemia and gastric cancer. There are several factors influencing the fate of nitrate in groundwater system, which is e.g. distribution of N- sources to soil and groundwater, distribution and amount of reactive substances maintaining denitrification, rate of nitrate degradation and its kinetics, and geological characteristics of the aquifer. Nitrate transport and redox transformation processes are closely linked to complex and spatially distributed physical and chemical interaction, therefore it is difficult to predict and quantify in the field and laboratory experiment. Models can play a key role in elucidation of nitrate reduction pathway in groundwater system and in the design and evaluation of field tests to investigate in situ remediation technologies as well. The goal of the current study is to predict groundwater vulnerability to nitrate, to identify functional zones of denitrification in heterogeneous aquifer systems and to describe the uncertainty of the predictions due to scale effects. For this aim, we developed a kinetic model using multi-component mass transport code OpenGeoSys coupling with IPhreeqc module of the geochemical solver PHREEQC. The developed model included sequential aerobic and nitrate-based respiration, multi-Monod kinetics, multi-species biogeochemical reactions, and geological characteristics of the groundwater aquifer. Moreover water-rock interaction such as secondary mineral precipitation was also included in this model. In this presentation, we focused on the general modelling approach and present the simulation results of nitrate transport simulation in a hypothetical aquifer systems based on data from

  15. Multiecho scheme advances surface NMR for aquifer characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, Elliot; Walsh, David

    2013-12-01

    nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is increasingly used as a method to noninvasively characterize aquifers. This technology follows a successful history of NMR logging, applied over decades to estimate hydrocarbon reservoir properties. In contrast to logging, however, surface methods have utilized relatively simple acquisition sequences, from which pore-scale properties may not be reliably and efficiently estimated. We demonstrate for the first time the capability of sophisticated multiecho measurements to rapidly record a surface NMR response that more directly reflects aquifer characteristics. Specifically, we develop an adaptation of the multipulse Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence, widely used in logging, to measure the T2 relaxation response in a single scan. We validate this approach in a field surface NMR data set and by direct comparison with an NMR log. Adoption of the CPMG marked a landmark advancement in the history of logging NMR; we have now realized this same advancement in the surface NMR method.

  16. Hydrogeophysical characterization and data integration for the Sardon catchment hard rock aquifer (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francés, Alain Pascal; Mohammed, Abubeker Ali; Roy, Jean; Mahmoudzadeh Ardekani, Mohammad Reza; Lambot, Sébastien; Lubczynski, Maciek

    2010-05-01

    Unaltered hard rocks are hydrogeologically characterized by low primary porosity and permeability. Productive aquifers can however be supported by fractured and/or weathered hard rocks. In this type of composite aquifers, the upper weathered layers have typically a storage function while the underlying fissured layers have a transmissive function. Such aquifer sequence is usually highly heterogeneous because the weathered and fractured zones are controlled by various factors such as mineralogy and texture of lithologies, regional and local tectonics, paleoclimate and interaction between these factors. In the proposed study we attempt to develop an efficient and accurate method to provide the hydrological characterization of a small hard rock (granite) aquifer within Sardon catchment (~80km2), located in the Iberian Meseta (west of Salamanca, Spain). The proposed method is based on the integration of five techniques : i) field mapping; ii) remote sensing imagery analysis (RS); iii) geographical information system (GIS); iv) hydrogeophysics; v) numerical flow modeling. The geological mapping including characterization of fractures was processed in GIS through the combination of conventional field survey and analysis of aerial photographs and space borne imagery. The hydrogeophysics complemented the previous work by: i) sub-surface characterization of weathered layers using vertical electrical soundings (VES) at 61 locations, an electromagnetic (EM) transect perpendicular to the main valley (~3 km length) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) at 13 locations; ii) ground penetrating radar (GPR) to derive the depth of the groundwater table to complement the information of the piezometric monitoring network (35 transects with a total length of ~23 km) in order to provide additional constrain of the numerical flow model; iii) magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) to derive the depth-wise subsurface water content and aquifer transmissivity at 15 locations. The collected

  17. An approximate analytical methodology for the concentration CDF and corresponding adverse health effects in 3D heterogeneous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarlenga, Antonio; de Barros, Felipe; Fiori, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    Predicting solutes displacement in ecosystems is a complex task because of heterogeneity of hydrogeological properties and limited financial resources for characterization. As a consequence, solute transport model predictions are subject to uncertainty and probabilistic methods are invoked. Despite the significant theoretical advances in subsurface hydrology, there is a compelling need to transfer those specialized know-hows into an easy-to-use practical tool. The deterministic approach is able to capture some features of the transport behavior but its adoption in practical applications (e.g. remediation strategies or health risk assessment) is often inadequate because of its inability to accurately model the phenomena triggered by the spatial heterogeneity. The rigorous evaluation of the local contaminant concentration in natural aquifers requires an accurate estimate of the domain properties and huge computational times; those aspects limit the adoption of fully 3D numerical models. In this presentation, we illustrate a physically-based methodology to analytically estimate of the statistics of the solute concentration in natural aquifers and the related health risk. Our methodology aims to provide a simple tool for a quick assessment of the contamination level in aquifers, as function of a few relevant, physically based parameters such as the log conductivity variance, the mean flow velocity, the Péclet number. Solutions of the 3D analytical model adopt the results of previous works: transport model is based on the solutions proposed by Zarlenga and Fiori (2013, 2014) where semi-analytical relations for the statics of local contaminant concentration are carry out through a Lagrangian first-order model. As suggested in de Barros and Fiori (2014), the Beta distribution is assumed for the concentration cumulative density function (CDF). We illustrate the use of the closed-form equations for the probability of local contaminant concentration and health risk in a

  18. Reduced Order Models for Decision Analysis and Upscaling of Aquifer Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesselinov, V. V.; O'Malley, D.; Alexandrov, B.; Moore, B.

    2016-12-01

    Model-based analyses such as uncertainty quantification, sensitivity analysis, and decision support using complex physics models with numerous model parameters and typically require a huge number of model evaluations (on order of 106). Furthermore, model simulations of complex physics may require substantial computational time. For example, accounting for simultaneously occurring physical processes such as fluid flow and biogeochemical reactions in heterogeneous porous medium may require days of wall-clock computational time. To address these issues, we have developed a methodology for reduced order modeling, which couples support vector regression (SVR), genetic algorithms (GA) and artificial and convolutional neural network (ANN/CNN). SVR is applied to predict the model behavior within prior uncertainty ranges associated with the model parameters. ANN and CNN procedures are applied to upscale heterogeneity of the porous medium. In the upscaling process, fine-scale high-resolution models of heterogeneity are applied to inform coarse-resolution models which have improved computational efficiency while capturing the impact of fine-scale effects at the course scale of interest. These techniques are tested independently on a series of synthetic problems. We also present a decision analysis related to contaminant remediation where the developed reduced order models are applied to reproduce groundwater flow and contaminant transport in a synthetic heterogeneous aquifer. The decision analysis is performed using Bayesian-Information-Gap Decision Theory which is implemented as part of the MADS framework (https://github.com/madsjulia/Mads.jl).

  19. Improved aquifer characterization and the optimization of the design of brackish groundwater desalination systems

    KAUST Repository

    Malivaa, Robert G.

    2011-07-01

    Many water scarce regions possess brackish-water resources that can be desalted to provide alternative water supplies. Brackish groundwater desalination by reverse osmosis (RO) is less expensive than seawater systems because of reduced energy and pretreatment requirements and lesser volumes of concentrate that require disposal. Development of brackish groundwater wellfields include the same hydraulic issues that affect conventional freshwater wellfields. Managing well interference and prevention of adverse impacts such as land subsidence are important concerns. RO systems are designed to treat water whose composition falls within a system-specific envelope of salinities and ion concentrations. A fundamental requirement for the design of brackish groundwater RO systems is prediction of the produced water chemistry at both the start of pumping and after 10-20 years of operation. Density-dependent solute-transport modeling is thus an integral component of the design of brackish groundwater RO systems. The accuracy of groundwater models is dependent upon the quality of the hydrogeological data upon which they are based. Key elements of the aquifer characterization are the determination of the three-dimensional distribution of salinity within the aquifer and the evaluation of aquifer heterogeneity with respect to hydraulic conductivity. It is necessary to know from where in a pumped aquifer (or aquifer zone) water is being produced and the contribution of vertical flow to the produced water. Unexpected, excessive vertical migration (up-coning) of waters that are more saline has adversely impacted some RO systems because the salinity of the water delivered to the system exceeded the system design parameters. Improved aquifer characterization is possible using advanced geophysical techniques, which can, in turn, lead to more accurate solute-transport models. Advanced borehole geophysical logs, such as nuclear magnetic resonance, were run as part of the exploratory test

  20. Integrating Tracer Test Data into Geostatistical Aquifer Characterization at the Hanford 300 Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Murakami, H.; Hahn, M. S.; Rockhold, M. L.; Vermeul, V.; Rubin, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Tracer testing under natural or forced gradient flow is an efficient method for characterizing subsurface properties, by monitoring and modeling the tracer plume migration in a heterogeneous aquifer. At the Hanford 300 area, non-reactive tracer experiments, in addition to constant-rate injection tests and electromagnetic borehole flow meter profiling, were conducted to characterize the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field at the site. The tracer was injected at a near-constant rate for 10 hours, and the tracer concentrations were monitored for 12 days in a network of observation wells. This work presents a Bayesian inverse modeling technique to infer the heterogeneity structure of the hydraulic conductivity in the saturated zone of the Hanford formation, using the breakthrough curves at various observation wells. Analytical or semi-analytical solutions for mass transport in divergent radial flow fields are adopted whenever possible to avoid expensive numerical forward simulations. Compared to the case conditioned on the constant-rate injection tests and electromagnetic borehole flow meter profiling, this study finds that the inclusion of tracer test data can improve the estimation of heterogeneity structure and reduce the prediction uncertainty of the solute transport at given locations. With the availability of observation wells at varying distances, we also investigate the worth of data in each observation well, which can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of current experimental setup and guide further data collection practices at the site.

  1. When good statistical models of aquifer heterogeneity go right: The impact of aquifer permeability structures on 3D flow and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, I.; Maghrebi, M.; Fiori, A.; Dagan, G.

    2017-02-01

    Natural gradient steady flow of mean velocity U takes place in heterogeneous aquifers of random logconductivity Y = lnK , characterized by the univariate PDF f(Y) and autocorrelation ρY. Solute transport is analyzed through the Breakthrough Curve (BTC) at planes at distance x from the injection plane. The study examines the impact of permeability structures sharing same f(Y) and ρY, but differing in higher order statistics (integral scales of variograms of Y classes) upon the numerical solution of flow and transport. Flow and transport are solved for 3D structures, rather than the 2D models adopted in most of previous works. We considered a few permeability structures, including the widely employed multi-Gaussian, the connected and disconnected fields introduced by Zinn and Harvey [2003] and a model characterized by equipartition of the correlation scale among Y values. We also consider the impact of statistical anisotropy of Y, the shape of ρY and local diffusion. The main finding is that unlike 2D, the prediction of the BTC of ergodic plumes by numerical and analytical models for different structures is quite robust, displaying a seemingly universal behavior, and can be used with confidence in applications. However, as a prerequisite the basic parameters KG (the geometric mean), σY2 (the logconductivity variance) and I (the horizontal integral scale of ρY) have to be identified from field data. The results suggest that narrowing down the gap between the BTCs in applications can be achieved by obtaining Kef (the effective conductivity) or U independently (e.g. by pumping tests), rather than attempting to characterize the permeability structure beyond f(Y) and ρY.

  2. MRF-based Stochastic Joint Inversion of Hydrological and Geophysical Datasets to Evaluate Aquifer Heterogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oware, E. K.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogeophysical assessment of aquifer parameters typically involve sparse noisy measurements coupled with incomplete understanding of the underlying physical process. Thus, recovering a single deterministic solution in light of the largely uncertain inputs is unrealistic. Stochastic imaging (SI) allows the retrieval of multiple equiprobable outcomes that facilitate probabilistic assessment of aquifer properties in a realistic fashion. Representation of prior models is a key aspect of the formulation of SI frameworks. However, higher-order (HO) statistics for representing complex priors in SI are usually borrowed from training images (TIs), which may bias outcomes if the prior hypotheses are inaccurate. A data-driven HO simulation alternative based on Markov random field (MRF) modeling is presented. Here, the modeling of spatial features is guided by potential (Gibbs) energy (PE) minimization. The estimation of the PE encompasses local neighborhood configuration (LNC) and prior statistical constraints. The lower the estimated PE the higher the likelihood of that particular local structure and vice versa. Hence, the LNC component of the PE estimation is designed to promote the recovery of some desired structures while penalizing the retrieval of patterns that are inconsistent with prior expectation. The statistical structure is adaptively inferred from the joint conditional datasets. The reconstruction proceeds in two-steps with the estimation of the lithological structure of the aquifer followed by the simulation of attributes within the identified lithologies. This two-step approach permits the delineation of physically realistic crisp lithological boundaries. The algorithm is demonstrated with a joint inversion of time-lapse concentration and electrical resistivity measurements, in a hypothetical trinary hydrofacies aquifer characterization problem.

  3. Accounting for the influence of aquifer heterogeneity on spatial propagation of pumping drawdown

    CERN Document Server

    Harp, Dylan R

    2011-01-01

    It has been previously observed that during a pumping test in heterogeneous media, drawdown data from different time periods collected at a single location produce different estimates of aquifer properties and that Theis type-curve inferences are more variable than late-time Cooper-Jacob inferences. In order to obtain estimates of aquifer properties from highly transient drawdown data using the Theis solution, it is necessary to account for this behavior. We present an approach that utilizes an exponential functional form to represent Theis parameter behavior resulting from the spatial propagation of a cone of depression. This approach allows the use of transient data consisting of early-time drawdown data to obtain late-time convergent Theis parameters consistent with Cooper-Jacob method inferences. We demonstrate the approach on a multi-year dataset consisting of multi-well transient water-level observations due to transient multi-well water-supply pumping. Based on previous research, transmissivities assoc...

  4. Is high-resolution inverse characterization of heterogeneous river bed hydraulic conductivities needed and possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Kurtz

    2013-10-01

    -resolution characterization of L fields with EnKF is still feasible. For less heterogeneous river bed hydraulic conductivities, a high-resolution characterization of L is less important. When uncertainties in the hydraulic parameters of the aquifer are also regarded in the assimilation, the errors in state and flux predictions increase, but the ensemble with a high spatial resolution for L still outperforms the ensembles with effective L values. We conclude that for strongly heterogeneous river beds the commonly applied simplified representation of the streambed, with spatially homogeneous parameters or constant parameters for a few zones, might yield significant biases in the characterization of the water balance. For strongly heterogeneous river beds, we suggest adopting a stochastic field approach to model the spatially heterogeneous river beds geostatistically. The paper illustrates that EnKF is able to calibrate such heterogeneous streambeds on the basis of hydraulic head measurements, outperforming zonation approaches.

  5. Model-based analysis of δ34S signatures to trace sedimentary pyrite oxidation during managed aquifer recharge in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Simone; Descourvieres, Carlos; Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Deng, Hailin; Prommer, Henning

    2017-05-01

    The oxidation of pyrite is often one of the main drivers affecting groundwater quality during managed aquifer recharge in deep aquifers. Data and techniques that allow detailed identification and quantification of pyrite oxidation are therefore crucial for assessing and predicting the adverse water quality changes that may be associated with this process. In this study, we explore the benefits of combining stable sulphur isotope analysis with reactive transport modelling to improve the identification and characterisation of pyrite oxidation during an aquifer storage and recovery experiment in a chemically and physically heterogeneous aquifer. We characterise the stable sulphur isotope signal (δ34S) in both the ambient groundwater and the injectant as well as its spatial distribution within the sedimentary sulphur species. The identified stable sulphur isotope signal for pyrite was found to vary between -32 and +34‰, while the signal of the injectant ranged between +9.06 and +14.45‰ during the injection phase of the experiment. Both isotope and hydrochemical data together suggest a substantial contribution of pyrite oxidation to the observed, temporally variable δ34S signals. The variability of the δ34S signal in pyrite and the injectant were both found to complicate the analysis of the stable isotope data. However, the incorporation of the data into a numerical modelling approach allowed to successfully employ the δ34S signatures as a valuable additional constraint for identifying and quantifying the contribution of pyrite oxidation to the redox transformations that occur in response to the injection of oxygenated water.

  6. Integrating non-colocated well and geophysical data to capture subsurface heterogeneity at an aquifer recharge and recovery site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Ian P.; Hermans, Thomas; Knight, Rosemary; Caers, Jef; Cameron, David A.; Regnery, Julia; McCray, John E.

    2017-12-01

    Geophysical data have proven to be very useful for lithological characterization. However, quantitatively integrating the information gained from acquiring geophysical data generally requires colocated lithological and geophysical data for constructing a rock-physics relationship. In this contribution, the issue of integrating noncolocated geophysical and lithological data is addressed, and the results are applied to simulate groundwater flow in a heterogeneous aquifer in the Prairie Waters Project North Campus aquifer recharge site, Colorado. Two methods of constructing a rock-physics transform between electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data and lithology measurements are assessed. In the first approach, a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) is used to fit a bimodal lognormal distribution to horizontal crosssections of the ERT resistivity histogram. In the second approach, a spatial bootstrap is applied to approximate the rock-physics relationship. The rock-physics transforms provide soft data for multiple point statistics (MPS) simulations. Subsurface models are used to run groundwater flow and tracer test simulations. Each model's uncalibrated, predicted breakthrough time is evaluated based on its agreement with measured subsurface travel time values from infiltration basins to selected groundwater recovery wells. We find that incorporating geophysical information into uncalibrated flow models reduces the difference with observed values, as compared to flow models without geophysical information incorporated. The integration of geophysical data also narrows the variance of predicted tracer breakthrough times substantially. Accuracy is highest and variance is lowest in breakthrough predictions generated by the MLE-based rock-physics transform. Calibrating the ensemble of geophysically constrained models would help produce a suite of realistic flow models for predictive purposes at the site. We find that the success of breakthrough predictions is highly

  7. Vulnerability of Deep Groundwater in the Bengal Basin to Contamination: the Role of Physical and Chemical Aquifer Heterogeneity and Pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. R.; Michael, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    Deep (≥150 m) groundwater is an indispensable resource in the Bengal Basin providing arsenic (As)-safe drinking water to millions of people. Simplifying the highly heterogeneous fluvio-deltaic Bengal Basin aquifer system into a homogeneous-anisotropic system, basin-scale modeling has shown that the deep groundwater can be utilized safely for millennia over much of the arsenic-affected area if irrigation remains shallow. However, the extent to which physical (variations in hydraulic conductivity, K) and geochemical (variations in sorption, Kd) heterogeneity as well as pumping affect the timescale of downward migration of contaminated shallow groundwater is unknown. Here we imbed detailed heterogeneous representations of physical and chemical aquifer properties and pumping rates within a basin-scale numerical groundwater flow model. Advective particle tracking shows that physical heterogeneity does not significantly affect the mean and median travel time of As transport to 150 m depth. However, it reduces the travel time for the fastest 10% particles by a factor of two, on average. In some cases, heterogeneity causes a shift in recharge locations from As-safe to As-unsafe areas. The distribution of deep pumping does not affect vulnerability as along as the irrigation pumping remains shallow, supporting conclusions from previous studies. Without sorption, >80% of the aquifer area at 150 m depth becomes contaminated after 1000 years. This reduces to <1% when either uniform sorption or sand-only sorption are considered. However, should As sorb only onto the less permeable aquifer materials (i.e. silts and clays), 30% of the area becomes contaminated on average. This suggests that both physical and chemical heterogeneity, as well as their correlation, are critical for managing deep groundwater in the Bengal Basin.

  8. Conditioning geostatistical simulations of a heterogeneous paleo-fluvial bedrock aquifer using lithologs and pumping tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, A.; Bentley, L. R.; Hayashi, M.

    2016-12-01

    Geostatistical simulations are used to construct heterogeneous aquifer models. Optimally, such simulations should be conditioned with both lithologic and hydraulic data. We introduce an approach to condition lithologic geostatistical simulations of a paleo-fluvial bedrock aquifer consisting of relatively high permeable sandstone channels embedded in relatively low permeable mudstone using hydraulic data. The hydraulic data consist of two-hour single well pumping tests extracted from the public water well database for a 250-km2 watershed in Alberta, Canada. First, lithologic models of the entire watershed are simulated and conditioned with hard lithological data using transition probability - Markov chain geostatistics (TPROGS). Then, a segment of the simulation around a pumping well is used to populate a flow model (FEFLOW) with either sand or mudstone. The values of the hydraulic conductivity and specific storage of sand and mudstone are then adjusted to minimize the difference between simulated and actual pumping test data using the parameter estimation program PEST. If the simulated pumping test data do not adequately match the measured data, the lithologic model is updated by locally deforming the lithology distribution using the probability perturbation method and the model parameters are again updated with PEST. This procedure is repeated until the simulated and measured data agree within a pre-determined tolerance. The procedure is repeated for each well that has pumping test data. The method creates a local groundwater model that honors both the lithologic model and pumping test data and provides estimates of hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. Eventually, the simulations will be integrated into a watershed-scale groundwater model.

  9. Pumping test analysis using a layered cylindrical grid numerical model in a complex, heterogeneous chalk aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, M. M.; Hughes, A. G.; Spink, A. E. F.; Riches, J.

    2011-04-01

    SummaryA groundwater investigation including several pumping tests has been carried out by Thames Water Utilities Limited (TWUL) to improve the understanding of the distribution of hydraulic properties of the Chalk in the Swanscombe area of Kent in south-eastern England. The pumping test behaviour is complicated by: the fractured condition of the Chalk, simultaneous pumping from adjacent boreholes, and variable pumping rates during the test. In addition, the groundwater flow system is complicated by quarrying of the Chalk. Analytical solutions for pumping test analysis fail to represent these complex flow processes and cannot reproduce the observed time-drawdown curves. A layered cylindrical grid numerical model has been applied to the results of the Swanscombe pumping test. This model can represent the heterogeneity of the aquifer and the detailed flow processes close to the abstraction borehole such as well storage, seepage face and well losses. It also includes a numerical representation of the moving water-table using a grid that deforms to eliminate numerical instabilities. The analyses of the test results demonstrate that they are significantly influenced by fracture flow, which needs to be included to improve the simulation of the groundwater system; not withstanding this, the layered cylindrical grid numerical model reproduced many of the features in observed time-drawdown, which allowed an assessment of the hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer as well as the investigation of the impact of quarries on the test results. This has demonstrated that the numerical model is a powerful tool that can be used to analyse complex pumping tests and aid to improvement of the conceptual understanding of a groundwater system.

  10. A step-wise semi-distributed simulation approach to characterize a karst aquifer and to support dam construction in a data-scarce environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinehvand, R.; Raeisi, E.; Hartmann, A.

    2017-11-01

    Karst systems provide significant volumes of drinking water for large parts of the world population. Due to chemical weathering, karst systems are characterized by strong heterogeneity resulting in a complex flow and storage behaviour. Presently available karst modelling strategies account for the karstic heterogeneity but often a lack of data limits their applicability in data-scarce regions. In this study, a step-wise simulation approach with a semi-distributed karst model is proposed to characterize a karst aquifer at a data-scarce region in Southwest Iran and to evaluate the leakage potential related to a future dam construction project at a river that cuts through the aquifer. Observed groundwater level time series were applied to calibrate and validate the model. In order to avoid over-parameterization, the karst aquifer was split into three sections down the hydraulic gradient. At each section, groundwater level observations were used to iteratively calibrate the model from the first to the last section. A spatial split-sample test and sensitivity analysis served to evaluate the prediction performance and the identifiability of the model parameters. Finally, simple scenarios of the river infiltration into the aquifer were applied to evaluate the leakage potential of the aquifer for future dam constructions. The spatial split-sample test showed that the semi-distributed model provided reliable predictions but prediction performance and parameter identifiability decreased from the first towards the last aquifer section, most probably due to increased aquifer complexity and propagation of uncertainty from the up-gradient model section. Using sensitivity analysis, we also show that parameter sensitivities increase significantly if parameter estimation was applied simultaneously to all three aquifer subsections. Using the model to assess the leakage potential indicated that, without further technical measures, the all river flow would be able infiltrate into the

  11. Impact of aquifer heterogeneity structure and local-scale dispersion on solute concentration uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srzic, Veljko; Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Andricevic, Roko; Gotovac, Hrvoje

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of high log-conductivity variance (σY2) and local-scale dispersion on the first two concentration moments as well as on higher-order moments, skewness, and kurtosis, in a 2-D heterogeneous aquifer. Three different heterogeneity structures are considered, defined with one and the same global isotropic Gaussian variogram. The three structures differ in terms of spatial connectivity patterns at extreme log-conductivity values. Our numerical approach to simulate contaminant transport through heterogeneous porous media is based on the Lagrangian framework with a reverse tracking formulation. Advection and local-scale dispersion are two competing and controlling mechanisms, with a relative ratio defined by the Peclet number (Pe); hydraulic log-conductivity variance σY2 in the simulations is assumed to be one or eight. The term local-scale dispersion is used as a combined effect of molecular diffusion and mechanical dispersion. Uncertainty of the concentration field is quantified by the second-order moment, or the coefficient of variation (CVC) as a function of the sampling position along a centerline, Peclet number, and σY2, as well as by higher-order moments, i.e., skewness and kurtosis. The parameter σY2 shows a strong influence on the concentration statistics, while the three different structures have a minor impact in the case of low heterogeneity. The results also indicate that for σY2=8, the influence of local-scale dispersion is significant after five integral scales (IY) from the source for the connected (CN) field, while in case of a disconnected field, the local-scale dispersion effect is observed after 20IY from the source. In the case of unit σY2, local-scale dispersion acts very slowly affecting concentration uncertainty at distances higher than 20IY from the source. Our inspection of Monte Carlo concentration skewness and kurtosis with the ones obtained from the Beta distribution show the discrepancies for high

  12. How does layered heterogeneity affect the ability of subsurface dams to clean up coastal aquifers contaminated with seawater intrusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoulhalik, Antoifi; Ahmed, Ashraf A.

    2017-10-01

    The main purpose of this work was to examine how aquifer layering impacts the ability of subsurface dams to retain seawater intrusion (SWI) and to clean up contaminated coastal aquifers using both experimental and numerical techniques. Four different layering configurations were investigated, including a homogeneous case (case H), and three different layered cases where a low permeability layer was set at the top of the aquifer (case LH), at the middle part of the aquifer as interlayer (case HLH), and at the lower part of the aquifer (case HL). The subsurface dam was able to retain the saltwater wedge associated with a drop of the hydraulic gradient from 0.0158 down to 0.0095 in all the cases, thereby achieving up to 78% reduction in the saltwater toe length. In cases LH and HLH, the start of the saltwater spillage was delayed compared to the homogeneous case, and the time taken for the freshwater zone to be fully contaminated (post-spillage) was twice and three times longer, respectively. By contrast, the existence of a low K layer at the bottom of the aquifer (case HL) considerably weakened the ability of dams to retain the intrusion, allowing for quicker saltwater spillage past the wall. The natural cleanup of SWI-contaminated coastal aquifers was, for the first time, evidenced in heterogeneous settings. Depending on the stratification pattern, the presence of stratified layers however prolonged the cleanup time to various degrees, compared to the homogeneous scenario, particularly in case HL, where the cleanup time was nearly 50% longer.

  13. Impact of sub-horizontal discontinuities and vertical heterogeneities on recharge processes in a weathered crystalline aquifer in southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Madeleine; Selles, Adrien; Bour, Olivier; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe; Crenner, Marion; Wajiduddin, Mohammed; Ahmed, Shakeel

    2017-04-01

    In the face of increasing demands for irrigated agriculture, many states in India are facing water scarcity issues, leading to severe groundwater depletion. Because perennial water resources in southern India consist mainly of crystalline aquifers, understanding how recharge takes place and the role of preferential flow zones in such heterogeneous media is of prime importance for successful and sustainable aquifer management. Here we investigate how vertical heterogeneities and highly transmissive sub-horizontal discontinuities may control groundwater flows and recharge dynamics. Recharge processes in the vadose zone were examined by analysing the propagation of an infiltration front and mass transfers resulting from the implementation of a managed aquifer recharge (MAR) structure. Said structure was set up in the Experimental Hydrogeological Park in Telangana (Southern India), a well-equipped and continuously monitored site, which is periodically supplied with surface water deviated from the nearby Musi river, downstream of Hyderabad. An initial volume balance equation was applied to quantify the overall inputs from the MAR structure into the groundwater system, which was confirmed using a chloride mass balance approach. To understand how this incoming mass is then distributed within the aquifer, we monitored the evolution of water volumes in the tank, and the resulting lateral propagation front observed in the surrounding borehole network. Borehole logs of temperature and conductivity were regularly performed to identify preferential flow paths. As a result we observed that mass transfers take place in the way of preferential lateral flow through the most transmissive zones of the profile. These include the interface between the lower portion of the upper weathered horizon (the saprolite) and the upper part of the underlying fissured granite, as well as the first flowing fractures. This leads to a rapid lateral transfer of recharge, which allows quick

  14. Characterization of Carbonate Hydrostratigraphy Using Ambient Seismic Noise: A Pilot Study in the Floridan Aquifer System, Ocala, FL, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S.; Screaton, E.; Russo, R. M.; Panning, M. P.; Bremner, P. M.; Stanciu, A. C.; Torpey, M. E.; Hongsresawat, S.; Farrell, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Defining zones of high and low hydraulic conductivity within aquifers is vital to hydrogeologic research and groundwater management. Carbonate aquifers are particularly difficult to characterize due to dissolution and dolomitization. We investigated a new imaging technique for aquifer characterization that uses cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise to determine seismic velocity structure. Differences in densities between confining units and high permeability flow zones can produce distinct seismic velocities in the correlated signals. We deployed an array of 9 short period geophones from 11/2013 to 3/2014 in Indian Lake State Forest, Florida, to determine if the high frequency diffusive seismic wavefield can be used for imaging hydrostratigraphy. Here, a thin surficial layer of siliciclastic deposits overlie a ~ 0.6 km sequence of Cenozoic limestone and dolomite units that comprise the Floridan Aquifer System (FAS). A low permeability dolomite unit vertically divides the FAS throughout most of Florida. Deep boreholes surrounding the site constrain hydrostratigraphy, however the horizontal continuity of the middle dolomite unit as well as its effectiveness as a confining unit in the study area are not well known. The stations were spaced at distances ranging from 0.18 to 2.6 km, and yielded 72 cross-correlation Green's functions for Rayleigh wave propagation at frequencies between 0.2 and 40 Hz, with dominant peaks around 0.8 Hz, 3 Hz and 13 Hz. Local vehicle traffic did interfere to a degree with the correlation of the diffuse waves, but was minimized by using only nighttime data. At the lowest frequencies (greatest depths) investigated, velocities increase with depth; however, correlations become less coherent at higher frequencies, perhaps due to shallow complex scattering. Comparison of cross-correlations for all station pairs also indicates spatial variations in velocity. Thus, the method shows promise for characterization of the heterogeneity of the

  15. Lithological and hydrological influences on ground-water composition in a heterogeneous carbonate-clay aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, S.J.; Herman, J.S.; Jones, B.F.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of clay units on ground-water composition was investigated in a heterogeneous carbonate aquifer system of Miocene age in southwest Florida, known as the Intermediate aquifer system. Regionally, the ground water is recharged inland, flows laterally and to greater depths in the aquifer systems, and is discharged vertically upward at the saltwater interface along the coast. A depth profile of water composition was obtained by sampling ground water from discrete intervals within the permeable carbonate units during coring and by squeezing pore water from a core of the less-permeable clay layers. A normative salt analysis of solute compositions in the water indicated a marine origin for both types of water and an evolutionary pathway for the clay water that involves clay diagenesis. The chemical composition of the ground water in the carbonate bedrock is significantly different from that of the pore water in the clay layers. Dissolution of clays and opaline silica results in high silica concentrations relative to water in other parts of the Intermediate aquifer system. Water enriched in chloride relative to the overlying and underlying ground water recharges the aquifer inland where the confining clay layer is absent, and it dissolves carbonate and silicate minerals and reacts with clays along its flow path, eventually reaching this coastal site and resulting in the high chloride and silica concentrations observed in the middle part of the Intermediate aquifer system. Reaction-path modeling suggests that the recharging surficial water mixes with sulfate-rich water upwelling from the Upper Floridan aquifer, and carbonate mineral dissolution and precipitation, weathering and exchange reactions, clay mineral diagenesis, clay and silica dissolution, organic carbon oxidation, and iron and sulfate reduction result in the observed water compositions.A study was conducted to clarify the influence of clay units on ground-water composition in a heterogeneous

  16. Hydrostratigraphy characterization of the Floridan aquifer system using ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Stephanie R.; Screaton, Elizabeth J.; Russo, Raymond M.; Panning, Mark P.; Bremner, Paul M.; Stanciu, A. Christian; Torpey, Megan E.; Hongsresawat, Sutatcha; Farrell, Matthew E.

    2017-05-01

    We investigated a new technique for aquifer characterization that uses cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise to determine seismic velocity structure of the Floridan aquifer system (FAS). Accurate characterization of aquifer systems is vital to hydrogeological research and groundwater management but is difficult due to limited subsurface data and heterogeneity. Previous research on the carbonate FAS found that confining units and high permeability flow zones have distinct seismic velocities. We deployed an array of 9 short period seismometers from 11/2013 to 3/2014 in Indian Lake State Forest near Ocala, Florida, to image the hydrostratigraphy of the aquifer system using ambient seismic noise. We find that interstation distance strongly influences the upper and lower frequency limits of the data set. Seismic waves propagating within 1.5 and 7 wavelengths between stations were optimal for reliable group velocity measurements and both an upper and lower wavelength threshold was used. A minimum of 100-250 hr of signal was needed to maximize signal-to-noise ratio and to allow cross-correlation convergence. We averaged measurements of group velocity between station pairs at each frequency band to create a network average dispersion curve. A family of 1-D shear-wave velocity profiles that best represents the network average dispersion was then generated using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The MCMC algorithm was implemented with either a fixed number of layers, or as transdimensional in which the number of layers was a free parameter. Results from both algorithms require a prominent velocity increase at ∼200 m depth. A shallower velocity increase at ∼60 m depth was also observed, but only in model ensembles created by collecting models with the lowest overall misfit to the observed data. A final round of modelling with additional prior constraints based on initial results and well logs produced a mean shear-wave velocity profile taken as the

  17. Probabilistic human health risk assessment of degradation-related chemical mixtures in heterogeneous aquifers: Risk statistics, hot spots, and preferential channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; de Barros, Felipe P. J.

    2015-06-01

    The increasing presence of toxic chemicals released in the subsurface has led to a rapid growth of social concerns and the need to develop and employ models that can predict the impact of groundwater contamination on human health risk under uncertainty. Monitored natural attenuation is a common remediation action in many contamination cases. However, natural attenuation can lead to the production of daughter species of distinct toxicity that may pose challenges in pollution management strategies. The actual threat that these contaminants pose to human health depends on the interplay between the complex structure of the geological media and the toxicity of each pollutant byproduct. This work addresses human health risk for chemical mixtures resulting from the sequential degradation of a contaminant (such as a chlorinated solvent) under uncertainty through high-resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations. We systematically investigate the interaction between aquifer heterogeneity, flow connectivity, contaminant injection model, and chemical toxicity in the probabilistic characterization of health risk. We illustrate how chemical-specific travel times control the regime of the expected risk and its corresponding uncertainties. Results indicate conditions where preferential flow paths can favor the reduction of the overall risk of the chemical mixture. The overall human risk response to aquifer connectivity is shown to be nontrivial for multispecies transport. This nontriviality is a result of the interaction between aquifer heterogeneity and chemical toxicity. To quantify the joint effect of connectivity and toxicity in health risk, we propose a toxicity-based Damköhler number. Furthermore, we provide a statistical characterization in terms of low-order moments and the probability density function of the individual and total risks.

  18. Scale dependent importance of spatial heterogeneity in biogeochemical cycling at aquifer-river interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Stefan; Blaen, Phillip; Hannah, David; Romejn, Paul; Gomez, Jesus; Kurz, Marie; Fleckenstein, Jan; Schmidt, Christian; Zarnetske, Jay; Cullin, Joe; Ward, Adam; Marti, Eugenia; Drummond, Jennifer; Schmadel, Noah; Knapp, Julia; Klaar, Megan; Mendoza, Clara

    2016-04-01

    The transport and transformation of carbon and nitrogen across aquifer - river interfaces are significantly altered along the streambed passage. Recent investigations have substantially improved the understanding of controls on streambed biogeochemical cycling, outlining a critical impact of exchange fluxes, temporal and spatial coincidence of reaction partners and streambed residence time distributions. Still, there is little understanding of the drivers of the widely observed strong spatial and temporal variability of interlinked carbon and nitrogen turnover at aquifer-river interfaces, including hotspots (locations) and hot moments (time periods) of increased reactivity. Previous research, predominantly with a surface water perspective, has mainly focused on the impact of bedform controlled hyporheic exchange fluxes and the chemical transformation of surface solutes transported along a hyporheic flow path. While such studies may explain nutrient turnover in the hyporheic zones of low-order streams in rather pristine headwater catchments, they fail to explain observations of spatially and temporally more variable nutrient turnover in streambeds with higher structural heterogeneity and relevant concentrations of autochthonous carbon and nitrogen. Here we combine laboratory, field and numerical modeling experiments from plot to stream reach/subcatchment scales to quantify the impacts of variability in physical and biogeochemical streambed properties on hyporheic nutrient (C, N, O) cycling. At the plot scale, hotspots of biogeochemical cycling have been found to be associated with peat and clay layers within streambed sediments, representing areas of significantly increased residence times and oxygen consumption what results in enhanced microbial metabolic activity and nitrogen removal capacity. We present distributed sensor network based up-scaling methods that allow identification of such features at larger reach scale. Numerical modeling based generalization

  19. Using Electrical Wireline Logs For Aquifer Characterization In Parts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interpretation by use of quantitative methods of electric log dataset was successfully applied to sandstone aquifers in parts of Anambra Basin of Nigeria. Depth to aquifers varies between 67 and 213m above mean sea level, porosity ranges between 13 and 55%. Transverse (unit) resistance T changes between 0.037 and ...

  20. Hydrodynamic characterization of the Paleocene aquifer in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2009-05-15

    May 15, 2009 ... groundwater level with a depression located in South-West of the study area. ... of the aquifers because of their configuration (great thick- ness of the .... Table 1. Values of hydraulic gradients in the Paleocene aquifer. Sectors. Equipotentials Gradient values. West of piezometric depression. 11.5 à -4.1. 1 ‰.

  1. Microgravity methods for characterization of groundwater-storage changes and aquifer properties in the karstic Madison aquifer in the Black Hills of South Dakota, 2009-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koth, Karl R.; Long, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    A study of groundwater storage in the karstic Madison aquifer in the Black Hills of South Dakota using microgravity methods was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with West Dakota Water Development District, South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and Lawrence County. Microgravity measurements from 2009 to 2012 were used to investigate groundwater-storage changes and effective porosity in unconfined areas of the Madison aquifer. Time-lapse microgravity surveys that use portable high-sensitivity absolute and relative gravimeters indicated temporal-gravity changes as a result of changing groundwater mass. These extremely precise measurements of gravity required characterization and removal of internal instrumental and external environmental effects on gravity from the raw data. The corrected data allowed groundwater-storage volume to be quantified with an accuracy of about plus or minus 0.5 foot of water per unit area of aquifer. Quantification of groundwater-storage change, coupled with water-level data from observation wells located near the focus areas, also was used to calculate the effective porosity at specific altitudes directly beneath gravity stations. Gravity stations were established on bedrock outcrops in three separate focus areas for this study. The first area, the Spring Canyon focus area, is located to the south of Rapid City with one gravity station on the rim of Spring Canyon near the area where Spring Creek sinks into the Madison aquifer. The second area, the Doty focus area, is located on outcrops of the Madison Limestone and Minnelusa Formation to the northwest of Rapid City, and consists of nine gravity stations. The third area, the Limestone Plateau focus area, consists of a single gravity station in the northwestern Black Hills located on an outcrop of the Madison Limestone. An absolute-gravity station, used to tie relative-gravity survey data together, was established on a relatively impermeable

  2. Application of ensemble-based data assimilation techniques for aquifer characterization using tracer data at Hanford 300 area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyuan; Hammond, Glenn E.; Murray, Chris J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-10-01

    Subsurface aquifer characterization often involves high parameter dimensionality and requires tremendous computational resources if employing a full Bayesian approach. Ensemble-based data assimilation techniques, including filtering and smoothing, are computationally efficient alternatives. Despite the increasing use of ensemble-based methods in assimilating flow and transport related data for subsurface aquifer characterization, most applications have been limited to synthetic studies or two-dimensional problems. In this study, we applied ensemble-based techniques adapted for parameter estimation, including the p-space ensemble Kalman filter and ensemble smoother, for assimilating field tracer experimental data obtained from the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at the Hanford 300 Area. The forward problem was simulated using the massively parallel three-dimensional flow and transport code PFLOTRAN to effectively deal with the highly transient flow boundary conditions at the site and to meet the computational demands of ensemble-based methods. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of ensemble-based methods for characterizing a heterogeneous aquifer by assimilating experimental tracer data, with refined prior information obtained from assimilating other types of data available at the site. It is demonstrated that high-performance computing enables the use of increasingly mechanistic nonlinear forward simulations for a complex system within the data assimilation framework with reasonable turnaround time.

  3. Influence of initial heterogeneities and recharge limitations on the evolution of aperture distributions in carbonate aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hubinger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Karst aquifers evolve where the dissolution of soluble rocks causes the enlargement of discrete pathways along fractures or bedding planes, thus creating highly conductive solution conduits. To identify general interrelations between hydrogeological conditions and the properties of the evolving conduit systems the aperture-size frequency distributions resulting from generic models of conduit evolution are analysed. For this purpose, a process-based numerical model coupling flow and rock dissolution is employed. Initial protoconduits are represented by tubes with log-normally distributed aperture sizes with a mean μ0 = 0.5 mm for the logarithm of the diameters. Apertures are spatially uncorrelated and widen up to the metre range due to dissolution by chemically aggressive waters. Several examples of conduit development are examined focussing on influences of the initial heterogeneity and the available amount of recharge. If the available recharge is sufficiently high the evolving conduits compete for flow and those with large apertures and high hydraulic gradients attract more and more water. As a consequence, the positive feedback between increasing flow and dissolution causes the breakthrough of a conduit pathway connecting the recharge and discharge sides of the modelling domain. Under these competitive flow conditions dynamically stable bimodal aperture distributions are found to evolve, i.e. a certain percentage of tubes continues to be enlarged while the remaining tubes stay small-sized. The percentage of strongly widened tubes is found to be independent of the breakthrough time and decreases with increasing heterogeneity of the initial apertures and decreasing amount of available water. If the competition for flow is suppressed because the availability of water is strongly limited breakthrough of a conduit pathway is inhibited and the conduit pathways widen very slowly. The resulting aperture distributions are found to be

  4. Temperature Logging to Characterize Flow Patterns in a Highly Permeable Fractured Karstic Aquifer, Poitiers (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelier, M.; Ruelleu, S.; Bour, O.; Porel, G.; Delay, F.

    2008-12-01

    In heterogeneous media, such as higly fractured rocks or karstic aquifers, the characterization of the main flow paths is required for further flow modeling but rather difficult to achieve due to the complexity of the flow field. Here we compare the information provided by temperature logs with flow logs measurements in a fractured karstic aquifer at the Hydrogeological Experimental Site (HES) of Poitiers (France). Temperature logs have been widely used to address flow in fractured rocks. Basically, the method tracks eventual distortions of the geothermic gradient due to groundwater motion. It is considered as inexpensive since the point is simply to monitor water temperatures along a borehole profile and then to translate the measures in terms of inflow-outflow locations and incidentally of vertical flows along the borehole. Flow logs were obtained from an heat-pulse flowmeter that allow to measure downward or upward vertical groundwater velocities larger than a mm/s. The HES is set up over a 100m thickness confined Jurassic limestone aquifer. The HES includes 32 fully penetrating wells which geometry is inspired from the "five spot" borehole configuration. The inter- comparisons between previous data from flowmeter testing, borehole imaging and 3D seismic imaging indicate that main flow-paths are mostly concealed within sub-horizontal layers riddled with karstic channels and along sub-vertical fractures. Temperature and flow measurements have been carried out under both ambient and forced flow conditions. Two forced flow conditions are available yielding short pumping time data with pumping at the monitored well, large pumping time data with pumping at a distant well. Most boreholes show quite constant vertical profiles of temperature indicating the existence of flow along boreholes. In addition, a few wells may show drop of temperature at 115 m depth and anomalous warm-water arrivals at 65m. These features associated with non equilibrated temperatures highlight

  5. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    A critical and long-standing need within the petroleum industry is the specification of suitable petrophysical properties for mathematical simulation of fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterization). The development of accurate reservoir characterizations is extremely challenging. Property variations may be described on many scales, and the information available from measurements reflect different scales. In fact, experiments on laboratory core samples, well-log data, well-test data, and reservoir-production data all represent information potentially valuable to reservoir characterization, yet they all reflect information about spatial variations of properties at different scales. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) provide enormous potential for developing new descriptions and understandings of heterogeneous media. NMR has the rare capability to probe permeable media non-invasively, with spatial resolution, and it provides unique information about molecular motions and interactions that are sensitive to morphology. NMR well-logging provides the best opportunity ever to resolve permeability distributions within petroleum reservoirs. We develop MRI methods to determine, for the first time, spatially resolved distributions of porosity and permeability within permeable media samples that approach the intrinsic scale: the finest resolution of these macroscopic properties possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the permeability is actually resolved at a scale smaller than the sample. In order to do this, we have developed a robust method to determine of relaxation distributions from NMR experiments and a novel implementation and analysis of MRI experiments to determine the amount of fluid corresponding to imaging regions, which are in turn used to determine porosity and saturation distributions. We have developed a novel MRI experiment to determine velocity distributions within flowing experiments, and

  6. Three-dimensional Bayesian geostatistical aquifer characterization at the Hanford 300 Area using tracer test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyuan; Murakami, Haruko; Hahn, Melanie S.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Zachara, John M.; Rubin, Yoram

    2012-06-01

    Tracer tests performed under natural or forced gradient flow conditions can provide useful information for characterizing subsurface properties, through monitoring, modeling, and interpretation of the tracer plume migration in an aquifer. Nonreactive tracer experiments were conducted at the Hanford 300 Area, along with constant-rate injection tests and electromagnetic borehole flowmeter tests. A Bayesian data assimilation technique, the method of anchored distributions (MAD) (Rubin et al., 2010), was applied to assimilate the experimental tracer test data with the other types of data and to infer the three-dimensional heterogeneous structure of the hydraulic conductivity in the saturated zone of the Hanford formation.In this study, the Bayesian prior information on the underlying random hydraulic conductivity field was obtained from previous field characterization efforts using constant-rate injection and borehole flowmeter test data. The posterior distribution of the conductivity field was obtained by further conditioning the field on the temporal moments of tracer breakthrough curves at various observation wells. MAD was implemented with the massively parallel three-dimensional flow and transport code PFLOTRAN to cope with the highly transient flow boundary conditions at the site and to meet the computational demands of MAD. A synthetic study proved that the proposed method could effectively invert tracer test data to capture the essential spatial heterogeneity of the three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity field. Application of MAD to actual field tracer data at the Hanford 300 Area demonstrates that inverting for spatial heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity under transient flow conditions is challenging and more work is needed.

  7. Hydrogeologic framework and characterization of the Truxton Aquifer on the Hualapai Reservation, Mohave County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bills, Donald J.; Macy, Jamie P.

    2016-12-30

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Department of Interior Federal Indian Water Rights Negotiation Team, the Department of Justice, and the Hualapai Tribe, developed a study to determine the estimated groundwater in storage in the Truxton aquifer on the Hualapai Reservation in northwestern Arizona. This study is part of a water-rights negotiation by the Hualapai Tribe, the Department of the Interior, and the Department of Justice. The physical characteristics of the Truxton aquifer have not been very well characterized in the past. In particular, the depth to impermeable bedrock, thickness of the basin, and its groundwater storage capacity are known in only a few locations where water wells have penetrated to bedrock. Increasing water demands on the Truxton aquifer by both tribal and nontribal water users have led to concern about the long-term sustainability of this water resource. The Hualapai Tribe currently projects an increase of their water needs from about 300 acre-feet (acre-ft) per year to about 780 acre-ft per year by 2050 to support the community of Peach Springs, Arizona, and the southern part of the reservation. This study aims to quantitatively develop better knowledge of aquifer characteristics, including aquifer storage and capacity, using (1) surface resistivity data collected along transects; (2) analysis of existing geologic, borehole, precipitation, water use, and water-level data; and (3) estimated recharge.Results of the surface resistivity surveys indicate that the depth to bedrock along the survey lines varies from less than 100 feet (ft) to over 1,300 ft. This is consistent with the erosional character of the Truxton basin; deep paleochannels characterize the deeper parts of the basin. Borehole data from wells projected into the resistivity profiles verify the geophysical survey results. The estimated average saturated thickness of the Truxton aquifer on the Hualapai Reservation is about 300 ft, based on both resistivity

  8. Integrating Non-Collocated Well and Geophysical Data to Capture Lithological Heterogeneity at a Managed Aquifer Recharge and Recovery Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, I.; Hermans, T.; Caers, J.; Cameron, D. A.; Knight, R. J.; Regnery, J.; McCray, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) is the process of enhancing natural groundwater resources and recovering water for later use by constructing engineered conveyances. Insufficient understanding of lithological heterogeneity at ARR sites often hinders attempts to predict where and how quickly infiltrating water will flow in the subsurface, which can adversely affect the quality and quantity of available water in the ARR site. In this study, we explored the use of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to assist in characterizing lithological heterogeneity at an ARR site, so as to incorporate it into a flow and contaminant transport model. In this case, we had non-collocated well core log data and ERT data from a full-scale ARR basin. We compared three independent methods for producing conditional lithology-resistivity probability distributions: 1) a search template to relate the nearest logged well lithologies with ERT resistivity panels, given search criteria; 2) a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) to match bimodal normal distributions to the histogram of each ERT line; and 3) variogram-based lithology indicator simulations constrained to well data. Each approach leverages Bayes' Rule to estimate lithology probability given electrical resistivity. The simplest approach (method 1) yields an erroneous conditional probability function where sand dominates the conditional probability at nearly all resistivities, due in part to the strong presence of sand in the wells nearest the ERT lines. The approaches using MLE and lithology simulations (methods 2 and 3) produce similar, more realistic lithofacies probability functions. The range of resistivities where clay and sand overlap differs between methods 2 and 3: ranging between 100 and 200 ohm-m for method 2, and between 30 and 50 ohm-m for the method 3. These differences affect the posterior lithology distributions in multiple point geostatistical (MPS) simulations, and in turn, predictions of flow from models which

  9. Physico-Chemical Heterogeneity of Organic-Rich Sediments in the Rifle Aquifer, CO: Impact on Uranium Biogeochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janot, Noémie; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S; Pham, Don Q; O'Brien, Timothy M; Hausladen, Debra; Noël, Vincent; Lallier, Florent; Maher, Kate; Fendorf, Scott; Williams, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Bargar, John R

    2016-01-05

    The Rifle alluvial aquifer along the Colorado River in west central Colorado contains fine-grained, diffusion-limited sediment lenses that are substantially enriched in organic carbon and sulfides, as well as uranium, from previous milling operations. These naturally reduced zones (NRZs) coincide spatially with a persistent uranium groundwater plume. There is concern that uranium release from NRZs is contributing to plume persistence or will do so in the future. To better define the physical extent, heterogeneity and biogeochemistry of these NRZs, we investigated sediment cores from five neighboring wells. The main NRZ body exhibited uranium concentrations up to 100 mg/kg U as U(IV) and contains ca. 286 g of U in total. Uranium accumulated only in areas where organic carbon and reduced sulfur (as iron sulfides) were present, emphasizing the importance of sulfate-reducing conditions to uranium retention and the essential role of organic matter. NRZs further exhibited centimeter-scale variations in both redox status and particle size. Mackinawite, greigite, pyrite and sulfate coexist in the sediments, indicating that dynamic redox cycling occurs within NRZs and that their internal portions can be seasonally oxidized. We show that oxidative U(VI) release to the aquifer has the potential to sustain a groundwater contaminant plume for centuries. NRZs, known to exist in other uranium-contaminated aquifers, may be regionally important to uranium persistence.

  10. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  11. Geoelectrical Characterization of Aquifer Precincts in Parts of Lapai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some geoelectric characteristics of aquifer in parts of Lapai, Central Nigeria were evaluated using Wenner vertical electrical sounding (VES) method. Fifteen (15) VES points were occupied using G41 Geotron Resistivity meter with electrode spacing varying from 10m to 150m while a global positioning system (GPS) tracking ...

  12. Effects of aquifer heterogeneity on ground-water flow and chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer near and within an active pumping well field, west-central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tihansky, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    Chloride concentrations have been increasing over time in water from wells within and near the Eldridge-Wilde well field, near the coast in west-central Florida. Variable increases in chloride concentrations from well to well over time are the combined result of aquifer heterogeneity and ground-water pumping within the Upper Floridan aquifer. Deep mineralized water and saline water associated with the saltwater interface appear to move preferentially along flow zones of high transmissivity in response to ground-water withdrawals. The calcium-bicarbonate-type freshwater of the Upper Floridan aquifer within the study area is variably enriched with ions by mixing with introduced deep and saline ground water. The amount and variability of increases in chloride and sulfate concentrations at each well are related to well location, depth interval, and permeable intervals intercepted by the borehole. Zones of high transmissivity characterize the multilayered carbonate rocks of the Upper Floridan aquifer. Well-developed secondary porosity within the Tampa/Suwannee Limestones and the Avon Park Formation has created producing zones within the Upper Floridan aquifer. The highly transmissive sections of the Avon Park Formation generally are several orders of magnitude more permeable than the Tampa/Suwannee Limestones, but both are associated with increased ground-water flow. The Ocala Limestone is less permeable and is dominated by primary, intergranular porosity. Acoustic televiewer logging, caliper logs, and borehole flow logs (both electromagnetic and heat pulse) indicate that the Tampa/Suwannee Limestone units are dominated by porosity owing to dissolution between 200 and 300 feet below land surface, whereas the porosity of the Avon Park Formation is dominated by fractures that occur primarily from 600 to 750 feet below land surface and range in angle from horizontal to near vertical. Although the Ocala Limestone can act as a semiconfining unit between the Avon Park

  13. Techniques for Source Zone and Plume Characterization of Tetrachloroethene in Fractured Limestone Aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Mosthaf, Klaus; Janniche, Gry S.

    Characterization of chlorinated solvents in fractured limestone aquifers is essential for proper development of site specific conceptual models and subsequent risk assessment and remediation. High resolution characterization is challenged by the difficulties involved in collection of intact core...... fractured limestone aquifers. The two sites represent different scales (source and plume) and contaminant levels (DNAPL and dissolved). The scope of the investigations was to evaluate different techniques for characterization of the contaminant distribution in the limestone aquifers and to obtain...... of the FACT field measurements, which allows the conversion of discrete activated carbon concentrations to aqueous concentrations at given hydraulic parameters and FACT parameters. The passive groundwater sampling with snap samplers resulted in significantly different concentration levels and concentration...

  14. Characterizing Sources of Recharge and Groundwater Quality in Sacramento Aquifers Following California's Historic Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, C. A.; Paukert Vankeuren, A. N.; Wagner, A. J.; Blackburn, C.; Druecker, D.

    2016-12-01

    Characterizing recharge will be critical for sustainable groundwater use, particularly following California's historic five-year drought . Groundwater is of great importance to Sacramento, which is a high priority basin as determined by the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act of 2014. The California State University, Sacramento (CSUS) campus has 18 monitoring wells, making it an ideal laboratory for examination of recharge sources and water quality in confined and unconfined aquifers in the Central Valley aquifer system. Historically, CSUS aquifers appear to have been recharged by water from the Western Sierra Nevada. The campus is bounded by the Lower American River, and some of its wells are in hydraulic connection with the river1. Lower than average river stage during the drought may have affected recharge to the aquifers from the river. Additionally, low impact development (LID) stormwater-management ponds have recently been installed on campus in an effort to increase infiltration and to help mitigate contamination of the aquifers and American River from campus runoff. The recently installed LID ponds on campus may have increased infiltration of local precipitation into the unconfined aquifer. Data collected from the monitoring wells allow for the examination of differences between the confined and unconfined aquifer systems in the Central Valley. To identify recharge sources, stable isotope and major ion analyses for samples collected from both campus aquifers are compared to samples from local precipitation and rivers in the Western Sierra Nevada feeding the American River. These results are used to assess current water quality and compared to historic datasets collected by the USGS to reveal changes that have occurred as a result of the recent drought. These data are the first in a dataset developed by CSUS Geology students for long-term monitoring of local groundwater quality. 1Moran et al., 2004. LLNL, UCR-203258.

  15. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

  16. Isotope characterization of shallow aquifers in the Horombe region, South of Madagascar

    CERN Document Server

    Fareze, L P; Ramaroson, V; Andriambololona, Raoelina; Andriamiarintsoa, G; Razafitsalama, P R; Rahobisoa, J J; Randrianarison, H; Ranaivoarisoa, A; Marah, H

    2012-01-01

    The present study deals with the problem of evaluation of the recharge mechanism and the characterization of the groundwater flow system in the basement shallow aquifer, which is one of the groundwater resource in the semi-arid South region of Madagascar. Stable isotopes (deuterium and oxygen-18) and tritium are used to achieve with accuracy the hydrogeological and geochemical dynamics study. Chemical analysis is used to provide complementary information to the investigation. A space distribution of tritium concentration and isotopic composition in groundwater shows evidence of two opposite categories of aquifers, which is confirmed by the chemical analysis results and by the geological features of the study site. Some groundwater flow path directions have been identified in the study area thanks to the tritium concentration space distribution and the geological formation. Besides, the groundwater recharge of the shallow aquifers in the South of Madagascar has been characterized by the exponential mixing mode...

  17. Characterizing subsurface hydraulic heterogeneity of alluvial fan using riverstage fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Li; Yeh, Tian-Chyi Jim; Wen, Jet-Chau; Huang, Shao-Yang; Zha, Yuanyuan; Tsai, Jui-Pin; Hao, Yonghong; Liang, Yue

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the ability of riverstage tomography to estimate 2-D spatial distribution of hydraulic diffusivity (D) of Zhuoshui River alluvial fan, Taiwan, using groundwater level data from 65 wells and stream stage data from 5 gauging stations. In order to accomplish this objective, wavelet analysis is first conducted to investigate the temporal characteristics of groundwater level, precipitation, and stream stage. The results of the analysis show that variations of groundwater level and stream stage are highly correlated over seasonal and annual periods while that between precipitation is less significant. Subsequently, spatial cross-correlation between seasonal variations of groundwater level and riverstage data is analyzed. It is found that the correlation contour map reflects the pattern of sediment distribution of the fan. This finding is further substantiated by the cross-correlation analysis using both noisy and noise-free groundwater and riverstage data of a synthetic aquifer, where aquifer heterogeneity is known exactly. The ability of riverstage tomography is then tested with these synthetic data sets to estimate D distribution. Finally, the riverstage tomography is applied to the alluvial fan. The results of the application reveal that the apex and southeast of the alluvial fan are regions with relatively high D and the D values gradually decrease toward the shoreline of the fan. In addition, D at northern alluvial fan is slightly larger than that at southern. These findings are consistent with the geologic evolution of this alluvial fan.

  18. Improving degradation of emerging organic compounds by applying chaotic advection in Managed Aquifer Recharge in randomly heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Escales, P.; Fernà ndez-Garcia, D.; Drechsel, J.; Folch, A.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2017-05-01

    Improving degradation rates of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) in groundwater is still a challenge. Although their degradation is not fully understood, it has been observed that some substances are preferably degraded under specific redox conditions. The coupling of Managed Aquifer Recharge with soil aquifer remediation treatment, by placing a reactive layer containing organic matter at the bottom of the infiltration pond, is a promising technology to improve the rate of degradation of EOCs. Its success is based on assuming that recharged water and groundwater get well mixed, which is not always true. It has been demonstrated that mixing can be enhanced by inducing chaotic advection through extraction-injection-engineering. In this work, we analyze how chaotic advection might enhance the spreading of redox conditions with the final aim of improving degradation of a mix of benzotriazoles: benzotriazole, 5-methyl-benzotriazole, and 5-chloro-benzotriazole. The degradation of the first two compounds was fastest under aerobic conditions whereas the third compound was best degraded under denitrification conditions. We developed a reactive transport model that describes how a recharged water rich in organic matter mixes with groundwater, how this organic matter is oxidized by different electron acceptors, and how the benzotriazoles are degraded attending for the redox state. The model was tested in different scenarios of recharge, both in homogenous and in heterogenous media. It was found that chaotic flow increases the spreading of the plume of recharged water. Consequently, different redox conditions coexist at a given time, facilitating the degradation of EOCs.

  19. Anionic co-contaminants and the biogeochemical evolution of aquifer heterogeneity. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, W.

    1997-07-01

    Adsorption heterogeneity of subsoils may depend on the sorbate and its concentration. Ligands in natural and contaminated subsoils may dissolve substantial metal oxides thereby altering the subsoil heterogeneity. We investigated these hypotheses on sands artificially and naturally coated with various amounts of metal oxides. The adsorbates Cu, oxalate, and mixtures of Cu and oxalate (Cu-Oxalate) were used as probes of the surface. For the concentration range studied, Binding Strength Analysis revealed that the naturally coated samples were heterogeneous at the microscale and the macroscale when oxalate was used as the probe of the surface. Cu revealed a smaller heterogeneity while Cu-Oxalate indicated an intermediate heterogeneity. Various elaborations of homogeneous-site Surface Complexation Models (SCM), calibrated to the surface protonation properties of goethite, modeled accurately the edges of oxalate, Cu, and mixtures of Cu and oxalate. The poorer fits for large concentrations was probably because of the site heterogeneity. The accuracy of SCMs was insensitive to the choice of surface protonation constants (pK{sub a}) and moderately sensitive to the choice of site density. The effective surface complexation constants (K{sup eff}) obtained from individual edges were somewhat different because of the concentration dependent heterogeneity. It was not always possible to use K{sup eff} values for one sorbate concentration to reproduce adsorption of other concentrations of the same sorbate. A modified version of the discrete pK{sub a} spectrum model closely reproduced the acid-base titration curve with two adsorption sites (four pK{sub a}`s). The adsorption of all concentrations of Cu, oxalate, and Cu-Oxalate was often reproduced with only one of those sites. The competition between the dissolved Al and the surface for the oxalate in solution was accurately reproduced with both sites. The dissolution of the oxide coating was often influenced by the pore velocity.

  20. 3D aquifer characterization using stochastic streamline calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Minchul

    2007-03-01

    the proposed approach to be applied to the construction of an aquifer model and forecasting of the aquifer performances of interest.

  1. Hydrogeologic framework and characterization of the Truxton Aquifer on the Hualapai Reservation, Mohave County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bills, Donald J.; Macy, Jamie P.

    2016-12-30

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, developed this study to determine an estimate of groundwater in storage in the Truxton aquifer on the Hualapai Reservation in northwestern Arizona. For this study, the Truxton aquifer is defined as the unconfined, saturated groundwater in the unconsolidated to semiconsolidated older and younger basin-fill deposits of the Truxton basin overlying bedrock. The physical characteristics of the Truxton aquifer have not been well characterized in the past. In particular, the depth to impermeable granite bedrock and thickness of the basin are known in only a few locations where water wells have penetrated into the granite. Increasing water demands on the Truxton aquifer by both tribal and nontribal water users have led to concern about the long-term sustainability of this water resource. The Hualapai Tribe currently projects an increase of their water needs from about 300 acre-feet (acre-ft) per year to about 780 acre-ft per year by 2050 to support the community of Peach Springs, Arizona, and the southern part of the reservation. This study aimed to quantitatively develop better knowledge of aquifer characteristics, including aquifer storage and capacity, using (1) surface resistivity data collected along transects and (2) analysis of existing geologic, borehole, precipitation, water use, and water-level data.The surface resistivity surveys indicated that the depth to granite along the survey lines varied from less than 100 feet (ft) to more than 1,300 ft below land surface on the Hualapai Reservation. The top of the granite bedrock is consistent with the erosional character of the Truxton basin and exhibits deep paleochannels filled with basin-fill deposits consistent with the results of surface resistivity surveys and borehole logs from wells. The estimated average saturated thickness of the Truxton aquifer on the Hualapai Reservation is about 330 ft (with an estimated range of 260 to 390 ft

  2. Characterization of a Heterogeneous Population of Rabbits for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to describe prolificacy and litter characteristics of a Nigerian heterogeneous population of rabbits. Data on 535 kits sired by 10 bucks and 48 does across three parities were used to characterize this population of rabbits for prolificacy, pre-weaning litter traits and kit survival under on-station ...

  3. Tracer test modeling for characterizing heterogeneity and local scale residence time distribution in an artificial recharge site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valhondo, Cristina; Martinez-Landa, Lurdes; Carrera, Jesús; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Ayora, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Artificial recharge of aquifers (AR) is a standard technique to replenish and enhance groundwater resources, that have widely been used due to the increasing demand of quality water. AR through infiltration basins consists on infiltrate surface water, that might be affected in more or less degree by treatment plant effluents, runoff and others undesirables water sources, into an aquifer. The water quality enhances during the passage through the soil and organic matter, nutrients, organic contaminants, and bacteria are reduced mainly due to biodegradation and adsorption. Therefore, one of the goals of AR is to ensure a good quality status of the aquifer even if lesser quality water is used for recharge. Understand the behavior and transport of the potential contaminants is essential for an appropriate management of the artificial recharge system. The knowledge of the flux distribution around the recharge system and the relationship between the recharge system and the aquifer (area affected by the recharge, mixing ratios of recharged and native groundwater, travel times) is essential to achieve this goal. Evaluate the flux distribution is not always simple because the complexity and heterogeneity of natural systems. Indeed, it is not so much regulate by hydraulic conductivity of the different geological units as by their continuity and inter-connectivity particularly in the vertical direction. In summary for an appropriate management of an artificial recharge system it is needed to acknowledge the heterogeneity of the media. Aiming at characterizing the residence time distribution (RTDs) of a pilot artificial recharge system and the extent to which heterogeneity affects RTDs, we performed and evaluated a pulse injection tracer test. The artificial recharge system was simulated as a multilayer model which was used to evaluate the measured breakthrough curves at six monitoring points. Flow and transport parameters were calibrated under two hypotheses. The first

  4. Aquifer characterization through an integrated GIS-based tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Rotman; Velasco, Violeta; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Serrano-Juan, Alejandro; Alcaraz, Mar; García-Gil, Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic parameters of the subsurface (transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storativity and specific storage) are important to achieve hydrogeological studies such as environmental impact assessments, water resources evaluations or groundwater contamination remediation, among others. There are several methods to determine aquifer parameters but pumping test is the most commonly used method to obtain them and generally leads to reliable hydraulic parameters. These parameters and other hydraulic data available for integration into the hydrogeological studies (which currently are supported by groundwater numerical models) usually has a very diverse origin and format and, therefore, a chance of bias in the interpretations. Consequently, it becomes necessary to have effective instruments that facilitate the pre-process, the visualization, the analysis and the validation (e.g. graphical analysis techniques) of this great amount of data. To achieve this in a clear and understandable manner, the GIS environment is a useful instrument. We developed a software to analyze pumping tests in a GIS platform environment to support the hydraulic parameterization of groundwater flow and transport models. This novel platform provides a package of tools for collecting, managing, analyzing, processing and interpreting data derived from pumping tests in a GIS environment. Additionally, within the GIS platform, it is possible to process the hydraulic parameters obtained from the pumping test and to create spatial distribution maps, perform geostatistical analysis and export the information to an external software platform. These tools have been applied in the metropolitan area of Barcelona (Spain) to tests out and improve their usefulness in hydrogeological analysis.

  5. Abiotic Dissolution of a Tetrachloroethene (PCE) Pool in an Anaerobic Sand Tank Aquifer System with Heterogeneous Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Sara; Seagren, Eric; Becker, Jennifer

    2017-04-01

    Intrinsic and engineered in situ bioremediation are made technologically challenging by the physically and chemically heterogeneous nature of the subsurface environment. Subsurface heterogeneities are important because they influence interfacial mass-transfer processes that impact the availability of substrates to the microorganisms. The laboratory experiments reported here examined the dissolution of a dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) tetrachloroethene (PCE) pool, and transport of the dissolved PCE plume in a aquifer simulated system with heterogeneous flow. These abiotic experiments were performed in a saturated intermediate-scale flow cell (1.2 m), with flow parallel to the PCE pool. A steady-state mass balance approach was used to estimate the PCE dissolution rate at two different flow rates. As expected, increasing the flow rate decreased the effluent dissolved PCE concentration and increased the dissolution flux. However, the effluent PCE concentration was higher than expected based on modeling predictions assuming a uniform distribution of flow across the depth of the tank. Nonreactive tracer studies confirmed that there was a velocity profile with depth, with the slowest velocity at the top of the tank, and the highest velocity at the bottom of the tank, possible due to consolidation of the sand that occurred during a wetting/drainage cycle. Revised modeling using the vertical flow variation provided an improved prediction of the effluent PCE concentration. These results have important implications for predicting DNAPL pool dissolution in the field. Whereas experimental systems in the laboratory typically employ porous media with uniform flow distribution, flow heterogeneities are the rule rather than the exception in the field, and it is well known that velocity impacts pool dissolution. In the case of this experimental system, the pore water velocity near the pool was greater than the average pore water velocity across the system, resulting in a

  6. A conceptual sedimentological-geostatistical model of aquifer heterogeneity based on outcrop studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Three outcrop studies were conducted in deposits of different depositional environments. At each site, permeability measurements were obtained with an air-minipermeameter developed as part of this study. In addition, the geological units were mapped with either surveying, photographs, or both. Geostatistical analysis of the permeability data was performed to estimate the characteristics of the probability distribution function and the spatial correlation structure. The information obtained from the geological mapping was then compared with the results of the geostatistical analysis for any relationships that may exist. The main field site was located in the Albuquerque Basin of central New Mexico at an outcrop of the Pliocene-Pleistocene Sierra Ladrones Formation. The second study was conducted on the walls of waste pits in alluvial fan deposits at the Nevada Test Site. The third study was conducted on an outcrop of an eolian deposit (miocene) south of Socorro, New Mexico. The results of the three studies were then used to construct a conceptual model relating depositional environment to geostatistical models of heterogeneity. The model presented is largely qualitative but provides a basis for further hypothesis formulation and testing.

  7. The fate of pesticides in soil and aquifers from a small-scale point of view: Does microbial and spatial heterogeneity have an impact?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, J.; Badawi, N.; Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth

    herbicides (MCPA, 2,4-D) were spatially distributed in soil, subsoil, and groundwater aquifers using a 96-well microplate mineralisation assay. In the top soil, all samples showed rapid mineralisation following Monod mineralisation kinetics. In the subsoil sediments, a more heterogeneous distribution...... of mineralisation potentials was observed with fewer samples showing rapid mineralisation and more samples showing either slow 0-order mineralisation kinetics or no degradation. A heterogeneous distribution of herbicide mineralisation potentials was also observed in the groundwater sediment showing the most rapid...... mineralization close to the water table. The impacts of microbial heterogeneity on degradation and leaching of MCPA through the upper meter of subsurface sediment is evaluated with a numerical model. Results show that for reasonably uniform soils, heterogeneity in mineralisation has little effect on leached...

  8. Risk characterization for toxic chemicals transported in aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andricevic, Roko; Srzic, Veljko; Gotovac, Hrvoje

    2012-02-01

    The risk characterization resulting from the introduction of toxic chemicals in a subsurface flow field is presented. The concept of concentration threshold is used to quantify the risk associated with non-carcinogenic chemicals introduced to the population by ingestion of groundwater as the exposure pathway. The risk assessment methodology presented uses the expected mass fraction (EMF) concept with exposure duration to identify the distribution of dosage over different concentrations during the plume migration over the well location. The numerical simulation of the subsurface transport by advection and local diffusion is used to produce the concentration plume that passes different locations of interest. The EMF obtained presents the probability of the expected mass above some concentration threshold found at the location of interest. The risk formulation is defined with the risk reliability (safety) and its complement, the risk exceedance (failure) value. The risk characterization is obtained as a probability for exceeding the human reference dose which is considered uncertain due to the necessary extrapolation between concentration used in toxicological studies and the concentration to which humans could be exposed in nature. The final risk assessment expression is derived in a closed form by coupling the expected mass fraction with the safe human threshold concentration probability density function (pdf) inferred from the toxicological studies. The results indicate the importance of estimating the probability of a concentration mass found at locations of interest together with its exposure duration. The exposure duration was revealed to be an important parameter that needs to be estimated depending on the human concentration threshold selected and the distance from the source. The results in terms of the risk safety and risk failure also indicate the dilution effect on the passing concentration plume in the subsurface as a function of the distance and

  9. Direct-push geochemical profiling for assessment of inorganic chemical heterogeneity in aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulmeister, M.K.; Healey, J.M.; Butler, J.J.; McCall, G.W.

    2004-01-01

    Discrete-depth sampling of inorganic groundwater chemistry is essential for a variety of site characterization activities. Although the mobility and rapid sampling capabilities of direct-push techniques have led to their widespread use for evaluating the distribution of organic contaminants, complementary methods for the characterization of spatial variations in geochemical conditions have not been developed. In this study, a direct-push-based approach for high-resolution inorganic chemical profiling was developed at a site where sharp chemical contrasts and iron-reducing conditions had previously been observed. Existing multilevel samplers (MLSs) that span a fining-upward alluvial sequence were used for comparison with the direct-push profiling. Chemical profiles obtained with a conventional direct-push exposed-screen sampler differed from those obtained with an adjacent MLS because of sampler reactivity and mixing with water from previous sampling levels. The sampler was modified by replacing steel sampling components with stainless-steel and heat-treated parts, and adding an adapter that prevents mixing. Profiles obtained with the modified approach were in excellent agreement with those obtained from an adjacent MLS for all constituents and parameters monitored (Cl, NO3, Fe, Mn, DO, ORP, specific conductance and pH). Interpretations of site redox conditions based on field-measured parameters were supported by laboratory analysis of dissolved Fe. The discrete-depth capability of this approach allows inorganic chemical variations to be described at a level of detail that has rarely been possible. When combined with the mobility afforded by direct-push rigs and on-site methods of chemical analysis, the new approach is well suited for a variety of interactive site-characterization endeavors. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiogenomics to characterize regional genetic heterogeneity in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Leland S; Ning, Shuluo; Eschbacher, Jennifer M; Baxter, Leslie C; Gaw, Nathan; Ranjbar, Sara; Plasencia, Jonathan; Dueck, Amylou C; Peng, Sen; Smith, Kris A; Nakaji, Peter; Karis, John P; Quarles, C Chad; Wu, Teresa; Loftus, Joseph C; Jenkins, Robert B; Sicotte, Hugues; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; O'Neill, Brian P; Elmquist, William; Hoxworth, Joseph M; Frakes, David; Sarkaria, Jann; Swanson, Kristin R; Tran, Nhan L; Li, Jing; Mitchell, J Ross

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) exhibits profound intratumoral genetic heterogeneity. Each tumor comprises multiple genetically distinct clonal populations with different therapeutic sensitivities. This has implications for targeted therapy and genetically informed paradigms. Contrast-enhanced (CE)-MRI and conventional sampling techniques have failed to resolve this heterogeneity, particularly for nonenhancing tumor populations. This study explores the feasibility of using multiparametric MRI and texture analysis to characterize regional genetic heterogeneity throughout MRI-enhancing and nonenhancing tumor segments. We collected multiple image-guided biopsies from primary GBM patients throughout regions of enhancement (ENH) and nonenhancing parenchyma (so called brain-around-tumor, [BAT]). For each biopsy, we analyzed DNA copy number variants for core GBM driver genes reported by The Cancer Genome Atlas. We co-registered biopsy locations with MRI and texture maps to correlate regional genetic status with spatially matched imaging measurements. We also built multivariate predictive decision-tree models for each GBM driver gene and validated accuracies using leave-one-out-cross-validation (LOOCV). We collected 48 biopsies (13 tumors) and identified significant imaging correlations (univariate analysis) for 6 driver genes: EGFR, PDGFRA, PTEN, CDKN2A, RB1, and TP53. Predictive model accuracies (on LOOCV) varied by driver gene of interest. Highest accuracies were observed for PDGFRA (77.1%), EGFR (75%), CDKN2A (87.5%), and RB1 (87.5%), while lowest accuracy was observed in TP53 (37.5%). Models for 4 driver genes (EGFR, RB1, CDKN2A, and PTEN) showed higher accuracy in BAT samples (n = 16) compared with those from ENH segments (n = 32). MRI and texture analysis can help characterize regional genetic heterogeneity, which offers potential diagnostic value under the paradigm of individualized oncology. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society

  11. Groundwater chemical characterization of a Rio de Janeiro coastal aquifer, SE - Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Filho, Emmanoel V.; Sobral Barcellos, Renato G.; Emblanch, Christophe; Blavoux, Bernard; Sella, Silvia Maria; Daniel, Michel; Simler, Roland; Wasserman, Julio Cesar

    2009-02-01

    Although the inhabitants of the studied area have been complaining of increasing salinity of the water and lowered water table, indicating reduction of groundwater quality, no scientific studies had been carried out to understand the degradation processes. In the present work, a geochemical characterization of the coastal aquifer from the Oceanic Region of Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Southeast Brazil, was carried out, using hydrogeochemical and isotopic (δ 18O) data, correlation matrices and factor analysis. Based on the hydrochemistry, the groundwater was classified into three types: Group 1 (53%) belongs to Na-Ca-Cl-HCO 3 facies, Group 2 (20%) belongs to Na-Ca-Cl-SO 4 facies and Group 3 (27%) belongs to an intermediate Na-Mg-Ca-HCO 3-Cl-SO 4 facies. The water geochemical evolution, from crystalline (bicarbonate facies) to a sedimentary aquifer (sulfate facies) seem to be controlled by environmental characteristics. The descriptive statistics and isotopic tracers indicate that the increasing salinity in the shallow coastal aquifer is caused by domestic wastewater and not by marine water encroachment.

  12. Evaluation of the Effect of Geological Heterogeneity on the Surfactant Transport by Performing Push-Pull Test in a Physical Aquifer Model (PAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Lim, D.; Park, S.; Hong, U.; Lim, J.; Lee, W.; Kwon, S.

    2009-12-01

    A surfactant flushing process is commonly used to remove light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) by enhancing solubility of the contaminants. Since the surfactant flushing process is significantly affected by the degree of geological heterogeneity, push-pull tests in a physical aquifer model (PAM) was performed to evaluate the surfactant transport and toluene removal efficiency in a lab-scale three layered aquifer. Push-pull tests showed that maximum bromide concentration detected at a sampling port located 15 cm downgradient from an injection port was approximately 95% of average injected bromide concentration in two permeable layers (0.22±0.02 cm/min of hydraulic conductivity) and only 40% in lower permeable layers (0.05±0.02 cm/min of hydraulic conductivity). Through the push-pull tests, we also found the different mass recovery of bromide (58%), toluene (47%) and surfactant (17%) in the PAM, confirming higher absorption characteristics of the surfactant on the soil particle than other solutes. Interestingly, toluene mass recovery in the presence of excessive surfactant decreased, possibly because of adsorption of toluene mass on the surfactant attached to soil particle. Through this work, we proved soil permeability, adsorption rate of surfactant, and amount of injected surfactant should be considered to remove the LNAPL contaminants efficiently by surfactant flushing process from the heterogeneous aquifer.

  13. Establishing a Geochemical Heterogeneity Model for a Contaminated Vadose Zone-Aquifer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, C. J.; Zachara, J. M.; McKinley, J. P.; Bott, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Hanford Integrated Field Research Center (IFRC) is investigating multiscale mass-transfer processes that control seasonally variable concentrations in the 300 Area uranium plume. The plume has displayed remarkable persistence over the past 20 years, and questions remain as to whether causes are hydrologic or geochemical. Key to the understanding and simulation of these questions is information on the spatial distribution of U(VI) contaminant concentrations, and reaction properties that determine solid-liquid distribution. About 750 grab samples were collected during the installation of 35 wells within the 1600 sq m IFRC site. Particle size distribution was measured, and the characterized for the following properties: total U, 1000 h bicarbonate extractable U, surface area, and ammonium oxalate- and hydroxyl amine-extractable Fe(III). Adsorption distribution ratios (Kd’s) were measured from synthetic groundwater on bicarbonate extracted sediments that had been washed repeatedly to remove residual bicarbonate. Desorption Kd’s, were measured in eight successive equilibrations with synthetic site groundwater. Correlations between the variables were evaluated, and a geostatistical analysis was performed that included generation of stochastic realizations of the spatial distribution of key properties and variables in the lower vadose zone and upper saturated zone of the IFRC site for reactive transport modeling. We found that high extractable U (> 7.5 µg-U/g of sediment) was localized to middle vadose zone hot spots that did not correlate with grain-size distribution. A secondary maximum of adsorbed U (~5 µg-U/g of sediment) occurred in the lower vadose zone, with concentrations increasing upward to the maximum elevation of the current water table (the “smear zone”). Adsorbed U(VI) was low but detectable in the saturated zone where the plume exists. Monte Carlo analysis was used to estimate the mass of extractable U present in the smear zone and the

  14. A Site Characterization Methodology for Aquifers in Support of Bioreclamation Activities. Volume 2: Borehole Flowmeter Technique, Tracer Tests, Geostatistics and Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    with a large potential impact on groundwater flow and contaminant transport . 3. Braided River Deposits The lower half of the aquifer is better...groundwater flow and contaminant transport will be less impacted by these heterogeneities. 4. Implications for a Heterogeneous Aquifer Model The coarse...sample variogram is, for all practical purposes, highly uncertain. An estimate of the importance 118 of this uncertainty is well summarized by the

  15. Comparison of stochastic and regression based methods for quantification of predictive uncertainty of model-simulated wellhead protection zones in heterogeneous aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen; Moore, C.; Doherty, J.

    2006-01-01

    accurate and required a few hundred model calls to be computed. (b) The linearized regression-based interval (Cooley, 2004) required just over a hundred model calls and also appeared to be nearly correct. (c) The calibration-constrained Monte-Carlo interval (Doherty, 2003) was found to be narrower than...... the regression-based intervals but required about half a million model calls. It is unclear whether or not this type of prediction interval is accurate.......For a synthetic case we computed three types of individual prediction intervals for the location of the aquifer entry point of a particle that moves through a heterogeneous aquifer and ends up in a pumping well. (a) The nonlinear regression-based interval (Cooley, 2004) was found to be nearly...

  16. Impacts of physical and chemical aquifer heterogeneity on basin-scale solute transport: Vulnerability of deep groundwater to arsenic contamination in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Holly A.; Khan, Mahfuzur R.

    2016-12-01

    Aquifer heterogeneity presents a primary challenge in predicting the movement of solutes in groundwater systems. The problem is particularly difficult on very large scales, across which permeability, chemical properties, and pumping rates may vary by many orders of magnitude and data are often sparse. An example is the fluvio-deltaic aquifer system of Bangladesh, where naturally-occurring arsenic (As) exists over tens of thousands of square kilometers in shallow groundwater. Millions of people in As-affected regions rely on deep (≥150 m) groundwater as a safe source of drinking water. The sustainability of this resource has been evaluated with models using effective properties appropriate for a basin-scale contamination problem, but the extent to which preferential flow affects the timescale of downward migration of As-contaminated shallow groundwater is unknown. Here we embed detailed, heterogeneous representations of hydraulic conductivity (K), pumping rates, and sorptive properties (Kd) within a basin-scale numerical groundwater flow and solute transport model to evaluate their effects on vulnerability and deviations from simulations with homogeneous representations in two areas with different flow systems. Advective particle tracking shows that heterogeneity in K does not affect average travel times from shallow zones to 150 m depth, but the travel times of the fastest 10% of particles decreases by a factor of ∼2. Pumping distributions do not strongly affect travel times if irrigation remains shallow, but increases in the deep pumping rate substantially reduce travel times. Simulation of advective-dispersive transport with sorption shows that deep groundwater is protected from contamination over a sustainable timeframe (>1000 y) if the spatial distribution of Kd is uniform. However, if only low-K sediments sorb As, 30% of the aquifer is not protected. Results indicate that sustainable management strategies in the Bengal Basin should consider impacts of both

  17. Characterization of Heterogeneous Prostate Tumors in Targeted Pten Knockout Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke Korsten

    Full Text Available Previously, we generated a preclinical mouse prostate tumor model based on PSA-Cre driven inactivation of Pten. In this model homogeneous hyperplastic prostates (4-5m developed at older age (>10m into tumors. Here, we describe the molecular and histological characterization of the tumors in order to better understand the processes that are associated with prostate tumorigenesis in this targeted mouse Pten knockout model. The morphologies of the tumors that developed were very heterogeneous. Different histopathological growth patterns could be identified, including intraductal carcinoma (IDC, adenocarcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma, all strongly positive for the epithelial cell marker Cytokeratin (CK, and carcinosarcomas, which were negative for CK. IDC pattern was already detected in prostates of 7-8 month old mice, indicating that it could be a precursor stage. At more than 10 months IDC and carcinosarcoma were most frequently observed. Gene expression profiling discriminated essentially two molecular subtypes, denoted tumor class 1 (TC1 and tumor class 2 (TC2. TC1 tumors were characterized by high expression of epithelial markers like Cytokeratin 8 and E-Cadherin whereas TC2 tumors showed high expression of mesenchyme/stroma markers such as Snail and Fibronectin. These molecular subtypes corresponded with histological growth patterns: where TC1 tumors mainly represented adenocarcinoma/intraductal carcinoma, in TC2 tumors carcinosarcoma was the dominant growth pattern. Further molecular characterization of the prostate tumors revealed an increased expression of genes associated with the inflammatory response. Moreover, functional markers for senescence, proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis were higher expressed in tumors compared to hyperplasia. The highest expression of proliferation and angiogenesis markers was detected in TC2 tumors. Our data clearly showed that in the genetically well-defined PSA-Cre;Pten-loxP/loxP prostate tumor

  18. Heterogeneities characterization from a core image using the wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaci, S.; Zaourar, N.; Ouadfeul, S.

    2012-04-01

    Core analysis provides valuable information about rocks properties in the sub-surface. In this paper, we suggest a new approach which goes beyond the conventional core analysis. It consists of investigating heterogeneities from core image using two-dimensional Brownian motion (2D-mBm) model. The latter allows to study processes whose regularity varies in space. Synthetic 2D-mBm paths are firstly generated using the kriging method. Then, these simulated paths are used to validate algorithms, developed for estimating Hölderian regularity functions, which are: FFT-based algorithms using the Morlet wavelet and the Mexican hat, and the multiple filter technique generalized to 2 dimensions (2D MFT). The results showed that the latter algorithm yields the best regularity estimates. Next, the suggested analysis is extended to digitalized image data of a core extracted from an Algerian borehole. It is demonstrated that the data exhibit a fractal behavior. In addition, the derived regularity maps can characterize the core heterogeneities. The lithological changes (faults, breaks, stratifications, etc.) are perfectly reflected by local variations of the Hölder exponent value. Keywords: core image, two-dimensional multifractional Brownian motion, fractal, regularity

  19. Multivariate characterization of white matter heterogeneity in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, D C; Lange, N; Travers, B G; Prigge, M B; Matsunami, N; Kellett, K A; Freeman, A; Kane, K L; Adluru, N; Tromp, D P M; Destiche, D J; Samsin, D; Zielinski, B A; Fletcher, P T; Anderson, J S; Froehlich, A L; Leppert, M F; Bigler, E D; Lainhart, J E; Alexander, A L

    2017-01-01

    The complexity and heterogeneity of neuroimaging findings in individuals with autism spectrum disorder has suggested that many of the underlying alterations are subtle and involve many brain regions and networks. The ability to account for multivariate brain features and identify neuroimaging measures that can be used to characterize individual variation have thus become increasingly important for interpreting and understanding the neurobiological mechanisms of autism. In the present study, we utilize the Mahalanobis distance, a multidimensional counterpart of the Euclidean distance, as an informative index to characterize individual brain variation and deviation in autism. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging data from 149 participants (92 diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and 57 typically developing controls) between 3.1 and 36.83 years of age were acquired over a roughly 10-year period and used to construct the Mahalanobis distance from regional measures of white matter microstructure. Mahalanobis distances were significantly greater and more variable in the autistic individuals as compared to control participants, demonstrating increased atypicalities and variation in the group of individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Distributions of multivariate measures were also found to provide greater discrimination and more sensitive delineation between autistic and typically developing individuals than conventional univariate measures, while also being significantly associated with observed traits of the autism group. These results help substantiate autism as a truly heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder, while also suggesting that collectively considering neuroimaging measures from multiple brain regions provides improved insight into the diversity of brain measures in autism that is not observed when considering the same regions separately. Distinguishing multidimensional brain relationships may thus be informative for identifying

  20. Are single-well "push-pull" tests suitable tracer methods for aquifer characterization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebig, Klaus; Zeilfelder, Sarah; Ito, Narimitsu; Machida, Isao; Scheytt, Traugott; Marui, Atsunao

    2013-04-01

    Recently, investigations were conducted for geological and hydrogeological characterisation of the sedimentary coastal basin of Horonobe (Hokkaido, Japan). Coastal areas are typical geological settings in Japan, which are less tectonically active than the mountain ranges. In Asia, and especially in Japan, these areas are often densely populated. Therefore, it is important to investigate the behaviour of solutes in such unconsolidated aquifers. In such settings sometimes only single boreholes or groundwater monitoring wells are available for aquifer testing for various reasons, e.g. depths of more than 100 m below ground level and slow groundwater velocities due to density driven flow. A standard tracer test with several involved groundwater monitoring wells is generally very difficult or even not possible at these depths. One of the most important questions in our project was how we can obtain information about chemical and hydraulic properties in such aquifers. Is it possible to characterize solute transport behaviour parameters with only one available groundwater monitoring well or borehole? A so-called "push-pull" test may be one suitable method for aquifer testing with only one available access point. In a push-pull test a known amount of several solutes including a conservative tracer is injected into the aquifer ("push") and afterwards extracted ("pull"). The measured breakthrough curve during the pumping back phase can then be analysed. This method has already been used previously with various aims, also in the recent project (e.g. Hebig et al. 2011, Zeilfelder et al. 2012). However, different test setups produced different tracer breakthrough curves. As no systematic evaluation of this aquifer tracer test method was done so far, nothing is known about its repeatability. Does the injection and extraction rate influence the shape of the breakthrough curve? Which role plays the often applied "chaser", which is used to push the test solution out from the

  1. Global sensitivity analysis for the geostatistical characterization of a regional-scale sedimentary aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi Janetti, Emanuela; Riva, Monica; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    We perform a variance-based global sensitivity analysis to assess the impact of the uncertainty associated with (a) the spatial distribution of hydraulic parameters, e.g., hydraulic conductivity, and (b) the conceptual model adopted to describe the system on the characterization of a regional-scale aquifer. We do so in the context of inverse modeling of the groundwater flow system. The study aquifer lies within the provinces of Bergamo and Cremona (Italy) and covers a planar extent of approximately 785 km2. Analysis of available sedimentological information allows identifying a set of main geo-materials (facies/phases) which constitute the geological makeup of the subsurface system. We parameterize the conductivity field following two diverse conceptual schemes. The first one is based on the representation of the aquifer as a Composite Medium. In this conceptualization the system is composed by distinct (five, in our case) lithological units. Hydraulic properties (such as conductivity) in each unit are assumed to be uniform. The second approach assumes that the system can be modeled as a collection of media coexisting in space to form an Overlapping Continuum. A key point in this model is that each point in the domain represents a finite volume within which each of the (five) identified lithofacies can be found with a certain volumetric percentage. Groundwater flow is simulated with the numerical code MODFLOW-2005 for each of the adopted conceptual models. We then quantify the relative contribution of the considered uncertain parameters, including boundary conditions, to the total variability of the piezometric level recorded in a set of 40 monitoring wells by relying on the variance-based Sobol indices. The latter are derived numerically for the investigated settings through the use of a model-order reduction technique based on the polynomial chaos expansion approach.

  2. Joining direct and indirect inverse calibration methods to characterize karst, coastal aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Giovanna; Foglia, Laura; Giudici, Mauro; Mehl, Steffen; Margiotta, Stefano; Negri, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    this reason, a joint procedure is proposed by merging both direct and indirect approaches, thus taking advantage of their strengths, first among them the possibility to get a hydraulic head distribution all over the domain, instead of a zonation. Pros and cons of such an integrated methodology, so far unexplored to the authors' knowledge, are derived after application to a highly heterogeneous karst, coastal aquifer located in southern Italy.

  3. Multivariate analyses with end-member mixing to characterize groundwater flow: Wind Cave and associated aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Andrew J.; Valder, Joshua F.

    2011-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to hydrochemical data has been used with end-member mixing to characterize groundwater flow to a limited extent, but aspects of this approach are unresolved. Previous similar approaches typically have assumed that the extreme-value samples identified by PCA represent end members. The method presented herein is different from previous work in that (1) end members were not assumed to have been sampled but rather were estimated and constrained by prior knowledge; (2) end-member mixing was quantified in relation to hydrogeologic domains, which focuses model results on major hydrologic processes; (3) a method to select an appropriate number of end members using a series of cluster analyses is presented; and (4) conservative tracers were weighted preferentially in model calibration, which distributed model errors of optimized values, or residuals, more appropriately than would otherwise be the case. The latter item also provides an estimate of the relative influence of geochemical evolution along flow paths in comparison to mixing. This method was applied to groundwater in Wind Cave and the associated karst aquifer in the Black Hills of South Dakota, USA. The end-member mixing model was used to test a hypothesis that five different end-member waters are mixed in the groundwater system comprising five hydrogeologic domains. The model estimated that Wind Cave received most of its groundwater inflow from local surface recharge with an additional 33% from an upgradient aquifer. Artesian springs in the vicinity of Wind Cave primarily received water from regional groundwater flow.

  4. Ensemble of Surrogates-based Optimization for Identifying an Optimal Surfactant-enhanced Aquifer Remediation Strategy at Heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W., Sr.; Xin, X.; Luo, J.; Jiang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Chen, M.; Hou, Z.; Ouyang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify an optimal surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) strategy for aquifers contaminated by dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) based on an ensemble of surrogates-based optimization technique. A saturated heterogeneous medium contaminated by nitrobenzene was selected as case study. A new kind of surrogate-based SEAR optimization employing an ensemble surrogate (ES) model together with a genetic algorithm (GA) is presented. Four methods, namely radial basis function artificial neural network (RBFANN), kriging (KRG), support vector regression (SVR), and kernel extreme learning machines (KELM), were used to create four individual surrogate models, which were then compared. The comparison enabled us to select the two most accurate models (KELM and KRG) to establish an ES model of the SEAR simulation model, and the developed ES model as well as these four stand-alone surrogate models was compared. The results showed that the average relative error of the average nitrobenzene removal rates between the ES model and the simulation model for 20 test samples was 0.8%, which is a high approximation accuracy, and which indicates that the ES model provides more accurate predictions than the stand-alone surrogate models. Then, a nonlinear optimization model was formulated for the minimum cost, and the developed ES model was embedded into this optimization model as a constrained condition. Besides, GA was used to solve the optimization model to provide the optimal SEAR strategy. The developed ensemble surrogate-optimization approach was effective in seeking a cost-effective SEAR strategy for heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated sites. This research is expected to enrich and develop the theoretical and technical implications for the analysis of remediation strategy optimization of DNAPL-contaminated aquifers.

  5. Characterization of the porosity distribution in the upper part of the karst Biscayne aquifer using common offset ground penetrating radar, Everglades National Park, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Gregory J.; Comas, Xavier; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-07-01

    The karst Biscayne aquifer is characterized by a heterogeneous spatial arrangement of porosity and hydraulic conductivity, making conceptualization difficult. The Biscayne aquifer is the primary source of drinking water for millions of people in south Florida; thus, information concerning the distribution of karst features that concentrate the groundwater flow and affect contaminant transport is critical. The principal purpose of the study was to investigate the ability of two-dimensional ground penetrating radar (GPR) to rapidly characterize porosity variability in the karst Biscayne aquifer in south Florida. An 800-m-long GPR transect of a previously investigated area at the Long Pine Key Nature Trail in Everglades National Park, collected in fast acquisition common offset mode, shows hundreds of diffraction hyperbolae. The distribution of diffraction hyperbolae was used to estimate electromagnetic (EM) wave velocity at each diffraction location and to assess both horizontal and vertical changes in velocity within the transect. A petrophysical model (complex refractive index model or CRIM) was used to estimate total bulk porosity. A set of common midpoint surveys at selected locations distributed along the common-offset transect also were collected for comparison with the common offsets and were used to constrain one-dimensional (1-D) distributions of porosity with depth. Porosity values for the saturated Miami Limestone ranged between 25% and 41% for common offset GPR surveys, and between 23% and 39% for common midpoint GPR surveys. Laboratory measurements of porosity in five whole-core samples from the saturated part of the aquifer in the study area ranged between 7.1% and 41.8%. GPR estimates of porosity were found to be valid only under saturated conditions; other limitations are related to the vertical resolution of the GPR signal and the volume of the material considered by the measurement methodology. Overall, good correspondence between GPR estimates and

  6. Characterization of the porosity distribution in the upper part of the karst Biscayne aquifer using common offset ground penetrating radar, Everglades National Park, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain, Gregory S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Comas, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The karst Biscayne aquifer is characterized by a heterogeneous spatial arrangement of porosity and hydraulic conductivity, making conceptualization difficult. The Biscayne aquifer is the primary source of drinking water for millions of people in south Florida; thus, information concerning the distribution of karst features that concentrate the groundwater flow and affect contaminant transport is critical. The principal purpose of the study was to investigate the ability of two-dimensional ground penetrating radar (GPR) to rapidly characterize porosity variability in the karst Biscayne aquifer in south Florida. An 800-m-long GPR transect of a previously investigated area at the Long Pine Key Nature Trail in Everglades National Park, collected in fast acquisition common offset mode, shows hundreds of diffraction hyperbolae. The distribution of diffraction hyperbolae was used to estimate electromagnetic (EM) wave velocity at each diffraction location and to assess both horizontal and vertical changes in velocity within the transect. A petrophysical model (complex refractive index model or CRIM) was used to estimate total bulk porosity. A set of common midpoint surveys at selected locations distributed along the common-offset transect also were collected for comparison with the common offsets and were used to constrain one-dimensional (1-D) distributions of porosity with depth. Porosity values for the saturated Miami Limestone ranged between 25% and 41% for common offset GPR surveys, and between 23% and 39% for common midpoint GPR surveys. Laboratory measurements of porosity in five whole-core samples from the saturated part of the aquifer in the study area ranged between 7.1% and 41.8%. GPR estimates of porosity were found to be valid only under saturated conditions; other limitations are related to the vertical resolution of the GPR signal and the volume of the material considered by the measurement methodology. Overall, good correspondence between GPR estimates and

  7. Bayesian approach for three-dimensional aquifer characterization at the Hanford 300 Area

    OpenAIRE

    H. Murakami; X. Chen; M. S. Hahn; Y. Liu; M. L. Rockhold; V. R. Vermeul; J. M. Zachara; Y. Rubin

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a stochastic, three-dimensional characterization of a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field within the Hanford 300 Area, Washington, USA, by assimilating large-scale, constant-rate injection test data with small-scale, three-dimensional electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) measurement data. We first inverted the injection test data to estimate the transmissivity field, using zeroth-order temporal moments of pressure buildup curves. We applied a newly developed Bay...

  8. Bayesian approach for three-dimensional aquifer characterization at the hanford 300 area

    OpenAIRE

    H. Murakami; X. Chen; M. S. Hahn; Y. Liu; M. L. Rockhold; V. R. Vermeul; J. M. Zachara; Y. Rubin

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a stochastic, three-dimensional characterization of a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field within DOE's Hanford 300 Area site, Washington, by assimilating large-scale, constant-rate injection test data with small-scale, three-dimensional electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) measurement data. We first inverted the injection test data to estimate the transmissivity field, using zeroth-order temporal moments of pressure buildup curves. We applied a newly developed B...

  9. Solute transport characterization in karst aquifers by tracer injection tests for a sustainable water resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, T.; Angulo, B.; Uriarte, J. A.; Olazar, M.; Arandes, J. M.; Antiguedad, I.

    2017-04-01

    Protection of water resources is a major challenge today, given that territory occupation and land use are continuously increasing. In the case of karst aquifers, its dynamic complexity requires the use of specific methodologies that allow establishing local and regional flow and transport patterns. This information is particularly necessary when springs and wells harnessed for water supply are concerned. In view of the present state of the art, this work shows a new approach based on the use of a LiCl based tracer injection test through a borehole for transport characterization from a local to a regional scale. Thus a long term tracer injection test was conducted in a particularly sensitive sector of the Egino karst massif (Basque Country, Spain). The initial displacement of tracer in the vicinity of the injection was monitored in a second borehole at a radial distance of 10.24 m. This first information, assessed by a radial divergent model, allows obtaining transport characteristic parameters in this immediate vicinity during injection. At a larger (regional) scale, the tracer reaches a highly transmissive network with mean traveling velocities to the main springs being from 4.3 to 13.7 m/h. The responses obtained, particularly clear in the main spring used for water supply, and the persistence of part of the tracer in the injection zone, pose reconsidering the need for their protection. Thus, although the test allows establishing the 24-h isochrone, which is the ceiling value in present European vulnerability approaches, the results obtained advise widening the zone to protect in order to guarantee water quality in the springs. Overall, this stimulus-response test allows furthering the knowledge on the dynamics of solute transport in karst aquifers and is a particularly useful tool in studies related to source vulnerability and protection in such a complex medium.

  10. Hydro-geochemical characterization of Treated Domestic Waste Water for possible use in homestead irrigation and managed aquifer recharge in the coastal city of Khulna, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, T.; Ahmed, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    Bangladesh is among the most densely populated countries in the world. Rapid and unplanned urbanization in Bangladesh has resulted in heterogeneous land use pattern and larger demands for municipal water. To meet the ever-increasing demand of water for such population, the usage of treated domestic waste water (DWW) has become a viable option that can serve specific purposes, i.e. homestead irrigation, managed aquifer recharge (MAR) in major cities like Khulna, the largest city in the southwest coastal region. It is an attractive solution to minimize the deficit between the demand and supply of water in the study area where, in specific parts, city-dwellers suffer year round shortage of potable water due to high salinity in shallow depths. However, certain degree of treatment is mandatory for DWW in order to ensure the compliance of the output water with a set of standards and regulations for the DWW reuse. At present, the DWW is being treated through Constructed Wetlands but the treated water is not used and discharged into the sewer system. Wastewater that has been treated through a constructed wetland is a resource that can be used for productive uses in homestead garden irrigation, artificial aquifer recharge, and other non-potable uses. The study addresses the effectiveness of constructed wetlands in improving the quality of wastewater through on the hydro-geochemical characterization of both raw and treated DWW as well as baseline water quality analysis of surface and ground water in and around the treatment plant with consideration of seasonal variations. The study aims at sustainable development through conservation of water, satisfaction of demands, reliability of water supply, contribution to urban food supply, sustenance of livelihood and replenishment of the depleting aquifer by assessing the suitability of the treated DWW for various non-potable uses and also to provide guidelines for possible uses of treated DWW without adverse impact on environment

  11. Utility of bromide and heat tracers for aquifer characterization affected by highly transient flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Zachara, John M.; Tonkin, Matthew

    2012-08-01

    A tracer test using both bromide and heat tracers conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Hanford 300 Area (300A), Washington, provided an instrument for evaluating the utility of bromide and heat tracers for aquifer characterization. The bromide tracer data were critical to improving the calibration of the flow model complicated by the highly dynamic nature of the flow field. However, most bromide concentrations were obtained from fully screened observation wells, lacking depth-specific resolution for vertical characterization. On the other hand, depth-specific temperature data were relatively simple and inexpensive to acquire. However, temperature-driven fluid density effects influenced heat plume movement. Moreover, the temperature data contained "noise" caused by heating during fluid injection and sampling events. Using the hydraulic conductivity distribution obtained from the calibration of the bromide transport model, the temperature depth profiles and arrival times of temperature peaks simulated by the heat transport model were in reasonable agreement with observations. This suggested that heat can be used as a cost-effective proxy for solute tracers for calibration of the hydraulic conductivity distribution, especially in the vertical direction. However, a heat tracer test must be carefully designed and executed to minimize fluid density effects and sources of noise in temperature data. A sensitivity analysis also revealed that heat transport was most sensitive to hydraulic conductivity and porosity, less sensitive to thermal distribution factor, and least sensitive to thermal dispersion and heat conduction. This indicated that the hydraulic conductivity remains the primary calibration parameter for heat transport.

  12. Stochastic joint inversion of geoelectrical cross-well data for salt tracer test monitoring to image the hydraulic conductivity field of heterogenous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.; Jardani, A.; Dupont, J.

    2012-12-01

    The assessment of hydraulic conductivity of heterogeneous aquifers is a difficult task using traditional hydrogeological methods (e.g., steady state or transient pumping tests) due to their low spatial resolution associated with a low density of available piezometers. Geophysical measurements performed at the ground surface and in boreholes provide additional information for increasing the resolution and accuracy of the inverted hydraulic conductivity. We use a stochastic joint inversion of Direct Current (DC) resistivity and Self-Potential (SP) data plus in situ measurement of the salinity in a downstream well during a synthetic salt tracer experiment to reconstruct the hydraulic conductivity field of an heterogeneous aquifer. The pilot point parameterization is used to avoid over-parameterization of the inverse problem. Bounds on the model parameters are used to promote a consistent Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling of the hydrogeological parameters of the model. To evaluate the effectiveness of the inversion process, we compare several scenarios where the geophysical data are coupled or not to the hydrogeological data to map the hydraulic conductivity. We first test the effectiveness of the inversion of each type of data alone, and then we combine the methods two by two. We finally combine all the information together to show the value of each type of geophysical data in the joint inversion process because of their different sensitivity map. The results of the inversion reveal that the self-potential data improve the estimate of hydraulic conductivity especially when the self-potential data are combined to the salt concentration measurement in the second well or to the time-lapse electrical resistivity data. Various tests are also performed to quantify the uncertainty in the inversion when for instance the semi-variogram is not known and its parameters should be inverted as well.

  13. An environmental tracers approach to characterize groundwater recharge within a carbonate coastal aquifer (Corse-du-Sud, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garel, Emilie; Huneau, Frederic; Khoumeri, Beatrice; Travi, Yves

    2013-04-01

    Bonifacio is a coastal city, highly touristic, located in the southest part of Corsica Island. One million people visit the city in July and August, whereas 3000 inhabitants live throughout the year. Bonifacio lies on a small limestone plateau with a potential aquifer poorly understood. Actually there is a strong need to characterize the hydrogeological behavior for the reason that the economic development of the region is highly dependent of the groundwater supply potential. The Miocene sedimentary basin of Bonifacio has an area of 25 km2 with a depth up to 250 m in the center. It is based and surrounded by a Hercynian granitic substratum. The basin is open to the Mediterranean Sea on its south and east sides. The formation is calcareous-sandstone and is divided in 3 sedimentary units. The upper unit is highly calcareous and sandstone with a pseudo-karstic morphology, the intermediary unit is more silty-sandstone than the last but less than the unit from below. To establish a conceptual model of the groundwater flows of the Bonifacio aquifer, a hydrochemical (major ions, δ18O, δ2H, 3H) and hydrodynamic investigation was carried out on 12 wells, 1 spring and 1 river since May 2011. Vertical recharge is dominant in the centre of the aquifer where unsaturated zone is thicker, while on the aquifer boundaries with the granitic area, lateral flow was significant. Environmental tracers approach had clearly showed the important role of the boundaries conditions for the groundwater flow behavior of the aquifer of Bonifacio and the necessity of an investigation larger than the aquifer itself due to its limited spatial extension.

  14. Characterizing transcriptional heterogeneity through pathway and gene set overdispersion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jean; Salathia, Neeraj; Liu, Rui; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E.; Yung, Yun C.; Herman, Joseph L.; Kaper, Fiona; Fan, Jian-Bing; Zhang, Kun; Chun, Jerold; Kharchenko, Peter V.

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptional state of a cell reflects a variety of biological factors, from persistent cell-type specific features to transient processes such as cell cycle. Depending on biological context, all such aspects of transcriptional heterogeneity may be of interest, but detecting them from noisy single-cell RNA-seq data remains challenging. We developed PAGODA to resolve multiple, potentially overlapping aspects of transcriptional heterogeneity by testing gene sets for coordinated variability amongst measured cells. PMID:26780092

  15. Characterizing fractured rock aquifers using heated Distributed Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensing to determine borehole vertical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, T. O.; Bour, O.; Selker, J. S.; Le Borgne, T.; Bense, V.; Hochreutener, R.; Lavenant, N.

    2013-12-01

    start of both the pumping and recovery phase of cross-borehole- and dipole- tests. In addition, the clear advantage of this is that by deploying a single fiber optic cable in multiple boreholes at a site, the flow profiles in all boreholes can be simultaneously measured, allowing many different pumping experiments to be conducted and monitored in a time efficient manner. Klepikova M. V., Le Borgne T., Bour O., and J-R.de Dreuzy, Inverse modelling of flow tomography experiments in fractured media, submitted to Water Resources Research. Le Borgne T., Bour O., Riley M. S., Gouze P., Pezard P.A., Belghoul A., Lods G., Le Provost R., Greswell R. B., Ellis P.A., Isakov E., and B. J. Last, Comparison of alternative methodologies for identifying and characterizing preferential flow paths in heterogeneous aquifers. Journal of Hydrology 2007, 345, 134-148.

  16. Hydrodynamical, hydrochemical and isotopic characterization of the Kourimat aquifer system (Essaouira basin, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes, P.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The synclinal basin of Kourimat, subdivided in two sub-basins (Igounzar in the North, and Zeltene in the South, is situated in the oriental part of Essaouira basin shelters a carbonate aquifer system contained in the limestones and dolomitic limestones of the Cenomanian and the Turonian. These ground waters represent the only drinking water and irrigation resource for the region.The geological formations outcropping in the studied area, start with the clay and marly formations of the terminal Jurassic in the south of Zelten watershed, and end with the sandy and loamy Quaternary formations in coastal areas in the Low Qsob watershed. The Middle and Upper Cretaceous (marl, fractured limestone, and dolomites represent the rest of the stratigraphic series especially in the areas of the Igrounzar watershed (up to 85% of the outcrops and in Zelten (up to 50%.The field occupation is not very significant. It basically consists of three types: 1 cultures (essentially cereals where it is possible (on the marly soils of the Cretaceous, the Quaternary and the Eocene; 2 uncovered areas corresponding to the fissured and karstic limestone outcrops of the Cretaceous and the Jurassic formations, and 3 forests (coniferous trees in the downstream part of the catchments area (Plio-quaternary soils and mountainous reinforcements of the Western High Atlas. Like for other undeveloped areas of Morocco, the Meskala basin is also subjected to an intensive deforestation (wood for heating and cooking.The study undertaken on the Cenomano-turonian aquifer has allowed us to characterize it from the hydrodynamical, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical point of view. The piezometric map of the two regrouped aquifer levels shows water flow senses from the SE to the NW. The hydraulic gradient varies from upstream to downstream, being weak n the central zone relative to the best hydrodynamic characteristics. The time evolution of the piezometry shows annual and seasonal

  17. Characterization and influence of deformation microstructure heterogeneity on recrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godfrey, A.; Mishin, Oleg V.; Yu, Tianbo

    2015-01-01

    . A methodology for quantifying this type of heterogeneity based on the identification of areas classified as low misorientation regions (LMRs) is described, and some parameters for quantification of both the extent and length scale of LMRs are presented. It is then shown how this approach can be used......The microstructure resulting from plastic deformation of metals typically contains heterogeneity on several length scales. This is also true for samples deformed to large strains, where an important form of heterogeneity is in the variation in microstructural refinement by high angle boundaries...... to investigate the early stages of recrystallization in samples deformed to large strains, by direct comparison of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps of the same area before and after annealing. Methods for estimation of the stored energy of deformation from EBSD data are also surveyed and the problems...

  18. Characterization of the bacterial flora in mineral waters in upstreaming fluids of deep igneous rock aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C.; Mau, M.; SchlöMann, M.; Heinicke, J.; Koch, U.

    2007-03-01

    The bacterial community of the mineral spring Wettinquelle in the Vogtland/NW Bohemian region (German-Czech border) was characterized by sequence analysis of amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. The acidulous spring water consists mostly of old groundwater from deep aquifers, which is mixed with 15-20% young water from upper groundwater horizons. The spring water contains high concentrations of iron, Ca2+ and SO42- ions. A remarkable attribute is the high radon activity of 27 kBq L-1 water. Free escaping spring gas consists mainly of CO2 originating from the mantle, N2 (1.2%) and traces of other gases, like methane and helium. Close relatives of Gallionella ferruginea, a micro-aerobic oxidizer of ferrous iron, contributed most to the clone library. Clones with sequences related to Thiobacillus aquaesulis, members of the Sulfuricurvum-cluster and members of several branches of the OP11 group were present in significantly lower numbers but still with some microdiversity. These bacterial groups, which contributed strongly to the clone library and have known physiology, obviously depend on the oxygen in the younger water and reduced compounds from the below.

  19. Demonstration of a Fractured Rock Geophysical Toolbox (FRGT) for Characterization and Monitoring of DNAPL Biodegradation in Fractured Rock Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    USER’S GUIDE Demonstration of a Fractured Rock Geophysical Toolbox (FRGT) for Characterization and Monitoring of DNAPL Biodegradation in...Fractured Rock Aquifers ESTCP Project ER-201118 JANUARY 2016 F.D. Day-Lewis C.D. Johnson U. S. Geological Survey, Office of Groundwater...RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 01/01/2016 Guidance July 2011 - January 2016 Demonstration of a Fractured Rock Geophysical

  20. Application of the top specified boundary layer (TSBL) approximation to initial characterization of an inland aquifer mineralization: 2. Seepage of saltwater through semi-confining layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a generalized basic study that addresses practical needs for an understanding of the major mechanisms involved in the mineralization of groundwater in the Great Bend Prairie aquifer in south- central Kansas. This Quaternary alluvial aquifer and associated surface waters are subject to contamination by saltwater, which in some areas seeps from the deeper Permian bedrock formation into the overlying freshwater aquifer through semiconfining layers. A simplified conceptual model is adopted. It incorporates the freshwater aquifer whose bottom is comprised of a semiconfining layer through which a hydrologically minor but geochemically important saline water discharge seeps into the aquifer. A hierarchy of approximate approaches is considered to analyze the mineralization processes taking place in the aquifer. The recently developed top specified boundary layer (TSBL) approach is very convenient to use for the initial characterization of these processes, and is further adapted to characterization of head-driven seepage through semi-confining layers. TSBL calculations indicate that the seeping saline water may create two distinct new zones in the aquifer: (1) a completely saline zone (CSZ) adjacent to the semiconfining bottom of the aquifer, and (2) a transition zone (TZ) which develops between the CSZ and the freshwater zone. Some possible scenarios associated with the various mineralization patterns are analyzed and discussed.

  1. Quantitative Application Data Flow Characterization for Heterogeneous Multicore Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostadzadeh, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent trends show a steady increase in the utilization of heterogeneous multicore architectures in order to address the ever-growing need for computing performance. These emerging architectures pose specific challenges with regard to their programmability. In addition, they require efficient

  2. Integrating geophysical and hydrochemical borehole-log measurements to characterize the Chalk aquifer, Berkshire, United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürch, Marc; Buckley, David

    2002-09-01

    Geophysical and hydrochemical borehole-logging techniques were integrated to characterize hydraulic and hydrogeochemical properties of the Chalk aquifer at boreholes in Berkshire, UK. The down-hole measurements were made to locate fissures in the chalk, their spatial extent between boreholes, and to determine the groundwater chemical quality of the water-bearing layers. The geophysical borehole logging methods used were caliper, focused resistivity, induction resistivity, gamma ray, fluid temperature, fluid electrical conductivity, impeller and heat-pulse flowmeter, together with borehole wall optical-imaging. A multiparameter data transmitter was used to measure groundwater temperature, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, and redox potential of the borehole fluid down-hole. High permeability developed at the Chalk Rock by groundwater circulation provides the major flow horizon at the Banterwick Barn study site and represents a conduit system that serves as an effective local hydraulic connection between the boreholes. The Chalk Rock includes several lithified solution-ridden layers, hardgrounds, which imply a gap in sedimentation possibly representing an unconformity. Lower groundwater temperature, high dissolved-oxygen content, and flowmeter evidence of preferential groundwater flow in the Chalk Rock indicated rapid groundwater circulation along this horizon. By repeating the logging at different times of the year under changing hydraulic conditions, other water-inflow horizons within the Chalk aquifer were recognized. Résumé. Des techniques géophysiques et hydrochimiques de diagraphies en forage ont été mises en oeuvre pour caractériser les propriétés hydrauliques et hydrogéochimiques de l'aquifère de la craie dans des forages du Berkshire (Grande-Bretagne). Les mesures en descente ont été faites pour localiser les fissures dans la craie et leur développement spatial entre forages, et pour déterminer la qualité de l'eau souterraine des

  3. Integrated Methods for Site Characterization and Conceptual Model Development for a Contaminated Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. D.; Kastrinos, J. R.; Haeni, F. P.

    2005-12-01

    of the geophysical surveys together with hydraulic and geochemical data from discrete-zone monitoring systems in bedrock wells, chemical data from private water supply wells, surface-water-quality data, and drive-point profiling data were used to develop a conceptual model of the ground-water flow and contaminant distribution at the site. The conceptual model was refined iteratively as additional data were obtained including transient head and chemical data. The conceptual model was used to assess contaminant migration from the landfill and chemical-waste disposal pits and to evaluate remedial alternatives. The University has initiated remedial actions on both the landfill and the chemical-waste disposal pits and has a long-term monitoring program, results of which will be evaluated against the conceptual model. This investigation demonstrated (1) the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach for characterizing contamination in a complex fractured-rock aquifer; (2) the development and use of an iteratively updated site conceptual ground-water flow model; and (3) the value of discrete-zone isolation and long-term monitoring in fractured-rock aquifers to prevent cross-contamination while permitting head measurements and water-quality sampling. This allowed characterization of contaminant migration over time, which might not have been identified without the discrete-interval data.

  4. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a ``heterogeneity matrix`` based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  5. Characterizing transcriptional heterogeneity through pathway and gene set overdispersion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jean; Salathia, Neeraj; Liu, Rui; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E; Yung, Yun C; Herman, Joseph L; Kaper, Fiona; Fan, Jian-Bing; Zhang, Kun; Chun, Jerold; Kharchenko, Peter V

    2016-03-01

    The transcriptional state of a cell reflects a variety of biological factors, from cell-type-specific features to transient processes such as the cell cycle, all of which may be of interest. However, identifying such aspects from noisy single-cell RNA-seq data remains challenging. We developed pathway and gene set overdispersion analysis (PAGODA) to resolve multiple, potentially overlapping aspects of transcriptional heterogeneity by testing gene sets for coordinated variability among measured cells.

  6. Characterizing mutational heterogeneity in a glioblastoma patient with double recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle C Nickel

    Full Text Available Human cancers are driven by the acquisition of somatic mutations. Separating the driving mutations from those that are random consequences of general genomic instability remains a challenge. New sequencing technology makes it possible to detect mutations that are present in only a minority of cells in a heterogeneous tumor population. We sought to leverage the power of ultra-deep sequencing to study various levels of tumor heterogeneity in the serial recurrences of a single glioblastoma multiforme patient. Our goal was to gain insight into the temporal succession of DNA base-level lesions by querying intra- and inter-tumoral cell populations in the same patient over time. We performed targeted "next-generation" sequencing on seven samples from the same patient: two foci within the primary tumor, two foci within an initial recurrence, two foci within a second recurrence, and normal blood. Our study reveals multiple levels of mutational heterogeneity. We found variable frequencies of specific EGFR, PIK3CA, PTEN, and TP53 base substitutions within individual tumor regions and across distinct regions within the same tumor. In addition, specific mutations emerge and disappear along the temporal spectrum from tumor at the time of diagnosis to second recurrence, demonstrating evolution during tumor progression. Our results shed light on the spatial and temporal complexity of brain tumors. As sequencing costs continue to decline and deep sequencing technology eventually moves into the clinic, this approach may provide guidance for treatment choices as we embark on the path to personalized cancer medicine.

  7. Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in A/M Area Crouch Branch (Cretaceous) Aquifer characterization samples: 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B.B.; Haselow, J.S.; Keenan, M.A.; Van Pelt, R.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Rossabi, J.; Simmons, J.L.

    1993-12-06

    Samples were collected during the A/M Area Crouch Branch (Cretaceous) Aquifer Characterization (Phase I) Program. The samples were analyzed for chlorinated VOCs by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and MicroSeeps Ltd. All samples were sealed in the field immediately upon retrieval of the core and subsampling. A total of 113 samples locations were selected for analysis. The Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of SRTC analyzed all locations in duplicate (226 samples). MicroSeeps Ltd was selected as the quality assurance (QA) check laboratory. MicroSeeps Ltd analyzed 40 locations with 4 duplicates (44 samples). The samples were collected from seven boreholes in A/M Area in the interval from 200 feet deep to the total depth of the boring (360 feet deep nominal); samples were collected every 10 feet within this interval. The sampling zone corresponds approximately to the Crouch Branch Aquifer in A/M Area. The overall A/M Area Crouch Branch Aquifer characterization objectives, a brief description of A/M Area geology and hydrology, and the sample locations, field notes, driller lithologic logs, and required procedural documentation are presented in WSRC (1993).

  8. Analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) to characterize microbial communities in aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Scow, Kate M.

    This paper reviews published applications of lipid-based biochemical techniques for characterizing microbial communities in aquifers and other deep subsurface habitats. These techniques, such as phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, can provide information on a variety of microbial characteristics, such as biomass, physiology, taxonomic and functional identity, and overall community composition. In addition, multivariate statistical analysis of lipid data can relate spatial or temporal changes in microbial communities to environmental factors. The use of lipid-based techniques in the study of groundwater microbiology is advantageous because they do not require culturing and can provide quantitative data on entire communities. However, combined effects of physiological and phylogenetic changes on the lipid composition of a community can confound interpretation of the data, and many questions remain about the validity of various lipid techniques. Despite these caveats, lipid-based research has begun to show trends in community composition in contaminated and pristine aquifers that contribute to our understanding of groundwater microbial ecology and have potential for use in optimization of bioremediation of groundwater pollutants. Résumé Ce papier passe en revue les applications des techniques biochimiques basées sur les lipides pour caractériser les communautés microbiennes présentes dans les aquifères et dans les autres habitats souterrains profonds. Ces techniques, telles que l'analyse des acides gras phospholipidiques (PLFA), peuvent fournir des informations sur un ensemble de caractères microbiens, tels que la biomasse, la physiologie, l'identité taxonomique et fonctionnelle, et surtout la composition de la communauté. En outre, l'analyse statistique multivariée des données sur les lipides peut établir les liens entre des changements spatiaux ou temporels dans la communauté microbienne et des facteurs environnementaux. L'utilisation des

  9. Characterization and modeling of in situ stress heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Lewis, Amy D. F.

    Through a series of related projects, the work described in this dissertation strives to better constrain, describe, and explain in situ stress heterogeneity. Although each project has specific goals, approaches, and outcomes, combined they represent important progress in the ongoing effort to understand stress heterogeneity at a variety of scales. In the first study we analyze multi-scale variations in the direction of maximum horizontal compressive stress as a function of depth in four scientific research boreholes located in a variety of tectonic environments. Our results provide insight into the mechanisms controlling in situ crustal stress heterogeneity over scales from centimeters to kilometers. We show that the orientation of the maximum, horizontal compressive stress determined from stress-induced wellbore failures displays scale-invariant, fractal distributions with spectral exponents between 1 and 2. The scaling of the stress variations is remarkably similar to the spatial scaling of earthquakes as a function of fault size in the individual study areas. Consequently, we suggest that wellbore stress heterogeneity is controlled by slip on a fractal distribution of active faults in the surrounding crust. The observed correlation between the amount of stress heterogeneity and local fault behavior may prove useful in models of dynamic earthquake rupture, where many of the key parameters including stress and fault strength appear to vary spatially. In the second study we develop two models---a two-dimensional, analytical model and a three-dimensional, numerical model---to explain the rotation of in situ stresses resulting from a pore pressure change on one side of an impermeable boundary (for example, near an impermeable fault in a depleted reservoir). Our models show clearly that near the boundary depletion will induce the maximum horizontal compressive stress to become more parallel to the boundary, whereas injection will have the opposite effect. We find a

  10. Sustainable management of transboundary water resources (Belgium/France): Characterization and modelling of the Carboniferous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, J.; Picot-Colbeaux, G.; Crastes de Paulet, F.; Rorive, A.; Bouvet, A.; Goderniaux, P.; Thiery, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Carboniferous Limestone groundwater extends from East to West across Belgium and the North of France (1420 km²). In a high population density and industrial activity region, it represents huge volumes of abstracted groundwater (98 Mm³). The aquifer thus constitutes a critical reserve for public distribution and industrial uses. This water reservoir is intensively exploited from both sides of the border since the end of the 19th century. Historically, this transboundary aquifer was overexploited, due to the massive requirements of the industry. As a consequence, a substantial piezometric level decrease was observed (up to 50 m). Due to the karstic nature of the aquifer, many sinkhole collapses were induced in the studied area. A reduction of the abstracted volumes was implemented in the 90s, which contributed to the relative stabilization of the piezometric levels, but the equilibrium remains uncertain. Due to complex political, urbanistic and industrial developments across this region, a reasonable and long-term management model was needed, involving all concerned countries and regions. Within the framework of the Interreg ScaldWIN Project, a belgo-french collaboration allowed the acquisition of new sets of geological and hydrogeological data. A new piezometric map was established and correlated with chemical and isotopic analyses. It enabled a more accurate knowledge on the main flow directions within the aquifer, and the relation between recharge area and the confined area, where groundwater is aged up to 10000 years. A new numerical model of the aquifer was implemented and calibrated by using the MARTHE code. This 4 layer-model includes a part of the French chalk aquifer and integrates all abstracted groundwater volumes (wells and quarries) from 1900 to 2010. Atmospheric and surface waters and potential evapotranspiration are included in relation to the groundwater. This model is used by the different partners to consider globally and locally the impact of

  11. Three-dimensional Characterization of A High-K Aquifer at the Hanford 300 Area and Retrospective Analysis of Experimental Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H.; Chen, X.; Hahn, M. S.; Liu, Y.; Rockhold, M. L.; Vermeul, V.; Rubin, Y.

    2009-12-01

    There is a significant challenge associated with characterizing local-scale heterogeneity of a hydraulic conductivity field in a high-permeability and coarse-grained aquifer such as the Hanford 300 Area. In addition to the fact that point conductivity measurements are not reliable, conventional pumping-test interpretations yield only effective properties over a large area. While electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) tests are feasible to obtain a large number of small-scale depth-discrete conductivities, the EBF data needs to be converted to absolute conductivity values, using a local-scale transmissivity value at each well location from the other aquifer tests. In this study, we first present a 3-D characterization of the hydraulic conductivity field under the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at the Hanford 300 Area, by combining EBF data with constant-rate injection test data. In order to characterize the transmissivity field based on injection tests, we apply the method of anchor distributions (MAD), which is a general Bayesian geostatistical inversion framework. In addition to typical structural parameters, the parameter vector includes conditioning points, called anchors, which capture local trends of the field and reduce uncertainty in prediction. Our goal is to obtain a joint posterior distribution of the parameters rather than point estimates so as to fully characterize the uncertainty. We invert the zeroth temporal moments of drawdowns during multiple tests, which can eliminate uncertainty in a storage coefficient as well as reduce the computational cost significantly. From the absolute conductivity values based on the inversion results and the EBF data, we obtain a joint posterior distribution of 3-D geostatistical parameters of the conductivity field. As a retrospective design analysis, we investigate the number and configuration of the constant-rate injection tests used in the inversion, by choosing subsets of the 14 injection tests

  12. Potential shallow aquifers characterization through an integrated geophysical method: multivariate approach by means of k-means algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bernardinetti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The need to obtain a detailed hydrogeological characterization of the subsurface and its interpretation for the groundwater resources management, often requires to apply several and complementary geophysical methods. The goal of the approach in this paper is to provide a unique model of the aquifer by synthesizing and optimizing the information provided by several geophysical methods. This approach greatly reduces the degree of uncertainty and subjectivity of the interpretation by exploiting the different physical and mechanic characteristics of the aquifer. The studied area, into the municipality of Laterina (Arezzo, Italy, is a shallow basin filled by lacustrine and alluvial deposits (Pleistocene and Olocene epochs, Quaternary period, with alternated silt, sand with variable content of gravel and clay where the bottom is represented by arenaceous-pelitic rocks (Mt. Cervarola Unit, Tuscan Domain, Miocene epoch. This shallow basin constitutes the unconfined superficial aquifer to be exploited in the nearly future. To improve the geological model obtained from a detailed geological survey we performed electrical resistivity and P wave refraction tomographies along the same line in order to obtain different, independent and integrable data sets. For the seismic data also the reflected events have been processed, a remarkable contribution to draw the geologic setting. Through the k-means algorithm, we perform a cluster analysis for the bivariate data set to individuate relationships between the two sets of variables. This algorithm allows to individuate clusters with the aim of minimizing the dissimilarity within each cluster and maximizing it among different clusters of the bivariate data set. The optimal number of clusters “K”, corresponding to the individuated geophysical facies, depends to the multivariate data set distribution and in this work is estimated with the Silhouettes. The result is an integrated tomography that shows a finite

  13. High resolution aquifer characterization using crosshole GPR full-waveform tomography: Comparison with direct-push and tracer test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueting, Nils; Vienken, Thomas; Klotzsche, Anja; van der Kruk, Jan; Vanderborght, Jan; Caers, Jef; Vereecken, Harry; Englert, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Limited knowledge about the spatial distribution of aquifer properties typically constrains our ability to predict subsurface flow and transport. Here we investigate the value of using high resolution full-waveform inversion of cross-borehole ground penetrating radar (GPR) data for aquifer characterization. By stitching together GPR tomograms from multiple adjacent crosshole planes, we are able to image, with a decimeter scale resolution, the dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of an alluvial aquifer along cross sections of 50 m length and 10 m depth. A logistic regression model is employed to predict the spatial distribution of lithological facies on the basis of the GPR results. Vertical profiles of porosity and hydraulic conductivity from direct-push, flowmeter and grain size data suggest that the GPR predicted facies classification is meaningful with regard to porosity and hydraulic conductivity, even though the distributions of individual facies show some overlap and the absolute hydraulic conductivities from the different methods (direct-push, flowmeter, grain size) differ up to approximately one order of magnitude. Comparison of the GPR predicted facies architecture with tracer test data suggests that the plume splitting observed in a tracer experiment was caused by a hydraulically low-conductive sand layer with a thickness of only a few decimeters. Because this sand layer is identified by GPR full-waveform inversion but not by conventional GPR ray-based inversion we conclude that the improvement in spatial resolution due to full-waveform inversion is crucial to detect small-scale aquifer structures that are highly relevant for solute transport.

  14. Assessment of vulnerability in karst aquifers using a quantitative integrated numerical model: catchment characterization and high resolution monitoring - Application to semi-arid regions- Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doummar, Joanna; Aoun, Michel; Andari, Fouad

    2016-04-01

    Karst aquifers are highly heterogeneous and characterized by a duality of recharge (concentrated; fast versus diffuse; slow) and a duality of flow which directly influences groundwater flow and spring responses. Given this heterogeneity in flow and infiltration, karst aquifers do not always obey standard hydraulic laws. Therefore the assessment of their vulnerability reveals to be challenging. Studies have shown that vulnerability of aquifers is highly governed by recharge to groundwater. On the other hand specific parameters appear to play a major role in the spatial and temporal distribution of infiltration on a karst system, thus greatly influencing the discharge rates observed at a karst spring, and consequently the vulnerability of a spring. This heterogeneity can only be depicted using an integrated numerical model to quantify recharge spatially and assess the spatial and temporal vulnerability of a catchment for contamination. In the framework of a three-year PEER NSF/USAID funded project, the vulnerability of a karst catchment in Lebanon is assessed quantitatively using a numerical approach. The aim of the project is also to refine actual evapotranspiration rates and spatial recharge distribution in a semi arid environment. For this purpose, a monitoring network was installed since July 2014 on two different pilot karst catchment (drained by Qachqouch Spring and Assal Spring) to collect high resolution data to be used in an integrated catchment numerical model with MIKE SHE, DHI including climate, unsaturated zone, and saturated zone. Catchment characterization essential for the model included geological mapping and karst features (e.g., dolines) survey as they contribute to fast flow. Tracer experiments were performed under different flow conditions (snow melt and low flow) to delineate the catchment area, reveal groundwater velocities and response to snowmelt events. An assessment of spring response after precipitation events allowed the estimation of the

  15. Geochemical characterization of shallow ground water in the Eutaw aquifer, Montgomery, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J.L.; Journey, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ground water samples were collected from 30 wells located in, or directly down gradient from, recharge areas of the Eutaw aquifer in Montgomery, Alabama. The major ion content of the water evolves from calcium-sodium-chloride- dominated type in the recharge area to calcium-bicarbonate-dominated type in the confined portion of the aquifer. Ground water in the recharge area was undersaturated with respect to aluminosilicate and carbonate minerals. Ground water in the confined portion of the aquifer was at equilibrium levels for calcite and potassium feldspar. Dissolved oxygen and nitrite-plus-nitrate concentrations decreased as ground water age increased; pH, iron, and sulfate concentrations increased as ground water age increased. Aluminum, copper, and zinc concentrations decreased as ground water age and pH increased. These relations indicate that nitrate, aluminum, copper, and zinc are removed from solution as water moves from recharge areas to the confined areas of the Eutaw aquifer. The natural evolution of ground water quality, which typically increases the pH and decreases the dissolved oxygen content, may be an important limiting factor to the migration of nitrogen based compounds and metals.

  16. CHROTRAN 1.0: A mathematical and computational model for in situ heavy metal remediation in heterogeneous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott K.; Pandey, Sachin; Karra, Satish; Vesselinov, Velimir V.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater contamination by heavy metals is a critical environmental problem for which in situ remediation is frequently the only viable treatment option. For such interventions, a multi-dimensional reactive transport model of relevant biogeochemical processes is invaluable. To this end, we developed a model, chrotran, for in situ treatment, which includes full dynamics for five species: a heavy metal to be remediated, an electron donor, biomass, a nontoxic conservative bio-inhibitor, and a biocide. Direct abiotic reduction by donor-metal interaction as well as donor-driven biomass growth and bio-reduction are modeled, along with crucial processes such as donor sorption, bio-fouling, and biomass death. Our software implementation handles heterogeneous flow fields, as well as arbitrarily many chemical species and amendment injection points, and features full coupling between flow and reactive transport. We describe installation and usage and present two example simulations demonstrating its unique capabilities. One simulation suggests an unorthodox approach to remediation of Cr(VI) contamination.

  17. Characterizing the spatiotemporal variability of groundwater levels of alluvial aquifers in different settings using drought indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Johannes Christoph; Birk, Steffen

    2017-05-01

    To improve the understanding of how aquifers in different alluvial settings respond to extreme events in a changing environment, we analyze standardized time series of groundwater levels (Standardized Groundwater level Index - SGI), precipitation (Standardized Precipitation Index - SPI), and river stages of three subregions within the catchment of the river Mur (Austria). Using correlation matrices, differences and similarities between the subregions, ranging from the Alpine upstream part of the catchment to its shallow foreland basin, are identified and visualized. Generally, river stages exhibit the highest correlations with groundwater levels, frequently affecting not only the wells closest to the river, but also more distant parts of the alluvial aquifer. As a result, human impacts on the river are transferred to the aquifer, thus affecting the behavior of groundwater levels. Hence, to avoid misinterpretation of groundwater levels in this type of setting, it is important to account for the river and human impacts on it. While the river is a controlling factor in all of the subregions, an influence of precipitation is evident too. Except for deep wells found in an upstream Alpine basin, groundwater levels show the highest correlation with a precipitation accumulation period of 6 months (SPI6). The correlation in the foreland is generally higher than that in the Alpine subregions, thus corresponding to a trend from deeper wells in the Alpine parts of the catchment towards more shallow wells in the foreland. Extreme events are found to affect the aquifer in different ways. As shown with the well-known European 2003 drought and the local 2009 floods, correlations are reduced under flood conditions, but increased under drought. Thus, precipitation, groundwater levels and river stages tend to exhibit uniform behavior under drought conditions, whereas they may show irregular behavior during floods. Similarly, correlations are found to be weaker in years with little

  18. Dielectric and Elastic Characterization of Nonlinear Heterogeneous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Giordano

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This review paper deals with the dielectric and elastic characterization of composite materials constituted by dispersions of nonlinear inclusions embedded in a linear matrix. The dielectric theory deals with pseudo-oriented particles shaped as ellipsoids of revolution: it means that we are dealing with mixtures of inclusions of arbitrary aspect ratio and arbitrary non-random orientational distributions. The analysis ranges from parallel spheroidal inclusions to completely random oriented inclusions. Each ellipsoidal inclusion is made of an isotropic dielectric material described by means of the so-called Kerr nonlinear relation. On the other hand, the nonlinear elastic characterization takes into consideration a dispersion of nonlinear (spherical or cylindrical inhomogeneities. Both phases are considered isotropic (actually it means polycrystalline or amorphous solids. Under the simplifying hypotheses of small deformation for the material body and of small volume fraction of the embedded phase, we describe a theory for obtaining the linear and nonlinear elastic properties (bulk and shear moduli and Landau coefficients of the overall material.

  19. Bayesian approach for three-dimensional aquifer characterization at the Hanford 300 Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H.; Chen, X.; Hahn, M. S.; Liu, Y.; Rockhold, M. L.; Vermeul, V. R.; Zachara, J. M.; Rubin, Y.

    2010-10-01

    This study presents a stochastic, three-dimensional characterization of a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field within the Hanford 300 Area, Washington, USA, by assimilating large-scale, constant-rate injection test data with small-scale, three-dimensional electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) measurement data. We first inverted the injection test data to estimate the transmissivity field, using zeroth-order temporal moments of pressure buildup curves. We applied a newly developed Bayesian geostatistical inversion framework, the method of anchored distributions (MAD), to obtain a joint posterior distribution of geostatistical parameters and local log-transmissivities at multiple locations. The unique aspects of MAD that make it suitable for this purpose are its ability to integrate multi-scale, multi-type data within a Bayesian framework and to compute a nonparametric posterior distribution. After we combined the distribution of transmissivities with depth-discrete relative-conductivity profile from the EBF data, we inferred the three-dimensional geostatistical parameters of the log-conductivity field, using the Bayesian model-based geostatistics. Such consistent use of the Bayesian approach throughout the procedure enabled us to systematically incorporate data uncertainty into the final posterior distribution. The method was tested in a synthetic study and validated using the actual data that was not part of the estimation. Results showed broader and skewed posterior distributions of geostatistical parameters except for the mean, which suggests the importance of inferring the entire distribution to quantify the parameter uncertainty.

  20. Bayesian approach for three-dimensional aquifer characterization at the Hanford 300 Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Murakami

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a stochastic, three-dimensional characterization of a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field within the Hanford 300 Area, Washington, USA, by assimilating large-scale, constant-rate injection test data with small-scale, three-dimensional electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF measurement data. We first inverted the injection test data to estimate the transmissivity field, using zeroth-order temporal moments of pressure buildup curves. We applied a newly developed Bayesian geostatistical inversion framework, the method of anchored distributions (MAD, to obtain a joint posterior distribution of geostatistical parameters and local log-transmissivities at multiple locations. The unique aspects of MAD that make it suitable for this purpose are its ability to integrate multi-scale, multi-type data within a Bayesian framework and to compute a nonparametric posterior distribution. After we combined the distribution of transmissivities with depth-discrete relative-conductivity profile from the EBF data, we inferred the three-dimensional geostatistical parameters of the log-conductivity field, using the Bayesian model-based geostatistics. Such consistent use of the Bayesian approach throughout the procedure enabled us to systematically incorporate data uncertainty into the final posterior distribution. The method was tested in a synthetic study and validated using the actual data that was not part of the estimation. Results showed broader and skewed posterior distributions of geostatistical parameters except for the mean, which suggests the importance of inferring the entire distribution to quantify the parameter uncertainty.

  1. 3D magnetotelluric characterization of the geothermal anomaly in the Llucmajor aquifer system (Majorca, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, C.; Marcuello, A.; Ledo, J.; Queralt, P.

    2009-08-01

    In the Llucmajor aquifer system (Majorca Island, Spain) some geothermal evidences have appeared. This phenomenon is not isolated to Majorca and it is present in other areas, where it can be associated with structural conditions, especially to the extensional event suffered by the island after the Alpine Orogeny. However, the origin of this anomaly in Llucmajor is not well known, and there is no surface geological evidence of these structural conditions. With the aim of delineating the geoelectrical structure of the zone and identifying the geological structure that allows the presence of this anomaly, an audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) survey was carried out. The AMT data was processed using a Wavelet Transform-based scheme. Dimensionality analysis indicates that the geoelectrical structure is mainly 3D. The 3D model was obtained by trial and error forward modeling, taking accounting of the responses from the determinant of the impedance tensor. The model shows a vertical resistivity distribution with three horizons associated with different units: on the top, a shallow high resistive media related to an unconfined shallow aquifer; in the middle, a conductive layer related to the aquitard, and below it, another resistive media related to the confined deeper aquifer. The intermediate horizon shows a sudden thinning beneath the thermal anomalous zone that can be identified as a weakness zone (fault or fracture) connecting both aquifers. An exploratory well was drilled after the AMT survey and reached almost 700 m in depth. This allowed correlating the resistivity distribution of the 3D model with data logging and lithology obtained from the well, showing a proper agreement between them.

  2. Multi-scale aquifer characterization and groundwater flow model parameterization using direct push technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Rogiers, Bart; Vienken, Thomas; Gedeon, Matej; Batelaan, Okke; Mallants, Dirk; Huysmans, Marijke; Dassargues, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater flow and contaminant transport models are used to support decision making regarding waste disposal options, sites contaminated by surface or subsurface sources, or to develop and test cost-effective groundwater remediation schemes. Such models are influenced by different sources of uncertainty, including those due to spatial variability in aquifer and aquitard properties including hydraulic conductivity (K). However, quantifying spatial variability in K remains challenging. Classi...

  3. The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) field test facility -- system description, aquifer characterization, and results of short-term test cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, M.; Hoyer, M.C.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Holm, N.L.; Holm, T.R.; Kanivetsky, R.; Jirsa, M.A.; Lee, H.C.; Lauer, J.L.; Miller, R.T.; Norton, J.L.; Runke, H. (Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Phase 1 of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Project at the University of Minnesota was to test the feasibility, and model, the ATES concept at temperatures above 100{degrees}C using a confined aquifer for the storage and recovery of hot water. Phase 1 included design, construction, and operation of a 5-MW thermal input/output field test facility (FTF) for four short-term ATES cycles (8 days each of heat injection, storage, and heat recover). Phase 1 was conducted from May 1980 to December 1983. This report describes the FTF, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville (FIG) aquifer used for the test, and the four short-term ATES cycles. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are all included. The FTF consists of monitoring wells and the source and storage well doublet completed in the FIG aquifer with heat exchangers and a fixed-bed precipitator between the wells of the doublet. The FIG aquifer is highly layered and a really anisotropic. The upper Franconia and Ironton-Galesville parts of the aquifer, those parts screened, have hydraulic conductivities of {approximately}0.6 and {approximately}1.0 m/d, respectively. Primary ions in the ambient ground water are calcium and magnesium bicarbonate. Ambient temperature FIG ground water is saturated with respect to calcium/magnesium bicarbonate. Heating the ground water caused most of the dissolved calcium to precipitate out as calcium carbonate in the heat exchanger and precipitator. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water, suggesting dissolution of some constituents of the aquifer during the cycles. Further work on the ground water chemistry is required to understand water-rock interactions.

  4. Characterization of Predominant Reductants in an Anaerobic Leachate-Contaminated Aquifer by Nitroaromatic Probe Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rügge, Kirsten; Hofstetter, Thomas B.; Haderlein, Stefan B.

    1998-01-01

    The biogeochemical processes controlling the reductive transformation of contaminants in an anaerobic aquifer were inferred from the relative reactivity patterns of redox-sensitive probe compounds. The fate of five nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) was monitored under different redox conditions in a...... results suggest that Fe(ll) associated with ferric iron minerals is a highly reactive reductant in anaerobic aquifers, which may also determine the fate of other classes of reducible contaminants such as halogenated solvents, azo compounds, sulfoxides, chromate, or arsenate.......The biogeochemical processes controlling the reductive transformation of contaminants in an anaerobic aquifer were inferred from the relative reactivity patterns of redox-sensitive probe compounds. The fate of five nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) was monitored under different redox conditions......-70 days in the leachate plume as well as in microbially active and in microbially deactivated experiments. Generally, aromatic amines were the predominant reduction products, and these compounds were stable within the time frame and under the conditions of our experiments. Despite the presence of various...

  5. Isotopic characterization of the Precambrian carbonate aquifers under the city of Bangui (Central African Republic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huneau, Frederic; Djebebe-Ndjiguim, Chantal-Laure; Foto, Eric; Ito, Mari; Celle-Jeanton, Helene; Garel, Emilie; Mabingui, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    The city of Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, is located on the right bank of the Ubangi River which is the northernmost tributary of the Congo River. From its foundation in 1889 this city has always suffered from serious problems of water management. This is related to the specificity of the site configuration (steep hills surrounding a large swampy flat valley poorly drained) and to the urbanisation process responsible for the waterproofing of soils and the associated increased runoff processes under tropical humid condition.This paper presents the results of a geochemical and isotopic survey carried out in 2011 aiming at evaluating the type and chemical quality of the groundwater resources of the Bangui region. By combining geological, hydrogeochemical and isotopic data it appears that the underground of Bangui seems favourable to the development of a secured and sustainable water supply from groundwater provided that the conditions of exploitation would be constrained by the local authorities. The deep fractured (and locally kastified) Precambrian carbonate aquifers known as Bimbo and Fatima formations are identified as target resources considering the relatively good quality of the resource from the chemical point of view, and the semi-confined structure of the aquifer preventing the mixing with shallow aquifers already strongly impacted by domestic and industrial pollutions.

  6. The Dammam aquifer in Bahrain - Hydrochemical characterization and alternatives for management of groundwater quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubari, Waleed K.

    Over-ion of the Dammam aquifer, the principal aquifer in Bahrain, by the agricultural and domestic sectors, has led to its salinization by adjacent brackish and saline water bodies. A hydrochemical study identified the locations of the sources of aquifer salinization and delineated their areas of influence. The investigation indicates that the aquifer water quality is significantly modified as groundwater flows from the northwestern parts of Bahrain, where the aquifer receives its water by lateral underflow from eastern Saudi Arabia, to the southern and southeastern parts. Four types of salinization of the aquifer are identified: brackish-water up-flow from the underlying brackish-water zones in north-central, western, and eastern regions; seawater intrusion in the eastern region; intrusion of sabkha water in the southwestern region; and irrigation return flow in a local area in the western region. Four alternatives for the management of groundwater quality that are available to the water authorities in Bahrain are discussed and their priority areas are proposed, based on the type and extent of each salinization source, in addition to groundwater use in that area. The effectiveness of the proposed management options in controlling the degradation of water quality in the Dammam aquifer should be evaluated using simulation modeling. Résumé La surexploitation de l'aquifère de Damman, principal aquifère de Bahreïn, du fait des besoins agricoles et domestiques, a conduit à sa salinisation à partir d'eaux voisines saumâtres et salées. Une étude hydrochimique a identifié les origines de la salinisation de l'aquifère et a délimité leurs zones d'influence. Les recherches montrent que la qualité de l'eau souterraine est modifiée de façon significative pour les écoulements souterrains dirigés vers les secteurs sud et sud-est et provenant de la région nord-ouest de Bahreïn, là où l'aquifère est alimenté latéralement à partir de l'Arabie Saoudite

  7. Characterizing the Impact of River Barrage Construction on Stream-Aquifer Interactions, Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Yeong Oh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated changes in stream–aquifer interactions during the period shortly after the construction of the Changnyeong-Haman River barrage (CHRB on the Nakdong River in South Korea. The hydraulic diffusivity (α and river resistance (R values at the semipervious stream–aquifer interface were estimated by using a one-dimensional (1-D analytical solution with Fourier transform (FT. Prior to the application of the 1-D analytical solution, the noise effects on the groundwater levels were removed by using fast Fourier transform and low-pass filtering techniques. Sinusoidal variation of the river stages was applied to the 1-D analytical solution. For the study period, the R values showed a decreasing trend, while the α values showed an increasing trend, and results showed that the average of the median values of flood duration times (td and flood amplitudes were reduced to 78% and 59%, respectively. Moreover, the ratio of flood peak time to td demonstrated a decreasing tendency after the construction of the CHRB. Hence, it is concluded that the dredging and increase of river-water storage due to CHRB construction enhanced stream–aquifer interactions during the period shortly after the construction of the CHRB.

  8. Hierarchical non-negative matrix factorization to characterize brain tumor heterogeneity using multi-parametric MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauwen, Nicolas; Sima, Diana M.; Van Cauter, Sofie; Veraart, Jelle; Leemans, Alexander; Maes, Frederik; Himmelreich, Uwe; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Tissue characterization in brain tumors and, in particular, in high-grade gliomas is challenging as a result of the co-existence of several intra-tumoral tissue types within the same region and the high spatial heterogeneity. This study presents a method for the detection of the relevant tumor

  9. Heat Transfer Characterization Using Heat and Solute Tracer Tests in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassargues, A.

    2013-12-01

    Very low enthalpy geothermal systems are increasingly considered for heating or cooling using groundwater energy combined with heat pumps. The design and the impact of shallow geothermal systems are often assessed in a semi-empirical way. It is accepted by most of the private partners but not by environmental authorities deploring a lack of rigorous evaluation of the mid- to long-term impact on groundwater. In view of a more rigorous methodology, heat and dye tracers are used for estimating simultaneously heat transfer and solute transport parameters in an alluvial aquifer. The experimental field site, is equipped with 21 piezometers drilled in alluvial deposits composed of a loam layer overlying a sand and gravel layer constituting the alluvial aquifer. The tracing experiment consisted in injecting simultaneously heated water and a dye tracer in a piezometer and monitoring evolution of groundwater temperature and tracer concentration in 3 control panels set perpendicularly to the main groundwater flow. Results showed drastic differences between heat transfer and solute transport due to the main influence of thermal capacity of the saturated porous medium. The tracing experiment was then simulated using a numerical model and the best estimation of heat transfer and solute transport parameters is obtained by calibrating this numerical model using inversion tools. The developed concepts and tests may lead to real projects of various extents that can be now optimized by the use of a rigorous and efficient methodology at the field scale. On the field: view from the injection well in direction of the pumping well through the three monitoring panels Temperature monitoring in the pumping well and in the piezometers of the three panels: heat transfer is faster in the lower part of the aquifer (blue curves) than in the upper part (red curves). Breakthrough curves are also more dispersed in the upper part with longer tailings.

  10. Geochemical Characterization of Shallow and Deep Aquifer Mixing in the East Newport Mesa Area, Orange County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, B.; Hagedorn, B.; Xu, X.; Walker, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater flow in the East Newport Mesa has not been extensively studied due to the lack of sufficiently deep production or monitoring wells in the area. In this study, a conceptual hydrogeologic model of the area is developed to characterize lateral and vertical flow patterns between the shallow-most semi-perched, semi-confined aquifer and the underlying regional, potable, confined aquifer. Groundwaters from 12 newly constructed monitoring wells throughout the region, screened at depths ranging from 6.5 to 110 meters below ground surface were sampled and analyzed once for 222Rn, 14C, 13C, 18O, and 2H, and one year quarterly for major ion composition. Additionally, water levels in each well were monitored weekly and adjacent surface waters were analyzed once for 222Rn activity. Geochemical analysis and groundwater level trends were used to test against a model developed based on correlation of downhole logs and known regional geologic structure from basin-wide reports. Major ion analysis revealed endmember groundwaters of NaHCO3, CaHCO3, and NaCl character, and others that fall along endmember mixing lines, while time-series data show that groundwaters in the shallow eastern-most portion of the mesa varied up to 20% in Ca:Na ratio throughout the year. 13C values range from -26.3 to -12.4‰, while 14C age dates range from 485 to 10,280 years before present, and in some cases show an age-inversion, where waters of younger apparent age lie below those of older. Groundwaters sampled throughout the mesa showed 222Rn values ranging from 8 to 1,501 pCi/L. A primary feature of the preliminary conceptual model is the presence of an aquifer mergence zone, i.e., an angular or erosional unconformity in which the intervening aquitard between the two zones is eroded away, thus hydraulically joining the two aquifers. Mixing patterns inferred by major ion data and asymptotic decay of 14C support the existence of a mergence zone and also highlight a potential seasonal intrusion

  11. Experimental characterization of electrostatic and conformational heterogeneity in an SH3 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Zimmermann, Jörg; Liu, Jian; Dawson, Philip E; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2013-10-24

    Electrostatic and conformational heterogeneity make central contributions to protein function, but their experimental characterization requires a combination of spatial and temporal resolution that is challenging to achieve. Src homology 3 (SH3) domains mediate protein-protein interactions, and NMR studies have demonstrated that most possess conformational heterogeneity, which could be critical for their function. Here, we use the IR absorptions of carbon-deuterium (C-D) bonds site-selectively incorporated throughout the N-terminal SH3 domain from the murine adapter protein Crk-II to characterize its different microenvironments with high spatial and temporal resolution. The C-D absorptions are only differentiated in the folded state of the protein where they show evidence of significant environmental heterogeneity. However, the spectra of the folded state are independent of temperature, and upon thermal denaturation the protein undergoes a single, global unfolding transition. While some evidence of conformational heterogeneity is found within the peptide backbone, the majority of the environmental heterogeneity appears to result from electrostatics.

  12. Hydrogeochemical Analysis of an Overexploited Aquifer In Bangladesh Toward Managed Aquifer Recharge Project Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. A.; Wiegand, B. A.; Pervin, M.; Sauter, M.

    2012-12-01

    In most parts of the upper Dupitila aquifer (Dhaka City, Bangladesh) the average groundwater depletion reaches 2-3 m/year due to increasing water demands of the growing population. To counteract overexploitation of the aquifer, a more sustainable water management is required. The analysis of the local water resources system suggests that Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) would help to restore groundwater resources to strengthen water supply of Dhaka City, e.g., by using collected urban monsoon runoff and excess surface water from rivers. To assess possible effects of surface water or rainwater injection on groundwater quality, a comprehensive hydrogeochemical survey of the Dupitila aquifer is required. This paper presents hydrogeochemical data to document the current status of groundwater quality and to evaluate potential groundwater pollution by mobilization of hazardous chemicals as a result of changes in the hydrochemical equilibria. We performed a comprehensive review of available secondary data sources and will present new results from hydrochemical and Sr isotope investigations of water samples that were conducted within this study. Currently, groundwater quality in the upper Dupitila aquifer is characterized by variations in the electrical conductivity in the range of 200 to 1100 μS/cm, which may indicate some anthropogenic contamination by leakage from waste disposal including the sewage network and from surface water infiltration into the groundwater aquifer. Dissolved oxygen concentrations range from 1.0 to 4.9 mg/L (average 2.5 mg/L) in the upper Dupitila aquifer, while the lower Dupilita aquifer shows dissolved oxygen concentrations in the range 0 to 0.7 mg/L. Concentrations of major ions show some variation primarily due to a sedimentologically/mineralogically heterogeneous aquifer composition (sand, gravel, clay horizons), but may also be affected by anthropogenic processes. The groundwater composition is predominated by Ca-Mg-HCO3 and saturation values

  13. Crosshole GPR full-waveform inversion and amplitude analysis of waveguides for 3D characterization of a gravel aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotzsche, Anja; van der Kruk, Jan; Linde, Niklas; Doetsch, Joseph; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    For an accurate characterization of aquifers, high resolution 3D visualization with a high resolution can greatly improve the understanding of the interior process of flow and transport. Over the last decades crosshole ground penetrating radar showed to be a powerful tool for the characterization of aquifers due to the possibility of providing high resolution images and the strong connection to porosity and soil water content. The full-waveform inversion of GPR, that incorporates the entire waveform, can significantly improve the model resolution compared to standard ray-based techniques that uses only a small fraction of the signal. Here, the 2D full-waveform inversion is applied to a gravel aquifer in Switzerland and analyzed in 3D by inverting six crosshole GPR planes acquired between four wells. The permittivity and conductivity results obtained by the full-waveform inversion for the saturated aquifer between 4m-10m depth showed sub-wavelength resolution images with mainly similar layering at the intersection of the planes and the borehole locations. In all the conductivity images the underlying lacustrine sediments (high clay content) are clearly identified. Additionally a high permittivity zone is resolved between 5m-6m depth in all the six GPR planes which indicates a high porosity zone that is possible acting as a zone of preferential flow. Due to the high contrast to the surrounding medium this layer is acting as an electromagnetic waveguide and causes high amplitude late arrival elongated wave trains with at least one order of magnitude higher trace energy in the GPR data for transmitters-receiver combinations in this zone. For the same receivers when the transmitter is located outside this zone a distinct minimum in the trace energy can be observed. Using these maxima and minima positions of the trace energy spectra, we developed a novel amplitude analysis approach that is able to identify waveguides and their boundaries already in the measured GPR data

  14. Characterization of saline groundwater across the coastal aquifer of Israel as resource for desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Shaked; Russak, Amos; Sivan, Orit; Yechieli, Yospeh; Oren, Yoram; Kasher, Roni

    2015-04-01

    In arid countries with access to marine water seawater desalination is becoming an important water source in order to deal with the water scarcity and population growth. Seawater reverse osmosis (RO) facilities use open seawater intake, which requires pretreatment processes to remove particles in order to avoid fouling of the RO membrane. In small and medium size desalination facilities, an alternative water source can be saline groundwater in coastal aquifers. Using saline groundwater from boreholes near the shore as feed water may have the advantage of natural filtration and low organic content. It will also reduce operation costs of pretreatment. Another advantage of using groundwater is its availability in highly populated areas, where planning of large RO desalination plants is difficult and expensive due to real-estate prices. Pumping saline groundwater underneath the freshwater-seawater interface (FSI) might shift the interface towards the sea, thus rehabilitating the fresh water reservoirs in the aquifer. In this research, we tested the potential use of saline groundwater in the coastal aquifer of Israel as feed water for desalination using field work and desalination experiments. Specifically, we sampled the groundwater from a pumping well 100 m from the shore of Tel-Aviv and sea water from the desalination plant in Ashqelon, Israel. We used an RO cross flow system in a pilot plant in order to compare between the two water types in terms of permeate flux, permeate flux decline, salt rejection of the membrane and the fouling on the membrane. The feed, brine and fresh desalinated water from the outlet of the desalination system were chemically analyzed and compared. Field measurements of dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH and salinity were also conducted in situ. Additionally, SDI (silt density index), which is an important index for desalination, and total organic carbon that has a key role in organic fouling and development of biofouling, were measured and

  15. Alluvial Aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This coverage shows the extents of the alluvial aquifers in Kansas. The alluvial aquifers consist of unconsolidated Quaternary alluvium and contiguous terrace...

  16. Chromosomal heterogeneity and instability characterize pediatric medulloblastoma cell lines and affect neoplastic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Gamero, Angel Mauricio; Borges, Kleiton Silva; Lira, Regia Caroline; Andrade, Augusto Faria; Fedatto, Paola Fernanda; Cruzeiro, Gustavo Alencastro Veiga; Silva, Ricardo Bonfim; Fontes, Aparecida Maria; Valera, Elvis Terci; Bobola, Michael; Scrideli, Carlos Alberto; Tone, Luiz Gonzaga

    2013-10-01

    Chromosomal heterogeneity is a hallmark of most tumors and it can drive critical events as growth advantages, survival advantages, progression and karyotypic evolution. Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor in children. This work attempted to investigate chromosomal heterogeneity and instability profiles of two MB pediatric cell lines and their relationship with cell phenotype. We performed GTG-banding and cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assays, as well as morphological characterization, cell population doubling time, colony-forming efficiency, and chemo-sensitivity assays in two pediatric MB cell lines (UW402 and UW473). Both MB cells showed a high chromosomal heterogeneity. UW473 cells showed ~2 fold higher both clonal- and non-clonal chromosomal alterations than UW402 cells. Besides, UW473 showed two clonal-groups well-differentiated by ploidy level ( and ) and also presented a significantly higher number of chromosomal instability biomarkers. These results were associated with high morphological heterogeneity and survival advantages for UW473 and proliferation advantages for UW402 cells. Moreover, UW473 was significantly more sensitive to methotrexate, temozolomide and cisplatin while UW402 cells were more sensitive to doxorubicin. These data suggest that distinct different degrees of karyotypic heterogeneity and instability may affect neoplasic phenotype of MB cells. These findings bring new insights into cell and tumor biology.

  17. Spatiotemporal Heterogeneity Characterizes the Genetic Landscape of Pheochromocytoma and Defines Early Events in Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crona, Joakim; Backman, Samuel; Maharjan, Rajani; Mayrhofer, Markus; Stålberg, Peter; Isaksson, Anders; Hellman, Per; Björklund, Peyman

    2015-10-01

    Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (PPGL) patients display heterogeneity in the clinical presentation and underlying genetic cause. The degree of inter- and intratumor genetic heterogeneity has not yet been defined. In PPGLs from 94 patients, we analyzed LOH, copy-number variations, and mutation status of SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, VHL, EPAS1, NF1, RET, TMEM127, MAX, and HRAS using high-density SNP array and targeted deep sequencing, respectively. Genetic heterogeneity was determined through (i) bioinformatics analysis of individual samples that estimated absolute purity and ploidy from SNP array data and (ii) comparison of paired tumor samples that allowed reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. Mutations were found in 61% of the tumors and correlated with specific patterns of somatic copy-number aberrations (SCNA) and degree of nontumoral cell admixture. Intratumor genetic heterogeneity was observed in 74 of 136 samples using absolute bioinformatics estimations and in 22 of 24 patients by comparison of paired samples. In addition, a low genetic concordance was observed between paired primary tumors and distant metastases. This allowed for reconstructing the life history of individual tumors, identifying somatic mutations as well as copy-number loss of 3p and 11p (VHL subgroup), 1p (Cluster 2), and 17q (NF1 subgroup) as early events in PPGL tumorigenesis. Genomic landscapes of PPGL are specific to mutation subtype and characterized by genetic heterogeneity both within and between tumor lesions of the same patient. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Characterizing the metabolic heterogeneity in human breast cancer xenografts by 3D high resolution fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N; Zheng, Gang; Tchou, Julia; Nioka, Shoko; Li, Lin Z

    2013-12-01

    We previously reported that tumor mitochondrial redox state and its heterogeneity distinguished between the aggressive and the indolent breast cancer xenografts, suggesting novel metabolic indices as biomarkers for predicting tumor metastatic potential. Additionally, we reported that the identified redox biomarkers successfully differentiated between the normal breast tissue and the cancerous breast tissue from breast cancer patients. The aim of the present study was to further characterize intratumor heterogeneity by its distribution of mitochondrial redox state and glucose uptake pattern in tumor xenografts and to further investigate the metabolic heterogeneity of the clinical biopsy samples. We employed the Chance redox scanner, a multi-section cryogenic fluorescence imager to simultaneously image the intratumor heterogeneity in the mitochondrial redox state and glucose uptake at a high spatial resolution (down to 50 × 50 × 20 μm(3)). The mitochondrial redox state was determined by the ratio of the intrinsic fluorescence signals from reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp including FAD, i.e., flavin adenine dinucleotide), and the glucose uptake was measured using a near-infrared fluorescent glucose-analogue, pyropheophorbide 2-deoxyglucosamide (Pyro-2DG). Significant inter- and intratumor metabolic heterogeneity were observed from our imaging data on various types of breast cancer xenografts. The patterns and degrees of heterogeneity of mitochondrial redox state appeared to relate to tumor size and metastatic potential. The glucose uptake was also heterogeneous and generally higher in tumor peripheries. The oxidized and reduced regions mostly corresponded with the lower and the higher pyro-2DG uptake, respectively. However, there were some regions where the glucose uptake did not correlate with the redox indices. Pronounced glucose uptake and high NADH were observed in certain localized areas within the tumor

  19. An overview of geophysical technologies appropriate for characterization and monitoring at fractured-rock sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geophysical methods are used increasingly for characterization and monitoring at remediation sites in fractured-rock aquifers. The complex heterogeneity of fractured rock poses enormous challenges to groundwater remediation professionals, and new methods are needed to cost-effect...

  20. Application of ensemble H-infinity filter in aquifer characterization and comparison to ensemble Kalman filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-chao Nan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Though the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF has been successfully applied in many areas, it requires explicit and accurate model and measurement error information, leading to difficulties in practice when only limited information on error mechanisms of observational instruments for subsurface systems is accessible. To handle the uncertain errors, we applied a robust data assimilation algorithm, the ensemble H-infinity filter (EnHF, to estimation of aquifer hydraulic heads and conductivities in a flow model with uncertain/correlated observational errors. The impacts of spatial and temporal correlations in measurements were analyzed, and the performance of EnHF was compared with that of the EnKF. The results show that both EnHF and EnKF are able to estimate hydraulic conductivities properly when observations are free of error; EnHF can provide robust estimates of hydraulic conductivities even when no observational error information is provided. In contrast, the estimates of EnKF seem noticeably undermined because of correlated errors and inaccurate error statistics, and filter divergence was observed. It is concluded that EnHF is an efficient assimilation algorithm when observational errors are unknown or error statistics are inaccurate.

  1. Multiscale Characterization of Structural Compositional and Textural Heterogeneity of Nano-porous Geomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hongkyu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geomechanics Dept.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the project was to perform multiscale characterization of low permeability rocks to determine the effect of physical and chemical heterogeneity on the poromechanical and flow responses of shales and carbonate rocks with a broad range of physical and chemical heterogeneity . An integrated multiscale imaging of shale and carbonate rocks from nanometer to centimeter scales include s dual focused ion beam - scanning electron microscopy (FIB - SEM) , micro computed tomography (micro - CT) , optical and confocal microscopy, and 2D and 3D energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). In addition, mineralogical mapping and backscattered imaging with nanoindentation testing advanced the quantitative evaluat ion of the relationship between material heterogeneity and mechanical behavior. T he spatial distribution of compositional heterogeneity, anisotropic bedding patterns, and mechanical anisotropy were employed as inputs for brittle fracture simulations using a phase field model . Comparison of experimental and numerical simulations reveal ed that proper incorporation of additional material information, such as bedding layer thickness and other geometrical attributes of the microstructures, can yield improvements on the numerical prediction of the mesoscale fracture patterns and hence the macroscopic effective toughness. Overall, a comprehensive framework to evaluate the relationship between mechanical response and micro-lithofacial features can allow us to make more accurate prediction of reservoir performance by developing a multi - scale understanding of poromechanical response to coupled chemical and mechanical interactions for subsurface energy related activities.

  2. Hydrogeochemical characterization of a shallow groundwater system in the weathered basement aquifer of Ilesha area, southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Tijani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogeochemical characterization of a weathered basement aquifer in Ilesha area, southwest Nigeria, was carried out with respect to geogenic and anthropogenic influences on the shallow groundwater system. Physico-chemical parameters revealed a pH of 6.4–8.4 and EC of 22–825 μs/cm in the urban areas compared to a pH of 7.3–10.5 and relatively higher EC of 126–1027 μs/cm in the peri-urban area. The concentrations of major cations (Ca, Na, K, Mg in the urban areas revealed relatively lower average concentrations of 28.4, 16.7, 8.4 and 5.0 mg/L, respectively, compared to 82.5, 33.4, 19.3 and 12.4 mg/L, respectively, for the peri-urban areas. The low concentrations of major cations in the urban areas can be attributed to low mineral dissolution of quartzite and muscovite quartz-schist bedrocks compared to the weathered granitic, amphibolite and biotite schist in the peri-urban areas. Hydrochemical characterization revealed two main water types; namely Ca-Mg-(Na-HCO3 mostly in the urban areas suggesting CO2-charged infiltrating recharge rainwater, and Ca-Na-(K-SO4-Cl type in the peri-urban areas as products of water–rock interactions.

  3. Dispersion measurement as a method of quantifying geologic characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzie, D.E.

    1995-05-01

    The main objective of this research project is to investigate dispersion as a method of quantifying geological characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity in order to enhance crude oil recovery. The dispersion of flow of a reservoir rock (dispersion coefficient and dispersivity) was identified as one of the physical properties of a reservoir rock by measuring the mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. A rock was 100% saturated with a resident fluid and displaced by a miscible fluid of equal viscosity and equal density. Some specific experiments were performed with unequal densities. Produced fluid was analyzed by refractometer, nuclear reaction, electrical conductivity and X-ray scan. Several physical and flow characteristics were measured on the sand rock sample in order to establish correlations with the measured dispersion property. Absolute permeability, effective porosity, relative permeability, capillary pressure, the heterogeneity factor and electrical conductivity were used to better understand the flow system. Linear, transverse, 2-D and 3-D dispersions were measured and used to characterize the rock heterogeneity of the flow system. A new system of measuring dispersion was developed using a gas displacing gas system in a porous medium. An attempt was also made to determine the dispersion property of an actual reservoir from present day well log data on a producing well. 275 refs., 102 figs., 17 tabs.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF METAL ADSORPTION VARIABILITY IN A SAND & GRAVEL AQUIFER, CAPE COD, MASSACHUSETTS, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several geochemical properties of an aquifer sediment that control metal-ion adsorption were investigated to determine their potential use as indicators of the spatial variability of metal adsorption. Over the length of a 4.5-m-long core from a sand and gravel aquifer, lead (Pb2+...

  5. An Integrated Hydrogeologic and Geophysical Investigation to Characterize the Hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards Aquifer in an Area of Northeastern Bexar County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sachin D.; Smith, Bruce D.; Clark, Allan K.; Payne, Jason

    2008-01-01

    In August 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, did a hydrogeologic and geophysical investigation to characterize the hydrostratigraphy (hydrostratigraphic zones) and also the hydrogeologic features (karst features such as sinkholes and caves) of the Edwards aquifer in a 16-square-kilometer area of northeastern Bexar County, Texas, undergoing urban development. Existing hydrostratigraphic information, enhanced by local-scale geologic mapping in the area, and surface geophysics were used to associate ranges of electrical resistivities obtained from capacitively coupled (CC) resistivity surveys, frequency-domain electromagnetic (FDEM) surveys, time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) soundings, and two-dimensional direct-current (2D-DC) resistivity surveys with each of seven hydrostratigraphic zones (equivalent to members of the Kainer and Person Formations) of the Edwards aquifer. The principal finding of this investigation is the relation between electrical resistivity and the contacts between the hydrostratigraphic zones of the Edwards aquifer and the underlying Trinity aquifer in the area. In general, the TDEM data indicate a two-layer model in which an electrical conductor underlies an electrical resistor, which is consistent with the Trinity aquifer (conductor) underlying the Edwards aquifer (resistor). TDEM data also show the plane of Bat Cave fault, a well-known fault in the area, to be associated with a local, nearly vertical zone of low resistivity that provides evidence, although not definitive, for Bat Cave fault functioning as a flow barrier, at least locally. In general, the CC resistivity, FDEM survey, and 2D-DC resistivity survey data show a sharp electrical contrast from north to south, changing from high resistivity to low resistivity across Bat Cave fault as well as possible karst features in the study area. Interpreted karst features that show relatively low resistivity within a relatively high

  6. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kraut, M. [Institute for Micro Process Engineering, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Grunwaldt, J.-D., E-mail: grunwaldt@kit.edu [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Catalysis Research and Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  7. Advances in ion mobility-mass spectrometry instrumentation and techniques for characterizing structural heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Megan M; Donohoe, Gregory C; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-10-21

    Over the last decade, the field of ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has experienced dramatic growth in its application toward ion structure characterization. Enabling advances in instrumentation during this time period include improved conformation resolution and ion sensitivity. Such advances have rendered IM-MS a powerful approach for characterizing samples presenting a diverse array of ion structures. The structural heterogeneity that can be interrogated by IM-MS techniques now ranges from samples containing mixtures of small molecules exhibiting a variety of structural types to those containing very large protein complexes and subcomplexes. In addition to this diversity, IM-MS techniques have been used to probe spontaneous and induced structural transformations occurring in solution or the gas phase. To support these measurement efforts, significant advances have been made in theoretical methods aimed at translating IM-MS data into structural information. These efforts have ranged from providing more reliable trial structures for comparison to the experimental measurements to dramatically reducing the time required to calculate collision cross sections for such structures. In this short review, recent advances in developments in IM-MS instrumentation, techniques, and theory are discussed with regard to their implications for characterization of gas- and solution-phase structural heterogeneity.

  8. Sequential Bayesian Geostatistical Inversion and Evaluation of Combined Data Worth for Aquifer Characterization at the Hanford 300 Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H.; Chen, X.; Hahn, M. S.; Over, M. W.; Rockhold, M. L.; Vermeul, V.; Hammond, G. E.; Zachara, J. M.; Rubin, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Subsurface characterization for predicting groundwater flow and contaminant transport requires us to integrate large and diverse datasets in a consistent manner, and quantify the associated uncertainty. In this study, we sequentially assimilated multiple types of datasets for characterizing a three-dimensional heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field at the Hanford 300 Area. The datasets included constant-rate injection tests, electromagnetic borehole flowmeter tests, lithology profile and tracer tests. We used the method of anchored distributions (MAD), which is a modular-structured Bayesian geostatistical inversion method. MAD has two major advantages over the other inversion methods. First, it can directly infer a joint distribution of parameters, which can be used as an input in stochastic simulations for prediction. In MAD, in addition to typical geostatistical structural parameters, the parameter vector includes multiple point values of the heterogeneous field, called anchors, which capture local trends and reduce uncertainty in the prediction. Second, MAD allows us to integrate the datasets sequentially in a Bayesian framework such that it updates the posterior distribution, as a new dataset is included. The sequential assimilation can decrease computational burden significantly. We applied MAD to assimilate different combinations of the datasets, and then compared the inversion results. For the injection and tracer test assimilation, we calculated temporal moments of pressure build-up and breakthrough curves, respectively, to reduce the data dimension. A massive parallel flow and transport code PFLOTRAN is used for simulating the tracer test. For comparison, we used different metrics based on the breakthrough curves not used in the inversion, such as mean arrival time, peak concentration and early arrival time. This comparison intends to yield the combined data worth, i.e. which combination of the datasets is the most effective for a certain metric, which

  9. Characterization of 200-UP-1 Aquifer Sediments and Results of Sorption-Desorption Tests Using Spiked Uncontaminated Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Brown, Christopher F.; Legore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2005-11-16

    Core characterization showed only 4 out of 13 core liner samples were intact samples and that the others were slough material. The intact samples showed typical Ringold Unit E characteristics such as being dominated by gravel and sand. Moderately reducing conditions are inferred in some core from borehole C4299. This reducing condition was caused by the hard tool process used to drill the wells. One core showed significant presence of ferric iron oxide/clay coatings on the gravels. There were no highly contaminated sediments found in the cores from the three new boreholes in UP-1 operable unit, especially for uranium. The presence of slough and ''flour'' caused by hard tooling is a serious challenge to obtaining field relevant sediments for use in geochemical experiments to determine the adsorption-desorption tendencies of redox sensitive elements such as uranium. The adsorption of COCs on intact Ringold Formation sediments and Fe/clay coatings showed that most of the anionic contaminants [Tc(VII), Se(VI), U(VI), Cr(VI), and I(-I)] did not adsorbed very well compared to cationic [Np(V), Sr(II), and Cs(I)] radionuclides. The high hydrous iron oxide content in Fe/clay coatings caused the highest Kd values for U and Np, suggesting these hydrous oxides are the key solid adsorbent in the sediments. Enhanced adsorption behavior for Tc, and Cr and perhaps Se on the sediments was considered an ?artifact? result caused by the induced reducing conditions from the hard tool drilling. Additional U(VI) adsorption Kd studies were performed on Ringold Formation sediments to develop more robust Kd data base for U. The <2 mm size separates of three UP-1 sediments showed a linear U(VI) adsorption isotherm up 1 ppm of total U(VI) concentration in solution. The additional U(VI) Kds obtained from varying carbonate concentration indicated that U(VI) adsorption was strongly influenced by the concentration of carbonate in solution. U(VI) adsorption decreased with

  10. Characterization of fractures and flow zones in a contaminated crystalline-rock aquifer in the Tylerville section of Haddam, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carole D.; Kiel, Kristal F.; Joesten, Peter K.; Pappas, Katherine L.

    2016-10-04

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, investigated the characteristics of the bedrock aquifer in the Tylerville section of Haddam, Connecticut, from June to August 2014. As part of this investigation, geophysical logs were collected from six water-supply wells and were analyzed to (1) identify well construction, (2) determine the rock type and orientation of the foliation and layering of the rock, (3) characterize the depth and orientation of fractures, (4) evaluate fluid properties of the water in the well, and (5) determine the relative transmissivity and head of discrete fractures or fracture zones. The logs included the following: caliper, electromagnetic induction, gamma, acoustic and (or) optical televiewer, heat-pulse flowmeter under ambient and pumped conditions, hydraulic head data, fluid electrical conductivity and temperature under postpumping conditions, and borehole-radar reflection collected in single-hole mode. In a seventh borehole, a former water-supply well, only caliper, fluid electrical conductivty, and temperature logs were collected, because of a constriction in the borehole.This report includes a description of the methods used to collect and process the borehole geophysical data, the description of the data collected in each of the wells, and a comparison of the results collected in all of the wells. The data are presented in plots of the borehole geophysical logs, tables, and figures. Collectively these data provide valuable characterizations that can be used to improve or inform site conceptual models of groundwater flow in the study area.

  11. Recent Advances in the Synthesis, Characterization and Application of Zn+-containing Heterogeneous Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangbo; Zhao, Yufei; Shang, Lu; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Kang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Zhang, Tierui

    2016-07-01

    Monovalent Zn+ (3d104s1) systems possess a special electronic structure that can be exploited in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis, though it remains challenge to synthesize Zn+-containing materials. By careful design, Zn+-related species can be synthesized in zeolite and layered double hydroxide systems, which in turn exhibit excellent catalytic potential in methane, CO and CO2 activation. Furthermore, by utilizing advanced characterization tools, including electron spin resonance, X-ray absorption fine structure and density functional theory calculations, the formation mechanism of the Zn+ species and their structure-performance relationships can be understood. Such advanced characterization tools guide the rational design of high-performance Zn+-containing catalysts for efficient energy conversion.

  12. Recent Advances in the Synthesis, Characterization and Application of Zn+‐containing Heterogeneous Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangbo; Zhao, Yufei; Shang, Lu; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I. N.; Kang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Li‐Zhu; Tung, Chen‐Ho

    2016-01-01

    Monovalent Zn+ (3d104s1) systems possess a special electronic structure that can be exploited in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis, though it remains challenge to synthesize Zn+‐containing materials. By careful design, Zn+‐related species can be synthesized in zeolite and layered double hydroxide systems, which in turn exhibit excellent catalytic potential in methane, CO and CO2 activation. Furthermore, by utilizing advanced characterization tools, including electron spin resonance, X‐ray absorption fine structure and density functional theory calculations, the formation mechanism of the Zn+ species and their structure‐performance relationships can be understood. Such advanced characterization tools guide the rational design of high‐performance Zn+‐containing catalysts for efficient energy conversion. PMID:27818902

  13. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells: Tissue Localization, Characterization, and Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Baer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue as a stem cell source is ubiquitously available and has several advantages compared to other sources. It is easily accessible in large quantities with minimal invasive harvesting procedure, and isolation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (ASCs yields a high amount of stem cells, which is essential for stem-cell-based therapies and tissue engineering. Several studies have provided evidence that ASCs in situ reside in a perivascular niche, whereas the exact localization of ASCs in native adipose tissue is still under debate. ASCs are isolated by their capacity to adhere to plastic. Nevertheless, recent isolation and culture techniques lack standardization. Cultured cells are characterized by their expression of characteristic markers and their capacity to differentiate into cells from meso-, ecto-, and entodermal lineages. ASCs possess a high plasticity and differentiate into various cell types, including adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, myocytes, hepatocytes, neural cells, and endothelial and epithelial cells. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that ASCs are a heterogeneous mixture of cells containing subpopulations of stem and more committed progenitor cells. This paper summarizes and discusses the current knowledge of the tissue localization of ASCs in situ, their characterization and heterogeneity in vitro, and the lack of standardization in isolation and culture methods.

  14. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palau, Jordi; Marchesi, Massimo; Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The use of compound specific multi-isotope approach (C and Cl) in the characterization of a chlorinated ethenes contaminated fractured aquifer allows the identification of several sources and contaminant plumes, as well as the occurrence of biodegradation and mixing processes. The study site...... is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50 mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon......, showed a wide range in δ13C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ37Cl values for TCE...

  15. Characterization of ground-water flow between the Canisteo Mine Pit and surrounding aquifers, Mesabi Iron Range, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Perry M.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, conducted a study to characterize ground-water flow conditions between the Canisteo Mine Pit, Bovey, Minnesota, and surrounding aquifers following mine abandonment. The objective of the study was to estimate the amount of steady-state, ground-water flow between the Canisteo Mine Pit and surrounding aquifers at pit water-level altitudes below the level at which surface-water discharge from the pit may occur. Single-well hydraulic tests and stream-hydrograph analyses were conducted to estimate horizontal hydraulic conductivities and ground-water recharge rates, respectively, for glacial aquifers surrounding the mine pit. Average hydraulic conductivity values ranged from 0.05 to 5.0 ft/day for sands and clays and from 0.01 to 121 ft/day for coarse sands, gravels, and boulders. The 15-year averages for the estimated annual recharge using the winter records and the entire years of record for defining baseflow recession rates were 7.07 and 7.58 in., respectively. These recharge estimates accounted for 25 and 27 percent, respectively, of the average annual precipitation for the 1968-82 streamflow monitoring period. Ground-water flow rates into and out of the mine pit were estimated using a calibrated steady-state, ground-water flow model simulating an area of approximately 75 mi2 surrounding the mine pit. The model residuals, or difference between simulated and measured water levels, for 15 monitoring wells adjacent to the mine pit varied between +28.65 and –3.78 ft. The best-match simulated water levels were within 4 ft of measured water levels for 9 of the 15 wells, and within 2 ft for 4 of the wells. The simulated net ground-water flow into the Canisteo Mine Pit was +1.34 ft3/s, and the net ground-water flow calculated from pit water levels measured between July 5, 1999 and February 25, 2001 was +5.4 ft3/s. Simulated water levels and ground-water flow to and from the mine

  16. Characterization of Heterogeneities Controlling Transport and Fate of Pollutants in Unconsolidated Sand and Gravel Aquifers: Third Year Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-30

    material in the well and incrustation of the well screen. The test responses displayed on Figure 2 are not thought to be a result of such a process of...crystalline, bordering on mica). There is no change in the composition of the clays while they are in the permeameter, but there was some deposition of

  17. Biofouling patterns in spacer filled channels: High resolution imaging for characterization of heterogeneous biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Staal, Marc

    2017-08-15

    Biofilms develop in heterogeneous patterns at a µm scale up to a cm scale, and patterns become more pronounced when biofilms develop under complex hydrodynamic flow regimes. Spatially heterogeneous biofilms are especially known in spiral wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane filtration systems used for desalination and wastewater reuse to produce high quality (drinking) water. These spiral wound membrane modules contain mesh-like spacer structures used to create an intermembrane space and improve water mixing. Spacers create inhomogeneous water flow patterns resulting in zones favouring biofilm growth, possibly leading to biofouling thus hampering water production. Oxygen sensing planar optodes were used to visualize variations in oxygen decrease rates (ODR). ODR is an indication of biofilm activity. In this study, ODR images of multiple repetitive spacer areas in a membrane fouling simulator were averaged to produce high resolution, low noise ODR images. Averaging 40 individual spacer areas improved the ODR distribution image significantly and allowed comparison of biofilm patterning over a spacer structure at different positions in an RO filter. This method clearly showed that most active biofilm accumulated on and in direct vicinity of the spacer. The averaging method was also used to calculate the deviation of ODR patterning from individual spacer areas to the average ODR pattern, proposing a new approach to determine biofilm spatial heterogeneity. This study showed that the averaging method can be applied and that the improved, averaged ODR images can be used as an analytical, in-situ, non-destructive method to assess and quantify the effect of membrane installation operational parameters or different spacer geometries on biofilm development in spiral wound membrane systems characterized by complex hydrodynamic conditions.

  18. Characterization of Cellular and Molecular Heterogeneity of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Elsafadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human bone marrow-derived stromal stem cells (hBMSC exhibit multiple functions, including differentiation into skeletal cells (progenitor function, hematopoiesis support, and immune regulation (nonprogenitor function. We have previously demonstrated the presence of morphological and functional heterogeneity of hBMSC cultures. In the present study, we characterized in detail two hTERT-BMSC clonal cell populations termed here CL1 and CL2 that represent an opposing phenotype with respect to morphology, markers expression: alkaline phosphatase (ALP and CD146, and ex vivo differentiation potential. CL1 differentiated readily to osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes as shown by expression of lineage specific genes and proteins. Whole genome transcriptome profiling of CL1 versus CL2 revealed enrichment in CL1 of bone-, mineralization-, and skeletal muscle-related genes, for example, ALP, POSTN, IGFBP5 BMP4, and CXCL12. On the other hand, CL2 transcriptome was enriched in immune modulatory genes, for example, CD14, CD99, NOTCH3, CXCL6, CFB, and CFI. Furthermore, gene expression microarray analysis of osteoblast differentiated CL1 versus CL2 showed significant upregulation in CL1 of bone development and osteoblast differentiation genes which included several homeobox genes: TBX15, HOXA2 and HOXA10, and IGF1, FGFR3, BMP6, MCAM, ITGA10, IGFBP5, and ALP. siRNA-based downregulation of the ALP gene in CL1 impaired osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. Our studies demonstrate the existence of molecular and functional heterogeneity in cultured hBMSC. ALP can be employed to identify osteoblastic and adipocytic progenitor cells in the heterogeneous hBMSC cultures.

  19. Characterizing permafrost active layer dynamics and sensitivity to landscape spatial heterogeneity in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yonghong; Kimball, John S.; Chen, Richard H.; Moghaddam, Mahta; Reichle, Rolf H.; Mishra, Umakant; Zona, Donatella; Oechel, Walter C.

    2018-01-01

    An important feature of the Arctic is large spatial heterogeneity in active layer conditions, which is generally poorly represented by global models and can lead to large uncertainties in predicting regional ecosystem responses and climate feedbacks. In this study, we developed a spatially integrated modeling and analysis framework combining field observations, local-scale ( ˜ 50 m resolution) active layer thickness (ALT) and soil moisture maps derived from low-frequency (L + P-band) airborne radar measurements, and global satellite environmental observations to investigate the ALT sensitivity to recent climate trends and landscape heterogeneity in Alaska. Modeled ALT results show good correspondence with in situ measurements in higher-permafrost-probability (PP ≥ 70 %) areas (n = 33; R = 0.60; mean bias = 1.58 cm; RMSE = 20.32 cm), but with larger uncertainty in sporadic and discontinuous permafrost areas. The model results also reveal widespread ALT deepening since 2001, with smaller ALT increases in northern Alaska (mean trend = 0.32±1.18 cm yr-1) and much larger increases (> 3 cm yr-1) across interior and southern Alaska. The positive ALT trend coincides with regional warming and a longer snow-free season (R = 0.60 ± 0.32). A spatially integrated analysis of the radar retrievals and model sensitivity simulations demonstrated that uncertainty in the spatial and vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) was the largest factor affecting modeled ALT accuracy, while soil moisture played a secondary role. Potential improvements in characterizing SOC heterogeneity, including better spatial sampling of soil conditions and advances in remote sensing of SOC and soil moisture, will enable more accurate predictions of active layer conditions and refinement of the modeling framework across a larger domain.

  20. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen; Veblen, D.R.; Blum, A.E.; Chipera, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona, was characterized with high-resolution transmission and analytical electron microscope (HRTEM-AEM) and field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). Here, we report the first HRTEM observation of a 10-nm thick amorphous layer on naturally weathered K-feldspar in currently slightly alkaline groundwater. The amorphous layer is probably deficient in K and enriched in Si. In addition to the amorphous layer, the feldspar surfaces are also partially coated with tightly adhered kaolin platelets. Outside of the kaolin coatings, feldspar grains are covered with a continuous 3-5 ??m thick layer of authigenic smectite, which also coats quartz and other sediment grains. Authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth and etch pits were also found on feldspar grains. These characteristics of the aged feldspar surfaces accentuate the differences in reactivity between the freshly ground feldspar powders used in laboratory experiments and feldspar grains in natural systems, and may partially contribute to the commonly observed apparent laboratory-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at ???105 times slower than laboratory rate at comparable temperature and pH under far from equilibrium condition. The tightly adhered kaolin platelets reduce the feldspar reactive surface area, and the authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth reduces the feldspar reactivity. However, the continuous smectite coating layer does not appear to constitute a diffusion barrier. The exact role of the amorphous layer on feldspar dissolution kinetics depends on the origin of the layer (leached layer versus re-precipitated silica), which is uncertain at present. However, the nanometer thin layer can be detected only with HRTEM, and thus our study raises the possibility of its wide occurrence in geological systems. Rate laws and proposed mechanisms should consider the

  1. Ozark Aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — These digital maps contain information on the altitude of the base and top, the extent, and the potentiometric surface of the Ozark aquifer in Kansas. The Ozark...

  2. Geochemical evidence of water source characterization and hydrodynamic responses in a karst aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano Bicalho, C.; Batiot-Guilhe, C.; Seidel, J. L.; Van Exter, S.; Jourde, H.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryThe Lez karst spring, the main perennial outlet of the Lez karst system in southern France, plays an important role in supplying drinking water to the Montpellier metropolitan region. In order to investigate the origin of groundwater, its circulation patterns, and to understand the connectivity and compartmentalization of a karst system, a multi-tracer approach was used to describe the hydrogeology of the Lez karst system. Groundwater samples were collected from Lez karst during a range of hydrologic conditions (between March 2006 and August 2009) and analyzed for major and trace elements, total organic carbon, fecal, and total coliform. During the first recharge event of autumn, highly-mineralized water was observed at Lez Spring during the studied years. Multiple parameters of water during this rise were monitored with a fine time-step in 2008. Discriminate Factorial Analyses revealed the existence of different water-types discharging at Lez Spring. During high stage periods, highly mineralized water initially discharges from the spring, followed by rapid infiltration water. This behavior suggests that hydrodynamics affect groundwater circulation by soliciting different endmembers. These characteristics were observed on a larger scale when monitoring three intermittent springs connected to Lez Spring. A detailed analysis using bivariate diagrams of major, trace elements and elemental ratios provided insight into different water origins, associated lithologies, and mineral-solution reactions related to hydrodynamic responses. From the five identified water-types, the two more contrasting ones are emphasized: the first one corresponds to the most geochemically evolved waters, issued from deep layers where evaporite chemical fingerprinting has been identified. They are characterized by high mineralization and high concentrations in Cl, Na, Mg, Li, B and Br elements, and high Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca and Cl/Br ratios. The second water-type corresponds to the most diluted

  3. Imaging geochemical heterogeneities using inverse reactive transport modeling: An example relevant for characterizing arsenic mobilization and distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fakhreddine, Sarah; Lee, Jonghyun; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of reactive minerals in the subsurface is often a primary factor controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in groundwater systems. However, direct measurement and estimation of heterogeneously distributed minerals are often costly and difficult to obtain. While...... groundwater parameters. Specifically, we simulate the mobilization of arsenic via kinetic oxidative dissolution of As-bearing pyrite due to dissolved oxygen in the ambient groundwater, which is an important mechanism for arsenic release in groundwater both under natural conditions and engineering applications...... such as managed aquifer recharge and recovery operations. The modeling investigation is carried out at various scales and considers different flow-through domains including (i) a ID lab-scale column (SO cm), (ii) a 2D lab-scale setup (60 cm x 30 cm) and (iii) a 2D field scale domain (20 nix 4 m). In these setups...

  4. Imaging geochemical heterogeneities using inverse reactive transport modeling: An example relevant for characterizing arsenic mobilization and distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fakhreddine, Sarah; Lee, Jonghyun; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of reactive minerals in the subsurface is often a primary factor controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in groundwater systems. However, direct measurement and estimation of heterogeneously distributed minerals are often costly and difficult to obtain. While......-bearing reactive minerals as aquifer contaminants. We use synthetic applications to demonstrate the ability of inverse modeling techniques combined with mechanistic reactive transport models to image reactive mineral lenses in the subsurface and quantify estimation error using indirect, commonly measured......, synthetic dissolved oxygen data and forward reactive transport simulations are used to image the spatial distribution of As-bearing pyrite using the Principal Component Geostatistical Approach (PCGA) for inverse modeling. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  5. Hydraulic characterization of volcanic rocks in Pahute Mesa using an integrated analysis of 16 multiple-well aquifer tests, Nevada National Security Site, 2009–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Jackson, Tracie R.; Halford, Keith J.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Damar, Nancy A.; Fenelon, Joseph M.; Reiner, Steven R.

    2017-01-20

    An improved understanding of groundwater flow and radionuclide migration downgradient from underground nuclear-testing areas at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site, requires accurate subsurface hydraulic characterization. To improve conceptual models of flow and transport in the complex hydrogeologic system beneath Pahute Mesa, the U.S. Geological Survey characterized bulk hydraulic properties of volcanic rocks using an integrated analysis of 16 multiple-well aquifer tests. Single-well aquifer-test analyses provided transmissivity estimates at pumped wells. Transmissivity estimates ranged from less than 1 to about 100,000 square feet per day in Pahute Mesa and the vicinity. Drawdown from multiple-well aquifer testing was estimated and distinguished from natural fluctuations in more than 200 pumping and observation wells using analytical water-level models. Drawdown was detected at distances greater than 3 miles from pumping wells and propagated across hydrostratigraphic units and major structures, indicating that neither faults nor structural blocks noticeably impede or divert groundwater flow in the study area.Consistent hydraulic properties were estimated by simultaneously interpreting drawdown from the 16 multiple-well aquifer tests with an integrated groundwater-flow model composed of 11 well-site models—1 for each aquifer test site. Hydraulic properties were distributed across volcanic rocks with the Phase II Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Hydrostratigraphic Framework Model. Estimated hydraulic-conductivity distributions spanned more than two orders of magnitude in hydrostratigraphic units. Overlapping hydraulic conductivity ranges among units indicated that most Phase II Hydrostratigraphic Framework Model units were not hydraulically distinct. Simulated total transmissivity ranged from 1,600 to 68,000 square feet per day for all pumping wells analyzed. High-transmissivity zones exceeding 10,000 square feet per day exist near caldera margins and extend

  6. SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

    2005-02-01

    The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. We learned, however, that this strategy was impractical. The different data and tools need to be integrated from the beginning because they are all interrelated. This report describes a new approach to geostatistical modeling and presents an integration of geology and geophysics to explain the formation of the complex Coalinga reservoir.

  7. Characterizing Heterogeneity within Head and Neck Lesions Using Cluster Analysis of Multi-Parametric MRI Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Borri

    Full Text Available To describe a methodology, based on cluster analysis, to partition multi-parametric functional imaging data into groups (or clusters of similar functional characteristics, with the aim of characterizing functional heterogeneity within head and neck tumour volumes. To evaluate the performance of the proposed approach on a set of longitudinal MRI data, analysing the evolution of the obtained sub-sets with treatment.The cluster analysis workflow was applied to a combination of dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted imaging MRI data from a cohort of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck patients. Cumulative distributions of voxels, containing pre and post-treatment data and including both primary tumours and lymph nodes, were partitioned into k clusters (k = 2, 3 or 4. Principal component analysis and cluster validation were employed to investigate data composition and to independently determine the optimal number of clusters. The evolution of the resulting sub-regions with induction chemotherapy treatment was assessed relative to the number of clusters.The clustering algorithm was able to separate clusters which significantly reduced in voxel number following induction chemotherapy from clusters with a non-significant reduction. Partitioning with the optimal number of clusters (k = 4, determined with cluster validation, produced the best separation between reducing and non-reducing clusters.The proposed methodology was able to identify tumour sub-regions with distinct functional properties, independently separating clusters which were affected differently by treatment. This work demonstrates that unsupervised cluster analysis, with no prior knowledge of the data, can be employed to provide a multi-parametric characterization of functional heterogeneity within tumour volumes.

  8. Characterizing Heterogeneity within Head and Neck Lesions Using Cluster Analysis of Multi-Parametric MRI Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borri, Marco; Schmidt, Maria A; Powell, Ceri; Koh, Dow-Mu; Riddell, Angela M; Partridge, Mike; Bhide, Shreerang A; Nutting, Christopher M; Harrington, Kevin J; Newbold, Katie L; Leach, Martin O

    2015-01-01

    To describe a methodology, based on cluster analysis, to partition multi-parametric functional imaging data into groups (or clusters) of similar functional characteristics, with the aim of characterizing functional heterogeneity within head and neck tumour volumes. To evaluate the performance of the proposed approach on a set of longitudinal MRI data, analysing the evolution of the obtained sub-sets with treatment. The cluster analysis workflow was applied to a combination of dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted imaging MRI data from a cohort of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck patients. Cumulative distributions of voxels, containing pre and post-treatment data and including both primary tumours and lymph nodes, were partitioned into k clusters (k = 2, 3 or 4). Principal component analysis and cluster validation were employed to investigate data composition and to independently determine the optimal number of clusters. The evolution of the resulting sub-regions with induction chemotherapy treatment was assessed relative to the number of clusters. The clustering algorithm was able to separate clusters which significantly reduced in voxel number following induction chemotherapy from clusters with a non-significant reduction. Partitioning with the optimal number of clusters (k = 4), determined with cluster validation, produced the best separation between reducing and non-reducing clusters. The proposed methodology was able to identify tumour sub-regions with distinct functional properties, independently separating clusters which were affected differently by treatment. This work demonstrates that unsupervised cluster analysis, with no prior knowledge of the data, can be employed to provide a multi-parametric characterization of functional heterogeneity within tumour volumes.

  9. Characterization of size, anisotropy, and density heterogeneity of nanoparticles by sedimentation velocity

    KAUST Repository

    Demeler, Borries

    2014-08-05

    A critical problem in materials science is the accurate characterization of the size dependent properties of colloidal inorganic nanocrystals. Due to the intrinsic polydispersity present during synthesis, dispersions of such materials exhibit simultaneous heterogeneity in density ρ, molar mass M, and particle diameter d. The density increments ∂ρ/∂d and ∂ρ/∂M of these nanoparticles, if known, can then provide important information about crystal growth and particle size distributions. For most classes of nanocrystals, a mixture of surfactants is added during synthesis to control their shape, size, and optical properties. However, it remains a challenge to accurately determine the amount of passivating ligand bound to the particle surface post synthesis. The presence of the ligand shell hampers an accurate determination of the nanocrystal diameter. Using CdSe and PbS semiconductor nanocrystals, and the ultrastable silver nanoparticle (M4Ag 44(p-MBA)30), as model systems, we describe a Custom Grid method implemented in UltraScan-III for the characterization of nanoparticles and macromolecules using sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation. We show that multiple parametrizations are possible, and that the Custom Grid method can be generalized to provide high resolution composition information for mixtures of solutes that are heterogeneous in two out of three parameters. For such cases, our method can simultaneously resolve arbitrary two-dimensional distributions of hydrodynamic parameters when a third property can be held constant. For example, this method extracts partial specific volume and molar mass from sedimentation velocity data for cases where the anisotropy can be held constant, or provides anisotropy and partial specific volume if the molar mass is known. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  10. Characterization of size, anisotropy, and density heterogeneity of nanoparticles by sedimentation velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeler, Borries; Nguyen, Tich-Lam; Gorbet, Gary E; Schirf, Virgil; Brookes, Emre H; Mulvaney, Paul; El-Ballouli, Ala'a O; Pan, Jun; Bakr, Osman M; Demeler, Aysha K; Hernandez Uribe, Blanca I; Bhattarai, Nabraj; Whetten, Robert L

    2014-08-05

    A critical problem in materials science is the accurate characterization of the size dependent properties of colloidal inorganic nanocrystals. Due to the intrinsic polydispersity present during synthesis, dispersions of such materials exhibit simultaneous heterogeneity in density ρ, molar mass M, and particle diameter d. The density increments ∂ρ/∂d and ∂ρ/∂M of these nanoparticles, if known, can then provide important information about crystal growth and particle size distributions. For most classes of nanocrystals, a mixture of surfactants is added during synthesis to control their shape, size, and optical properties. However, it remains a challenge to accurately determine the amount of passivating ligand bound to the particle surface post synthesis. The presence of the ligand shell hampers an accurate determination of the nanocrystal diameter. Using CdSe and PbS semiconductor nanocrystals, and the ultrastable silver nanoparticle (M4Ag44(p-MBA)30), as model systems, we describe a Custom Grid method implemented in UltraScan-III for the characterization of nanoparticles and macromolecules using sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation. We show that multiple parametrizations are possible, and that the Custom Grid method can be generalized to provide high resolution composition information for mixtures of solutes that are heterogeneous in two out of three parameters. For such cases, our method can simultaneously resolve arbitrary two-dimensional distributions of hydrodynamic parameters when a third property can be held constant. For example, this method extracts partial specific volume and molar mass from sedimentation velocity data for cases where the anisotropy can be held constant, or provides anisotropy and partial specific volume if the molar mass is known.

  11. Combining geoelectrical and advanced lysimeter methods to characterize heterogeneous flow and transport under unsaturated transient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrer, M.; Skowronski, J.; Binley, A. M.; Slater, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    Our ability to predict flow and transport processes in the unsaturated critical zone is considerably limited by two characteristics: heterogeneity of flow and transience of boundary conditions. The causes of heterogeneous - or preferential - flow and transport are fairly well understood, yet the characterization and quantification of such processes in natural profiles remains challenging. This is due to current methods of observation, such as staining and isotope tracers, being unable to observe multiple events on the same profile and offering limited spatial information. In our study we demonstrate an approach to characterize preferential flow and transport processes applying a combination of geoelectrical methods and advanced lysimeter techniques. On an agricultural soil profile, which was transferred undisturbed into a lysimeter container, we applied systematically varied input flow boundary conditions, resembling natural precipitation events. We simultaneously measured the breakthrough of a conservative tracer. Flow and transport in the soil column were observed using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), tensiometers, water content probes and a multicompartment suction plate (MSP). These techniques allowed a direct ground-truthing of soil moisture and pore fluid resistivity changes estimated noninvasively using ERT. We were able to image both the advancing infiltration front and the advancing tracer front using time lapse ERT. Water content changes associated with the advancing infiltration front dominated over pore fluid conductivity changes during short term precipitation events. Conversely, long term displacement of the solute front was monitored during periods of constant water content in between infiltration events. We observed preferential flow phenomena through ERT and through the MSP, which agreed in general terms. The preferential flow fraction was observed to be independent of precipitation rate. This suggests the presence of a fingering process

  12. Preliminary characterization of an alpine karst aquifer in a complex geological setting using the KARSYS approach. Picos de Europa, North Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Daniel; Malard, Arnauld; Jeannin, Pierre-Yves; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; García-Sansegundo, Joaquín; Meléndez, Mónica; Sendra, Gemma

    2013-04-01

    Research applied to karst aquifers linked to a homogeneous limestone in high mountain areas affected by several tectonic events is a hard task, due to methodological constraints and the uncertainties of the geological data. The KARSYS approach (Jeannin et al. 2012) is based on the combination of existing geological data and basic principles of karst hydraulic, allowing for characterizing the geometry of an aquifer considering a smaller amount of data than other methods. The Picos de Europa (North Spain) is an alpine karst massif with a surface area of 700 km2, peaks up to 2,648 m and fluvial gorges up to 2,000 m deep, including about 270 km of cave passage. The bedrock is mainly composed of Ordovician quartzite covered by massive Carboniferous limestone and is affected by two systems of thrusts and other faults. The most of the geological structures are from Variscan orogeny (Carboniferous in age), some of them could be originated or modified during the Permian-Mesozoic extensional episode, and the others were originated or reactivated during the Alpine Orogeny. Therefore, the Picos de Europa can be considered as a complex geological environment in which usual hydrogeological methods are difficult to use. The aim of this study is to characterize the geometry of the Picos de Europa aquifers applying the KARSYS approach. The approach includes: 1) the identification of aquifer and aquiclude formations; 2) the inventory of the main springs; 3) the establishment of a 3D geological model, focused on the aquifer boundaries; 4) the implementation of the hydraulic features within the 3D model and the delineation of the karst system. The main aquifer of the Picos de Europa is developed within the Carboniferous limestone and displays a complex geometry generally limited and divided into several unconfined groundwater bodies by Ordovician to Carboniferous rocks related to the thrusts. The lowest limit of the aquifer is marked by the N-dipping detachment level of the thrusts

  13. Tracing aquifer-surface water and aquifer-aquifer interactions using a multi-tracer approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuth, Myriam; Stumpp, Christine

    2013-04-01

    Conserving a good groundwater quality is a major challenge because of its importance as a reservoir for drinking water. Influxes from surface water, especially input of nitrate, can deteriorate groundwater quality. The objective of our project was to i) investigate aquifer-surface water interactions and ii) trace aquifer-aquifer interactions concerning the separation between three porous aquifers. The investigation area is located in Bavaria, Southern Germany and contains three aquifers A-C (quaternary sediment) that were described as three separated flow systems to date. Two rivers 1 -2 drain the investigation area. The sampling campaign (Apr-Oct 2012) included three sampling locations along the streams, six wells in aquifer A and three wells each in aquifers B and C. The water samples were analyzed for concentration of anions (Cl-, SO42-, NO3-), cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+), electrical conductivity, water temperature, pH, oxygen and stable isotopes of water (^18O, ^2H), which were used as environmental tracers. Our results showed that only one out of three groundwater wells close to river 1 indicated river water infiltration into the groundwater due to elevated concentration of sulfate and depleted concentration of calcium and magnesium compared to the rest of the aquifer. The water chemistry of all other groundwater wells at river 1 and all sites at river 2 did not show any similarity with river water. By that, we assume that no river water infiltrated into groundwater but we cannot exclude groundwater infiltration into the rivers. Contrary to prior knowledge assumptions, aquifer-aquifer interaction took place in all three monitored aquifers. The results of stable isotopes of water and ions indicated that aquifers B and C are constantly connected to aquifer A at certain sites. The monitoring of groundwater and river water sites in the investigation area points to a heterogeneous groundwater flow regime particularly in aquifer A. Regarding the conservation of a

  14. Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User's Manual for the Multifunction Bedrock-Aquifer Transportable Testing Tool (BAT3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Allen M.

    2007-01-01

    A borehole testing apparatus has been designed to isolate discrete intervals of a bedrock borehole and conduct hydraulic tests or collect water samples for geochemical analyses. This borehole testing apparatus, referred to as the Multifunction Bedrock-Aquifer Transportable Testing Tool (BAT3), includes two borehole packers, which when inflated can form a pressure-tight seal against smooth borehole walls; a pump apparatus to withdraw water from between the two packers; a fluid-injection apparatus to inject water between the two packers; pressure transducers to monitor fluid pressure between the two packers, as well as above and below the packers; flowmeters to monitor rates of fluid withdrawal or fluid injection; and data-acquisition equipment to record and store digital records from the pressure transducers and flowmeters. The generic design of this apparatus was originally discussed in United States Patent Number 6,761,062 (Shapiro, 2004). The prototype of the apparatus discussed in this report is designed for boreholes that are approximately 6 inches in diameter and can be used to depths of approximately 300 feet below land surface. The apparatus is designed to fit in five hard plastic boxes that can be shipped by overnight freight car-riers. The equipment can be assembled rapidly once it is removed from the shipping boxes, and the length of the test interval (the distance between the two packers) can be adjusted to account for different borehole conditions without reconfiguring the downhole components. The downhole components of the Multifunction BAT3 can be lowered in a borehole using steel pipe or a cable; a truck mounted winch or a winch and tripod can be used for this purpose. The equipment used to raise and lower the downhole components of the Multifunction BAT3 must be supplied on site, along with electrical power, a compressor or cylinders of compressed gas to inflate the packers and operate downhole valves, and the proper length of tubing to connect the

  15. Heterogeneous glycoform separation by process chromatography: I: Monomer purification and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Xuankuo; Shupe, Alan; Yang, Rong; Bai, Kevin; Das, Tapan; Borys, Michael C; Li, Zheng Jian

    2015-07-24

    Fc fusion proteins with high and low sialylation were purified and separated by preparative ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Heterogeneity in sialylation and glycosylation led to variation in surface charge and hydrophobicity, and resulted in multiple distinct glycoform populations in response to various purification conditions. Monomer with high sialic acid content has higher surface charge and adsorbs stronger to ion-exchange resin, while the less sialylated monomer interacts more favorably with hydrophobic resin. Extensive biophysical characterization was carried out for purified monomers at different level of sialylation. In general, different monomeric glycoforms have different surface charge and hydrophobicity, different thermal stability, and different aggregation propensity. The surface charge corresponds well with sialic acid content, as evidenced by electrophoresis, N-link domain analysis, and zeta potential results. The sialylation also contributes to minor modification of protein size, molecular mass and tertiary structure. Notably, fluorescence emission spectra and thermal transition became less distinguishable when the monomers containing low and high sialic acid were prepared in high ionic strength solution. Such finding reiterates the fact that the electrostatic forces, which are largely dependent on sialic acid content of protein, plays a dominant role in many intra- and inter-molecular interactions. Overall, the characterization data agreed well with separation behaviors and provided valuable insight to control of glycoform profile in purification process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Clonal characterization of rat muscle satellite cells: proliferation, metabolism and differentiation define an intrinsic heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo A Rossi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite cells (SCs represent a distinct lineage of myogenic progenitors responsible for the postnatal growth, repair and maintenance of skeletal muscle. Distinguished on the basis of their unique position in mature skeletal muscle, SCs were considered unipotent stem cells with the ability of generating a unique specialized phenotype. Subsequently, it was demonstrated in mice that opposite differentiation towards osteogenic and adipogenic pathways was also possible. Even though the pool of SCs is accepted as the major, and possibly the only, source of myonuclei in postnatal muscle, it is likely that SCs are not all multipotent stem cells and evidences for diversities within the myogenic compartment have been described both in vitro and in vivo. Here, by isolating single fibers from rat flexor digitorum brevis (FDB muscle we were able to identify and clonally characterize two main subpopulations of SCs: the low proliferative clones (LPC present in major proportion (approximately 75% and the high proliferative clones (HPC, present instead in minor amount (approximately 25%. LPC spontaneously generate myotubes whilst HPC differentiate into adipocytes even though they may skip the adipogenic program if co-cultured with LPC. LPC and HPC differ also for mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m, ATP balance and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS generation underlying diversities in metabolism that precede differentiation. Notably, SCs heterogeneity is retained in vivo. SCs may therefore be comprised of two distinct, though not irreversibly committed, populations of cells distinguishable for prominent differences in basal biological features such as proliferation, metabolism and differentiation. By these means, novel insights on SCs heterogeneity are provided and evidences for biological readouts potentially relevant for diagnostic purposes described.

  17. Characterizing permafrost active layer dynamics and sensitivity to landscape spatial heterogeneity in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An important feature of the Arctic is large spatial heterogeneity in active layer conditions, which is generally poorly represented by global models and can lead to large uncertainties in predicting regional ecosystem responses and climate feedbacks. In this study, we developed a spatially integrated modeling and analysis framework combining field observations, local-scale ( ∼  50 m resolution active layer thickness (ALT and soil moisture maps derived from low-frequency (L + P-band airborne radar measurements, and global satellite environmental observations to investigate the ALT sensitivity to recent climate trends and landscape heterogeneity in Alaska. Modeled ALT results show good correspondence with in situ measurements in higher-permafrost-probability (PP  ≥  70 % areas (n = 33; R = 0.60; mean bias  =  1.58 cm; RMSE  =  20.32 cm, but with larger uncertainty in sporadic and discontinuous permafrost areas. The model results also reveal widespread ALT deepening since 2001, with smaller ALT increases in northern Alaska (mean trend  = 0.32±1.18 cm yr−1 and much larger increases (>  3 cm yr−1 across interior and southern Alaska. The positive ALT trend coincides with regional warming and a longer snow-free season (R =  0.60 ± 0.32. A spatially integrated analysis of the radar retrievals and model sensitivity simulations demonstrated that uncertainty in the spatial and vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC was the largest factor affecting modeled ALT accuracy, while soil moisture played a secondary role. Potential improvements in characterizing SOC heterogeneity, including better spatial sampling of soil conditions and advances in remote sensing of SOC and soil moisture, will enable more accurate predictions of active layer conditions and refinement of the modeling framework across a larger domain.

  18. Contribution of Magnetic Resonance Sounding to karst aquifer characterization and sinkhole hazard evaluation on the Jordanian coast of the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, M.; Legchenko, A.; Ezersky, M.; Camerlynck, C.; Al-Zoubi, A.

    2012-04-01

    Since the 1970s, the water level of the Dead Sea has highly dropped causing the appearance of sinkholes along the shoreline both in Jordan and Israel. In South Jordan, the consequences are dramatic for farmers who exploit the land. The subsurface in this area is heterogeneous and composed of intercalated sand and clay layers over a salt rock, which is partly karstified. The appearance of sinkholes is known to be initiated by the emptying of karst cavities in depth. In order to identify the risk of collapse it is necessary to better understand the relations between the Dead Sea and the coastal aquifer. In this framework, the Ghor Al Haditha site was prospected by Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS). The MRS method is a non-invasive geophysical method that allows estimating the geometry, the porosity and the transmissivity of aquifers. On Ghor Al Haditha site, 3 MR soundings were performed in 2005 and repeated in 2007 and 12 additional soundings were carried out in 2007. The conductivity of the field (to 0.3-0.5 ohm.m in this context) was measured by TDEM on the same locations and was taken into account in the inversion of MRS data. We detected water saturated and permeable sediments (water content of 10-15% and permeability of 2.10-4-2.10-3 m/s) that is located at the salt formation (~40 m) deep. MRS results revealed also a hydraulic gradient towards the Dead Sea, indicating a flow of water from the sediment aquifer to the Dead Sea that rounds the salt (and karstic cavities). The hydraulic gradient is particularly high (~3%) in the area where sinkholes had appeared. This higher gradient can be explained by slightly lower MRS transmissivity (0.01-0.02 m/s2) in comparison with the part of the site without sinkhole (0.03-0.05m/s2). We suggest that the low transmissivities are probably due to the refilling of karst cavities by fine materials after sinkholes formations. Indeed, the MR sounding repeated 2 times and located in the close vicinity of an area that collapsed

  19. Pseudodynamic Source Characterization for Strike-Slip Faulting Including Stress Heterogeneity and Super-Shear Ruptures

    KAUST Repository

    Mena, B.

    2012-08-08

    Reliable ground‐motion prediction for future earthquakes depends on the ability to simulate realistic earthquake source models. Though dynamic rupture calculations have recently become more popular, they are still computationally demanding. An alternative is to invoke the framework of pseudodynamic (PD) source characterizations that use simple relationships between kinematic and dynamic source parameters to build physically self‐consistent kinematic models. Based on the PD approach of Guatteri et al. (2004), we propose new relationships for PD models for moderate‐to‐large strike‐slip earthquakes that include local supershear rupture speed due to stress heterogeneities. We conduct dynamic rupture simulations using stochastic initial stress distributions to generate a suite of source models in the magnitude Mw 6–8. This set of models shows that local supershear rupture speed prevails for all earthquake sizes, and that the local rise‐time distribution is not controlled by the overall fault geometry, but rather by local stress changes on the faults. Based on these findings, we derive a new set of relations for the proposed PD source characterization that accounts for earthquake size, buried and surface ruptures, and includes local rise‐time variations and supershear rupture speed. By applying the proposed PD source characterization to several well‐recorded past earthquakes, we verify that significant improvements in fitting synthetic ground motion to observed ones is achieved when comparing our new approach with the model of Guatteri et al. (2004). The proposed PD methodology can be implemented into ground‐motion simulation tools for more physically reliable prediction of shaking in future earthquakes.

  20. Characterization of a fluvial aquifer at a range of depths and scales: the Triassic St Bees Sandstone Formation, Cumbria, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Giacomo; West, L. J.; Mountney, N. P.

    2017-11-01

    Fluvial sedimentary successions represent porous media that host groundwater and geothermal resources. Additionally, they overlie crystalline rocks hosting nuclear waste repositories in rift settings. The permeability characteristics of an arenaceous fluvial succession, the Triassic St Bees Sandstone Formation in England (UK), are described, from core-plug to well-test scale up to 1 km depth. Within such lithified successions, dissolution associated with the circulation of meteoric water results in increased permeability (K 10-1-100 m/day) to depths of at least 150 m below ground level (BGL) in aquifer systems that are subject to rapid groundwater circulation. Thus, contaminant transport is likely to occur at relatively high rates. In a deeper investigation (> 150 m depth), where the aquifer has not been subjected to rapid groundwater circulation, well-test-scale hydraulic conductivity is lower, decreasing from K 10-2 m/day at 150-400 m BGL to 10-3 m/day down-dip at 1 km BGL, where the pore fluid is hypersaline. Here, pore-scale permeability becomes progressively dominant with increasing lithostatic load. Notably, this work investigates a sandstone aquifer of fluvial origin at investigation depths consistent with highly enthalpy geothermal reservoirs ( 0.7-1.1 km). At such depths, intergranular flow dominates in unfaulted areas with only minor contribution by bedding plane fractures. However, extensional faults represent preferential flow pathways, due to presence of high connective open fractures. Therefore, such faults may (1) drive nuclear waste contaminants towards the highly permeable shallow (< 150 m BGL) zone of the aquifer, and (2) influence fluid recovery in geothermal fields.

  1. Hydrogeological characterization of the Nador Plio-Quaternary aquifer, Tipaza (Algeria); Caracterizacion hidrogeologica del acuifero pliocuaternario de Nador, Tipaza (Argelia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouderbala, A.; Remini, B.; Pulido-Bosch, A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper focuses on the hydrogeological and hydrochemical knowledge of the Nador Plio-Quaternary aquifer in Tipaza, situated along the Algerian coastline. It includes the identification of the hydrodynamic aquifer, hydrogeological and piezometric characteristics and, finally, an overview of the hydro-geochemistry of the area. We carried out this study between 2008 and 2013, with piezometric and hydrochemical monitoring of 24 wells in the study area. The physicochemical analysis of water shows that 25 % of the wells in the coastal zone have values of electrical conductivity greater than 3000 μS/cm The Mg{sup 2}+/Ca{sup 2}+ ratio is also higher than one and there are sodium chloride facies due to the mix of freshwater with seawater exceeding 10 % in some places. However, the comparison of the salinity of the groundwater during the period 2008-2013 with 1988-2004 indicates that there is a low dilution due to the reduction of pumping in the aquifer after the construction of the Boukourdane dam. There has also been a more rainy period and a possible return flow from irrigation in the area. (Author)

  2. Synthesis, characterization and heterogeneous base catalysis of amino functionalized lanthanide metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinping; Li, Chunmei; Tao, Lingling; Zhu, Huilin; Hu, Gang

    2017-10-01

    Lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Ln-MOFs) are featured by their tolerance to water and dense structure. In this work, an amine-functionalized Ln-MOF was facilely synthesized by coordination of terbium with 2-aminoterephthalic acid under the condition of microwave irradiation. The crystal structure was characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, Raman, TG-DTA and XPS analysis. The basic catalytic activity of the NH2-Tb-MOF was evaluated for Knoevenagel condensation and Henry reactions. Apart from the high activity and 100% selectivity to the condensation product, the NH2-Tb-MOF catalyst could be easily recycled and reused owing to the high stability of the MOF framework formed by coordination of Tb3+ with carboxylic groups. Remarkably, the NH2-Tb-MOF exhibited size-selective catalysis to substrates. For the small-sized reactants, it displayed comparable activity to the homogeneous catalyst of aniline owing to the high dispersion of NH2- active sites and the low diffusion limits. However, in the same reaction system, extremely poor activity in Knoevenagel condensation and Henry reaction for the bulky substrate 4-(tert-butyl) benzaldehyde was observed due to the both effects of substitute and inhibition of diffusion into the micropores. Crystal structure analysis provided a mechanistic evidence that the heterogeneous base catalysis arose from the amino groups densely distributed inside the micropores.

  3. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity; Final report, November 1, 1989--June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, G.D.

    1993-09-01

    The Alaskan North Slope comprises one of the Nation`s and the world`s most prolific oil province. Original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at nearly 70 BBL (Kamath and Sharma, 1986). Generalized reservoir descriptions have been completed by the University of Alaska`s Petroleum Development Laboratory over North Slope`s major fields. These fields include West Sak (20 BBL OOIP), Ugnu (15 BBL OOIP), Prudhoe Bay (23 BBL OOIP), Kuparuk (5.5 BBL OOIP), Milne Point (3 BBL OOIP), and Endicott (1 BBL OOIP). Reservoir description has included the acquisition of open hole log data from the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (AOGCC), computerized well log analysis using state-of-the-art computers, and integration of geologic and logging data. The studies pertaining to fluid characterization described in this report include: experimental study of asphaltene precipitation for enriched gases, CO{sup 2} and West Sak crude system, modeling of asphaltene equilibria including homogeneous as well as polydispersed thermodynamic models, effect of asphaltene deposition on rock-fluid properties, fluid properties of some Alaskan north slope reservoirs. Finally, the last chapter summarizes the reservoir heterogeneity classification system for TORIS and TORIS database.

  4. Characterization of gene organization and generation of heterogeneous mRNA species of rat ISK protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, M; Masu, M; Tsuchida, K; Mori, T; Ohkubo, H; Nakanishi, S

    1990-08-01

    The ISK protein is a novel, probably epithelial potassium channel which differs from conventional potassium channels in its structure, electrophysiology, and tissue distribution. In this investigation, we isolated and analyzed genomic and cDNA clones coding for the rat ISK protein to characterize the structural organization and expression pattern of the ISK protein gene. This analysis, together with primer extension and RNase protection experiments, indicated that the ISK protein mRNA is initiated from two different upstream exons and then encoded by an uninterrupted downstream exon covering the protein-coding and the 3'-untranslated regions of the mRNA. RNA blot hybridization analysis showed additional generation of several large species of mRNAs which result from inclusion of a part of the intron sequence and the 3'-flanking region of the ISK protein gene. Thus, the single ISK protein gene is involved in the production of multiple species of mRNAs through a variety of cellular mechanisms including transcription initiation at different sites, alternative RNA splicing, and polyadenylation at different sites. The heterogeneity of the ISK protein mRNAs may be associated with the emergence of the functional and regulatory diversity observed for potassium ion permeation in epithelial cells.

  5. Central serotonergic receptors: evidence for heterogeneity and characterization by ligand-binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, D.L.

    Evidence has accumulated which suggests that receptors for serotonin exist in multiple forms both in the central nervous system and the periphery. This has come from the use of a variety of techniques and a number of different tissues. In the central nervous system the ligand-binding technique has proven particularly useful for characterizing different types of serotonin receptors, and two major classes of central serotonin receptors have been proposed on the basis of studies using this procedure. The first group (5-HT1 receptors) is defined by the high-affinity binding of /sup 3/H-serotonin in the brain, and the second (5-HT2 receptors) is defined by the high-affinity binding of /sup 3/H-spiperone in the frontal cortex. The 5-HT1 sites have themselves been shown to be a heterogeneous group, and recent studies suggest that it is possible to synthesize tryptamine analogues which can discriminate between the different types of 5-HT1 receptors. Such studies suggest the possibility of designing new selective serotonin agonists and antagonists for the study of the effects of specific receptor subtypes on behavioral and physiological activities.

  6. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.palau@unine.ch [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Marchesi, Massimo [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Chambon, Julie C.C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Aravena, Ramon [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Canals, Àngels [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Binning, Philip J.; Bjerg, Poul L. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    The use of compound specific multi-isotope approach (C and Cl) in the characterization of a chlorinated ethenes contaminated fractured aquifer allows the identification of several sources and contaminant plumes, as well as the occurrence of biodegradation and mixing processes. The study site is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50 mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon, showed a wide range in δ{sup 13}C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ{sup 37}Cl values for TCE in the contaminant sources, ranging from + 0.53 to + 0.66‰. Variations of δ{sup 37}Cl and δ{sup 13}C in the different contaminant plumes were used to investigate the role of biodegradation in groundwater. Moreover, the isotopic data were incorporated into a reactive transport model for determination of whether the isotope pattern observed downstream from the tank's source could be explained by the simultaneous effect of mixing and biodegradation. The results demonstrate that a multi-isotope approach is a valuable tool for characterization of complex sites such as fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by multiple sources, providing important information which can be used by consultants and site managers to prioritize and design more successful remediation strategies. - Highlights: • Origin and fate of CAHs in groundwater by means of multi CSIA ({sup 13}C,{sup 35}Cl) survey • Innovative/new approach tested in a fractured bedrock site • Differentiation of distinct CAH sources • Biodegradation and source mixing recognition in the aquifer.

  7. Sensitivity and Uncertainty analysis of saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z.; Jin, G.; Zhao, J.; Li, L.; Chen, X.; Tao, X.

    2012-12-01

    Aquifer heterogeneity has been a focus in uncertainty analysis of saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers, especially the spatial variance of hydraulic conductivities. In this study, we investigated how inland and seaward boundary conditions may also contribute to the uncertainty in predicting saltwater intrusion in addition to the aquifer properties. Based on numerical simulations, the analysis focused on the salt-freshwater mixing zoon characterized by its location given by the contour line of 50% salt concentration of seawater and width of an area between the contour lines of 10% and 90% seawater concentrations. Sensitivity analysis was conducted first to identify the most influential factors on the location and width of the mixing zoon among tidal amplitude, freshwater influx rate, aquifer permeability, fluid viscosity and longitudinal dispersivity. Based on the results of the sensitivity analysis, an efficient sampling strategy was form to determine the parameter space for uncertainty analysis. The results showed that (1) both freshwater influx across the inland boundary and tidal oscillations on the seaward boundary imposed a retardation effect on the mixing zoon; and (2) seasonal variations of freshwater influx rate combined with tidal fluctuations of sea level led to great uncertainty with the simulated mixing zoon.

  8. Evaluation of simplified stream-aquifer depletion models for water rights administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophocleous, Marios; Koussis, Antonis; Martin, J.L.; Perkins, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    We assess the predictive accuracy of Glover's (1974) stream-aquifer analytical solutions, which are commonly used in administering water rights, and evaluate the impact of the assumed idealizations on administrative and management decisions. To achieve these objectives, we evaluate the predictive capabilities of the Glover stream-aquifer depletion model against the MODFLOW numerical standard, which, unlike the analytical model, can handle increasing hydrogeologic complexity. We rank-order and quantify the relative importance of the various assumptions on which the analytical model is based, the three most important being: (1) streambed clogging as quantified by streambed-aquifer hydraulic conductivity contrast; (2) degree of stream partial penetration; and (3) aquifer heterogeneity. These three factors relate directly to the multidimensional nature of the aquifer flow conditions. From these considerations, future efforts to reduce the uncertainty in stream depletion-related administrative decisions should primarily address these three factors in characterizing the stream-aquifer process. We also investigate the impact of progressively coarser model grid size on numerically estimating stream leakage and conclude that grid size effects are relatively minor. Therefore, when modeling is required, coarser model grids could be used thus minimizing the input data requirements.

  9. Coupled Hydrogeophysical Inversion for Characterizing Heterogeneous Permeability Field at a Groundwater-River Water Interaction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Johnson, T. C.; Hammond, G. E.; Zachara, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the groundwater and river water interface are largely controlled by the exchange dynamics between the two water bodies. Accurate characterization of the heterogeneous permeability field at such interface is critical for modeling the bulk flow as well as the biogeochemical processes that are coupled with the flow. Taking advantage of the distinct conductivities in groundwater and rive water, time lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can provide rich spatial and temporal data for characterizing the permeability field, by imaging the change in subsurface electric conductivity driven by river water intrusion and retreat. We installed a large-scale (300 m by 300 m) 3-dimensional ERT array to monitor river water intrusion and retreat through time at a major river corridor, and the 4-dimensional electrical geophysical data is assimilated to invert for the underlying permeability field using ensemble-based algorithms (e.g., ensemble Kalman filter and ensemble smoother). We developed a new high-performance hydrogeophysical code by coupling an ERT imaging code E4D (Johnson et al., 2010) with a site-scale flow and transport code, PFLOTRAN (Hammond et al., 2012). The coupled code provides the key modeling capability of multi-physics processes, parallel efficiency, and multi-realization simulation capability for hydrogeophysical inversion. We assimilated both well-based point measurements of water table and specific conductance and spatially continuous ERT images in a sequential Bayesian way. Our study demonstrates the effectiveness of joint hydrogeophysical inversion for large-scale characterization of subsurface properties in the groundwater and river water interaction zone. Our investigation of spatial versus temporal data assimilation strategies have inspired systematic data worth analyses to identify the most valuable data sets for hydrogeophysical inversion. The high performance computing is performed on the Hopper

  10. Integrated characterization of groundwater contamination in an alluvial system. Case study of Allier alluvial aquifer (Massif Central, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Nabaz; Celle-Jeanton, Hélène; Batisson, Isabelle; Bardot, Corinne; Colombet, Jonathan; Huneau, Frédéric; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Clauzet, Marie-Laure; Lavastre, Véronique

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogeology is an intrinsically multi-disciplinary field because of the critical role water plays in both human health and natural ecosystems. The NAA (Nappe Alluviale de l'Allier) project proposes an integrated research (hydrodynamic, hydrochemistry and biology) on the shallow aquifer of the Allier River (one of the main tributaries of the Loire River). This aquifer plays an important role in the regional water supply for it represents more than 60% of the total water abstraction. As an example, the sampling site, located near the city of Clermont-Ferrand (France) constitutes the major source of drinking water supply for more than 100 000 inhabitants and then plays a major role on the local socio-economy. A biweekly following sampling, that concerns hydrodynamical parameters, major ions and isotopes (oxygen-18, deuterium and carbon-13), has been achieved during two years on 2 rivers, 1 pond, 2 springs and 17 boreholes with the aim of defining the functioning of the aquifer in terms of quality and quantity of the water resources and then on the main processes that governs hydrodynamic and hydrochemistry. Preliminary results allowed discriminating different origins of groundwater with a part due to surface waters/groundwater interactions and a secondary origin that implies water circulating from the surrounding hills. A monthly following sampling of pesticides, pharmaceuticals and traces ions provides information on contaminants sources. In parallel, the dynamics of the microbial communities (bacteria, pico-cyanobacteria and pico-eukaryotes) was followed by flow cytometer. The bacterial diversity has been measured through PCR-DGGE analysis in order to evaluate the impact of the occurrence of contaminants.

  11. Multiparametric PET imaging in thyroid malignancy characterizing tumour heterogeneity: somatostatin receptors and glucose metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Putzer, Daniel; Bale, Reto [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Dobrozemsky, Georg; Nilica, Bernhard; Kendler, Dorota; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    Radiolabelled somatostatin (SST) analogues have proven useful in diagnosing tumours positive for SST receptor (SSTR). As different subtypes of SSTR are expressed on the tumour cell surface, the choice of appropriate therapeutic SST analogue is crucial. We evaluated the SSTR status of thyroid cancer patients who had signs of progressive disease comparing different SSTR ligands for PET imaging to evaluate possible further therapeutic options. PET with {sup 68}Ga-radiolabelled SSTR ligands DOTA lanreotide (DOTA-LAN), DOTA-Tyr{sup 3} octreotide (DOTA-TOC) and {sup 18}F-FDG was performed in 31 patients with thyroid cancer (TC). These 31 patients comprised 18 with radioiodine non-avid differentiated TC (DTC) including 6 papillary TC (PTC), 8 follicular TC (FTC) and 4 oxyphilic TC (oxyTC), 5 with anaplastic TC (ATC), and 8 with medullary TC (MTC). The PET results were compared in a region-based evaluation. All patients underwent a PET study with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN, 28 patients with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC and 28 patients with {sup 18}F-FDG. A lack of SSTR expression was found in 13 of the 31 patients (42 %) with negative results with both SSTR tracers in 12 patients. Ambiguous results with both SSTR tracers were observed in one patient. High tracer uptake in SSTR PET images was seen in seven DTC patients (39 %; two PTC, three FTC, two oxyTC), in four ATC patients (80 %) and in six MTC patients (75 %). Lesions showing aerobic glycolysis on {sup 18}F-FDG PET were found in 24 of 28 patients (86 %) with corresponding positive results with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN in 35 % and with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC in 29 %. The heterogeneous SSTR profile of TC tumour lesions needs to be evaluated using different SSTR PET tracers to characterize more closely the SSTR subtype affinities in patients with progressive TC in order to further stratify therapy with SSTR therapeutics. (orig.)

  12. Characterization of the Gacka River basin karst aquifer (Croatia): hydrochemistry, stable isotopes and tritium-based mean residence times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt, Nur N; Lutz, Hans O; Hunjak, Tamara; Mance, Diana; Roller-Lutz, Zvjezdana

    2014-07-15

    The Gacka River basin aquifer is a highly-developed karst system, located in the Croatian Dinarides. It is mostly composed of permeable Jurassic and Cretaceous carbonate rocks, and clastic sedimentary rocks of Paleogene age. Gacka River provides high quality water for the town of Otočac and several villages; together with the neighboring Lika River, the water is used for the Hydroelectric Power Plant at Senj on the coast. About 10 perennial and over 20 seasonal springs are located at 450 to 460 ma.s.l. (above sea level). Three major springs (Pećina, Majerovo and Tonkovića) provide 57% of the mean annual river flow. Similarities between the average groundwater temperatures as well as between the average specific electrical conductivity values (9.0°C-328 μS/cm, 9.6°C-350 μS/cm and 8.9°C-312 μS/cm) of the springs imply that they are fed from aquifers with similar mean residence times (MRTs). The mean δ(18)O contents of Majerovo, Tonkovića, and Pećina are around -10.1‰, -9.2‰ and -8.9‰, respectively, revealing differences in the mean recharge area elevations. Compared to the temporal amplitude of the(18)O signal of precipitation, the (18)O signal variations of the springs are substantially attenuated because the recharges occurring at different times are well mixed within the aquifers. This indicates MRTs of more than just a few years. The average tritium contents of Pećina, Majerovo and Tonkovića are 5.48 TU, 6.13 TU and 6.17 TU, respectively. Serially connected exponential-plug type unsteady lumped-parameter models run on an annual time scale resulted in rather satisfactory matches between the observed and calculated tritium contents for all studied springs. The models revealed similar MRTs (and corresponding reservoir volumes) for Pećina, Tonkovića and Majerovo of 12 years (470 Mm(3)), 12 years (1,190 Mm(3)), and 12.2 years (1,210 Mm(3)), respectively. Plug flow conditions dominate in about 90% of the total aquifer volumes. Copyright © 2014

  13. Hydrogeological and hydrochemical characterization of unconfined aquifer located in the alteration mantle of the Serra Geral Formation, in the Taquari-Antas river basin, northeast of Rio Grande do Sul State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Cemin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the hydrogeological and hydrochemical characterization of the unconfined aquifer located in the alteration mantle in the volcanic rocks from Serra Geral Formation, in the northeast region of Rio Grande do Sul State. This aquifer is conditioned by the soil, topography, lithology and climate, being characterized by a saturated layer thinner than 1,7 m, static levels between 0 and 1 m and low flow (<0,5 m3/h. These waters are of calcium or magnesium bicarbonate type, and low alkalinity and electrical conductivity, low calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium and chloride concentrations, and high iron and manganese concentrations. Additionally, these waters have high concentration of nitrates (mean above 10 mg/L and the presence of total coliforms. These characteristics evidence a quick circulation between the recharging and discharge zones in the aquifer.

  14. Characterizing tree canopy temperature heterogeneity using an unmanned aircraft-borne thermal imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, M.; Powell, R.; Silman, M.; Wright, M.; Nicholson, W.

    2013-12-01

    Leaf temperature (Tleaf) is an important control on many physiological processes such as photosynthesis and respiration, is a key variable for characterizing canopy energy fluxes, and is a valuable metric for identifying plant water stress or disease. Traditional methods of Tleaf measurement involve either the use of thermocouples, a time and labor-intensive method that samples sparsely in space, or the use of air temperature (Tair) as a proxy measure, which can introduce inaccuracies due to near constant canopy-atmosphere energy flux. Thermal infrared (TIR) imagery provides an efficient means of collecting Tleaf for large areas. Existing satellite and aircraft-based TIR imagery is, however, limited by low spatial and/or temporal resolution, while crane-mounted camera systems have strictly limited spatial extents. Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) offer new opportunities to acquire high spatial and temporal resolution imagery on demand. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of collecting tree canopy Tleaf data using a small multirotor UAS fitted with a high spatial resolution TIR imager. The goals of this pilot study were to a) characterize basic patterns of within crown Tleaf for 4 study species and b) identify trends in Tleaf between species with varying leaf morphologies and canopy structures. TIR imagery was acquired for individual tree crowns of 4 species common to the North Carolina Piedmont ecoregion (Quercus phellos, Pinus strobus, Liriodendron tulipifera, Magnolia grandiflora) in an urban park environment. Due to significantly above-average summer precipitation, we assumed that none of the sampled trees was limited by soil water availability. We flew the TIR imaging system over 3-4 individuals of each of the 4 target species on 3 separate days. Imagery of all individuals was collected within the same 2-hour period in the afternoon on all days. There was low wind and partly cloudy skies during imaging. Tair, relative humidity, and wind speed were recorded at

  15. Hydrogeological Conditions of a Crystalline Aquifer: Simulation of Optimal Abstraction Rates under Scenarios of Reduced Recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fynn, Obed Fiifi; Chegbeleh, Larry Pax; Nude, Prosper M.; Asiedu, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    A steady state numerical groundwater flow model has been calibrated to characterize the spatial distribution of a key hydraulic parameter in a crystalline aquifer in southwestern Ghana. This was to provide an initial basis for characterizing the hydrogeology of the terrain with a view to assisting in the large scale development of groundwater resources for various uses. The results suggest that the structural entities that control groundwater occurrence in the area are quite heterogeneous in their nature and orientation, ascribing hydraulic conductivity values in the range of 4.5 m/d to over 70 m/d to the simulated aquifer. Aquifer heterogeneities, coupled possibly with topographical trends, have led to the development of five prominent groundwater flowpaths in the area. Estimated groundwater recharge at calibration ranges between 0.25% and 9.13% of the total annual rainfall and appears to hold significant promise for large-scale groundwater development to support irrigation schemes. However, the model suggests that with reduced recharge by up to 30% of the current rates, the system can only sustain increased groundwater abstraction by up to 150% of the current abstraction rates. Prudent management of the resource will require a much more detailed hydrogeological study that identifies all the aquifers in the basin for the assessment of sustainable basin yield. PMID:24453882

  16. Assessment and characterization of phenotypic heterogeneity of anxiety disorders across five large cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Minyoung; Aggen, Steven H.; Otowa, Takeshi; Castelao, Enrique; Preisig, Martin; Grabe, Hans J.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Tiemeier, Henning; Hettema, John M.

    2016-01-01

    To achieve sample sizes necessary for effectively conducting genome-wide association studies (GWASs), researchers often combine data from samples possessing multiple potential sources of heterogeneity. This is particularly relevant for psychiatric disorders, where symptom self-report, differing

  17. Characterizing heterogeneous intragranular deformations in polycrystalline solids using diffraction-based and mechanics-based metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Robert; Obstalecki, Mark; Miller, Matthew; Dawson, Paul

    2017-07-01

    Deformations within and among crystals have been observed to be heterogeneous for most structural alloys whether the alloys are subjected to monotonic or cyclic loading. Over a material’s loading history, these intragrain deformations influence how failure mechanisms activate. A series of finite element simulations were conducted for a completely reversed loading cycle applied to a precipitation hardened copper alloy. The simulations were conducted using different hardening assumptions within a single crystal, elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model. The results were used to develop several intragrain heterogeneity metrics applicable to both measured and computed data. The computed metrics are shown to correlate strongly with the corresponding values derived from x-ray diffraction experiments. The intragrain heterogeneity metrics provide an effective tool to quantitatively measure and compare the influence of different constitutive models under the same loading conditions. This is demonstrated for the differences in deformation heterogeneity between isotropic and anisotropic hardening assumptions under cyclic loading.

  18. Chromosomal heterogeneity and instability characterize pediatric medulloblastoma cell lines and affect neoplastic phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Castro-Gamero, Angel Mauricio; Borges, Kleiton Silva; Lira, Regia Caroline; Andrade, Augusto Faria; Fedatto, Paola Fernanda; Cruzeiro, Gustavo Alencastro Veiga; Silva, Ricardo Bonfim; Fontes,Aparecida Maria; Valera, Elvis Terci; Bobola, Michael; Scrideli,Carlos Alberto; Tone,Luiz Gonzaga

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal heterogeneity is a hallmark of most tumors and it can drive critical events as growth advantages, survival advantages, progression and karyotypic evolution. Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor in children. This work attempted to investigate chromosomal heterogeneity and instability profiles of two MB pediatric cell lines and their relationship with cell phenotype. We performed GTG-banding and cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assays, ...

  19. Isotopic and hydrogeochemical characterization of high-altitude karst aquifers in complex geological settings. The Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park (Northern Spain) case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambán, L.J., E-mail: javier.lamban@igme.es [Geological Survey of Spain (IGME) (Spain); Jódar, J., E-mail: jorge.jodar@upc.edu [Department of Geotechnical Engineering and Geosciences, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona (Spain); Custodio, E., E-mail: emilio.custodio@upc.edu [Department of Geotechnical Engineering and Geosciences, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona (Spain); Soler, A., E-mail: albertsoler@ub.edu [Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Departament Cristal lografia Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB) (Spain); Sapriza, G., E-mail: g.sapriza@usask.ca [Global Institute for Water Security, National Hydrology Research Centre (Canada); Soto, R., E-mail: r.soto@igme.es [Geological Survey of Spain (IGME) (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    The Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park, located in the Southern Pyrenees, constitutes the highest karst system in Western Europe. No previous studies regarding its geochemical and isotopic groundwater characterization are available in this area. This work presents the results of field and sampling campaigns carried out between July 2007 and September 2013. The groundwater presents high calcium bicarbonate contents due to the occurrence of upper Cretaceous and lower Paleocene–Eocene carbonate materials in the studied area. Other relevant processes include dissolution of anhydrite and/or gypsum and incongruent dissolution of Mg-limestone and dolomite. The water stable isotopes (δ{sup 18}O, δ{sup 2}H) show that the oceanic fronts from the Atlantic Ocean are responsible for the high levels of precipitation. In autumn, winter, and spring, a deuterium excess is found in the recharge water, which could be related to local atmospheric transport of low-altitude snow sublimation vapour and its later condensation on the snow surface at higher altitude, where recharge is mostly produced. The recharge zones are mainly between 2500 m and 3200 m a.s.l. The tritium content of the water suggests short groundwater transit times. The isotopic composition of dissolved sulphate points to the existence of regional fluxes mixed with local discharge in some of the springs. This work highlights the major role played by the altitude difference between the recharge and discharge zones in controlling the chemistry and the vertical variability of the isotopic composition in high-altitude karst aquifers. - Highlights: • Environmental tracers are essential to study complex alpine karst aquifers. • The long presence of snow controls the deuterium excess in groundwater. • Seasonal δD content in springs depends on gap between recharge and discharge points. • The first hydrogeological characterization of the Ordesa National Park is presented. • Sulphate content in springs comes

  20. Heterogeneous porous media permeability field characterization from fluid displacement data; Integration de donnees de deplacements de fluides dans la caracterisation de milieux poreux heterogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretz, V.

    2002-11-01

    The prediction of oil recovery or pollutant dispersion requires an accurate knowledge of the permeability field distribution. Available data are usually measurements in well bores, and, since a few years, 4D-seismic data (seismic mappings repeated in time). Such measurements allow to evaluate fluids displacements fronts evolution. The purpose of the thesis is to evaluate the possibility to determinate permeability fields from fluid displacement measurements in heterogeneous porous media. At the laboratory scale, experimental studies are made on a model and on numerical simulations. The system uses blocks of granular materials whose individual geometries and permeabilities are controlled. The fluids displacements are detected with an acoustical. The key parameters of the study are the size and spatial correlation of the permeability heterogeneity distribution, and the influence of viscosity and gravity contrasts between the injected ant displaced fluid. Then the inverse problem - evaluating the permeability field from concentration fronts evolution - is approached. At the reservoir scale, the work will mainly be focused on the integration of 4D-seismic data into inversion programs on a 3D synthetic case. A particular importance will be given to the calculation of gradients, in order to obtain a complementary information about the sensitivity of data. The information provided by 4D-seismic data consists in maps showing the vertical average of oil saturation or the presence of gas. The purpose is to integrate this qualitative information in the inversion process and to evaluate the impact on the reservoir characterization. Comparative studies - with or without 4D-seismic data - will be realized on a synthetic case. (author)

  1. Thermal Analysis by Structural Characterization as a Method for Assessing Heterogeneity in Complex Solid Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhijjaj, Muqdad; Reading, Mike; Belton, Peter; Qi, Sheng

    2015-11-03

    Characterizing inter- and intrasample heterogeneity of solid and semisolid pharmaceutical products is important both for rational design of dosage forms and subsequent quality control during manufacture; however, most pharmaceutical products are multicomponent formulations that are challenging in this regard. Thermal analysis, in particular differential scanning calorimetry, is commonly used to obtain structural information, such as degree of crystallinity, or identify the presence of a particular polymorph, but the results are an average over the whole sample; it cannot directly provide information about the spatial distribution of phases. This study demonstrates the use of a new thermo-optical technique, thermal analysis by structural characterization (TASC), that can provide spatially resolved information on thermal transitions by applying a novel algorithm to images acquired by hot stage microscopy. We determined that TASC can be a low cost, relatively rapid method of characterizing heterogeneity and other aspects of structure. In the examples studied, it was found that high heating rates enabled screening times of 3-5 min per sample. In addition, this study demonstrated the higher sensitivity of TASC for detecting the metastable form of polyethylene glycol (PEG) compared to conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). This preliminary work suggests that TASC will be a worthwhile additional tool for characterizing a broad range of materials.

  2. Characterization of trapped gas saturation and heterogeneity in core samples using miscible-displacement experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Jikich, S.A. [EG& G Technical Services of West Virginia, Inc. (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Trapped gas saturation and permeability heterogeneity were evaluated in Berea cores at reservoir conditions, using standard miscible displacement experiments, with and without surfactants. Pressure and production history were influenced by core heterogeneity and foam lamellae formation when aqueous surfactant was present in the core. A simple dispersion model and a three-coefficient dispersion-capacitance model (Coates-Smith) were fit to the experimental data. The dispersion-capacitance model successfully matched the experiments in which foam lamella formed, while the simple dispersion model was used only for determining initial core flow heterogeneity. The objective of the dispersion-capacitance model was to estimate trapped gas saturations; however longitudinal dispersion and mass transfer also were examined. The results show that the dispersion-capacitance model accurately fits trapped gas saturation controlled by rock heterogeneities and foam lamellae for lamella generating mechanisms that allow a continuous gas phase (leave-behind lamellae). The practical applications resulting from this study can aid in core sample selection and scaling short laboratory corefloods to field dimensions for applications to foam stimulation and underground storage of natural gas.

  3. Enhanced characterization of fracture compliance heterogeneity using multiple reflections and data-driven Green's function retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minato, S.; Ghose, R.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial heterogeneity along a fracture is a key determinant for fracture-associated mechanical and hydraulic properties of the subsurface. Laboratory experiments have been performed to test the applicability of the nonwelded interface representation to predict the frequency- and

  4. Geostatistical description of geological heterogeneity in clayey till as input for improved characterization of contaminated sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Timo Christian; Klint, K.E.S.; Renard, P.

    2010-01-01

    In low-permeability clay tills subsurface transport is governed by preferential flow in sand lenses and fractures. A proper geological model requires the integration of these features, i.e. the spatial distribution of the geological heterogeneities. Detailed mapping of sand lenses has been done...

  5. A seismic processing approach dedicated to quantitative characterization of landfill heterogeneities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantaki, L.A.; Ghose, R.; Draganov, D.S.; Diaferia, G.; Heimovaara, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to image and quantify the heterogeneity in municipal landfills is crucial for improving the landfill treatment methods, for predicting the behaviour of processes that take place inside the landfills and hence, for estimating the after-care period. Our aim is to image the flow paths

  6. Field Test Report: Preliminary Aquifer Test Characterization Results for Well 299-W15-225: Supporting Phase I of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit Remedial Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2009-09-23

    This report examines the hydrologic test results for both local vertical profile characterization and large-scale hydrologic tests associated with a new extraction well (well 299-W15-225) that was constructed during FY2009 for inclusion within the future 200-West Area Groundwater Treatment System that is scheduled to go on-line at the end of FY2011. To facilitate the analysis of the large-scale hydrologic test performed at newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225 (C7017; also referred to as EW-1 in some planning documents), the existing 200-ZP-1 interim pump-and-treat system was completely shut-down ~1 month before the performance of the large-scale hydrologic test. Specifically, this report 1) applies recently developed methods for removing barometric pressure fluctuations from well water-level measurements to enhance the detection of hydrologic test and pump-and-treat system effects at selected monitor wells, 2) analyzes the barometric-corrected well water-level responses for a preliminary determination of large-scale hydraulic properties, and 3) provides an assessment of the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in the vicinity of newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225. The hydrologic characterization approach presented in this report is expected to have universal application for meeting the characterization needs at other remedial action sites located within unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

  7. A new method of combined techniques for characterization and monitoring of seawater interface in an alluvial aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, Albert; del Val, Laura; Luquot, Linda; Martínez, Laura; Bellmunt, Fabian; Le Lay, Hugo; Rodellas, Valentí; Ferrer, Núria; Fernández, Sheila; Ledo, Juanjo; Pezard, Philippe; Bour, Olivier; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Alex; García-Orellana, Jordi; Saaltink, Maarten; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Carrera, Jesús

    2016-04-01

    Understand the dynamics of the fresh-salt water interface in aquifers is a key issue to comprehend mixing process and to quantity the discharge of nutrients in to coastal areas. In order to go beyond the current knowledge in this issue an experimental site has been set up at the alluvial aquifer Riera Argentona (Barcelona - Spain). The site comprises 16 shallow piezometers installed between 30 and 90 m from the seashore, with depths ranging between 15 and 25 meters. The seawater interface is being monitored using several techniques, the combination of which will help us to understand the spatial and temporal behaviour of the mixing zone and the geochemical processes occurring there. Specially the deepest piezometers are equipped with electrodes in order to perform cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (CHERT). In addition, all piezometers are also equipped with Fiber Optic cable to perform distributed temperature measurements. Two single steel armoured fibre optic cable lines of around 600m length were installed in all boreholes. The objective is to use the cable both as passive and active temperature sensor. The first is being done for the continuous monitoring of temperature whereas; the second provides a higher temperature resolution used to monitor field experiments. Periodic CHERT measurements are carried out between the piezometer equipped with electrodes, resulting in parallel and perpendicular vertical cross sections of the site resistivity. The position of the fresh-salt water interface can be identified due to the resistivity contrast between the saline and fresh water. Preliminary results of periodic distributed temperature measurements will be also be used to monitor the position of the mixing zone thanks to the contrast and seasonal temperature changes. Periodic down-hole EC profiles will be used to validate the method. Acknowledgements This work was funded by the projects CGL2013-48869-C2-1 y CGL2013-48869-C2-2-R of the Spanish Government. We

  8. Comparison of Recharge Estimation Methods During a Wet Period in a Karst Aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardiola-Albert, Carolina; Martos-Rosillo, Sergio; Pardo-Igúzquiza, Eulogio; Durán Valsero, Juan José; Pedrera, Antonio; Jiménez-Gavilán, Pablo; Liñán Baena, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Management of water resources, implying their appropriate protection, calls for a sound evaluation of recharge. Such assessment is very complex in karst aquifers. Most methods are developed for application to detrital aquifers, without taking into account the extraordinary heterogeneity of porosity and permeability of karst systems. It is commonly recommended to estimate recharge using multiple methods; however, differences inherent to the diverse methods make it difficult to clarify the accuracy of each result. In this study, recharge was estimated in a karst aquifer working in a natural regime, in a Mediterranean-type climate, in the western part of the Sierra de las Nieves (southern Spain). Mediterranean climate regions are characterized by high inter-annual rainfall variability featuring long dry periods and short intense wet periods, the latter constituting the most important contribution to aquifer water input. This paper aims to identify the methods that provide the most plausible range of recharge rate during wet periods. Six methods were tested: the classical method of Thornthwaite-Mather, the Visual Balan code, the chloride balance method, and spatially distributed methods such as APLIS, a novel spatiotemporal estimation of recharge, and ZOODRM. The results help determine valid methods for application in the rest of the unit of study and in similar karst aquifers. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  9. Heterogeneous reactive transport under unsaturated transient conditions characterized by 3D electrical resistivity tomography and advanced lysimeter methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrer, Markus; Slater, Lee

    2015-04-01

    Our ability to predict flow and transport processes in the unsaturated critical zone is considerably limited by two characteristics: heterogeneity of flow and transience of boundary conditions. The causes of heterogeneous flow and transport are fairly well understood, yet the characterization and quantification of such processes in natural profiles remains challenging. This is due to current methods of observation, such as staining and isotope tracers, being unable to observe multiple events on the same profile and offering limited spatial information. In our study we demonstrate an approach to characterize preferential flow and transport processes applying a combination of geoelectrical methods and advanced lysimeter techniques. On an agricultural soil profile, which was transferred undisturbed into a lysimeter container, we systematically applied a variety of input flow boundary conditions, resembling natural precipitation events. We measured breakthroughs of a conservative tracer and of nitrate, originating from the application of a slow release fertilizer and serving as a reactive tracer. Flow and transport in the soil column were observed using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), tensiometers, water content probes and a multicompartment suction plate (MSP). These techniques allowed a direct validation of water content dynamics and tracer breakthrough under transient boundary conditions characterized noninvasively by ERT. We were able to image the advancing infiltration front and the advancing front of tracer and nitrate using time lapse ERT. Water content changes associated with the advancing infiltration front dominated over pore fluid conductivity changes during short term precipitation events. Conversely, long-term displacement of the solute fronts was monitored during periods of constant water content in between infiltration events. We observed preferential flow phenomena through ERT and through the MSP, which agreed in general terms. The preferential

  10. Hydrogeologic and geochemical characterization and evaluation of two arroyos for managed aquifer recharge by surface infiltration in the Pojoaque River Basin, Santa Fe County, New Mexico, 2014–15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andrew J.; Cordova, Jeffrey; Teeple, Andrew; Payne, Jason; Carruth, Rob

    2017-02-22

    In order to provide long-term storage of diverted surface water from the Rio Grande as part of the Aamodt water rights settlement, managed aquifer recharge by surface infiltration in Pojoaque River Basin arroyos was proposed as an option. The initial hydrogeologic and geochemical characterization of two arroyos located within the Pojoaque River Basin was performed in 2014 and 2015 in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation to evaluate the potential suitability of these two arroyos as sites for managed aquifer recharge through surface infiltration.The selected reaches were high-gradient (average 3.0–3.5 percent) braided channels filled with unconsolidated sand and gravel-sized deposits that were generally 30–50 feet thick. Saturation was not observed in the unconsolidated channel sands in four subsurface borings but was found at 7–60 feet below the contact between the unconsolidated channel sands and the bedrock. The poorly to well-cemented alluvial deposits that make up the bedrock underlying the unconsolidated channel material is the Tesuque Formation. The individual beds of the Tesuque Formation are reported to be highly heterogeneous and anisotropic, and the bedrock at the site was observed to have variable moisture and large changes in lithology. Surface electrical-resistivity geophysical survey methods showed a sharp contrast between the electrically resistive unconsolidated channel sands and the highly conductive bedrock; however, because of the high conductivity, the resistivity methods were not able to image the water table or preferential flow paths (if they existed) in the bedrock.Infiltration rates measured by double-ring and bulk infiltration tests on a variety of channel morphologies in the study reaches were extremely large (9.7–94.5 feet per day), indicating that the channels could potentially accommodate as much as 6.6 cubic feet per second of applied water without generating surface runoff out of the reach; however, the small volume

  11. Proteomic comparison defines novel markers to characterize heterogeneous populations of extracellular vesicle subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Kowal, Joanna; Arras, Guillaume; Colombo, Marina; Jouve, Mabel; Morath, Jakob Paul; Primdal-Bengtson, Bjarke; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Tkach, Mercedes; Théry, Clotilde

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has seen a rapid expansion of interest in extracellular vesicles (EVs), proposed to mediate cell–cell communication in patho/physiological conditions. Although heterogeneity of EVs has become obvious, as highlighted recently by the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles, the field is lacking specific tools to distinguish EVs of different intracellular origins, and thus probably different functions. Here, thanks to a comprehensive comparison of different types of EVs ...

  12. Characterization of organic precursors in DBP formation and AOC in urban surface water and their fate during managed aquifer recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Won Mo; Lee, Seunghak; Choi, Jaewon; Maeng, Sung Kyu

    2017-10-15

    In this study, the organic components were identified that are mainly responsible for the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and for the biostability of urban surface water. The compositional distribution of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was strongly associated with the potential for both DBP formation and bacterial growth. Further evaluation was carried out (1) to compare the potential for DBP formation upon chlorination of treated water, (2) to determine the biostability that might result from minimizing assimilable organic carbon (AOC), and (3) to use laboratory-scale soil-column experiments to compare the effects of removal of trace organic chemicals (TOrCs) between managed aquifer recharge (MAR) hybrid systems (such as bank filtration followed by artificial recharge and recovery: ARR), and ozonation followed by ARR. Our fractionation and removal methods provided useful insights into the removal of problematic organic components using MAR hybrid systems. Pretreatment with a small amount of ozone (∼0.7 mg-O3 mg-C-1) resulted in improved ARR performance, especially from removing organic acids from DOM, which substantially decreased the potential for DBP formation, while the robust removal of AOC was attributed to a significant decrease in non-acidic and more hydrophilic fractions during soil passage. Both pretreatments used in this study were effective in the removal of selected TOrCs, but carbamazepine was persistent during soil passage. The pretreatment, which used ozonation before ARR, significantly enhanced the removal of carbamazepine; therefore, ozonation followed by ARR is considered an effective way to enhance removal of persistent compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterizing permafrost active layer dynamics and sensitivity to landscape spatial heterogeneity: A case study in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Y.; Kimball, J. S.; Moghaddam, M.; Reichle, R. H.

    2016-12-01

    An important feature of the Arctic is the large spatial heterogeneity in permafrost and active layer conditions, which are generally poorly represented in global climate and carbon models and can lead to large uncertainties in predicting regional ecosystem responses and feedbacks to climate change. In this study, we developed a spatially integrated analysis and modeling framework to investigate the sensitivity of permafrost active layer processes to sub-grid heterogeneity in vegetation, terrain and disturbance factors. The model framework combines detailed field measurements of vegetation, microclimate and active layer properties with local scale ( 100m resolution) soil active layer retrievals from airborne radar remote sensing, and landscape level (≥1-km resolution) environmental observations from satellite microwave and optical-infrared sensors. Satellite observations, including land surface temperature, snow cover extent and soil moisture from the MODIS and SMAP sensors, are used as primary model drivers for estimating snow/soil thermal conductivity and soil temperature profiles. The model estimates regional patterns and recent changes (2001-present) in permafrost extent (PE) and ALT across Alaska at landscape scale ( 1-km resolution). Local scale maps of active layer conditions and additional land parameters include soil moisture and surface organic layer thickness from combined low frequency (L+P-band) airborne radar backscatter from the NASA UAVSAR and AirMOSS sensors will be used to inform the coarser landscape model simulations and quantify the effects of surface organic layer and soil moisture spatial heterogeneity on the estimated soil active layer dynamics. These results are used to clarify regional patterns and recent changes in permafrost active layer conditions, and underlying environmental controls across Alaska.

  14. Descriptive characterization of a Nigerian heterogeneous rabbit population - factors affecting litter traits

    OpenAIRE

    Oseni, S.O.; Ajayi, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of female body weight at conception (FWC), season of mating (SM), type of mating (TM) and litter size at birth (LSB) on the litter performance in a heterogeneous Nigerian population of rabbits. Data on 116 litters from 10 bucks and 48 does across three parities were analysed. Reproductive traits evaluated included LSB, number born alive (NBA), litter sizes and weights at 7, 14 and 21 d post-kindling, pre-weaning survival rate (SR) and daily weight gain of kits ...

  15. Estimating concentration rebounds in pumping wells and their impact on aquifer remediation and risk analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vila, X.; de Barros, F. P. J.; Fernández-Garcia, D.; Bolster, D.

    2012-04-01

    Capturing the effects of aquifer heterogeneity is key to evaluating risk in groundwater related problems. In this work we analyze the potential failure of remediation due to the rebound of concentrations driven by back diffusion. Withdrawing polluted water from a contaminated aquifer by pumping is one of the most common components of many remediation actions. Pumping proceeds until concentrations of contaminants in the extracted water falls below some pre-specified value. In several cases, it has been observed that a rebound in the concentration signal takes place at the well after remediation pumping stops. For this reason, a conservative approach may be needed and pumping may have to last much longer than back of the envelope calculations might suggest. It is well known and documented that spatial heterogeneity, ubiquitously found in the hydraulic properties of aquifers, leads to multiple mass transfer processes occurring at different time scales, both for conservative and reactive species. Heterogeneity thus plays a significant role in the interpretation of breakthrough curves and plays a driving role in controlling processes associated with concentration rebounds as described above. In this study we take a close look at this and lay the groundwork for a risk-based optimal operation methodology that is capable of estimating the time at which to end remediation pumping. Our model is built with aquifer parameters that characterize the role of a heterogeneous medium and the multiple scales of mass transfer as well as pumping rates and initial size of the polluted area. The results from this modeling framework will have a clear impact in economic terms on determining optimal and viable remediation strategies.

  16. Prediction, time variance, and classification of hydraulic response to recharge in two karst aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Andrew J.; Mahler, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Many karst aquifers are rapidly filled and depleted and therefore are likely to be susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (spring flow, groundwater level, stream base flow, and cave drip) at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA) and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA). A lumped-parameter model simulates nonlinear soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a time-variant convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data is 2.4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods according to the Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency, which ranges from 0.53 to 0.94 for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs) obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and between aquifers. Time-variant IRFs were applied to 62% of the sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs indicates three principal components that together account for 84% of the variability in IRF shape: the first is related to IRF skewness and temporal spread and accounts for 51% of the variability; the second and third largely are related to time-variant properties and together account for 33% of the variability. Sites with IRFs that dominantly comprise exponential curves are separated geographically from those dominantly comprising lognormal curves in both aquifers as a result of spatial heterogeneity. The use of multiple IRF metrics in PCA is a novel method to characterize, compare, and classify the way in which different sites and aquifers respond to recharge. As convolution models are developed for

  17. Prediction, time variance, and classification of hydraulic response to recharge in two karst aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Long

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many karst aquifers are rapidly filled and depleted and therefore are likely to be susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (spring flow, groundwater level, stream base flow, and cave drip at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA. A lumped-parameter model simulates nonlinear soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a time-variant convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data is 2.4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods according to the Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency, which ranges from 0.53 to 0.94 for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and between aquifers. Time-variant IRFs were applied to 62% of the sites. Principal component analysis (PCA of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs indicates three principal components that together account for 84% of the variability in IRF shape: the first is related to IRF skewness and temporal spread and accounts for 51% of the variability; the second and third largely are related to time-variant properties and together account for 33% of the variability. Sites with IRFs that dominantly comprise exponential curves are separated geographically from those dominantly comprising lognormal curves in both aquifers as a result of spatial heterogeneity. The use of multiple IRF metrics in PCA is a novel method to characterize, compare, and classify the way in which different sites and aquifers respond to recharge. As convolution models are

  18. A spatial theory for characterizing predator–multiprey interactions in heterogeneous landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Daniel; Buono, Pietro-Luciano; Schmitz, Oswald J.; Courbin, Nicolas; Losier, Chrystel; St-Laurent, Martin-Hugues; Drapeau, Pierre; Heppell, Sandra; Dussault, Claude; Brodeur, Vincent; Mainguy, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Trophic interactions in multiprey systems can be largely determined by prey distributions. Yet, classic predator–prey models assume spatially homogeneous interactions between predators and prey. We developed a spatially informed theory that predicts how habitat heterogeneity alters the landscape-scale distribution of mortality risk of prey from predation, and hence the nature of predator interactions in multiprey systems. The theoretical model is a spatially explicit, multiprey functional response in which species-specific advection–diffusion models account for the response of individual prey to habitat edges. The model demonstrates that distinct responses of alternative prey species can alter the consequences of conspecific aggregation, from increasing safety to increasing predation risk. Observations of threatened boreal caribou, moose and grey wolf interacting over 378 181 km2 of human-managed boreal forest support this principle. This empirically supported theory demonstrates how distinct responses of apparent competitors to landscape heterogeneity, including to human disturbances, can reverse density dependence in fitness correlates. PMID:26224710

  19. Application of Surface Geophysical Methods, With Emphasis on Magnetic Resonance Soundings, to Characterize the Hydrostratigraphy of the Brazos River Alluvium Aquifer, College Station, Texas, July 2006 - A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sachin D.; Kress, Wade H.; Legchenko, Anatoly

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, used surface geophysical methods at the Texas A&M University Brazos River Hydrologic Field Research Site near College Station, Texas, in a pilot study, to characterize the hydrostratigraphic properties of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer and determine the effectiveness of the methods to aid in generating an improved ground-water availability model. Three non-invasive surface geophysical methods were used to characterize the electrical stratigraphy and hydraulic properties and to interpret the hydrostratigraphy of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer. Two methods, time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) soundings and two-dimensional direct-current (2D-DC) resistivity imaging, were used to define the lateral and vertical extent of the Ships clay, the alluvium of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer, and the underlying Yegua Formation. Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS), a recently developed geophysical method, was used to derive estimates of the hydrologic properties including percentage water content and hydraulic conductivity. Results from the geophysics study demonstrated the usefulness of combined TDEM, 2D-DC resistivity, and MRS methods to reduce the need for additional boreholes in areas with data gaps and to provide more accurate information for ground-water availability models. Stratigraphically, the principal finding of this study is the relation between electrical resistivity and the depth and thickness of the subsurface hydrostratigraphic units at the site. TDEM data defined a three-layer electrical stratigraphy corresponding to a conductor-resistor-conductor that represents the hydrostratigraphic units - the Ships clay, the alluvium of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer, and the Yegua Formation. Sharp electrical boundaries occur at about 4 to 6 and 20 to 22 meters below land surface based on the TDEM data and define the geometry of the more resistive Brazos River alluvium aquifer

  20. Saltwater wedge variation in a non-anthropogenic coastal karst aquifer influenced by a strong tidal range (Burren, Ireland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perriquet, Marie; Leonardi, Véronique; Henry, Tiernan; Jourde, Hervé

    2014-11-01

    Spatial and temporal changes in saltwater wedges in coastal karst aquifers are still poorly understood, largely due to complex mixing processes in these heterogeneous environments, but also due to anthropogenic forcing such as pumping, which commonly affect natural variations in wedges. The purpose of this study was first to characterize the hydrodynamic functioning of a karst aquifer in an oceanic temperate climate with little anthropogenic pressure but strongly influenced by a high tidal range and second, to evaluate the extent and movements of a saltwater wedge influenced by both the tide and the natural recharge of the aquifer. Variations in specific conductivity combined with water chemistry results from six boreholes and two lakes located in the Bell Harbour catchment (western Ireland) enabled us to assess the extent of the intrusion of the saltwater wedge into the aquifer as a function of both karst recharge and tidal movements at high/low and neap/spring tidal cycles. The marked spatial disparity of the saltwater wedge was analysed as a function of both the hydrodynamic and the structural properties of the karst aquifer. Results showed that the extent of the saltwater wedge depended not only on the intrinsic properties of the aquifer but also on the relative influence of the recharge and the tide on groundwater levels, which have opposite effects. Recharge in the Burren area throughout the year is large enough to prevent saltwater intruding more than about one kilometre from the shore. A strong tidal amplitude seems to be the motor of sudden saltwater intrusion observed in the aquifer near the shore while the position of the groundwater level seems to influence the intensity of the salinity increase. Competition between recharge and the tide thus controls the seawater inputs, hence explaining temporal and spatial changes in the saltwater wedge in this coastal karst aquifer.

  1. Characterization of Soil Heterogeneity Across Scales in an Intensively Investigated Soil Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Matthew; Gimenez, Daniel; Nemes, Attila; Dathe, Annette; French, Helen; Bloem, Esther; Koestel, John; Jarvis, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous water flow in undisturbed soils is a natural occurrence that is complex to model due to potential changes in hydraulic properties in soils over changes in space. The use of geophysical methods, such as Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), can provide a minimally-invasive approximation of the spatial heterogeneity of the soil. This spatial distribution can then be combined with measured hydraulic properties to inform a model. An experiment was conducted on an Intensively Investigated Soil Volume (IISV), with dimensions of 2m x 1m x 0.8m, located in an agricultural field that is part of the Gryteland catchment in Ås, Norway. The location of the IISV was determined through surface ERT runs at two sequential resolutions. The first run was used to find an area of higher apparent electrical resistivity in a 23.5 x 11.5 m area with 0.5 m spacing. The second run measured apparent electrical resistivity in a 4.7 x 1 m area with 0.1 m spacing, from which the final IISV volume was derived. Distinct features found in the higher resolution run of the IISV, including a recent tire track from a harvester, were used as a spatial reference point for the installation of 20 pairs of TDR probes and tensiometers. The instruments measured water content, temperature and pressure potential at 10 minute intervals and ran continuously for a period of two weeks. After completion of the data collection the IISV was intensively sampled, with 30 samples taken for bulk density, 62 for hydraulic property measurements, and 20 to be used for both CT scanning and hydraulic property measurements. The measurement of hydraulic properties is ongoing and retention will be measured in the 0 - 100 cm range on a sand table, and from 100 - approx. 900 cm with an automated evaporation method. The formation of spatial clusters to represent the soil heterogeneity as relatively homogeneous units based on mesoscale properties like apparent electrical resistivity, bulk density, texture, in

  2. Characterization of Preferential Ground-Water Seepage From a Chlorinated Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer to West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, 2002-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majcher, Emily H.; Phelan, Daniel J.; Lorah, Michelle M.; McGinty, Angela L.

    2007-01-01

    Wetlands act as natural transition zones between ground water and surface water, characterized by the complex interdependency of hydrology, chemical and physical properties, and biotic effects. Although field and laboratory demonstrations have shown efficient natural attenuation processes in the non-seep wetland areas and stream bottom sediments of West Branch Canal Creek, chlorinated volatile organic compounds are present in a freshwater tidal creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volatile organic compound concentrations in surface water indicate that in some areas of the wetland, preferential flow paths or seeps allow transport of organic compounds from the contaminated sand aquifer to the overlying surface water without undergoing natural attenuation. From 2002 through 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division of the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, characterized preferential ground-water seepage as part of an ongoing investigation of contaminant distribution and natural attenuation processes in wetlands at this site. Seep areas were discrete and spatially consistent during thermal infrared surveys in 2002, 2003, and 2004 throughout West Branch Canal Creek wetlands. In these seep areas, temperature measurements in shallow pore water and sediment more closely resembled those in ground water than those in nearby surface water. Generally, pore water in seep areas contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds had lower methane and greater volatile organic compound concentrations than pore water in non-seep wetland sediments. The volatile organic compounds detected in shallow pore water in seeps were spatially similar to the dominant volatile organic compounds in the underlying Canal Creek aquifer, with both parent and anaerobic daughter compounds detected. Seep locations characterized as focused seeps contained the highest concentrations of chlorinated parent compounds

  3. Characterization of genetic intratumor heterogeneity in colorectal cancer and matching patient-derived spheroid cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Árnadóttir, Sigrid S; Jeppesen, Maria; Lamy, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    and see how well intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) was recapitulated in matching patient-derived spheroids. Three to five biopsies were collected from six CRC tumors. Each biopsy was split in two; one half was used for spheroid culturing, while the other half was used for DNA and RNA purification. For two...... patients, lymph node metastases were analyzed. Somatic mutations were called from whole exome sequencing data. Each tumor contained mutations shared across all biopsies and spheroids, including major CRC drivers such as APC, KRAS, and TP53. At the same time, all tumors exhibited ITH on both mutation...... and copy number level. The concordance between biopsies and spheroids ranged between 40 and 70% for coding mutations. For three patients, the biopsy and spheroid from matching areas clustered together, meaning that the spheroid resembled the area of origin more than the other areas. However, all biopsies...

  4. Characterization of FGFR1 Locus in sqNSCLC Reveals a Broad and Heterogeneous Amplicon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Rooney

    Full Text Available FGFR1 amplification occurs in ~20% of sqNSCLC and trials with FGFR inhibitors have selected FGFR1 amplified patients by FISH. Lung cancer cell lines were profiled for sensitivity to AZD4547, a potent, selective inhibitor of FGFRs 1-3. Sensitivity to FGFR inhibition was associated with but not wholly predicted by increased FGFR1 gene copy number. Additional biomarker assays evaluating expression of FGFRs and correlation between amplification and expression in clinical tissues are therefore warranted. We validated nanoString for mRNA expression analysis of 194 genes, including FGFRs, from clinical tumour tissue. In a panel of sqNSCLC tumours 14.4% (13/90 were FGFR1 amplified by FISH. Although mean FGFR1 expression was significantly higher in amplified samples, there was significant overlap in the range of expression levels between the amplified and non-amplified cohorts with several non-amplified samples expressing FGFR1 to levels equivalent to amplified samples. Statistical analysis revealed increased expression of FGFR1 neighboring genes on the 8p12 amplicon (BAG4, LSM1 and WHSC1L1 in FGFR1 amplified tumours, suggesting a broad rather than focal amplicon and raises the potential for codependencies. High resolution aCGH analysis of pre-clinical and clinical samples supported the presence of a broad and heterogeneous amplicon around the FGFR1 locus. In conclusion, the range of FGFR1 expression levels in both FGFR1 amplified and non-amplified NSCLC tissues, together with the breadth and intra-patient heterogeneity of the 8p amplicon highlights the need for gene expression analysis of clinical samples to inform the understanding of determinants of response to FGFR inhibitors. In this respect the nanoString platform provides an attractive option for RNA analysis of FFPE clinical samples.

  5. Application of the top specified boundary layer (TSBL) approximation to initial characterization of an inland aquifer mineralization. 1. Direct contact between fresh and saltwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Hillel; Buddemeier, Robert W.

    1998-08-01

    This paper presents a basic study in generalized terms that originates from two needs: (1) to understand the major mechanisms involved in the mineralization of groundwater of the Great Bend Prairie aquifer of Kansas by saltwater originating from a deeper Permian bedrock formation, and (2) to develop simple, robust tools that can readily be used for local assessment and management activities in the salt-affected region. A simplified basic conceptual model is adopted, incorporating two horizontal layers of porous medium which come into contact at a specific location within the model domain. The top layer is saturated with freshwater, and the bottom layer is saturated with saltwater. The paper considers various stages of approximation which can be useful for simplified simulation of the build-up of the transition zone (TZ) between the freshwater and the saltwater. The hierarchy of approximate approaches leads to the development of the top specified boundary layer (TSBL) method, which is the major tool used in this study for initial characterization of the development of the TZ. It is shown that the thickness of the TZ is mainly determined by the characteristic dispersivity. The build-up of the TZ is completed after a time period equal to the time needed to advect a fluid particle along the whole extent of the TZ. Potential applications and the effects of natural recharge and pumpage on salinity transport in the domain are discussed and evaluated in the context of demonstrating the practicality of the TSBL approach.

  6. Application of the top specified boundary layer (TSBL) approximation to initial characterization of an inland aquifer mineralization 1. Direct contact between fresh and saltwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a basic study in generalized terms that originates from two needs: (1) to understand the major mechanisms involved in the mineralization of groundwater of the Great Bend Prairie aquifer of Kansas by saltwater originating from a deeper Permian bedrock formation, and (2) to develop simple, robust tools that can readily be used for local assessment and management activities in the salt-affected region. A simplified basic conceptual model is adopted, incorporating two horizontal layers of porous medium which come into contact at a specific location within the model domain. The top layer is saturated with freshwater, and the bottom layer is saturated with saltwater. The paper considers various stages of approximation which can be useful for simplified simulation of the build-up of the transition zone (TZ) between the freshwater and the saltwater. The hierarchy of approximate approaches leads to the development of the top specified boundary layer (TSBL) method, which is the major tool used in this study for initial characterization of the development of the TZ. It is shown that the thickness of the TZ is mainly determined by the characteristic dispersivity. The build-up of the TZ is completed after a time period equal to the time needed to advect a fluid particle along the whole extent of the TZ. Potential applications and the effects of natural recharge and pumpage on salinity transport in the domain are discussed and evaluated in the context of demonstrating the practicality of the TSBL approach.

  7. Characterizing spatial heterogeneity based on the b-value and fractal analyses of the 2015 Nepal earthquake sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nampally, Subhadra; Padhy, Simanchal; Dimri, Vijay P.

    2018-01-01

    The nature of spatial distribution of heterogeneities in the source area of the 2015 Nepal earthquake is characterized based on the seismic b-value and fractal analysis of its aftershocks. The earthquake size distribution of aftershocks gives a b-value of 1.11 ± 0.08, possibly representing the highly heterogeneous and low stress state of the region. The aftershocks exhibit a fractal structure characterized by a spectrum of generalized dimensions, Dq varying from D2 = 1.66 to D22 = 0.11. The existence of a fractal structure suggests that the spatial distribution of aftershocks is not a random phenomenon, but it self-organizes into a critical state, exhibiting a scale-independent structure governed by a power-law scaling, where a small perturbation in stress is sufficient enough to trigger aftershocks. In order to obtain the bias in fractal dimensions resulting from finite data size, we compared the multifractal spectrum for the real data and random simulations. On comparison, we found that the lower limit of bias in D2 is 0.44. The similarity in their multifractal spectra suggests the lack of long-range correlation in the data, with an only weakly multifractal or a monofractal with a single correlation dimension D2 characterizing the data. The minimum number of events required for a multifractal process with an acceptable error is discussed. We also tested for a possible correlation between changes in D2 and energy released during the earthquakes. The values of D2 rise during the two largest earthquakes (M > 7.0) in the sequence. The b- and D2 values are related by D2 = 1.45 b that corresponds to the intermediate to large earthquakes. Our results provide useful constraints on the spatial distribution of b- and D2-values, which are useful for seismic hazard assessment in the aftershock area of a large earthquake.

  8. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Annual report, November 1, 1990--October 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

  9. Heterogeneous slip distribution on faults responsible for large earthquakes: characterization and implications for tsunami modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglione, Enrico; Armigliato, Alberto; Pagnoni, Gianluca; Tinti, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    The fact that ruptures on the generating faults of large earthquakes are strongly heterogeneous has been demonstrated over the last few decades by a large number of studies. The effort to retrieve reliable finite-fault models (FFMs) for large earthquakes occurred worldwide, mainly by means of the inversion of different kinds of geophysical data, has been accompanied in the last years by the systematic collection and format homogenisation of the published/proposed FFMs for different earthquakes into specifically conceived databases, such as SRCMOD. The main aim of this study is to explore characteristic patterns of the slip distribution of large earthquakes, by using a subset of the FFMs contained in SRCMOD, covering events with moment magnitude equal or larger than 6 and occurred worldwide over the last 25 years. We focus on those FFMs that exhibit a single and clear region of high slip (i.e. a single asperity), which is found to represent the majority of the events. For these FFMs, it sounds reasonable to best-fit the slip model by means of a 2D Gaussian distributions. Two different methods are used (least-square and highest-similarity) and correspondingly two "best-fit" indexes are introduced. As a result, two distinct 2D Gaussian distributions for each FFM are obtained. To quantify how well these distributions are able to mimic the original slip heterogeneity, we calculate and compare the vertical displacements at the Earth surface in the near field induced by the original FFM slip, by an equivalent uniform-slip model, by a depth-dependent slip model, and by the two "best" Gaussian slip models. The coseismic vertical surface displacement is used as the metric for comparison. Results show that, on average, the best results are the ones obtained with 2D Gaussian distributions based on similarity index fitting. Finally, we restrict our attention to those single-asperity FFMs associated to earthquakes which generated tsunamis. We choose few events for which tsunami

  10. Selected Basin Characterization Model Parameters for the Great Basin Carbonate and Alluvial Aquifer System of Nevada, Utah, and Parts of Adjacent States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset was created in support of a study focusing on ground-water resources in the Great Basin carbonate and alluvial aquifer system (GBCAAS). The GBCAAS is a...

  11. Direct molecular-level characterization of different heterogeneous freezing modes on mica – Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abdelmonem

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms behind heterogeneous ice nucleation are of fundamental importance to the prediction of the occurrence and properties of many cloud types, which influence climate and precipitation. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation and freezing nuclei. The surface–water interaction of an ice nucleation particle plays a major, not well explored, role in its ice nucleation ability. This paper presents a real-time molecular-level comparison of different freezing modes on the surface of an atmospherically relevant mineral surface (mica under varying supersaturation conditions using second-harmonic generation spectroscopy. Two sub-deposition nucleation modes were identified (one- and two-stage freezing. The nonlinear signal at the water–mica interface was found to drop following the formation of a thin film on the surface regardless of (1 the formed phase (liquid or ice and (2 the freezing path (one or two step, indicating similar molecular structuring. The results also revealed a transient phase of ice at water–mica interfaces during freezing, which has a lifetime of around 1 min. Such information will have a significant impact on climate change, weather modification, and the tracing of water in hydrosphere studies.

  12. Integrated reservoir characterization: Improvement in heterogeneities stochastic modelling by integration of additional external constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doligez, B.; Eschard, R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France); Geffroy, F. [Centre de Geostatistique, Fontainebleau (France)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The classical approach to construct reservoir models is to start with a fine scale geological model which is informed with petrophysical properties. Then scaling-up techniques allow to obtain a reservoir model which is compatible with the fluid flow simulators. Geostatistical modelling techniques are widely used to build the geological models before scaling-up. These methods provide equiprobable images of the area under investigation, which honor the well data, and which variability is the same than the variability computed from the data. At an appraisal phase, when few data are available, or when the wells are insufficient to describe all the heterogeneities and the behavior of the field, additional constraints are needed to obtain a more realistic geological model. For example, seismic data or stratigraphic models can provide average reservoir information with an excellent areal coverage, but with a poor vertical resolution. New advances in modelisation techniques allow now to integrate this type of additional external information in order to constrain the simulations. In particular, 2D or 3D seismic derived information grids, or sand-shale ratios maps coming from stratigraphic models can be used as external drifts to compute the geological image of the reservoir at the fine scale. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of these new tools, their impact on the final reservoir model, and their sensitivity to some key parameters.

  13. Direct molecular-level characterization of different heterogeneous freezing modes on mica - Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmonem, Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    The mechanisms behind heterogeneous ice nucleation are of fundamental importance to the prediction of the occurrence and properties of many cloud types, which influence climate and precipitation. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation and freezing nuclei. The surface-water interaction of an ice nucleation particle plays a major, not well explored, role in its ice nucleation ability. This paper presents a real-time molecular-level comparison of different freezing modes on the surface of an atmospherically relevant mineral surface (mica) under varying supersaturation conditions using second-harmonic generation spectroscopy. Two sub-deposition nucleation modes were identified (one- and two-stage freezing). The nonlinear signal at the water-mica interface was found to drop following the formation of a thin film on the surface regardless of (1) the formed phase (liquid or ice) and (2) the freezing path (one or two step), indicating similar molecular structuring. The results also revealed a transient phase of ice at water-mica interfaces during freezing, which has a lifetime of around 1 min. Such information will have a significant impact on climate change, weather modification, and the tracing of water in hydrosphere studies.

  14. Environmentally benign heterogeneous nano-particle catalysts: synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of 4-nitrophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Eagambaram; Jebaranjitham, J Nimita

    2011-02-01

    Pollution free catalyst is an attractive area of current interest. The p-Aminophenol is one of the most significant catalyst, because it involves the manufacture of various pharmaceuticals. Crosslinked poly(styrene)-co-poly(4-vinylimidazole) (PSPVIM) was prepared by varying the crosslinked monomer ratio as 2% and 10% respectively. The 2 (w%) of DVB, 25 (w%) of N-VIm as functional monomer and 73 (w%) of styrene as support monomer as organic phase and gelatin, boric acid and polyvinyl alcohol as aqueous phase was used to prepare cross-linked poly(styrene)-co-poly(N-vinyl imidazole) (PVIM) beads (Type-I). Similarly, Type II beads were also prepared by fixing the 10% as a cross linking ratio (DVB). The immobilization of Ag NPs onto the PS-VIm polymer matrix was performed using AgNO3 as a metal precursor solution. The k(obs) determined from UV-Vis results, reveals that the degree of reduction of 4-nitrophenol using Type-I catalysts is more effective than Type-II catalyst due to lower immobilization of AgNPs at higher cross-linked bead matrix. It was found that on increasing the amount of catalyst i.e., type-I PS-PVIm-AgNPs, the rate constant also increases. Therefore, PS-PVIm-AgNPs (Type-I) heterogeneous catalyst is superior for the reduction of 4-NP.

  15. Characterization of normal breast tissue heterogeneity using time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Tomas [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Swartling, Johannes [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Taroni, Paola [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-210 33 Milan (Italy); Torricelli, Alessandro [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-210 33 Milan (Italy); Lindblom, Pia [Department of Surgery, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund (Sweden); Ingvar, Christian [Department of Surgery, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund (Sweden); Andersson-Engels, Stefan [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2005-06-07

    In recent years, extensive efforts have been made in developing near-infrared optical techniques to be used in detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. Variations in optical properties of normal breast tissue set limits to the performance of such techniques and must therefore be thoroughly examined. In this paper, we present intra- and intersubject as well as contralateral variations of optical and physiological properties in breast tissue as measured by using four-wavelength time-resolved spectroscopy (at 660, 786, 916 and 974 nm). In total, 36 volunteers were examined at five regions at each breast. Optical properties (absorption, {mu}{sub a}, and reduced scattering, {mu}'{sub s}) are derived by employing diffusion theory. The use of four wavelengths enables determination of main tissue chromophores (haemoglobin, water and lipids) as well as haemoglobin oxygenation. Variations in all evaluated properties seen over the entire breast are approximately twice those for small-scale heterogeneity (millimetre scale). Intrasubject variations in optical properties are almost in all cases below 20% for {mu}'{sub s}, and 40% for {mu}{sub a}. Overall variations in water, lipid and haemoglobin concentrations are all in the order of 20%. Oxygenation is the least variable of the quantities evaluated, overall intrasubject variations being 6% on average. Extracted physiological properties confirm differences between pre- and post-menopausal breast tissue. Results do not indicate systematic differences between left and right breast000.

  16. Proteomic comparison defines novel markers to characterize heterogeneous populations of extracellular vesicle subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Joanna; Arras, Guillaume; Colombo, Marina; Jouve, Mabel; Morath, Jakob Paul; Primdal-Bengtson, Bjarke; Dingli, Florent; Tkach, Mercedes; Théry, Clotilde

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have become the focus of rising interest because of their numerous functions in physiology and pathology. Cells release heterogeneous vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins, including small EVs formed inside endosomal compartments (i.e., exosomes) and EVs of various sizes budding from the plasma membrane. Specific markers for the analysis and isolation of different EV populations are missing, imposing important limitations to understanding EV functions. Here, EVs from human dendritic cells were first separated by their sedimentation speed, and then either by their behavior upon upward floatation into iodixanol gradients or by immuno-isolation. Extensive quantitative proteomic analysis allowing comparison of the isolated populations showed that several classically used exosome markers, like major histocompatibility complex, flotillin, and heat-shock 70-kDa proteins, are similarly present in all EVs. We identified proteins specifically enriched in small EVs, and define a set of five protein categories displaying different relative abundance in distinct EV populations. We demonstrate the presence of exosomal and nonexosomal subpopulations within small EVs, and propose their differential separation by immuno-isolation using either CD63, CD81, or CD9. Our work thus provides guidelines to define subtypes of EVs for future functional studies. PMID:26858453

  17. A new regularity-based algorithm for characterizing heterogeneities from digitized core image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaci, Said; Zaourar, Naima; Hachay, Olga

    2014-05-01

    The two-dimensional multifractional Brownian motion (2D-mBm) is receiving an increasing interest in image processing. However, one difficulty inherent to this fractal model is the estimation of its local Hölderian regularity function. In this paper, we suggest a new estimator of the local Hölder exponent of 2D-mBm paths. The suggested algorithm has been first tested on synthetic 2D-mBm paths, then implemented on digitized image data of a core extracted from an Algerian borehole. The obtained regularity map shows a clear correlation with the geological features observed on the investigated core. These lithological discontinuities are reflected by local variations of the Hölder exponent value. However, no clear relationship can be drawn between regularity and digitized data. To conclude, the suggested algorithm may be a powerful tool for exploring heterogeneities from core images using the regularity exponents. Keywords: core image, two-dimensional multifractional Brownian motion, fractal, regularity.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of ionic liquid immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles: A recyclable heterogeneous organocatalyst for the acetylation of alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbani-Choghamarani, Arash, E-mail: arashghch58@yahoo.com; Norouzi, Masoomeh

    2016-03-01

    Herein, we describe a simple and efficient procedure for the preparation of 3-((3-(trisilyloxy)propyl)propionamide)-1-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid supported on magnetic nanoparticle (TPPA–IL–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The structure of this magnetic ionic liquid is fully characterized by FT-IR, TGA, XRD, VSM, SEM, EDX and DLS techniques. TPPA–IL–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is employed as a catalyst for the acetylation of alcohols with acetic anhydride under mild and heterogeneous conditions at room temperature with good to excellent yields. The magnetic catalyst could be readily separate from the reaction media by simple magnetic decantation, and reused several times without significant loss of its catalytic activity. - Highlights: • TPPA–IL–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} were prepared and well characterized. • TPPA–IL–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} could be easily separated from solution with an external magnet. • The TPPA–IL–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was characterized by, FT-IR, SEM, TGA, DLS, EDS and VSM. • The catalytic activity of TPPA–IL–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was investigated in acetylation of alcohols.

  19. Characterization of a large panel of patient-derived tumor xenografts representing the clinical heterogeneity of human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Sylvia; Merino-Trigo, Ana; Lacroix, Ludovic; Pocard, Marc; Goéré, Diane; Mariani, Pascale; Landron, Sophie; Bigot, Ludovic; Nemati, Fariba; Dartigues, Peggy; Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Lantuas, Denis; Morgand, Loïc; Pham, Emmanuel; Gonin, Patrick; Dangles-Marie, Virginie; Job, Bastien; Dessen, Philippe; Bruno, Alain; Pierré, Alain; De Thé, Hugues; Soliman, Hany; Nunes, Manoel; Lardier, Guillaume; Calvet, Loreley; Demers, Brigitte; Prévost, Grégoire; Vrignaud, Patricia; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Duchamp, Olivier; Berthet, Cyril

    2012-10-01

    Patient-derived xenograft models are considered to represent the heterogeneity of human cancers and advanced preclinical models. Our consortium joins efforts to extensively develop and characterize a new collection of patient-derived colorectal cancer (CRC) models. From the 85 unsupervised surgical colorectal samples collection, 54 tumors were successfully xenografted in immunodeficient mice and rats, representing 35 primary tumors, 5 peritoneal carcinoses and 14 metastases. Histologic and molecular characterization of patient tumors, first and late passages on mice includes the sequence of key genes involved in CRC (i.e., APC, KRAS, TP53), aCGH, and transcriptomic analysis. This comprehensive characterization shows that our collection recapitulates the clinical situation about the histopathology and molecular diversity of CRC. Moreover, patient tumors and corresponding models are clustering together allowing comparison studies between clinical and preclinical data. Hence, we conducted pharmacologic monotherapy studies with standard of care for CRC (5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and cetuximab). Through this extensive in vivo analysis, we have shown the loss of human stroma cells after engraftment, observed a metastatic phenotype in some models, and finally compared the molecular profile with the drug sensitivity of each tumor model. Through an experimental cetuximab phase II trial, we confirmed the key role of KRAS mutation in cetuximab resistance. This new collection could bring benefit to evaluate novel targeted therapeutic strategies and to better understand the basis for sensitivity or resistance of tumors from individual patients.

  20. On the characterization of the heterogeneous mechanical response of human brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Antonio E; Gentleman, Stephen M; Dini, Daniele

    2017-06-01

    The mechanical characterization of brain tissue is a complex task that scientists have tried to accomplish for over 50 years. The results in the literature often differ by orders of magnitude because of the lack of a standard testing protocol. Different testing conditions (including humidity, temperature, strain rate), the methodology adopted, and the variety of the species analysed are all potential sources of discrepancies in the measurements. In this work, we present a rigorous experimental investigation on the mechanical properties of human brain, covering both grey and white matter. The influence of testing conditions is also shown and thoroughly discussed. The material characterization performed is finally adopted to provide inputs to a mathematical formulation suitable for numerical simulations of brain deformation during surgical procedures.

  1. Characterization of outcomes 1 year after endoscopic thermal vapor ablation for patients with heterogeneous emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herth FJ

    2012-07-01

    deviation age of 63 (5.6 years, FEV1 0.86 mL (0.25 mL (n = 22 men and 22 women. Mean (standard deviation changes from baseline at 12 months were: FEV1 86.2 mL (173.8 mL, St George's Respiratory Questionnaire -11.0 (14.0 units, treated lobar volume from high-resolution computed tomography -751.8 mL (653.9 mL, residual volume -302.8 mL (775.6 mL, 6MWD 18.5 m (63.7 m, and modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale score -0.83 (0.97 (P < 0.05 for all except 6MWD. Improvements were numerically larger at 6 versus 12 months. GOLD stage III and IV patients had similar outcomes at 6 months; however, improvements relative to baseline were numerically higher in GOLD stage IV patients. Larger improvements were observed in patients with higher heterogeneity. In total, 39 serious adverse events were reported in 23 patients with 10 events in 8 patients between 6 and 12 months.Conclusion: Unilateral lobar InterVapor treatment of heterogeneous emphysema improved lung function and health outcomes 1 year following treatment. The magnitude of improvement was larger at 6 months compared to 12 months. Improvements relative to baseline continue to be exhibited at 12 months despite the expected disease related decline over time.Clinical trials: NCT 01041586 and NCT 01102712Keywords: emphysema, bronchoscopy, lung volume reduction, thermal energy

  2. Characterization of the role of heterogeneous advection and diffusion on transport in weathered and fractured granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guihéneuf, N.; Boisson, A.; Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Marechal, J.; Nigon, B.; Wajiddudin, M.; Ahmed, S.

    2013-12-01

    The prediction of transport in weathered and fractured rocks is critical as it represents the primary control of contaminant transfer from the subsurface in many parts of the world. This is the case in Southern India, where the subsurface is composed mainly of weathered and fractured granite and where the overexploitation of the groundwater resource since the 70's has led to high water table depletion and strong groundwater quality deterioration. One key issue for modelling transport in such systems is to quantify the respective role of advective heterogeneities and matrix diffusion, which can both lead to strongly non Fickian transport properties. We investigate this question by analysing tracer test experiments performed under different flow configurations at a fractured granite experimental site located in Andhra Pradesh (India). We performed both convergent and push-pull tracer tests within the same fracture and at different scales. Three convergent tracer tests were performed with a solution of fluorescein for different pumping rate and for different distances between injection and pumping boreholes: 6, 30 and 41 meters. To evaluate diffusive process, we performed two long-duration push-pull tests (push time of 3 hours) with a solution of two conservative tracers of different diffusion coefficient (fluorescein and sodium chloride). We performed also six others push-pull tests with only fluorescein but for a variable push times of 14 min and 55 min with or without resting time of about 60 min. The late-time behaviour on the breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained for all convergent tracer tests showed a power-law slope of -2. Two of them showed an inflexion in the BTCs suggesting the existence of two independent flow paths and thus a highly channelized flow. The long-duration push-pull tests showed similar late-time behaviour with a power-law slope of -2.2 for both tracers. The six others push-pull tests showed a variation of power-law exponent from -3 to -2

  3. Characterization of genetic intratumor heterogeneity in colorectal cancer and matching patient-derived spheroid cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Árnadóttir, Sigrid S; Jeppesen, Maria; Lamy, Philippe; Bramsen, Jesper B; Nordentoft, Iver; Knudsen, Michael; Vang, Søren; Madsen, Mogens R; Thastrup, Ole; Thastrup, Jacob; L Andersen, Claus

    2018-01-01

    Patient-derived in vitro cultures of colorectal cancer (CRC) may help guide treatment strategies prior to patient treatment. However, most previous studies have been performed on a single biopsy per tumor. The purpose of this study was to analyze multiple spatially distinct biopsies from CRCs and see how well intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) was recapitulated in matching patient-derived spheroids. Three to five biopsies were collected from six CRC tumors. Each biopsy was split in two; one half was used for spheroid culturing, while the other half was used for DNA and RNA purification. For two patients, lymph node metastases were analyzed. Somatic mutations were called from whole exome sequencing data. Each tumor contained mutations shared across all biopsies and spheroids, including major CRC drivers such as APC, KRAS, and TP53. At the same time, all tumors exhibited ITH on both mutation and copy number level. The concordance between biopsies and spheroids ranged between 40 and 70% for coding mutations. For three patients, the biopsy and spheroid from matching areas clustered together, meaning that the spheroid resembled the area of origin more than the other areas. However, all biopsies and spheroids contained private mutations. Therefore, multiple cultures from spatially distinct sites of the tumor increase the insight into the genetic profile of the entire tumor. Molecular subtypes were called from RNA sequencing data. When based on transcripts from both cancer and noncancerous cells, the subtypes were largely independent of sampling site. In contrast, subtyping based on cancer cell transcripts alone was dependent on sample site and genetic ITH. In conclusion, all examined CRC tumors showed genetic ITH. Spheroid cultures partly reflected this ITH, and having multiple cultures from distinct tumor sites improved the representation of the genetic tumor subclones. This should be taken into account when establishing patient-derived models for drug screening. © 2017

  4. Aquifers of the Denver Basin, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topper, R.

    2004-01-01

    Development of the Denver Basin for water supply has been ongoing since the late 1800s. The Denver Basin aquifer system consists of the water-yielding strata of Tertiary and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks within four overlying formations. The four statutory aquifers contained in these formations are named the Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, and Laramie-Fox Hills. For water rights administrative purposes, the outcrop/subcrop of the Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer defines the margins of the Basin. Initial estimates of the total recoverable groundwater reserves in storage, under this 6700-mi2 area, were 295 million acre-ft. Recent geologic evidence indicates that the aquifers are very heterogeneous and their composition varies significantly with distance from the source area of the sediments. As a result, available recoverable reserves may be one-third less than previously estimated. There is no legal protection for pressure levels in the aquifer, and water managers are becoming increasingly concerned about the rapid water level declines (30 ft/yr). Approximately 33,700 wells of record have been completed in the sedimentary rock aquifers of the Denver Basin for municipal, industrial, agricultural, and domestic uses.

  5. Field Mapping and Fracture Characterization Techniques Predict Groundwater Preferential Flow Paths in Fractured Bedrock Aquifers, Nashoba Terrane, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, A. K.; Mabee, S. B.; Hubbs, S. A.

    2005-12-01

    A study examining the relationship between fracture characteristics and groundwater was undertaken in the crystalline Nashoba Terrane of eastern Massachusetts. The Nashoba Terrane, a fault-bounded, highly deformed sliver of Paleozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks, covers an area of 600 sq km about 50 km northwest of Boston. Increasing industrial development coupled with population growth place significant pressure on developers to provide sufficient potable water for the population. To aid water development and management, this study examined fracture characteristics at regional, quadrangle and wellfield scales. The regional-scale work involved recording over 4000 structural measurements from 80 outcrops in the terrane. Fracture information recorded at each data station included strike and dip, trace length, spacing, termination, and fracture type. Preliminary results show that hydrostructural domains can be defined from combinations of fracture characterization and rock types. These domains are used to conceptualize general groundwater flow patterns in the subsurface: steeply dipping fractures, such as partings parallel to foliation enhance recharge potential and impose strong flow anisotropy. A different character is observed if steeply dipping joints intersect sheeting joints. In this instance, both recharge and lateral flow will be enhanced and flow anisotropy will be reduced. The distribution and intensity of particular fracture sets varies as a function of rock type, proximity to major features and local stress states. Partings parallel to foliation are prevalent in gneissic rocks whereas sheeting joints are more common in igneous rocks. Common joints are the most prevalent fractures, present in all rock types across the entire terrane. Quadrangle and wellfield scale data can be used to validate the regional-scale conceptual models. A comprehensive well-yield database was created to test the proposed models. Over 500 water wells in the terrane were evaluated

  6. Microbial characterization of nitrification in a shallow, nitrogen-contaminated aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts and detection of a novel cluster associated with nitrifying Betaproteobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D.N.; Smith, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater nitrification is a poorly characterized process affecting the speciation and transport of nitrogen. Cores from two sites in a plume of contamination were examined using culture-based and molecular techniques targeting nitrification processes. The first site, located beneath a sewage effluent infiltration bed, received treated effluent containing O2 (> 300????M) and NH4+ (51-800????M). The second site was 2.5??km down-gradient near the leading edge of the ammonium zone within the contaminant plume and featured vertical gradients of O2, NH4+, and NO3- (0-300, 0-500, and 100-200????M with depth, respectively). Ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizers enumerated by the culture-based MPN method were low in abundance at both sites (1.8 to 350??g- 1 and 33 to 35,000??g- 1, respectively). Potential nitrifying activity measured in core material in the laboratory was also very low, requiring several weeks for products to accumulate. Molecular analysis of aquifer DNA (nested PCR followed by cloning and 16S rDNA sequencing) detected primarily sequences associated with the Nitrosospira genus throughout the cores at the down-gradient site and a smaller proportion from the Nitrosomonas genus in the deeper anoxic, NH4+ zone at the down-gradient site. Only a single Nitrosospira sequence was detected beneath the infiltration bed. Furthermore, the majority of Nitrosospira-associated sequences represent an unrecognized cluster. We conclude that an uncharacterized group associated with Nitrosospira dominate at the geochemically stable, down-gradient site, but found little evidence for Betaproteobacteria nitrifiers beneath the infiltration beds where geochemical conditions were more variable.

  7. Effect of hypersaline cooling canals on aquifer salinization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joseph D.; Langevin, Christian D.; Brakefield-Goswami, Linzy

    2010-01-01

    The combined effect of salinity and temperature on density-driven convection was evaluated in this study for a large (28 km2) cooling canal system (CCS) at a thermoelectric power plant in south Florida, USA. A two-dimensional cross-section model was used to evaluate the effects of hydraulic heterogeneities, cooling canal salinity, heat transport, and cooling canal geometry on aquifer salinization and movement of the freshwater/saltwater interface. Four different hydraulic conductivity configurations, with values ranging over several orders of magnitude, were evaluated with the model. For all of the conditions evaluated, aquifer salinization was initiated by the formation of dense, hypersaline fingers that descended downward to the bottom of the 30-m thick aquifer. Saline fingers reached the aquifer bottom in times ranging from a few days to approximately 5 years for the lowest hydraulic conductivity case. Aquifer salinization continued after saline fingers reached the aquifer bottom and coalesced by lateral movement away from the site. Model results showed that aquifer salinization was most sensitive to aquifer heterogeneity, but was also sensitive to CCS salinity, temperature, and configuration.

  8. Towards improved characterization of high-risk releases using heterogeneous indoor sensor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreedharan, Priya; Sohn, Michael D.; Nazaroff, William W.; J. Gadgil, Ashok

    2010-06-30

    The sudden release of toxic contaminants that reach indoor spaces can be hazardous to building occupants. For an acutely toxic contaminant, the speed of the emergency response strongly influences the consequences to occupants. The design of a real time sensor system is made challenging both by the urgency and complex nature of the event, and by the imperfect sensors and models available to describe it. In this research, we use Bayesian modeling to combine information from multiple types of sensors to improve the characterization of a release. We discuss conceptual and algorithmic considerations for selecting and fusing information from disparate sensors. To explore system performance, we use both real tracer gas data from experiments in a three story building, along with synthetic data, including information from door position sensors. The added information from door position sensors is found to be useful for many scenarios, but not always. We discuss the physical conditions and design factors that affect these results, such as the influence of the door positions on contaminant transport. We highlight potential benefits of multisensor data fusion, challenges in realizing those benefits, and opportunities for further improvement.

  9. Towards improved characterization of high-risk releases using heterogeneous indoor sensor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreedharan, Priya [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740 (United States); Indoor Environment Department, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sohn, Michael D. [Indoor Environment Department, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nazaroff, William W.; Gadgil, Ashok J. [Indoor Environment Department, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1710 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The sudden release of toxic contaminants that reach indoor spaces can be hazardous to building occupants. For an acutely toxic contaminant, the speed of the emergency response strongly influences the consequences to occupants. The design of a real-time sensor system is made challenging both by the urgency and complex nature of the event, and by the imperfect sensors and models available to describe it. In this research, we use Bayesian modeling to combine information from multiple types of sensors to improve the characterization of a release. We discuss conceptual and algorithmic considerations for selecting and fusing information from disparate sensors. To explore system performance, we use both real tracer gas data from experiments in a three-story building, along with synthetic data, including information from door-position sensors. The added information from door-position sensors is found to be useful for many scenarios, but not always. We discuss the physical conditions and design factors that affect these results, such as the influence of the door positions on contaminant transport. We highlight potential benefits of multisensor data fusion, challenges in realizing those benefits, and opportunities for further improvement. (author)

  10. Upgrading aquifer test interpretations with numerical axisymmetric flow models using MODFLOW in the Donana area (Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Bravo, N.; Guardiola-Albert, C.

    2011-07-01

    Though axisymmetric modelling is not widely used it can be incorporated into MODFLOW by tricking the grids with a log-scaling method to simulate the radial flow to a well and to upgrade hydraulic properties. Furthermore, it may reduce computer runtimes considerably by decreasing the number of dimensions. The Almonte-Marismas aquifer is a heterogeneous multi-layer aquifer underlying the Donana area, one of the most important wetlands in Europe. The characterization of hydraulic conductivity is of great importance, because this factor is included in the regional groundwater model, the main water-management support tool in the area. Classical interpretations of existing pumping tests have never taken into account anisotropy, heterogeneity and large head gradients. Thus, to improve the characterization of hydraulic conductivity in the groundwater model, five former pumping tests, located in different hydrogeological areas, have been modelled numerically to represent radial flow in different parts of the aquifer. These numerical simulations have proved to be suitable for reproducing groundwater flow during a pumping test, to corroborate hypotheses concerning unconfined or semi-confined aquifers and even to estimate different hydraulic conductivity values for each lithological layer drilled, which constitutes the main improvement of this model in comparison with classical methods. A comparison of the results shows that the values of the numerical model are similar to those obtained by classical analytic techniques but are always lower for the most permeable layer. It is also clear that the less complex the lithological distribution the more accurate the estimations of hydraulic conductivity. (Author) 46 refs.

  11. A theoretical model of the hydrodynamic operation of the aquifers in the Leon Valley (Guanajato, Mexico) and characterizations of the deep hydrother mal inflows. Modelizacion del funcionamiento hidrodinamico de los acuiferos del valle de Leon (Guanajuato, Mexico) y caracterizacion de los apartes hidrotermales profundos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro Flores, A.

    1994-01-01

    Aquifers of Leon river basin (Guanajuato) are a complex flow system, that we assume like confinated as a whole, and its initial mathematical modelling shows a very small recharge and the over-explotation of the systems. Further, this aquifers are contaminated by superficial focus, associated with wastewaters and Cr-VI, and they are affected by deep thermal waters near temperatures of 40 degree centigree, that shows anormal fluorine contents. Multivariate methods make possible the hydrogeochemical characterization of hydrothermal contributions, that can influence to the systems, if the over explotation of the aquifer increase in the future. (Author) 12 refs.

  12. Preparation and Characterization of Anadara Granosa Shells and CaCO3 as Heterogeneous Catalyst for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiyanto Hadiyanto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the use of homogenous catalyst has been gradually reduced for its operational reason. The homogenous catalyst leads in difficulty of separation after the process completed and the life cycle is shorter. Therefore, most of researches are introducing heterogenous catalyst for its substitution. This research was aimed to evaluate the use of shell of Anadara granosa and CaCO3 as source of CaO based catalyst through impregnation method. The preparation of the catalyst was started by decomposition of shells and CaCO3 at temperature of 800 oC for 3 hours, followed by impregnation at 70 oC for 4 hours and then calcined at 800 oC for 2 hours. The CaCO3 based catalyst gained high yield of biodiesel (94% as compared to Anadara granoasa based catalyst (92%. The reusability study showed that these catalysts could be used until three times recycle with 40-60% yield of biodiesel. The CaO contents of catalyst decreased up to 90% after three times recycles. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 10th November 2015; Revised: 6th January 2016; Accepted: 6th January 2016 How to Cite: Hadiyanto, H., Lestari, S.P., Widayat, W. (2016. Preparation and Characterization of Anadara Granosa Shells and CaCO3 as Heterogeneous Catalyst for Biodiesel Production. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (1: 21-26. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.1.402.21-26 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.1.402.21-26

  13. Use of ``rock-typing`` to characterize carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikwuakor, K.C.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of the project was to apply techniques of ``rock-typing`` and quantitative formation evaluation to borehole measurements in order to identify reservoir and non-reservoir rock-types and their properties within the ``C`` zone of the Ordovician Red River carbonates in the northeast Montana and northwest North Dakota areas of the Williston Basin. Rock-typing discriminates rock units according to their pore-size distribution. Formation evaluation estimates porosities and pore fluid saturation. Rock-types were discriminated using crossplots involving three rock-typing criteria: (1) linear relationship between bulk density and porosity, (2) linear relationship between acoustic interval transit-time and porosity, and (3) linear relationship between acoustic interval transit-time and bulk density. Each rock-type was quantitatively characterized by the slopes and intercepts established for different crossplots involving the above variables, as well as porosities and fluid saturations associated with the rock-types. All the existing production was confirmed through quantitative formation evaluation. Highly porous dolomites and anhydritic dolomites contribute most of the production, and constitute the best reservoir rock-types. The results of this study can be applied in field development and in-fill drilling. Potential targets would be areas of porosity pinchouts and those areas where highly porous zones are downdip from non-porous and tight dolomites. Such areas are abundant. In order to model reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations, a more localized (e.g. field scale) study, expanded to involve other rock-typing criteria, is necessary.

  14. Evaluation of intratumoural heterogeneity on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for characterization of peripheral nerve sheath tumours in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, Johannes; Derlin, Thorsten; Bannas, Peter; Busch, Jasmin D.; Herrmann, Jochen; Adam, Gerhard [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Bockhorn, Maximilian [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Hagel, Christian [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Institute of Neuropathology, Hamburg (Germany); Friedrich, Reinhard E. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Mautner, Victor F. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the potential usefulness of intratumoural tracer uptake heterogeneity on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT as compared to a cut-off maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) for characterization of peripheral nerve sheath tumours (PNSTs) in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Fifty patients suffering from NF1 were examined by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Intralesional tracer uptake was analysed qualitatively and semi-quantitatively by measuring the mean and maximum SUV. Uptake heterogeneity was graded qualitatively using a three-point scale and semi-quantitatively by calculating an SUV-based heterogeneity index (HI{sub SUV}). Cohen's {kappa} was used to determine inter- and intra-rater agreement. Histopathological evaluation and clinical as well as radiological follow-up examinations served as the reference standards. A highly significant correlation between the degree of intratumoural uptake heterogeneity on {sup 18}F-FDG PET and malignant transformation of PNSTs was observed (p < 0.0001). Semi-quantitative HI{sub SUV} was significantly higher in malignant PNSTs (MPNSTs) than in benign tumours (p = 0.0002). Both intralesional heterogeneity and SUV{sub max} could be used to identify malignant tumours with a sensitivity of 100 %. Cohen's {kappa} was 0.86 for inter-rater agreement and 0.88 for intra-rater agreement on heterogeneity. MPNSTs in patients with NF1 demonstrate considerable intratumoural uptake heterogeneity on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Assessment of tumour heterogeneity is highly reproducible. Both tumour heterogeneity and a cut-off SUV{sub max} may be used to sensitively identify malignant PNSTs, but the specificity is higher for the latter. A combination of both methods leads to a non-significant improvement in diagnostic performance. (orig.)

  15. Use of passive samplers to characterize the spatial heterogeneity of coarse particle mass concentration and composition in Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawvel, Eric J.

    The overall goals of this dissertation are: 1) to better quantify the spatial heterogeneity of coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) and its chemical composition; and 2) to evaluate the performance (accuracy and precision) of passive samplers analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDS) for PM10-2.5. For these goals, field studies were conducted over multiple seasons in Cleveland, OH and were the source of data for this dissertation. To achieve the first goal, we characterized spatial variability in the mass and composition of PM10-2.5 in Cleveland, OH with the aid of inexpensive passive samplers. Passive samplers were deployed at 25 optimized sites for three week-long intervals in summer 2008 to characterize spatial variability in components of PM10-2.5. The size and composition of individual particles were determined using CCSEM-EDS. For each sample, this information was used to estimate PM10-2.5 mass and aerosol composition by particle class. The highest PM10-2.5 means were observed at three central industrial urban sites (35.4 mug m-3, 43.4 mug m-3, and 47.6 mug m -3), whereas lower means were observed to the west and east of this area with the lowest means observed at outskirt suburban background sites (12.9 mug m-3 and 14.7 mug m-3). Concentration maps for PM10-2.5 and some compositional components of PM10-2.5 (Fe oxide and Ca rich) show an elongated shape of high values stretching from Lake Erie south through the central industrial area, whereas those for other compositional components (e.g., Si/Al rich) are considerably less heterogeneous. The findings from the spatial variability of coarse particles by compositional class analysis, presented in Chapter II of this dissertation, show that the concentrations of some particle classes were substantially more spatially heterogeneous than others. The data suggest that industrial sources located in The Flats district in particular may contribute

  16. Biodiesel synthesis from cottonseed oil using homogeneous alkali catalyst and using heterogeneous multi walled carbon nanotubes: Characterization and blending studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arun Shankar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The trans-esterification of cottonseed oil using strong alkali catalyst and using multi walled carbon nano tubes as catalyst to produce biodiesel was studied. The interaction effects of various factors such as temperature, amount of alkali used, alcohol to oil ratio and reaction time on yield of biodiesel were studied. The maximum yield of 95% biodiesel was obtained. The biodiesel produced was characterized using FT-IR spectral analysis and GC–MS analysis to ascertain the various functional groups and compounds available in it. The properties of biodiesel using homogeneous alkali catalyst and heterogeneous multi walled carbon nanotubes such as calorific value (36.18 MJ/kg, 33.78 MJ/kg, flash point (160 °C, 156 °C and other properties such as viscosity, cloud point, pour point and density were found to determine the quality of biodiesel produced. The studies were done by blending the biodiesel produced with diesel and properties of blended samples were estimated to ascertain the use of blended samples in internal combustion engines.

  17. Development of a highly sensitive three-dimensional gel electrophoresis method for characterization of monoclonal protein heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Keiichi; Tamura, Shogo; Otuka, Kohei; Niizeki, Noriyasu; Shigemura, Masahiko; Shimizu, Chikara; Matsuno, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Seiichi; Moriyama, Takanori

    2013-07-15

    Three-dimensional gel electrophoresis (3-DE), which combines agarose gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing/SDS-PAGE, was developed to characterize monoclonal proteins (M-proteins). However, the original 3-DE method has not been optimized and its specificity has not been demonstrated. The main goal of this study was to optimize the 3-DE procedure and then compare it with 2-DE. We developed a highly sensitive 3-DE method in which M-proteins are extracted from a first-dimension agarose gel, by diffusing into 150 mM NaCl, and the recovery of M-proteins was 90.6%. To validate the utility of the highly sensitive 3-DE, we compared it with the original 3-DE method. We found that highly sensitive 3-DE provided for greater M-protein recovery and was more effective in terms of detecting spots on SDS-PAGE gels than the original 3-DE. Moreover, highly sensitive 3-DE separates residual normal IgG from M-proteins, which could not be done by 2-DE. Applying the highly sensitive 3-DE to clinical samples, we found that the characteristics of M-proteins vary tremendously between individuals. We believe that our highly sensitive 3-DE method described here will prove useful in further studies of the heterogeneity of M-proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of heterogeneous nickel sites in CO dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum by nickel L-edge x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralston, C.Y. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Kumar, M.; Ragsdale, S.W. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    L-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful spectroscopic technique for determining the electronic state of transition metals. For first row transition metals, the L-edge represents a transition from 2p core levels to 3d valence levels. Coulomb and exchange interactions between the core hole and 3d valence electrons make the L-edge sensitive to the number and configuration of 3d electrons, hence to the metal spin state and oxidation state. The authors have used L-edge XAS to characterize the Ni sites in the carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) enzyme from Clostridium thermoaceticum. This CODH catalyzes both CO oxidation and acetyl-CoA synthesis at two Ni and Fe containing centers, C and A, respectively. Since the enzyme exhibits complex EPR signals that never integrate to one spin per Ni, there is evidence for heterogeneity in the types of Ni present. The Ni L-edge protein spectra were recorded at ALS beamline 9.3.2. The photon energy resolutions used for protein samples and for Ni model compound spectra were 350 and 270 meV respectively. During data collection the sample chamber was maintained at less than 5{times}10{sup {minus}9} Torr using a helium cryopump. Model compound spectra were measured using total electron yield detection, while protein spectra were recorded using fluorescence detection with a windowless 13-element germanium detector, and were calibrated using the total electron yield spectrum of NiF{sub 2} or NiO. Each protein spectrum presented represents the sum of approximately 40 15-minute scans. The authors have found that by using L-edge XAS they are able to distinguish between different spin and oxidation states of Ni compounds. They have used this result to characterize the Ni containing CODH protein in various states. The L-edge spectra are consistent with other results showing that when CODH is reacted with CO, the metal centers undergo reduction.

  19. Characterization of Paper Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    John M. Considine

    2014-01-01

    Paper and paperboard are the most widely-used green materials in the world because they are renewable, recyclable, reusable, and compostable. Continued and expanded use of these materials and their potential use in new products requires a comprehensive understanding of the variability of their mechanical properties.

  20. Permeability profiles in granular aquifers using flowmeters in direct-push wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, D.; Lefebvre, R.; Morin, R.H.; Gloaguen, E.

    2010-01-01

    Numerical hydrogeological models should ideally be based on the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K), a property rarely defined on the basis of sufficient data due to the lack of efficient characterization methods. Electromagnetic borehole flowmeter measurements during pumping in uncased wells can effectively provide a continuous vertical distribution of K in consolidated rocks. However, relatively few studies have used the flowmeter in screened wells penetrating unconsolidated aquifers, and tests conducted in gravel-packed wells have shown that flowmeter data may yield misleading results. This paper describes the practical application of flowmeter profiles in direct-push wells to measure K and delineate hydrofacies in heterogeneous unconsolidated aquifers having low-to-moderate K (10−6 to 10−4 m/s). The effect of direct-push well installation on K measurements in unconsolidated deposits is first assessed based on the previous work indicating that such installations minimize disturbance to the aquifer fabric. The installation and development of long-screen wells are then used in a case study validating Kprofiles from flowmeter tests at high-resolution intervals (15 cm) with K profiles derived from multilevel slug tests between packers at identical intervals. For 119 intervals tested in five different wells, the difference in log K values obtained from the two methods is consistently below 10%. Finally, a graphical approach to the interpretation of flowmeter profiles is proposed to delineate intervals corresponding to distinct hydrofacies, thus providing a method whereby both the scale and magnitude of K contrasts in heterogeneous unconsolidated aquifers may be represented.

  1. Evaluation of the aquifer characteristic of Nanka Sands using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... identification of the vertical variation in subsurface lithology and for the characterization of the aquifer system of the study area. The interpretation of the VES data revealed 3 to 5 geoelectric units with the depth to aquifer varying from 7 to 108m and the resistivity of the saturated layer varying between 42.9 and 8829 ohm-m.

  2. Characterization of Recharge Mechanisms and Sources of Groundwater Salinization in Ras Jbel Coastal Aquifer (Northeast Tunisia Using Hydrogeochemical Tools, Environmental Isotopes, GIS, and Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Hammami Abidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is among the most available water resources in Tunisia; it is a vital natural resource in arid and semiarid regions. Located in north-eastern Tunisia, the Metline-Ras Jbel-Raf Raf aquifer is a mio-plio-quaternary shallow coastal aquifer, where groundwater is the most important source of water supply. The major ion hydrochemistry and environmental isotope composition (δ18O, δ2H were investigated to identify the recharge sources and processes that affect the groundwater salinization. The combination of hydrogeochemical, isotopic, statistical, and GIS approaches demonstrates that the salinity and the groundwater composition are largely controlled by the water-rock interaction particularly the dissolution of evaporate minerals and the ion exchange process, the return flow of the irrigation water, agricultural fertilizers, and finally saltwater intrusion which started before 1980 and which is partially mitigated by the artificial recharge since 1993. As for the stable isotope signatures, results showed that groundwater samples lay on and around the local meteoric water line LMWL; hence, this arrangement signifies that the recharge of the Ras Jbel aquifer is ensured by recent recharge from Mediterranean air masses.

  3. Biscayne aquifer, southeast Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Howard; Hull, John E.

    1978-01-01

    Peak daily pumpage from the highly permeable, unconfined Biscayne aquifer for public water-supply systems in southeast Florida in 1975 was about 500 million gallons. Another 165 million gallons was withdrawn daily for irrigation. Recharge to the aquifer is primarily by local rainfall. Discharge is by evapotranspiration, canal drainage, coastal seepage, and pumping. Pollutants can enter the aquifer by direct infiltration from land surface or controlled canals, septic-tank and other drainfields, drainage wells, and solid-waste dumps. Most of the pollutants are concentrated in the upper 20 to 30 feet of the aquifer; public supply wells generally range in depth from about 75 to 150 feet. Dilution, dispersion, and adsorption tend to reduce the concentrations. Seasonal heavy rainfall and canal discharge accelerate ground-water circulation, thereby tending to dilute and flush upper zones of the aquifer. The ultimate fate of pollutants in the aquifer is the ocean, although some may be adsorbed by the aquifer materials en route to the ocean, and some are diverted to pumping wells. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Numerical investigation of temperature distribution in a confined heterogeneous geothermal reservoir due to injection-production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganguly, Sayantan; Tan, Lippong; Date, Abhijit; Mohan Kumar, M.S.

    The present study deals with the modeling of transient temperature distribution in a heterogeneous geothermal reservoir in response to the injection-production process. The heterogeneous geothermal aquifer considered here is a confined aquifer with homogeneous layers of finite length and overlain

  5. Transmissivity and water quality of water-producing zones in the intermediate aquifer system, Sarasota County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knochenmus, L.A.; Bowman, Geronia

    1998-01-01

    The intermediate aquifer system is an important water source in Sarasota County, Florida, because the quality of water in it is usually better than that in the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer. The intermediate aquifer system consists of a group of up to three water-producing zones separated by less-permeable units that restrict the vertical movement of ground water between zones. The diverse lithology, that makes up the intermediate aquifer system, reflects the variety of depositional environments that occurred during the late Oligocene and Miocene epochs. Slight changes in the depositional environment resulted in aquifer heterogeneity, creating both localized connection between water-producing zones and abrupt culmination of water-producing zones that are not well documented. Aquifer heterogeneity results in vertical and areal variability in hydraulic and water-quality properties. The uppermost water-producing zone is designated producing zone 1 but is not extensively used because of its limited production capability and limited areal extent. The second water-producing zone is designated producing zone 2, and most of the domestic- and irrigation-supply wells in the area are open to this zone. Additionally, producing zone 2 is utilized for public supply in southern coastal areas of Sarasota County. Producing zone 3 is the lowermost and most productive water-producing zone in the intermediate aquifer system. Public-supply well fields serving the cities of Sarasota and Venice, as well as the Plantation and Mabry Carlton Reserve well fields, utilize producing zone 3. Heads within the intermediate aquifer system generally increase with aquifer depth. However, localized head-gradient reversals occur in the study area, coinciding with sites of intense ground-water withdrawals. Heads in producing zones 1, 2, and 3 range from 1 to 23, 0.2 to 34, and 7 to 42 feet above sea level, respectively. Generally, an upward head gradient exists between producing zones 3 and 2

  6. Staging of cervical cancer based on tumor heterogeneity characterized by texture features on 18F-FDG PET images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wei; Chen, Zhe; Liang, Ying; Shen, Wei; Yang, Feng; Dai, Ruwei; Wu, Ning; Tian, Jie

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the staging value of the tumor heterogeneity characterized by texture features and other commonly used semi-quantitative indices extracted from 18F-FDG PET images of cervical cancer (CC) patients. Forty-two patients suffering CC at different stages were enrolled in this study. Firstly, we proposed a new tumor segmentation method by combining the intensity and gradient field information in a level set framework. Secondly, fifty-four 3D texture features were studied besides of SUVs (SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV). Through correlation analysis, receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves analysis, some independent indices showed statistically significant differences between the early stage (ES, stages I and II) and the advanced stage (AS, stages III and IV). Then the tumors represented by those independent indices could be automatically classified into ES and AS, and the most discriminative feature could be chosen. Finally, the robustness of the optimal index with respect to sampling schemes and the quality of the PET images were validated. Using the proposed segmentation method, the dice similarity coefficient and Hausdorff distance were 91.78   ±   1.66% and 7.94   ±   1.99 mm, respectively. According to the correlation analysis, all the fifty-eight indices could be divided into 20 groups. Six independent indices were selected for their highest areas under the ROC curves (AUROC), and showed significant differences between ES and AS (P  <  0.05). Through automatic classification with the support vector machine (SVM) Classifier, run percentage (RP) was the most discriminative index with the higher accuracy (88.10%) and larger AUROC (0.88). The Pearson correlation of RP under different sampling schemes is 0.9991   ±   0.0011. RP is a highly stable feature and well correlated with tumor stage in CC, which suggests it could differentiate ES and AS with high

  7. Impacts of fluvial sedimentary heterogeneities on CO2 storage performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issautier, B. H.; Viseur, S.; Audigane, P. D.

    2011-12-01

    The heterogeneity of fluvial systems is a key parameter in sedimentology due to the associated impacts on flow performance. In a broader context, fluvial reservoirs are now targets for CO2 storage projects in several sedimentary basins (Paris Basin, North German Basin), thus calling for detailed characterization of reservoir behaviour and capacity. Fluvial reservoirs are a complex layout of highly heterogeneous sedimentary bodies with varying connectivity, depending on the sedimentary history of the system. Reservoir characterization must determine (a) the nature and dimension of the sedimentary bodies, and (b) the connectivity drivers and their evolution throughout the stratigraphic succession. Based on reservoir characterization, geological modelling must account for this information and can be used as a predictive tool for capacity estimation. Flow simulation, however, describes the reservoir behaviour with respect to CO2 injection. The present work focuses on fluvial reservoir performance and was carried out as part of a PhD (2008-2011) dedicated to the impact of sedimentary heterogeneity on CO2 storage performance. The work comprises three steps: ? Reservoir characterization based on detailed fieldwork (sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy) carried out in Central Arabia on the Minjur Sandstone. Twelve depositional environments and their associated heterogeneity are identified, and their layout is presented in a high-resolution sequence stratigraphy analysis. This step is summed up in a 3D geological model. ? Conceptual modelling based on this field data, using gOcad software and an in-house python code. The purpose was to study, for a given architecture, the impact of sedimentary heterogeneity on storage capacity estimations using two models: one with heterogeneity within the sedimentary fill (model A); the other without heterogeneity within the sedimentary fill (model B). A workflow was designed to estimate and compare the storage capacities for a series

  8. Hydrodynamical and hydrocal chemics characterization of aquifers in the Loukkos river (Morocco); Caracterizacion hidrodinamica e hidroquimica de los acuiferos de la Cuenca Baja del no Loukkors (Marruecos)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhmadi, B.; Benavente, J.; Crus-San Julian, J.; Sanroma, A. [Instituto del Agua, Universidad de Granada, Granada (Spain)

    1995-08-01

    The aquifer of the alluvial plain of the Loukkors river (Morocco) and the Oulad-Ogbane conglomerate formation, wich constitutes one of its borders, have been studied for, basically, (a) defining the geometry of the substratum as well as the character of the permeable materials, from data obtained in borehole columns and electrical geophysical prospections, (b) evaluation their hydraulic parameters from the results of some pumping test, and (c) hydrochemical assessment (types of groundwaters, spatial and temporal evolution of chemical quality) from four sampling campaigns, using conventional graphical methods as well as statistical multivariate procedures.

  9. Characterization of heterogeneous reservoirs: sentinels method and quantification of uncertainties; Caracterisation des reservoirs heterogenes: methode des sentinelles et quantification des incertitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezghani, M.

    1999-02-11

    The aim of this thesis is to propose a new inversion method to allow both an improved reservoir characterization and a management of uncertainties. In this approach, the identification of the permeability distribution is conducted using the sentinel method in order to match the pressure data. This approach, based on optimal control theory, can be seen as an alternative of least-squares method. Here, we prove the existence of exact sentinels under regularity hypothesis. From a numerical point of view, we consider regularized sentinels. We suggest a novel approach to update the penalization coefficient in order to improve numerical robustness. Moreover, the flexibility of the sentinel method enables to develop a way to treat noisy pressure data. To deal with geostatistical modelling of permeability distribution, we propose to link the pilot point method with sentinels to reach the identification of permeability. We particularly focus on the optimal location of pilot points. Finally, we present an original method, based on adjoint state computations, to quantify the dynamic data contribution to the characterisation of a calibrated geostatistical model. (author) 67 refs.

  10. EPA Sole Source Aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Information on sole source aquifers (SSAs) is widely used in assessments under the National Environmental Policy Act and at the state and local level. A national...

  11. Evaluating drywells for stormwater management and enhanced aquifer recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drywells are increasingly used for stormwater management and enhanced aquifer recharge, but only limited research has quantitatively determined drywell performance. Numerical and field experiments were therefore conducted to improve our understanding and ability to characterize drywell behavior. I...

  12. Identifying aquifer type in fractured rock aquifers using harmonic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahi, Khayyun A; Halihan, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Determining aquifer type, unconfined, semi-confined, or confined, by drilling or performing pumping tests has inherent problems (i.e., cost and complex field issues) while sometimes yielding inconclusive results. An improved method to cost-effectively determine aquifer type would be beneficial for hydraulic mapping of complex aquifer systems like fractured rock aquifers. Earth tides are known to influence water levels in wells penetrating confined aquifers or unconfined thick, low-porosity aquifers. Water-level fluctuations in wells tapping confined and unconfined aquifers are also influenced by changes in barometric pressure. Harmonic analyses of water-level fluctuations of a thick (~1000 m) carbonate aquifer located in south-central Oklahoma (Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer) were utilized in nine wells to identify aquifer type by evaluating the influence of earth tides and barometric-pressure variations using signal identification. On the basis of the results, portions of the aquifer responded hydraulically as each type of aquifer even though there was no significant variation in lithostratigraphy. The aquifer type was depth dependent with confined conditions becoming more prevalent with depth. The results demonstrate that harmonic analysis is an accurate and low-cost method to determine aquifer type. © 2012, The Author(s). Ground Water © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  13. Integrating seismic-reflection and sequence-stratigraphic methods to characterize the hydrogeology of the Floridan aquifer system in southeast Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system (FAS) is receiving increased attention as a result of regulatory restrictions on water-supply withdrawals and treated wastewater management practices. The South Florida Water Management District’s Regional Water Availability Rule, adopted in 2007, restricts urban withdrawals from the shallower Biscayne aquifer to pre-April 2006 levels throughout southeast Florida. Legislation adopted by the State of Florida requires elimination of ocean outfalls of treated wastewater by 2025. These restrictions have necessitated the use of the more deeply buried FAS as an alternate water resource to meet projected water-supply shortfalls, and as a repository for the disposal of wastewater via Class I deep injection wells and injection of reclaimed water. Some resource managers in Broward County have expressed concern regarding the viability of the FAS as an alternative water supply due to a lack of technical data and information regarding its long-term sustainability. Sustainable development and management of the FAS for water supply is uncertain because of the potential risk posed by structural geologic anomalies (faults, fractures, and karst collapse structures) and knowledge gaps in the stratigraphy of the system. The integration of seismic-reflection and borehole data into an improved geologic and hydrogeologic framework will provide a better understanding of the structural and stratigraphic features that influence groundwater flow and contaminant transport.

  14. Flow paths in the Edwards aquifer, northern Medina and northeastern Uvalde counties, Texas, based on hydrologic identification and geochemical characterization and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Allan K.; Journey, Celeste

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, conducted a 4-year study during 2001– 04 to identify major ground-water flow paths in the Edwards aquifer in northern Medina and northeastern Uvalde Counties, Texas. The study involved use of geologic structure, surfacewater and ground-water data, and geochemistry to identify ground-water flow paths. Relay ramps and associated faulting in northern Medina County appear to channel ground-water flow along four distinct flow paths that move water toward the southwest. The northwestern Medina flow path is bounded on the north by the Woodard Cave fault and on the south by the Parkers Creek fault. Water moves downdip toward the southwest until the flow encounters a cross fault along Seco Creek. This barrier to flow might force part or most of the flow to the south. Departure hydrographs for two wells and discharge departure for a streamflow-gaging station provide evidence for flow in the northwestern Medina flow path. The north-central Medina flow path (northern part) is bounded by the Parkers Creek fault on the north and the Medina Lake fault on the south. The adjacent north-central Medina flow path (southern part) is bounded on the north by the Medina Lake fault and on the south by the Diversion Lake fault. The north-central Medina flow path is separated into a northern and southern part because of water-level differences. Ground water in both parts of the northcentral Medina flow path moves downgradient (and down relay ramp) from eastern Medina County toward the southwest. The north-central Medina flow path is hypothesized to turn south in the vicinity of Seco Creek as it begins to be influenced by structural features. Departure hydrographs for four wells and Medina Lake and discharge departure for a streamflow-gaging station provide evidence for flow in the north-central Medina flow path. The south-central Medina flow path is bounded on the north by the Seco Creek and Diversion Lake faults

  15. Fluorescence microscopy image-analysis (FMI) for the characterization of interphase HO˙ production originated by heterogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuo; Quan, Xie; Wang, Dong

    2017-02-23

    Herein, fluorescence microscopy image-analysis (FMI) visualized the information of interphase HO˙ radicals using luminescent 7-hydroxycoumarin as the marker, revealing the inhomogeneity and intensity of HO˙ production originated by surface-mediated catalysis. The FMI is recommended as a quick-response method for the evaluation of HO˙-assigned heterogeneous catalysis.

  16. A field proof-of-concept of aquifer imaging using 3-D transient hydraulic tomography with modular, temporarily-emplaced equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiff, M.; Barrash, W.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2012-05-01

    Hydraulic tomography is a field scale aquifer characterization method capable of estimating 3-D heterogeneous parameter distributions, and is directly sensitive to hydraulic conductivity (K), thus providing a useful data source for improving flow and transport models. We present results from a proof-of-concept field and modeling study in which we apply 3-D transient hydraulic tomography (3DTHT) to the relatively high-K and moderately heterogeneous unconfined aquifer at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site. Short-duration (20 min) partially penetrating pumping tests, for which observed responses do not reach steady state, are used as the aquifer stimulation. To collect field data, we utilize a system of temporarily emplaced packer equipment to isolate multiple discrete intervals in boreholes. To analyze the data, we utilize MODFLOW combined with geostatistical inversion code based on the quasilinear approach of Kitanidis (1995). This combination of practical software allows inversion of large datasets (>250 drawdown curves, and almost 1000 individual data points) and estimation of K at >100,000 locations; reasonable runtimes are obtained using a single multicore computer with 12 GB of RAM. The K heterogeneity results from 3DTHT are cross-validated against K characterization from a large set of partially penetrating slug tests, and found to be quite consistent. The use of portable, modular equipment for field implementation means that 3DTHT data collection can be performed (including mobilization/demobilization) within a matter of days. Likewise, use of a practical, efficient and scalable numerical modeling and inversion strategy means that computational effort is drastically reduced, such that 3-D aquifer property distributions can be estimated quickly.

  17. Basement and alluvial aquifers of Malawi: An overview of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elizabeth B Mapoma

    2014-02-17

    Feb 17, 2014 ... Pritchard et al., 2007). GROUNDWATER QUALITY IN MALAWI. Introductory remarks. As mentioned earlier, spatial variation in chemical and physical quality is attributed to the heterogeneity of the aquifer system, groundwater flow regime and weathering processes (Chilton and Foster, 1995). Some shallow.

  18. Characterization of aerosol photooxidation flow reactors: heterogeneous oxidation, secondary organic aerosol formation and cloud condensation nuclei activity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Lambe

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the need to develop instrumental techniques for characterizing organic aerosol aging, we report on the performance of the Toronto Photo-Oxidation Tube (TPOT and Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM flow tube reactors under a variety of experimental conditions. The PAM system was designed with lower surface-area-to-volume (SA/V ratio to minimize wall effects; the TPOT reactor was designed to study heterogeneous aerosol chemistry where wall loss can be independently measured. The following studies were performed: (1 transmission efficiency measurements for CO2, SO2, and bis(2-ethylhexyl sebacate (BES particles, (2 H2SO4 yield measurements from the oxidation of SO2, (3 residence time distribution (RTD measurements for CO2, SO2, and BES particles, (4 aerosol mass spectra, O/C and H/C ratios, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity measurements of BES particles exposed to OH radicals, and (5 aerosol mass spectra, O/C and H/C ratios, CCN activity, and yield measurements of secondary organic aerosol (SOA generated from gas-phase OH oxidation of m-xylene and α-pinene. OH exposures ranged from (2.0 ± 1.0 × 1010 to (1.8 ± 0.3 × 1012 molec cm−3 s. Where applicable, data from the flow tube reactors are compared with published results from the Caltech smog chamber. The TPOT yielded narrower RTDs. However, its transmission efficiency for SO2 was lower than that for the PAM. Transmission efficiency for BES and H2SO4 particles was size-dependent and was similar for the two flow tube designs. Oxidized BES particles had similar O/C and H/C ratios and CCN activity at OH exposures greater than 1011 molec cm−3 s, but different CCN activity at lower OH exposures. The O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and yield of m-xylene and α-pinene SOA was strongly affected by reactor design and

  19. Vulsino volcanic aquifer in Umbria Region : Hydrogeological survey for the characterization of the presence of arsenic and aluminium and the correct use of groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Fratini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In December 2009 and the first months of 2010, a large water crisis took place in the Orvieto area, because of sudden high concentration of aluminum (Al in the groundwater of the vulsino aquifer. This represents a supply for Orvieto’s population and other near municipalities (about 20,000 people. The contamination had reached values of about 3000 μg/l. Water crisis was made worse because of the expiring, in the same period, as expected, of the derogation of European Commission that allowed Arsenic concentrations above 10 μg/l (up to 50 μg/l. The contamination by Al occurred after intense and persistent rains, that mobilized a large amount of aluminum hydroxides in perched water table, in the form of colloidal particles. The field analysis showed that the potable water catchments are not interested in the same way by the contamination, i.e. the vulsino aquifer was not wholly conditioned by the presence of Al; in addition, in the same period in which the Al contamination occurred, there were no changes in the levels of As in groundwater. This paper shows the study of the complex hydrogeological Vulsino system; the aim is to identify technical solutions for realizing new catchments in order to manage the resource, in qualitative and quantitative terms, replacing/integrating the current equipments, which represent a risk because of the presence of Al and, secondly, As. A numerical flow and transport model was implemented to support the hydrogeological study, that has allowed us to formulate reliable predictions regarding the risk of Al contamination of future new wells.

  20. Development of a Control Optimization System for Real Time Monitoring of Managed Aquifer Recharge and Recovery Systems Using Intelligent Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, K. M.; Drumheller, Z. W.; Lee, J. H.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Regnery, J.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    Aquifers around the world show troubling signs of irreversible depletion and seawater intrusion as climate change, population growth, and urbanization lead to reduced natural recharge rates and overuse. Scientists and engineers have begun to revisit the technology of managed aquifer recharge and recovery (MAR) as a means to increase the reliability of the diminishing and increasingly variable groundwater supply. Unfortunately, MAR systems remain wrought with operational challenges related to the quality and quantity of recharged and recovered water stemming from a lack of data-driven, real-time control. This research seeks to develop and validate a general simulation-based control optimization algorithm that relies on real-time data collected though embedded sensors that can be used to ease the operational challenges of MAR facilities. Experiments to validate the control algorithm were conducted at the laboratory scale in a two-dimensional synthetic aquifer under both homogeneous and heterogeneous packing configurations. The synthetic aquifer used well characterized technical sands and the electrical conductivity signal of an inorganic conservative tracer as a surrogate measure for water quality. The synthetic aquifer was outfitted with an array of sensors and an autonomous pumping system. Experimental results verified the feasibility of the approach and suggested that the system can improve the operation of MAR facilities. The dynamic parameter inversion reduced the average error between the simulated and observed pressures between 12.5 and 71.4%. The control optimization algorithm ran smoothly and generated optimal control decisions. Overall, results suggest that with some improvements to the inversion and interpolation algorithms, which can be further advanced through testing with laboratory experiments using sensors, the concept can successfully improve the operation of MAR facilities.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of mangenese(III) porphyrin supported on imidazole modified chloromethylated MIL-101(Cr): A heterogeneous and reusable catalyst for oxidation of hydrocarbons with sodium periodate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zadehahmadi, Farnaz; Tangestaninejad, Shahram, E-mail: stanges@sci.ui.ac.ir; Moghadam, Majid, E-mail: moghadamm@sci.ui.ac.ir; Mirkhani, Valiollah, E-mail: mirkhani@sci.ui.ac.ir; Mohammadpoor-Baltork, Iraj; Khosropour, Ahmad R.; Kardanpour, Reihaneh

    2014-10-15

    In the present work, chloromethylated MIL-101(Cr) modified with imidazole, Im-MIL-101, was applied as a support for immobilizing of tetraphenylporphyrinatomangenese(III) chloride. The imidazole-bound MIL-101, Im-MIL-101, not only used as support for immobilization of manganese porphyrin but also applied as a heterogeneous axial base. The Mn(TPP)Cl@Im-MIL-101 catalyst was characterized by UV–vis, FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), elemental analysis and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) methods. The catalytic activity of this new catalytic system was investigated in the alkene epoxidation and alkane hydroxylation using NaIO{sub 4} as an oxidant in CH{sub 3}CN/H{sub 2}O at room temperature. This heterogeneous catalyst is highly efficient, stable and reusable in the oxidation of hydrocarbons. - Highlights: • MIL-101 was modified by covalent post synthetic modification. • Mn(TPP)Cl was anchored to imidazole modified MIL-101 by covalent attachment. • A heterogeneous catalyst was prepared. • The catalyst was used for epoxidation of alkenes and hydroxylation of alkanes. • The catalyst was reusable.

  2. Factors affecting public-supply well vulnerability in two karst aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, MaryLynn; Katz, Brian G.; Fahlquist, Lynne S.; Crandall, Christy A.; Lindgren, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Karst aquifers occur in a range of climatic and geologic settings. Nonetheless, they are commonly characterized by their vulnerability to water-quality impairment. Two karst aquifers, the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas and the Upper Floridan aquifer in western Florida, were investigated to assess factors that control the movement of contaminants to public-supply wells (PSWs). The geochemistry of samples from a selected PSW or wellfield in each aquifer was compared with that from nearby monitoring wells and regional PSWs. Geochemistry results were integrated with age tracers, flow modeling, and depth-dependent data to refine aquifer conceptual models and to identify factors that affect contaminant movement to PSWs. The oxic Edwards aquifer is vertically well mixed at the selected PSW/wellfield, although regionally the aquifer is geochemically variable downdip. The mostly anoxic Upper Floridan aquifer is affected by denitrification and also is geochemically variable with depth. In spite of considerable differences in geology and hydrogeology, the two aquifers are similarly vulnerable to anthropogenic contamination. Vulnerability in studied PSWs in both aquifers is strongly influenced by rapid karst flowpaths and the dominance of young (nitrate, atrazine, deethylatrazine, tetrachloroethene, and chloroform). Specific consideration of water-quality protection efforts, well construction and placement, and aquifer response times to land-use changes and contaminant loading are discussed, with implications for karst groundwater management.

  3. EFFECT OF TOPOGRAPHIC AND GEOLOGIC HETEROGENEITIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geologic heterogeneities and topographic variations in relation to aquifer distribution ad occurrence in Akwa Ibom State have been assessed based on geologic and geophysical studies sixty-six sounding points together with electric log responses of representative wells together with surface geologic data have been ...

  4. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L. [BDM Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  5. Objective sampling design in a highly heterogeneous landscape - characterizing environmental determinants of malaria vector distribution in French Guiana, in the Amazonian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Emmanuel; Gaborit, Pascal; Romaña, Christine A; Girod, Romain; Dessay, Nadine; Dusfour, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    Sampling design is a key issue when establishing species inventories and characterizing habitats within highly heterogeneous landscapes. Sampling efforts in such environments may be constrained and many field studies only rely on subjective and/or qualitative approaches to design collection strategy. The region of Cacao, in French Guiana, provides an excellent study site to understand the presence and abundance of Anopheles mosquitoes, their species dynamics and the transmission risk of malaria across various environments. We propose an objective methodology to define a stratified sampling design. Following thorough environmental characterization, a factorial analysis of mixed groups allows the data to be reduced and non-collinear principal components to be identified while balancing the influences of the different environmental factors. Such components defined new variables which could then be used in a robust k-means clustering procedure. Then, we identified five clusters that corresponded to our sampling strata and selected sampling sites in each stratum. We validated our method by comparing the species overlap of entomological collections from selected sites and the environmental similarities of the same sites. The Morisita index was significantly correlated (Pearson linear correlation) with environmental similarity based on i) the balanced environmental variable groups considered jointly (p = 0.001) and ii) land cover/use (p-value sampling approach. Land cover/use maps (based on high spatial resolution satellite images) were shown to be particularly useful when studying the presence, density and diversity of Anopheles mosquitoes at local scales and in very heterogeneous landscapes.

  6. Characterizing Focused-Ultrasound Mediated Drug Delivery to the Heterogeneous Primate Brain In Vivo with Acoustic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Sanchez, Carlos Sierra; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Buch, Amanda; Ferrera, Vincent P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-11-01

    Focused ultrasound with microbubbles has been used to noninvasively and selectively deliver pharmacological agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for treating brain diseases. Acoustic cavitation monitoring could serve as an on-line tool to assess and control the treatment. While it demonstrated a strong correlation in small animals, its translation to primates remains in question due to the anatomically different and highly heterogeneous brain structures with gray and white matteras well as dense vasculature. In addition, the drug delivery efficiency and the BBB opening volume have never been shown to be predictable through cavitation monitoring in primates. This study aimed at determining how cavitation activity is correlated with the amount and concentration of gadolinium delivered through the BBB and its associated delivery efficiency as well as the BBB opening volume in non-human primates. Another important finding entails the effect of heterogeneous brain anatomy and vasculature of a primate brain, i.e., presence of large cerebral vessels, gray and white matter that will also affect the cavitation activity associated with variation of BBB opening in different tissue types, which is not typically observed in small animals. Both these new findings are critical in the primate brain and provide essential information for clinical applications.

  7. Characterization of Tumor Heterogeneity by Texture Analysis in 18F-FDG PET images: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manso, M.; Martino, M.E.; Rodriguez, E.A.; Landaeta, L.C.; Carreras, J.L.; Calvo, F.A.; Desco, M.; Pascau, J.; Muñoz-Barrutia, M.

    2016-07-01

    2-Deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is often used in clinic for cancer diagnosis, staging, therapy planning and monitoring. Alternative features to the classical semi-quantitative variables have been recently proposed to study the heterogeneity of tumors. The method to extract such characteristics is texture analysis, which quantifies variations of uptake distribution within the lesions. Methods: Fifty-three head and neck and twelve rectal cancer patients were included in the analysis. A workflow in an open-source software, 3D slicer, was designed and expert clinicians were trained on its use, sixty six features were calculated including metabolic and texture parameters. Statistical analysis and dimensionality reduction techniques were performed on the data. Results: After observing a high correlation between variables, dimensions were reduced to five and three independent components for head and neck and rectal cancer cohort, respectively. Conclusion: Tumor heterogeneity parameters could be expressing important information about tumor and cancer disease, information that could be used to assess disease staging, patients’ prognosis, therapy plan and survival. (Author)

  8. Synthesis and characterization of biomatrixed-gold nanoparticles by the mushroom Flammulina velutipes and its heterogeneous catalytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Park, Hyun Ho; Han, Sung Soo

    2015-12-01

    Sustainable and greener synthesis of intracellular gold nanoparticles using mushroom Flammulina velutipes is reported. Incubation of a mushroom in chloroaurate solution resulted in the synthesis and immobilization of stable gold nanoparticles inside the mushroom mycelia. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis revealed the presence of gold nanoparticles (⩽20nm) inside the mycelia, primarily on the inner surface of the cell membrane. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) revealed that the accumulated gold concentration ranged from 64.4 to 330.5mgkg(-1) dry weight (DW) in the mushroom mycelia. The reduction of Au(3+) ions to Au(0) and stabilization of gold nanoparticles occurred within 1h, and the formation of fcc crystalline gold nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. This facile intracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles by a mushroom without using any toxic chemicals or technologically expensive processes is used as a heterogeneous catalyst in the reduction of organic pollutants methylene blue (MB) and 4-nitrophenol (4NP). The reduction reaction follows pseudo-first order kinetics with a reaction rate constant of 0.0529min(-1) and 0.1236min(-1) for MB and 4NP, respectively. This biological process of biomatrixing of metal nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalytic reactions is simple, nontoxic, environmentally benign, and economically viable compared to the chemical synthetic routes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Application of High Resolution Satellite Imagery to Characterize Individual-Based Environmental Heterogeneity in a Wild Blue Tit Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szulkin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Environmental heterogeneity in space and time plays a key role in influencing trait variability in animals, and can be particularly relevant to animal phenology. Until recently, the use of remotely sensed imagery in understanding animal variation was limited to analyses at the population level, largely because of a lack of high-resolution data that would allow inference at the individual level. We evaluated the potential of SPOT 4 (Take 5 satellite imagery data (with observations every fifth day at 20 m resolution and equivalent to acquisition parameters of Sentinel-2 in animal ecology research. We focused on blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus reproduction in a study site containing 227 nestboxes scattered in a Mediterranean forest dominated by deciduous downy oaks Quercus pubescens with a secondary cover of evergreen holm oaks Quercus ilex. We observed high congruence between ground data collected in a 50 m radius around each nestbox and NDVI values averaged across a 5 by 5 pixel grid centered around each nestbox of the study site. The number of deciduous and evergreen oaks around nestboxes explained up to 66% of variance in nestbox-centered, SPOT-derived NDVI values. We also found highly equivalent patterns of spatial autocorrelation for both ground- and satellite-derived indexes of environmental heterogeneity. For deciduous and evergreen oaks, the derived NDVI signal was highly distinctive in winter and early spring. June NDVI values for deciduous and evergreen oaks were higher by 58% and 8% relative to February values, respectively. The number of evergreen oaks was positively associated with later timing of breeding in blue tits. SPOT-derived, Sentinel-2 like imagery thus provided highly reliable, ground-validated information on habitat heterogeneity of direct relevance to a long-term field study of a free-living passerine bird. Given that the logistical demands of gathering ground data often limit our understanding of variation in animal

  10. FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  11. Scale continuous characterisation of karst aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Tobias; Ladouche, Bernard; Reimann, Thomas; Jourde, Hervé; Liedl, Rudolf; Dörfliger, Nathalie; Sauter, Martin

    2010-05-01

    In this work results of different field experiments for the characterization of karst aquifers are compared and attributed to the structural properties of these systems. The results are important for parameterizing numerical models dealing with karst hydraulics. A karst aquifer represents a dual flow system consisting of a low permeability fissured matrix and a highly permeable conduit system. Over a large volume the fissured matrix can be considered as a continuum and a representative elementary volume (REV) can be defined. However this REV is only valid on a local scale. On a regional scale the drainage of the karst aquifer is controlled by the conduit system which might display a highly anisotropic geometry. In current modeling approaches for simulation of karst hydraulics the conduit system is therefore implemented as a second continuum or as a discrete pipe network hydraulically coupled to a fissured matrix continuum (Sauter et al. 2006). Classical methods to characterize karst conduit systems are artificial tracer tests. These tests are usually applied to identify point-to-point connections (e.g. between a sinkhole and a karst spring), to determine flow and transport parameters in the aquifer and to estimate geometric and hydraulic parameters of a conduit system. A disadvantage of the method is, however, that only limited information about the geometry of the conduit system and the interaction between conduit system and fissured matrix is achieved. Conventional methods for characterization of aquifer properties on local scale are hydraulic borehole tests. Slug-tests, for example, can be applied in deep small-diameter boreholes as it is often the case in karst systems with thick unsaturated zones. However, test results strongly depend on the location of the investigated borehole and the applied displacement depth. The spectrum of responses may range from strongly oscillating water levels in high conductivity parts of the aquifer to slowly responding water

  12. Characteristics of Point Recharge in Karst Aquifers

    OpenAIRE

    Somaratne, Nara

    2014-01-01

    Karstic groundwater basins are characterized by both point and diffuse recharge. This paper describes the hydrologic characteristics of point recharge and their influence on recharge estimation for four groundwater basins. Point recharge is highly transient and may occur in relatively short-time periods, yet is capable of recharging a large volume of water, even from a single extreme rainfall event. Preferential groundwater flows are observed in karst aquifers with local fresher water pockets...

  13. Investigating the Sources of Nitrogen Contamination in the Shallow Aquifer of Jakarta using a Newly Developed Distributed River-Aquifer Flow and Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, D.; Burlando, P.; Liong, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations in the shallow aquifer of Jakarta show a rise in nitrate (NO3-) levels. Groundwater is extensively used in the city to compensate for the limited public water supply network and therefore the risk to public health from a rise in NO3- concentration is high. NO3- has been identified as a cofactor for methemoglobinemia in infants, a disease which can lead to death in extreme cases. The NO3- levels detected are still below regulatory limits for drinking purposes but strategies are necessary to contain the growing problem. To this end, the main sources and pathways of inorganic compounds containing nitrogen (N) - i.e. nitrate, nitrite (NO2-) and ammonium (NH4+) - were investigated. We combined 3 years of field measurements in the Ciliwung River, the major river flowing through Jakarta, with a distributed river-aquifer interaction model to characterize the N-cycle in both systems and quantify the contribution of river infiltration in the overall groundwater N budget. The computed infiltration fluxes were compared to estimates of leaks from poorly maintained septic tanks, which are extensively used in the city, to identify the main source of groundwater contamination. Observations show a strong and interdependent spatial and seasonal variability in the levels of NO3-, NO2- and NH4+ in the river, which is caused by changes in nitrification/denitrification rates due to variations in dissolved oxygen concentrations. Simulation results suggest that such dynamics in the river cause river to aquifer contamination patterns to likewise change over space and time, which leads to heterogeneous vulnerability distributions. The estimated contribution of river-N infiltration to the observed NO3- groundwater levels is small if compared to that originating from all leaking septic tanks inside Jakarta. However, in the vicinity of the Ciliwung, river to groundwater N-loading can play an important role in the local NO3- groundwater levels because it is highly

  14. Dynamic heterogeneity in life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Uli; Orzack, Steven Hecht

    2009-01-01

    generate dynamic heterogeneity: life-history differences produced by stochastic stratum dynamics. We characterize dynamic heterogeneity in a range of species across taxa by properties of the Markov chain: the entropy, which describes the extent of heterogeneity, and the subdominant eigenvalue, which...... distributions of lifetime reproductive success. Dynamic heterogeneity contrasts with fixed heterogeneity: unobserved differences that generate variation between life histories. We show by an example that observed distributions of lifetime reproductive success are often consistent with the claim that little...... or no fixed heterogeneity influences this trait. We propose that dynamic heterogeneity provides a 'neutral' model for assessing the possible role of unobserved 'quality' differences between individuals. We discuss fitness for dynamic life histories, and the implications of dynamic heterogeneity...

  15. Object-based semi-automatic approach for forest structure characterization using lidar data in heterogeneous Pinus sylvestris stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Pascual; A. Garcia-Abril; L.G. Garcia-Montero; S. Martin-Fernandez; W.B. Cohen

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a two-stage approach for characterizing the structure of Pinus sylvestris L. stands in forests of central Spain. The first stage was to delimit forest stands using eCognition and a digital canopy height model (DCHM) derived from lidar data. The polygons were then clustered into forest structure types based on the DCHM data...

  16. Characteristics of Point Recharge in Karst Aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Somaratne

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Karstic groundwater basins are characterized by both point and diffuse recharge. This paper describes the hydrologic characteristics of point recharge and their influence on recharge estimation for four groundwater basins. Point recharge is highly transient and may occur in relatively short-time periods, yet is capable of recharging a large volume of water, even from a single extreme rainfall event. Preferential groundwater flows are observed in karst aquifers with local fresher water pockets of low salinity that develop around point recharge sources. Measurable fresh water plumes develop only when a large quantity of surface water enters the aquifer as a point recharge. In fresh water plumes, the difference in chloride concentrations in diffuse and point recharge zones decreases as the plumes become enriched through mixing. The relative contributions to total recharge from point sources using the measured gap between groundwater and rainwater chloride in the chloride vs. δ18O plot is not necessarily indicative of sinkholes not directly recharging the aquifer. In karst aquifers, recharge estimation methods based on groundwater age distribution; average annual rainfall and basin average chloride in the conventional chloride mass balance (CMB method are questionable due to theoretical limitations and key assumptions of these methods not being met. In point recharge dominant groundwater basins, application of: watertable fluctuation, numerical groundwater modelling, Darcy flow calculation or water budget methods are more suitable for recharge estimation as they are independent of the particular mode of recharge. The duality of the recharge mechanism in karst aquifers suggests that modification to the CMB method may be required to include both point and diffuse recharge components.

  17. Climate change and Mediterranean coastal karst aquifers: the case of Salento (southern Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Polemio; Romanazzi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Second half of the 20th century was characterized by an increase of groundwater discharge. Numerous aquifers are overexploited in the world and in particular in the Mediterranean area. Problems tie to overexploitation, as piezometric decline and increase of seawater intrusion, are amplified in karst coastal aquifers where the whole effect could be a groundwater quality and quantity degradation. Focusing on Mediterranean countries, most part of coastal aquifers of Spain, France, Portugal, S...

  18. Characterization of the C-protein from posterior latissimus dorsi muscle of the adult chicken: heterogeneity within a single sarcomere

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Specific isoforms of myofibrillar proteins are expressed in different muscles and in various fiber types within a single muscle. We have isolated and characterized monoclonal antibodies against C-proteins from slow tonic (anterior latissimus dorsi, ALD) and fast twitch (pectoralis major) muscles of the chicken. Although the antibody against "fast" C-protein (MF-1) did not bind to the "slow" isoform and the antibody to the "slow" C-protein (ALD-66) did not bind to the "fast" isoform, we observ...

  19. Electrochemical characterization of mixed matrix heterogeneous cation exchange membranes modified by simultaneous using ilmenite-co-iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen; Hamidi, Alireza; Moghadassi, Abdolreza [Faculty of Engineering, Arak University, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Madaeni, Sayed Siavash [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Mixed matrix heterogeneous cation exchange membranes were prepared by solution casting technique. Ilmenite-co-iron oxide nanoparticle was also employed as inorganic filler additive in membrane fabrication. The effect of the used additives on membrane electrochemical properties was studied. Membrane ion exchange capacity, membrane potential, transport number and selectivity all were improved by use of FeTiO{sub 3}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in membrane matrix. Utilizing FeTiO{sub 3}-co-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the casting solution also led to increase in ionic flux obviously. The modified membranes containing FeTiO{sub 3}-co-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles showed higher transport number, selectivity and ionic flux compared to modified membrane containing ilmenite. Electrodialysis experiment in laboratory scale also showed higher cation removal for modified membrane containing FeTiO{sub 3}-co-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles compared to other modified membranes and pristine ones. Results showed that membrane areal electrical resistance declined sharply by use of FeTiO{sub 3}-co-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in membrane matrix. Moreover, modified membrane containing ilmenite showed lower electrical resistance compared to others. Results showed that oxidative stability of membranes was decreased slightly by use of FeTiO{sub 3}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in membrane matrix. The results revealed that modified membranes in this study are comparable with that of other commercial ones.

  20. Characterizing Subcore Heterogeneity: A New Analytical Model and Technique to Observe the Spatial Variation of Transverse Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Maartje; Niu, Ben; Krevor, Sam

    2015-04-01

    Transverse dispersion, the lateral spread of chemical components in an aqueous solution caused by small heterogeneities in a rock, plays an important role in spreading, mixing and reaction during flow through porous media. Conventionally, transverse dispersion has been determined with the use of an annular core device and concentration measurements of the effluent (Blackwell, 1962; Hassinger and Von Rosenberg, 1968) or concentration measurements at probe locations along the core (Han et al, 1985; Harleman and Rumer, 1963). Both methods were designed around an analytical model of the transport equations assuming a single constant for the transverse dispersion coefficient, which is used to analyse the experimental data. We have developed a new core flood test with the aim of characterising chemical transport and dispersion directly in three dimensions to (1) produce higher precision observations of transverse dispersion than has been possible before and (2) so that the effects of rock heterogeneity on transport can also be observed and summarised using statistical descriptions allowing for a more nuanced picture of transport than allowed by description with a single transverse dispersion coefficient. The dispersion of a NaI aqueous solution injected into a Berea sandstone rock core was visualised in 3D with the use of a medical x-ray CT scanner. A device consisting out of three annular regions was used for injection. Water was injected into the centre and outer annular region and a NaI aqueous solution was injected in the middle annular region. An analytical solution to the flow and transport equations for this new inlet configuration was derived to design the tests. The Berea sandstone core was 20 cm long and had a diameter of 7.62cm. The core flood experiments were carried out for Peclet nr 0.5 and Peclet nr 2. At steady state, x-ray images were taken every 0.2 cm along the core. This resulted in a high quality 3D digital data set of the concentration distribution

  1. Investigating groundwater flow between Edwards and Trinity aquifers in central Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C I; Kromann, J S; Hunt, B B; Smith, B A; Banner, J L

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the nature of communication between aquifers can be challenging when using traditional physical and geochemical groundwater sampling approaches. This study uses two multiport wells completed within Edwards and Trinity aquifers in central Texas to determine the degree of groundwater inter-flow between adjacent aquifers. Potentiometric surfaces, hydraulic conductivities, and groundwater major ion concentrations and Sr isotope values were measured from multiple zones within three hydrostratigraphic units (Edwards and Upper and Middle Trinity aquifers). Physical and geochemical data from the multiport wells were combined with historical measurements of groundwater levels and geochemical compositions from the region to characterize groundwater flow and identify controls on the geochemical compositions of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers. Our results suggest that vertical groundwater flow between Edwards and Middle Trinity aquifers is likely limited by low permeability, evaporite-rich units within the Upper and Middle Trinity. Potentiometric surface levels in both aquifers vary with changes in wet vs. dry conditions, indicating that recharge to both aquifers occurs through distinct recharge areas. Geochemical compositions in the Edwards, Upper, and Middle Trinity aquifers are distinct and likely reflect groundwater interaction with different lithologies (e.g., carbonates, evaporites, and siliceous sediments) as opposed to mixing of groundwater between the aquifers. These results have implications for the management of these aquifers as they indicate that, under current conditions, pumping of either aquifer will likely not induce vertical cross-formational flow between the aquifers. Inter-flow between the Trinity and the Edwards aquifers, however, should be reevaluated as pumping patterns and hydrogeologic conditions change. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  2. Geochemical and isotopic composition of ground water with emphasis on sources of sulfate in the upper Floridan Aquifer and intermediate aquifer system in southwest Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Laura A.; Tihansky, Ann B.

    1996-01-01

    has not dissolved significant amounts of gypsum compared to fresher water in the aquifer. This is consistent with a shallow seawater source for the saltwater, rather than a deeper source from the underlying middle confining unit or Lower Floridan aquifer, which would have elevated sulfate concentrations. Ion exchange and dolomitization may be important reactions for saltwater in the aquifer. According to geochemical modeling, the freshwater end member for water in the saltwater mixing zone in the southwestern part of the study area is not upgradient water from the Upper Floridan aquifer that dissolved gypsum. Instead, this water appears to be isolated from the regional freshwater flow system and may be part of a more localized flow system. The chemical and isotopic composition of water in the intermediate aquifer system is controlled by differences in extent of reactions with aquifer minerals, upward leakage from the Upper Floridan aquifer, and saltwater mixing. In inland areas, water generally is characterized by relatively low sulfate concentrations (less than 250 milligrams per liter) and differences in extent of carbonate mineral dissolution. Some inland waters have elevated chloride concentrations, which may be related to evaporation prior to recharge. In coastal Sarasota County and in isolated inland areas, water from the intermediate aquifer system has high sulfate concentrations characteristic of dedolomitization waters from the Upper Floridan aquifer. The chemical and isotopic composition of these waters is controlled by upward leakage from the Upper Floridan aquifer, which naturally occurs in the discharge area but may be locally enhanced by pumping or interconnection of wells open to both aquifer systems. In western Charlotte County, the waters are dominated by sodium and chloride, and their compositions are consistent with mixing between saltwater and inland intermediate aquifer system water that has not been influenced by discharge from the

  3. Geochemistry, biota and natural background levels in an arsenic naturally contaminated volcanic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preziosi, Elisabetta; Amalfitano, Stefano; Di Lorenzo, Tiziana; Parrone, Daniele; Rossi, David; Ghergo, Stefano; Lungarini, Silvia; Zoppini, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    The tight links between chemical and ecological status are largely acknowledged as for surface water bodies, while aquifers are still considered as hidden groundwater reservoirs, rather than ecosystems to be preserved. Geochemical and biological interactions play a key role in all subterranean processes, including the dynamics of the fate of anthropogenic contaminants. Studies on groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDE) were mainly focused on karst aquifers so far, but an increased awareness on the importance of water-rock interactions and methodological improvements in microbial ecology are rapidly increasing the level of characterization of groundwater ecosystems in various hydrogeological contexts. Similarly, knowledge about groundwater biodiversity is still limited, especially if porous habitats are concerned. Yet, groundwater and GDEs are populated by a diverse and highly adapted biota, dominated by crustaceans, which provide important ecosystem services and act as biological indicators of chemical and quantitative impact on groundwater resources. In a previous research (Amalfitano et al. 2014), we reported that the microbial community heterogeneity may reflect the lithological and hydrogeological complexity within volcanic and alluvial facies transition in a groundwater body. The quantitative tracking of the microbial community structure allowed disentangling the natural biogeochemical processes evolving within the aquifer flow path. The analyses of groundwater crustaceans assemblages may contribute to shed more light upon the state and dynamics of such ecosystems. In the present research, a comprehensive study of a water table aquifer flowing through a quaternary volcanic district is being performed, including the geochemical (inorganic) composition, the microbial composition, and the analysis of crustacean assemblages . Groundwater samples are periodically collected from private wells and springs under a low anthropic impact. The key issues within the

  4. Long-term Denitrification Processes and Kinetics in a Crystalline Aquifer subject to Pumping from 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, Clement; Aquilina, Luc; Vergnaud-Ayraud, Virginie; Boisson, Alexandre; Labasque, Thierry; Longuevergne, Laurent; Ben Maamar, Sarah; Dufresne, Alexis; Bour, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    The kinetic of denitrification associated to long-term mixing processes in heterogeneous aquifers is particularly challenging to constrain. Specifically, chemical evolutions related to groundwater exploitation are cases that are poorly known. It remains particularly unclear if long-term pumping whether enhances or slows-down the nitrate reducing processes and what is the source of electron donor sustaining the reaction. The aim of this study is to investigate the dynamic of denitrification processes induced by long-term pumping in the Ploemeur aquifer (Britany, France) which has been operated for water supply since 1991. Several batch experiments have been carried out in order to fully characterize the kinetics of the denitrification reaction involved. Batches consisted in crushed rock: more or less weathered granite and schists, and water sampled from the site. Denitrification always developed except in sterilized batchs. Denitrification rate was independent on the rock type but more on the state of the bacterial community. Inorganic dissolved carbon only showed moderate variations while organic carbon remained at low concentrations. Both observations make heterotrophic denitrification unlikely. A silicate dissolution was observed and detailed analysis of the cations quantified a main biotite contribution. The iron produced by biotite dissolution accounts for the denitrification processes observed. Long term time-series analysis of the conservative elements recorded at the pumped well were used to determine mixing fractions from different compartments of the aquifer based on a Principal Component Analysis approach coupled with an end-member mixing analysis. Discharge fractions were then used to quantify the denitrification kinetic linked to pumping. With increasing concentration of Nitrate entering in the groundwater system since the beginning of the operations, computations confirm that i) autotrophic denitrification processes are dominant and ii) biotite plays a

  5. EPA Region 1 Sole Source Aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This coverage contains boundaries of EPA-approved sole source aquifers. Sole source aquifers are defined as an aquifer designated as the sole or principal source of...

  6. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  7. Combining Deterministic structures and stochastic heterogeneity for transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Alraune; Attinger, Sabine; Dietrich, Peter; Teutsch, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Contaminant transport in highly heterogeneous aquifers is extremely challenging and subject of current scientific debate. Tracer plumes often show non-symmetric but highly skewed plume shapes. Predicting such transport behavior using the classical advection-dispersion-equation (ADE) in combination with a stochastic description of aquifer properties requires a dense measurement network. This is in contrast to the available information for most aquifers. A new conceptual aquifer structure model is presented which combines large-scale deterministic information and the stochastic approach for incorporating sub-scale heterogeneity. The conceptual model is designed to allow for a goal-oriented, site specific transport analysis making use of as few data as possible. Thereby the basic idea is to reproduce highly skewed tracer plumes in heterogeneous media by incorporating deterministic contrasts and effects of connectivity instead of using unimodal heterogeneous models with high variances. The conceptual model consists of deterministic blocks of mean hydraulic conductivity which might be measured by pumping tests indicating values differing in orders of magnitudes. A sub-scale heterogeneity is introduced within every block. This heterogeneity can be modeled as bimodal or log-normal distributed. The impact of input parameters, structure and conductivity contrasts is investigated in a systematic manor. Furthermore, some first successful implementation of the model was achieved for the well known MADE site.

  8. Nanomechanical characterization of heterogeneous and hierarchical biomaterials and tissues using nanoindentation: the role of finite mixture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadpoor, Amir A

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical characterization of biological tissues and biomaterials at the nano-scale is often performed using nanoindentation experiments. The different constituents of the characterized materials will then appear in the histogram that shows the probability of measuring a certain range of mechanical properties. An objective technique is needed to separate the probability distributions that are mixed together in such a histogram. In this paper, finite mixture models (FMMs) are proposed as a tool capable of performing such types of analysis. Finite Gaussian mixture models assume that the measured probability distribution is a weighted combination of a finite number of Gaussian distributions with separate mean and standard deviation values. Dedicated optimization algorithms are available for fitting such a weighted mixture model to experimental data. Moreover, certain objective criteria are available to determine the optimum number of Gaussian distributions. In this paper, FMMs are used for interpreting the probability distribution functions representing the distributions of the elastic moduli of osteoarthritic human cartilage and co-polymeric microspheres. As for cartilage experiments, FMMs indicate that at least three mixture components are needed for describing the measured histogram. While the mechanical properties of the softer mixture components, often assumed to be associated with Glycosaminoglycans, were found to be more or less constant regardless of whether two or three mixture components were used, those of the second mixture component (i.e. collagen network) considerably changed depending on the number of mixture components. Regarding the co-polymeric microspheres, the optimum number of mixture components estimated by the FMM theory, i.e. 3, nicely matches the number of co-polymeric components used in the structure of the polymer. The computer programs used for the presented analyses are made freely available online for other researchers to use. Copyright

  9. Key subsurface data help to refine Trinity aquifer hydrostratigraphic units, south-central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blome, Charles D.; Clark, Allan K.

    2014-01-01

    The geologic framework and hydrologic characteristics of aquifers are important components for studying the nation’s subsurface heterogeneity and predicting its hydraulic budgets. Detailed study of an aquifer’s subsurface hydrostratigraphy is needed to understand both its geologic and hydrologic frameworks. Surface hydrostratigraphic mapping can also help characterize the spatial distribution and hydraulic connectivity of an aquifer’s permeable zones. Advances in three-dimensional (3-D) mapping and modeling have also enabled geoscientists to visualize the spatial relations between the saturated and unsaturated lithologies. This detailed study of two borehole cores, collected in 2001 on the Camp Stanley Storage Activity (CSSA) area, provided the foundation for revising a number of hydrostratigraphic units representing the middle zone of the Trinity aquifer. The CSSA area is a restricted military facility that encompasses approximately 4,000 acres and is located in Boerne, Texas, northwest of the city of San Antonio. Studying both the surface and subsurface geology of the CSSA area are integral parts of a U.S. Geological Survey project funded through the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program. This modification of hydrostratigraphic units is being applied to all subsurface data used to construct a proposed 3-D EarthVision model of the CSSA area and areas to the south and west.

  10. A methodology for extreme groundwater surge predetermination in carbonate aquifers: Groundwater flood frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, K.; Jourde, H.; Pistre, S.

    2008-04-01

    SummaryThe present paper introduces a methodology devoted to groundwater flooding hazard assessment. It focuses on groundwater floodings due to water table rises that are induced by heavy rainfall events. This special kind of flooding can cause devastating damages, particularly in fractured and karstified carbonate aquifers. Indeed, hydrodynamic conditions prevailing in these heterogeneous formations can involve strong groundwater surges. The developed methodology shows how flood frequency analysis methods can be applied in groundwater flood frequency analysis. Actually, it consists in estimating the T-year hydraulic head that characterizes the T-year groundwater surge, given a return period T. It also aims at defining the rainfall events likely to cause such extreme groundwater surges. This methodology was applied within the framework of a building construction project in a karstic Mediterranean aquifer located in Southern France. The present paper is designated to be a first contribution to groundwater flood frequency analysis. This new field of research has to be further developed in order to put forward consensus guidelines for hydrogeologists and decision-makers as in flood frequency analysis.

  11. Slugtests in fractured aquifers - advantages and caveats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The hydraulic characterisation of fractured aquifers is a challenge due to the large contrast between conductive fractures and a relative low conductive rock matrix. Depending on the type of problem, spanning from water resources issues at catchment scale to contaminant transport at local, borehole scale, different methodological approaches are required. The employment of slugtests as a characterisation method has a major advantage above classical pumping tests since they provide information also for the lower end of the permeability spectrum and are less logistically demanding. However, the volume of investigation of slugtests is generally small and limited to the immediate borehole area. The application of slug tests to fractured systems was investigated by Barker and Black (1983); Dougherty and Babu (1984) and Karasaki et al. (1988). Barker and Black (1983) pointed out the non-uniqueness of type curves with re¬spect to determining reservoir parameters, apart from hydraulic conductivity and sto¬rage coefficients. The unknowns in¬clude fissure densities, apertures and the hy¬draulic parameters of the rock matrix. They found that the Cooper method syste¬matically overestimates aquifer transmis-sivities by a factor of up to three. This figure however applies to a fairly homogeneously fissured aquifer such as the English Chalk. Dougherty and Babu (1984) examined in detail the effects of partial penetration, dif¬ferent skin factors and mass exchange coef-ficients in a double porosity system. They did however not present any parameter estimation solu¬tion. Karasaki et al. (1988) developed type curves for heterogeneous aquifer systems and came to the conclusion that "slug tests suffer problems of non-uniqueness to a greater ex¬tent than other well tests". In this paper, this aspect of non-uniqueness is addressed in detail, based on slugtest data in a fractured and karstified aquifer from the Swabian Alb in the SW of Germany, explanations and models of

  12. Hydrogeological typologies of the Indo-Gangetic basin alluvial aquifer, South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsor, H. C.; MacDonald, A. M.; Ahmed, K. M.; Burgess, W. G.; Basharat, M.; Calow, R. C.; Dixit, A.; Foster, S. S. D.; Gopal, K.; Lapworth, D. J.; Moench, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Rao, M. S.; Shamsudduha, M.; Smith, L.; Taylor, R. G.; Tucker, J.; van Steenbergen, F.; Yadav, S. K.; Zahid, A.

    2017-08-01

    The Indo-Gangetic aquifer is one of the world's most important transboundary water resources, and the most heavily exploited aquifer in the world. To better understand the aquifer system, typologies have been characterized for the aquifer, which integrate existing datasets across the Indo-Gangetic catchment basin at a transboundary scale for the first time, and provide an alternative conceptualization of this aquifer system. Traditionally considered and mapped as a single homogenous aquifer of comparable aquifer properties and groundwater resource at a transboundary scale, the typologies illuminate significant spatial differences in recharge, permeability, storage, and groundwater chemistry across the aquifer system at this transboundary scale. These changes are shown to be systematic, concurrent with large-scale changes in sedimentology of the Pleistocene and Holocene alluvial aquifer, climate, and recent irrigation practices. Seven typologies of the aquifer are presented, each having a distinct set of challenges and opportunities for groundwater development and a different resilience to abstraction and climate change. The seven typologies are: (1) the piedmont margin, (2) the Upper Indus and Upper-Mid Ganges, (3) the Lower Ganges and Mid Brahmaputra, (4) the fluvially influenced deltaic area of the Bengal Basin, (5) the Middle Indus and Upper Ganges, (6) the Lower Indus, and (7) the marine-influenced deltaic areas.

  13. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. Apart from high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. An enormous technical challenge is the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10 - 50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye, into a depth of about 300 m b.s.l. resp. 470 m b.s.l. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. To achieve the desired water temperatures, about 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for analysing the concentration of the dyes and the major cations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analysed in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger prooved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating. Nevertheless, hydrochemical data proved both, dissolution and precipitation processes in the aquifer. This was also suggested by the hydrochemical modelling with PhreeqC and is traced back to mixture dissolution and changing

  14. Heterogeneity in the multiple myeloma tumor clone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; Hovenga, Sjoerd; Vellenga, Edo; Bos, Nicolaas A.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy which is characterized by a very heterogeneous disease outcome. Heterogeneity in plasma cell characteristics, including morphology, maturation status, immunophenotype and genetic abnormalities partly account for the variable disease outcome. Although

  15. Characterization of spatial heterogeneity of groundwater-stream water interactions using multiple depth streambed temperature measurements at the reach scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schmidt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Streambed temperatures can be easily, accurately and inexpensively measured at many locations. To characterize patterns of groundwater-stream water interaction with a high spatial resolution, we measured 140 vertical streambed temperature profiles along a 220 m section of a small man-made stream. Groundwater temperature at a sufficient depth remains nearly constant while stream water temperatures vary seasonally and diurnally. In summer, streambed temperatures of groundwater discharge zones are relatively colder than downwelling zones of stream water. Assuming vertical flow in the streambed, the observed temperatures are correlated to the magnitude of water fluxes. The water fluxes are then estimated by applying a simple analytical solution of the heat conduction-advection equation to the observed vertical temperature profiles. The calculated water fluxes through the streambed ranged between 455 Lm−2 d−1 of groundwater discharging to the stream and approximately 10 Lm−2 d−1 of stream water entering the streambed. The investigated reach was dominated by groundwater discharge with two distinct high discharge locations accounting for 50% of the total flux on 20% of the reach length.

  16. Specific yield, High Plains aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents specific-yield ranges in the High Plains aquifer of the United States. The High Plains aquifer underlies 112.6 million acres (176,000...

  17. Using Wavelet-Based Functional Mixed Models to Characterize Population Heterogeneity in Accelerometer Profiles: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeffrey S.; Arroyo, Cassandra; Coull, Brent A.; Ryan, Louise M.; Herrick, Richard; Gortmaker, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We present a case study illustrating the challenges of analyzing accelerometer data taken from a sample of children participating in an intervention study designed to increase physical activity. An accelerometer is a small device worn on the hip that records the minute-by-minute activity levels of the child throughout the day for each day it is worn. The resulting data are irregular functions characterized by many peaks representing short bursts of intense activity. We model these data using the wavelet-based functional mixed model. This approach incorporates multiple fixed effect and random effect functions of arbitrary form, the estimates of which are adaptively regularized using wavelet shrinkage. The method yields posterior samples for all functional quantities of the model, which can be used to perform various types of Bayesian inference and prediction. In our case study, a high proportion of the daily activity profiles are incomplete, i.e. have some portion of the profile missing, so cannot be directly modeled using the previously described method. We present a new method for stochastically imputing the missing data that allows us to incorporate these incomplete profiles in our analysis. Our approach borrows strength from both the observed measurements within the incomplete profiles and from other profiles, from the same child as well as other children with similar covariate levels, while appropriately propagating the uncertainty of the imputation throughout all subsequent inference. We apply this method to our case study, revealing some interesting insights into children's activity patterns. We point out some strengths and limitations of using this approach to analyze accelerometer data. PMID:19169424

  18. Keep your Sox on: Community genomics-directed isolation and microscopic characterization of the dominant subsurface sulfur-oxidizing bacterium in a sediment aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, S. W.; Wrighton, K. C.; Luef, B.; Wilkins, M. J.; Handley, K. M.; Williams, K. H.; Banfield, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Community genomics and proteomics (proteogenomics) can be used to predict the metabolic potential of complex microbial communities and provide insight into microbial activity and nutrient cycling in situ. Inferences regarding the physiology of specific organisms then can guide isolation efforts, which, if successful, can yield strains that can be metabolically and structurally characterized to further test metagenomic predictions. Here we used proteogenomic data from an acetate-stimulated, sulfidic sediment column deployed in a groundwater well in Rifle, CO to direct laboratory amendment experiments to isolate a bacterial strain potentially involved in sulfur oxidation for physiological and microscopic characterization (Handley et al, submitted 2012). Field strains of Sulfurovum (genome r9c2) were predicted to be capable of CO2 fixation via the reverse TCA cycle and sulfur oxidation (Sox and SQR) coupled to either nitrate reduction (Nap, Nir, Nos) in anaerobic environments or oxygen reduction in microaerobic (cbb3 and bd oxidases) environments; however, key genes for sulfur oxidation (soxXAB) were not identified. Sulfidic groundwater and sediment from the Rifle site were used to inoculate cultures that contained various sulfur species, with and without nitrate and oxygen. We isolated a bacterium, Sulfurovum sp. OBA, whose 16S rRNA gene shares 99.8 % identity to the gene of the dominant genomically characterized strain (genome r9c2) in the Rifle sediment column. The 16S rRNA gene of the isolate most closely matches (95 % sequence identity) the gene of Sulfurovum sp. NBC37-1, a genome-sequenced deep-sea sulfur oxidizer. Strain OBA grew via polysulfide, colloidal sulfur, and tetrathionate oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction under autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. Strain OBA also grew heterotrophically, oxidizing glucose, fructose, mannose, and maltose with nitrate as an electron acceptor. Over the range of oxygen concentrations tested, strain OBA was not

  19. Geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks of the Biscayne aquifer in central Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Williams, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluations of the lithostratigraphy, lithofacies, paleontology, ichnology, depositional environments, and cyclostratigraphy from 11 test coreholes were linked to geophysical interpretations, and to results of hydraulic slug tests of six test coreholes at the Snapper Creek Well Field (SCWF), to construct geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks for the study area in central Miami-Dade County, Florida. The resulting geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks are consistent with those recently described for the Biscayne aquifer in the nearby Lake Belt area in Miami-Dade County and link the Lake Belt area frameworks with those developed for the SCWF study area. The hydrogeologic framework is characterized by a triple-porosity pore system of (1) matrix porosity (mainly mesoporous interparticle porosity, moldic porosity, and mesoporous to megaporous separate vugs), which under dynamic conditions, produces limited flow; (2) megaporous, touching-vug porosity that commonly forms stratiform groundwater passageways; and (3) conduit porosity, including bedding-plane vugs, decimeter-scale diameter vertical solution pipes, and meter-scale cavernous vugs. The various pore types and associated permeabilities generally have a predictable vertical spatial distribution related to the cyclostratigraphy. The Biscayne aquifer within the study area can be described as two major flow units separated by a single middle semiconfining unit. The upper Biscayne aquifer flow unit is present mainly within the Miami Limestone at the top of the aquifer and has the greatest hydraulic conductivity values, with a mean of 8,200 feet per day. The middle semiconfining unit, mainly within the upper Fort Thompson Formation, comprises continuous to discontinuous zones with (1) matrix porosity; (2) leaky, low permeability layers that may have up to centimeter-scale vuggy porosity with higher vertical permeability than horizontal permeability; and (3) stratiform flow zones composed of fossil moldic porosity, burrow

  20. Solute transport in aquifers: The comeback of the advection dispersion equation and the First Order Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, A.; Zarlenga, A.; Jankovic, I.; Dagan, G.

    2017-12-01

    Natural gradient steady flow of mean velocity U takes place in heterogeneous aquifers of random logconductivity Y = lnK , characterized by the normal univariate PDF f(Y) and autocorrelation ρY, of variance σY2 and horizontal integral scale I. Solute transport is quantified by the Breakthrough Curve (BTC) M at planes at distance x from the injection plane. The study builds on the extensive 3D numerical simulations of flow and transport of Jankovic et al. (2017) for different conductivity structures. The present study further explores the predictive capabilities of the Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE), with macrodispersivity αL given by the First Order Approximation (FOA), by checking in a quantitative manner its applicability. After a discussion on the suitable boundary conditions for ADE, we find that the ADE-FOA solution is a sufficiently accurate predictor for applications, the many other sources of uncertainty prevailing in practice notwithstanding. We checked by least squares and by comparison of travel time of quantiles of M that indeed the analytical Inverse Gaussian M with αL =σY2 I , is able to fit well the bulk of the simulated BTCs. It tends to underestimate the late arrival time of the thin and persistent tail. The tail is better reproduced by the semi-analytical MIMSCA model, which also allows for a physical explanation of the success of the Inverse Gaussian solution. Examination of the pertinent longitudinal mass distribution shows that it is different from the commonly used Gaussian one in the analysis of field experiments, and it captures the main features of the plume measurements of the MADE experiment. The results strengthen the confidence in the applicability of the ADE and the FOA to predicting longitudinal spreading in solute transport through heterogeneous aquifers of stationary random structure.

  1. Resolving Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölzenspies, Jurriaan; Dela Cruz, Gelo Victoriano; M Brickman, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    sets of pluripotency and differentiation markers. It has become increasingly apparent that this transcriptional heterogeneity is an important characteristic of ESC culture. By sorting for specific populations of ESCs it is possible to enrich for cells with a capacity to colonize the embryo proper...

  2. Contrasting definitions for the term `karst aquifer'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Stephen R. H.; Jeannin, Pierre-Yves; Alexander, E. Calvin; Davies, Gareth J.; Schindel, Geary M.

    2017-08-01

    It is generally considered that karst aquifers have distinctly different properties from other bedrock aquifers. A search of the literature found five definitions that have been proposed to differentiate karst aquifers from non-karstic aquifers. The five definitions are based upon the presence of solution channel networks, hydraulic conductivities >10-6 m/s, karst landscapes, channels with turbulent flow, and caves. The percentage of unconfined carbonate aquifers that would classify as `karst' ranges from 50%.

  3. Fraction of young water as an indicator of aquifer vulnerability along two regional flow paths in the Mississippi embayment aquifer system, southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, James A.; Barlow, Jeannie R. B.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; McMahon, Peter B.; Carmichael, John K.

    2017-09-01

    Wells along two regional flow paths were sampled to characterize changes in water quality and the vulnerability to contamination of the Memphis aquifer across a range of hydrologic and land-use conditions in the southeastern United States. The flow paths begin in the aquifer outcrop area and end at public supply wells in the confined parts of the aquifer at Memphis, Tennessee. Age-date tracer (e.g. SF6, 3H, 14C) data indicate that a component of young water is present in the aquifer at most locations along both flow paths, which is consistent with previous studies at Memphis that documented leakage of shallow water into the Memphis aquifer locally where the overlying confining unit is thin or absent. Mixtures of young and old water were most prevalent where long-term pumping for public supply has lowered groundwater levels and induced downward movement of young water. The occurrence of nitrate, chloride and synthetic organic compounds was correlated to the fraction of young water along the flow paths. Oxic conditions persisted for 10 km or more down dip of the confining unit, and the presence of young water in confined parts of the aquifer suggest that contaminants such as nitrate-N have the potential for transport. Long-term monitoring data for one of the flow-path wells screened in the confined part of the aquifer suggest that the vulnerability of the aquifer as indicated by the fraction of young water is increasing over time.

  4. Effects of pore-scale dispersion, degree of heterogeneity, sampling size, and source volume on the concentration moments of conservative solutes in heterogeneous formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele Tonina; Alberto Bellin

    2008-01-01

    Pore-scale dispersion (PSD), aquifer heterogeneity, sampling volume, and source size influence solute concentrations of conservative tracers transported in heterogeneous porous formations. In this work, we developed a new set of analytical solutions for the concentration ensemble mean, variance, and coefficient of variation (CV), which consider the effects of all these...

  5. Groundwater vulnerability mapping in Guadalajara aquifers system (Western Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo-Decelis, L. David; Marín, Ana I.; Andreo, Bartolomé

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater vulnerability mapping is a practical tool to implement strategies for land-use planning and sustainable socioeconomic development coherent with groundwater protection. The objective of vulnerability mapping is to identify the most vulnerable zones of catchment areas and to provide criteria for protecting the groundwater used for drinking water supply. The delineation of protection zones in fractured aquifers is a challenging task due to the heterogeneity and anisotropy of hydraulic conductivities, which makes difficult prediction of groundwater flow organization and flow velocities. Different methods of intrinsic groundwater vulnerability mapping were applied in the Atemajac-Toluquilla groundwater body, an aquifers system that covers around 1300 km2. The aquifer supplies the 30% of urban water resources of the metropolitan area of Guadalajara (Mexico), where over 4.6 million people reside. Study area is located in a complex neotectonic active volcanic region in the Santiago River Basin (Western Mexico), which influences the aquifer system underneath the city. Previous works have defined the flow dynamics and identified the origin of recharge. In addition, the mixture of fresh groundwater with hydrothermal and polluted waters have been estimated. Two main aquifers compose the multilayer system. The upper aquifer is unconfined and consists of sediments and pyroclastic materials. Recharge of this aquifer comes from rainwater and ascending vertical fluids from the lower aquifer. The lower aquifer consists of fractured basalts of Pliocene age. Formerly, the main water source has been the upper unit, which is a porous and unconsolidated unit, which acts as a semi-isotropic aquifer. Intense groundwater usage has resulted in lowering the water table in the upper aquifer. Therefore, the current groundwater extraction is carried out from the deeper aquifer and underlying bedrock units, where fracture flow predominates. Pollution indicators have been reported in

  6. Evaluation of the aquifer characteristic of Nanka Sands using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    characterization of the aquifer system of the study area. The interpretation of the VES data revealed 3 to 5 geoelectric ... important issue all over the world. Groundwater constitutes the only reliable water supply for ... has been severely reduced in many parts of the study area to Savannah vegetation through anthropogenic.

  7. Heterogeneous Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Davide; Guerraoui, Rachid; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Koldehofe, Boris; Mogensen, Martin; Monod, Maxime; Quéma, Vivien

    Gossip-based information dissemination protocols are considered easy to deploy, scalable and resilient to network dynamics. Load-balancing is inherent in these protocols as the dissemination work is evenly spread among all nodes. Yet, large-scale distributed systems are usually heterogeneous with respect to network capabilities such as bandwidth. In practice, a blind load-balancing strategy might significantly hamper the performance of the gossip dissemination.

  8. MODFLOW-NWT model of a hypothetical stream-aquifer system to assess capture map bias

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A MODFLOW-NWT (version 1.0.9) model of a hypothetical stream-aquifer system is presented for the evaluation and characterization of capture map bias. The...

  9. Vorticity and upscaled dispersion in 3D heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Dato, Mariaines; Chiogna, Gabriele; de Barros, Felipe; Bellin, Alberto; Fiori, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    Modeling flow in porous media is relevant for many environmental, energy and industrial applications. From an environmental perspective, the relevance of porous media flow becomes evident in subsurface hydrology. In general, flow in natural porous media is creeping, yet the large variability in the hydraulic conductivity values encountered in natural aquifers leads to highly heterogeneous flow fields. This natural variability in the conductivity field will affect both dilution rates of chemical species and reactive mixing. A physical consequence of this heterogeneity is also the presence of a various localized kinematical features such as straining, shearing and vorticity in aquifers, which will influence the shape of solute clouds and its fate and transport. This work aims in fundamentally characterizing the vorticity field in spatially heterogeneous flow fields as a function of their statistical properties in order to analyze the impact on transport processes. In our study, three-dimensional porous formations are constructed with an ensemble of N independent, non-overlapping spheroidal inclusions submerged into an homogeneous matrix, of conductivity K0. The inclusions are randomly located in a domain of volume W and are fully characterized by the geometry of spheroid (oblate or prolate), their conductivity K (random and drawn from a given probability density function fκ), the centroid location ¯x, the axes ratio e, the orientation of the rotational axis (α1,α2) and the volume w. Under the assumption of diluted medium, the flow problem is solved analitically by means of only two parameters: the conductivity contrast κ = K/K0 and the volume fraction n = Nw/W . Through the variation of these parameters of the problem, it is possible to approximate the structure of natural heterogeneous porous media. Using a random distribution of the orientation of the inclusions, we create media defined by the same global anisotropy f = Iz/Ix but different micro

  10. Multi-scale nitrate transport in a sandstone aquifer system under intensive agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Daniel; Ballard, Jean-Marc; Lefebvre, René; Savard, Martine M.

    2017-09-01

    Nitrate transport in heterogeneous bedrock aquifers is influenced by mechanisms that operate at different spatial and temporal scales. To understand these mechanisms in a fractured sandstone aquifer with high porosity, a groundwater-flow and nitrate transport model—reproducing multiple hydraulic and chemical targets—was developed to explain the actual nitrate contamination observed in groundwater and surface water in a study area on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Simulations show that nitrate is leached to the aquifer year-round, with 61% coming from untransformed and transformed organic sources originating from fertilizers and manure. This nitrate reaches the more permeable shallow aquifer through fractures in weathered sandstone that represent only 1% of the total porosity (17%). Some of the nitrate reaches the underlying aquifer, which is less active in terms of groundwater flow, but most of it is drained to the main river. The river-water quality is controlled by the nitrate input from the shallow aquifer. Groundwater in the underlying aquifer, which has long residence times, is also largely influenced by the diffusion of nitrate in the porous sandstone matrix. Consequently, following a change of fertilizer application practices, water quality in domestic wells and the river would change rapidly due to the level of nitrate found in fractures, but a lag time of up to 20 years would be necessary to reach a steady level due to diffusion. This demonstrates the importance of understanding nitrate transport mechanisms when designing effective agricultural and water management plans to improve water quality.

  11. Provision of Desalinated Irrigation Water by the Desalination of Groundwater within a Saline Aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D. J. Antia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Irrigated land accounts for 70% of global water usage and 30% of global agricultural production. Forty percent of this water is derived from groundwater. Approximately 20%–30% of the groundwater sources are saline and 20%–50% of global irrigation water is salinized. Salinization reduces crop yields and the number of crop varieties which can be grown on an arable holding. Structured ZVI (zero valent iron, Fe0 pellets desalinate water by storing the removed ions as halite (NaCl within their porosity. This allows an “Aquifer Treatment Zone” to be created within an aquifer, (penetrated by a number of wells (containing ZVI pellets. This zone is used to supply partially desalinated water directly from a saline aquifer. A modeled reconfigured aquifer producing a continuous flow (e.g., 20 m3/day, 7300 m3/a of partially desalinated irrigation water is used to illustrate the impact of porosity, permeability, aquifer heterogeneity, abstraction rate, Aquifer Treatment Zone size, aquifer thickness, optional reinjection, leakage and flow by-pass on the product water salinity. This desalination approach has no operating costs (other than abstraction costs (and ZVI regeneration and may potentially be able to deliver a continuous flow of partially desalinated water (30%–80% NaCl reduction for $0.05–0.5/m3.

  12. Characterization of Oligomers of Heterogeneous Size as Precursors of Amyloid Fibril Nucleation of an SH3 Domain: An Experimental Kinetics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzafa, David; Morel, Bertrand; Varela, Lorena; Azuaga, Ana I.; Conejero-Lara, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the earliest molecular events during nucleation of the amyloid aggregation cascade is of fundamental significance to prevent amyloid related disorders. We report here an experimental kinetic analysis of the amyloid aggregation of the N47A mutant of the α-spectrin SH3 domain (N47A Spc-SH3) under mild acid conditions, where it is governed by rapid formation of amyloid nuclei. The initial rates of formation of amyloid structures, monitored by thioflavine T fluorescence at different protein concentrations, agree quantitatively with high-order kinetics, suggesting an oligomerization pre-equilibrium preceding the rate-limiting step of amyloid nucleation. The curves of native state depletion also follow high-order irreversible kinetics. The analysis is consistent with the existence of low-populated and heterogeneous oligomeric precursors of fibrillation that form by association of partially unfolded protein monomers. An increase in NaCl concentration accelerates fibrillation but reduces the apparent order of the nucleation kinetics; and a double mutant (K43A, N47A) Spc-SH3 domain, largely unfolded under native conditions and prone to oligomerize, fibrillates with apparent first order kinetics. On the light of these observations, we propose a simple kinetic model for the nucleation event, in which the monomer conformational unfolding and the oligomerization of an amyloidogenic intermediate are rapidly pre-equilibrated. A conformational change of the polypeptide chains within any of the oligomers, irrespective of their size, is the rate-limiting step leading to the amyloid nuclei. This model is able to explain quantitatively the initial rates of aggregation and the observed variations in the apparent order of the kinetics and, more importantly, provides crucial thermodynamic magnitudes of the processes preceding the nucleation. This kinetic approach is simple to use and may be of general applicability to characterize the amyloidogenic intermediates and

  13. Characterization of HER2 gene amplification heterogeneity in invasive and in situ breast cancer using bright-field in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polónia, António; Oliveira, Guilherme; Schmitt, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate and compare the HER2 gene amplification status in invasive and adjacent in situ breast carcinoma, using bright-field in situ hybridization, and to document the possible presence of HER2 genetic heterogeneity (HER2-GH) in both components. A cohort of 100 primary invasive carcinomas (IC) associated with carcinoma in situ (CIS) were evaluated for HER2 gene amplification by SISH according to the 2013 ASCO/CAP HER2 guideline. A second cohort of all the cases with HER2-GH since the introduction of the updated ASCO/CAP HER2 guideline was also characterized, and an evaluation of the HER2 gene amplification in the CIS component, if present, was also done. In the first cohort, the HER2 amplification in the IC was negative in 87% of the cases and positive in 13% of the cases, without the presence of HER2-GH. All the cases had an associated CIS with the same HER2 status as IC, with four cases of CIS presenting HER2-GH. In the CIS, we observed a significant relationship of HER2 gene amplification with high nuclear grade. In the four cases with HER2-GH in CIS, two cases presented HER2 gene amplification in the IC. The second cohort included 12 cases with HER2-GH in a total of 1243 IC cases (0.97%). Additionally, we identified two cases associated with non-amplified CIS. HER2-GH is a rare event in IC and can already be present in CIS, not being an important step in the acquisition of invasive features.

  14. On parameterization of the inverse problem for estimating aquifer properties using tracer data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalsky, M. B.; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Commer, Michael; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Englert, Andreas L.; Steefel, Carl I.; Hubbard, Susan

    2012-06-11

    We consider a field-scale tracer experiment conducted in 2007 in a shallow uranium-contaminated aquifer at Rifle, Colorado. In developing a reliable approach for inferring hydrological properties at the site through inverse modeling of the tracer data, decisions made on how to parameterize heterogeneity (i.e., how to represent a heterogeneous distribution using a limited number of parameters that are amenable to estimation) are of paramount importance. We present an approach for hydrological inversion of the tracer data and explore, using a 2D synthetic example at first, how parameterization affects the solution, and how additional characterization data could be incorporated to reduce uncertainty. Specifically, we examine sensitivity of the results to the configuration of pilot points used in a geostatistical parameterization, and to the sampling frequency and measurement error of the concentration data. A reliable solution of the inverse problem is found when the pilot point configuration is carefully implemented. In addition, we examine the use of a zonation parameterization, in which the geometry of the geological facies is known (e.g., from geophysical data or core data), to reduce the non-uniqueness of the solution and the number of unknown parameters to be estimated. When zonation information is only available for a limited region, special treatment in the remainder of the model is necessary, such as using a geostatistical parameterization. Finally, inversion of the actual field data is performed using 2D and 3D models, and results are compared with slug test data.

  15. Application of multiple-point geostatistics on modelling groundwater flow and transport in a cross-bedded aquifer

    OpenAIRE

    Huysmans, Marijke; Dassargues, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Sedimentological processes often result in complex three-dimensional subsurface heterogeneity of hydrogeological parameter values. Variogram-based stochastic approaches are often not able to describe heterogeneity in such complex geological environments. This work shows how multiple-point geostatistics can be applied in a realistic hydrogeological application to determine the impact of complex geological heterogeneity on groundwater flow and transport. The approach is applied to a real aquife...

  16. Aquifers Characterization and Productivity in Ellala Catchment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    It is also found underlying the young units in the flatland of the area. In some areas it is also found affected by minor and major faults, localized folds, joints, fractures, and karstic features. Figure 2. A) Thinly bedded and intensive laterally as well as vertical jointed limestone; B) scarcely vertical and lateral jointed and fractured ...

  17. Use of seasonal trend decomposition to understand groundwater behaviour in the Permo-Triassic Sandstone aquifer, Eden Valley, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafare, Antoine E. A.; Peach, Denis W.; Hughes, Andrew G.

    2016-02-01

    The daily groundwater level (GWL) response in the Permo-Triassic Sandstone aquifers in the Eden Valley, England (UK), has been studied using the seasonal trend decomposition by LOESS (STL) technique. The hydrographs from 18 boreholes in the Permo-Triassic Sandstone were decomposed into three components: seasonality, general trend and remainder. The decomposition was analysed first visually, then using tools involving a variance ratio, time-series hierarchical clustering and correlation analysis. Differences and similarities in decomposition pattern were explained using the physical and hydrogeological information associated with each borehole. The Penrith Sandstone exhibits vertical and horizontal heterogeneity, whereas the more homogeneous St Bees Sandstone groundwater hydrographs characterize a well-identified seasonality; however, exceptions can be identified. A stronger trend component is obtained in the silicified parts of the northern Penrith Sandstone, while the southern Penrith, containing Brockram (breccias) Formation, shows a greater relative variability of the seasonal component. Other boreholes drilled as shallow/deep pairs show differences in responses, revealing the potential vertical heterogeneities within the Penrith Sandstone. The differences in bedrock characteristics between and within the Penrith and St Bees Sandstone formations appear to influence the GWL response. The de-seasonalized and de-trended GWL time series were then used to characterize the response, for example in terms of memory effect (autocorrelation analysis). By applying the STL method, it is possible to analyse GWL hydrographs leading to better conceptual understanding of the groundwater flow. Thus, variation in groundwater response can be used to gain insight into the aquifer physical properties and understand differences in groundwater behaviour.

  18. Investigating river–aquifer relations using water temperature in an anthropized environment (Motril-Salobreña aquifer)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duque, Carlos; Calvache, Marie; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard

    2010-01-01

    of recharge events have been analyzed with different methodologies for the characterization of the recharge process. Changes in groundwater temperatures recorded between 15 and 40 m deep are detected during the periods of higher river discharge. Temperature logs envelopes reveal areas of infiltration...... dominance and areas where vertical upward flows are present. For the quantification of the recharge volume, a model was constructed with VS2DHI. The study of the temperature measurements suggests an upper zone of groundwater temperature variability related with the direct infiltration from the river. Also......Heat was applied as a tracer for determining river–aquifer relations in the Motril-Salobreña aquifer (S Spain). The aquifer has typically been recharged by River Guadalfeo infiltration, nevertheless from 2005 a dam was constructed changing the traditional dynamic river flow and recharge events...

  19. Estimating Groundwater Mounding in Sloping Aquifers for Managed Aquifer Recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnik, Vitaly A; Kacimov, Anvar; Al-Maktoumi, Ali

    2017-11-01

    Design of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) for augmentation of groundwater resources often lacks detailed data, and simple diagnostic tools for evaluation of the water table in a broad range of parameters are needed. In many large-scale MAR projects, the effect of a regional aquifer base dip cannot be ignored due to the scale of recharge sources (e.g., wadis, streams, reservoirs). However, Hantush's (1967) solution for a horizontal aquifer base is commonly used. To address sloping aquifers, a new closed-form analytical solution for water table mound accounts for the geometry and orientation of recharge sources at the land surface with respect to the aquifer base dip. The solution, based on the Dupiuit-Forchheimer approximation, Green's function method, and coordinate transformations is convenient for computing. This solution reveals important MAR traits in variance with Hantush's solution: mounding is limited in time and space; elevation of the mound is strongly affected by the dip angle; and the peak of the mound moves over time. These findings have important practical implications for assessment of various MAR scenarios, including waterlogging potential and determining proper rates of recharge. Computations are illustrated for several characteristic MAR settings. © 2017, National Ground Water Association.

  20. Karst Aquifer Recharge: Comments on Somaratne, N. Characteristics of Point Recharge in Karst Aquifers. Water 2014, 6, 2782–2807

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian D. Werner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article “Characteristics of Point Recharge in Karst Aquifers, Water 6: 2782–2807” by N. Somaratne evaluates various recharge estimation techniques applied to four limestone aquifers in South Australia. Somaratne [1] concludes that methods based on watertable fluctuations, groundwater modelling and water budgets are independent of recharge processes, and are therefore superior to the chloride mass balance (CMB approach for karst aquifers. The current comment offers alternative interpretations from existing field measurements and previous literature, in particular for the Uley South aquifer, which is the focus of much of the article by Somaratne [1]. Conclusions regarding this system are revised, partly to account for the misrepresentation of previous studies. The aeolianite sediments of Uley South are mostly unconsolidated or poorly consolidated, and dissolution features in the calcrete capping provide point infiltration into a predominantly unconsolidated vadose zone, whereas Somaratne’s [1] findings require that the system comprises well-developed conduits in otherwise low-conductivity limestone. Somaratne’s [1] assertion that the basic premise of CMB is violated in Uley South is disputable, given strong evidence of relatively well-mixed groundwater arising from mostly diffuse recharge. The characterization of karst aquifer recharge should continue to rely on multiple techniques, including environmental tracers such as chloride.

  1. Predictability, stationarity, and classification of hydraulic responses to recharge in two karst aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, A. J.; Mahler, B. J.

    2012-08-01

    Karst aquifers, many of which are rapidly filled and depleted, are likely to be highly susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (spring flow, groundwater level, and stream base flow) at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA) and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA). A one-dimensional, lumped-parameter model simulates nonstationary soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a nonstationary convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data was 4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs) obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and among aquifers. Combined principal component analysis and cluster analysis of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs separated those sites with IRFs having a large ratio of the mean response time to the system memory from those with large skewness and kurtosis. Classification of the IRF metrics indicate that there is a range of IRF characteristics for different site types (i.e., spring flow, groundwater level, base flow) within a karst system. Further, similar site types did not necessarily display similar IRFs. Results indicate that the differences existing within either aquifer are larger than the differences between the two aquifers and that the two aquifers are similar according to this classification. The use of multiple metrics to describe the IRFs provides a novel way to characterize and compare the way in which multiple sites respond to recharge. As convolution models are developed for additional aquifers, they could contribute to an IRF

  2. Integration of Landscape Metrics and Variograms to Characterize and Quantify the Spatial Heterogeneity Change of Vegetation Induced by the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of spatial heterogeneity can be used to examine the structure of ecological systems. The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake caused severe vegetation damage. In addition to simply detecting change, the magnitude of changes must also be examined. Remote sensing and geographic information system techniques were used to produce landscape maps before and after the earthquake and analyze the spatial-temporal change of the vegetation pattern. Landscape metrics were selected to quantify the spatial heterogeneity in a categorical map at both the class and landscape levels. The results reveal that the Wenchuan earthquake greatly increased the heterogeneity in the study area. In particular, forests experienced the most fragmentation among all of the landscape types. In addition, spatial heterogeneity in a numerical map was studied by using variogram analysis of normalized difference vegetation indices derived from Landsat images. In comparison to before the earthquake, the spatial variability after the earthquake had doubled. The structure of the spatial heterogeneity represented by the range of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI variograms also changed due to the earthquake. Moreover, the results of the NDVI variogram analysis of three contrasting landscapes, which were farmland, broadleaved forest, and coniferous forest, confirm that the earthquake produced spatial variability and changed the structure of the landscapes. Regardless of before or after the earthquake, farmland sites are the most heterogeneous among the three landscapes studied.

  3. Water balance of global aquifers revealed by groundwater footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Tom; Wada, Yoshihide; Bierkens, Marc F P; van Beek, Ludovicus P H

    2012-08-09

    Groundwater is a life-sustaining resource that supplies water to billions of people, plays a central part in irrigated agriculture and influences the health of many ecosystems. Most assessments of global water resources have focused on surface water, but unsustainable depletion of groundwater has recently been documented on both regional and global scales. It remains unclear how the rate of global groundwater depletion compares to the rate of natural renewal and the supply needed to support ecosystems. Here we define the groundwater footprint (the area required to sustain groundwater use and groundwater-dependent ecosystem services) and show that humans are overexploiting groundwater in many large aquifers that are critical to agriculture, especially in Asia and North America. We estimate that the size of the global groundwater footprint is currently about 3.5 times the actual area of aquifers and that about 1.7 billion people live in areas where groundwater resources and/or groundwater-dependent ecosystems are under threat. That said, 80 per cent of aquifers have a groundwater footprint that is less than their area, meaning that the net global value is driven by a few heavily overexploited aquifers. The groundwater footprint is the first tool suitable for consistently evaluating the use, renewal and ecosystem requirements of groundwater at an aquifer scale. It can be combined with the water footprint and virtual water calculations, and be used to assess the potential for increasing agricultural yields with renewable groundwaterref. The method could be modified to evaluate other resources with renewal rates that are slow and spatially heterogeneous, such as fisheries, forestry or soil.

  4. DYNAMIC HETEROGENEITY IN LIFE HISTORIES

    OpenAIRE

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Ulrich K.; Orzack, Steven Hecht

    2008-01-01

    Longitudinal data on natural populations have been analyzed using multi-stage models in which survival depends on reproductive stage, and individuals change stages according to a Markov chain. These models are special cases of stage-structured population models. We show that stage-structured models generate dynamic heterogeneity: life history differences produced by stochastic stratum dynamics. We characterize dynamic heterogeneity in a range of species across taxa by properties of the Markov...

  5. Hydrogeochemical contrast between brown and grey sand aquifers in shallow depth of Bengal Basin: consequences for sustainable drinking water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ashis; Nath, Bibhash; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Halder, Dipti; Kundu, Amit K; Mandal, Ujjal; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Chatterjee, Debashis; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Jacks, Gunnar

    2012-08-01

    Delineation of safe aquifer(s) that can be targeted by cheap drilling technology for tubewell (TW) installation becomes highly imperative to ensure access to safe and sustainable drinking water sources for the arsenic (As) affected population in Bengal Basin. This study investigates the potentiality of brown sand aquifers (BSA) as a safe drinking water source by characterizing its hydrogeochemical contrast to grey sand aquifers (GSA) within shallow depth (water guidelines, which warrants rigorous assessment of attendant health risk for Mn prior to considering mass scale exploitation of the BSA for possible sustainable drinking water supply. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic heterogeneity in life histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Ulrich K; Orzack, Steven Hecht

    2009-01-01

    Longitudinal data on natural populations have been analysed using multistage models in which survival depends on reproductive stage, and individuals change stages according to a Markov chain. These models are special cases of stage-structured population models. We show that stage-structured models generate dynamic heterogeneity: life-history differences produced by stochastic stratum dynamics. We characterize dynamic heterogeneity in a range of species across taxa by properties of the Markov chain: the entropy, which describes the extent of heterogeneity, and the subdominant eigenvalue, which describes the persistence of reproductive success during the life of an individual. Trajectories of reproductive stage determine survivorship, and we analyse the variance in lifespan within and between trajectories of reproductive stage. We show how stage-structured models can be used to predict realized distributions of lifetime reproductive success. Dynamic heterogeneity contrasts with fixed heterogeneity: unobserved differences that generate variation between life histories. We show by an example that observed distributions of lifetime reproductive success are often consistent with the claim that little or no fixed heterogeneity influences this trait. We propose that dynamic heterogeneity provides a 'neutral' model for assessing the possible role of unobserved 'quality' differences between individuals. We discuss fitness for dynamic life histories, and the implications of dynamic heterogeneity for the evolution of life histories and senescence.

  7. Metaphors and models: the ASR bubble in the Floridan aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, H L; Hutchings, William C; Budd, David A

    2006-01-01

    Studies at the intersection of cognitive science and linguistics have revealed the crucial role that metaphors play in shaping our thoughts about phenomena we cannot see. According to the domains interaction theory of cognition, a metaphoric expression sets up mappings between a target domain that we wish to understand and a familiar source domain. The source domain contains elements ("commonplaces") that we manipulate mentally, like parts of an analogue model, to illuminate the target domain. This paper applies the structure of domains interaction theory to analyze the dynamics of a metaphor in hydrogeology: the so-called bubble formed by water injected into an aquifer during aquifer storage and recovery (ASR). Of the four commonplaces of bubbles--(1) they are discrete; (2) they are geometrically simple; (3) they rise; and (4) they burst--we focus on the first two using both displacement and dispersion (tracer) models for both homogeneous and heterogeneous storage zones patterned from geological studies of the Suwannee Limestone of Sarasota County, Florida. The displacement model easily shows that "bottle brush" better represents the geometric complexity predicted from the known and inferred heterogeneity. There is virtually no difference, however, in the prediction of recovery efficiency using the dispersion model for a bubble (homogeneous flow zone) vs. bottle brush (heterogeneous flow zone). On the other hand, only the bottle brush reveals that unrecovered tracer is located preferentially in the low-permeability layers that lie adjacent to high-permeability channels in the flow zones.

  8. Saturated thickness, High Plains aquifer, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents the saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer of the United States, 2009, in feet. The High Plains aquifer underlies...

  9. Use of large-scale multi-configuration EMI measurements to characterize heterogeneous subsurface structures and their impact on crop productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, Cosimo; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Kaufmann, Manuela Sarah; von Hebel, Christian; van der Kruk, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-04-01

    Soil subsurface structures can play a key role in crop performance, especially during water stress periods. Geophysical techniques like electromagnetic induction EMI have been shown to be able of providing information about dominant shallow subsurface features. However, previous work with EMI has typically not reached beyond the field scale. The objective of this study is to use large-scale multi-configuration EMI to characterize patterns of soil structural organization (layering and texture) and the associated impact on crop vegetation at the km2 scale. For this, we carried out an intensive measurement campaign and collected high spatial resolution multi-configuration EMI data on an agricultural area of approx. 1 km2 (102 ha) near Selhausen (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) with a maximum depth of investigation of around 2.5 m. We measured using two EMI instruments simultaneously with a total of nine coil configurations. The instruments were placed inside polyethylene sleds that were pulled by an all-terrain-vehicle along parallel lines with a spacing of 2 to 2.5 m. The driving speed was between 5 and 7 km h-1 and we used a 0.2 Hz sampling frequency to obtain an in-line resolution of approximately 0.3 m. The survey area consists of almost 50 different fields managed in different way. The EMI measurements were collected between April and December 2016 within a few days after the harvest of each field. After data acquisition, EMI data were automatically filtered, temperature corrected, and interpolated onto a common grid. The resulting EMI maps allowed us to identify three main areas with different subsurface heterogeneities. The differences between these areas are likely related to the late quaternary geological history (Pleistocene and Holocene) of the area that resulted in spatially variable soil texture and layering, which has a strong impact on spatio-temporal soil water content variability. The high resolution surveys also allowed us to identify small scale

  10. Subsoil heterogeneities controlling porewater contaminant mass and microbial diversity at a site with a complex pollution history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigserver, Diana; Carmona, José M; Cortés, Amparo; Viladevall, Manuel; Nieto, José M; Grifoll, Magdalena; Vila, Joaquim; Parker, Beth L

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to improve our understanding of the conceptual model of pollutant transport and fate in cases of DNAPL contamination at sites with a complex contamination history. The study was carried out in an unconfined aquifer of alluvial fans in the Tarragona Petrochemical Complex (Spain). Two boreholes were drilled and continuous cores were recovered in order to carry out a detailed core description at centimeter scale and a comprehensive sampling of borehole cores. The biogeochemical heterogeneity at these sites is controlled by the conjunction of lithological, hydrochemical and microbiological heterogeneities. Biodegradation processes of contaminant compounds take place not only at the level of the dissolved fraction in the aquifer but also at the level of the fraction retained in the fine, less conductive materials as shown by the biodegradation haloes of parent and metabolite compounds. Sampling the low-conductivity levels also allowed us to identify compounds, e.g. BTEX, that are the remaining traces of the passage of old contaminant plumes whose sources no longer exist. This enabled us to describe past biogeochemical processes and to partially account for the processes occurring today. Transition zones, characterized by numerous textural changes, constitute ecotones whose biostimulation could be effective in promoting the acceleration of the remediation of the multiple pollution at these sites. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Crossing redox boundaries--aquifer redox history and effects on iron mineralogy and arsenic availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banning, Andre; Rüde, Thomas R; Dölling, Bettina

    2013-11-15

    Cretaceous shallow marine sediments from northwestern Germany exhibit a distinct colour and geochemical boundary in a depth of several decametres, witnessing a terrestrial oxidative paleo redox process which resulted in cement loss and oxidation of Fe(II) phases. Sediment samples were obtained from boreholes drilled in near-coastal and further basinward paleo environments, including both reduced and oxidized redox facies, to characterize As and Fe occurrence in unaltered layers and redistributional consequences of the redox event. Geochemical and mineralogical composition and As fractionation were assessed. Arsenic resides in pyrite in the reduced section with a bulk rock maximum concentration of 39 μg g(-1), calculated Aspyrite is ~0.2 wt.%. Siderite concretions in the fine sands do not function as As sinks, neither does glauconite whose general As/Fe leaching behaviour was characterized. In the zone of redox transition, reduced and oxidized phases coexist and elevated As concentrations (up to 73 μg g(-1)) with high proportions of reactive As were detected. Arsenic behaviour changes from relatively homogeneous Fe sulphide-control in the unaltered sediments to very heterogeneous Fe hydroxide-control above the paleo redox boundary. The studied characteristics determine recent As availability in the subsurface and must be considered during groundwater extraction from this highly important aquifer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Relative importance of time, land use and lithology on determining aquifer-scale denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, Tamara; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Abbott, Benjamin W.; Marçais, Jean; Babey, Tristan; Thomas, Zahra; Peiffer, Stefan; Aquilina, Luc; Labasque, Thierry; Laverman, Anniet; Fleckenstein, Jan; Boulvais, Philippe; Pinay, Gilles

    2017-04-01

    Unconfined shallow aquifers are commonly contaminated by nitrate in agricultural regions, because of excess fertilizer application over the last decades. Watershed studies have indicated that 1) changes in agricultural practices have caused changes in nitrate input over time, 2) denitrification occurs in localized hotspots within the aquifer, and 3) heterogeneous groundwater flow circulation has led to strong nitrate gradients in aquifers that are not yet well understood. In this study we investigated the respective influence of land use, groundwater transit time distribution, and hotspot distribution on groundwater denitrification with a particular interest on how a detailed understanding of transit time distributions could be used to upscale the point denitrification measurements to the aquifer-scale. We measured CFC-based groundwater age, oxygen, nitrate, and dinitrogen gas excess in 16 agricultural wells of an unconfined crystalline aquifer in Brittany, France. Groundwater age data was used to calibrate a mechanistic groundwater flow model of the study site. Historical nitrate inputs were reconstructed by using measured nitrate concentrations, dinitrogen gas excess and transit time distributions of the wells. Field data showed large differences in denitrification activity among wells, strongly associated with differences in transit time distribution. This suggests that knowing groundwater flow dynamics and consequent transit time distributions at the catchment-scale could be used to estimate the overall denitrification capacity of agricultural aquifers.

  13. Snowmelt induced hydrologic perturbations drive dynamic microbiological and geochemical behaviors across a shallow riparian aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eDanczak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Shallow riparian aquifers represent hotspots of biogeochemical activity in the arid western US. While these environments provide extensive ecosystem services, little is known of how natural environmental perturbations influence subsurface microbial communities and associated biogeochemical processes. Over a six-month period we tracked the annual snowmelt-driven incursion of groundwater into the vadose zone of an aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River, leading to increased dissolved oxygen (DO concentrations in the normally suboxic saturated zone. Strong biogeochemical heterogeneity was measured across the site, with abiotic reactions between DO and sulfide minerals driving rapid DO consumption and mobilization of redox active species in reduced aquifer regions. Conversely, extensive DO increases were detected in less reduced sediments. 16S rRNA gene surveys tracked microbial community composition within the aquifer, revealing strong correlations between increases in putative oxygen-utilizing chemolithoautotrophs and heterotrophs and rising DO concentrations. The gradual return to suboxic aquifer conditions favored increasing abundances of 16S rRNA sequences matching members of the Microgenomates (OP11 and Parcubacteria (OD1 that have been strongly implicated in fermentative processes. Microbial community stability measurements indicated that deeper aquifer locations were relatively less affected by geochemical perturbations, while communities in shallower locations exhibited the greatest change. Reactive transport modeling of the geochemical and microbiological results supported field observations, suggesting that a predictive framework can be applied to develop a greater understanding of such environments.

  14. Enhancement of wadi recharge using dams coupled with aquifer storage and recovery wells

    KAUST Repository

    Missimer, Thomas M. M.

    2014-06-25

    Wadi channel recharge to the underlying alluvial aquifer is naturally limited by the flashy nature of flood events, evapotranspiration losses of water from the vadose zone, and aquifer heterogeneity, particularly low vertical hydraulic conductivity. Anthropogenic lowering of the water table in many wadi aquifers has also reduced the potential recharge by increasing the thickness of the vadose zone, causing interflow water loss from surface emergence and evaporation. A method to enhance recharge is to slow the flow within wadi channels by placement of dam structures, thereby ponding water and increasing the vertical head gradient to create a more rapid rate of infiltration and percolation. Effectiveness of wadi dams to enhance aquifer recharge reduces over time due to mud deposition within the reservoir caused by storm events. Up to 80 % of the water in old wadi reservoirs is lost to free-surface evaporation before infiltration and recharge can occur. One method to maintain or increase the rate of recharge is to convey clean water by gravity flow from the reservoir down-gradient to artificially recharge the aquifer using existing wells. This type of system is a low-cost and low-energy recharge method which could greatly enhance groundwater storage in wadi aquifers. Modeling results show that existing wells could store up to 1,000 m3/day under gravity-feed conditions and up to 3,900 m3/day with the shut-in of the well to produce a pressurized system. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  15. Hydrogeochemistry of multi-level aquifers of Bengal Basin in Matlab, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Ahmed, K. M.; von Brömssen, M.; Jacks, G.; Hasan, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Occurrence of natural arsenic (As) in groundwater through drinking water has reduced the access to safe drinking water in Bangladesh. Since the discovery of As in 1993, tens of millions of people are exposed to concentration at levels above the BDWS (50 μg/L) and WHO guideline (10 μg/L). This study deals with a comprehensive and systematic hydrogeological study in the Matlab, Bangladesh which included hydraulic head monitoring using depth-specific piezometers installed to target specific aquifers (shallow, intermediate-deep and deep). Fifteen piezometer nests were drilled targeting the shallow, intermediate-deep and deep aquifers. In most of the nests four wells were drilled within depths up to 70 m, one well was drilled to a depth of 110 m and a deep well down to about 235 m. Groundwater levels were monitored for over a three years period. The hydraulic heads reveal that the shallow aquifers are separated from intermediate and deep aquifers. P1 and P2 piezometers (Aquifer 1) indicated typically high median concentrations of As in groundwater (71-646 µg/L). Derived from the black sand aquifers., these groundwaters were characterized by elevated DOC, HCO3, Fe, NH4-N and PO4-P and relatively low Mn and SO4 justifying the release of As due to reductive dissolution of Fe-oxyhydroxides. Shallow P3 and P4 piezometers revealed median As concentrations ranging from 6-30 µg/L in wells placed in the red and off-white sediments (Aquifer-2). These groundwaters were typically low in DOC, HCO3, Fe, NH4-N and PO4-P, and high Mn and SO4. The As concentrations in the intermediate-deep (P6) and deep (P5) piezometers in Aquifer 3, contained low in As, mostly within the WHO guideline value of 10 µg/L, with low concentration of DOC, HCO3, NH4-N and PO4-P compared to the shallow aquifers. The study thus reveals a distinct hydrogeochemical contrast in the Matlab area in the shallow, intermediate-deep and deep aquifers. The groundwater heads in the shallow aquifers are separated from

  16. Megaporosity and permeability of Thalassinoides-dominated ichnofabrics in the Cretaceous karst-carbonate Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Current research has demonstrated that trace fossils and their related ichnofabrics can have a critical impact on the fluid-flow properties of hydrocarbon reservoirs and groundwater aquifers. Most petroleum-associated research has used ichnofabrics to support the definition of depositional environments and reservoir quality, and has concentrated on siliciclastic reservoir characterization and, to a lesser degree, carbonate reservoir characterization (for example, Gerard and Bromley, 2008; Knaust, 2009). The use of ichnology in aquifer characterization has almost entirely been overlooked by the hydrologic community because the dynamic reservoir-characterization approach has not caught on with hydrologists and so hydrology is lagging behind reservoir engineering in this area (de Marsily and others, 2005). The objective of this research is to show that (1) ichnofabric analysis can offer a productive methodology for purposes of carbonate aquifer characterization, and (2) a clear relation can exist between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers.

  17. Fate of parabens and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid in aquifer materials columns during step experiments with fresh and sea waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ortiz, C. M.; Boluda-Botella, N.; Prats-Rico, D.; Sentana-Gadea, I.

    2018-02-01

    Coastal areas submitted to seawater intrusion and with discharges from urban and industrial wastewaters, municipal landfill leachates, rivers, recreational waters and other sources are sensitive to be polluted with parabens. Understanding the fate of these compounds in environmental studies, it requires previously the knowledge of the reactive processes in controlled conditions. In this research, laboratory columns experiments were carried out with a group of parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and butylparaben) and their main degradation compound (4-hydroxybenzoic acid) to study mainly the dynamic sorption processes in different aquifer materials (100% sand and heterogeneous: 81% sand, 9% silt and 10% clay) and with fresh and sea waters, the end members of seawater intrusions. To the column hydrodynamic characterization, tracer assays with increase and decrease of salinity were performed, to obtain the mean residence time of each column and other transport parameters which allow us to compare parabens' sorption in different conditions. The results of the adsorption and desorption of parabens in the sand column demonstrated be fast and simultaneous, with a short delay and without influence of the water salinity. Very different results were found in the column experiments with heterogeneous material, where the presence of clay and organic matter increase the time of adsorption/desorption as the length of the alkyl chain paraben increased, according with their hydrophobicity. It should be noted that despite the quick desorption of the major quantities of parabens, the elution of their trace concentrations was very slow (for the seawater, the buthylparaben required a dimensionless time of 800). Planning the restoration of a coastal aquifer with freshwater, and in the conditions of the studied sand column experiment, it will need a dimensionless time of 160. However, it is necessary to take into account that the studied parabens and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid are

  18. Contribution to the characterization of 222-radon concentrations variability in water to the understanding of an aquifer behaviour in fractured medium: example of the Ploemeur site, Morbihan; Apport de la caracterisation de la variabilite des concentrations en radon-222 dans l'eau a la comprehension du fonctionnement d'un aquifere en milieu fracture de socle: exemple du site de Ploemeur, Morbihan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Druillennec, Th

    2007-06-15

    Heterogeneous fractured aquifers which developed in crystalline rocks, such as schist or granite, supply 20% of tap water production of Brittany. These fractured media present a large range of permeability. In these aquifers, fluid flow and transport of elements dissolved in water are strongly related on the geometry of the fractured network. Increasing the knowledge of the hydrogeological behaviour of the aquifer is fundamental for the management and the protection of the groundwater resources. Radon-222 is a radioactive noble gas produced from radium-226 further to the radioactive decay of uranium-238; it occurs naturally in ground waters and derives primarily from U-rich rocks and minerals that have been in contact with water. Radon-222 concentrations in waters are liable to provide significant and relevant information on both the geometry of a fracture network and the flow distribution. Furthermore, radon may also be used as a tracer in the aquifer of water exchanges between zones of variable permeability. Three main results were obtained in this study: 1. An accurate characterisation of the radon concentrations in water was carried out in the Ploemeur aquifer (Brittany, France). These results highlight the variability in the spatial and vertical distributions of {sup 222}Rn activity in groundwater together with a wide range of concentrations extending from 0 to 1 500 Bq.L{sup -1}. 2. The influence of fracture aperture on radon content in groundwater has been demonstrated with the modelling of radon concentration. Indeed, the satisfactory results obtained with a simple crack model highlight that the geometry of the fracture network controls the radon activity in groundwater. 3. Thus, the results of pumping tests performed in the boreholes improved our understanding of the system. After the pumping test, an increase of the radon content in groundwater occurred and evidenced a contribution of a radon-rich water to supply the flow rate that seems to come from the

  19. The leaky aquifer function revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. Temme (Nico)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis papers discusses the leaky aquifer function considered in a recent paper by Frank Harris in the Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics (2008). We describe properties of an integral representing this function and give details on how to compute this function with a single

  20. Quality of groundwater in the Denver Basin aquifer system, Colorado, 2003-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, MaryLynn; Beck, Jennifer A.; Paschke, Suzanne; Bauch, Nancy J.; Mashburn, Shana L.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater resources from alluvial and bedrock aquifers of the Denver Basin are critical for municipal, domestic, and agricultural uses in Colorado along the eastern front of the Rocky Mountains. Rapid and widespread urban development, primarily along the western boundary of the Denver Basin, has approximately doubled the population since about 1970, and much of the population depends on groundwater for water supply. As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted groundwater-quality studies during 2003–5 in the Denver Basin aquifer system to characterize water quality of shallow groundwater at the water table and of the bedrock aquifers, which are important drinking-water resources. For the Denver Basin, water-quality constituents of concern for human health or because they might otherwise limit use of water include total dissolved solids, fluoride, sulfate, nitrate, iron, manganese, selenium, radon, uranium, arsenic, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. For the water-table studies, two monitoring-well networks were installed and sampled beneath agricultural (31 wells) and urban (29 wells) land uses at or just below the water table in either alluvial material or near-surface bedrock. For the bedrock-aquifer studies, domestic- and municipal-supply wells completed in the bedrock aquifers were sampled. The bedrock aquifers, stratigraphically from youngest (shallowest) to oldest (deepest), are the Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, and Laramie-Fox Hills aquifers. The extensive dataset collected from wells completed in the bedrock aquifers (79 samples) provides the opportunity to evaluate factors and processes affecting water quality and to establish a baseline that can be used to characterize future changes in groundwater quality. Groundwater samples were analyzed for inorganic, organic, isotopic, and age-dating constituents and tracers. This report discusses spatial and statistical distributions of chemical constituents

  1. Sequestration of carbon in saline aquifers - mathematical and numerical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2004-01-01

    The work in this thesis focuses equally on two main topics. The set of these subjects deals with development of criteria for monotonicity of control volume methods. These methods are important and frequently used for solving the pressure equation arising in porous media flow. First we consider homogeneous parallelogram grids, and subsequently general logical Cartesian grids in heterogeneous media. This subject is concluded by the development of a new class of Multi Point Flux Approximation methods, motivated by the monotonicity results obtained. The second topic of this thesis is the development of analytical and semi- analytical solutions to the problem of leakage through abandoned wells. More specially, we look at a set of aquifers, separated by impermeable layers (aquicludes), where injection of water or CO{sub 2} takes place in some or all the aquifers. The aquifers and aquicludes are frequently penetrated by abandoned wells from oil exploration, and our problem consists of finding solutions to flow and leakage through these wells. The goal is to obtain expressions for leakage rates that may be evaluated quickly enough such that Monte Carlo realizations over statistical distributions of properties for abandoned wells can be performed. (author)

  2. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems at Waynesboro, Burke County, Georgia, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogeology and water quality of the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems were characterized in the City of Waynesboro area in Burke County, Georgia, based on geophysical and drillers’ logs, flowmeter surveys, a 24-houraquifer test, and the collection and chemical analysis of water samples in a newly constructed well. At the test site, the Dublin aquifer system consists of interlayered sands and clays between depths of 396 and 691 feet, and the Midville aquifer system consists of a sandy clay layer overlying a sand and gravel layer between depths of 728 and 936 feet. The new well was constructed with three screened intervals in the Dublin aquifer system and four screened intervals in the Midville aquifer system. Wellbore-flowmeter testing at a pumping rate of 1,000 gallons per minute indicated that 52.2 percent of the total flow was from the shallower Dublin aquifer system with the remaining 47.8 percent from the deeper Midville aquifer system. The lower part of the lower Midville aquifer (900 to 930 feet deep), contributed only 0.1 percent of the total flow. Hydraulic properties of the two aquifer systems were estimated using data from two wellbore-flowmeter surveys and a 24-hour aquifer test. Estimated values of transmissivity for the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems were 2,000 and 1,000 feet squared per day, respectively. The upper and lower Dublin aquifers have a combined thickness of about 150 feet and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Dublin aquifer system averages 10 feet per day. The upper Midville aquifer, lower Midville confining unit, and lower Midville aquifer have a combined thickness of about 210 feet, and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Midville aquifer system averages 6 feet per day. Storage coefficient of the Dublin aquifer system, computed using the Theis method on water-level data from one observation well, was estimated to be 0.0003. With a thickness of about 150 feet, the specific storage of the Dublin aquifer

  3. A continuous time random walk model for Darcy-scale anomalous transport in heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Hakoun, Vivien; Dentz, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Achieving the understanding of the process of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media is of crucial importance for several environmental and social purposes, ranging from aquifers contamination and remediation, to risk assessment in nuclear waste repositories. The complexity of this aim is mainly ascribable to the heterogeneity of natural media, which can be observed at all the scales of interest, from pore scale to catchment scale. In fact, the intrinsic heterogeneity of porous media is responsible for the arising of the well-known non-Fickian footprints of transport, including heavy-tailed breakthrough curves, non-Gaussian spatial density profiles and the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement. Several studies investigated the processes through which heterogeneity impacts the transport properties, which include local modifications to the advective-dispersive motion of solutes, mass exchanges between some mobile and immobile phases (e.g. sorption/desorption reactions or diffusion into solid matrix) and spatial correlation of the flow field. In the last decades, the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model has often been used to describe solute transport in heterogenous conditions and to quantify the impact of point heterogeneity, spatial correlation and mass transfer on the average transport properties [1]. Open issues regarding this approach are the possibility to relate measurable properties of the medium to the parameters of the model, as well as its capability to provide predictive information. In a recent work [2] the authors have shed new light on understanding the relationship between Lagrangian and Eulerian dynamics as well as on their evolution from arbitrary initial conditions. On the basis of these results, we derive a CTRW model for the description of Darcy-scale transport in d-dimensional media characterized by spatially random permeability fields. The CTRW approach models particle velocities as a spatial Markov process, which is

  4. Hydrogeological and geochemical overview of the karst aquifers in the Apuan Alps (Northwestern Tuscany, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matia Menichini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Apuan Alps, in north-western Tuscany (Italy, have a very complex geological structure. For this reason karst springs show very different behaviours according to the geological setting of aquifer systems. More than 80 springs are fed by carbonate aquifers; flow rates (Q range from 10 to 1600 L/s, in average, temperatures range from 8 to 15 °C. Deep and very slow groundwater flow feed some low-thermal springs (20-30 °C. Major karst springs (Q > 100 L/s are concentrated in two altimetry ranges, one from 200 to 300 m a.s.l. in the seaward side (SW-NW and a second one from 500 to 600 m a.s.l. on the inner (NE-SE side of the mountain range. Most of the springs are the final destination of large karst systems developed in meta-dolomite and marbles characterized by a very rapid flow. Some springs have a regular regime and are fed by bathyphreatic systems in metamorphic rocks or by carbonate aquifers with a major contribution of fissured drainage in non-metamorphic rocks. Large physical-chemical variations, both in space and time, are observed as a consequence of lithological heterogeneity, mixing processes and hydrodynamic conditions. Most waters are of the Ca-HCO3 type, but Ca-SO4 and Na-Cl facies are also present. A wide range of electrical conductivity is recorded, with values between 0.1 μS/cm and 10 μS/cm. Significant differences in the average isotopic signature (e.g. δ18O from -5.5 to -8.5‰ of the “base-flow” are registered due to the variability of hydrogeological basins dimension and their distribution in terms of altitude range and side. In some cases, springs with similar chemical features and located close to each other, point out very different isotopes signature, thus highlighting complicated flow path of groundwater. Furthermore, different seasonal evolutions of isotopic signatures are registered.

  5. 20 years of long-term atrazine monitoring in a shallow aquifer in western Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonberg, David; Vanderborght, Jan; Cremer, Nils; Pütz, Thomas; Herbst, Michael; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-03-01

    Atrazine was banned in Germany in 1991 due to findings of atrazine concentrations in ground- and drinking waters exceeding threshold values. Monitoring of atrazine concentrations in the groundwater since then provides information about the resilience of the groundwater quality to changing agricultural practices. In this study, we present results of a monitoring campaign of atrazine concentrations in the Zwischenscholle aquifer. This phreatic aquifer is exposed to intensive agricultural land use and susceptible to contaminants due to a shallow water table. In total 60 observation wells (OWs) have been monitored since 1991, of which 15 are sampled monthly today. Descriptive statistics of monitoring data were derived using the "regression on order statistics" (ROS) data censoring approach, estimating values for nondetects. The monitoring data shows that even 20 years after the ban of atrazine, the groundwater concentrations of sampled OWs remain on a level close to the threshold value of 0.1 μg l(-1) without any considerable decrease. The spatial distribution of atrazine concentrations is highly heterogeneous with OWs exhibiting permanently concentrations above the regulatory threshold on the one hand and OWs were concentrations are mostly below the limit of quantification (LOQ) on the other hand. A deethylatrazine-to-atrazine ratio (DAR) was used to distinguish between diffuse - and point-source contamination, with a global mean value of 0.84 indicating mainly diffuse contamination. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) of the monitoring dataset demonstrated relationships between the metabolite desisopropylatrazine, which was found to be exclusively associated with the parent compound simazine but not with atrazine, and between deethylatrazine, atrazine, nitrate, and the specific electrical conductivity. These parameters indicate agricultural impacts on groundwater quality. The findings presented in this study point at the difficulty to estimate mean concentrations

  6. Hydrogeophysical methods for analyzing aquifer storage and recovery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsley, Burke J; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Morgan, Frank Dale

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogeophysical methods are presented that support the siting and monitoring of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems. These methods are presented as numerical simulations in the context of a proposed ASR experiment in Kuwait, although the techniques are applicable to numerous ASR projects. Bulk geophysical properties are calculated directly from ASR flow and solute transport simulations using standard petrophysical relationships and are used to simulate the dynamic geophysical response to ASR. This strategy provides a quantitative framework for determining site-specific geophysical methods and data acquisition geometries that can provide the most useful information about the ASR implementation. An axisymmetric, coupled fluid flow and solute transport model simulates injection, storage, and withdrawal of fresh water (salinity ∼500 ppm) into the Dammam aquifer, a tertiary carbonate formation with native salinity approximately 6000 ppm. Sensitivity of the flow simulations to the correlation length of aquifer heterogeneity, aquifer dispersivity, and hydraulic permeability of the confining layer are investigated. The geophysical response using electrical resistivity, time-domain electromagnetic (TEM), and seismic methods is computed at regular intervals during the ASR simulation to investigate the sensitivity of these different techniques to changes in subsurface properties. For the electrical and electromagnetic methods, fluid electric conductivity is derived from the modeled salinity and is combined with an assumed porosity model to compute a bulk electrical resistivity structure. The seismic response is computed from the porosity model and changes in effective stress due to fluid pressure variations during injection/recovery, while changes in fluid properties are introduced through Gassmann fluid substitution. Copyright © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  7. Aquifer test interpretation using derivative analysis and diagnostic plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Espriú, Antonio; Real-Rangel, Roberto; Cortés-Salazar, Iván; Castro-Herrera, Israel; Luna-Izazaga, Gabriela; Sánchez-León, Emilio

    2017-04-01

    Pumping tests remain a method of choice to deduce fundamental aquifer properties and to assess well condition. In the oil and gas (O&G) industry, well testing has been the core technique in examining reservoir behavior over the last 50 years. The pressure derivative by Bourdet, it is perhaps, the most significant single development in the history of well test analysis. Recently, the so-called diagnostics plots (e.g. drawdown and drawdown derivative in a log-log plot) have been successfully tested in aquifers. However, this procedure is still underutilized by groundwater professionals. This research illustrates the applicability range, advantages and drawbacks (e.g. smoothing procedures) of diagnostic plots using field examples from a wide spectrum of tests (short/long tests, constant/variable flow rates, drawdown/buildup stages, pumping well/observation well) in dissimilar geological conditions. We analyze new and pre-existent aquifer tests in Mexico, USA, Canada, Germany, France and Saudi Arabia. In constant flow rate tests, our results show that derivative analysis is an easy, robust and powerful tool to assess near-borehole damage effects, formation heterogeneity, boundaries, flow regimes, infinite-acting radial stages, i.e., valid Theisian framework, and fracture-driven flow. In step tests, the effectiveness relies on high-frequency drawdown measurements. Moreover, we adapt O&G analytical solutions to cater for the conditions in groundwater systems. In this context, further parameters can be computed analytically from the plots, such as skin factor, head losses, wellbore storage, distance to the boundary, channel-aquifer and/or fracture zone width, among others. Therefore, diagnostic plots should be considered a mandatory tool for pumping tests analysis among hydrogeologists. This project has been supported by DGAPA (UNAM) under the research project PAPIIT IN-112815.

  8. The Tunisian Jurassic aquifer in the North African Sahara aquifer system: information derived from two-dimensional seismic reflection and well logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Lasmar, Rafika; Guellala, Rihab; Garrach, Mohamed; Mahroug, Ali; Sarsar Naouali, Benen; Inoubli, Mohamed Hédi

    2017-12-01

    Southern Tunisia is an arid area where socio-economic activities are dependent on groundwater resources. The presented study aims to better characterize the Jurassic aquifer based on geological and geophysical data, with a view to develop a rational exploitation program. Well logs are used to precisely determine the position and composition of the known Jurassic aquifer layers and to identify others able to produce good quality water. The logs show that limestones, sandstones and dolomites of the Krachoua, Techout and Foum Tataouine formations are the main Jurassic aquifers. Sixty-eight seismic-reflection sections are integrated within this study. The interpolation between the interpreted sections leads to the construction of isochronous isopach maps and geoseismic sections, and their analysis finds that compressive and extensive tectonic deformations have influenced the Jurassic aquifer geometry. The Hercynian orogeny phase manifestation is remarkable in that there are several stratigraphic gaps in the Jurassic sequence. The E-W, NW-SE, and NNW-SSE accidents, reactivated in normal faults since the Permian to Lower Cretaceous epochs, have generated the structures found in the Jurassic series, such as subsided and raised blocks. Their syn-sedimentary activity has controlled the thickness and facies of these series. The Cretaceous, Tortonian and Post-Villafranchian compressions are responsible for the Jurassic-deposits folding in some localities. The highlighted tectonic and sedimentary events have an important impact on the Jurassic aquifer function by favoring the Jurassic aquifer interconnections and their connections with the Triassic and Cretaceous permeable series.

  9. The Tunisian Jurassic aquifer in the North African Sahara aquifer system: information derived from two-dimensional seismic reflection and well logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Lasmar, Rafika; Guellala, Rihab; Garrach, Mohamed; Mahroug, Ali; Sarsar Naouali, Benen; Inoubli, Mohamed Hédi

    2017-07-01

    Southern Tunisia is an arid area where socio-economic activities are dependent on groundwater resources. The presented study aims to better characterize the Jurassic aquifer based on geological and geophysical data, with a view to develop a rational exploitation program. Well logs are used to precisely determine the position and composition of the known Jurassic aquifer layers and to identify others able to produce good quality water. The logs show that limestones, sandstones and dolomites of the Krachoua, Techout and Foum Tataouine formations are the main Jurassic aquifers. Sixty-eight seismic-reflection sections are integrated within this study. The interpolation between the interpreted sections leads to the construction of isochronous isopach maps and geoseismic sections, and their analysis finds that compressive and extensive tectonic deformations have influenced the Jurassic aquifer geometry. The Hercynian orogeny phase manifestation is remarkable in that there are several stratigraphic gaps in the Jurassic sequence. The E-W, NW-SE, and NNW-SSE accidents, reactivated in normal faults since the Permian to Lower Cretaceous epochs, have generated the structures found in the Jurassic series, such as subsided and raised blocks. Their syn-sedimentary activity has controlled the thickness and facies of these series. The Cretaceous, Tortonian and Post-Villafranchian compressions are responsible for the Jurassic-deposits folding in some localities. The highlighted tectonic and sedimentary events have an important impact on the Jurassic aquifer function by favoring the Jurassic aquifer interconnections and their connections with the Triassic and Cretaceous permeable series.

  10. Fraction of young water as an indicator of aquifer vulnerability along two regional flow paths in the Mississippi embayment aquifer system, southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, James A.; Barlow, Jeannie R.; Jurgens, Bryant; McMahon, Peter B.; Carmichael, John K.

    2017-01-01

    Wells along two regional flow paths were sampled to characterize changes in water quality and the vulnerability to contamination of the Memphis aquifer across a range of hydrologic and land-use conditions in the southeastern United States. The flow paths begin in the aquifer outcrop area and end at public supply wells in the confined parts of the aquifer at Memphis, Tennessee. Age-date tracer (e.g. SF6, 3H, 14C) data indicate that a component of young water is present in the aquifer at most locations along both flow paths, which is consistent with previous studies at Memphis that documented leakage of shallow water into the Memphis aquifer locally where the overlying confining unit is thin or absent. Mixtures of young and old water were most prevalent where long-term pumping for public supply has lowered groundwater levels and induced downward movement of young water. The occurrence of nitrate, chloride and synthetic organic compounds was correlated to the fraction of young water along the flow paths. Oxic conditions persisted for 10 km or more down dip of the confining unit, and the presence of young water in confined parts of the aquifer suggest that contaminants such as nitrate-N have the potential for transport. Long-term monitoring data for one of the flow-path wells screened in the confined part of the aquifer suggest that the vulnerability of the aquifer as indicated by the fraction of young water is increasing over time.

  11. Investigation of groundwater recirculation for the removal of RDX from the Pantex Plant perched aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, A.L. [ed.; Barnes, D.L. [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States); Boles, K.M.; Charbeneau, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Black, S.; Rainwater, K. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Water Resources Center

    1998-07-01

    The Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas, is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility that has been in operation since 1942. Past and present operations at Pantex include the creation of chemical high explosives components for nuclear weapons and assembly and disassembly of nuclear weapons. The Pantex Plant is underlain by the Ogallala aquifer, which in this area, consists of the main water-bearing unit and a perched water zone. These are separated by a fine-grained zone of low permeability. Multiple contaminant plumes containing high explosive (HE) compounds have been detected in the perched aquifer beneath the plant. The occurrence of these contaminants is the result of past waste disposal practices at the facility. RDX is an HE compound, which has been detected in the groundwater of the perched aquifer at significant concentrations. A pilot-scale, dual-phase extraction treatment system has been installed at one location at the plant, east of Zone 12, to test the effectiveness of such a system on the removal of these contaminants from the subsurface. A tracer test using a conservative tracer, bromide (Br), was conducted at the treatment site in 1996. In addition to the bromide, RDX and water elevations in the aquifer were monitored. Using data from the tracer test and other relevant data from the investigations at Pantex, flow and contaminant transport in the perched aquifer were simulated with groundwater models. The flow was modeled using MODFLOW and the transport of contaminants in the aqueous phase was modeled using MT3D. Modeling the perched aquifer had been conducted to characterize the flow in the perched aquifer; estimate RDX retardation in the perched aquifer; and evaluate the use of groundwater re-circulation to enhance the extraction of RDX from the perched aquifer.

  12. Combined interpretation of radar, hydraulic, and tracer data from a fractured-rock aquifer near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Lane, J.W.; Gorelick, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    An integrated interpretation of field experimental cross-hole radar, tracer, and hydraulic data demonstrates the value of combining time-lapse geophysical monitoring with conventional hydrologic measurements for improved characterization of a fractured-rock aquifer. Time-lapse difference-attenuation radar tomography was conducted during saline tracer experiments at the US Geological Survey Fractured Rock Hydrology Research Site near Mirror Lake, Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA. The presence of electrically conductive saline tracer effectively illuminates permeable fractures or pathways for geophysical imaging. The geophysical results guide the construction of three-dimensional numerical models of ground-water flow and solute transport. In an effort to explore alternative explanations for the tracer and tomographic data, a suite of conceptual models involving heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields and rate-limited mass transfer are considered. Calibration data include tracer concentrations, the arrival time of peak concentration at the outlet, and steady-state hydraulic head. Results from the coupled inversion procedure suggest that much of the tracer mass migrated outside the three tomographic image planes, and that solute is likely transported by two pathways through the system. This work provides basic and site-specific insights into the control of permeability heterogeneity on ground-water flow and solute transport in fractured rock. ?? Springer-Verlag 2004.

  13. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the High Plains aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digital aquifer boundaries for the High Plains aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses the panhandle counties of Cimarron,...

  14. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Elk City aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized polygons of constant recharge values for the Elk City aquifer in western Oklahoma. The aquifer covers an area of approximately...

  15. Assessment of nonpoint-source contamination of the High Plains Aquifer in south-central Kansas, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgesen, John O.; Stullken, Lloyd E.; Rutledge, A.T.

    1994-01-01

    for these compounds. The unsaturated zone in the study area is lithologically heterogeneous and contains substantial amounts of clay that inhibit the downward movement of water and solutes. Within the aquifer, the rate of lateral regional flow and solute transport is slow enough so that the ground-water quality reflects overlying land use in discrete areas of several square miles, but it is still sufficiently rapid so that the type of well sampled is not important in regional characterizations of water quality beneath irrigated cropland; the seasonal pumping of irrigation wells does not appear to divert regional flow enough to cause substantial local anomalies of more mineralized ground water.

  16. Spatial Heterogeneity of Carbonates: genetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violette, Sophie; Gonçalvès, Julio; de Marsily, Ghislain

    2010-05-01

    Homogeneous equivalent property is a classical concept used in hydrogeology to define heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. Known as averaging, it tries to describe the spatial variability of the rock properties from geologic observations and local measurements. The techniques available for these descriptions are mostly continuous Geostatistical models, or discontinuous facies models such as the Boolean, Indicator or Gaussian-Threshold models and the Markow chain model. These facies models are better suited to treating issues of rock strata connectivity, e.g. buried high permeability channels or low permeability barriers, which greatly affect flow and, above all, transport in aquifers. Genetic models provide new ways to incorporate more geology into the facies description, an approach that has been well developed in the oil industry, but not enough in hydrogeology. Here we present how a 3Dbasin model, based on a detailed stratigraphic data base, has been used in a genetic way to reproduce the permeability and storage coefficient heterogeneities at the regional scale.

  17. Functional Heterogeneity and Senior Management Team Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoliel, Pascale; Somech, Anit

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There has been an increasing trend toward the creation of senior management teams (SMTs) which are characterized by a high degree of functional heterogeneity. Although such teams may create better linkages to information, along with the benefits of functional heterogeneity comes the potential for conflicts that stem from the value…

  18. Understanding the Executive Functioning Heterogeneity in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffard, Stephane; Bayard, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by heterogeneous brain abnormalities involving cerebral regions implied in the executive functioning. The dysexecutive syndrome is one of the most prominent and functionally cognitive features of schizophrenia. Nevertheless, it is not clear to what extend executive deficits are heterogeneous in schizophrenia…

  19. Variable-density numerical modeling of seawater intrusion in coastal aquifer with well-developed conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Hu, B. X.

    2015-12-01

    Karst aquifer is an important drinking water supply for nearly 25% of the world's population. Well-developed subground conduit systems usually can be found in a well-developed karst aquifer, as a dual permeability system. Hydraulic characteristics of non-laminar flow in conduits could be significantly different from darcian flow in porous medium; therefore, hybrid model and different governing equations are necessary in numerical modeling of karst hydrogeology. On the other hand, seawater intrusion has been observed and studied for several decades, also become a worldwidely problem due to groundwater over-pumping and rising sea level. The density difference between freshwater and seawater is recognized as the major factor governing the movements of two fluids in coastal aquifer. Several models have been developed to simulate groundwater flow in karst aquifer, but hardly describe seawater intrusion through the conduits without coupling variable density flow and solute transport. In this study, a numerical SEAWAT model has been developed to simulate variable density flow and transport in heterogeneous karst aquifer. High-density seawater is verified to intrude further inland through high permeability conduit network rather than porous medium. The numerical model also predicts the effect of different cases on seawater intrusion in coastal karst aquifer, such as rising sea level, tide stages and freshwater discharge effects. A series of local and global uncertainty analysis have been taken to evaluate the sensitivity of hydraulic conductivity, porosity, groundwater pumping, sea level, salinity and dispersivity. Heterogeneous conduit and porous medium hydraulic characteristics play an important role in groundwater flow and solute transport simulation. Meanwhile, another hybrid model VDFST-CFP model is currently under development to couple turbulent conduit flow and variable density groundwater flow in porous media, which provides a new method and better description in

  20. Biogenic synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles by Escherichia coli K12 and its heterogeneous catalysis in degradation of 4-nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sarvesh Kumar; Yamada, Ryosuke; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-02-01

    Room-temperature extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) was achieved using Escherichia coli K12 cells without the addition of growth media, pH adjustments or inclusion of electron donors/stabilizing agents. The resulting nanoparticles were analysed by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Highly dispersed gold nanoplates were achieved in the order of around 50 nm. Further, the underlying mechanism was found to be controlled by certain extracellular membrane-bound proteins, which was confirmed by Fourier transformation-infrared spectroscopy and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We observed that certain membrane-bound peptides are responsible for reduction and subsequent stabilization of Au NPs (confirmed by zeta potential analysis). Upon de-activation of these proteins, no nanoparticle formation was observed. Also, we prepared a novel biocatalyst with Au NPs attached to the membrane-bound fraction of E. coli K12 cells serving as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst in complete reduction of 4-nitrophenol in the presence of NaBH4 which was studied with UV-vis spectroscopy. This is the first report on bacterial membrane-Au NP nanobiocomposite serving as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst in complete reduction of nitroaromatic pollutant in water.

  1. Aquifer test plan for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, L.C.; Hartman, M.J.

    1994-03-28

    This test plan directs hydrologic testing activities planned at three existing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) wells in the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit of the Hanford Site. Three additional wells will be installed near these existing wells and used as additional testing arid observation points during the field activities. Figure 1 shows the locations of the three test sites. A primary objective of the testing program is to provide more detailed hydraulic characterization information for the unconfined aquifer and targeted test sites than provided by the initial reconnaissance-level slug testing of Vukelich. A second objective is to evaluate the applicability of slug interference and dipole flow tests for detailed hydraulic characterization in an unconfined aquifer. This aquifer testing program will also be useful for substantiating hydraulic conductivities reported from previous slug tests and evaluating the effects of filter pack volume/configuration on slug test data. Vukelich recommended additional testing to address the latter two issues.

  2. Characterization of solid heterogeneous waste fuel - the effect of sampling and preparation method; Karaktaerisering av fasta inhomogena avfallsbraenslen - inverkan av metoder foer provtagning och provberedning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikstroem-Blomqvist, Evalena; Franke, Jolanta; Johansson, Ingvar

    2007-12-15

    The aim of the project is to evaluate the possibilities to simplify the methods used during sampling and laboratory preparation of heterogeneous waste materials. Existing methods for solid fuel material is summarized and evaluated in the project. As a result of the project two new simplified methods, one for field sampling and one for laboratory preparation work has been suggested. One large challenge regarding waste sampling is to achieve a representative sample due to the considerable heterogeneity of the material. How do you perform a sampling campaign that will give rise to representative results without too large costs? The single largest important source of error is the sampling procedure, equivalent to about 80% of the total error. Meanwhile the sample reduction and laboratory work only represents 15 % and 5 % respectively. Thus, to minimize the total error it is very important that the sampling is well planned in a testing program. In the end a very small analytical sample (1 gram) should reflected a large heterogeneous sample population of 1000 of tons. In this project two sampling campaigns, the fall of 2006 and early winter 2007, were conducted at the waste power plant Renova in Gothenburg, Sweden. The first campaign consisted of three different sample sizes with different number of sub-samples. One reference sample (50 tons and 48 sub-samples), two samples consisting of 16 tons and 8 sub-samples and finally two 4 tons consisting of 2 sub-samples each. During the second sampling campaign, four additional 4 ton samples were taken to repeat and thus evaluate the simplified sampling method. This project concludes that the simplified sampling methods only consisting of two sub-samples and a total sample volume of 4 tons give rise to results with as good quality and precision is the more complicated methods tested. Moreover the results from the two sampling campaigns generated equivalent results. The preparation methods used in the laboratory can as well be

  3. On aquifer thicknesses and geological complexity affecting fresh/salt groundwater distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamrsky, Daniel; Oude Essink, Gualbert; Bierkens, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Large coastal populations will face serious issues associated with global sea level rise in the near future. Among those are increased risk of coastal flooding and upconing of old saline groundwater caused by expected regional groundwater overexploitation initiated by growing urbanization. With predictions of rising sea level by 60-100cm by 2100 and a recent study suggesting even much larger changes than previously thought, it is essential to conduct a study to identify the most threatened coastal aquifers worldwide. Previous global studies dealing with salt water intrusion into coastal aquifers only considered homogenous geological conditions. However, literature and local data show a higher degree of heterogeneity. In our study, we consider possible geological scenarios and their impact on the fresh/salt groundwater distribution. The focus is on coastal aquifers that consist of unconsolidated sediments formed during the recent geological times and are underlain by a consolidated bedrock formation. Aquifer thickness and inland extent are the two most important parameters that determine the vulnerability of the coastal aquifer to salt water intrusion. To estimate these two parameters, a method using the latest global geological and elevation datasets is presented. By combining these inputs, we can estimate the slope of a bedrock formation that underlies a coastal aquifer consisting of unconsolidated sediments. Our estimated thicknesses are compared to a validation dataset of open source boreholes and literature information collected over numerous locations worldwide. While our results show that using our method to estimate coastal aquifer (made of unconsolidated sediments) thickness leads to satisfying results, it remains challenging to obtain information about the type of the sediments (gravel, sand, clay) themselves on such a scale. Therefore, we constructed a substantial set of 2D vertical variable-density groundwater flow models perpendicular to the shoreline

  4. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Tillman terrace and alluvial aquifer in southwestern Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digital aquifer boundaries for the Tillman terrace and alluvial aquifer in southwestern Oklahoma. The Tillman terrace aquifer encompasses...

  5. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer in east-central Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized aquifer boundaries for the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer in east-central Oklahoma. The Vamoosa-Ada aquifer is an important source of water...

  6. Compression-induced crystallization of amorphous indomethacin in tablets: characterization of spatial heterogeneity by two-dimensional X-ray diffractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakral, Naveen K; Mohapatra, Sarat; Stephenson, Gregory A; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2015-01-05

    Tablets of amorphous indomethacin were compressed at 10, 25, 50, or 100 MPa using either an unlubricated or a lubricated die and stored individually at 35 °C in sealed Mylar pouches. At selected time points, tablets were analyzed by two-dimensional X-ray diffractometry (2D-XRD), which enabled us to profile the extent of drug crystallization in tablets, in both the radial and axial directions. To evaluate the role of lubricant, magnesium stearate was used as "internal" and/or "external" lubricant. Indomethacin crystallization propensity increased as a function of compression pressure, with 100 MPa pressure causing crystallization immediately after compression (detected using synchrotron radiation). However, the drug crystallization was not uniform throughout the tablets. In unlubricated systems, pronounced crystallization at the radial surface could be attributed to die wall friction. The tablet core remained substantially amorphous, irrespective of the compression pressure. Lubrication of the die wall with magnesium stearate, as external lubricant, dramatically decreased drug crystallization at the radial surface. The spatial heterogeneity in drug crystallization, as a function of formulation composition and compression pressure, was systematically investigated. When formulating amorphous systems as tablets, the potential for compression induced crystallization warrants careful consideration. Very low levels of crystallization on the tablet surface, while profoundly affecting product performance (decrease in dissolution rate), may not be readily detected by conventional analytical techniques. Early detection of crystallization could be pivotal in the successful design of a dosage form where, in order to obtain the desired bioavailability, the drug may be in a high energy state. Specialized X-ray diffractometric techniques (2D; use of high intensity synchrotron radiation) enabled detection of very low levels of drug crystallization and revealed the heterogeneity in

  7. [Review on landscape heterogeneity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yutao; Yu, Xinxiao; Guang, Wenbin

    2002-04-01

    On the base of precedent studies, the occurring mechanism, classification, measurement methods, and the important role of landscape heterogeneity in landscape ecology were reviewed. The inner and outer uncertain factors result in landscape heterogeneity. Landscape heterogeneity has close relations with landscape stability, landscape design, architecture, management and disturbance, scale and ecological diversity in ecology. Complexity of landscape heterogeneity research, non-system of measurement indices and methods, difficulties and limitations of landscape heterogeneity modelling were all discussed respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the theory and methods of ecological complexity should be used to improve landscape heterogeneity research.

  8. Groundwater sustainability assessment in coastal aquifers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present work investigates the response of shallow, coastal unconfined aquifers to anticipated over- draft conditions and ... negative impact on groundwater quality emerges due to overdraft conditions and reduced recharge with the areal extent of ... aquifers are well addressed with the use of MOD-. FLOW (Chen and ...

  9. Geohydrology of the Cerro Prieto geothermal aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez R, J.; de la Pena L, A.

    1981-01-01

    The most recent information on the Cerro Prieto geothermal aquifer is summarized, with special emphasis on the initial production zone where the wells completed in the Alpha aquifer are located. These wells produce steam for power plant units 1 and 2. Brief comments also are made on the Beta aquifer, which underlies the Alpha aquifer in the Cerro Prieto I area and which extends to the east to what is known as the Cerro Prieto II and Cerro Prieto III areas. The location of the area studied is shown. The Alpha and Beta aquifers differ in their mineralogy and cementing mineral composition, temperatures, and piezometric levels. The difference in piezometric levels indicates that there is no local communication between the two aquifers. This situation has been verified by a well interference test, using well E-1 as a producer in the Beta aquifer and well M-46 as the observation well in the Alpha aquifer. No interference between them was observed. Information on the geology, geohydrology, and geochemistry of Cerro Prieto is presented.

  10. The Sparta Aquifer: A Sustainable Water Resource?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Paul W.; Hays, Phillip D.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The Sparta aquifer is an aquifer of regional importance within the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. It consists of varying amounts of unconsolidated sand, inter-stratified with silt and clay lenses within the Sparta Sand of the Claiborne Group. It extends from south Texas, north into Louisiana, Arkansas, and Tennessee, and eastward into Mississippi and Alabama (fig. 1). On both the west and east sides of the Mississippi embayment, the Sparta aquifer is exposed at the surface (outcrops) and is locally unconfined; it becomes confined as it dips toward the axis of the embayment, (generally corresponding with the Mississippi River) and southward toward the Gulf of Mexico where it is deeply buried in the subsurface (Hosman, 1968). Generalized ground-water flow in the Sparta aquifer is from the outcrop areas to the axis (center) of the embayment (fig. 2). In Arkansas, the Sparta aquifer outcrops parallel to the Fall Line at the western extreme of the Mississippi embayment (the Fall Line is a line dividing the mountainous highlands of Arkansas from the lowland area); and the formation dips from its outcrop area to the southeast. The Sparta aquifer supplies water for municipalities, industries such as paper production, and to a lesser degree, irrigation of agricultural crops (fig. 3). This report highlights hydrologic conditions of the aquifer in Arkansas County as an example of how water use is affecting water levels.

  11. Overview of the Ogallala Aquifer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrigation increased markedly on the Southern High Plains during the second half of the 20th century, drawing water primarily from the Ogallala Aquifer. During this time, irrigation sustained regional farm incomes and rural economies. Withdrawals from the aquifer, however, have exceeded recharge, re...

  12. The World Karst Aquifer Mapping project: concept, mapping procedure and map of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao; Auler, Augusto S.; Bakalowicz, Michel; Drew, David; Griger, Franziska; Hartmann, Jens; Jiang, Guanghui; Moosdorf, Nils; Richts, Andrea; Stevanovic, Zoran; Veni, George; Goldscheider, Nico

    2017-05-01

    Karst aquifers contribute substantially to freshwater supplies in many regions of the world, but are vulnerable to contamination and difficult to manage because of their unique hydrogeological characteristics. Many karst systems are hydraulically connected over wide areas and require transboundary exploration, protection and management. In order to obtain a better global overview of karst aquifers, to create a basis for sustainable international water-resources management, and to increase the awareness in the public and among decision makers, the World Karst Aquifer Mapping (WOKAM) project was established. The goal is to create a world map and database of karst aquifers, as a further development of earlier maps. This paper presents the basic concepts and the detailed mapping procedure, using France as an example to illustrate the step-by-step workflow, which includes generalization, differentiation of continuous and discontinuous carbonate and evaporite rock areas, and the identification of non-exposed karst aquifers. The map also shows selected caves and karst springs, which are collected in an associated global database. The draft karst aquifer map of Europe shows that 21.6% of the European land surface is characterized by the presence of (continuous or discontinuous) carbonate rocks; about 13.8% of the land surface is carbonate rock outcrop.

  13. Comparison of Tumor Uptake Heterogeneity Characterization Between Static and Parametric 18F-FDG PET Images in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tixier, F.; Vriens, D.; Cheze-Le Rest, C.; Hatt, M.; Disselhorst, J.A.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Visser, E.P.; Visvikis, D.

    2016-01-01

    (18)F-FDG PET is well established in the field of oncology for diagnosis and staging purposes and is increasingly being used to assess therapeutic response and prognosis. Many quantitative indices can be used to characterize tumors on (18)F-FDG PET images, such as SUVmax, metabolically active tumor

  14. Probing Shallow Aquifers in Northern Kuwait Using Airborne Sounding Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggy, E.; Fadlelmawla, A.; Farr, T. G.; Al-Rashed, M.

    2011-12-01

    Most of the global warming observations, scientific interest and data analyses have concentrated on the earth Polar Regions and forested areas, as they provide direct measurable impacts of large scale environmental changes. Unfortunately, the arid environments, which represent ~20% of the earth surface, have remained poorly studied. Yet water rarity and freshness, drastic changes in rainfall, flash floods, high rates of aquifer discharge and an accelerated large-scale desertification process are all alarming signs that suggest a substantial large-scale climatic variation in those areas that can be correlated to the global change that is affecting the volatile dynamic in arid zones. Unfortunately the correlations, forcings and feedbacks between the relevant processes (precipitation, surface fresh water, aquifer discharge, sea water rise and desertification) in these zones remain poorly observed, modeled, let alone understood. Currently, local studies are often oriented toward understanding small-scale or regional water resources and neither benefit from nor feedback to the global monitoring of water vapor, precipitation and soil moisture in arid and semi-arid areas. Furthermore techniques to explore deep subsurface water on a large scale in desertic environments remain poorly developed making current understanding of earth paleo-environment, water assessment and exploration efforts poorly productive and out-phased with current and future needs to quantitatively understand the evolution of earth water balance. To address those deficiencies we performed a comprehensive test mapping of shallow subsurface hydro-geological structures in the western Arabic peninsula in Kuwait, using airborne low frequency sounding radars with the main objectives to characterize shallow fossil aquifers in term of depth, sizes and water freshness. In May 2011, an experimental airborne radar sounder operating at 50 MHz was deployed in Kuwait and demonstrated an ability to penetrate down to

  15. Link-Heterogeneity vs. Node-Heterogeneity in Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Beaumont, Olivier; Rosenberg, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Heterogeneity in resources pervades all modern computing platforms. How do the effects of heterogeneity depend on which resources differ among computers in a platform? Some answers are derived within a formal framework, by comparing heterogeneity in computing power (node-heterogeneity) with heterogeneity in communication speed (link-heterogeneity). The former genre of heterogeneity seems much easier to understand than the latter.

  16. High-resolution nanoprobe X-ray fluorescence characterization of heterogeneous calcium and heavy metal distributions in alkali-activated fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provis, John L; Rose, Volker; Bernal, Susan A; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2009-10-06

    The nanoscale distribution of elements within fly ash and the aluminosilicate gel products of its alkaline activation ("fly ash geopolymers") are analyzed by means of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence using a hard X-ray Nanoprobe instrument. The distribution of calcium within a hydroxide-activated (fly ash/KOH solution) geopolymer gel is seen to be highly heterogeneous, with these data providing for the first time direct evidence of the formation of discrete high-calcium particles within the binder structure of a geopolymer synthesized from a low-calcium (geopolymer gel binder structure surrounding the unreacted fly ash particles. This has important implications for the understanding of calcium chemistry within aluminosilicate geopolymer gel phases. Additionally, chromium and iron are seen to be very closely correlated within the structures of both fly ash and the geopolymer product and remain within the regions of the geopolymer which can be identified as unreacted fly ash particles. Given that the potential for chromium release has been one of the queries surrounding the widespread utilization of construction materials derived from fly ash, the observation that this element appears to be localized within the fly ash rather than dispersed throughout the gel binder indicates that it is unlikely to be released problematically into the environment.

  17. Aquifer Vulnerability maps and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducci, Daniela; Sellerino, Mariangela

    2017-04-01

    The aquifer vulnerability maps to contamination are used worldwide by environmental agencies and water-resource managers with the aim of preserving the water resources and of evaluating the most suitable areas where to locate new settlements. In the parametric methods, more used to assess the groundwater contamination vulnerability, e.g. the DRASTIC and the AVI methods, an important role is played by the protective capacity of cover layers to the introduction and transport of contaminants into the aquifer. Therefore, these methods point out the importance of the "Depth to water" parameter, which represents, where the aquifer is unconfined, the depth of the piezometric level and, where the aquifer is confined, the top of the aquifer. This parameter is rarely variable in confined aquifers and in deep unconfined aquifers, as karst aquifers, where the piezometric oscillations are low, compared with the depth of the water table. On the contrary, in shallow aquifers of flat areas, where in addition a large number of human activities are practiced and the contamination risk is high, the piezometric level varies suddenly with the rainfall, and it is very sensitive to drought periods and climatic changes. This affects noticeably the "Depth to water" parameter and consequently the vulnerability maps (e.g. 3 m of piezometric lowering can produce a change in the DRASTIC index from 10 to 7…). To validate this hypothesis, the DRASTC and AVI methods have been applied on a shallow aquifer located in a flat area in Campania (Italy,) considering data corresponding to an average rainfall period and to a drought period.

  18. Economics of Managed Aquifer Recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Maliva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Managed aquifer recharge (MAR technologies can provide a variety of water resources management benefits by increasing the volume of stored water and improving water quality through natural aquifer treatment processes. Implementation of MAR is often hampered by the absence of a clear economic case for the investment to construct and operate the systems. Economic feasibility can be evaluated using cost benefit analysis (CBA, with the challenge of monetizing benefits. The value of water stored or treated by MAR systems can be evaluated by direct and indirect measures of willingness to pay including market price, alternative cost, value marginal product, damage cost avoided, and contingent value methods. CBAs need to incorporate potential risks and uncertainties, such as failure to meet performance objectives. MAR projects involving high value uses, such as potable supply, tend to be economically feasible provided that local hydrogeologic conditions are favorable. They need to have low construction and operational costs for lesser value uses, such as some irrigation. Such systems should therefore be financed by project beneficiaries, but dichotomies may exist between beneficiaries and payers. Hence, MAR projects in developing countries may be economically viable, but external support is often required because of limited local financial resources.

  19. Solute concentration at a well in non-Gaussian aquifers under constant and time-varying pumping schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libera, Arianna; de Barros, Felipe P. J.; Riva, Monica; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    Our study is keyed to the analysis of the interplay between engineering factors (i.e., transient pumping rates versus less realistic but commonly analyzed uniform extraction rates) and the heterogeneous structure of the aquifer (as expressed by the probability distribution characterizing transmissivity) on contaminant transport. We explore the joint influence of diverse (a) groundwater pumping schedules (constant and variable in time) and (b) representations of the stochastic heterogeneous transmissivity (T) field on temporal histories of solute concentrations observed at an extraction well. The stochastic nature of T is rendered by modeling its natural logarithm, Y = ln T, through a typical Gaussian representation and the recently introduced Generalized sub-Gaussian (GSG) model. The latter has the unique property to embed scale-dependent non-Gaussian features of the main statistics of Y and its (spatial) increments, which have been documented in a variety of studies. We rely on numerical Monte Carlo simulations and compute the temporal evolution at the well of low order moments of the solute concentration (C), as well as statistics of the peak concentration (Cp), identified as the environmental performance metric of interest in this study. We show that the pumping schedule strongly affects the pattern of the temporal evolution of the first two statistical moments of C, regardless the nature (Gaussian or non-Gaussian) of the underlying Y field, whereas the latter quantitatively influences their magnitude. Our results show that uncertainty associated with C and Cp estimates is larger when operating under a transient extraction scheme than under the action of a uniform withdrawal schedule. The probability density function (PDF) of Cp displays a long positive tail in the presence of time-varying pumping schedule. All these aspects are magnified in the presence of non-Gaussian Y fields. Additionally, the PDF of Cp displays a bimodal shape for all types of pumping

  20. Ground Water Redox Zonation near La Pine, Oregon: Relation to River Position within the Aquifer-Riparian Zone Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Stephen R.; Morgan, David S.; Orzol, Leonard L.; Polette, Danial J.

    2007-01-01

    peripheral zones, whereas older, typically more reduced ground water tends to discharge closer to the center of the river corridor. Such distributions of redox state reflect ground-water movement and geochemical evolution at the aquifer-scale. Redox state of ground water undergoes additional modification as ground water nears discharge points in or adjacent to rivers, where riparian zone processes can be important. Lateral erosion of river systems away from the center of the flood plain can decrease or even eliminate interactions between ground water and reducing riparian zone sediments. Thus, ground water redox patterns in near-river sediments appear to reflect the position of a river within the riparian zone/aquifer continuum. Spatial heterogeneity of redox conditions near the river/aquifer boundary (that is, near the riverbed) makes it difficult to extrapolate transect-scale findings to a precise delineation of the oxic-suboxic boundary in the near-river environment of the entire study area. However, the understanding of relations between near-river redox state and proximity to riparian zone edges provides a basis for applying these results to the study-area scale, and could help guide management efforts such as nitrogen-reduction actions or establishment of Total Maximum Daily Load criteria. Coupling the ground-water redox-based understanding of riv