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Sample records for characterize sediment toxicity

  1. Characterizing toxicity of metal-contaminated sediments from mining areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We review methods for testing toxicity of sediments affected by metals. • Toxicity testing provides site-specific assessment of impacts on resident biota. • Goals are to document extent of toxicity and associations with metal exposure. • Need to characterize bioavailability of metals in sediment and pore water. • Toxicity data is basis for guidelines used to predict hazards of metal toxicity. - Abstract: This paper reviews methods for testing the toxicity of metals associated with freshwater sediments, linking toxic effects with metal exposure and bioavailability, and developing sediment quality guidelines. The most broadly applicable approach for characterizing metal toxicity is whole-sediment toxicity testing, which attempts to simulate natural exposure conditions in the laboratory. Standard methods for whole-sediment testing can be adapted to test a wide variety of taxa. Chronic sediment tests that characterize effects on multiple endpoints (e.g., survival, growth, and reproduction) can be highly sensitive indicators of adverse effects on resident invertebrate taxa. Methods for testing of aqueous phases (pore water, overlying water, or elutriates) are used less frequently. Analysis of sediment toxicity data focuses on statistical comparisons between responses in sediments from the study area and responses in one or more uncontaminated reference sediments. For large or complex study areas, a greater number of reference sediments is recommended to reliably define the normal range of responses in uncontaminated sediments – the ‘reference envelope’. Data on metal concentrations and effects on test organisms across a gradient of contamination may allow development of concentration-response models, which estimate metal concentrations associated with specified levels of toxic effects (e.g. 20% effect concentration or EC20). Comparisons of toxic effects in laboratory tests with measures of impacts on resident benthic invertebrate

  2. Application of Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures for the characterization and management of dredged harbor sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, N; Belzunce-Segarra, M J; Gonzalez, J-L; Menchaca, I; Garmendia, J M; Etxebarria, N; Nieto, O; Franco, J

    2013-06-15

    This study refers to the performance of Phase I Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures to identify the contaminants (i.e. organic compounds, metals and ammonia) exerting toxicity in marine sediments from the Pasaia harbor (Oiartzun estuary, northern Spain). The effectiveness of the manipulations to reduce toxicity was proved with the marine amphipod survival test (whole-sediment) and the sea urchin embryo-larval assay (elutriates). By means of TIEs it was concluded that organic compounds were the major contaminants exerting toxicity, although toxic effects by metals was also demonstrated. Additionally, the combination of Phase I treatments allowed to investigate the toxicity changes associated to the mobility of contaminants during dredging activities. Therefore, the performance of TIE procedures as another line of evidence in the decision-making process is recommended. They show a great potential to be implemented at different steps of the characterization and management of dredged harbor sediments. PMID:23465571

  3. Sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) Phases I, II and III Guidance Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation summarizes the sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) techniques that allow researchers to characterize and identify chemical causes of acute toxicity in sediments that can be applied using the 10-d solid-phase sediment toxicity tests.

  4. Assessing sediment contamination using six toxicity assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen G. BURTON Jr.

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of sediment toxicity at Lake Orta, Italy was conducted to compare a toxicity test battery of 6 assays and to evaluate the extent of sediment contamination at various sediment depths. Lake Orta received excessive loadings of copper and ammonia during the 1900’s until a large remediation effort was conducted in 1989-90 using lime addition. Since that time, the lake has shown signs of a steady recovery of biological communities. The study results showed acute toxicity still exists in sediments at a depth of 5 cm and greater. Assays that detected the highest levels of toxicity were two whole sediment exposures (7 d using Hyalella azteca and Ceriodaphnia dubia. The MicrotoxR assay using pore water was the third most sensitive assay. The Thamnotox, Rototox, Microtox solid phase, and Seed Germination-Root Elongation (pore and solid phase assays showed occasional to no toxicity. Based on similarity of responses and assay sensitivity, the two most useful assays were the C. dubia (or H. azteca and Microtox pore water. These assays were effective at describing sediment toxicity in a weight-of-evidence approach.

  5. Assessing the potential toxicity of resuspended sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, C.; Babut, M.; Ferard, J.F.; Martel, L.; Garric, J.

    2000-05-01

    Two moderately contaminated freshwater sediments (Sorel Harbour, St. Lawrence River, Canada) were subjected to a suspension event. The objective was to assess the environmental impact of the disposal of dredged material in water, in particular, the short-term effects of dumping on the water column and the long-term effects of dredged sediment deposits. In a series of microcosms, the sediments were left to stand for 25 d under flow-through conditions. In a second series of microcosms, sediments were vigorously suspended for 15 min before being left to settle and were submitted to the same treatment as reference sediments during the following 25 d. Physicochemical and biological parameters (Daphnia magna and Hydra attenuata survival) were measured in overlying water throughout the experiment. Sediment toxicity was assessed with Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca exposed to sediments collected at both the beginning and end of the 25-d period. Pore-water toxicity was evaluated with D. magna. During the suspension process, in the Sorel Harbour mixed sediment overlying water, the authors observed effects on H. attenuata survival and ammonia and metals (chromium, copper, and zinc) releases. Meanwhile, in reference (nonmixed) and mixed sediments as well as in associated pore waters, there were no significant chemical modifications no biological effects after the 25-d experiments. The developed approach, which attempts to simulate a dumping process, aims at allowing the assessment of the short- and long-term hazards resulting from a resuspension process in overlying water and in resettled sediments using both chemical and biological measurements.

  6. A SEDIMENT TOXICITY METHOD USING LEMNA MINOR, DUCKWEED

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed a Lemna minor sediment toxicity test method to assess sediment contaminants which may affect plants. This 96-hour test used 15 ml of sediment and 2 ml of overlying water which was renewed after 48 hours. Sand was used as the control sediment and also to dilute test ...

  7. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G. [Geological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States); Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Mid-Continent Ecology Div.

    1998-11-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. The authors investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by {ge}70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  8. Toxicity Assessment of Sediments with Natural Anomalous Concentrations in Heavy Metals by the Use of Bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martín

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential toxicity in riverbed sediments was assessed with a bioassay using the bioluminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The selected area was characterized by the presence of ultramafic rocks (peridotites, and the sediments had high values in Ni, Cr, and Co. For the toxicity bioassay with Vibrio fischeri, water-soluble forms were used. The results indicated that most of the samples had a very low degree of toxicity, with 10% of reduction in luminescence in relation to the control; meanwhile 25% of the samples had a moderate degree of toxicity with a reduction in luminescence between 13 and 21% in relation to the control. The toxicity index correlated significantly with the concentrations of Ni and Cr in the water extracts. This toxicity bioassay was proved to be a sensitive and useful tool to detect potential toxicity in solutions, even with anomalous concentrations in heavy metals of natural origin.

  9. The status of toxicity tests with sediment in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, R.P.A. [Companhia de Tecnologia e Saneamento Ambiental, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    The earliest studies in Brazil aiming to evaluate sediment quality through toxicity tests started in the beginning of the 80`s. These were developed by the Environmental Sanitation Agency of Sao Paulo State (CETESB) in Cubatao River and Billings Reservoir, which are located in industrialized and populous regions. Elutriate phase sediment toxicity tests were run with Daphnia similis. In the Cubatao River Basin the combination of toxicity, chemistry data and benthic community structure provided clear indications of sites with different levels of pollution. At this time there was a consensus that the study of a complex compartment such as sediment needed improvements in sampling and analysis procedures. Only in the 90`s the investigations involving sediment toxicity assessment were resumed by CETESB, and it was clear that integrative studies were needed in order to make environmental quality assessment. This kind of studies were conducted by CETESB in some highly polluted areas of Sao Paulo State, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Photobacterium phosphoreum interstitial water tests and Hyalella sp whole sediment tests were run, and the results correlated with several sediment organic and inorganic contaminants. The Sediment Quality Triad proposed by Chapman was applied in one of these studies. This approach was extremely useful in interpreting the data. At the same time marine sediment toxicity tests were developed by CETESB in collaboration with Sao Paulo University, and tests were run with the amphipods Tiburonella viscana, Battyporeiapus bisetosus; tanaidacean Kalliapseudes shubarti and the echinoderm Lytechinus variegatus. The embryo test with L. variegatus was the most adequate in these studies. Nowadays there are other groups in some universities developing sediment toxicity tests with Hyalella and Chironomus in response to a growing concern in Brazil to establish adequate sediment quality assessment guidelines.

  10. Extent and toxicity of contaminated marine sediments in Southeastern Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Cantillo, A. Y.; Lauenstein, G. G.

    2004-01-01

    Thirty sites were sampled in southern Biscayne Bay and Manatee Bay in December 1999 to determine the extent of toxicity in sediments. Analyses and assays included: pesticides and phenols in seawater; chemical contaminants in sediment; amphipod mortality, HRGS P450, sea urchin sperm fertilization and embryology, MicrotoxTM, MutatoxTM, grass shrimp AChE and juvenile clam mortality assays; sea urchin sperm, amphipod and oyster DNA damage; and benthic community assessment. Sediment sites near the...

  11. Integrating the fish embryo toxicity test as triad element for sediment toxicity assessment based on the water framework directive approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartzke, Mariana [Dept. Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gobio GmbH, Aarbergen/Kettenbach (Germany); Dept. Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, UFZ, Leipzig (Germany); Delov, Vera [Dept. Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gobio GmbH, Aarbergen/Kettenbach (Germany); Ecotoxicology, Fraunhofer Inst. for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME, Aachen (Germany); Stahlschmidt-Allner, Petra; Allner, Bernhard [Gobio GmbH, Aarbergen/Kettenbach (Germany); Oehlmann, Joerg [Dept. Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to complement analyses according to the European Union Water Framework Directive (WFD) with a sediment toxicity analysis as part of an integrated river assessment. To this end, Hessian water courses were analyzed using the sediment quality triad concept according to Chapman with chemical analyses, in situ effect evaluations, and ecotoxicological assessments. For the ecotoxicological assessment (fish embryo toxicity test with Danio rerio), a new evaluation scheme was developed, the fish teratogenicity index (FTI), that allows for a classification of sediments into ecological quality classes compliant to the WFD. Materials and methods sediment and macrozoobenthos samples were taken from tributaries of the rivers Fulda and Lahn. Sediments were characterized regarding particle size, carbon, heavy metals, and polyaromatic hydrocarbon content. Macroinvertebrate samples were taken via multi-habitat sampling. The fish embryo toxicity test with D. rerio was conducted as a contact assay on the basis of DIN 38415-6. Results and discussion The integrated assessment indicated a significant influence of heavy metals and carbon content on macroinvertebrate communities. The bioaccessibility of sediment pollutants were clearly demonstrated by the FTI, which showed a wide range of adverse effects. A significant linear relationship between metals and the FTI was detected. However, there was no statistically significant evidence that macroinvertebrate communities were affected by the hydromorphological quality clements at the sampling sites. Conclusions The new scheme for the assessment of fish embryo toxicity test was successfully applied. The results suggest that sediment compounds impact macroinvertebrate communities and early development of fish. It demonstrates that the quality of sediments should be evaluated on a routine basis as part of an integrated river assessment. (orig.)

  12. Hyalella IQ Toxicity Test{trademark} as a predictor of whole sediment toxicity with diversely contaminated sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, W.S.; Hayes, K.R. [Aqua Survey, Inc., Flemington, NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The IQ TOXICITY TEST{trademark} is a toxicity screening test that evaluates the organism`s galactosidase enzyme system functionality as a predictor of acute toxicity. Organisms are exposed to a potentially toxic solution for approximately one hour. Following the exposure, the organisms are exposed to a slurry of a galactoside sugar tagged with a fluorescent marker (methylumbelliferyl galactoside) for 15--20 minutes. A black light can then be used to examine whether the hemolymph of the organism contains free umbelliferone, which brightly fluoresces. The organisms are then scored as ``on`` or ``off`` with respect to free umbelliferone. This endpoint can then be used to calculate an EC50, which is comparable to a whole effluent, pure compound, or sediment toxicity test. Slightly different methodologies are used for different toxicity test organisms. The objective of this presentation is to discuss the use of the IQ{trademark} methodology with porewater extract exposures of the amphipod Hyalella azteca as a predictor of results of whole sediment toxicity tests. The results of over thirty 10 and 28-day whole sediment toxicity tests and the concurrent Hyalella azteca 10 TOXICITY TESTS{trademark} are compared and discussed. The use of screening tests as a reduced cost method for initial site assessment will be discussed.

  13. Chronic toxicity of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments: variation in toxicity among eight invertebrate taxa and eight sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, John M; Brumbaugh, William G; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Ivey, Chris D; Kunz, James L; Kemble, Nile E; Schlekat, Christian E; Garman, Emily Rogevich

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluated the chronic toxicity of Ni-spiked freshwater sediments to benthic invertebrates. A 2-step spiking procedure (spiking and sediment dilution) and a 2-stage equilibration period (10 wk anaerobic and 1 wk aerobic) were used to spike 8 freshwater sediments with wide ranges of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS; 0.94-38 µmol/g) and total organic carbon (TOC; 0.42-10%). Chronic sediment toxicity tests were conducted with 8 invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Gammarus pseudolimnaeus, Chironomus riparius, Chironomus dilutus, Hexagenia sp., Lumbriculus variegatus, Tubifex tubifex, and Lampsilis siliquoidea) in 2 spiked sediments. Nickel toxicity thresholds estimated from species-sensitivity distributions were 97 µg/g and 752 µg/g (total recoverable Ni; dry wt basis) for sediments with low and high concentrations of AVS and TOC, respectively. Sensitive species were tested with 6 additional sediments. The 20% effect concentrations (EC20s) for Hyalella and Gammarus, but not Hexagenia, were consistent with US Environmental Protection Agency benchmarks based on Ni in porewater and in simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) normalized to AVS and TOC. For Hexagenia, sediment EC20s increased at less than an equimolar basis with increased AVS, and toxicity occurred in several sediments with Ni concentrations in SEM less than AVS. The authors hypothesize that circulation of oxygenated water by Hexagenia led to oxidation of AVS in burrows, creating microenvironments with high Ni exposure. Despite these unexpected results, a strong relationship between Hexagenia EC20s and AVS could provide a basis for conservative site-specific sediment quality guidelines for Ni. PMID:23657897

  14. Chronic toxicity of oiled sediments to Japanese medaka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different constituents of oil mixtures have different modes of toxicity, making it difficult to assess the risk to fish in the event of an oil spill. This study assessed whether components of oil are toxic to Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), and whether the toxicity decreases when oiled sediments weather. Weathered MESA oil was applied to experimental plots in an intertidal region in Ste. Croix, Quebec. The sediments were collected at 6 and 12 months following the oiling. Exposure to fish 6 months after the oiling resulted in mortality, reduced growth, fin deformities, liver problems and reproductive abnormalities. The sediments collected 12 months after the application were not lethal to medaka and there was a significant reduction in fin deformities and liver pathology. But growth was still impaired and reproductive abnormalities remained. It was concluded that oiled sediments are chronically toxic to fish. Although degradation and weathering of oil over time can reduce the severity of some toxic effects, there is little change to fish reproduction and growth. 19 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  15. Toxicity and biodegradation of PCBs in contaminated sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PCBs represent a serious ecological problem due to their low degradability, high toxicity, and strong bioaccumulation. Because of many environmental and economical problems, there are efforts to develop bio-remediation technologies for decontamination of the PCB-polluted areas. PCB were used by storage of spent nuclear fuel in nuclear power plants Jaslovske Bohunice. In the locality of the former producer of PCB - Chemko Strazske a. s. - big amount of these substances is still persisting in sediments and soil. The goal of this study was to analyze the contaminated sediments from Strazsky canal and Zemplinska Sirava water reservoir from several points of view. The study of eco-toxicity confirmed that both sediments were toxic for various tested organisms. The genotoxicity test has not proved the mutagenic effect. The subsequent step included microbiological analysis of the contaminated sediments and isolation of pure bacterial cultures capable of degrading PCBs. In order to determine the genetic potential for their biodegradability, the gene bphA1 was identified using PCR technique in their genomes. This gene codes the enzyme biphenyl-dioxygenase, which is responsible for PCB degradation. The final goal was to perform aerobic biodegradation of PCBs in the sediments. The bacteria present in both sediments are able to degrade certain low chlorinated congeners. The issue of biodiversity is still open and has to be studied to reveal the real cooperation between bacteria. (authors)

  16. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of sediment-associated silver nanoparticles in the estuarine polychaete, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Yi; Banta, Gary T; Selck, Henriette; Berhanu, Deborah; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Forbes, Valery E

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the toxicities of sediment-associated silver added to sediment as commercially available silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 20 and 80 nm) and aqueous Ag (AgNO3) to the estuarine polychaete, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor, were investigated for both individual and subcellular endpoints after 10 d of exposure. Both Ag NP types were characterized in parallel to the toxicity studies and found to be polydispersed and overlapping in size. Burrowing activity decreased (marginally) with increasing Ag concentration and depended on the form of Ag added to sediment. All worms accumulated Ag regardless of the form in which it was added to the sediment, and worm size (expressed as dry weight) was found to significantly affect bioaccumulation such that smaller worms accumulated more Ag per body weight than larger worms. Lysosomal membrane permeability (neutral red retention time, NRRT) and DNA damage (comet assay tail moment and tail DNA intensity %) of Nereis coelomocytes increased in a concentration-dependent manner in all three Ag treatments. Ag NP treatments were more toxic than aqueous Ag for all toxicity endpoints, even though bioaccumulation did not differ significantly among Ag forms. No significant difference in toxicity was observed between the two Ag NP treatments which was attributed to their overlap in particle size. PMID:25179147

  17. Isolating the impact of sediment toxicity in urban streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Stephen, E-mail: s.marshall@zoology.unimelb.edu.a [Centre for Environmental Stress and Adaptation Research (CESAR), The University of Melbourne, Bio21 Institute, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Pettigrove, Vincent [Melbourne Water Research and Technology, Melbourne Water Corporation, PO Box 4342, VIC 3000 (Australia); Carew, Melissa; Hoffmann, Ary [Centre for Environmental Stress and Adaptation Research (CESAR), The University of Melbourne, Bio21 Institute, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2010-05-15

    Several factors can contribute to the ecological degradation of stream catchments following urbanization, but it is often difficult to separate their relative importance. We isolated the impact of polluted sediment on the condition of an urban stream in Melbourne, Australia, using two complementary approaches. Using a rapid bioassessment approach, indices of stream condition were calculated based on macroinvertebrate field surveys. Urban stream reaches supported impoverished macroinvertebrate communities, and contained potentially toxic concentrations of heavy metals and hydrocarbons. Using a field microcosm approach, a bioassay was carried out to assess sediment pollution effects on native macroinvertebrates. Sediment from urban sites substantially altered the microcosm macroinvertebrate community, most likely due to elevated heavy metal and hydrocarbon concentrations. Macroinvertebrate surveys combined with a bioassay approach based on field microcosms can help isolate the effect of stream pollutants in degraded ecosystems. - Field microcosms isolate the ecological impact of polluted sediment in an urban stream.

  18. Isolating the impact of sediment toxicity in urban streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several factors can contribute to the ecological degradation of stream catchments following urbanization, but it is often difficult to separate their relative importance. We isolated the impact of polluted sediment on the condition of an urban stream in Melbourne, Australia, using two complementary approaches. Using a rapid bioassessment approach, indices of stream condition were calculated based on macroinvertebrate field surveys. Urban stream reaches supported impoverished macroinvertebrate communities, and contained potentially toxic concentrations of heavy metals and hydrocarbons. Using a field microcosm approach, a bioassay was carried out to assess sediment pollution effects on native macroinvertebrates. Sediment from urban sites substantially altered the microcosm macroinvertebrate community, most likely due to elevated heavy metal and hydrocarbon concentrations. Macroinvertebrate surveys combined with a bioassay approach based on field microcosms can help isolate the effect of stream pollutants in degraded ecosystems. - Field microcosms isolate the ecological impact of polluted sediment in an urban stream.

  19. Toxicity of silicon carbide nanowires to sediment-dwelling invertebrates in water or sediment exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, Joseph N.; Wang, Ning; Ritts, Andrew; Kunz, James L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Li, Hao; Deng, Baolin

    2011-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNW) are insoluble in water. When released into an aquatic environment, SiCNW would likely accumulate in sediment. The objective of this study was to assess the toxicity of SiCNW to four freshwater sediment-dwelling organisms: amphipods (Hyalella azteca), midges (Chironomus dilutus), oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus), and mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea). Amphipods were exposed to either sonicated or nonsonicated SiCNW in water (1.0 g/L) for 48 h. Midges, mussels, and oligochaetes were exposed only to sonicated SiCNW in water for 96 h. In addition, amphipods were exposed to sonicated SiCNW in whole sediment for 10 d (44% SiCNW on dry wt basis). Mean 48-h survival of amphipods exposed to nonsonicated SiCNW in water was not significantly different from the control, whereas mean survival of amphipods exposed to sonicated SiCNW in two 48-h exposures (0 or 15% survival) was significantly different from the control (90 or 98% survival). In contrast, no effect of sonicated SiCNW was observed on survival of midges, mussels, or oligochaetes. Survival of amphipods was not significantly reduced in 10-d exposures to sonicated SiCNW either mixed in the sediment or layered on the sediment surface. However, significant reduction in amphipod biomass was observed with the SiCNW either mixed in sediment or layered on the sediment surface, and the reduction was more pronounced for SiCNW layered on the sediment. These results indicated that, under the experimental conditions, nonsonicated SiCNW in water were not acutely toxic to amphipods, sonicated SiCNW in water were acutely toxic to the amphipods, but not to other organisms tested, and sonicated SiCNW in sediment affected the growth but not the survival of amphipods.

  20. Evaluating sediment chemistry and toxicity data using logistic regression modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, L.J.; MacDonald, D.D.; Norton, S.B.; Severn, C.G.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the use of logistic-regression modeling for evaluating matching sediment chemistry and toxicity data. Contaminant- specific logistic models were used to estimate the percentage of samples expected to be toxic at a given concentration. These models enable users to select the probability of effects of concern corresponding to their specific assessment or management objective or to estimate the probability of observing specific biological effects at any contaminant concentration. The models were developed using a large database (n = 2,524) of matching saltwater sediment chemistry and toxicity data for field-collected samples compiled from a number of different sources and geographic areas. The models for seven chemicals selected as examples showed a wide range in goodness of fit, reflecting high variability in toxicity at low concentrations and limited data on toxicity at higher concentrations for some chemicals. The models for individual test endpoints (e.g., amphipod mortality) provided a better fit to the data than the models based on all endpoints combined. A comparison of the relative sensitivity of two amphipod species to specific contaminants illustrated an important application of the logistic model approach.

  1. Investigations on sediment toxicity of German rivers applying a standardized bioassay battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Christoph; Gartiser, Stefan; Garcia-Käufer, Manuel; Schiwy, Sabrina; Hercher, Christoph; Meyer, Wiebke; Achten, Christine; Larsson, Maria; Engwall, Magnus; Keiter, Steffen; Hollert, Henner

    2015-11-01

    River sediments may contain a huge variety of environmental contaminants and play a key role in the ecological status of aquatic ecosystems. Contaminants adsorbed to sediments and suspended solids may contribute directly or after remobilization to an adverse ecological and chemical status of surface water. In this subproject of the joint research project DanTox, acetonic Soxhlet extracts from three German river sediments from the River Rhine (Altrip and Ehrenbreitstein with moderate contamination) and River Elbe (Veringkanal Hamburg heavily contaminated) were prepared and redissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). These extracts were analyzed with a standard bioassay battery with organisms from different trophic levels (bacteria, algae, Daphnia, fish) as well as in the Ames test and the umuC test for bacterial mutagenicity and genotoxicity according to the respective OECD and ISO guidelines. In total, 0.01% (standard) up to 0.25% (only fish embryo test) of the DMSO sediment extract was dosed to the test systems resulting in maximum sediment equivalent concentrations (SEQ) of 2 up to 50 g l(-1). The sediment of Veringkanal near Hamburg harbor was significantly more toxic in most tests compared to the sediment extracts from Altrip and Ehrenbreitstein from the River Rhine. The most toxic effect found for Veringkanal was in the algae test with an ErC50 (72 h) of 0.00226 g l(-1) SEQ. Ehrenbreitstein and Altrip samples were about factor 1,000 less toxic. In the Daphnia, Lemna, and acute fish toxicity tests, no toxicity at all was found at 2 g l(-1) SEQ. corresponding to 0.01% DMSO. Only when increasing the DMSO concentration the fish embryo test showed a 22-fold higher toxicity for Veringkanal than for Ehrenbreitstein and Altrip samples, while the toxicity difference was less evident for the Daphnia test due to the overlaying solvent toxicity above 0.05% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The higher toxicities observed with the Veringkanal sample are supported by the PAH and PCB

  2. Effect Of Environmental Load On The Toxicity Of Bottom Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šestinová Oľga

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is devoted to Ecotoxicity tests, Terrestrial Plant Test (modification of OECD 208, Phytotoxkit microbiotest on Sinapis alba and chronic tests of Earthworm (Eisenia veneta, modification of OECD Guidelines for the testing of chemicals 317, Bioaccumulation in Terrestrial Oligochaetes on polluted sediments. Earthworms can accelerate the removal of contaminants from soil. The study materials are river sediments, which were obtained from a monitoring station - the Water reservoir the Ružín No.1 particularly, the river Hornád, Hnilec and sample from sludge bed Rudňany. The samples of sediment were used to assess of the potential phytotoxic effect of heavy metals on higher plants. Total mortality was established in earthworms using chronic toxicity test after 7 and 28 exposure days. Based on the phytotoxicity testing, phytotoxic effects of the metals contaminated sediments from the sludge bed Rudňany on S. alba seeds was observed. The largest concentration differences were recorded in the sample R7 after 7 days earthworms exposure. The earthworms mortality was not influenced by sediment neither after 7 nor 28 exposure days The spectra of samples H, HO and R showed broad peak at 1 419 - 1 512 cm−1 characteristic for carbonate radical. In the spectra of the samples (R and R7 the vibration of C-H groups at 2 926 and 2 921 cm−1, respectively were also observed, demonstrating the presence of organic matter. Our research will continue with determination of metals concentration in earthworms.

  3. Geochemical control processes and potential sediment toxicity in a mine-impacted lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke, Solomon Babatunde; Svensson, Bo H; Yekta, Sepehr Shakeri; Adeleye, Michael Mayowa

    2016-03-01

    Geochemical parameters and major ion concentrations from sediments of a freshwater lake in the town of Åtvidaberg, southeastern, Sweden, were used to identify the geochemical processes that control the water chemistry. The lake sediments are anoxic, characterized by reduced sulfur and sulfidic minerals. The hypothesis tested is that in sulfidic-anaerobic contaminated sediments, the presence of redox potential changes creates a favorable condition for sulfide oxidation, resulting in the release of potentially toxic metals. The acid volatile sulfide (AVS) contents ranged from 5.5 μmol/g to 16 μmol/g of dry sediment. Comparison of total mine tailing metals (∑mine tailing metals) with simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) in sediments indicates that up to 20% of the ∑mine tailing metals are bound to the solid phase as AVS. Consequently, the AVS and SEM analysis classified all sediment samples as potentially toxic in terms of heavy metal concentrations (i.e., SEM to AVS ratio distribution > 1). Evaluation of hydrogeochemical data suggests that calcite dissolution, iron (III) oxyhydroxysulfate mineral jarosite (H-jarosite) precipitation, hematite precipitation, and siderite precipitation are the most prevailing geochemical processes that control the geochemical interactions between the water column and sediment in a mine-impacted lake. The geochemical processes were verified and quantified using a chemical equilibrium modeling program, Visual MINTEQ, Ver 3.1, beta. The identified geochemical processes create an environment in which the characteristics of sulfate-rich waters and acidic-iron produce the geochemical conditions for acid mine drainage and mobilization of toxic metals. PMID:26313659

  4. Evaluation of the toxicity of oil residues in shoreline sediments following the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The grounding of the Exxon Valdez resulted in the oiling of approximately 16% (487 miles) of shorelines in Prince William Sound (PWS) with weathered North Slope crude oil. Shortly after the spill an extensive program was initiated to evaluate the fate and effects of this oil on shorelines using the benthic amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius. Analytical characterizations for saturate (GC/FID) and aromatic (GC/MS/SIM) hydrocarbons were conducted on samples taken concurrently with toxicity test samples. During the 3 year study period, more than 1,600 sediment samples were taken from more than 60 sites in PWS and the northern Gulf of Alaska ranging from the upper intertidal to subtidal. A range of toxic responses, consistent with sediment hydrocarbon content, was observed; however, toxic residues were generally confined to the upper intertidal zone. The 2 and 3-ring aromatic hydrocarbons are implicated as responsible for the majority of the observed toxicity. Toxicity, and hydrocarbon residues, decreased substantially one year after the spill, indicating that natural processes and shoreline clean-up efforts were effective in removing toxic hydrocarbon residues

  5. What’s Causing Toxicity in Sediments? Results of Twenty Years of Toxicity Identification and Evaluations (TIEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIEs) methods have been used for twenty years to identify the causes of toxicity in sediments around the world. We summarized and categorized results of more than 80 peer-reviewed TIE studies into non-ionic organic, cationic, ammo...

  6. Effects of storage on sediment toxicity, bioaccumulation potential, and chemistry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatem, H.E.; Brandon, D.L.; Lee, C.R.; Jarvis, A.S.; Rhett, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    Current guidance on storage of sediments for bioassay/bioaccumulation tests requires that samples be held at 4 C and used within 2 weeks of collection. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of sediment storage for 40 weeks on sediment toxicity, bioaccumulation potential, and chemical analyses. Toxicity and bioaccumulation tests were conducted five times during 40 weeks of storage. Chemical analyses were performed three times during this period. The data indicate that sediments can be held for longer than 2 to 4 weeks, in many cases, without significant effect on test results. However, results of the study also show that tests performed at different times can produce different results. This study showed that a sediment that was toxic to mysids remained toxic during 16 weeks of sediment storage. Two sediments that were toxic initially continued to show significant toxicity after 8 and 16 weeks of sediment storage. One sediment, not toxic initially or at 4 weeks, changed during storage, becoming significantly toxic compared to the Atlantic Ocean (Ref) sediment. The bioaccumulation results showed that certain sediment contaminants (lead, mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, and some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs), generally do not reveal a statistical change in bioaccumulation, relative to Ref animals, during 16 weeks of sediment storage. Other PAHs, including phenanthrene, anthracene, benzo (a) anthracene, and chrysene, did change in bioaccumulation potential during storage.

  7. The sediment-contact test using the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens: Effect of fine sediments and determination of toxicity thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado-Martinez, M Carmen; Burga-Pérez, Karen F; Bebon, Rebecca; Férard, Jean-François; Vermeirssen, Etienne L M; Werner, Inge

    2016-05-01

    The toxicity test using freshwater ostracods of the species Heterocypris incongruens is a sub-chronic static test that exposes individuals to whole sediments over a period of 6 d, the endpoints being mortality and growth. We tested the hypothesis that endpoints of the sediment bioassay using Heterocypris incongruens are affected by the presence of fine sediment particles by testing control sediment supplied with the commercial test kit with increasing proportions of kaolin clay as a proxy for fines. While mortality was not affected, the results showed that increasing the presence of clay reduced ostracod growth. Based on the variability in growth, a sublethal toxicity threshold of 35% is proposed to distinguish effects due to sediment properties from those due to toxicity. The relevance of this threshold was verified using data from toxicity tests of ambient sediment samples with low levels of contamination. PMID:26943743

  8. Microtox Toxicity Assay for the Sediment Quality Assessment of Ganga River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Beg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the sediment quality assessment of Ganga River at Kanpur city where effluents from tannery industries are discharged. Sediment samples from control, upstream and downstream area were collected and analyzed for bacterial toxicity bioassay along with a reference sediment (LGC6137. The control samples collected from the point of origin of Ganga River at Deoparyag were found non toxic to the bacteria and served as negative controls for the test method. The EC50 of upstream sediment sample were >10,000 mg L-1 sediment (>1% and categorized as non toxic according to toxicity classification. The down stream sediment samples were very toxic to the bacteria and average EC50 value was 4,266 mg L-1 (0.43 % that falls in very toxic category. The downstream sediment and reference sediment were toxic but the later was 10-fold more toxic. It is indicated in our study that the Microtox SPT assay can differentiate between toxic and non-toxic samples over a wide range of toxicity. The present study demonstrated the efficiency of the Microtox SPT assay in the sediment quality assessment and confirms the existing pollution in Ganga River contributed by tannery industries.

  9. Assessment of sediment toxicity in the Lagoon of Venice (Italy) using a multi-species set of bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, Marco; Bergamin, Martina; Losso, Chiara; Delaney, Eugenia; Arizzi Novelli, Alessandra; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi

    2016-01-01

    significantly affected by high ammonia concentrations found in the elutriates extracted from some mudflat and industrial sediments. No significant temporal variation of the toxicity was observed within the experimental period. Amendments to the set of bioassays, with inclusion of chronic tests, can certainly provide more reliability and consistency to the characterization of the (possible) toxic effects. PMID:26409652

  10. USE OF POWDERED COCONUT CHARCOAL AS A TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION MANIPULATION FOR ORGANIC TOXICANTS IN MARINE SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report on a procedure using powdered coconut charcoal to sequester organic contaminants and reduce toxicity in sediments as part of a series of toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) methods. Powdered coconut charcoal (PCC) was effective in reducing the toxicity of endos...

  11. ISOLATING AND FRACTIONATING ORGANIC TOXICANTS IN SEDIMENTS: EVALUATION OF AN EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most solid-phase sediment TIE techniques for organic chemicals have been focused on solid phase sorptive techniques, such as amending contaminated sediments with the carbonaceousresin, Ambersorb coconut charcoal, or XAD resin to reduce toxicity caused by organic contaminants. Cha...

  12. ISOLATING AND EVALUATING ORGANIC TOXICANTS IN SEDIMENTS: EVALUATION OF AN EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most solid-phase sediment toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) techniques for organic chemicals have been focused on solid phase sorptive techniques, such as amending contaminated sediments with the carbonaceous resin, Ambersorb, coconut charcoal, or XAD resin to reduce t...

  13. Application of ecological risk indicators for the assessment of Greek surficial sediments contaminated by toxic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahladakis, John Ν; Vasilaki, Georgia; Smaragdaki, Eleftheria; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2016-05-01

    Τhe present research investigates the partitioning of six selected toxic metals (Ni, Cr, Pb, Zn, Cu, and As) in eight sediment samples; half of them were collected from Elefsis Gulf, and the other half were taken from Koumoundourou Lake, Athens, Greece. Each one of them was treated by applying Tessier's five-step sequential extraction procedure. Regarding gulf sediments, the results indicated that Cu exhibits a strong affinity to the organic matter with percentages ranging from 65 to 78 %. Considerable amount of Zn (32-40 %) is bound to the Fe-Mn fraction and the non-residual fraction, while Cr and Ni are bound to the organic fraction, an observation that suits all toxic metals examined. Regarding lake sediments, Pb is the predominant metal bound to Fe-Mn (48-51 %). It is also noteworthy that the percentage of Zn bound to carbonated fraction (5-15 %), indicating biological availability. In conclusion, the application of several ecological risk indicators demonstrated that Elefsis Gulf sediments correspond to a moderate pollution level, with Pb and Ni being less bioavailable than in the lake's samples, in contrast to Zn which is more bioavailable. Finally, Koumoundourou Lakes' basin is characterized of "low risk." PMID:27052348

  14. Bunker Hill Sediment Characterization Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal A. Yancey; Debby F. Bruhn

    2009-12-01

    The long history of mineral extraction in the Coeur d’Alene Basin has left a legacy of heavy metal laden mine tailings that have accumulated along the Coeur d’Alene River and its tributaries (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2001; Barton, 2002). Silver, lead and zinc were the primary metals of economic interest in the area, but the ores contained other elements that have become environmental hazards including zinc, cadmium, lead, arsenic, nickel, and copper. The metals have contaminated the water and sediments of Lake Coeur d’Alene, and continue to be transported downstream to Spokane Washington via the Spokane River. In 1983, the EPA listed the Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex on the National Priorities List. Since that time, many of the most contaminated areas have been stabilized or isolated, however metal contaminants continue to migrate through the basin. Designation as a Superfund site causes significant problems for the economically depressed communities in the area. Identification of primary sources of contamination can help set priorities for cleanup and cleanup options, which can include source removal, water treatment or no action depending on knowledge about the mobility of contaminants relative to water flow. The mobility of contaminant mobility under natural or engineered conditions depends on multiple factors including the physical and chemical state (or speciation) of metals and the range of processes, some of which can be seasonal, that cause mobilization of metals. As a result, it is particularly important to understand metal speciation (National Research Council, 2005) and the link between speciation and the rates of metal migration and the impact of natural or engineered variations in flow, biological activity or water chemistry.

  15. The effect of manipulations of freshwater sediments on responses of benthic invertebrates in whole-sediment toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, K.E.; Kirby, R.S.; Reynoldson, T.B. [National Water Research Inst., Burlington, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of the Environment

    1995-08-01

    Manipulations of freshwater sediment were performed to remove indigenous organisms prior to conducting toxicity tests with three species of benthic invertebrates. The effects of these treatments on end points in bioassays were compared within and between two sediments, i.e., a ``clean`` sediment and a ``contaminated`` sediment. In addition, the effects of manipulations on the physicochemical structure of the two sediments and the presence of metals, PAHs, and PCBs in the contaminated sediment were examined. The amphipod Hyalella azteca was most sensitive to the manipulations and had low survival in sediment that was sterilized. Growth (milligrams dry weight per individual) was affected by the presence of contaminants. Survival of Chironomus riparius was not affected by any manipulation but was reduced by contaminants as well as indigenous organisms. Growth of C. riparius was higher in autoclaved sediment but lower in sediment containing endemic tubificid worms. Production of young by Tubifex tubifex increased in sediment that was irradiated, possibly due to increased detrital material. Particle size distribution, metals, nutrients, and PAHs varied little as a function of manipulation; however, sieving of sediment through 250-{micro}m mesh did reduce percent total organic carbon (TOC), percent loss on ignition (LOI), and concentrations of some PCBs in either clean or contaminated sediment. Manipulation of sediments to remove endemic species should be determined on a case-by-case basis and is specific to the organisms used in toxicity tests.

  16. Development and application of freshwater sediment-toxicity benchmarks for currently used pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Norman, Julia E.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Moran, Patrick W.

    2016-01-01

    Sediment-toxicity benchmarks are needed to interpret the biological significance of currently used pesticides detected in whole sediments. Two types of freshwater sediment benchmarks for pesticides were developed using spiked-sediment bioassay (SSB) data from the literature. These benchmarks can be used to interpret sediment-toxicity data or to assess the potential toxicity of pesticides in whole sediment. The Likely Effect Benchmark (LEB) defines a pesticide concentration in whole sediment above which there is a high probability of adverse effects on benthic invertebrates, and the Threshold Effect Benchmark (TEB) defines a concentration below which adverse effects are unlikely. For compounds without available SSBs, benchmarks were estimated using equilibrium partitioning (EqP). When a sediment sample contains a pesticide mixture, benchmark quotients can be summed for all detected pesticides to produce an indicator of potential toxicity for that mixture. Benchmarks were developed for 48 pesticide compounds using SSB data and 81 compounds using the EqP approach. In an example application, data for pesticides measured in sediment from 197 streams across the United States were evaluated using these benchmarks, and compared to measured toxicity from whole-sediment toxicity tests conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28-d exposures) and the midge Chironomus dilutus (10-d exposures). Amphipod survival, weight, and biomass were significantly and inversely related to summed benchmark quotients, whereas midge survival, weight, and biomass showed no relationship to benchmarks. Samples with LEB exceedances were rare (n = 3), but all were toxic to amphipods (i.e., significantly different from control). Significant toxicity to amphipods was observed for 72% of samples exceeding one or more TEBs, compared to 18% of samples below all TEBs. Factors affecting toxicity below TEBs may include the presence of contaminants other than pesticides, physical

  17. Characterization of Dredged Sediments from Santander Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is the physico- chemical characterisation of Santander Bay (North Spain) inter-tidal sediments, with the determination of levels of selected organic compounds pollution. A sampling strategy has been developed based on characteristic parameters of the study. The physico-chemical seasonal characterisation of sediments has been performed by determination of waster content, Ph, density, humidity, lost on ignition (LOI), particle size distribution, and chemical analysis of three categories of organic compounds (VOCs,EOX and PAHs) selected for its ubiquity, persistence and high potential of environmental hazard. The EOX analysis give a picture of the total load of organo halogen compounds in the estuarine area and the VOC and ph values obtained, allow the characterization of sediments in two areas in function of the closeness to the urban and industrial activities

  18. UTMTOX, Toxic Chemical Transport in Atmosphere, Ground Water, Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A - Description of program or function: UTMTOX is a unified transport model for toxic materials. It combines hydrologic, atmospheric, and sediment transport in one computer code and extends the scope to predict the transport of not only trace metals but also many chemical compounds, including organics. UTMTOX is capable of calculating 1) the atmospheric dispersion of up to 20 chemicals from a maximum of 10 point, 10 line, and 10 area sources; 2) deposition of one chemical at a time in both wet and dry form on foliage or the surface of the earth; 3) surface flow and erosion; 4) percolation through the soil to a stream channel; and 5) flow in the stream channel to the outfall of a watershed. B - Method of solution: UTMTOX calculates rates of flux of chemicals from release to the atmosphere, through deposition on a watershed, infiltration, and runoff from the soil to flow in the stream channel and the associated sediment transport. From these values, mass balances can be established, budgets for the chemical can be made, and concentrations in many environmental compartments can be estimated. Since the coupling is established among three major submodels, they can share data

  19. Weathering and toxicity of marine sediments contaminated with oils and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, M.T.O.; Sinke, A.; Brils, J.M.; Murk, A.J.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Many sediments are contaminated with mixtures of oil residues and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), but little is known about the toxicity of such mixtures to sediment-dwelling organisms and the change in toxicity on weathering. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a seminatur

  20. Lac Dufault sediment core trace metal distribution, bioavailability and toxicity to Hyalella azteca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine changes in metal distribution, bioavailability and toxicity with sediment depth, two 20-cm-long replicate cores were collected from a lake historically subjected to the influence of metal mining and smelting activity. The vertical distribution of Pb, Cd and Cu in sediment was similar for all three metals, with the surface layers showing enrichment and the deeper (pre-industrial) layers showing lower concentrations. Toxicity of each sediment core section was determined in laboratory tests with the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. Bioavailable metal in each sediment slice was estimated from metal concentrations in overlying water in these toxicity tests and, for Cd, also from metal bioaccumulation. The profile for Cd in tissue was comparable to Cd in sediment and overlying water, but relative Cd bioavailability from sediment increased with sediment depth. Survival increased with increasing sediment depth, suggesting that surface sediments were probably less or non-toxic before industrialization. - Toxicity and bioaccumulation tests with sediment cores provide more information on biological effects of metals than surface sediment tests

  1. Lac Dufault sediment core trace metal distribution, bioavailability and toxicity to Hyalella azteca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowierski, Monica [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Dixon, D. George [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Borgmann, Uwe [National Water Research Institute, Canada Centre for Inland Waters, 867 Lakeshore Road, PO Box 5050, Burlington, Ontario L7R 4A6 (Canada)]. E-mail: uwe.borgmann@ec.gc.ca

    2006-02-15

    To determine changes in metal distribution, bioavailability and toxicity with sediment depth, two 20-cm-long replicate cores were collected from a lake historically subjected to the influence of metal mining and smelting activity. The vertical distribution of Pb, Cd and Cu in sediment was similar for all three metals, with the surface layers showing enrichment and the deeper (pre-industrial) layers showing lower concentrations. Toxicity of each sediment core section was determined in laboratory tests with the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. Bioavailable metal in each sediment slice was estimated from metal concentrations in overlying water in these toxicity tests and, for Cd, also from metal bioaccumulation. The profile for Cd in tissue was comparable to Cd in sediment and overlying water, but relative Cd bioavailability from sediment increased with sediment depth. Survival increased with increasing sediment depth, suggesting that surface sediments were probably less or non-toxic before industrialization. - Toxicity and bioaccumulation tests with sediment cores provide more information on biological effects of metals than surface sediment tests.

  2. Addition of contaminant bioavailability and species susceptibility to a sediment toxicity assessment: Application in an urban stream in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediments collected from an urban creek in China exhibited high acute toxicity to Hyalella azteca with 81.3% of sediments being toxic. A toxic unit (TU) estimation demonstrated that the pyrethroid, cypermethrin, was the major contributor to toxicity. The traditional TU approach, however, overestimated the toxicity. Reduced bioavailability of sediment-associated cypermethrin due to sequestration explained the overestimation. Additionally, antagonism among multiple contaminants and species susceptibility to various contaminants also contributed to the unexpectedly low toxicity to H. azteca. Bioavailable TUs derived from the bioavailability-based approaches, Tenax extraction and matrix-solid phase microextraction (matrix-SPME), showed better correlations with the noted toxicity compared to traditional TUs. As the first successful attempt to use matrix-SPME for estimating toxicity caused by emerging insecticides in field sediment, the present study found freely dissolved cypermethrin concentrations significantly improved the prediction of sediment toxicity to H. azteca compared to organic carbon normalized and Tenax extractable concentrations. Highlights: •Over 80% sediments from an urban stream in China were acutely toxic to H. azteca. •Toxic unit analysis showed cypermethrin was the major contributor to toxicity. •The traditional toxic unit approach overestimated sediment toxicity. •Reduced bioavailability was the reason for overestimating sediment toxicity. Freely dissolved cypermethrin concentrations greatly improved toxicity prediction. -- Field sediment toxicity caused by current-use pesticides could be more accurately evaluated by incorporating bioavailability measurements into the toxic unit analysis

  3. SEDIMENT TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION (TIE)PHASE I,II,III GUIDANCE DOCUMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment contamination in the United States has been amply documented and, in order to comply with the 1972 Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency must address the issue of toxic sediments. Contaminated sediments from a number of freshwater and marine sites hav...

  4. Tolerance of freshwater test organisms to formulated sediments for use as control materials in whole-sediment toxicity tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemble, N.E.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Dawson, T.D.; Norberg-King, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    A method is described for preparing formulated sediments for use in toxicity testing. Ingredients used to prepare formulated sediments included commercially available silt, clay, sand, humic acid, dolomite, and ??- cellulose (as a source of organic carbon). ??-Cellulose was selected as the source of organic carbon because it is commercially available, consistent from batch to batch, and low in contaminant concentrations. The tolerance of freshwater test organisms to formulated sediments for use as control materials in whole-sediment toxicity testing was evaluated. Sediment exposures were conducted for 10 d with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midges Chironomus riparius and C. tentans, and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and for 28 d with H. azteca. Responses of organisms in formulated sediments was compared with a field-collected control sediment that has routinely been used to determine test acceptability. Tolerance of organisms to formulated sediments was evaluated by determining responses to varying levels of ??-cellulose, to varying levels of grain size, to evaluation of different food types, or to evaluation of different sources of overlying water. In the 10-d exposures, survival of organisms exposed to the formulated sediments routinely met or exceeded the responses of test organisms exposed to the control sediment and routinely met test acceptability criteria required in standard methods. Growth of amphipods and oligochaetes in 10-d exposures with formulated sediment was often less than growth of organisms in the field-collected control sediment. Additional research is needed, using the method employed to prepare formulated sediment, to determine if conditioning formulated sediments before starting 10-d tests would improve the growth of amphipods. In the 28-d exposures, survival of H. azteca was low when reconstituted water was used as the source of overlying water. However, when well water was used as the source of overlying water in 28-d exposures

  5. Tolerance of freshwater test organisms to formulated sediments for use as control materials in whole-sediment toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemble, N.E.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G. [Geological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States). Environmental and Contaminants Research Center; Dawson, T.D. [Integrated Laboratory Systems, Duluth, MN (United States); Norberg-King, T.J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Mid-Continent Ecological Div.

    1999-02-01

    A method is described for preparing formulated sediments for use in toxicity testing. Ingredients used to prepare formulated sediments included commercially available silt, clay, sand, humic acid, dolomite, and {alpha}-cellulose (as a source of organic carbon). {alpha}-Cellulose was selected as the source of organic carbon because it is commercially available, consistent from batch to batch, and low in contaminant concentrations. The tolerance of freshwater test organisms to formulated sediments for use as control materials in whole-sediment toxicity testing was evaluated. Sediment exposures were conducted for 10 d with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midges Chironomus riparius and C. tentans, and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and for 28 d with H. azteca. Responses of organisms in formulated sediments was compared with a field-collected control sediment that has routinely been used to determine test acceptability. Tolerance of organisms to formulated sediments was evaluated by determining responses to varying levels of {alpha}-cellulose, to varying levels of grain size, to evaluation of different food types, or to evaluation of different sources of overlying water. In the 10-d exposures, survival of organisms exposed to the formulated sediments routinely met or exceeded the responses of test organisms exposed to the control sediment and routinely met test acceptability criteria required in standard methods. Growth of amphipods and oligochaetes in 10-d exposures with formulated sediment was often less than growth of organisms in the field-collected control sediment. Additional research is needed, using the method employed to prepare formulated sediment, to determine if conditioning formulated sediments before starting 10-d tests would improve the growth of amphipods. In the 28-d exposures, survival of H. azteca was low when reconstituted water was used as the source of overlying water. However, when well water was used as the source of overlying water in

  6. Evaluation of the Polyethylene Reverse Sampler as a Dosing System in Marine Phase II Whole Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contaminated marine sediments can cause acute and chronic impairments to benthic organisms. Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are often a primary cause of impairment. Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIEs) are used to identify chemicals causing toxicity in sediments. Ph...

  7. Ecotoxicity of sediments in rivers: Invertebrate community, toxicity bioassays and the toxic unit approach as complementary assessment tools

    OpenAIRE

    Castro-Català, Núria de; Kuzmanović, Maja; Roig, Neus; Sierra, Jordi; Ginebreda, Antoni; Barceló i Cullerés, Damià; Pérez, Sandra; Petrović, Mira; Picó, Yolanda; Schuhmacher, Marta; Muñoz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the real toxicity of sediments in aquatic ecosystems is challenging and necessary for an appropriate risk assessment. Different approaches have been developed and applied over the last several decades. Currently, the joint implementation of chemical, ecological and toxicological tools is recommended for an appropriate and successful toxicity risk assessment. We chose the combination of the toxic unit approach with acute pore water tests (Vibrio fischeri, Pseudokirchneriel...

  8. Ecotoxicity of sediments in rivers: Invertebrate community, toxicity bioassays and the toxic unit approach as complementary assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro-Català, Núria; Kuzmanovic, Maja; Roig, Neus; Sierra, Jordi; Ginebreda, Antoni; Barceló, Damià; Pérez, Sandra; Petrovic, Mira; Picó, Yolanda; Schuhmacher, Marta; Muñoz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the real toxicity of sediments in aquatic ecosystems is challenging and necessary for an appropriate risk assessment. Different approaches have been developed and applied over the last several decades. Currently, the joint implementation of chemical, ecological and toxicological tools is recommended for an appropriate and successful toxicity risk assessment. We chose the combination of the toxic unit approach with acute pore water tests (Vibrio fischeri, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Daphnia magna) and whole-sediment exposure tests (V. fischeri, Chironomus riparius), together with invertebrate community composition (multivariate analyses) to detect short and long-term responses of the organisms in four rivers of the Iberian Peninsula. High toxicity was detected in three sites (the downstream sites of the Llobregat and the Júcar, and the most upstream site of the Ebro). We identified organophosphate insecticides and metals as the main variables responsible for this toxicity, particularly in the whole-sediment tests. In particular, chlorpyrifos was mostly responsible for the toxicity (TUs) of D. magna, coinciding with the C. riparius mortality (long-term toxicity) in the mentioned sites, and copper was the main pollutant responsible for the short-term toxicity of P. subcapitata. The combination of the different approaches allowed us to detect ecotoxicological effects in organisms and identify the main contributors to the toxicity in these multi-stressed rivers. PMID:26118861

  9. Integrated approach to the toxicity evaluation of Irish marine sediments: exotoxicological assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Macken, Ailbhe

    2007-01-01

    The quality of sediment in any aquatic ecosystem is vital to the health of that system. Sediments have been recognised as a major repository for persistent toxic substances. If sediments become sufficiently polluted they can lead to the disruption of surrounding natural biological communities. Therefore the monitoring of sediment quality is essential for successful ecosystem functioning in the marine environment. The aim of the present study was to employ an integrated approach of the toxicit...

  10. Copper Sediment Toxicity and Partitioning during Oxidation in a Flow-Through Flume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, David M; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Burton, G Allen

    2015-06-01

    The bioavailability of transition metals in sediments often depends on redox conditions in the sediment. We explored how the physicochemistry and toxicity of anoxic Cu-amended sediments changed as they aged (i.e., naturally oxidized) in a flow-through flume. We amended two sediments (Dow and Ocoee) with Cu, incubated the sediments in a flow-through flume, and measured sediment physicochemistry and toxicity over 213 days. As sediments aged, oxygen penetrated sediment to a greater depth, the relative abundance of Fe oxides increased in surface and deep sediments, and the concentration of acid volatile sulfide declined in Ocoee surface sediments. The total pool of Cu in sediments did not change during aging, but porewater Cu, and Cu bound to amorphous Fe oxides decreased while Cu associated with crystalline Fe oxides increased. The dose-response of the epibenthic amphipod Hyalella azteca to sediment total Cu changed over time, with older sediments being less toxic than freshly spiked sediments. We observed a strong dose-response relationship between porewater Cu and H. azteca growth across all sampling periods, and measurable declines in relative growth rates were observed at concentrations below interstitial water criteria established by the U.S. EPA. Further, solid-phase bioavailability models based on AVS and organic carbon were overprotective and poorly predicted toxicity in aged sediments. We suggest that sediment quality criteria for Cu is best established from measurement of Cu in pore water rather than estimating bioavailable Cu from the various solid-phase ligands, which vary temporally and spatially. PMID:25966043

  11. Development and application of a marine sediment porewater toxicity test using algal spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooten, R. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States); Carr, R.S. [National Biological Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    An acute pore water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of marine macroalgae as endpoints was developed to indicate the presence of toxic compounds in marine/estuarine and sediment porewater samples. Zoospores collected from Ulva fasciata and U. lactuca were used as test organisms. Preliminary results with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, a reference toxicant) indicate that zoospores germination and growth of embryonic gametophytes are as sensitive as the sea urchin fertilization and embryological development toxicity tests. Algal germination and growth data for copper, mercury and other metals will be presented. The results of tests utilizing this algal assay with sediment pore water from contaminated sediments will be compared with more traditional sediment toxicity test methods.

  12. Toxicity assessment by microtox {sup registered} in sediments, pore waters and sediment saline elutriates in the Gulf of Gdansk (Baltic sea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukawska-Matuszewska, Katarzyna; Burska, Dorota; Niemirycz, Elzbieta [Institute of Oceanography, University of Gdansk (Poland)

    2009-07-15

    The toxicity of sediments in the Gulf of Gdansk is analyzed in relation to the chemical composition of interstitial and near-bottom waters, and sediment properties. The toxicity of sediments, pore waters and saline elutriates is determined by using the Microtox {sup registered} test based on changes in light production of the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The results indicate considerable toxicity in the majority of examined sediments. Since the sediment elutriates and pore waters are toxic in some cases, the total toxicity of the sediments is likely to be due to both sediment-bound and water soluble substances. The sediment toxicity is related to the percentage contribution of the fine fraction of sediments. A significant correlation between the toxicity of the sediments and the black carbon content implies anthropogenic contamination. The toxicity of the sediments is seen to increase with the increase of hydrogen sulfide concentration in pore waters. The ammonia in pore waters was found not to be responsible for the toxicity of the sediments. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Evaluating the Type II error rate in a sediment toxicity classification using the Reference Condition Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Pilar; Maestre, Zuriñe; Martinez-Madrid, Maite; Reynoldson, Trefor B

    2011-01-17

    Sediments from 71 river sites in Northern Spain were tested using the oligochaete Tubifex tubifex (Annelida, Clitellata) chronic bioassay. 47 sediments were identified as reference primarily from macroinvertebrate community characteristics. The data for the toxicological endpoints were examined using non-metric MDS. Probability ellipses were constructed around the reference sites in multidimensional space to establish a classification for assessing test-sediments into one of three categories (Non Toxic, Potentially Toxic, and Toxic). The construction of such probability ellipses sets the Type I error rate. However, we also wished to include in the decision process for identifying pass-fail boundaries the degree of disturbance required to be detected, and the likelihood of being wrong in detecting that disturbance (i.e. the Type II error). Setting the ellipse size to use based on Type I error does not include any consideration of the probability of Type II error. To do this, the toxicological response observed in the reference sediments was manipulated by simulating different degrees of disturbance (simpacted sediments), and measuring the Type II error rate for each set of the simpacted sediments. From this procedure, the frequency at each probability ellipse of identifying impairment using sediments with known level of disturbance is quantified. Thirteen levels of disturbance and seven probability ellipses were tested. Based on the results the decision boundary for Non Toxic and Potentially Toxic was set at the 80% probability ellipse, and the boundary for Potentially Toxic and Toxic at the 95% probability ellipse. Using this approach, 9 test sediments were classified as Toxic, 2 as Potentially Toxic, and 13 as Non Toxic. PMID:20980065

  14. Removal of organic contaminant toxicity from sediments - Early work toward development of a toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, J.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.; Ho, K.T.

    1999-01-01

    Work was performed to determine the feasibility of selectively detoxifying organic contaminants in sediments. The results of this research will be used to aid in the development of a scheme for whole-sediment toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs). The context in which the method will be used inherently restricts the treatments to which the sediments can be subjected: Sediments cannot be significantly altered physically or chemically and the presence and bioavailabilities of other toxicants must not be changed. The methodological problem is daunting because of the requirement that the detoxification method be relatively fast and convenient together with the stipulation that only innocuous and minimally invasive treatments be used. Some of the experiments described here dealt with degrees of decontamination (i.e., detoxification as predicted from instrumental measurements) of spiked sediments rather than with degrees of detoxification as gauged by toxicity tests (e.g., 48-h toxicity tests with amphipods). Although the larger TIE scheme itself is mostly outside the scope of this paper, theoretical aspects of bioavailability and of the desorption of organic contaminants from sediments are discussed.

  15. Variability of sediment-contact tests in freshwater sediments with low-level anthropogenic contamination - Determination of toxicity thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoess, S., E-mail: hoess@ecossa.d [Ecossa, Giselastr. 6, 82319 Starnberg (Germany); Institute of Biodiversity - Network (IBN), Dreikronengasse 2, 93047 Regensburg (Germany); Ahlf, W., E-mail: ahlf@tu-harburg.d [Institute of Environmental Technology and Energy Economics, Technical University Hamburg-Harburg, Eissendorfer Str. 40, 21071 Hamburg (Germany); Fahnenstich, C. [Institute of Environmental Technology and Energy Economics, Technical University Hamburg-Harburg, Eissendorfer Str. 40, 21071 Hamburg (Germany); Gilberg, D., E-mail: d-gilberg@ect.d [ECT Oekotoxikologie, Boettgerstr. 2-14, 65439 Floersheim (Germany); Hollert, H., E-mail: henner.hollert@bio5.rwth-aachen.d [Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research (Biology 5), RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Melbye, K. [Dr. Fintelmann and Dr. Meyer, Mendelssohnstr. 15D, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Meller, M., E-mail: m-meller@ecotox-consult.d [ECT Oekotoxikologie, Boettgerstr. 2-14, 65439 Floersheim (Germany); Hammers-Wirtz, M., E-mail: hammers-wirtz@gaiac.rwth-aachen.d [Research Institute for Ecosystem Analysis and Assessment (gaiac), RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Heininger, P., E-mail: heininger@bafg.d [Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG), Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56070 Koblenz (Germany); Neumann-Hensel, H., E-mail: hensel@fintelmann-meyer.d [Dr. Fintelmann and Dr. Meyer, Mendelssohnstr. 15D, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ottermanns, R., E-mail: ottermanns@bio5.rwth-aachen.d [Chair for Environmental Biology and Chemodynamics, Institute for Environmental Research (Biology 5), RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Ratte, H.-T., E-mail: toni.ratte@bio5.rwth-aachen.d [Chair for Environmental Biology and Chemodynamics, Institute for Environmental Research (Biology 5), RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Freshwater sediments with low levels of anthropogenic contamination and a broad range of geochemical properties were investigated using various sediment-contact tests in order to study the natural variability and to define toxicity thresholds for the various toxicity endpoints. Tests were performed with bacteria (Arthrobacter globiformis), yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans), oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus), higher plants (Myriophyllum aquaticum), and the eggs of zebrafish (Danio rerio). The variability in the response of some of the contact tests could be explained by particle size distribution and organic content. Only for two native sediments could a pollution effect not be excluded. Based on the minimal detectable difference (MDD) and the maximal tolerable inhibition (MTI), toxicity thresholds (% inhibition compared to the control) were derived for each toxicity parameter: >20% for plant growth and fish-egg survival, >25% for nematode growth and oligochaete reproduction, >50% for nematode reproduction and >60% for bacterial enzyme activity. - Sediment-contact tests require toxicity thresholds based on their variability in native sediments with low-level contamination.

  16. Variability of sediment-contact tests in freshwater sediments with low-level anthropogenic contamination - Determination of toxicity thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freshwater sediments with low levels of anthropogenic contamination and a broad range of geochemical properties were investigated using various sediment-contact tests in order to study the natural variability and to define toxicity thresholds for the various toxicity endpoints. Tests were performed with bacteria (Arthrobacter globiformis), yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans), oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus), higher plants (Myriophyllum aquaticum), and the eggs of zebrafish (Danio rerio). The variability in the response of some of the contact tests could be explained by particle size distribution and organic content. Only for two native sediments could a pollution effect not be excluded. Based on the minimal detectable difference (MDD) and the maximal tolerable inhibition (MTI), toxicity thresholds (% inhibition compared to the control) were derived for each toxicity parameter: >20% for plant growth and fish-egg survival, >25% for nematode growth and oligochaete reproduction, >50% for nematode reproduction and >60% for bacterial enzyme activity. - Sediment-contact tests require toxicity thresholds based on their variability in native sediments with low-level contamination.

  17. Characterization of marine sediments using analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with the characterization of a marine sediments profile from the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico. Ten sediment samples obtained from a core of 18.3 m of length were analysed. Although there have been numerous marine sediments studies carried out in Mexico, more are needed to better understand the sea floor formation. Crystallographic, morphologic, physical, chemical and gamma ray activity analysis were carried out on the samples. The analysis results showed a decrease in organic matter content as a function of sea depth; this value is related to the specific surface area. Some hazardous materials as Cr, Mn, Ni, Sr and Hg were also identified by PIXE in some samples, probably due to anthropogenic activity. The presence of uranium a naturally occurring element was found in all the samples, suggesting a migration through all materials of strata, radioactive elements such as 226Ra, 235U, 212Pb, 214Pb, 228Ac, 208Ti, 214Bi, 228Ac and 40K were detected. (author)

  18. Evaluation of toxicity of sediment samples collected from the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of sediments collected from the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Hidalgo Co in southern Texas, USA. A...

  19. STUDIES ON BIOREMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: BIOAVAILABILITY, BIODEGRADABILITY, AND TOXICITY ISSUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread contamination of aquatic sediments by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has created a need for cost-effective bioremediation processes, on which the bioavailability and the toxicity of PAHs often have a significant impact. This research investigated the biode...

  20. An investigation of sediment toxicity in the Horse Lick Creek system (Upper Cumberland River drainage)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Microtox tests were used to assess the toxicity of water and sediment pore water samples collected from the Horse Lick Creek system in southeastern Kentucky. A...

  1. Toxicity of Athabasca River and oil sands sediments to larval fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation reported on a study that evaluated oil sands tailings pond sediments and sediments from the Athabasca River for embryo-larval toxicity in fathead minnows and walleye. Following 20 days of exposure to 5 sediments from the Athabasca River at concentrations up to 25 g/L, there were no observed effects in fathead minnow eggs and larvae. However, at concentrations as low as 0.2 to 1 g wet wt/L, two of three tailings pond sediments were toxic to fathead minnows. Larvae growth was reduced in all three tailings pond sediments. Nine of 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) measured in tailing pond sediments were found to be above the Freshwater Sediment Quality Guidelines set by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), with phenanthrene being the highest. The values for total dry weight PAHs and total naphthenic acids in tailings pond sediment and river sediment were discussed. The cause for the observed toxicity in fathead minnow larvae could not be determined based on the preliminary study results. As part of the ongoing study, walleye eggs and larvae are being exposed to the sediments to compare their relative sensitivity and to determine possible causative compounds.

  2. Toxicity of Athabasca River and oil sands sediments to larval fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrott, J.; Turcotte, D.; Headley, J.; Hewitt, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation reported on a study that evaluated oil sands tailings pond sediments and sediments from the Athabasca River for embryo-larval toxicity in fathead minnows and walleye. Following 20 days of exposure to 5 sediments from the Athabasca River at concentrations up to 25 g/L, there were no observed effects in fathead minnow eggs and larvae. However, at concentrations as low as 0.2 to 1 g wet wt/L, two of three tailings pond sediments were toxic to fathead minnows. Larvae growth was reduced in all three tailings pond sediments. Nine of 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) measured in tailing pond sediments were found to be above the Freshwater Sediment Quality Guidelines set by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), with phenanthrene being the highest. The values for total dry weight PAHs and total naphthenic acids in tailings pond sediment and river sediment were discussed. The cause for the observed toxicity in fathead minnow larvae could not be determined based on the preliminary study results. As part of the ongoing study, walleye eggs and larvae are being exposed to the sediments to compare their relative sensitivity and to determine possible causative compounds.

  3. Sediment quality in the Douro river estuary based on trace metal contents, macrobenthic community and elutriate sediment toxicity test (ESTT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucha, Ana P; Bordalo, Adriano A; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sediment quality in the mesotidal Douro River estuarine environment, in order to identify areas where sediment contamination could cause ecosystem degradation. Samples were obtained in five locations and sediment characterised for grain size, total organic matter, total-recoverable metals (Al, Fe, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cd, Zn and Mn), as well as acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM). In situ effects were evaluated by examining the macrobenthic community structure. An elutriate sediment toxicity test (ESTT) was used to estimate the amount of metals and nutrients that could be exchanged with the water column through resuspension, and its positive or negative effects on the growth of the micro-alga Emiliania huxleyi in a 10 day test. Anthropogenic metal contamination was identified at the north bank of the Douro estuary, with deleterious effects on the macrobenthic community, namely decrease in number of species and diversity. This contamination could possibly also be toxic for water column organisms, in case of resuspension, as shown by the ESTT. Sediments from the salt marsh at the south bank showed an impoverished macrobenthic community and elutriate toxicity, which appeared to be due to anaerobic conditions. This study clearly shows the usefulness of the ESST approach to assess the biological effect of resuspension of estuarine sediments. PMID:15237288

  4. Chronic toxicity of tire and road wear particles to water- and sediment-dwelling organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panko, Julie M; Kreider, Marisa L; McAtee, Britt L; Marwood, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Tire and road wear particles (TRWP) consist of a complex mixture of rubber, and pavement released from tires during use on road surfaces. Subsequent transport of the TRWP into freshwater sediments has raised some concern about the potential adverse effects on aquatic organisms. Previous studies have shown some potential for toxicity for tread particles, however, toxicity studies of TRWP collected from a road simulator system revealed no acute toxicity to green algae, daphnids, or fathead minnows at concentrations up to 10,000 mg/kg under conditions representative of receiving water bodies. In this study, the chronic toxicity of TRWP was evaluated in four aquatic species. Test animals were exposed to whole sediment spiked with TRWP at concentrations up to 10,000 mg/kg sediment or elutriates from spiked sediment. Exposure to TRWP spiked sediment caused mild growth inhibition in Chironomus dilutus but had no adverse effect on growth or reproduction in Hyalella azteca. Exposure to TRWP elutriates resulted in slightly diminished survival in larval Pimephales promelas but had no adverse effect on growth or reproduction in Ceriodaphnia dubia. No other endpoints in these species were affected. These results, together with previous studies demonstrating no acute toxicity of TRWP, indicate that under typical exposure conditions TRWP in sediments pose a low risk of toxicity to aquatic organisms. PMID:23001428

  5. Toxicity of metal-contaminated sediments from Keswick Reservoir, California, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finlayson, B.; Fujimura, R.; Huang, Z.Z.

    2000-02-01

    Keswick Reservoir, California, USA, receives metal-laden acid-mine drainage (AMD) from the abandoned Iron Mountain Mine. Mixing of the AMD with reservoir water causes precipitation and deposition of metal-rich sludge in the reservoir. Hydroelectric generation activities can scour the sediments and mobilize trace metals cadmium, copper, and zinc into the water column, thus creating potentially toxic conditions to fish and aquatic invertebrates. Sediment samples collected from Keswick Reservoir in 1993 and 1994 were analyzed for acid-volatile sulfides and for simultaneously extractable metals (SEM), and whole sediments and sediment elutriates were tested for toxicity to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), amphipods (Hyalella azteca), and cladocerans (Ceriodaphnia dubia). Acid-volatile sulfide concentrations in the sediments were low (<10 {micro}mol/g H{sub 2}S), indicating that dissolved metals in the sediment pore water were not limited by sulfide. The SEM concentrations were generally high (up to 11 {micro}g/g Cd, 4,800 {micro}g/g Cu, and 1,600 {micro}g/g Zn, dry weight) in the sediments. Whole sediments and 20% w/w sediment elutriates from 16 sites were tested for toxicity. Low survival (as low as 0{degree}) in whole sediments was generally associated with copper and zinc, and to a lesser extent cadmium, concentrations that exceeded probable effect level values for freshwater sediments; survival also may have been influenced by low pH and alkalinity conditions. Low survival (as low as 0%) in sediment elutriates was also generally associated with higher concentrations of dissolved zinc. Further study is required to formulate sediment cleanup levels that are protective of fish and wildlife. Source control in the Iron Mountain Mine drainage will eventually significantly lessen the production of sediments.

  6. Seasonal variation of sediment toxicity in the Rivers Dommel and Elbe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contaminated sediment in the river basin has become a source of pollution with increasing importance to the aquatic ecosystem downstream. To monitor the temporal changes of the sediment bound contaminants in the River Elbe and the River Dommel monthly toxicity tests were applied to layered sediment and river water samples over the course of 10 months. There is an indication that contaminated sediments upstream adversely affected sediments downstream, but this process did not cause a continuous increase of sediment toxicity. A clear decrease of toxic effects in water and upper layer sediment was observed at the River Elbe station in spring related to high water discharge and algal blooms. The less obvious variation of sediment toxicity in the River Dommel could be explained by stable hydrological conditions. Future monitoring programmes should promote a more frequent and intensive sampling regime during these particular events for ecotoxicological evaluation. - Significant impacts of hydrological and biological factors on the ecotoxicological quality in two European rivers (Elbe and Dommel)

  7. USE OF THE AMPHIPOD CRUSTACEAN HYALELLA AZTECA IN FRESHWATER AND ESTUARINE SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyalella azteca (Saussure), which are currently used in toxicity tests with freshwater sediments, were tested to determine their suitability for tests with estuarine sediments. eproduction was good after 24 d at and below 12.5 g/L (ppt) salinity in water only. C50 values (50% red...

  8. Bioaccumulation, sublethal toxicity, and biotransformation of sediment-associated pentachlorophenol in Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäenpää, K; Sorsa, K; Lyytikäinen, M; Leppänen, M T; Kukkonen, J V K

    2008-01-01

    The xenobiotics accumulated in sediments represent a hazard to organisms. In order to study the toxic effects of xenobiotics in organisms, body residue has been proposed as a more relevant dose-metric than the environmental concentration of the chemical. In this study, the benthic oligochaetes Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed to sediment-spiked pentachlorophenol (PCP) in a chronic study at different exposure concentrations. The aim was to examine sublethal toxic effects in sediment-dwelling and sediment-ingesting organisms, and to link the effects with chemical body residues. Growth, reproduction, and egestion rate were used as sublethal endpoints. Bioaccumulation, sublethal toxic effects, and biotransformation of PCP were investigated by exposing organisms to both artificial and natural sediments with similar organic carbon content. Sediment characteristics were assumed to have an effect on toxicity since PCP retarded both growth and reproduction in L. variegatus in the artificial sediment. In natural sediment, growth, and reproduction was also reduced in control treatments, probably indicating poor nutritional quality. Most of the extracted chemicals in L. variegatus tissues were water-soluble metabolites, indicating that L. variegatus was capable of biotransforming PCP. The extractable parent PCP body residues (CBR(50)) for L. variegatus growth and reproduction were in agreement with the values estimated for respiratory uncouplers in the literature. PMID:17292960

  9. Identifying the cause of sediment toxicity in agricultural sediments: the role of pyrethroids and nine seldom-measured hydrophobic pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Donald P; Ding, Yuping; Zhang, Minghua; Lydy, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Few currently used agricultural pesticides are routinely monitored for in the environment. Even if concentrations are known, sediment LC(50) values are often lacking for common sediment toxicity testing species. To help fill this data gap, sediments in California's Central Valley were tested for nine hydrophobic pesticides seldom analyzed: abamectin, diazinon, dicofol, fenpropathrin, indoxacarb, methyl parathion, oxyfluorfen, propargite, and pyraclostrobin. Most were detected, but rarely at concentrations acutely toxic to Hyalella azteca or Chironomus dilutus. Only abamectin, fenpropathrin, and methyl parathion were found at concentrations of potential concern, and only in one or two samples. One-quarter of over 100 samples from agriculture-affected waterways exhibited toxicity, and in three-fourths of the toxic samples, pyrethroids exceeded concentrations expected to cause toxicity. The pyrethroid Bi-fen-thrin in particular, as well as lambda-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, esfenvalerate, permethrin, and the organophosphate chlorpyrifos, were primarily responsible for the observed toxicity, rather than the more novel analytes, despite the fact that much of the sampling targeted areas of greatest use of the novel pesticides. PMID:22832339

  10. Toxicity Testing of Silver Nanoparticles in Artificial and Natural Sediments Using the Benthic Organism Lumbriculus variegatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajala, Juho Elias; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Vehniäinen, Eeva-Riikka;

    2016-01-01

    The increased use of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in industrial and consumer products worldwide has resulted in their release to aquatic environments. Previous studies have mainly focused on the effects of AgNP on pelagic species, whereas few studies have assessed the risks to benthic invertebrates...... despite the fact that the sediments act as a large potential sink for NPs. In this study, the toxicity of sediment-associated AgNP was evaluated using the standard sediment toxicity test for chemicals provided by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development. The freshwater benthic oligochaete...

  11. Optimization of Hyalella azteca IQ Toxicity Test{trademark} for prediction of 28-day sediment toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, A.N.; Ezzard, C.L.; Douglas, W.S.; Home, M.T. [Aqua Survey, Inc., Flemington, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The IQ Toxicity Test, which is a rapid screening toxicity test consisting of the observation of in-vivo inhibition of an enzymatic process using a fluorescent substrate, has proven successful for the determination of 24 and 48-hour EC50`s of D. magna, C. dubia, D. pulex and M. bahia. The application of this concept to utilize the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca may be an excellent way in which to reduce the standard 28-day chronic sediment toxicity test to possibly one hour`s time. This study incorporates an additive experimental design to explore the effects of and interactions between five specific variables: size of the amphipod, exposure time to the toxicant, concentration of substrate, exposure time to the substrate, and length of time starved prior to testing. The results of the IQ toxicity test were compared to those of a 28-day chronic sediment toxicity test. Preliminary data indicate that there is an optimal combination of these variables which results in a concise, reproducible toxicity test for use with Hyalella azteca, and would potentially be applicable to other freshwater amphipods in the future.

  12. Toxicity of Sediment-Associated Pesticides to Chironomus dilutus and Hyalella azteca

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Yuping; Weston, Donald P; You, Jing; Rothert, Amanda K.; Lydy, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Two hundred sediment samples were collected and their toxicity evaluated to aquatic species in a previous study in the agriculturally dominated Central Valley of California, United States. Pyrethroid insecticides were the main contributors to the observed toxicity. However, mortality in approximately one third of the toxic samples could not be explained solely by the presence of pyrethroids in the matrices. Hundreds of pesticides are currently used in the Central Valley of California, but onl...

  13. Mapping the extent and relative toxicity of sediments, Winter Quarters Bay, Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurdo Station was established in the mid 1950s and is the largest research station in Antarctica. In earlier days, wastes were dumped on the steep shores of Winter Quarters Bay, dosed with up to 19,000 L of diesel or jet fuel and ignited. Along with periodic fuel spills, and the discharge of raw sewage the Bay became littered with trash and contaminated with elevated levels of metals, PCBs and petroleum hydrocarbons. The original benthic community was essentially totally replaced with more opportunistic species. In 1993, a study was initiated to map the distribution of PCB and hydrocarbon contamination as well as determine sediment pore water toxicity. Sediments were collected from over forty locations with an Ekman dredge after drilling through about 210 cm of ice. Maps of sediment particle size distribution, percent organic carbon, total PCBs, total petroleum hydrocarbons, etc. were developed. Potential toxicity was mapped by normalizing the data to 1 percent organic carbon and comparing the data with various sediment quality criteria. While onsite sediment pore water toxicity tests showed essentially no impacts, the new Microtox trademark chronic bioassay on both pore water and solvent extra showed considerable toxic effects. This paper compares the relative levels of contamination, with sediment quality criteria and toxicity as determined by a chronic microbial bioassays

  14. Toxicity assessment of wastewaters, river waters, and sediments in Austria using cost-effective microbiotests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Muna; Licek, Elisabeth

    2004-08-01

    The toxicity and chemical quality of surface water and sediment in the River Traun in Austria were studied because of recurrent fish mortality in some alpine rivers over the last few years. The analyses were carried out on samples collected during winter and summer upstream and downstream of two municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and on effluents taken at the points of discharge of these two plants. Toxicity tests were performed on 20 samples of surface water, effluent, and sediment pore water. The test battery was composed of microbiotests with protozoans (Protoxkit F), microalgae (Algaltoxkit F), crustaceans (Daphtoxkit F magna and Thamnotoxkit F), and a higher plant (seed germination and root elongation assay on cress). Direct contact tests were performed on whole sediment with crustaceans (Ostracodtoxkit F). The physical-chemical characteristics of the surface water, effluent, and sediment pore water samples analyzed were conductivity, total hardness, pH, O(2), BOD(5), TOC, DOC, AOX, NH(4), NH(3), NO(2), PO(4)--P, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn. The toxicity data were expressed as percentage mortality or percentage inhibition, depending on the effect criterion of the respective assay. None of the water samples collected upstream and downstream of the WWTPs showed any significant (short-term) toxicity in either winter or in summer, but the effluents of the first municipal wastewater treatment plant were toxic to some of the test biota. All the sediment pore water samples induced serious inhibition of root growth of cress, and several pore waters were toxic to other test biota as well, particularly at the outlets of the WWTPs. The toxic character of some sediments was confirmed by direct contact tests with the ostracod crustacean. The chemical analyses did not reveal particularly high concentrations of any chemical that is very toxic. As a result no direct causal relationship could be established between the detected toxic effects and the chemical composition of

  15. Toxicity assessment in marine sediment for the Terra Nova environmental effects monitoring program (1997-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteway, Sandra A.; Paine, Michael D.; Wells, Trudy A.; DeBlois, Elisabeth M.; Kilgour, Bruce W.; Tracy, Ellen; Crowley, Roger D.; Williams, Urban P.; Janes, G. Gregory

    2014-12-01

    This paper discusses toxicity test results on sediments from the Terra Nova offshore oil development. The Terra Nova Field is located on the Grand Banks approximately 350 km southeast of Newfoundland (Canada). The amphipod (Rhepoxynius abronius) survival and solid phase luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, or Microtox) assays were conducted on sediment samples collected from approximately 50 stations per program year around Terra Nova during baseline (1997), prior to drilling, and in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2010 after drilling began. The frequency of toxic responses in the amphipod toxicity test was low. Of the ten stations that were toxic in environmental effects monitoring (EEM) years, only one (station 30(FE)) was toxic in more than one year and could be directly attributed to Terra Nova project activities. In contrast, 65 (18%) of 364 EEM samples were toxic to Microtox. Microtox toxicity in EEM years was not related to distance from Terra Nova drill centres or concentrations of >C10-C21 hydrocarbons or barium, the primary constituents of the synthetic-based drill muds used at Terra Nova. Of the variables tested, fines and strontium levels showed the strongest (positive) correlations with toxicity. Neither fines nor strontium levels were affected by drill cuttings discharge at Terra Nova, except at station 30(FE) (and that station was not toxic to Microtox). Benthic macro-invertebrate abundance, richness and diversity were greater in toxic than in non-toxic sediments. Therefore, Microtox responses indicating toxicity were associated with positive biological responses in the field. This result may have been an indirect function of the increased abundance of most invertebrate taxa in less sandy sediments with higher gravel content, where fines and strontium levels and, consequently, toxicity to Microtox were high; or chemical substances released by biodegradation of organic matter, where invertebrates are abundant, may be toxic to Microtox. Given

  16. Sediment quality in Rio Guadiamar (SW, Spain) after a tailing dam collapse: contamination, toxicity and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, Inmaculada; Delvalls, T Angel; Reynoldson, Trefor B; Milani, Danielle

    2006-09-01

    An integrated assessment of sediment quality in the Guadiamar River after a mining spill was conducted. The concentration of different metals and other conventional parameters were measured in sediments located along the river. Four sediment toxicity tests (Hyalella azteca 28-day survival and growth test; Chironomus riparius 10-day survival and growth test; Hexagenia spp. 21-day survival and growth test; and Tubifex tubifex 28-day reproduction and survival test) were carried out to determine the effects associated with the accidental spill. The geochemical fractions of 6 metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd) were determined to establish the bioavailability of the metals. The relationship found in the concentrations of metals associated with the mobile fractions of the sediments in the sites studied is similar to the toxic mud from tailing pond and confirms that the toxic effects are associated with the metals Zn and Cd originating from the spill. PMID:16820209

  17. From streets to streams: assessing the toxicity potential of urban sediment by particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Steven R.; Selbig, William R.; Roger T. Bannerman; Roger T. Bannerman

    2013-01-01

    Urban sediment can act as a transport mechanism for a variety of pollutants to move towards a receiving water body. The concentrations of these pollutants oftentimes exceed levels that are toxic to aquatic organisms. Many treatment structures are designed to capture coarse sediment but do not work well to similarly capture the fines. This study measured concentrations of select trace metals and PAHs in both the silt and sand fractions of urban sediment from four sources: stormwater bed, stormwater suspended, street dirt, and streambed. Concentrations were used to assess the toxic potential of sediment based on published sediment quality guidelines. All sources of sediment showed some level of toxic potential with stormwater bed sediment the highest followed by stormwater suspended, street dirt, and streambed. Both metal and PAH concentration distributions were highly correlated between the four sampling locations suggesting the presence of one or perhaps only a few sources of these pollutants which remain persistent as sediment is transported from street to stream. Comparison to other forms of combustion- and vehicle-related sources of PAHs revealed coal tar sealants to have the strongest correlation, in both the silt and sand fractions, at all four sampling sites. This information is important for environmental managers when selecting the most appropriate Best Management Practice (BMP) as a way to mitigate pollution conveyed in urban stormwater from source to sink.

  18. Toxicity of sediment-associated pesticides to Chironomus dilutus and Hyalella azteca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuping; Weston, Donald P; You, Jing; Rothert, Amanda K; Lydy, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    Two hundred sediment samples were collected and their toxicity evaluated to aquatic species in a previous study in the agriculturally dominated Central Valley of California, United States. Pyrethroid insecticides were the main contributors to the observed toxicity. However, mortality in approximately one third of the toxic samples could not be explained solely by the presence of pyrethroids in the matrices. Hundreds of pesticides are currently used in the Central Valley of California, but only a few dozen are analyzed in standard environmental monitoring. A significant amount of unexplained sediment toxicity may be due to pesticides that are in widespread use that but have not been routinely monitored in the environment, and even if some of them were, the concentrations harmful to aquatic organisms are unknown. In this study, toxicity thresholds for nine sediment-associated pesticides including abamectin, diazinon, dicofol, fenpropathrin, indoxacarb, methyl parathion, oxyfluorfen, propargite, and pyraclostrobin were established for two aquatic species, the midge Chironomus dilutus and the amphipod Hyalella azteca. For midges, the median lethal concentration (LC₅₀) of the pesticides ranged from 0.18 to 964 μg/g organic carbon (OC), with abamectin being the most toxic and propargite being the least toxic pesticide. A sublethal growth endpoint using average individual ash-free dry mass was also measured for the midges. The no-observable effect concentration values for growth ranged from 0.10 to 633 μg/g OC for the nine pesticides. For the amphipods, fenpropathrin was the most toxic, with an LC₅₀ of 1-2 μg/g OC. Abamectin, diazinon, and methyl parathion were all moderately toxic (LC₅₀s 2.8-26 μg/g OC). Dicofol, indoxacarb, oxyfluorfen, propargite, and pyraclostrobin were all relatively nontoxic, with LC₅₀s greater than the highest concentrations tested. The toxicity information collected in the present study will be helpful in decreasing the

  19. Pollution of the Begej Canal sediment--metals, radioactivity and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmacija, B; Prica, M; Ivancev-Tumbas, I; van der Kooij, A; Roncevic, S; Krcmar, D; Bikit, I; Teodorovic, I

    2006-07-01

    The Begej Canal is one among a large number of canals in Vojvodina (Northern Province of Serbia and Montenegro). The paper describes a study of metal and radioactivity contamination of the Begej Canal sediment. It is also concerned with the evaluation of sediment acute toxicity based on standard test species Daphnia magna and simultaneously extracted metals and acid volatile sulfides. The quality of sediment was assessed according to Dutch standards, but the results were also compared with some Canadian and USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) guidelines for sediment quality. The results showed severe pollution with chromium, copper, cadmium and zinc, whereby the anthropogenic origin of these contaminants was indicated. The tests of toxicity of sediment pore water to D. magna, gave no indication of the presence of substances in acutely toxic concentrations to this species. It can be speculated that, despite of high metal contents, the observed toxicity was low because of the high contents of clay and iron, as well as sulphide. Also, based on a comparison with the Danube sediment and Vojvodina soil in general, the data of the Begej sediment contamination with 238U and 137Cs. The 137Cs data were used for approximate dating of the sediment. No traces of contamination by nuclear power plants in the region were found, while the presence of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) was proved. Conclusions based on different criteria for sediment quality assessment were in some cases contradictory. Study also showed that radioactivity aspects can be useful in sediment quality surveys. The obtained results will be invaluable for the future activities regarding integrated water management based on EC Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) in the Danube basin, and particularly in the region of crossborder water body of the Begej Canal. PMID:16527352

  20. Evaluation of the toxicity of organic matter in marine sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    . The variation of the inhibition of AChE is attributed to the presence of the residues of various neurotoxic substances in the sediment contaminatEd. by the river runoff as well industrial effluents and sewage...

  1. Evaluation of the toxicity of organic matter in marine sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    . The variation of the inhibition of AChE is attributed to the presence of the residues of various neurotoxic substances in the sediment contaminatEd. by the river runoff as well industrial effluents and sewage....

  2. Toxicity of water and sediment from stormwater retarding basins to Hydra hexactinella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydra hexactinella was used to assess the toxicity of stormwater and sediment samples from three retarding basins in Melbourne, Australia, using an acute test, a sublethal test, and a pulse test. Stormwater from the Avoca St retarding basins resulted in a LC50 of 613 ml/L, NOEC and LOEC values of 50 ml/L and 100 ml/L, while the 7 h pulse exposure caused a significant increase in the mean population growth rate compared to the control. Water samples from the two other retarding basins were found non-toxic to H. hexactinella. This is the first study to employ sediment tests with Hydra spp. on stormwater sediments and a lower population growth rate was observed for organisms exposed to sediment from the Avoca St retarding basins. The behavioral study showed that H. hexactinella tended to avoid the sediment-water interface when exposed to sediment from all retarding basins, compared to the reference sediment. Further work is needed to determine the long-term effects of stormwater polluted sediments and acute effects due to organism exposure to short-term high concentrations during rain events. - Stormwater systems have the potential to have ecotoxicological impact as sediment and water from a retarding basin had a negative impact on Hydra hexactinella

  3. Toxicity of water and sediment from stormwater retarding basins to Hydra hexactinella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenkrantz, Rikke T. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: rtr@env.dtu.dk; Pollino, Carmel A. [Water Studies Centre, PO Box 23, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Nugegoda, Dayanthi [School of Applied Science, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia); Baun, Anders [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2008-12-15

    Hydra hexactinella was used to assess the toxicity of stormwater and sediment samples from three retarding basins in Melbourne, Australia, using an acute test, a sublethal test, and a pulse test. Stormwater from the Avoca St retarding basins resulted in a LC50 of 613 ml/L, NOEC and LOEC values of 50 ml/L and 100 ml/L, while the 7 h pulse exposure caused a significant increase in the mean population growth rate compared to the control. Water samples from the two other retarding basins were found non-toxic to H. hexactinella. This is the first study to employ sediment tests with Hydra spp. on stormwater sediments and a lower population growth rate was observed for organisms exposed to sediment from the Avoca St retarding basins. The behavioral study showed that H. hexactinella tended to avoid the sediment-water interface when exposed to sediment from all retarding basins, compared to the reference sediment. Further work is needed to determine the long-term effects of stormwater polluted sediments and acute effects due to organism exposure to short-term high concentrations during rain events. - Stormwater systems have the potential to have ecotoxicological impact as sediment and water from a retarding basin had a negative impact on Hydra hexactinella.

  4. Biochemical parameters in Tubifex tubifex as an integral part of complex sediment toxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smutna, M.; Hilscherova, K.; Paskova, V. [Masaryk Univ., Brno (CZ). RECETOX (Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology); Marsalek, B [Czech Academy of Science, Brno (Czech Republic). Centre for Cyanobacteria and their Toxins

    2008-06-15

    Background, aim, and scope Restoration of lakes and reservoirs with extensive cyanobacterial water bloom often requires evaluation of the sediment quality. Next to the chemical analysis of known pollutants, sediment bioassays should be employed to assess toxicity of the present contaminants and to make predictions of associated risk. Brno reservoir in the Czech Republic is a typical example of water bodies with long-term problems concerning cyanobacterial water blooms. Comprehensive assessment of reservoir sediment quality was conducted since successful reservoir restoration might require sediment removal. An important part of this survey focused on an examination of the utility of Tubifex tubifex and its sublethal biochemical markers for the assessment of direct sediment toxicity. Materials and methods This complex study included chemical analysis of contaminants (heavy metals, organic pollutants), ecotoxicity testing of sediment elutriates (tests with Daphnia magna, Pseudomonas putida, Sinapis alba, Scenedesmus subspicatus), and other parameters. We have tested in more detail the applicability of T. tubifex as a test organism for direct evaluation of contact sediment toxicity. Survival tests after 14 days of exposure were complemented by an assessment of parameters serving as biomarkers for sublethal effects [such as total glutathione content (GSH), activities of the enzymes glutathione transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR)]. The data matrix was subjected to multivariate analysis to interpret relationships between different parameters and possible differences among locations. Results The multivariate statistical techniques helped to clearly identify the more contaminated upstream sites and separate them from the less contaminated and reference samples. The data document closer relationships of the detected sediment contamination with results of direct sediment exposure in the T. tubifex test regarding mortality but namely

  5. Use of petroleum hydrocarbon fingerprinting techniques to predict sediment PAH toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) in marine sediments adverse biological effects are often absent. This study evaluated toxicity in relation to PAM distributions in sediments to determine the class of petroleum responsible for toxicity. Relative concentrations of a full suite of PAHs were evaluated using multivariate statistical techniques and a computer simulated neural network to fingerprint various petroleum hydrocarbons to explain toxicity results. US EPA priority pollutant PAHs and their alkylated homologs were analyzed using GC/MS with selective ion monitoring. Fingerprinting indices of various PAHs were used to determine class of petroleum hydrocarbon present in marine samples collected from two southern California sites. Results were compared to existing data sets comprised of over 200 petroleum samples, including various crude oils, fuels, and combustion products using both multivariate statistical techniques (posterior discriminant analysis) and a gradient descent neural network (back-propagation with a radial basis output function). Sediments were assigned independently to petroleum hydrocarbon classes and the results were linearly regressed in order to predict toxicity results displayed in the same sediments. Petroleum hydrocarbon class was found to be a much better indicator of sediment toxicity than individual PAM concentration (r2 = 0.89 and r2 = 0.43, respectively)

  6. Evaluation of toxicity to the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and to the midge, Chironomus dilutus; and bioaccumulation by the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, with exposure to PCB-contaminated sediments from Anniston, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Steevens, Jeffery A.; MacDonald, Donald D.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Coady, Matthew R.; Farrar, J. Daniel; Lotufo, Guilherme R.; Kemble, Nile E.; Kunz, James L.; Stanley, Jacob K.; Sinclair, Jesse A.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) requested that as part of the remedial investigation for the Anniston, Alabama Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Site (Anniston PCB Site), that Pharmacia Corporation and Solutia Inc. (P/S) perform long-term reproduction toxicity tests with the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and the midge, Chironomus dilutus, and bioaccumulation tests with the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, using sediment samples collected from reference locations and from Operable Unit 4 of the Anniston PCB Site. The sediment toxicity testing and sediment bioaccumulation results will be used by ARCADIS U.S., Inc. (ARCADIS) as part of a weight-of-evidence assessment to evaluate risks and establish sediment remediation goals for contaminants to sediment-dwelling organisms inhabiting the Anniston PCB Site. The goal of this study was to characterize relations between sediment chemistry and sediment toxicity and relations between sediment chemistry and sediment bioaccumulation in samples of sediments collected from the Anniston PCB Site. A total of 32 samples were evaluated from six test sites and one reference site to provide a wide range in concentrations of chemicals of potential concern (COPCs) including PCBs in samples of whole sediment. The goal of this study was not to determine the extent of sediment contamination across the Anniston PCB Site. Hence, the test sites or samples collected from within a test site were not selected to represent the spatial extent of sediment contamination across the Anniston PCB Site. Sediment chemistry, pore-water chemistry, and sediment toxicity data were generated for 26 sediment samples from the Anniston PCB Site. All of the samples were evaluated to determine if they qualified as reference sediment samples. Those samples that met the chemical selection criteria and biological selection criteria were identified as reference samples and used to develop the reference envelope for each toxicity test endpoint. Physical

  7. Effects of organic amendments on the toxicity and bioavailability of cadmium and copper in spiked formulated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; May, T.W.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the partitioning and toxicity of cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) spiked into formulated sediments containing two types of organic matter (OM), i.e., cellulose and humus. Amendments of cellulose up to 12.5% total organic carbon (TOC) did not affect partitioning of Cd or Cu between sediment and pore water and did not significantly affect the toxicity of spiked sediments in acute toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca. In contrast, amendments of natural humus shifted the partitioning of both Cd and Cu toward greater concentrations in sediment and lesser concentrations in pore water and significantly reduced toxic effects of both metals. Thresholds for toxicity, based on measured metal concentrations in whole sediment, were greater for both Cd and Cu in sediments amended with a low level of humus (2.9% TOC) than in sediments without added OM. Amendments with a high level of humus (8.9% TOC) eliminated toxicity at the highest spike concentrations of both metals (sediment concentrations of 12.4 ??g Cd/g and 493 ??g Cu/g). Concentrations of Cd in pore water associated with acute toxicity were similar between sediments with and without humus amendments, suggesting that toxicity of Cd was reduced primarily by sorption to sediment OM. However, toxic effects of Cu in humus treatments were associated with greater pore-water concentrations than in controls, suggesting that toxicity of Cu was reduced both by sorption and by complexation with soluble ligands. Both sorption and complexation by OM tend to make proposed sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) based on total metal concentrations more protective for high-OM sediments. Our results suggest that the predictive ability of SQGs could be improved by models of metal interactions with natural OM in sediment and pore water.

  8. Influences of sediment geochemistry on metal accumulation rates and toxicity in the aquatic oligochaete Tubifex tubifex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Fernández, Leire; De Jonge, Maarten; Bervoets, Lieven

    2014-12-01

    Metal bioaccumulation and toxicity in the aquatic oligochaete Tubifex tubifex exposed to three metal-contaminated field-sediments was studied in order to assess whether sediment-geochemistry (AVS, TOC) plays a major role in influencing these parameters, and to assess if the biodynamic concept can be used to explain observed effects in T. tubifex tissue residues and/or toxicity. An active autotomy promotion was observed in three studied sediments at different time points and reproduction impairment could be inferred in T. tubifex exposed to two of the tested sites after 28 days. The present study showed that sediment metal concentration and tissue residues followed significant regression models for four essential metals (Cu, Co, Ni and Zn) and one non-essential metal (Pb). Organic content normalization for As also showed a significant relationship with As tissue residue. Porewater was also revealed to be an important source of metal uptake for essential metals (e.g. Cu, Ni and Zn) and for As, but AVS content was not relevant for metal uptake in T. tubifex in studied sediments. Under the biodynamic concept, it was shown that influx rate from food (IF, sediment ingestion) in T. tubifex, in a range of sediment geochemistry, was able to predict metal bioaccumulation, especially of the essential metals Cu, Ni and Zn, and for the non-essential metal Pb. Additionally, IF appeared to be a better predictor for metal bioaccumulation in T. tubifex compared to sediment geochemistry normalization. PMID:25456225

  9. Potential risks of metal toxicity in contaminated sediments of Deule river in Northern France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → A historical environmental pollution is evidenced with reference to background levels. → Sedimentary trace metals partitioning is examined under undisturbed conditions. → Anoxia and diagenetic processes induce geochemical and mineralogical variabilities. → Do metals present in particles and pore waters exhibit a potential toxicity risk? → Behaviour of binding fractions contributes to trace metals scavenging. - Abstract: The aim of this paper was to evaluate the potential sediment cumulative damage and toxicity due to metal contamination in a polluted zone of Deule river (in northern France) from nearby two smelters. Metal-enrichment factors and geoaccumulation indices measured with sediment depth revealed that - compared to background levels either in local reference soils or in world rivers sediments/suspended particulate matter - Cd contributed to the highest pollution levels, followed by Zn, Pb and to a much lesser extent Cu and Ni. A comparison of the vertical distribution of AVS (acid volatile sulfides), SEM (simultaneously extracted metals), TMC (total metal concentrations), TOC (total organic carbon) and interstitial water-metal concentrations in the sediment allowed us to highlight the extent of toxicity caused by Cd, Pb, Zn, Ni and Cu and to raise the possibility of their association with certain geochemical phases. To assess the actual environmental impacts of these metals in Deule river, numerical sediment quality guidelines were further used in the present work. Sedimentary Pb, Zn, and Cd contents largely exceeded PEC (probable effect concentration) values reported as consensus-based sediment quality guidelines for freshwater ecosystems. As for risks of toxicity from pore waters, metal concentrations reached their maxima at the surficial layers of the sediment (1-3 cm) and IWCTU (Interstitial Water Criteria Toxicity Unit) observed for Pb and to a lesser extent Cd, violated the corresponding water quality data recommended

  10. Magnitude and Extent of Contaminated Sediment and Toxicity in Chesapeake Bay

    OpenAIRE

    Hartwell, S. Ian; Hameedi, Jawed

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This report summarizes the results of NOAA's sediment toxicity, chemistry, and benthic community studies in the Chesapeake Bay estuary. As part of the National Status and Trends (NS&T) Program, NOAA has conducted studies to determine the spatial extent and severity of chemical contamination and associated adverse biological effects in coastal bays and estuaries of the United States since 1991. Sediment contamination in U.S. coastal areas is a major environmental issue becaus...

  11. Potentially Toxic Metal and Metalloid Fractionation Contamination in Sediments of Daya Bay, South China Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, L. L.; Yang, J; P. Wang; Wang, L.; Tian, H. T.; Zou, M. K.; Xie, J.

    2015-01-01

    The metal profiles in sediments of the Daya Bay (DYB) in China were established using sequential extraction protocols proposed by the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR). The surface sediment samples from 23 representative stations were collected in 2011 and were analysed to evaluate the mobility and bioavailability of a suite of potentially toxic metals (Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd) and metalloid (As). The obtained ranking order of migration and transformation, and the degree of pollu...

  12. Effects of untreated hospital effluents on the accumulation of toxic metals in sediments of receiving system under tropical conditions: case of South India and Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubedi, Josué Ilunga; Devarajan, Naresh; Le Faucheur, Séverine; Mputu, John Kayembe; Atibu, Emmanuel K; Sivalingam, Periyasamy; Prabakar, Kandasamy; Mpiana, Pius T; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2013-10-01

    Physicochemical and ecotoxicological analyses have been performed to assess the quality of sediments receiving untreated hospital effluents from Indian and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) hospitals. The sediments were collected monthly and characterized for grain size, organic matter, total organic carbon, total carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, toxic metals and ecotoxicity. The results highlight the high concentration of toxic metals from the Indian hospital effluent receiving systems, especially for Cr, Cu, As, Zn and Hg. On the other hand, the metal concentrations in the sediment receiving system from DRC are low (e.g. maximum Hg and Zn concentration were 0.46 and 48.84 mg kg(-1) respectively). Ostracods exposed to sediment samples H2 (September month sample) and H3 (June and September month samples) were found dead after 6d of exposure whereas the higher mortality rate for Congo sediments was 23% but was accompanied with 33 ± 7% of growth inhibition. The results of this study show the variation of sediment composition on toxic metal levels as well as toxicity related to both, the type of hospitals and the sampling period. Additionally, hospital effluent disposal practices at the study sites can lead to the pollution of water resources and may generate risks for aquatic organisms and human health. PMID:23816453

  13. Toxicity of oiled sediments treated with bioremediation agents: A shoreline experiment in Delaware, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a randomized complete block design, a battery of five pore water and sediment bioassays were used to monitor and compare toxicity among un-oiled, oiled (light Nigerian crude) and nutrient and bacteria-treated shoreline plots on a sandy beach. Tests included sea urchin fertilization, water and modified-solid phase microtox, 10-day amphipod survival and grass shrimp embryo bioassays. During the 13-week study, bioremediation treatment with nutrients and/or bacteria did not decrease toxicity relative to that in untreated plots. Results from at least one bioassay suggested that, relative to no treatment, treatment may have increased toxicity for several weeks. The least and most sensitive tests were sea urchin fertilization (pore water) and 10-day amphipod test, respectively. Coupled with chemical monitoring, the study produced a large data-base for evaluating toxic concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in sandy sediments

  14. Toxicities of sediments below 10 effluent outfalls to near-coastal areas of the Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical quality and toxicities of sediments collected in the receiving waters below 10 wastewater outfalls to Northwest Florida coastal areas were evaluated at multiple stations during 1994--1996. Eight types of toxicity tests using 11 test species were used to assess acute and chronic toxicity of the sediments collected below industrial, municipal, power generation and pulp mill outfalls. The primary objectives of the study were to evaluate the relative ability of different assessment procedures to detect toxicity and to provide some much-needed perspective on the impact of major point sources on sediment quality in Gulf of Mexico estuaries. The major chemical contaminants were heavy metals and PAHs. Acute and chronic toxicities were noted. Results of tests with sediment collected at the same location but several months later often differed. The most sensitive species were mysids and an estuarine amphipod. The least sensitive species were fish and macrophyte seedlings. There was poor correlation of effluent toxicity to sediment toxicity in the receiving water. Toxicity of the effluents was greater than that of the sediments. Overall, the unavailability of relevant chronic toxicity methods, uncertain criteria for choice of control stations, lack of guidance on frequency of testing and the dynamic physical and chemical characteristics of sediments are factors that need consideration if sediment monitoring is to be part of the NPDES regulatory process

  15. Geogenically vs. anthropogenic pollution of river sediments by potentially toxic trace elements on model locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rtg diffraction analysis was used to evaluate the stream sediments mineralogical composition of Maly Dunaj, Nitra and Hron rivers. Identified minerals in the sediment samples, in addition with chemical analysis of selected elements (As, Sb, Hg, Cu, Pb), helped to determine the origin (geogenic vs. anthropogenic) of these potentially toxic trace elements. The results show that Maly Dunaj sediments are mostly loaded with anthropogenic contamination (agriculture, industry). Heavy minerals identified in Nitra sediments suggest natural higher concentrations of Cu, Pb and Fe. On the other hand As and Hg contamination is caused by human activities. The main sources are the coal ash impoundments in Zemianske Kostolany and Chalmova (for As) and Novacke chemicke zavody a.s. (for Hg). Stream sediments of Hron river are mostly influneced by the geology of the catchment area (Sb - As deposits in Nizke Tatry, volcanics). (authors)

  16. An automated overlying water-renewal system for sediment toxicity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, G.M.; Wheat, J.V.; Carriger, J.F.; Lee, T.A

    2003-04-01

    A new system is described for sediment toxicity testing. - An automated water-renewal toxicity test system is described for exposing benthic invertebrates to whole sediments. The system will intermittently deliver laboratory or on-site water for overlying water replacement in sediment exposures. A range of cycle rates can be used to produce different volume additions of overlying water per day to exposure chambers. The system can be used with six different treatments and eight replicates per treatment producing 48 exposure chambers. Three formulated sediments with variable organic carbon (1.5%, 7.5%) and sand (14%, 63%) content were prepared to test the system exposing amphipods, Hyalella azteca and midges, Chironomus tentans in 10 day whole sediment tests. Intermittent water flow was used with a 90 min cycle time to create two volume additions of laboratory water per 24 h in exposure chambers (180 ml sediment, 320 ml water). Overlying water quality conditions, and survival and growth of both species were consistent and within acceptable limits for the testing requirements of the U.S. EPA guidelines for sediments with freshwater invertebrates.

  17. Assessing metal toxicity in sediments using the equilibrium partitioning model and empirical sediment quality guidelines: A case study in the nearshore zone of the Bohai Sea, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Based on the EqP model, 35% samples had potential metal toxicity in sediments. • The empirical SQGs are not suitable for assessing sediment toxicity in Bohai Sea. • The EqP model is a much needed tool for metal toxicity assessment in coastal China. - Abstract: Surface sediments were collected from five nearshore (wastewater discharges, aquaculture facilities and a seaport) sites in Bohai Bay and Laizhou Bay, China. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) model and empirical sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) were applied to assess the potential metal toxicity in the collected sediments. The results show that, based on the EqP model, 35% of stations exhibited potential metal toxicity. Several metals (Cu, Ni and Cr) exceeded the empirical SQGs (9–93% of the time), however these guidelines may not be suitable for use in the Bohai Sea owing to the background concentrations. The EqP model is a more useful method for assessing potential metal toxicity in Bohai Sea sediment than the empirical SQGs. Additionally, we have provided new understanding about methods for assessing sediment metal toxicity in the Bohai Sea that may be useful in other coastal areas in China

  18. Results of toxicity tests and chemical analyses conducted on sediments collected from the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit, July 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, W.L.

    2000-02-11

    In order to provide unit specific toxicity data that will be used to address critical uncertainty in the ecological risk assessment (ERA) for the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit (TNXOD OU), sediments were collected from eight locations in the Inner Swamp portion of the operable unit and two unit specific background locations. These samples were analyzed for total mercury, total uranium, and sediment toxicity.

  19. Pollution by metals and toxicity assessment using Caenorhabditis elegans in sediments from the Magdalena River, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda-Benitez, Lesly; Flegal, Russell; Odigie, Kingsley; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2016-05-01

    The Magdalena River is the most important river in Colombia, supplying over 70% of the population of fish and drinking water, and it also is the main river transportation way of the country. It receives effluents from multiple sources along its course such as contaminant agricultural and industrial discharges. To evaluate the toxicity profile of Magdalena River sediments through endpoints such as survival, locomotion, and growth, wild type strains of Caenorhabditis elegans were exposed to aqueous extracts of the sediments. To identify changes in gene expression, GFP transgenic strains were used as reporter genes. Physiological and biochemical data were correlated with metal concentration in the sediments, identifying patterns of toxicity along the course of the river. Levels of some metals such as Cd, Cu, and Ni were above TEC and PEC limits. Effects in survival, growth, and locomotion were observed in most of the samples, and changes in gene expression were evident in the genes mtl-2, sod-4, and gst-1 using fluorescence expression. Cadmium and lead were the metals which were primarily associated with sediment toxicity, and the sampling sites with the highest increased expression of stress response genes were Barrancabermeja and Girardot. However, the diverse nature of toxic profiles observed in C. elegans in the study area showed the pervasiveness of different types of discharges throughout the river system. PMID:26851980

  20. Toxicity of water and sediment from stormwater retarding basins to Hydra hexactinella

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkrantz, Rikke Tjørnhøj; Pollino, Carmel A.; Nugegoda, Dayanthi;

    2008-01-01

    Hydra hexactinella was used to assess the toxicity of stormwater and sediment samples from three retarding basins in Melbourne, Australia, using an acute test, a sublethal test, and a pulse test. Stormwater from the Avoca St retarding basins resulted in a LC50 of 613 ml/L, NOEC and LOEC values of...

  1. Toxicity of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments to benthic invertebrates-Spiking methodology, species sensitivity, and nickel bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Kemble, Nile E.; Ivey, Chris D.; Kunz, James L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Rudel, David

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes data from studies of the toxicity and bioavailability of nickel in nickel-spiked freshwater sediments. The goal of these studies was to generate toxicity and chemistry data to support development of broadly applicable sediment quality guidelines for nickel. The studies were conducted as three tasks, which are presented here as three chapters: Task 1, Development of methods for preparation and toxicity testing of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments; Task 2, Sensitivity of benthic invertebrates to toxicity of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments; and Task 3, Effect of sediment characteristics on nickel bioavailability. Appendices with additional methodological details and raw chemistry and toxicity data for the three tasks are available online at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2011/5225/downloads/.

  2. Characterization of carbonaceous particles from lake sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spheroidal carbonaceous particles produced by high temperature combustion of coal and oil were found in high concentrations in lake sediments from areas of high acid deposition. The sediment record of these particles showing the onset of industrialisation correlates well with the record of acidification as indicated by diatom analysis. To find sources of the atmospheric deposition affecting a lake and its catchment, characterisation of the carbonaceous particles is necessary. A reference data set of particle chemistries from coal and oil power stations was produced using EDS generated data of 17 elements. Using multivariate statistical techniques, the most important elements for the coal/oil separation were identified and incorporated into a linear discriminant function which allocated fuel type with > 97% accuracy. Application of this technique to surface sediments in Scotland shows the influence of oil burning from outside the region. When applied to a full sediment core, the history of coal and oil combustion affecting the lake is seen and correlates well with known coal and oil consumption figures. Consequently this method could be used to add extra dating levels to sediment cores. The technique has been extended to include peat particles and could potentially be used on those from brown coal, lignite and oil shale combustion

  3. Geochemistry and toxicity of sediment porewater in a salt-impacted urban stormwater detention pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive study was carried out to investigate the impacts of road salts on the benthic compartment of a small urban detention facility, Rouge River Pond. Although the pond is an engineered water body, it is representative of many small urban lakes, ponds and wetlands, which receive road runoff and are probable high impact areas. Specific objectives of the study were to document the porewater chemistry of an aquatic system affected by elevated salt concentrations and to carry out a toxicological assessment of sediment porewater to determine what factors may cause porewater toxicity. The results indicate that the sediment porewater may itself attain high salt concentrations. The computations show that increased chloride levels have important implications on the Cd complexation, augmenting its concentration in porewater. The toxicity tests suggest that the toxicity in porewater is caused by metals or other toxic chemicals, rather than high levels of chloride. - Effects of chlorides on metal chemistry and toxicity of sediment porewater in a stormwater detention pond impacted by road salts

  4. Using marine bioassays to classify the toxicity of Dutch harbor sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronkhorst, Joost; Schipper, Cor; Brils, Jos; Dubbeldam, Marco; Postma, Jaap; van de Hoeven, Nelly

    2003-07-01

    A procedure was developed to assess contaminated marine sediments from Dutch harbors for possible adverse biological effects using three laboratory bioassays: A 10-d survival test with the amphipod Corophium volutator, a 14-d survival test with the heart urchin Echinocardium cordatum (adults), and the bioluminescence inhibition test with the bacterium Vibrio fischeri (Microtox solid phase test LSP]). Microtox results were mathematically corrected for the modifying influence of fine sediment particles. After a validation procedure on test performance and modifying factors, respectively, 81%, 99%, and 90% of the amphipod, heart urchin, and Microtox results were approved. Lower and upper threshold limits for biological effects were set at respectively 24 and 30% mortality for C. volutator, 27 and 35% mortality for E. cordatum, and 24 and 48 toxic units for the Microtox SP based on significant differences with control sediment and the performance of reference sediments. The bioassays clearly distinguished harbor sediments that give rise to acute effects and those that do not. Threshold limits for the amphipods, heart urchins, and bacteria were exceeded in, respectively, 9 to 17%, 33 to 40%, and 23 to 50% of the sediment samples. Highest effects were observed in sediments from the northerly harbors; there was significantly less response in sediments from the Delta Region and the port of Rotterdam (The Netherlands). The procedure outlined in this paper can be used for routine screening of contaminated dredged material that is proposed for open water disposal. PMID:12836979

  5. Comparative study of three oligochaete species as indicators of metals in a sediment toxicity bioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, K.; Scheuerman, P.; Lanza, G.; Nelson, D. [East Tennessee State Univ., Johnson City, TN (United States); Brinkhurst, R. [Aquatic Resources Center, Franklin, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Three oligochaete species, Tubifex tubifex, Branchiura sowerbyi and Lumbriculus variegatus, were analyzed for bioaccumulation and reproductive effects from reference sediment spiked with Cd or Cu. Sediment was spiked using the Sediment Suspension method to achieve concentrations of 4.0, 8.0 and 16.0 mg Cd/kg sediment (dry weight) and 25.0, 36.0, 50.0, 100.0 mg Cu/kg sediment (dry weight) . The bioassay was conducted under aerated, static conditions for 28 d at 22.5 C. Reproductive effects consisting of number of cocoons and eggs produced a negative linear regression with increasing Cd concentration. Cocoon volume remained consistent. Cu was more toxic to T. tubifex in this bioassay than results reported by the USEPA using similar concentrations. Lower concentrations of Cu also showed a negative linear regression with reproductive effects showing that oligochaetes could be a feasible indicator organism for sediment toxicity in a standardized ecological impact assay using reproduction as an endpoint.

  6. Influences of sediment geochemistry on metal accumulation rates and toxicity in the aquatic oligochaete Tubifex tubifex

    OpenAIRE

    Mendez-Fernandez, L; De Jonge, M.; Bervoets, L.

    2014-01-01

    Metal bioaccumulation and toxicity in the aquatic oligochaete Tubifex tubifex exposed to three metal-contaminated field-sediments was studied in order to assess whether sediment-geochemistry (AVS, TOC) plays a major role in influencing these parameters, and to assess if the biodynamic concept can be used to explain observed effects in T. tubifex tissue residues and/or toxicity. An active autotomy promotion was observed in three studied sediments at different time points and reproduction impai...

  7. Development of marine sediment bioassays and toxicity tests for monitoring and regulation in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thain, J.; Matthiessen, P.

    1995-12-31

    There is a need in Europe and elsewhere for a broad suite of whole-sediment bioassays and toxicity tests which can be used for routine monitoring and assessment of the marine environment and for evaluating the toxic effects of chemicals which may find their way into sediments. Until recently, few European species had been incorporated into such tests but the availability of suitable methodologies is now increasing rapidly. Perhaps the most important recent activity in this area consisted of an international ring test of acute sediment toxicity test methods which was organized by the Oslo and Paris Commissions in 1993, using up to 4 offshore chemicals as test materials. It evaluated the performance of 4 acute (5--10 day) tests involving: the sea urchin Echinocardium cordatum, the bivalve mollusc Abra alba, the amphipod crustacean Corophium volutator, and the polychaete worm Arenicola marina. The ring test concluded that the C. volutator test was the most appropriate for evaluating offshore chemicals, but all these methods are now widely used in Europe, both as toxicity tests and as bioassays. For example, the A. marina procedure (which has both lethal and sublethal endpoints), in combination with the C. volutator method, is now routinely used in the UK for monitoring the toxicity of estuarine sediments. Further activities are in progress. Perhaps the most important is the development of chronic marine sediment tests and bioassays which can be used to assess the long-term effects of the many sedimentary contaminants which are able to persist in this type of habitat and possibly cause delayed effects on the growth and reproduction, etc. of benthic fauna.

  8. Assessment of toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Dong, Cheng-Di; Kao, Chih-Ming

    2013-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination and toxicity levels in the surface sediments of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan were evaluated using sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) and toxic equivalent factors. Eighty surface sediment samples were collected from twenty locations in Kaohsiung Harbor for PAH analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Concentrations of total PAHs varies from 34.0 to 16,700 ng/g with a mean concentration of 1490±2689 ng/g. The spatial distribution of PAHs reveals that PAH concentration is relatively higher in the river mouth regions, especially in the Salt River mouth where it gradually diminishes toward the harbor region. Distributions of PAHs, during both the wet and dry seasons, show that PAHs are more easily disbursed in the receiving sea water thereby leading to a wider range of chemical distribution. Hence, most of the chemicals accumulate in the harbor water channel. Diagnostic ratios show that the possible source of PAHs in the southern industrial area of the harbor could be coal combustion while in the other zones it could be petroleum combustion and/or a mixed sources. The toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQ(carc)) of PAHs varied from 3.9 to 1970 ng TEQ/g. The higher total TEQ(carc) values were found in the southern industrial area of the harbor. As compared with US sediment quality guidelines, the observed levels of PAHs in the industrial zone exceeded the effects range low (ERL), which will eventually cause acute biological damage. Based on the analyses using the SQGs, surface sediments from Kaohsiung Harbor were moderately contaminated and most samples have a low probability of toxicity pollution, except for the Salt River mouth situated in the south Kaohsiung Harbor area. This area has a medium to high probability of toxicity pollution. PMID:22818911

  9. Phylogenetic Characterization of Archaea in Saltpan Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Nasier; Johri, Sarojini; Sultan, Phalisteen; Abdin, Malik Z.; Qazi, Ghulam N

    2011-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the presence of archaeal diversity in saltpan sediments of Goa, India by 16S rDNA-dependent molecular phylogeny. Small subunit rRNA (16S rDNA) from saltpan sediment metagenome were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific to the domain archaea. 10 unique phylotypes were obtained by PCR based RFLP of 16S rRNA genes using endonuclease Msp 1, which was most suitable to score the genetic diversity. These phylotypes spanned a wide ra...

  10. PAHs concentration and toxicity in organic solvent extracts of atmospheric particulate matter and sea sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Noriatsu; Takeuchi, Shin-ya; Kojima, Keisuke; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Komatsu, Toshiko; Fukushima, Takehiko

    2012-01-01

    The concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the toxicity to marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) were measured for the organic solvent extracts of sea sediments collected from an urban watershed area (Hiroshima Bay) of Japan and compared with the concentrations and toxicity of atmospheric particulate matter (PM). In atmospheric PM, the PAHs concentration was highest in fine particulate matter (FPM) collected during cold seasons. The concentrations of sea sediments were 0.01-0.001 times those of atmospheric PM. 1/EC50 was 1-10 L g(-1) PM for atmospheric PM and 0.1-1 L g(-1) dry solids for sea sediments. These results imply that toxic substances from atmospheric PM are diluted several tens or hundreds of times in sea sediments. The ratio of the 1/EC50 to PAHs concentration ((1/EC50)/16PAHs) was stable for all sea sediments (0.1-1 L μg(-1) 16PAHs) and was the same order of magnitude as that of FPM and coarse particulate matter (CPM). The ratio of sediments collected from the west was more similar to that of CPM while that from the east was more similar to FPM, possibly because of hydraulic differences among water bodies. The PAHs concentration pattern analyses (principal component analysis and isomer ratio analysis) were conducted and the results showed that the PAHs pattern in sea sediments was quite different to that of FPM and CPM. Comparison with previously conducted PAHs analyses suggested that biomass burning residues comprised a major portion of these other sources. PMID:22797225

  11. Copper speciation in variably toxic sediments at the Ely Copper Mine, Vermont, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Bryn E.; Foster, Andrea L.; Seal, Robert; Piatak, Nadine; Webb, Samuel M.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    At the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site, Cu concentrations exceed background values in both streamwater (160–1200 times) and sediments (15–79 times). Previously, these sediment samples were incubated with laboratory test organisms, and they exhibited variable toxicity for different stream sites. In this study we combined bulk- and microscale techniques to determine Cu speciation and distribution in these contaminated sediments on the basis of evidence from previous work that Cu was the most important stressor in this environment and that variable observed toxicity could have resulted from differences in Cu speciation. Copper speciation results were similar at microscopic and bulk scales. The major Cu species in the more toxic samples were sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary Mn (birnessite) and Fe minerals (jarosite and goethite), which together accounted for nearly 80% of the total Cu. The major Cu species in the less toxic samples were Cu sulfides (chalcopyrite and a covellite-like phase), making up about 80–95% of the total Cu, with minor amounts of Cu associated with jarosite or goethite. These Cu speciation results are consistent with the toxicity results, considering that Cu sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary phases at near-neutral pH is relatively less stable than Cu bound to sulfide at lower pH. The more toxic stream sediment sites were those that contained fewer detrital sulfides and were upstream of the major mine waste pile, suggesting that removal and consolidation of sulfide-bearing waste piles on site may not eliminate all sources of bioaccessible Cu.

  12. Copper Speciation in Variably Toxic Sediments at the Ely Copper Mine, Vermont, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Bryn E; Foster, Andrea L; Seal, Robert R; Piatak, Nadine M; Webb, Samuel M; Hammarstrom, Jane M

    2016-02-01

    At the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site, Cu concentrations exceed background values in both streamwater (160-1200 times) and sediments (15-79 times). Previously, these sediment samples were incubated with laboratory test organisms, and they exhibited variable toxicity for different stream sites. In this study we combined bulk- and microscale techniques to determine Cu speciation and distribution in these contaminated sediments on the basis of evidence from previous work that Cu was the most important stressor in this environment and that variable observed toxicity could have resulted from differences in Cu speciation. Copper speciation results were similar at microscopic and bulk scales. The major Cu species in the more toxic samples were sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary Mn (birnessite) and Fe minerals (jarosite and goethite), which together accounted for nearly 80% of the total Cu. The major Cu species in the less toxic samples were Cu sulfides (chalcopyrite and a covellite-like phase), making up about 80-95% of the total Cu, with minor amounts of Cu associated with jarosite or goethite. These Cu speciation results are consistent with the toxicity results, considering that Cu sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary phases at near-neutral pH is relatively less stable than Cu bound to sulfide at lower pH. The more toxic stream sediment sites were those that contained fewer detrital sulfides and were upstream of the major mine waste pile, suggesting that removal and consolidation of sulfide-bearing waste piles on site may not eliminate all sources of bioaccessible Cu. PMID:26734712

  13. Physical and chemical parameters of sediment extraction and fractionation that influence toxicity, as evaluated by microtox (trade name)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several physical and chemical parameters of sediment extraction and fractionation of organic compounds that influence bioassay results were evaluated. Each parameter was evaluated with a photoluminescent bacterial bioassay (Microtox) as an end point. Three solvents (acetonitrile, acetone, and methanol) were studied for their ability to extract toxic organic components from marine sediments. Acetone extracted the most toxicity, with no difference between acetonitrile and methanol. Two methods of fractionating sediment extracts (silica-gel-column chromatography (SGCC) and acid-base fractionation) were compared. SGCC was more useful because it resulted in a wider range of responses and was faster to perform than acid-base fractionation. Microtox was used to rank four marine sediments with respect to toxicity and to determine if one chemical class (or fraction) was consistently more toxic among different sediments. With some caveats, Microtox results agreed with general chemical concentration trends and other bioassay results in distinguishing between contaminated and noncontaminated sediments. Although results indicated there was not a consistently most toxic fraction among sediments, there was a consistently least toxic fraction. The effect of sediment storage time on toxicity was also evaluated. Results indicated that the most stable chemical fraction (containing nonpolar hydrocarbons) did not change toxicologically for 30 weeks, whereas the more chemically active fraction (containing ketones, quinones, and carboxyls) changed as soon as one week

  14. Geochemical characterization of seaplane lagoon sediments, Alameda Naval Air Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bono, A; Carroll, S; Esser, B; Luther, G W; O' Day, P; Randall, S

    1999-08-16

    Our objective in the characterization of sediments from Seaplane Lagoon at the Alameda Naval Air Station (NAS) was to determine the geochemical interactions that control the partitioning of cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc between the sediments and the porewaters. Our approach was to collect several cores at the east outfall location of the Seaplane Lagoon. We determined the porewater chemistry by (1) making in situ micro-electrode measurements, (2) extracting porewaters, and (3) modeling geochemical reactions. We determined the sediment chemistry by measuring (1) elemental abundance, (2) mineralogy, and (3) trace-element speciation. This information should help the US Navy determine the long-term hazard of the sediments if they are left in place and the short-term hazard if they are dredged. We did not fully examine the geochemistry of sediments from the West Beach Landfill Wetlands site, because these sediments were distinct from the Seaplane Lagoon sediments. Our initial motivation for studying the Landfill Wetlands site was to determine the trace-element geochemistry in Seaplane Lagoon sediments that had been dredged and then disposed in the Landfill Wetlands. Unfortunately, the location of these dredged sediments is unknown. The cores we sampled were not from the Seaplane Lagoon.

  15. Development and application of a marine sediment pore-water toxicity test using Ulva fasciata zoospores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooten, R.L.; Carr, R.S. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Geological Survey

    1998-01-01

    An acute (96 h) pore-water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of Ulva fasciata zoospores as endpoints was developed to test the toxicity of marine and estuarine sediment pore-water samples. Tests with an organic toxicant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS), three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn), and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) were conducted to determine zoospore sensitivity. Zoospore germination and gametophyte growth were as sensitive to SDS as sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development. Zoospore sensitivity to metals was greater than or comparable to that of adult macroalgae. Zoospores were less sensitive to NH{sub 3} than were other commonly used toxicity test organisms. Test results using this algal assay with sediment pore-water samples with high NH{sub 3} concentrations were compared with results from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development tests for the same samples. Ulva fasciata zoospore germination was not affected by samples with high NH{sub 3} concentrations that were toxic in both sea urchin tests. Zoospore tolerance of NH{sub 3} and sensitivity to other contaminants indicate that their response may be useful in toxicity identification evaluation studies with pore-water samples that contain high concentrations of unionized NH{sub 3}.

  16. Development and application of a marine sediment pore-water toxicity test using Ulva fasciata zoospores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, R.L.; Carr, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    An acute (96 h) pore-water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of Ulva fasciata zoospores as endpoints was developed to test the toxicity of marine and estuarine sediment pore-water samples. Tests with an organic toxicant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS), three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn), and ammonia (NH3) were conducted to determine zoospore sensitivity. Zoospore germination and gametophyte growth were as sensitive to SDS as sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development. Zoospore sensitivity to metals was greater than or comparable to that of adult macroalgae. Zoospores were less sensitive to NH3 than were other commonly used toxicity test organisms. Test results using this algal assay with sediment pore-water samples with high NH3 concentrations were compared with results from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development tests for the same samples. Ulva fasciata zoospore germination was not affected by samples with high NH3 concentrations that were toxic in both sea urchin tests. Zoospore tolerance of NH3 and sensitivity to other contaminants indicate that their response may be useful in toxicity identification evaluation studies with pore-water samples that contain high concentrations of unionized NH3.

  17. Calculating background levels for ecological risk parameters in toxic harbor sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadon, C.J.; McDonnell, T.R.; Lear, J.; Barclift, D.

    2007-01-01

    Establishing background levels for biological parameters is necessary in assessing the ecological risks from harbor sediment contaminated with toxic chemicals. For chemicals in sediment, the term contaminated is defined as having concentrations above background and significant human health or ecological risk levels. For biological parameters, a site could be considered contaminated if levels of the parameter are either more or less than the background level, depending on the specific parameter. Biological parameters can include tissue chemical concentrations in ecological receptors, bioassay responses, bioaccumulation levels, and benthic community metrics. Chemical parameters can include sediment concentrations of a variety of potentially toxic chemicals. Indirectly, contaminated harbor sediment can impact shellfish, fish, birds, and marine mammals, and human populations. This paper summarizes the methods used to define background levels for chemical and biological parameters from a survey of ecological risk investigations of marine harbor sediment at California Navy bases. Background levels for regional biological indices used to quantify ecological risks for benthic communities are also described. Generally, background stations are positioned in relatively clean areas exhibiting the same physical and general chemical characteristics as nearby areas with contaminated harbor sediment. The number of background stations and the number of sample replicates per background station depend on the statistical design of the sediment ecological risk investigation, developed through the data quality objective (DQO) process. Biological data from the background stations can be compared to data from a contaminated site by using minimum or maximum background levels or comparative statistics. In Navy ecological risk assessments (ERA's), calculated background levels and appropriate ecological risk screening criteria are used to identify sampling stations and sites with contaminated

  18. Toxicity of sediments from lead-zinc mining areas to juvenile freshwater mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea) compared to standard test organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Kemble, Nile E.; May, Thomas W.; Wang, Ning; MacDonald, Donald D.; Roberts, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Sediment toxicity tests compared chronic effects on survival, growth, and biomass of juvenile freshwater mussels (28-d exposures with Lampsilis siliquoidea) to the responses of standard test organisms—amphipods (28-d exposures with Hyalella azteca) and midges (10-d exposures with Chironomus dilutus)—in sediments from 2 lead–zinc mining areas: the Tri-State Mining District and Southeast Missouri Mining District. Mussel tests were conducted in sediments sieved to <0.25 mm to facilitate recovery of juvenile mussels (2–4 mo old). Sediments were contaminated primarily with lead, zinc, and cadmium, with greater zinc and cadmium concentrations in Tri-State sediments and greater lead concentrations in southeast Missouri sediments. The frequency of highly toxic responses (reduced 10% or more relative to reference sites) in Tri-State sediments was greatest for amphipod survival (25% of samples), midge biomass (20%), and mussel survival (14%). In southeast Missouri sediments, the frequency of highly toxic samples was greatest for mussel biomass (25%) and amphipod biomass (13%). Thresholds for metal toxicity to mussels, expressed as hazard quotients based on probable effect concentrations, were lower for southeast Missouri sediments than for Tri-State sediments. Southeast Missouri sites with toxic sediments had 2 or fewer live mussel taxa in a concurrent mussel population survey, compared with 7 to 26 taxa at reference sites. These results demonstrate that sediment toxicity tests with juvenile mussels can be conducted reliably by modifying existing standard methods; that the sensitivity of mussels to metals can be similar to or greater than standard test organisms; and that responses of mussels in laboratory toxicity tests are consistent with effects on wild mussel populations.

  19. Assessment of heavy metals bioavailability and toxicity toward Vibrio fischeri in sediment of the Huelva estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Daniel; Usero, José; Morillo, José

    2016-06-01

    Relationship between toxicity and bioavailable metals in sediments from the Huelva estuary and its littoral of influence was analyzed. Toxicity was assessed with Microtox(®) bioassay using a marine luminescent bacterium: Vibrio fischeri. Bioavailable metals were considered as both, acid extractable fraction of BCR procedure and the sum of exchangeable and bound to carbonates fractions of Tessier sequential extraction. A bioavailable metals index was calculated to integrate results in a single figure. Toxicity and bioavailable metals showed a similar pattern. Higher levels were found in the estuary than in the littoral (140 TU/g). In Huelva estuary, highest levels were found in the Tinto estuary (5725 TU/g), followed by the Odiel estuary (5100 TU/g) and the Padre Santo Canal (2500 TU/g). Results in this area were well over than those in nearby estuaries. Furthermore, they are similar to or even higher than those in other polluted sediments around the world. Bioavailable metal index showed a stronger correlation with acid extractable fraction of BCR (R(2) = 0.704) than that for the sum of exchangeable and bound to carbonates fractions of Tessier (R(2) = 0.661). These results suggest that bioavailable metals are an important source of sediment toxicity in the Huelva estuary and its littoral of influence, an area with one of the highest mortality risks of Spain. PMID:27002282

  20. Phylogenetic characterization of archaea in saltpan sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nasier; Johri, Sarojini; Sultan, Phalisteen; Abdin, Malik Z; Qazi, Ghulam N

    2011-06-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the presence of archaeal diversity in saltpan sediments of Goa, India by 16S rDNA-dependent molecular phylogeny. Small subunit rRNA (16S rDNA) from saltpan sediment metagenome were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific to the domain archaea. 10 unique phylotypes were obtained by PCR based RFLP of 16S rRNA genes using endonuclease Msp 1, which was most suitable to score the genetic diversity. These phylotypes spanned a wide range within the domain archaea including both crenarchaeota and euryarcheaota. None of the retrieved crenarchaeota sequences could be grouped with previously cultured crenarchaeota however; two sequences were related with haloarchaea. Most of the sequences determined were closely related to the sequences that had been previously obtained from metagenome of a variety of marine environments. The phylogenetic study of a site investigated for the first time revealed the presence of low archaeal population but showed yet unclassified species, may specially adapted to the salt pan sediment of Goa. PMID:22654153

  1. Sediment toxicity and bioaccumulation of nano and micron-sized aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jacob K; Coleman, Jessica G; Weiss, Charles A; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2010-02-01

    Nano-aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3)) is used commercially in coatings and abrasives. Nano-Al(2)O(3) can also be generated through the oxidation of nano-aluminum in military propellants and energetics. The purpose of the present study was to assess toxicity and bioaccumulation of nano-Al(2)O(3) to a variety of sediment organisms (Tubifex tubifex, Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Corbicula fluminea). The bioaccumulation and toxicity of nano-Al(2)O(3) was compared with that of micron-sized Al(2)O(3) to investigate potential size-related effects. Results of the present study show species-specific differences in relative bioaccumulation of nano and micron-sized Al(2)O(3). Significant toxic effects (survival and growth) were observed in H. azteca testing, but only at high concentrations unlikely to be found in the environment. Nano-Al(2)O(3) was found to be more toxic than micron-sized Al(2)O(3) to H. azteca survival in a 14-d study in which organisms were in direct contact with a thin layer of 625 or 2,500 mg of Al(2)O(3) dispersed on the surface of either sediment or sand. A significant growth effect was also observed for nano but not micron-sized Al(2)O(3) at the highest treatment level tested (100 g/kg Al(2)O(3)) in a 10-d H. azteca bioassay in which Al(2)O(3) was homogenized with sediment. However, differences in measured sediment Al concentrations (micron-sized = 55.1 [+/-0.6] g/kg Al; nano-sized = 66.2 [+/-0.6] g/kg Al) in the nano and micron-sized Al(2)O(3) preclude direct comparison of the toxicity of these two treatments based on particle size. PMID:20821462

  2. Assessment of sediments from Tiete River - toxicity and trace elements - from Salesopolis to Suzano counties, Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, sediment samples from the Tiete River were evaluated for toxicity and trace metals (5 sampling sites). The studied region includes Salesopolis to Suzano and surroundings, a highly industrialized area. The study involved toxicity evaluation (sediment, elutriate and pore-water) and the distribution of some major, trace and rare earth elements on sediments. Multielemental analysis was carried out by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and total mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption technique (CV AAS). The concentration values obtained for the metals As, Cr, Hg and Zn in the sediment samples were compared to the Canadian Council of Minister of the Environment (CCME) oriented values (TEL and PEL). Regarding toxicity, whole sediments and elutriate fractions were evaluated using chronic assays for Ceriodaphnia dubia, while the pore water was carried out for Vibrio fischeri toxicity assays. These assays followed Brazilian Standardized Methods (ABNT). Whole sediments and elutriate evidenced negative biological effects, even at Salesopolis county, the control site (less impacted area). The worst effects were obtained at Mogi das Cruzes and Suzano counties (sampling stations 3 and 4). The elutriate fractions collected at the same stations showed acute toxicity in two of three samples (C. dubia). When pore water was evaluated, a toxicity gradient which increased as the river flowed through Mogi das Cruzes county was obtained. Regarding toxic metal contents in the sediment samples points 3 and 4 exceeded the TEL oriented values for As, Cr, Hg and Zn and point 4 also exceeded the PEL values for all these elements. (author)

  3. Assessment of sediments from Tiete River - toxicity and trace elements - from Salesopolis to Suzano counties, Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alegre, Gabriel F.; Borrely, Sueli, E-mail: gabrielfonseca@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes; Nascimento, Thuany M.; Favaro, Deborah I.T., E-mail: defavaro@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise por Ativacao Neutronica

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, sediment samples from the Tiete River were evaluated for toxicity and trace metals (5 sampling sites). The studied region includes Salesopolis to Suzano and surroundings, a highly industrialized area. The study involved toxicity evaluation (sediment, elutriate and pore-water) and the distribution of some major, trace and rare earth elements on sediments. Multielemental analysis was carried out by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and total mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption technique (CV AAS). The concentration values obtained for the metals As, Cr, Hg and Zn in the sediment samples were compared to the Canadian Council of Minister of the Environment (CCME) oriented values (TEL and PEL). Regarding toxicity, whole sediments and elutriate fractions were evaluated using chronic assays for Ceriodaphnia dubia, while the pore water was carried out for Vibrio fischeri toxicity assays. These assays followed Brazilian Standardized Methods (ABNT). Whole sediments and elutriate evidenced negative biological effects, even at Salesopolis county, the control site (less impacted area). The worst effects were obtained at Mogi das Cruzes and Suzano counties (sampling stations 3 and 4). The elutriate fractions collected at the same stations showed acute toxicity in two of three samples (C. dubia). When pore water was evaluated, a toxicity gradient which increased as the river flowed through Mogi das Cruzes county was obtained. Regarding toxic metal contents in the sediment samples points 3 and 4 exceeded the TEL oriented values for As, Cr, Hg and Zn and point 4 also exceeded the PEL values for all these elements. (author)

  4. Sediment chemistry and toxicity in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey: Pre- and post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanok, Kristin M; Szabo, Zoltan; Reilly, Timothy J; Defne, Zafer; Ganju, Neil K

    2016-06-30

    Hurricane Sandy made landfall in Barnegat Bay, October, 29, 2012, damaging shorelines and infrastructure. Estuarine sediment chemistry and toxicity were investigated before and after to evaluate potential environmental health impacts and to establish post-event baseline sediment-quality conditions. Trace element concentrations increased throughout Barnegat Bay up to two orders of magnitude, especially north of Barnegat Inlet, consistent with northward redistribution of silt. Loss of organic compounds, clay, and organic carbon is consistent with sediment winnowing and transport through the inlets and sediment transport modeling results. The number of sites exceeding sediment quality guidance levels for trace elements tripled post-Sandy. Sediment toxicity post-Sandy was mostly unaffected relative to pre-Sandy conditions, but at the site with the greatest relative increase for trace elements, survival rate of the test amphipod decreased (indicating degradation). This study would not have been possible without comprehensive baseline data enabling the evaluation of storm-derived changes in sediment quality. PMID:27158047

  5. Joint toxicity of sediment-associated DDT and copper to a polychaete, Nereis succinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Qi, Hong-Xue; You, Jing

    2015-03-01

    As major components in antifouling paints, both dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and copper are ubiquitous in estuarine sediment and have been detected at high concentrations in the harbors in South China. In the present study joint toxicity between DDT and copper to an estuarine polychaete, Nereis succinea, was examined using bioaccumulation potential, growth impairment and change in lipid peroxidation contents as sub-lethal endpoints. In general, the toxicity of DDXs (DDT and its metabolites) and copper acted independently and copper was more toxic to the lugworms at environmentally relevant concentrations. Nevertheless, co-exposure to copper led to a significant reduction in the bioaccumulation of DDXs when the concentrations of DDXs in sediment were high. The inhibition of DDX bioaccumulation by copper may be partially explained by the decrease in the bioavailability of sediment-associated DDXs which were estimated by biomimetic gut fluid extraction. The saturation of the solubilization agents or the inhibition of protease activity in gut fluid of N. succinea by copper limited the DDX bioavailability and the subsequent bioaccumulation. PMID:25424350

  6. Toxicity Tests of Whole Sediment Samples Using the Hyallella (H. azteca) Survival and Growth Tests (ASTM E 1283-93)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — 10-day toxicity tests using Hyalella azteca were conducted with sediment samples collected by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Bloomington, Indiana facility to...

  7. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Magnitude and Extent of Sediment Toxicity in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of the toxicity of sediments was performed by NOAA's National Status and Trends (NSandT) Program throughout the Hudson-Raritan Estuary. The objectives of...

  8. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Biological Effects of Toxic Contaminants in Sediments from Long Island Sound and Environs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of sediment toxicity was carried out by NOAA's National Status and Trends Program in the coastal bays that surround Long Island Sound in New York and...

  9. Metal toxicity in a sediment-dwelling polychaete: Threshold body concentrations or overwhelming accumulation rates?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmen Casado-Martinez, M., E-mail: c.casado-martinez@nhm.ac.u [Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Smith, Brian D. [Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Luoma, Samuel N. [John Muir Institute of the Environment, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Rainbow, Philip S. [Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    We followed the net accumulation of As, Cu and Zn in the deposit-feeding polychaete Arenicola marina exposed in the laboratory to natural metal-contaminated sediments, one exposure leading to mass mortality between day 10 and 20, and the other not causing lethality over a period of 60 days of exposure. The worms showed lower total accumulated metal concentrations just before mortality occurred (<20 days) at the lethal exposure, than after 30 days of exposure to sediments not causing mortality. Moreover rates of accumulation of As, Cu and Zn were significantly higher in the lethal exposure than in the sublethal exposure. Our results show that it is not possible to link mortality to a critical total body concentration, and we add to a growing body of literature indicating that metal toxicity occurs when organisms cannot cope with overwhelming influx and subsequent accumulation rates. - Laboratory exposures with the deposit-feeding polychaete Arenicola marina suggest that toxicity is not caused by the accumulated concentration of toxic metals in the body of the animal, but by the rate at which the toxic metal is accumulated.

  10. Metal toxicity in a sediment-dwelling polychaete: Threshold body concentrations or overwhelming accumulation rates?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We followed the net accumulation of As, Cu and Zn in the deposit-feeding polychaete Arenicola marina exposed in the laboratory to natural metal-contaminated sediments, one exposure leading to mass mortality between day 10 and 20, and the other not causing lethality over a period of 60 days of exposure. The worms showed lower total accumulated metal concentrations just before mortality occurred (<20 days) at the lethal exposure, than after 30 days of exposure to sediments not causing mortality. Moreover rates of accumulation of As, Cu and Zn were significantly higher in the lethal exposure than in the sublethal exposure. Our results show that it is not possible to link mortality to a critical total body concentration, and we add to a growing body of literature indicating that metal toxicity occurs when organisms cannot cope with overwhelming influx and subsequent accumulation rates. - Laboratory exposures with the deposit-feeding polychaete Arenicola marina suggest that toxicity is not caused by the accumulated concentration of toxic metals in the body of the animal, but by the rate at which the toxic metal is accumulated.

  11. Toxicity characterization of waste mobile phone plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste plastic housing units (N = 60) of mobile phones (of different models, and brands), were collected and analyzed for lead, cadmium, nickel and silver using atomic absorption spectrophotometry after acid digestion using a 1:1 mixture of H2SO4 and HNO3. The mean (±S.D.) and range of the results are 58.3 ± 50.4 mg/kg (5.0-340 mg/kg) for Pb, 69.9 ± 145 mg/kg (4.6-1005 mg/kg) for Cd, 432 ± 1905 mg/kg (5.0-11,000 mg/kg) for Ni, and 403 ± 1888 mg/kg (5.0-12,500 mg/kg) for Ag. Approximately 90% of the results for the various metals were ≤100 mg/kg. Results greater than 300 mg/kg were generally less than 7% for each metal and could be attributed to exogenous contamination of the samples. These results suggest that there may not be any immediate danger from end-of-life (EoL) mobile phone plastic housing if appropriately treated/managed. However, considering the large quantities generated and the present low-end management practices in most developing countries, such as open burning, there appears a genuine concern over the potential for environmental pollution and toxicity to man and the ecology

  12. Toxicity testing of freshwater sediment collected near freshwater aquaculture facilities in the Maritimes, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, B A; Garron, C; Ernst, B; Jackman, P

    2013-01-01

    In the Atlantic region of Canada, there are close to 50 land-based freshwater aquaculture facilities, most of which discharge wastewater to freshwater receiving environments. This study was designed to assess the chemical and toxicological characteristics of sediments in those receiving environments. Thirty sediment samples were collected from 3 locations (upstream, outfall and downstream) at seven freshwater aquaculture facilities. Toxicity tests conducted included amphipod growth, amphipod survival and Microtox™. Sediments were also analysed for ammonia/porewater ammonia, redox and sulphide. Porewater ammonia concentration for the amphipod survival test ranged from 0.01 to 42 mg/L at the conclusion of the 14-day survival test. Ammonia concentration in sediment ranged from 0.3-202 μg/g, sulphide concentration ranged from 0.15 to 17.4 μg/g, yet redox ranged from 32 to 594 mV. Microtox™  IC50 values ranged from 108,00 to >164,000 mg/L, yet amphipod survival ranged from 0 to 100%, depending on sampling locations. Amphipod survival was significantly related (P aquaculture facilities are impacting sediment dwelling benthic invertebrates at the outfall but that impact largely disappears by 100 m downstream. Furthermore those impacts were rarely detected during the early winter season, when biomass production was at the lowest. PMID:23705607

  13. Assessment of photoinduced toxicity of crude oil-contaminated sediments on aquatic invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accidental crude oil releases resulting in environmental contamination are becoming increasingly widespread and frequent occurrences. Investigations of impacts to aquatic ecosystems following crude oil spills have often uncovered alterations in invertebrate community diversity and species abundance. Crude oil is partially composed of aromatic hydrocarbons, including some phototoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To assess organism phototoxic response to PAHs present in crude oil, laboratory toxicity tests were conducted with porewater extracts from crude oil-contaminated sediments and reference sediments using Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca. Test organisms were exposed to porewater samples under artificial near-ultraviolet (UV) radiation and normal laboratory white fluorescent lighting. Controls under both lighting exposures included: culture water controls, anthracene controls (representing a known phototoxic PAH), and solvent controls. Following acute exposure periods, C. dubia mortality under near-UV light in crude oil porewater was significantly different from corresponding mortality under fluorescent light. C. dubia experienced 100% mortality in crude oil sediment porewater under near-UV light, 0% mortality in reference sediment porewater under near-UV light, and 0% mortality across corresponding treatments under fluorescent light exposures. H. azteca mortality under near-UV light in crude oil porewater was also significantly different from corresponding treatments under fluorescent light. Laboratory results suggest that PAHs in crude oil-contaminated sediments in the aquatic environment have the potential to substantially adversely affect survival of UV-exposed aquatic invertebrates

  14. Characterizing the toxicity of pulsed selenium exposure to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tham C; Klaine, Stephen J

    2008-03-01

    The acute toxicity of selenium (Se) to aquatic biota has been studied extensively for decades. However, most studies have used a constant concentration aqueous exposure of Se to an invertebrate species. Since constant concentration exposure of toxicants to invertebrates is unusual in the environment, episodic exposure or pulsed exposures may represent true risk to aquatic biota more accurately. This research was designed to characterize the toxicity effects of pulsed Se exposure to Daphnia magna. Selenium exposure was varied during a 21-d chronic toxicity test to examine the effects of exposure concentration, duration, and recovery on survival, growth, and reproduction of D. magna. While D. magna did not die during exposures, latent mortality was observed. Latent mortality increased with exposure concentration and duration. Hence, standard toxicity test using continuous exposures would underestimate Se toxicity. Risk assessment method using results of continuous exposure would underestimate risk of Se to biota. For double-pulse exposures, cumulative mortality on day 21 was higher when time interval between pulses was shorter. With the same total exposure time, continuous exposure caused higher toxicity than did pulsed exposures due to recovery and tolerance development in D. magna after earlier pulses. Growth and reproduction of surviving D. magna were not affected by pulsed Se exposure due to recovery of D. magna after removal of the pulses. Based on these results, risk assessment for Se should take latent effects and the effect of recovery in to account. PMID:18190947

  15. Metals in sediments: bioavailability and toxicity in a tropical reservoir used for public water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Silva, Sheila; Da Silva, Daniel Clemente Vieira Rego; Lage, Fernanda; de Paiva, Teresa Cristina Brazil; Moschini-Carlos, Viviane; Rosa, André Henrique; Pompêo, Marcelo

    2016-05-01

    Sediments may be a repository of contaminants in freshwater ecosystems. One way to assess the quality of this compartment, in terms of potentially bioavailable metals, is by the analysis of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM). In order to investigate the bioavailability, toxicity, and compartmentalization of different metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn), sampling of surface sediments was performed at nine stations along the Paiva Castro reservoir (São Paulo, Brazil). The metals were analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Sediment organic matter (OM), organic carbon (OC), and grain size were also measured. The parameters pH, EH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen were determined at the sediment-water interface. Chronic and acute toxicological tests were performed with sediments from the area where water was extracted for the public water supply. Low levels of OM, associated with loss of stratification in the water column, explained the relatively low AVS values. The molar ratio ∑[SEM]-[AVS]/fOC was less than 130 mmol/kg(-1) for all the sampling stations, indicating that the metals were not bioavailable. With the exception of Cd, metal levels were in accordance with background concentrations and the threshold effect level (TEL) established by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment. The ecotoxicological tests confirmed the absence of toxic effects to biota. Application of principal component analysis indicated the presence of four compartments along the reservoir: (1) a riverine zone, potentially threatened by contamination with Cd; (2) an intermediate zone; (3) a limnic area; and (4) the area where water was taken for the public water supply. PMID:27117444

  16. Local impacts of coal mines and power plants across Canada. II. Metals, organics and toxicity in sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheam, V.; Reynoldson, T.; Garbai, G.; Rajkumar, J.; Milani, D. [Environment of Canada, Burlington, ON (Canada). National Water Research Institute

    2000-07-01

    A Canada-wide survey was undertaken to study local impacts of coal mines and coal-fired electrical generating stations. The first part dealt with thallium in waters and sediments. This, Part II, deals with metals and organics in sediments as well as sediment toxicity to four different organisms. Several elevated metal and PAH concentrations as well as high toxicity (based on biological sediment guidelines) were observed compared to uncontaminated sites. Based on Ontario's sediment guidelines, most of the studied sediments fell in the 'marginally to significantly polluted' category of sediment quality, although two belonged to the 'grossly polluted' class due to the extremely high concentrations of some metals. The observed diversity of PAHs and near-unity carbon preference indices indicate non-biological origins of the studied sediments. In this initial study, four different organisms, Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca, Hexagenia spp. (Hexagenia limbata) and Tubifex tubifex were used to determine sediment toxicity, which showed 50% of the tested sites were highly stressed.

  17. Are PAHS the Right Metric for Assessing Toxicity Related to Oils, Tars, Creosote and Similar Contaminants in Sediments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oils, tars, and other non-aqueous phase hydrocarbon liquids (NAPLs) are common sources of contamination in aquatic sediments, and the toxicity of such contamination has generally been attributed to component chemicals, particularly PAHs. While there is no doubt PAHs can be toxic ...

  18. Bioaccumulation and toxicity of a cationic surfactant (DODMAC) in sediment dwelling freshwater invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comber, S.D.W. [Atkins Ltd, Chilbrook, Oasis Business Park, Eynsham, Oxford, OX29 4AH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: sean.comber@atkinsglobal.com; Rule, K.L. [Centre for Environmental Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Conrad, A.U. [Scottish Environmental Protection Agency, SEPA Corporate Office, Erskine Court Castle Business Park, Stirling FK9 4TR (United Kingdom); Hoess, S. [ECOSSA, Thierschstrasser 43, 80538 Muenchen (Germany); Webb, S.F. [Procter and Gamble, Temselaan 100, Strombeek-Bever B1853 (Belgium); Marshall, S. [Unilever Colworth, Sharnbrook, Bedford MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Dimethyldioctadecylammonium chloride (DODMAC, CAS No. 107-64-2) is the principal active component of Di(hydrogenated tallow alkyl) dimethylammonium chloride (DHTDMAC, CAS No. 61789-80-8), a cationic surfactant formerly used principally in laundry fabric softeners. After discharge to water, DODMAC partitions strongly to sediment, therefore the assessment of the effects of DODMAC to benthic organisms is essential in any risk assessment. Chronic toxicity studies were conducted with Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaete), Tubifex tubifex (Oligochaete) and Caenorhabditis elegans (Nematode). NOECs were greater than 5738, 1515 and 1351 mg/kg dw, respectively, even for sub-lethal effects. Measurement of the route of uptake of DODMAC by L. variegatus demonstrated the relative importance of uptake via ingestion (86%) compared with direct contact with the sediment and via pore water (14%). The overall tendency of DODMAC to bioaccumulate, however, was low with measured accumulation factors of 0.22 and 0.78 for L. variegatus and T. tubifex, respectively. - The cationic surfactant, DODMAC, exhibits low bioavailability and toxicity to sediment dwelling organisms, with uptake dominated by ingestion.

  19. Bioaccumulation and toxicity of a cationic surfactant (DODMAC) in sediment dwelling freshwater invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimethyldioctadecylammonium chloride (DODMAC, CAS No. 107-64-2) is the principal active component of Di(hydrogenated tallow alkyl) dimethylammonium chloride (DHTDMAC, CAS No. 61789-80-8), a cationic surfactant formerly used principally in laundry fabric softeners. After discharge to water, DODMAC partitions strongly to sediment, therefore the assessment of the effects of DODMAC to benthic organisms is essential in any risk assessment. Chronic toxicity studies were conducted with Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaete), Tubifex tubifex (Oligochaete) and Caenorhabditis elegans (Nematode). NOECs were greater than 5738, 1515 and 1351 mg/kg dw, respectively, even for sub-lethal effects. Measurement of the route of uptake of DODMAC by L. variegatus demonstrated the relative importance of uptake via ingestion (86%) compared with direct contact with the sediment and via pore water (14%). The overall tendency of DODMAC to bioaccumulate, however, was low with measured accumulation factors of 0.22 and 0.78 for L. variegatus and T. tubifex, respectively. - The cationic surfactant, DODMAC, exhibits low bioavailability and toxicity to sediment dwelling organisms, with uptake dominated by ingestion

  20. Potentially Toxic Metal and Metalloid Fractionation Contamination in Sediments of Daya Bay, South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Cao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The metal profiles in sediments of the Daya Bay (DYB in China were established using sequential extraction protocols proposed by the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR. The surface sediment samples from 23 representative stations were collected in 2011 and were analysed to evaluate the mobility and bioavailability of a suite of potentially toxic metals (Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd and metalloid (As. The obtained ranking order of migration and transformation, and the degree of pollution was Pb > Cd > Cu > Zn > Ni > Cr > As. Among these elements, Pb is considered to pose a serious threat to human health and ecological environment due to its significant percentage in non-residual form. The ratios of secondary and primary phases showed that studied sediments are moderately to heavily polluted with Cu and Zn, and Cd and Pb respectively. The levels of association between the variables (metal-metalloid at each step of sequential extractions were evaluated with multivariate statistical analysis, including correlation analysis and principal components analysis. With these analyses, the possible sources of potential pollution were deduced. The correlation analysis revealed that Total Organic Carbon content is the most important influencing factor affecting the distribution of potentially toxic elements in Daya Bay. The principal components analysis (PCA suggested that the studied elements in DYB area originate primarily from natural weathering and secondly from industrial wastewater and aquaculture waste water.

  1. Environmental characterization of soils and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elevated chromium level in the ground water at the SNL/CA site is a major concern. The author has developed an analytical methodology that allows one to identify the possible sources of the contamination. This methodology is focused on the integration of various analytical techniques to characterize physical and chemical properties of the soil samples from the contaminated area. The techniques include inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), and electron microscopy with image analysis (EM/IA). This report describes the overall experimental approaches and findings for the soil samples from the area where the Cr-level was found to be elevated. Current findings suggest that the potential source of the Cr is the Cr-containing minerals that are present in natural abundance rather than externally introduced. In addition to chromium, other heavy metals, such as manganese, iron, and arsenic were also characterized and reported

  2. Toxicity of sediment-bound pollutants in the Seine estuary, France, using a Eurytemora affinis larval bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesueur, Teddy; Boulangé-Lecomte, Céline; Restoux, Gwendal; Deloffre, Julien; Xuereb, Benoît; Le Menach, Karyn; Budzinski, Hélène; Petrucciani, Nathalie; Marie, Sabine; Petit, Fabienne; Forget-Leray, Joëlle

    2015-03-01

    Coastal urbanisation exposes surrounding estuarine environments to urban-related contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and pesticide mixtures. Hydrophobic contaminants can adsorb on estuarine sediments. They can subsequently be released on a massive scale in the aquatic environment due to artificial or natural phenomena (e.g. dredging, tides), thereby threatening living organisms. The contamination of sediment is a significant ecological issue in the Seine estuary, France. However, few relevant methods have been developed to assess sediment toxicity and its ecological impacts in a cost-effective way. In this context, we aimed to assess the toxicity of natural sediments from the Seine estuary on the development of the calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis using a previously developed larval bioassay. This assay involves direct exposure of nauplii to elutriates of sediments for six days. Sediments were collected along the Seine estuary from six polluted sites and one reference site. Pollutants in this estuary included PAHs, PCBs and OCPs (organochlorine pesticides). Nauplius survival was significantly more affected by exposure to all contaminated sediment elutriates, than by exposure to sediment from Yville-sur-Seine (the reference site), whereas nauplius growth was significantly reduced after exposure to contaminated sediment elutriates from four of the six contaminated sites. We identified two distinct site clusters, one including both the sand-rich and the least polluted sediments (Oissel, Quillebeuf-sur-Seine, Caudebec-en-Caux) and the other including both the clay- and silt-rich, and the most polluted sediments (La Bouille, Poses, Pont de Normandie). As expected, survival was significantly more impacted after exposure to elutriates from the second cluster than from the first. This work enables (i) assessment of the toxicity of natural sediments in the Seine estuary and (ii) validation of the larval bioassay

  3. Effect of indigenous animals on chronic end points in freshwater sediment toxicity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynoldson, T.B.; Day, K.E.; Clarke, C.; Milani, D. (National Water Research Inst., Burlington, Ontario (Canada))

    1994-06-01

    Sediment toxicity tests were conducted using three species of benthic invertebrates, Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca, and Hexagenia limbata, with various densities of the oligochaete worm Tubifex tubifex. It was shown that indigenous animals, simulated by the presence of Tubifex tubifex, did not affect survival of the test species (P [>=] 0.05) but did reduce growth in all three test species and in two species at the lowest tested densities, equivalent to 1,460 worms per square meter. At densities of Tubifex tubifex equivalent to 20,000 m[sup [minus]2], the growth of Chironomus riparius was reduced by >90%, Hyalella azteca by >60%, and Hexagenia limbata by almost 50%. The densities of oligochaetes are equivalent to those found in many contaminated sites. Therefore, it is concluded that the presence of indigenous organisms can confound the interpretation of toxicity test results, based on chronic end points. It is recommended that removal of organisms by considered before toxicity tests are conducted with freshwater sediments from sites with large populations of benthic invertebrates, especially oligochaete worms.

  4. Equilibrium partitioning theory to predict the sediment toxicity of the anionic surfactant C12-2-LAS to Corophium volutator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the effect of the sorption of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) on the bioavailability to marine benthic organisms is essential to refine the environmental risk assessment of these compounds. According to the equilibrium partitioning theory (EqP), the effect concentration in water-only exposure will be similar to the effect concentration in the sediment pore water. In this work, sorption and desorption experiments with two marine sediments were carried out using the compound C12-2-LAS. The effect of the sediment sorption on the toxicity of benthic organisms was studied in water-only and in sediment bioassays with the marine mud shrimp Corophium volutator. In addition, three common spiking methods were tested for its application in the toxicity tests, as well as the stability of the surfactant during the water-only and sediment-water test duration. LC50 values obtained from water-only exposure showed a good correspondence with the pore water concentrations calculated from the sorption and desorption isotherms in the spiked sediments. - The toxicity of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate to Corophium volutator in marine sediments can be predicted from toxicity measured via water-only exposure

  5. Improving sediment-quality guidelines for nickel: development and application of predictive bioavailability models to assess chronic toxicity of nickel in freshwater sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangheluwe, Marnix L U; Verdonck, Frederik A M; Besser, John M; Brumbaugh, William G; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Schlekat, Christan E; Garman, Emily Rogevich

    2013-11-01

    Within the framework of European Union chemical legislations an extensive data set on the chronic toxicity of sediment nickel has been generated. In the initial phase of testing, tests were conducted with 8 taxa of benthic invertebrates in 2 nickel-spiked sediments, including 1 reasonable worst-case sediment with low concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and total organic carbon. The following species were tested: amphipods (Hyalella azteca, Gammarus pseudolimnaeus), mayflies (Hexagenia sp.), oligochaetes (Tubifex tubifex, Lumbriculus variegatus), mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea), and midges (Chironomus dilutus, Chironomus riparius). In the second phase, tests were conducted with the most sensitive species in 6 additional spiked sediments, thus generating chronic toxicity data for a total of 8 nickel-spiked sediments. A species sensitivity distribution was elaborated based on 10% effective concentrations yielding a threshold value of 94 mg Ni/kg dry weight under reasonable worst-case conditions. Data from all sediments were used to model predictive bioavailability relationships between chronic toxicity thresholds (20% effective concentrations) and AVS and Fe, and these models were used to derive site-specific sediment-quality criteria. Normalization of toxicity values reduced the intersediment variability in toxicity values significantly for the amphipod species Hyalella azteca and G. pseudolimnaeus, but these relationships were less clearly defined for the mayfly Hexagenia sp. Application of the models to prevailing local conditions resulted in threshold values ranging from 126 mg to 281 mg Ni/kg dry weight, based on the AVS model, and 143 mg to 265 mg Ni/kg dry weight, based on the Fe model. PMID:23983116

  6. Multivariate analysis of potentially toxic metals in sediments of a tropical coastal lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyiola, A O; Davidson, C M; Olayinka, K O; Oluseyi, T O; Alo, B I

    2013-03-01

    Surface sediments collected from the Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria, and three adjoining rivers were analysed for their physicochemical properties and pseudo-total concentration of the potentially toxic metals (PTM) Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn. The concentration of the PTM varied seasonally and spatially. Odo-Iyaalaro was observed to be the most polluted river, with highest concentrations of 42.1 mg kg(-1), 102 mg kg(-1), 185 mg kg(-1), 154 mg kg(-1) and 1040 mg kg(-1) of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn, respectively, while Ibeshe River was the least contaminated, apart from a site affected by Cu from the textile industry. Some of the sediments were found to be above the consensus-based probable effect concentrations and Dutch sediment guideline for metals. Overall metal concentrations were similar to those reported for other tropical lagoon and estuarine systems affected by anthropogenic inputs as a result of rapid urbanisation. Due to the large number of samples, principal component analysis was used to examine relationships within the data set. Generally, sediments collected during the dry season were observed to have higher concentration of PTM than those collected during the rainy season. This means that PTM could accumulate over a prolonged period and then be released relatively rapidly, on an annual basis, into tropical lagoon systems. PMID:22628107

  7. Use of Azolla to assess toxicity and accumulation of metals from artificial and natural sediments containing cadmium, copper, and zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, G.M. [S.M. Stoller Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Nimmo, D.W.R.; Flickinger, S.A.; Brinkman, S.F.

    1998-12-31

    The aquatic macrophyte Azolla mexicana was studied to determine if it could indicate toxicity and bioavailability of cadmium, copper, and zinc in sediments. Plants were exposed to metal-fortified artificial sediment and to natural sediment contaminated with tailings from a Superfund site near Deer Lodge, Montana. Dry weights (mass) of biomass were used to determine effects of the metal concentrations and tissue metals were measured to determine metal uptake from the sediments. Plants exposed to artificial sediments fortified with cadmium and copper showed the greatest reduction in dry mass while zinc showed the least. And, plants exposed to copper singly in artificial sediments lost both zinc and cadmium for their tissues. Plants exposed to metal-contaminated natural sediment developed necrotic and chlorotic tissue within 24 hours in 75% and 100% dilutions but significant effects (P < 0.0001) using dry mass were found as low as 3.13%.

  8. Chronic sublethal effects of San Francisco Bay sediments on nereis (neanthes) arenaceodentata; effect of food ration on sediment toxicity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, D.W.; Dillon, T.M.

    1993-09-01

    This report is designed to address concerns regarding the effect of food ration on toxicity during chronic sublethal sediment bioassays. To this end, a contaminated San Francisco Bay sediment and a clean control sediment were evaluated in a chronic sublethal test under a series of different food rations, with the marine polychaete worm Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata. Animals were exposed from early juvenile stage through the onset of gametogenesis. Treatments were 2.OX, 1.OX, 0.5X, and 0.25X where X is the recommended food ration for laboratory cultures. Test end points were survival, growth, and reproduction. The contaminated sediment was a composite of several cores taken to project depth (38 ft (11.6 m) below mean low water mark) from an area in Oakland Inner Harbor known to be contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals. Comparisons were made with a clean control sediment. The control sediment is used in the laboratory cultures of N. arenaceodentata and was collected from Sequim, WA. Mean percent survival of Neanthes was high (>90 percent) in both the contaminated and control sediment across all food ration treatments. Individual wet weights were significantly reduced with decreasing food ration in both contaminated and control sediments. Significant differences in wet weight between sediment types were observed at the 1.OX, 0.5X, and 0.25X rations. Reproduction (fecundity and emergent juvenile (EJ) production) was also Chronic sublethal, Neanthes, Dredged material, San Francisco Bay, Food ration, Sediment.

  9. Bioaccumulation and toxicity of a cationic surfactant (DODMAC) in sediment dwelling freshwater invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, S D W; Rule, K L; Conrad, A U; Höss, S; Webb, S F; Marshall, S

    2008-05-01

    Dimethyldioctadecylammonium chloride (DODMAC, CAS No. 107-64-2) is the principal active component of Di(hydrogenated tallow alkyl) dimethylammonium chloride (DHTDMAC, CAS No. 61789-80-8), a cationic surfactant formerly used principally in laundry fabric softeners. After discharge to water, DODMAC partitions strongly to sediment, therefore the assessment of the effects of DODMAC to benthic organisms is essential in any risk assessment. Chronic toxicity studies were conducted with Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaete), Tubifex tubifex (Oligochaete) and Caenorhabditis elegans (Nematode). NOECs were greater than 5738, 1515 and 1351 mg/kg dw, respectively, even for sub-lethal effects. Measurement of the route of uptake of DODMAC by L. variegatus demonstrated the relative importance of uptake via ingestion (86%) compared with direct contact with the sediment and via pore water (14%). The overall tendency of DODMAC to bioaccumulate, however, was low with measured accumulation factors of 0.22 and 0.78 for L. variegatus and T. tubifex, respectively. PMID:17889974

  10. Effects of acid-volatile sulfide on metal bioavailability and toxicity to midge (Chironomus tentans) larvae in black shale sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogendi, G.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Hannigan, R.E.; Farris, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Metal bioavailability and toxicity to aquatic organisms are greatly affected by variables such as pH, hardness, organic matter, and sediment acid-volatile sulfide (AVS). Sediment AVS, which reduces metal bioavailability and toxicity by binding and immobilizing metals as insoluble sulfides, has been studied intensely in recent years. Few studies, however, have determined the spatial variability of AVS and its interaction with simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) in sediments containing elevated concentrations of metals resulting from natural geochemical processes, such as weathering of black shales. We collected four sediment samples from each of four headwater bedrock streams in northcentral Arkansa (USA; three black shale-draining streams and one limestone-draining stream). We conducted 10-d acute whole-sediment toxicity tests using the midge Chironomus tentans and performed analyses for AVS, total metals, SEMs, and organic carbon. Most of the sediments from shale-draining streams had similar total metal and SEM concentrations but considerable differences in organic carbon and AVS. Zinc was the leading contributor to the SEM molar sum, averaging between 68 and 74%, whereas lead and cadmium contributed less than 3%. The AVS concentration was very low in all but two samples from one of the shale streams, and the sum of the SEM concentrations was in molar excess of AVS for all shale stream sediments. No significant differences in mean AVS concentrations between sediments collected from shale-draining or limestone-draining sites were noted (p > 0.05). Midge survival and growth in black shale-derived sediments were significantly less (p < 0.001) than that of limestone-derived sediments. On the whole, either SEM alone or SEM-AVS explained the total variation in midge survival and growth about equally well. However, survival and growth were significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the two sediment samples that contained measurable AVS compared with the two sediments from the

  11. Spectroscopic characterization of uranium in evaporation basin sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaporation ponds in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), CA, used for the containment of irrigation drainage waters contain elevated levels of uranium (U) resulting from the extensive leaching by carbonate-rich irrigation waters of the local agricultural soils that contain low levels of naturally-occurring U. The SJV ponds are subjected to changes in redox chemistry with cycles of drying and flooding. Past studies have shown that U in the SJV Pont 14 surface sediments is present as mostly the oxidized and soluble form, U(VI). However, the authors were uncertain whether the U in the soil was only present as a U oxide of mixed stoichiometry, such as U3O8(s) (pitchblende) or other species. Here they present characterization information, which includes wet chemical and in situ spectroscopic techniques (X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and low temperature time-resolved luminescence spectroscopies) for samples from two SJV Pond sediments. Surface sediments from SJV Pont 16 were characterized for average oxidation state of U with XANES spectroscopy. The wet chemical extractions and in situ spectroscopic techniques provided fundamental and basic knowledge about the fraction of U(IV) to U(VI), the speciation of luminescent U(VI), and the susceptibility of the sediment U species to leaching

  12. Uptake and Toxicity of Silver Ions, Nanoparticlses and Microparticles in Nereis Virens In a Sediment Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Rayner, Thomas; Mackevica, Aiga; Wejdling, Asbjørn; Zurera, Jaime G. Ocaña; Vaskio, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the project is to investigate how the size and form of Ag affects the internal distribution in the gut cells of Nereis virens and to investigate if the toxicity can be related to the differences in distribution within the cell compartments. The worms were exposed to the ion, nanoparticle and microparticle form of silver in sediment with a concentration of 90µg/g dw and left for 10 days. After exposure the worms were dissected, the gut were extracted and used for cellular fractiona...

  13. Toxicity of sediment pore water associated with offshore oil and gas platforms in the Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of a multidisciplinary program to assess the long-term impacts of offshore petroleum production in the Gulf of Mexico, a series of sediment porewater toxicity tests were conducted. Sediments were samples from five petroleum production platforms along five radial transects. Pore water was extracted from the sediment using a pressure extraction device, centrifuged, and frozen for later toxicity testing and chemical analysis. The sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) embryological development assay and fertilization assay were used to assess porewater toxicity. Significant decreases in normal development of embryos was observed at 14 stations and fertilization was reduced at three stations. All stations with reduced fertilization also showed impaired development in the embryological development assay. All but three toxic sites were within 150 m of the platform. The six most toxic stations were at one platform near the Flower Garden reef, occurring near the platform along three radii; toxicity was always greater at the first site on a radium than at the second. Toxicity is discussed in relation to metal and hydrocarbon concentrations in whole sediment and in pore water

  14. Determination of trace and toxic elements in marine sediments collected from the strait of Malacca, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Strait of Malacca has been a major route for international trade with heavy traffic of large vessels navigating through the narrow waterway everyday. Beside, the Strait of Malacca has some natural ecosystem which requires proper protection from human activities. Therefore, the Malaysian government has initiated a project to monitor the pollution level at the Strait of Malacca. As a result, sampling expeditions had been conducted to collect marine samples to be analyzed for trace and toxic elements as well as organic pollutions and radionuclides. The focus of this report is to determine trace and toxic element concentration in surface sediment samples collected from 18 sampling locations at the Strait of Malacca was reported. (author)

  15. Monitoring the effectiveness of remediation techniques using sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a controlled oil release experiment of weathered crude oil was presented. The released oil was applied to a tidal saltwater marsh at Conrod's Beach, Nova Scotia, Canada. The study included 3 replicate blocks which included 2 unoiled treatments and 4 oiled treatments for each block. One unoiled site had no treatment, the second unoiled site had nutrient addition to examine the effect of nutrients. The oiled treatments included natural attenuation, nutrient addition, nutrient addition with plants, and nutrient addition with a garden aerator to introduce oxygen. A standard lab procedure was used to analyze the sediments to determine the effectiveness of the technique as well as the toxic effects on the survival of the amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius. Test results indicated that the unoiled sites were non-toxic, with a slight decrease in survival in the treatment with nutrient addition. All the oiled sites were very toxic at first, but toxicity decreased gradually with time. Treatment with nutrient addition with a garden aerator proved to be the most complete and fastest detoxification method. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs

  16. Characterization of toxic waste produced in PYMES manufacturing detergents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the protection of the environment, the problem of the residuals squatter a main place in the environmental administration; presently study a test pilot was standardized, to characterize the toxic waste generated in the production of detergents, to standardize methods of chemical valuation and microbiological of polluted waters that allow later on to apply methods of biological purification and processes of bio-treatment of residuals, the project macro of handling of toxic waste it was addressed this way in small and medium companies producers of detergents. The presence settled down of toxic in the studied waste, represented in surfactants significant amounts, phenols, hydrocarbons, fat and phosphates and the decrease of its quantity in front of the action of bacteria, situation that allowed concluding that the approach to the biotransformation process could be carried out

  17. Characterization of anthropogenic sediment particles after a transboundary water pollution of river Tisza using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osan, Janos E-mail: osan@sunserv.kfki.hu; Toeroek, Szabina; Alfoeldy, Balint; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2004-05-21

    At the beginning of 2000, a major mining accident occurred in the Romanian part of the Tisza catchment area due to tailings dam failure releasing huge amounts of heavy metals to the river. Sediment samples were taken from the main riverbed at six sites in Hungary, on March 16, 2000. The objective of this work was to characterize the anthropogenic particles in river sediment previously selected by single-particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA). The trace element composition, heterogeneity and heavy metal speciation of individual particles was studied using synchrotron radiation-based microbeam X-ray emission and absorption methods. Particles were selected only from samples regarded as polluted sediment. White-beam micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF) allowed the quantitative determination of heavy metals such as cadmium in individual particles. The maximum observed concentration of cadmium (>700 {mu}g/g) indicates that this highly toxic heavy metal is concentrated in individual anthropogenic particles. Using the combination of micro X-ray absorption near-edge structure and target-transformation principle component analysis, quantitative chemical speciation of copper and zinc was feasible on individual sediment particles. Heavy metals in most of the particles released from the pollution site remained in the sulfide form resulting in a limited mobility of these metals. Based on the information obtained using microanalytical methods, the estimation of the environmental mobility of heavy metals connected to microparticles becomes possible.

  18. Characterization of anthropogenic sediment particles after a transboundary water pollution of river Tisza using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osán, János; Török, Szabina; Alföldy, Bálint; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2004-05-01

    At the beginning of 2000, a major mining accident occurred in the Romanian part of the Tisza catchment area due to tailings dam failure releasing huge amounts of heavy metals to the river. Sediment samples were taken from the main riverbed at six sites in Hungary, on March 16, 2000. The objective of this work was to characterize the anthropogenic particles in river sediment previously selected by single-particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA). The trace element composition, heterogeneity and heavy metal speciation of individual particles was studied using synchrotron radiation-based microbeam X-ray emission and absorption methods. Particles were selected only from samples regarded as polluted sediment. White-beam micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) allowed the quantitative determination of heavy metals such as cadmium in individual particles. The maximum observed concentration of cadmium (>700 μg/g) indicates that this highly toxic heavy metal is concentrated in individual anthropogenic particles. Using the combination of micro X-ray absorption near-edge structure and target-transformation principle component analysis, quantitative chemical speciation of copper and zinc was feasible on individual sediment particles. Heavy metals in most of the particles released from the pollution site remained in the sulfide form resulting in a limited mobility of these metals. Based on the information obtained using microanalytical methods, the estimation of the environmental mobility of heavy metals connected to microparticles becomes possible.

  19. Characterization of anthropogenic sediment particles after a transboundary water pollution of river Tisza using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the beginning of 2000, a major mining accident occurred in the Romanian part of the Tisza catchment area due to tailings dam failure releasing huge amounts of heavy metals to the river. Sediment samples were taken from the main riverbed at six sites in Hungary, on March 16, 2000. The objective of this work was to characterize the anthropogenic particles in river sediment previously selected by single-particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA). The trace element composition, heterogeneity and heavy metal speciation of individual particles was studied using synchrotron radiation-based microbeam X-ray emission and absorption methods. Particles were selected only from samples regarded as polluted sediment. White-beam micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) allowed the quantitative determination of heavy metals such as cadmium in individual particles. The maximum observed concentration of cadmium (>700 μg/g) indicates that this highly toxic heavy metal is concentrated in individual anthropogenic particles. Using the combination of micro X-ray absorption near-edge structure and target-transformation principle component analysis, quantitative chemical speciation of copper and zinc was feasible on individual sediment particles. Heavy metals in most of the particles released from the pollution site remained in the sulfide form resulting in a limited mobility of these metals. Based on the information obtained using microanalytical methods, the estimation of the environmental mobility of heavy metals connected to microparticles becomes possible

  20. Statistical characterization of spatiotemporal sediment dynamics in the Venice lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniello, Luca; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Botter, Gianluca; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Characterizing the dynamics of suspended sediment is crucial when investigating the long-term evolution of tidal landscapes. Here we apply a widely tested mathematical model which describes the dynamics of cohesive and noncohesive sediments, driven by the combined effect of tidal currents and wind waves, using 1 year long time series of observed water levels and wind data from the Venice lagoon. The spatiotemporal evolution of the computed suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is analyzed on the basis of the "peak over threshold" theory. Our analysis suggests that events characterized by high SSC can be modeled as a marked Poisson process over most of the lagoon. The interarrival time between two consecutive over threshold events, the intensity of peak excesses, and the duration are found to be exponentially distributed random variables over most of tidal flats. Our study suggests that intensity and duration of over threshold events are temporally correlated, while almost no correlation exists between interarrival times and both durations and intensities. The benthic vegetation colonizing the central southern part of the Venice lagoon is found to exert a crucial role on sediment dynamics: vegetation locally decreases the frequency of significant resuspension events by affecting spatiotemporal patterns of SSCs also in adjacent areas. Spatial patterns of the mean interarrival of over threshold SSC events are found to be less heterogeneous than the corresponding patterns of mean interarrivals of over threshold bottom shear stress events because of the role of advection/dispersion processes in mixing suspended sediments within the lagoon. Implications for long-term morphodynamic modeling of tidal environments are discussed.

  1. Occurrence, compositional distribution, and toxicity assessment of pyrethroid insecticides in sediments from the fluvial systems of Chaohu Lake, Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Zhong; Bai, Ya-Shu; Wu, Yakton; Zhang, Shuo; Chen, Tian-Hu; Peng, Shu-Chuan; Xie, Yu-Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Surface sediment-associated synthetic pyrethroid insecticides (SPs) are known to pose high risks to the benthic organisms in Chaohu Lake, a shallow lake of Eastern China. However, the pollution status of the lake's tributaries and estuaries is still unknown. The present study was conducted to investigate the occurrence, compositional distribution, and toxicity of 12 currently used SPs in the surface sediments from four important tributaries, as well as in the sediment cores at their estuaries, using GC-MS for quantification. All SPs selected were detectable, with cypermethrin, es/fenvalerate, and permethrin dominant in both surface and core sediments, suggesting that these compounds were extensively applied. Urban samples contained the highest summed concentrations of the 12 SPs analyzed (Σ12SP) in both surface and core sediments compared with rural samples, suggesting that urban areas near aquatic environments posed high risks for SPs. The mean concentration of Σ12SP in surface sediments of each river was generally higher than that found in core sediments from its corresponding estuary, perhaps implying recent increases in SP usage. Surface sediments were significantly dominated by cypermethrin and permethrin, whereas core sediments were dominated by permethrin and es/fenvalerate. The compositional distributions demonstrated a spatial variation for surface sediments because urban sediments generally contained greater percentages of permethrin and cypermethrin, but rural sediments had significant levels of es/fenvalerate and cypermethrin. In all sediment cores, the percentage of permethrin gradually increased, whereas es/fenvalerate tended to decrease, from the bottom sediments to the top, indicating that the former represented fresh input, whereas the latter represented historical residue. Most urban samples would be expected to be highly toxic to benthic organisms due to the residue of SPs based on a calculation of toxic units (TUs) using toxicity data of the

  2. Sediment toxicity and bioaccumulation assessment in abandoned copper and mercury mining areas of the Nalón River basin (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Fernández, L; Rodríguez, P; Martínez-Madrid, M

    2015-01-01

    Sediment toxicity and metal bioaccumulation were assessed at sites affected by historical copper (Cu) and mercury (Hg) mining activities in the Nalón River basin, Asturias, Spain. Toxicity assessment of stream sediments was based on a 28-day oligochaete Tubifex tubifex sediment bioassay, which allowed the classification of sites into three levels of toxicity: 11 sites were classified as nontoxic (including Cu mine sites), three sites as potentially toxic, and seven sites as toxic (all located in Hg mine districts). The greatest levels of arsenic (As), chromium, Hg, lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in T. tubifex were measured at sites affected by Hg mining and the highest Cu levels in tissues at Cu mining sites. Chronic toxicity responses were best explained by As and Hg sediment concentrations and by As, Pb, and Zn tissue residues. Residue levels of As, Hg, Zn, and Pb were successfully used to predict sediment chronic toxicity and estimate effective tissue residues. PMID:25374379

  3. Development of a bioassay to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments to pike (Esox lucius)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike (Esox lucius) are a commercially sought fish species that inhabit the Athabasca River, which flows through the Athabasca oil sands. The fish are exposed to natural sources of bitumen from the McMurray formation. This study was conducted to design and implement a daily-renewal bioassay to assess the toxicity of oil sands to this fish species and to obtain information regarding the development of pike exposed to bitumen. Eggs were collected and fertilized with milt from spawning wild pike captured from Lake Diefenbaker in Saskatchewan. The fertilized eggs were exposed to different concentrations of sediments or culture water only (negative controls) until complete yolk absorption of control fish, approximately 15 days post-hatch. For the rest of the experiment, brine shrimp were fed to the walleye embryos every day after hatching. The developing fish were examined for morphological deformities, survival, hatching success, and changes in weight and length. The research findings indicated that pike is less sensitive than walleye and fathead minnow to the toxicity of oil sands sediments.

  4. Development of a bioassay to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments to pike (Esox lucius)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, D.; Yuan, H.; Tumber, V.; Parrott, J. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Raine, J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Pike (Esox lucius) are a commercially sought fish species that inhabit the Athabasca River, which flows through the Athabasca oil sands. The fish are exposed to natural sources of bitumen from the McMurray formation. This study was conducted to design and implement a daily-renewal bioassay to assess the toxicity of oil sands to this fish species and to obtain information regarding the development of pike exposed to bitumen. Eggs were collected and fertilized with milt from spawning wild pike captured from Lake Diefenbaker in Saskatchewan. The fertilized eggs were exposed to different concentrations of sediments or culture water only (negative controls) until complete yolk absorption of control fish, approximately 15 days post-hatch. For the rest of the experiment, brine shrimp were fed to the walleye embryos every day after hatching. The developing fish were examined for morphological deformities, survival, hatching success, and changes in weight and length. The research findings indicated that pike is less sensitive than walleye and fathead minnow to the toxicity of oil sands sediments.

  5. Development of a bioassay using walleye (Sander vitreus) to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the effects of sediments from the Athabasca oil sands area on fish development and survival. Walleye (Sander vitreus) which inhabit the Athabasca River are exposed to natural sources of bitumen eroding from the McMurray formation. This study described the design and implementation of a daily-renewal bioassay to evaluate the potential effects of toxicants on walleye development. Eggs were collected and fertilized with milt from spawning wild walleye captured from Lake Diefenbaker in Saskatchewan. The fertilized eggs were exposed to different concentrations of sediments or culture water only (negative controls) until complete yolk absorption of control fish. The walleye embryos were fed brine shrimp daily after hatching and the developing fish were examined for morphological deformities, survival, hatching success, and changes in weight and length between treatments. Organics concentrations in fish tissues and water were measured when possible. Fathead minnows and northern pikes will also be exposed to the same sediments in order to compare the relative sensitivity of the three species.

  6. Development of a bioassay using walleye (Sander vitreus) to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, D.; Yuan, H.; Tumber, V.; Parrott, J. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Raine, J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the effects of sediments from the Athabasca oil sands area on fish development and survival. Walleye (Sander vitreus) which inhabit the Athabasca River are exposed to natural sources of bitumen eroding from the McMurray formation. This study described the design and implementation of a daily-renewal bioassay to evaluate the potential effects of toxicants on walleye development. Eggs were collected and fertilized with milt from spawning wild walleye captured from Lake Diefenbaker in Saskatchewan. The fertilized eggs were exposed to different concentrations of sediments or culture water only (negative controls) until complete yolk absorption of control fish. The walleye embryos were fed brine shrimp daily after hatching and the developing fish were examined for morphological deformities, survival, hatching success, and changes in weight and length between treatments. Organics concentrations in fish tissues and water were measured when possible. Fathead minnows and northern pikes will also be exposed to the same sediments in order to compare the relative sensitivity of the three species.

  7. Use of an oiled gravel column dosing system to characterize exposure and toxicity of fish to sunken heavy oil on spawning substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.; Hodson, P. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    In August 2005, a freight train derailment near the shore of Lake Wabamun near Edmonton, Alberta resulted in the release of nearly 150,000 litres of Bunker C oil on the lakeshore. The purpose of this study was to define the toxic load of oil in sediments to better describe the exposure and toxicity of fish to sunken heavy oil on spawning substrates. Heavy Bunker C fuel contains a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), particularly the 3-4 ringed alkylated forms that cause sublethal toxic responses in early life stages of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Oil patches still persist in near-shore sediments where fish spawn. This study evaluated how the behaviour of heavy oil in water interacts with exposure and toxicity to trout embryo. Flow-through oiled gravel columns were used to determine whether the toxic constituents of heavy oil are transferred to water quickly enough to cause toxicity. Embryonic trout exposed to the outflow of these columns showed signs of sublethal toxicity and dose-dependent mortality. In addition, column output of hydrocarbons and CYP1A induction in fish were flow-dependent. The desorption kinetics of the gravel column dosing was characterized in order to evaluate the toxicity of oil on these substrates and relate it back to toxicity of oil in sediments. The time to steady-state desorption of oil constituents in water was first determined, and then the rate at which different classes of oil constituents partition into water were identified.

  8. Quick, portable toxicity testing of marine or terrigenous fluids, sediments, or chemicals with bioluminescent organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hand-held, battery-operated instrument, which measures bioluminescence inhibition of the microscopic marine dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula, is capable of field-testing substances for toxicity. The organism is sensitive to ppb of strong toxicants. It tolerates some solvents in concentrations necessary for testing lipophylic samples. A test consumes only micrograms of sample. This method requires no adjustments for salinity, pH, color, or turbidity. It has been used successfully to test oil-well drilling fluids, brines produced with oil, waters and sediments from streams and lakes and petroleum-plant effluents containing contaminants such as benzene. The test is non-specific; however, if the substance is known, the end-point effects a direct measurement of its concentration. One-hour toxicity screening tests in the field produce results comparable to the standard four-hour laboratory test. Keeping the sample in the dark during incubation and testing, together with shortness of the overall procedure, eliminates anomalies from light-sensitive substances. Day-to-day variation, as well as among test replicates, is less than 10%. This quick method yields results comparable with a quick test that uses Photobacterium phosphoria, and with 96-hour tests that use Mysidopsis bahia, Artemia salina, Gonyaulax polyedra, Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Cyprinodon variegatus

  9. Toxicity Identification Evaluation (Phase I) of water and sediment samples from a tropical reservoir contaminated with industrial and domestic effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Mariana de F; Botta, Clarice Maria Rispoli; Fonseca, Ana Lúcia

    2014-11-01

    The Funil Reservoir (Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil) is an environment degraded by constant discharge of nutrients and pollution coming from the most industrialized region of the country. As a consequence of eutrophication, there are continuous cyanobacteria blooms, which cause acute and chronic toxicity to zooplankton. In this context, Phase I of Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) was performed on Daphnia similis using water and interstitial water from the reservoir, with the aim of identifying classes of compounds responsible for toxicity. The results indicated that water toxicity was due to cyanobacteria resulting from blooms in the reservoir and surfactants. Metals, especially copper, contributed to sediment toxicity. This research is the first attempt to describe the nature of toxicity in this reservoir using this method. PMID:25103213

  10. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF COAL FLY ASH AMENDMENTS ON THE TOXICITY OF A CONTAMINATED MARINE SEDIMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Robert M.; Perron, Monique M.; Friedman, Carey L.; Suuberg, Eric M.; Pennell, Kelly G.; Cantwell, Mark G.; Pelletier, Marguerite C.; Ho, Kay T.; Serbst, Jonathan R.; Ryba, Stephan A.

    2013-01-01

    Approaches for cleaning-up contaminated sediments range from dredging to in situ treatment. In the present report, we discuss the effects of amending reference and contaminated sediments with coal fly ash to reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of a field sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Six fly ashes and a coconut charcoal were evaluated in 7 d whole sediment toxicity tests with a marine amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) and mysid (Americamysis bahia). Fly ashes with high carbon content and the coconut charcoal showed proficiency at reducing toxicity. Some of the fly ashes demonstrated toxicity in the reference treatments. It is suspected that some of this toxicity is related to the presence of ammonia associated with fly ashes as a result of post-oxidation treatment to reduce nitrous oxides emissions. Relatively simple methods exist to remove ammonia from fly ash prior to use and fly ashes with low ammonia content are available. Fly ashes were also shown to effectively reduce overlying water concentrations of several PAHs. There was no evidence of the release of the metals cadmium, copper, nickel or lead from the fly ashes. A preliminary 28 d polychaete bioaccumulation study with one of the high carbon fly ashes and a reference sediment was also performed. Although preliminary, there was no evidence of adverse effects to worm growth or lipid content, or the accumulation of PAHs or mercury from exposure to the fly ash. These data show fly ashes with high carbon contents may represent viable remedial materials for reducing the bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediments. PMID:18717615

  11. Sublethal toxicity of nano-titanium dioxide and carbon nanotubes in a sediment dwelling marine polychaete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, Tamara, E-mail: t.s.galloway@exeter.ac.u [School of Biosciences, Hatherly Laboratories, University of Exeter, EX4 4PS, Exeter, Devon (United Kingdom); Lewis, Ceri [School of Biosciences, Hatherly Laboratories, University of Exeter, EX4 4PS, Exeter, Devon (United Kingdom); Dolciotti, Ida [Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Institute of Biology and Genetics, Via Ranieri, Monte Dago, 60121 Ancona (Italy); Johnston, Blair D. [School of Biosciences, Hatherly Laboratories, University of Exeter, EX4 4PS, Exeter, Devon (United Kingdom); Moger, Julian [School of Physics, Stocker Road, University of Exeter, Devon EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Regoli, Francesco [Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Institute of Biology and Genetics, Via Ranieri, Monte Dago, 60121 Ancona (Italy)

    2010-05-15

    The ecotoxicology of manufactured nanoparticles (MNPs) in estuarine environments is not well understood. Here we explore the hypothesis that nanoTiO{sub 2} and single walled nanotubes (SWNT) cause sublethal impacts to the infaunal species Arenicola marina (lugworm) exposed through natural sediments. Using a 10 day OECD/ASTM 1990 acute toxicity test, no significant effects were seen for SWNT up to 0.03 g/kg and no uptake of SWNTs into tissues was observed. A significant decrease in casting rate (P = 0.018), increase in cellular damage (P = 0.04) and DNA damage in coelomocytes (P = 0.008) was measured for nanoTiO{sub 2}, with a preliminary LOEC of 1 g/kg. Coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering microscopy (CARS) located aggregates of TiO{sub 2} of >200 nm within the lumen of the gut and adhered to the outer epithelium of the worms, although no visible uptake of particles into tissues was detected. - This study explores the hypothesis that nano-TiO{sub 2} and single walled nanotubes (SWNT) can cause sublethal impacts to Arenicola marina exposed through natural sediments.

  12. Genotype and toxicity relationships among Hyalella azteca: II. Acute exposure to fluoranthene-contaminated sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Y.; Guttman, S.I.; Oris, J.T.; Huang, X.; Burton, G.A.

    2000-05-01

    This study examined the genotypic responses of Hyalella azteca to the toxicity of sediment contaminated by the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fluoranthene. The authors monitored the time to death for 696 H. azteca exposed to ultraviolet light and sediment spiked with fluoranthene. The survival distribution functions within the genotypes at each of these variable allozyme loci (acid phosphatase [ACP*], glucose-6-phosphate isomerase [GPI*], and phosphoglucomutase [PGM*]) were compared using a long-rank test. Results showed significant differences among SDFs at all three loci. No association of heterozygosity with time to death was observed. The homozygote ACP*-CC was associated with decreased survivorship compared with ACP*-AA, ACP*-BB, and ACP*-AB. However, GPI*-AA was associated with increased survivorship compared with GPI*-BB, GPI*-CC, and GPI*-BC. Significant differences in resistance also were observed for PGM*-BB versus either PGM*-AC or PGM*-BC. These results indicate that differential resistance to PAH phototoxicity was genetically related, producing significant alteration in the frequencies of several genotypes in the population.

  13. Characterization of a developmental toxicity dose-response model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faustman, E.M.; Wellington, D.G.; Smith, W.P.; Kimmel, C.A.

    1989-02-01

    The Rai and Van Ryzin dose-response model proposed for teratology experiments has been characterized for its appropriateness and applicability in modeling the dichotomous response data from developmental toxicity studies. Modifications were made in the initial probability statements to reflect more accurately biological events underlying developmental toxicity. Data sets used for the evaluation were obtained from the National Toxicology Program and U.S. EPA laboratories. The studies included developmental evaluations of ethylene glycol, diethylhexyl phthalate, di- and triethylene glycol dimethyl ethers, and nitrofen in rats, mice, or rabbits. Graphic examination and statistical evaluation demonstrate that this model is sensitive to the data when compared to directly measured experimental outcomes. The model was used to interpolate to low-risk dose levels, and comparisons were made between the values obtained and the no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) divided by an uncertainty factor. Our investigation suggests that the Rai and Van Ryzin model is sensitive to the developmental toxicity end points, prenatal deaths, and malformations, and appears to model closely their relationship to dose.

  14. SEDIMENT TOXICITY AND COMMUNITY COMPOSITION OF BENTHOS AND COLONIZED PERIPHYTON IN THE EVERGLADES - FLORIDA BAY TRANSITIONAL ZONE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael A., Larry R. Goodman, John M. Macauley and James C. Moore. 2004. Sediment Toxicity and Community Composition of Benthos and Colonized Periphyton in the Everglades-Florida Bay Transitional Zone. Ecotoxicology. 13(3):231-244. (ERL,GB 1164). This survey provid...

  15. Occurrence and potential toxicity of pyrethroids and other insecticides in bed sediments of urban streams in central Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite heavy insecticide usage in urban areas, only a few studies have investigated the impact of current-use insecticides on benthic invertebrates in urban streams. The objective of this study was to measure the presence and concentration of current-use pesticides in sediments of residential streams in central Texas. Additionally, toxicity of these sediments to Hyalella azteca was evaluated. Sediment samples were collected from several sites in urban streams over the course of a year, of which, 66% had greater than one toxic unit (TU) of insecticide. Bifenthrin was the greatest contributor accounting for 65% of the TUs, and sediment toxicity to H. azteca correlated with the magnitude of total insecticides and bifenthrin TUs. The results of this study further raise concerns over the environmental consequences posed by many current-use insecticides, especially pyrethroids, in urban settings. - This study examined the presence of insecticides in Texas stream sediments as a model for evaluating the potential impact of urban insecticide use in the Southern United States

  16. Occurrence and potential toxicity of pyrethroids and other insecticides in bed sediments of urban streams in central Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintzen, Emily P. [Department of Environmental Studies, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Lydy, Michael J. [Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, and Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62091 (United States); Belden, Jason B. [Department of Zoology, Oklahoma State University, 430 Life Science West, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)], E-mail: jbelden@okstate.edu

    2009-01-15

    Despite heavy insecticide usage in urban areas, only a few studies have investigated the impact of current-use insecticides on benthic invertebrates in urban streams. The objective of this study was to measure the presence and concentration of current-use pesticides in sediments of residential streams in central Texas. Additionally, toxicity of these sediments to Hyalella azteca was evaluated. Sediment samples were collected from several sites in urban streams over the course of a year, of which, 66% had greater than one toxic unit (TU) of insecticide. Bifenthrin was the greatest contributor accounting for 65% of the TUs, and sediment toxicity to H. azteca correlated with the magnitude of total insecticides and bifenthrin TUs. The results of this study further raise concerns over the environmental consequences posed by many current-use insecticides, especially pyrethroids, in urban settings. - This study examined the presence of insecticides in Texas stream sediments as a model for evaluating the potential impact of urban insecticide use in the Southern United States.

  17. Toxicity characterization of urban stormwater with bioanalytical tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Janet Y M; Aryal, Rupak; Deletic, Ana; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Glenn, Eva; McCarthy, David; Escher, Beate I

    2013-10-01

    Stormwater harvesting has become an attractive alternative strategy to address the rising demand for urban water supply due to limited water sources and population growth. Nevertheless, urban stormwater is also a major source of surface water pollution. Runoff from different urban catchments with source contributions from anthropogenic activities and various land uses causes variable contaminant profiles, thus posing a challenging task for environmental monitoring and risk assessment. A thorough understanding of raw stormwater quality is essential to develop appropriate treatment facilities for potential indirect potable reuse of stormwater. While some of the key chemical components have previously been characterized, only scarce data are available on stormwater toxicity. We benchmarked stormwater samples from urban, residential and industrial sites across various Australian capital cities against samples from the entire water cycle, from sewage to drinking water. Six biological endpoints, targeting groups of chemicals with modes of toxic action of particular relevance for human and environmental health, were investigated: non-specific toxicity (Microtox and combined algae test), the specific modes of action of phytotoxicity (combined algae test), dioxin-like activity (AhR-CAFLUX), and estrogenicity (E-SCREEN), as well as reactive toxicity encompassing genotoxicity (umuC) and oxidative stress (AREc32). Non-specific toxicity was highly variable across sites. The baseline toxicity equivalent concentrations of the most polluted samples were similar to secondary treated effluent from wastewater treatment plants. Phytotoxicity results correlated well with the measured herbicide concentrations at all sites. High estrogenicity was found in two sampling events and could be related to sewage overflow. Genotoxicity, dioxin-like activity, and oxidative stress response were evident in only three of the samples where the stormwater drain was beside a heavy traffic road

  18. Characterization and source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Sediments from the Bohai Sea, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jihua; Hu, Ningjing; Shi, Xuefa

    2015-04-01

    Characterization and source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Sediments from the Bohai Sea, China Liu Jihua, Hu Ningjing, Shi Xuefa First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061, China Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of ubiquitous organic contaminants in the environment. Indeed, 16 PAH compounds have been listed as priority pollutants by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the European Union because of their potential toxicity to humans and ecosystems. As POPs are released or escape into the environment, their global accumulation in marine sediments generates a complex balance between inputs and outputs. Furthermore, PAHs in coastal sediments can serve as effective tracers of materials transport from land-to-sea (Fang et al., 2009). Hence, investigations of PAHs in sediments can provide useful information for further understanding of environmental processes and material transport. In this study, sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were extracted from a total of 112 surface sediment samples collected across the entire territory of the Bohai Sea. The detectable concentrations of PAHs ranged from 97.2 to 300.7 ng/g across all samples, indicating low contamination levels of PAHs compared with reported values for other coastal sediments in China and developed countries. The highest concentrations were found within three belts in the vicinity of Luan River Estuary-Qinhuangdao Harbor, the Cao River Estuary-Bohai Sea Center, and north of the Yellow River Estuary. The distribution patterns of PAHs and source identification implied that PAH contamination in the Bohai Sea mainly originates from offshore oil exploration, sewage discharge from rivers and shipping activities. Further Principal components analysis (PCA)/multivariate linear regression (MLR) analysis suggested that the contributions of spilled oil products (petrogenic), coal combustion and traffic

  19. Characterization of contamination in and toxicities of a shipyard area in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first integrated study on the contaminant characterization and toxicities of a shipyard area. This site in Hong Kong contained 3.6-33.4 mg kg-1 dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and 5-79 g kg-1 oil and grease. Other pollutants exceeding the Dutch intervention values were total polyaromatic hydrocarbons, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and metals Cu, Pb and Zn. These pollutants persisted partially owing to the poor fertility with -1 and -1 typical of coastal soil. Sediments collected within 100 m also showed contamination exceeding the China and Hong Kong intervention levels. The shipyard soil killed two bacteria Pseudomonas stutzeri and Acinetobacter sp. isolated from a clean coastal soil, inhibited germination of three exogenous plants Triticum aestivum, Brassica chinense and Lolium perenne, and inhibited proliferation of three indigenous bacteria: Methylobacterium sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus. Thus, ex situ remediation was needed. - Heavily contaminated shipyards result in high ecotoxicities but the environmental conditions handicap natural degradation

  20. Spatial and seasonal toxicity in a stormwater management facility: evidence obtained by adapting an integrated sediment quality assessment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tixier, Guillaume; Rochfort, Quintin; Grapentine, Lee; Marsalek, Jiri; Lafont, Michel

    2012-12-15

    Stormwater ponds have been widely used to control increased surface runoff resulting from urbanization, and to enhance runoff quality. As receiving waters, they are impacted by intermittent stormwater pollution while also serving as newly created aquatic habitats, which partly offset changes of aquatic ecosystems and their biodiversity by urbanization. Thus, determining ecological risks in stormwater ponds is important for the preservation and rehabilitation of biodiversity in urban areas. Limitations of the conventional toxicity assessment techniques in stormwater ponds have led us to use the sediment quality triad approach with the specific analyses of oligochaetes. The latter analyses build on the earlier work by the Cemagref (Lyon, France) and use the oligochaetes as bioindicators of the sediment quality. This integrative approach was tested at eight sites in the Terraview-Willowfield stormwater facility in Toronto, Ontario, in all four seasons (summer 2008-spring 2009). The facility receives direct runoff from the MacDonald-Cartier freeway with a traffic intensity of 340,000 vehicles/d. Sediment chemistry results indicate that several heavy metals and PAH compounds exceeded the Ontario sediment quality guidelines in the facility. Regardless of the season, laboratory bioassays revealed a strong spatial variation in sediment toxicity along the flow path from the inlet to the outlet, agreeing with decreasing concentrations of contaminants in sediment, especially of heavy metals. However, in situ assessments of the benthic macroinvertebrate community structure and in particular of the oligochaete community revealed an overriding influence of seasonally varying toxicity. This seasonal pattern was described as high toxicity in spring and recovery in fall and corresponded to the influx and flushing-out of road salts and of several heavy metals within the facility. PMID:22212882

  1. Multielemental characterization of sediments from rivers and reservoirs of a sediment quality monitoring network of Sao Paulo state, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Walace A.A.; Quinaglia, Gilson A., E-mail: wasoares@sp.gov.br, E-mail: gquinaglia@sp.gov.br [Companhia Ambiental do Estado de Sao Paulo (CETESB), SP (Brazil). Setor de Analises Toxicologicas; Favaro, Deborah I.T., E-mail: defavaro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (LAN/CRPq/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise por Ativacao Neutronica

    2013-07-01

    The Environment Company of the State of Sao Paulo (CETESB) by means of its quality monitoring network does, systematically, the assessment of water and sediment quality in rivers and reservoirs in the Sao Paulo state. The quality evaluation is done by means 50 parameters in water and 63 for sediment that are considered the more representative for CETESB monitoring. In 2011 the network monitoring analyzed 420 points being 24 in sediments. In the present study the multielemental characterization (total concentration) of 13 sediment samples from 24 rivers and reservoirs belonging to the CETESB monitoring network were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The analytical validation according to precision and accuracy was checked through certified reference materials analyzes BEN (Basalt-IWG-GIT), SL-1 (Lake Sediment - IAEA) and Soil-5 (IAEA), that presents certified concentration values for all elements analyzed. The results obtained for multielemental characterization were compared to NASC values (North American Shale Composite) and the enrichment factor (EF) by using Sc as a normalizer element was calculated. The results showed higher enrichment values for As, Br, Cr, Hf, Ta, Th , U and Zn and rare earth elements (REE) Ce, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Tb and Yb in many of the tested sediment samples indicating that there may be an anthropogenic contribution for these elements. The multielemental results were also compared to the granulometric composition of the sediment samples. Factorial and Cluster Analysis were applied and indicated that the elements distribution is controlled, mainly by the granulometric fractions of the sediments. (author)

  2. Multielemental characterization of sediments from rivers and reservoirs of a sediment quality monitoring network of Sao Paulo state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environment Company of the State of Sao Paulo (CETESB) by means of its quality monitoring network does, systematically, the assessment of water and sediment quality in rivers and reservoirs in the Sao Paulo state. The quality evaluation is done by means 50 parameters in water and 63 for sediment that are considered the more representative for CETESB monitoring. In 2011 the network monitoring analyzed 420 points being 24 in sediments. In the present study the multielemental characterization (total concentration) of 13 sediment samples from 24 rivers and reservoirs belonging to the CETESB monitoring network were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The analytical validation according to precision and accuracy was checked through certified reference materials analyzes BEN (Basalt-IWG-GIT), SL-1 (Lake Sediment - IAEA) and Soil-5 (IAEA), that presents certified concentration values for all elements analyzed. The results obtained for multielemental characterization were compared to NASC values (North American Shale Composite) and the enrichment factor (EF) by using Sc as a normalizer element was calculated. The results showed higher enrichment values for As, Br, Cr, Hf, Ta, Th , U and Zn and rare earth elements (REE) Ce, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Tb and Yb in many of the tested sediment samples indicating that there may be an anthropogenic contribution for these elements. The multielemental results were also compared to the granulometric composition of the sediment samples. Factorial and Cluster Analysis were applied and indicated that the elements distribution is controlled, mainly by the granulometric fractions of the sediments. (author)

  3. Occurrence and toxicity of three classes of insecticides in water and sediment in two Southern California coastal watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Moreno, Laura; Lin, Kunde; Veiga-Nascimento, Rebecca; Gan, Jay

    2011-09-14

    The occurrence of chlorpyrifos, diazinon, pyrethroids, and fipronil was investigated in two watersheds along the southern California coast. Paired surface water and sediment samples were collected under dry and wet (after significant rain events) weather conditions. Insecticide concentrations in water and sediment were higher following rain events than during the dry season. Chlorpyrifos was the most frequently detected compound (>88%). Pyrethroids were detected in 74 and 100% of the water and sediment samples, respectively, with bifenthrin detected most frequently. Trans-permethrin was detected at the highest concentration followed by bifenthrin. Bifenthrin and trans-permethrin water concentrations were significantly correlated (P 100 ng L(-1). Sediment pyrethroid levels (0.5-1100 ng g(-1)) were frequently higher than the respective Hyalella azteca LC(50) values, with bifenthrin as the primary contributor of H. azteca toxicity. PMID:21819079

  4. Integration of semi-automatic detection and sediment connectivity assessment for the characterization of sediment source areas in mountain catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Stefano; Bossi, Giulia; Marchi, Lorenzo; Cavalli, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Identifying areas that are directly delivering sediment to the channel network or to a catchment outlet is of great importance for a sound sediment dynamic characterization and for assessing sediment budget. We present an integration of remote sensing analysis techniques to characterize the effective sediment contributing area that is the sub-portion of the catchment in which sediment is effectively routed towards the catchment outlet. A semi-automatic mapping of active sediment source areas is carried out via image analysis techniques. To this purpose, satellite multispectral images and aerial orthophotos are considered for the analysis. Several algorithms for features extraction are applied and the maps obtained are compared with an expert-based sediment source mapping derived from photointerpretation and field surveys. The image-based analysis is additionally integrated with a topography-driven filtering procedure. Thanks to the availability of High-Resolution, LiDAR-derived Digital Terrain Models, it is possible to work at a fine scale and to compute morphometric parameters (e.g., slope, roughness, curvature) suitable for refining the image analysis. In particular, information on local topography was integrated with the image-based analysis to discriminate between rocky outcrops and sediment sources, thus improving the overall consistency of the procedure. The sediment source areas are then combined with the output of a connectivity assessment. A topography-based index of sediment connectivity is computed for the analyzed areas in order to better estimate the effective sediment contributing area and to obtain a ranking of the source areas in the studied catchments. The study methods have been applied in catchments of the Eastern Italian Alps where a detailed census of sediment source areas is available. The comparison of the results of image analysis with expert-based sediment sources mapping shows a satisfactory agreement between the two approaches

  5. The chemistry and toxicity of sediment affected by oil from the North Cape spilled into Rhode Island Sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 19 January 1996, the barge North Cape spilled more than three million litres of No.2 fuel oil into Rhode Island Sound near Matunuck, Rhode Island. The toxicity and chemistry of this oil in two subtidal sediments were followed for more than 9 months. Maximum concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the sediments reached 730 μg/g dry weight (DW). Water samples taken immediately after the spill were phototoxic to embryos of the bivalve Mulinia lateralis. Total PAHs and toxicity to the amphipod Ampelisca abdita were high immediately after the spill, decreasing to background values (10 μg/g DW and <20% mortality, respectively) after 6 months. Changes in toxicity to A. abdita related closely to changes of PAH concentrations in sediments. Weathering and degradation of the oil were followed by using ratios of PAHs, and alkanes as indicators. To distinguish effects of local boat traffic from spill effects, these ratios plus distributions of PAHs in sediments from a nearby marina were used. (Author)

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotubes toxicity to the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca: influence of sediment and exposure duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messika Revel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials are present in various industrial applications and therefore their release into the environment including freshwater ecosystem is expected to increase. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of several parameters on the toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT to the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca. The effect of period of exposure, sediment presence and possible impurities released during SWCNT preparation on survival and/or growth of such organism was evaluated. We measured a reduction of survival at concentrations ranging from 10 to 40 mg/L after 96-h exposure, while no mortality was observed with the same concentrations and in the presence of artificial sediment after 14 days of exposure. It is possible that SWCNT are adsorbed on the organic matter from the artificial sediment leading to a decrease of SWCNT bioavailability. The survival and growth toxicity tests revealed a stronger effect at 28 days compared to the 14 days of exposure, and full mortality of organisms at 1000 mg/L for both exposure times. The presence of SWCNT in the gut of survived organisms was observed. The present study demonstrates that the interaction with sediment should be considered when carbon nanotubes toxicity through water exposure is investigated.

  7. The effect of modifying factors on the toxicity of oil sands reclamation sediments to medaka embryo development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High levels of alkylated polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) and naphthenic acids (NAs) are found in aquatic oilsands reclamation sites in northern Alberta. These compounds have been shown to induce signs of blue sac disease (BSD) in numerous fish species. Slight phytotoxicity was noted in fish embryos exposed to an oil sands derived PAC mixture and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Although it is known that NAs are less toxic than PACs for fish embryo development, it is not clear if low levels of NAs affect the toxicity of PACs. This study evaluated the effects of oil sands aquatic reclamation sediments and modifying factors, such as exposure to NA and UV, on the development of Japanese medaka embryos exposed to sediments from a range of oil sands aquatic reclamation strategies and mature fine tailings. Prior to exposure to medaka embryos, oil sands reclamation sediments were mixed with water containing different levels of NAs. For each sediment treatment, replicates were exposed to simulated solar radiation with and without UV. The embryos were checked for deformities and hatch length upon hatching. It was concluded that modifying factors should be considered when choosing reclamation options to reduce toxicity

  8. Batch and column studies of the stabilization of toxic heavy metals in dredged marine sediments by hematite after bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamindy-Pajany, Yannick; Geret, Florence; Hurel, Charlotte; Marmier, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    The management of dredged sediments is an important issue in coastal regions where the marine sediments are highly polluted by metals and organic pollutants. In this paper, mineral-based amendments (hematite, zero-valent iron and zeolite) were used to stabilize metallic pollutants (As, Cd, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in a contaminated marine sediment sample. Mineral-based amendments were tested at three application rates (5 %, 10 %, and 15 %) in batch experiments in order to select the best amendment to perform column experiments. Batch tests have shown that hematite was the most efficient amendment to stabilize inorganic pollutants (As, Cd, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in the studied sediment. Based on batch tests, hematite was used at one application rate equal to 5 % to conduct column experiments. Column tests confirmed that hematite was able to decrease metal concentrations in leachates from stabilized sediment. The stabilization rates were particularly high for Cd (67 %), Mo (80 %), and Pb (90 %). The Microtox solid phase test showed that hematite could decrease significantly the toxicity of stabilized sediment. Based on batch and column experiments, it emerged that hematite could be a suitable adsorbent to stabilize metals in dredged marine sediment. PMID:23370851

  9. Characterization of water and lake sediments in Laguna de Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, Ce, Nd, and Pb in the stream bed. Working out of mineral balance indicated that many of the elements are associated with mineral sources. Except for lead, the concentrations of the potentially toxic trace elements in the lake's sediments were lower than the concentrations associated with frequent adverse effect to aquatic life. Lead concentrations in sites 1,2, and 3 respectively, were 50,90, and 98 parts per million, ppm. Mass transfer of plagioclase, feldspar, biotite, CO2, calcite and kaolinite, were modeled on or after the elemental composition. Kaolinite and biotite were the minerals alluded to govern the mineral composition of Site 3 water, while smectite was the sole contributor to the water chemistry of Sites 1 and 2. Simultaneous liberation of CO2 and mineralization of calcite was predicted in Site 3. The archiving of geological, hydrological, biological, and mineral resource data and the availability of such data has a great importance on the proper resource management of Laguna de Bay. (author)

  10. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Susana M; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Guilhermino, Lúcia; Ribeiro, Rui

    2006-01-01

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Müller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified b...

  11. Do weirs affect the physical and geochemical mobility of toxic metals in mining-impacted floodplain sediments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcock, Amelia; Coleman, Alexandra; Whitfield, Elizabeth; Andres Lopez-Tarazon, Jose; Byrne, Patrick; Whitfield, Greg

    2015-04-01

    Weirs are common river structures designed to modify river channel hydraulics and hydrology for purposes of navigation, flood defence, irrigation and hydrometry. By design, weirs constrain natural flow processes and affect sediment flux and river channel forms leading to homogenous river habitats and reduced biodiversity. The recent movement towards catchment-wide river restoration, driven by the EU Water Framework Directive, has recognised weirs as a barrier to good ecological status. However, the removal of weirs to achieve more 'natural' river channels and flow processes is inevitably followed by a period of adjustment to the new flow regime and sediment flux. This period of adjustment can have knock-on effects that may increase flood risk, sedimentation and erosion until the river reaches a state of geomorphological equilibrium. Many catchments in the UK contain a legacy of toxic metals in floodplain sediments due to historic metal mining activities. The consequences of weir removal in these catchments may be to introduce 'stored' mine wastes into the river system with severe implications for water quality and biodiversity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential impact of a weir on the physical and geochemical mobilisation of mine wastes in the formerly mined River Twymyn catchment, Wales. Our initial investigations have shown floodplain and riverbed sediments to be grossly contaminated (up to 15,500 mg/kg Pb) compared to soil from a pre-mining Holocene terrace (180 mg/kg Pb). Geomorphological investigations also suggest that weir removal will re-establish more dynamic river channel processes resulting in lateral migration of the channel and erosion of contaminated floodplain sediments. These data will be used as a baseline for more detailed investigations of the potential impact of weirs on the physical and geochemical mobilisation of contaminated sediments. We have two specific objectives. (1) Geomorphological assessments will use unmanned

  12. Development of models for predicting toxicity from sediment chemistry by partial least squares-discriminant analysis and counter-propagation artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Guerra, Manuel; Ballabio, Davide; Amigo, José Manuel; Bro, Rasmus; Viguri, Javier R

    2010-02-01

    There is strong interest in developing tools to link chemical concentrations of contaminants to the potential for observing sediment toxicity that can be used in initial screening-level sediment quality assessments. This paper presents new approaches for predicting toxicity in sediments, based on 10-day survival tests with marine amphipods, from sediment chemistry, by means of the application of Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and Counter-propagation Artificial Neural Networks (CP-ANNs) to large historical databases of chemical and toxicity data. The exploration of the internal structure of the developed models revealed inherent limitations of predicting toxicity from common chemical analyses of bulk contaminant concentrations. However, the results obtained in the validation of these models combined relevant values of non-error classification rate, sensitivity and specificity of, respectively, 76, 87 and 73% with PLS-DA and 92, 75 and 97% with CP-ANNs, outperforming the results reported for previous approaches. PMID:19751957

  13. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Magnitude and Extent of Sediment Toxicity in Four Bays of the Florida Panhandle: Pensacola, Choctawhatchee, St. Andrew and Apalachicola

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The toxicity of sediments in Pensacola, Choctawhatchee, St. Andrew and Apalachicola Bays was determined as part of bioeffects assessments performed by NOAA's...

  14. Ecotoxicological effects of sediments from Mar Piccolo, South Italy: toxicity testing with organisms from different trophic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Elisa; Piazza, Veronica; Gambardella, Chiara; Moresco, Roberto; Prato, Ermelinda; Biandolino, Francesca; Cassin, Daniele; Botter, Margherita; Maurizio, Daniela; D'Adamo, Raffaele; Fabbrocini, Adele; Faimali, Marco; Garaventa, Francesca

    2016-07-01

    The Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy) is a semi-enclosed and strongly polluted basin. For decades, it has been subjected to different anthropogenic impacts. These stressors caused severe sediments contamination with high concentration of different pollutants (PAHs, PCB, heavy metals). In order to assess the current status of sediments contamination, an ecotoxicological investigation combined with chemical analysis (heavy metals, PAH, and PCB) has been performed. In order to derive ecologically relevant conclusions, a multiorganisms and multiend-points approach has been applied, exposing organisms from different trophic levels to elutriate and whole sediment. The battery of bioassays consists of a microalgal growth inhibition test (Dunaliella tertiolecta), acute and sublethal assays (end-points: mortality, immobilization and swimming speed alteration) on crustaceans larvae and juveniles, and rotifers (Amphibalanus amphitrite, Artemia salina, Corophium insidiosum and Brachionus plicatilis), and embryotoxicity test on echinoderms (Paracentrotus lividus). Considering the high levels of sediment contamination highlighted from chemical analysis, an unexpected very low toxic effect was observed, even considering the sublethal end-point (larval swimming speed alteration). The results of this study suggest a very complex contaminants dynamic in the Mar Piccolo sediments that, despite a strong level of contamination, seems to not affect in a proportional manner the biological compartment. PMID:26423289

  15. Characterization of the Songhua River sediments and evaluation of their adsorption behavior for nitrobenzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ruiping; LIU Huijuan; WAN Dongjin; YANG Min

    2008-01-01

    The explosion at a plant of the Jilin Petrochemical Corporation on 13 November, 2005, and the spill of an estimated 100 t of toxic substances (nitrobenzene as the main component) into the Songhua River received worldwide attention. This study has focused on the adsorption behavior of nitrobenzene that spilled onto sediments along the Songhua River, which was one of the efforts to evaluate the fate of nitrobenzene after the spillage event. The organic carbon contents of these sediments along the Songhua River vary from 2.1 g TOC/Kg at Hulanhekouxia to 86.1 g TOC/Kg at Jiuzhan. The average volumetric particle diameter also vary largely from 11 μm at Jiangchuan to 311 μm at Hulanhekouxia. The sediment in the Jiuzhan section shows the highest potential for nitrobenzene adsorption (8.3 mg/Kg sediment), whereas, that at Hulanhekouxia exhibits the lowest adsorption capacity, of 1.6 mg/Kg sediment. The nitrobenzene adsorption potential is linearly related to the organic carbon content of sediments (R2 = 0.609), indicating that the organic carbon content is the main factor affecting the adsorption behavior of sediments along the Songhua River. Conclusively, the adsorption of nitrobenzene onto the sediments is insignificant, and the release of nitrobenzene from sediments is of minor importance.

  16. Geochemical characterization of mangrove sediments of the Zuari estuarine system, West coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha-D'Mello, Cheryl A.; Nayak, G. N.

    2015-12-01

    The grain size, clay mineralogy and geochemistry were studied in the sediment cores collected from the mangrove environments of the Zuari estuary to understand sources and factors affecting accumulation, mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of metals. Finer sediments, organic matter and metals were higher in the middle estuary and canal sediments while coarser sediments with fewer metal concentrations were seen in the lower estuary. Kaolinite, smectite, illite and traces of chlorite constituted the clay mineral assemblage and had a minor influence on metal distributions. In the study area, the hydrodynamic conditions changed from lower estuary towards the upstream regions owing to mixing of riverine and sea water that led to finer sediment deposition in the middle estuary. The variations in metal abundance were attributed to a difference in hydrodynamic conditions regulated by the tide, freshwater flow and geomorphology of the Zuari estuary. The results revealed that the estuary received material from natural weathering of rocks as well as from anthropogenic sources such as mining and industrial/domestic discharges. Enrichment factor and Geo-accumulation index showed that Fe, Mn and Cr were enriched in the mangrove sediments whereas fractionation of metals revealed that concentrations of bioavailable Mn pose a considerable risk to biota. Increased accumulation of Fe and Mn in the upper middle estuary and canal sediments, trap trace metals that may considerably affect sediment quality and dredging of these sediments can cause re-suspension and mobilize metals from loosely bound sedimentary forms to the water column.

  17. Dynamics of metal availability and toxicity in historically polluted floodplain sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Geest, van der, S.; León Paumen, M.

    2008-01-01

    Many floodplains contain high concentrations of sediment associated contaminants that might be subjected to large changes in terms of mobility, transformation and bioavailability. Therefore, this study describes 1) changes in the redox conditions and the mobility of metals in artificially uncovered polluted floodplain sediments, 2) metal uptake by organisms and 3) colonization, succession and functioning of benthic algae on these sediments. Flooding caused long term changes in redox potential...

  18. Assessment of toxicity of radioactively contaminated sediments of the Yenisei River for aquatic plants in laboratory assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotina, T.; Trofimova, E.; Medvedeva, M.; Bolsunovsky, A. [Institute of Biophysic SB RAS (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The Yenisei River has been subjected to radioactive contamination due to the operation of the Mining-and-Chemical Combine (Rosatom) (MCC) producing weapon-grade plutonium for more than fifty years (1958-2010). As a result, high activities of long-lived artificial radionuclides (Cs-137, Pu-238, 239, 241, Am-241) were deposited in sediments of the river. Bottom sediments of the Yenisei River downstream of the Krasnoyarsk city are also polluted with heavy metals because of industrial discharges and from the water catchment area. The purpose of this research was to estimate the ability of submersed macrophytes Elodea canadensis and Myriophyllum spicatum to serve as indicators of toxicity of bottom sediments of the Yenisei River. Activities of artificial radionuclides in the biomass of aquatic plants sampled in the Yenisei River upstream of the MCC were below detection limit (< 0.5 Bq/kg of dry mass for Cs-137). The activities of artificial radionuclides in the biomass of macrophytes sampled in the Yenisei River in the vicinity of the MCC in autumn 2012 were (Bq/kg of dry mass): 67±4 for Co-60, 16±2 for Cs-137, and 8±1 for Eu-152. For eco-toxicological experiments, top 20-cm layers of bottom sediments (BS) were collected from the Yenisei River at three sites in the vicinity of the MCC (No. 2-4) and at one site upstream of the MCC (No. 1). Samples of sediments contained natural isotope K-40 (240-330 Bq/kg, fresh mass) and artificial radionuclides: Co-60 (up to 70 Bq/kg), Cs-137 (0.8-1400 Bq/kg), Eu-152, 154 (up to 220 Bq/kg), Am-241 (up to 40 Bq/kg). The total activity concentration of radionuclides measured on an HPGe-Gamma-spectrometer (Canberra, U.S.) in samples of BS No. 1-4 was 330, 500, 880 and 1580 Bq/kg of fresh mass, respectively. Apical shoots of submersed macrophytes were planted in sediments (6-9 shoots per sediment sub-sample in three replicates). Endpoints of shoot and root growth were used as toxicity indicators; the number of cells with chromosome

  19. Characterization of the sediments overlying the Floridan aquifer system in Alachua County, Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Richard; Duncan, Joel; Seal, Thomas; Weinberg, J. Michael; Rupert, Frank

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of this project is to attempt to improve the existing hydrogeologic information through lithologic and hydrogeologic characterizations of the sediments overlying the Floridan aquifer system in Alachua County. These sediments locally comprise both the intermediate aquifer system and associated confining beds and the surficial aquifer system. (PDF has 119 pages.)

  20. Characterization of Oily and Non-Oily Natural Sediments in Palm Oil Mill Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem A. Alrawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Palm oil is one of the many vegetable oils widely consumed around the world. The production of palm oil requires voluminous amount of water with the concurrent generation of large amount of wastewater known as palm oil mill effluent (POME. POME is a mixture of water, oil, and natural sediments (solid particles and fibres.There is a dearth of information on the physical properties of these POME sediments. This study intends to distinguish the physical properties of oily and non-oily POME sediments which include sediment size, particle size distribution (PSD, sediment shape, sediment surface morphology, and sediment density. These characterizations are important for future researches because these properties have significant effects on the settling process that occurs either under natural gravity or by coagulations. It was found that the oily and non-oily POME sediments have different sizes with nonspherical irregular shapes, and because of that, the aspect ratio (AR and circularity shape factors were adopted to describe the shapes of these sediments. The results also indicate that the density of oily POME sediment decreases as the sediment size increases.

  1. Characterizing the effects of bisphenol A on sediment-dwelling benthic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Charles; Mihaich, Ellen; Ortego, Lisa; Caspers, Norbert; Klečka, Gary; Woelz, Jan; Hentges, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high production volume chemical intermediate used primarily in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. It primarily enters surface water and sediment via effluent discharges during its manufacture and use. The physical properties of BPA suggest that sediment is a potential sink and may result in exposure to benthic organisms. Currently there are no studies measuring the chronic toxicity of BPA to benthic organisms via direct sediment exposure. The present study examined the chronic toxicity of BPA to 3 commonly used test organisms that are generally representative of invertebrates occupying the base of the benthic food web and for which standardized testing protocols are available: the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus (mean numbers and biomass), the midge Chironomus riparius (emergence and development rate), and the estuarine amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus (survival, growth, and reproduction). No-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) for the 3 species ranged from 12 mg/kg to 54 mg/kg dry weight. All NOEC values were higher than all measured concentrations of BPA in freshwater and marine sediments reported in reliable, fully reported studies from North America and Europe from the 1990s to the present. For the first time, there are studies with BPA measuring the chronic toxicity to 3 taxa of sediment dwelling invertebrates, which are suitable to support region-specific risk assessments. PMID:26297924

  2. "Human Health Impact Characterization of Toxic Chemicals for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    A schematic method to characterize the human health impact of toxic chemicals is presented. This schematic method uses a streamlined three-tiered hierarchy process which includes intake, toxicity and persistence of a chemical release for its impact characterization. The human health impact of a chemical is represented by its position in a two-dimensional characterization plot, which enables the benchmarking of chemicals to be easily made by comparing the relative positions of the chemicals in...

  3. Comparison of marine sediment toxicity test protocols for the amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius and the polychaete worm Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, B.S.; Hunt, J.W.; Phillips, B.M. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Inst. of Marine Sciences]|[Marine Pollution Studies Lab., Monterey, CA (United States)] [and others

    1998-05-01

    The 10-d amphipod survival toxicity test protocol using Rhepoxynius abronius was compared to the 20-d polychaete worm growth and survival protocol using Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata. Of the 341 sediment samples collected in California and tested over a 2-year period. 78% significantly inhibited R. abronius survival, whereas 2 and 26% significantly inhibited N. arenaceodentata survival and biomass, respectively. Statistical power associated with each protocol endpoint was determined by calculating the minimum significant difference (MSD) for each test protocol for this data set. The 90th percentile MSDs for R. abronius survival and N. arenaceodentata survival and biomass were 16, 36, and 56%, respectively. Survival of R. abronius was significantly negatively correlated with a number of toxicants including metals, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls. No significant correlations were determined between N. arenaceodentata survival or biomass and contaminants measured. Amphipod survival was also negatively correlated with sediment total organic carbon and grain size, but when samples with a high percent fine grain size (>90% fines) were eliminated from consideration, the overall conclusions of the study were not altered. The 10-d amphipod survival protocol using R. abronius was a more sensitive indicator of toxicity, but the results indicate that this was due to greater statistical power rather than greater sensitivity of the test organisms or endpoints.

  4. TOXICITY OF VERTICAL SEDIMENTS IN THE TRENTON CHANNEL, DETROIT RIVER, MICHIGAN, TO CHIRONOMUS TENTANS (INSECTA: CHIRONOMIDAE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of sediment from various sediment core depths on survival and weight gain of larvae of the dipteran midge, Chironomus tentans, during 10-d laboratory exposures. ediment cores were collected from 12 sites in the Trenton Chan...

  5. Characterization of marine near-surface sediments by electromagnetic profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates the theory, develops the technology and demonstrates the applicabilities for synchronous in-situ mapping of the magnetic and electric signatures of marine near-surface sediments. A marine electromagnetic profiler has been developed for coastal and shelf operations in 5 to 500 m water depths. The system was designed to resolve subtle and gradual variations in silt and clay content, porosity and diagenesis state of marine sediments at a sub-meter scale. An electromagnet...

  6. Equilibrium partitioning theory to predict the sediment toxicity of the anionic surfactant C{sub 12}-2-LAS to Corophium volutator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rico-Rico, Angeles [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 2, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: a.ricorico@uu.nl; Temara, Ali [Procter and Gamble Company, Central Product Safety, Temselaan 100, 1853 Strombeek-Bever (Belgium); Hermens, Joop L.M. [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 2, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-02-15

    The study of the effect of the sorption of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) on the bioavailability to marine benthic organisms is essential to refine the environmental risk assessment of these compounds. According to the equilibrium partitioning theory (EqP), the effect concentration in water-only exposure will be similar to the effect concentration in the sediment pore water. In this work, sorption and desorption experiments with two marine sediments were carried out using the compound C{sub 12}-2-LAS. The effect of the sediment sorption on the toxicity of benthic organisms was studied in water-only and in sediment bioassays with the marine mud shrimp Corophium volutator. In addition, three common spiking methods were tested for its application in the toxicity tests, as well as the stability of the surfactant during the water-only and sediment-water test duration. LC50 values obtained from water-only exposure showed a good correspondence with the pore water concentrations calculated from the sorption and desorption isotherms in the spiked sediments. - The toxicity of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate to Corophium volutator in marine sediments can be predicted from toxicity measured via water-only exposure.

  7. Geochemical characteristics and microbial community composition in toxic metal-rich sediments contaminated with Au-Ag mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Man Jae; Yang, Jung-Seok; Lee, Seunghak; Lee, Giehyeon; Ham, Baknoon; Boyanov, Maxim I; Kemner, Kenneth M; O'Loughlin, Edward J

    2015-10-15

    The effects of extreme geochemical conditions on microbial community composition were investigated for two distinct sets of sediment samples collected near weathered mine tailings. One set (SCH) showed extraordinary geochemical characteristics: As (6.7-11.5%), Pb (1.5-2.1%), Zn (0.1-0.2%), and pH (3.1-3.5). The other set (SCL) had As (0.3-1.2%), Pb (0.02-0.22%), and Zn (0.01-0.02%) at pH 2.5-3.1. The bacterial communities in SCL were clearly different from those in SCH, suggesting that extreme geochemical conditions affected microbial community distribution even on a small spatial scale. The clones identified in SCL were closely related to acidophilic bacteria in the taxa Acidobacterium (18%), Acidomicrobineae (14%), and Leptospirillum (10%). Most clones in SCH were closely related to Methylobacterium (79%) and Ralstonia (19%), both well-known metal-resistant bacteria. Although total As was extremely high, over 95% was in the form of scorodite (FeAsO4·2H2O). Acid-extractable As was only ∼118 and ∼14 mg kg(-1) in SCH and SCL, respectively, below the level known to be toxic to bacteria. Meanwhile, acid-extractable Pb and Zn in SCH were above toxic concentrations. Because As was present in an oxidized, stable form, release of Pb and/or Zn (or a combination of toxic metals in the sediment) from the sediment likely accounts for the differences in microbial community structure. The results also suggest that care should be taken when investigating mine tailings, because large differences in chemical/biological properties can occur over small spatial scales. PMID:25917692

  8. Characterization of contamination in and toxicities of a shipyard area in Hong Kong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, S.W. [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin N.T., Hong Kong (China) and Environmental Science Programme, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin N.T., Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: swchiu@cuhk.edu.hk; Ho, K.M. [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin N.T., Hong Kong (China); Environmental Science Programme, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin N.T., Hong Kong (China); Chan, S.S. [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin N.T., Hong Kong (China); Environmental Science Programme, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin N.T., Hong Kong (China); So, O.M. [Environmental Science Programme, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin N.T., Hong Kong (China); Lai, K.H. [Environmental Science Programme, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin N.T., Hong Kong (China)

    2006-08-15

    This is the first integrated study on the contaminant characterization and toxicities of a shipyard area. This site in Hong Kong contained 3.6-33.4 mg kg{sup -1} dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and 5-79 g kg{sup -1} oil and grease. Other pollutants exceeding the Dutch intervention values were total polyaromatic hydrocarbons, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and metals Cu, Pb and Zn. These pollutants persisted partially owing to the poor fertility with <125 mg N kg{sup -1} and <530 mg P kg{sup -1} typical of coastal soil. Sediments collected within 100 m also showed contamination exceeding the China and Hong Kong intervention levels. The shipyard soil killed two bacteria Pseudomonas stutzeri and Acinetobacter sp. isolated from a clean coastal soil, inhibited germination of three exogenous plants Triticum aestivum, Brassica chinense and Lolium perenne, and inhibited proliferation of three indigenous bacteria: Methylobacterium sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus. Thus, ex situ remediation was needed. - Heavily contaminated shipyards result in high ecotoxicities but the environmental conditions handicap natural degradation.

  9. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of sediment-associated silvernanoparticles in the estuarine polychaete, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cong, Yi; Banta, Gary Thomas; Selck, Henriette;

    2014-01-01

    damage (comet assay tail moment and tail DNA intensity %) of Nereis coelomocytes increased in a concentration-dependent manner in all three Ag treatments. Ag NP treatments were more toxic than aqueous Ag for all toxicity endpoints, even though bioaccumulation did not differ significantly among Ag forms...

  10. Dynamics of metal availability and toxicity in historically polluted floodplain sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geest, Harm G; León Paumen, Miriam

    2008-12-01

    Many floodplains contain high concentrations of sediment associated contaminants that might be subjected to large changes in terms of mobility, transformation and bioavailability. Therefore, this study describes 1) changes in the redox conditions and the mobility of metals in artificially uncovered polluted floodplain sediments, 2) metal uptake by organisms and 3) colonization, succession and functioning of benthic algae on these sediments. Flooding caused long term changes in redox potential (Eh) profiles. In top layers strong gradients in redox potential established quickly, while in deeper layers changes occurred more gradually. The availability of copper as measured by Diffusive Gradients in Thinfilms (DGT) showed a consistent relationship with fluctuations in Eh. However, this relationship was restricted to deeper layers in the sediment. Within 1 week high amounts of total copper were immobilized. Differences in total copper concentrations between polluted and clean sediments became only partially apparent when comparing the available copper fraction (DGT-Cu). Introduced Tubifex shows only marginal differences in levels of accumulated Cu. Colonization, growth and succession of algal communities on polluted sediments was not impaired, most likely due to low bioavailability. It is concluded that changing environmental conditions, such as flooding, can result in stable chemical conditions with low a availability of metals and hence in a diminution of actual ecological risks. PMID:18644615

  11. Development of models for predicting toxicity from sediment chemistry by partial least squares-discriminant analysis and counter-propagation artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Guerra, Manuel [Department of Chemical Engineering and Inorganic Chemistry, ETSIIT, University of Cantabria, Avda. de los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain); Ballabio, Davide [Milano Chemometrics and QSAR Research Group, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, P.za della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Amigo, Jose Manuel; Bro, Rasmus [Department of Food Science, Quality and Technology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, 1958 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Viguri, Javier R., E-mail: vigurij@unican.e [Department of Chemical Engineering and Inorganic Chemistry, ETSIIT, University of Cantabria, Avda. de los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    There is strong interest in developing tools to link chemical concentrations of contaminants to the potential for observing sediment toxicity that can be used in initial screening-level sediment quality assessments. This paper presents new approaches for predicting toxicity in sediments, based on 10-day survival tests with marine amphipods, from sediment chemistry, by means of the application of Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and Counter-propagation Artificial Neural Networks (CP-ANNs) to large historical databases of chemical and toxicity data. The exploration of the internal structure of the developed models revealed inherent limitations of predicting toxicity from common chemical analyses of bulk contaminant concentrations. However, the results obtained in the validation of these models combined relevant values of non-error classification rate, sensitivity and specificity of, respectively, 76, 87 and 73% with PLS-DA and 92, 75 and 97% with CP-ANNs, outperforming the results reported for previous approaches. - Models for predicting toxicity based on amphipod tests, derived using PLS-DA and CP-ANN, can be useful aids for screening-level sediment quality assessment.

  12. Development of models for predicting toxicity from sediment chemistry by partial least squares-discriminant analysis and counter-propagation artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is strong interest in developing tools to link chemical concentrations of contaminants to the potential for observing sediment toxicity that can be used in initial screening-level sediment quality assessments. This paper presents new approaches for predicting toxicity in sediments, based on 10-day survival tests with marine amphipods, from sediment chemistry, by means of the application of Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and Counter-propagation Artificial Neural Networks (CP-ANNs) to large historical databases of chemical and toxicity data. The exploration of the internal structure of the developed models revealed inherent limitations of predicting toxicity from common chemical analyses of bulk contaminant concentrations. However, the results obtained in the validation of these models combined relevant values of non-error classification rate, sensitivity and specificity of, respectively, 76, 87 and 73% with PLS-DA and 92, 75 and 97% with CP-ANNs, outperforming the results reported for previous approaches. - Models for predicting toxicity based on amphipod tests, derived using PLS-DA and CP-ANN, can be useful aids for screening-level sediment quality assessment.

  13. Leachates draining from controlled municipal solid waste landfill: Detailed geochemical characterization and toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavakala, Bienvenu K; Le Faucheur, Séverine; Mulaji, Crispin K; Laffite, Amandine; Devarajan, Naresh; Biey, Emmanuel M; Giuliani, Gregory; Otamonga, Jean-Paul; Kabatusuila, Prosper; Mpiana, Pius T; Poté, John

    2016-09-01

    Management of municipal solid wastes in many countries consists of waste disposal into landfill without treatment or selective collection of solid waste fractions including plastics, paper, glass, metals, electronic waste, and organic fraction leading to the unsolved problem of contamination of numerous ecosystems such as air, soil, surface, and ground water. Knowledge of leachate composition is critical in risk assessment of long-term impact of landfills on human health and the environment as well as for prevention of negative outcomes. The research presented in this paper investigates the seasonal variation of draining leachate composition and resulting toxicity as well as the contamination status of soil/sediment from lagoon basins receiving leachates from landfill in Mpasa, a suburb of Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Samples were collected during the dry and rainy seasons and analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, soluble ions, toxic metals, and were then subjected to toxicity tests. Results highlight the significant seasonal difference in leachate physicochemical composition. Affected soil/sediment showed higher values for toxic metals than leachates, indicating the possibility of using lagoon system for the purification of landfill leachates, especially for organic matter and heavy metal sedimentation. However, the ecotoxicity tests demonstrated that leachates are still a significant source of toxicity for terrestrial and benthic organisms. Therefore, landfill leachates should not be discarded into the environment (soil or surface water) without prior treatment. Interest in the use of macrophytes in lagoon system is growing and toxic metal retention in lagoon basin receiving systems needs to be fully investigated in the future. This study presents useful tools for evaluating landfill leachate quality and risk in lagoon systems which can be applied to similar environmental compartments. PMID:27177465

  14. Effect-directed analysis of sediment-associated algal toxicants at selected hot spots in the river Elbe basin with a special focus on bioaccessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Katrin; Altenburger, Rolf; Lübcke-von Varel, Urte; Streck, Georg; Brack, Werner

    2009-07-01

    Benthic algae are the dominant primary producers in many rivers and may be at risk of being affected by sediment-associated toxicants. Toxicity as well as bioaccessibility should be considered for the identification of major toxicants affecting benthic algae. Thus, effect-directed analysis (EDA) combining biotesting, fractionation, and chemical analysis was combined with both exhaustive and bioaccessibility-directed extraction to identify the major toxicants in sediments at three industrial sites in the Elbe River basin (Bitterfeld, Most, and Prelouc). Exhaustive accelerated solvent extraction was used together with bioaccessibility-directed extraction with TENAX in aqueous suspension. Growth inhibition of the green alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus identified polycyclic aromatic compounds as important algal toxicants at all three sites, while in Bitterfeld and Prelouc additional toxicants, such as N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine and 7H-benzo[de]anthracen-7-one, played an important role. Confirmation of the identified compounds was based on the index of confirmation quality (ICQ) comparing the effect of an artificial mixture to that of the original sample. The results suggest a successful confirmation of identified toxicants for most fractions with ICQ values between 0.5 and 2. The bioaccessibility of toxicants decreased in the order Prelouc > Bitterfeld > Most as determined by the investigation of TENAX samples. Similar total concentrations of toxicants in Prelouc and Most sediment result in bioaccessible concentrations in Prelouc that exceed those in Most by a factor of 10 to 20. The extraction with TENAX with a subsequent EDA proved to be a powerful tool for prioritizing contaminants and contaminated sites with respect to the hazard of sediment-associated toxicants to green algae. PMID:19228079

  15. Characterization of shallow ocean sediments using the airborne electromagnetic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, I. J.; Smits, K.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey data collected in Cape Cod Bay are used to derive continuous profiles of water depth, electrical depth, water conductivity, and bottom sediment conductivity. Through a few well-known empirical relationships, the conductivities are used, in turn, to derive density, porosity, sound speed, and acoustic reflectivity of the ocean bottom. A commercially available Dighem III AEM system was used for the survey without any significant modification. The helicopter-borne system operated at 385 and 7200 Hz; both were in a horizontal coplanar configuration. The interpreted profiles show good agreement with available ground truth data. Where no such data are available, the results appear to be very reasonable. Compared with the shipborne electrode array method, the AEM method can determine the necessary parameters at a much higher speed with a better lateral resolution over a wide range of water depths from 0 to perhaps 100 m. The bottom sediment conductivity that can be measured by the AEM method is closely related to physical properties of sediments, such as porosity, density, sound speed, and, indirectly, sediment types that might carry broad implications for various offshore activities.

  16. A short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay with Hediste diversicolor (Polychaeta) for estuarine sediments based on postexposure feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Susana Maria; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Guilhermino, Lúcia; Ribeiro, Rui

    2005-08-01

    This study evaluated a short-term sublethal endpoint for in situ toxicity assays for estuarine sediments, based on postexposure feeding of the polychaete Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Müller. A method for precisely quantifying postexposure feeding rates of H. diversicolor was established under laboratory conditions using Artemia franciscana Kellog nauplii. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response to copper was investigated by comparing postexposure feeding rates to growth and lethality. The 48-h and 96-h median lethal concentration (LC50) of copper were 241 and 125 microg/L, respectively, whereas the 48-h median inhibitory concentration (IC50) for postexposure feeding and the 20-d IC50 for growth were 52 and 25 microg/L of copper, respectively. The influence of different exposure conditions (substrate, temperature, salinity, food availability, and light) on H. diversicolor postexposure feeding was assessed; temperature and salinity were found to influence significantly postexposure feeding. The effectiveness of the proposed in situ assay was investigated by deploying it at two reference and six contaminated Portuguese estuaries. A 48-h exposure period was followed by a 1-h postexposure feeding period. High organism recoveries (89-100%) were obtained. Postexposure feeding was depressed significantly (17-90%) at all contaminated sites relatively to reference sites. The proposed in situ assay with H. diversicolor was shown to be a potential useful tool for estuarine sediment toxicity testing. PMID:16152974

  17. Evaluating the efficiency of oil spill countermeasures by monitoring changes in the bioavailability and toxicity to fish of PAH from wetland sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact that oil spills have on fish can be assessed most accurately by using biological responses that reflect the flux of hydrocarbons through fish, rather than absolute concentrations. In this study, the exposure and toxicity to fish of oiled sediments was assessed in a freshwater semidiurnal tidal area of the St. Lawrence River in Quebec and at a tidal salt marsh at Petpeswick Inlet in Nova Scotia. The effectiveness of wetland bioremediation strategies was assessed by monitoring the bioavailability and toxicity of oil-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to early life stages of fish. The study involved the application of weathered MESA oil to experimental plots on vegetated beaches with different combinations of fertilizer, plant removal and sediment aeration. Sediments sampled over 1.5 years were tested by bioassays of mixed function oxygenase enzyme activity in livers of trout as an index of PAH exposure. The study revealed that oil alone, oil mixed with sediments in the lab, and oiled sediments from the experimental plots, caused enzyme induction relative to un-oiled controls. This suggested the presence and bioavailability of PAH. It was also shown that induction did not vary significantly between treatments, but declined slowly with time. The observations were supported by chemical analysis. It was concluded that PAH most likely depletes through weathering or sediment dispersion instead of by bioremediation treatment. The increased rate of deformities and mortality among trout and medaka indicated that oiled sediments are chronically toxic to developing stages fish. 19 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  18. Integrating structural and functional connectivity to characterize sediment dynamics in a small Alpine catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Marco; Crema, Stefano; Blok, Michiel; Lucía, Ana; Comiti, Francesco; Marchi, Lorenzo; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Sediment connectivity can be regarded as a descriptor of the internal linkages between different landscape components within a catchment. The recent focus of the scientific community on connectivity related topics, both concerning hydrological and sediment connectivity, stresses the importance of understanding the main active pathways for a better estimation of energy and matter transfer at catchment scale. This task can be addressed using topography-based indices that analyse the linkages between landscape units. This approach to characterize connectivity is known as structural connectivity. The main limitation of structural connectivity is that it does not account for the processes driving sediment and energy fluxes (i.e., functional connectivity). In this work the integration between structural and functional approaches is proposed for characterizing sediment connectivity in mountain catchments. The structural approach, based on a topography-based sediment connectivity index, was used for assessing hillslope-to-channel connectivity. Since field data on processes driving sediment transport along the channel network are available, a functional approach has been devised to estimate within-channel connectivity. An index of unit stream power computed from the hydraulic properties of the channel (i.e., discharge, slope and channel width) has been compared with the critical unit stream power computed from incipient motion thresholds derived from field data to identify the cells of the Digital Terrain Model (DTM) in which sediment can be mobilized under near-bankfull conditions. The index expressing the within-channel connectivity is given by the length of the reaches consisting of contiguous cells that exceed the critical unit stream power. During high-magnitude floods, when unit stream power values exceed the threshold for incipient motion, channels experience an increase in both hydrological and sediment connectivity. The proposed index characterizes those sections

  19. Occurrence of persistent toxic substances in soils, sediments, fishes and human breast milk in southern Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Ngoc Vinh

    2009-01-01

    Global contamination and toxic effects of persistent toxic substances (PTSs) have been an emerging environmental issue and have received considerable attention during the past four decades. The rapid agricultural and industrial growths as well as the expansion of urban areas in Hochiminh City and Mekong River Delta, two of the most densely populated areas in the world with about 26 million peoples, result in the widespread contamination of PTSs in southern Vietnam. Due to adverse effects to h...

  20. Arsenic, Chromium, and Other Potentially Toxic Elements in the Rocks and Sediments of Oropos-Kalamos Basin, Attica, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Alexakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rocks and sediments are non-anthropogenic sources of elements contamination. In this study, a series of potentially toxic elements were quantified in rocks and sediments of the Oropos-Kalamos basin. Only As, Hg, Pb, and Sb contents, in all the examined rocks and sediments, were higher than the levels given in international literature. Concentration of the elements As, Cr, Hg, Mo, Ni, and U is highly elevated in the lignite compared to crustal element averages. The enrichment of Cr and Ni in the lignite can be attributed to the known ultramafic rock masses surrounding the basin, while enrichment of As, Hg, Mo, Sb, and U is associated with the past geothermal activity of the Upper Miocene (about 15 million years ago. Nickel and Cr were transported into the lignite deposition basin by rivers and streams draining ultramafic rock bodies. The results of this study imply the natural source of Cr3+ and Cr6+ contamination of the Oropos-Kalamos groundwater, since high Cr contents were also recorded in the lignite (212.3 mg kg−1, chromiferous iron ore occurrences (256.6 mg kg−1, and alluvial deposits (212.5 mg kg−1, indicating Cr leaching and transportation to the depositional basin dating from the Upper Miocene age.

  1. Predicting toxicity to Hyalella azteca in pyrogenic-impacted sediments-Do we need to analyze for all 34 PAHs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Stephen C; Azzolina, Nicholas A; Nakles, David V; Hawthorne, Steven B

    2016-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are major drivers of risk at many urban and/or industrialized sediment sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) currently recommends using measurements of 18 parent + 16 groups of alkylated PAHs (PAH-34) to assess the potential for sediment-bound PAHs to impact benthic organisms at these sites. ASTM Method D7363-13 was developed to directly measure low-level sediment porewater PAH concentrations. These concentrations are then compared to ambient water criteria (final chronic values [FCVs]) to assess the potential for impact to benthic organisms. The interlaboratory validation study that was used to finalize ASTM D7363-13 was developed using 24 of the 2-, 3-, and 4-ring PAHs (PAH-24) that are included in the USEPA PAH-34 analyte list. However, it is the responsibility of the user of ASTM Method D7363 to establish a test method to quantify the remaining 10 higher molecular weight PAHs that make up PAH-34. These higher molecular weight PAHs exhibit extremely low saturation solubilities that make their detection difficult in porewater, which has proven difficult to implement in a contract laboratory setting. As a result, commercial laboratories are hesitant to conduct the method on the entire PAH-34 analyte list. This article presents a statistical comparison of the ability of the PAH-24 and PAH-34 porewater results to predict survival of the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca, using the original 269 sediment samples used to gain ASTM D7363 Method approval. The statistical analysis shows that the PAH-24 are statistically indistinguishable from the PAH-34 for predicting toxicity. These results indicate that the analysis of freely dissolved porewater PAH-24 is sufficient for making risk-based decisions based on benthic invertebrate toxicity (survival and growth). This reduced target analyte list should result in a cost-saving for stakeholders and broader implementation of the method at PAH-impacted sediment sites

  2. In-situ characterization and assessment of arsenic mobility in lake sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qin; Ding, Shiming; Wang, Yan; Xu, Lv; Wang, Dan; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-07-01

    In-situ characterization and assessment of arsenic (As) mobility in sediments was scarce. In this study, the distributions of labile As at a vertical resolution of 2 mm were obtained in the sediments of a large Lake Taihu through in-situ measurements using a Zr-oxide diffusive gradients in thin films (Zr-oxide DGT) technique. The DGT-labile As, interpreted as DGT flux (FDGT), exhibited three different patterns in the lake, with all the patterns generally showing an increasing mobility followed by a decreasing mobility with sediment depth. The mobility of As could be characterized by the average FDGT (0.06-1.27 pg cm(-2) s(-1)) in the top 10 mm surface sediments, the maximal FDGT (FDGT-M, 0.14-2.44 pg cm(-2) s(-1)) in the end of the initial increasing phase of FDGT, and the diffusion length (ΔL, 28-66 mm) from the depth showing the FDGT-M to the sediment-water interface. The upward mobilization of labile As from the deep sediments to the surface sediments and overlying water became evident when FDGT-M > 1.7 pg cm(-2) s(-1) or ΔL < 41 mm. The results, for the first time, showed a prospect in in-situ risk assessment of the pollution of sediment As. It was suggested that the increasing mobility of As in the upper sediments was controlled by the reduction of As(V) and the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, while the decreasing mobility in the deep sediments was attributed to immobilization of As(III) by secondary Fe(II)-bearing minerals. PMID:27107255

  3. Extraction, chemical characterization and narcosis toxicity in a field contaminated marine food chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beekman, M.; Klamer, H.; Wezel, A. van [National Inst. for Coastal and Marine Management, The Hague (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Lug worms, mussels and flounder were chronically exposed to contaminated sediment from the Rotterdam Harbour in a marine mesoscosm. The sediment contained a variety of known and unknown contaminants. The amount of toxic stress in the System was evaluated by extraction of the biota and testing of the extracts to Microtox{reg_sign}. An extract of biota is a reflection of the bioavailable contaminants and their biotransformation products that induce toxicity in the organism. First different extraction procedures were evaluated in the mussel. Samples were Soxhlet extracted for 16 hr, with (1) acetone/hexane, (2) ethylacetatehexane, (3) chloroform/hexane or (4) chloroform/methanol as a solvent. The different extracts were analyzed on total lipid amount, lipid composition (HPLC-ELSD), contaminant composition (HPLC-UV, HPLC-fluorescence and GC-MS) and on their toxicity on Microtox{reg_sign}. The chloroform/methanol extraction yielded almost twice as much lipids compared to the other procedures, the difference was mainly explained by a more efficient extraction of the polar lipids. The contaminant chromatograms showed approximately the same spectra for the four procedures, the toxicity of the extracts to Microtox{reg_sign} was somewhat higher for extraction procedure 4. The worm and flounder samples were extracted with chloroform/methanol and also tested on their toxicity by Microtox{reg_sign}. The difference in toxicity between the different species was correlated with their difference in {delta}{sup 15}N, a parameter to indicate the trophic position in the food web. The use of the testing of organisms` extracts in Microtox{reg_sign} for the assessment of the toxic stress in a field situation is discussed.

  4. Acute toxicity and environmental risk of teflubenzuron to Daphnia magna, Poecilia reticulata and Lemna minor in the absence and presence of sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Louise S; Souza, Jaqueline P; Winkaler, Elissandra U; Carraschi, Silvia P; Cruz, Claudinei; Souza-Júnior, Severino C; Machado-Neto, Joaquim G

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the acute toxicity of teflubenzuron (1-(3,5-dichloro-2,4-difluorophenyl)-3-(2,6-difluorobenzoyl)urea) (TFB) for Daphnia magna, Lemna minor and Poecilia reticulata, in the absence and presence of sediment; evaluate the effect of sediment on the TFB bioavailability; and to classify this insecticide according to its environmental poisoning risk for agricultural and aquaculture uses. The tests of TFB acute toxicity were conducted in static system in a completely randomized design with increasing TFB concentrations, and a control group. The TFB has been classified according to the estimated values of EC50 and LC50 by its acute toxicity and environmental risk. The sediment significantly reduced toxicity and bioavailability of TFB in water column. Therefore, the insecticide can be classified as being highly toxic to Daphnia magna, which means the agricultural and aquacultural uses of TFB pose a high risk of environmental toxicity to non-target organisms. However, it was practically non-toxic to L. minor and P. reticulata. PMID:23581694

  5. Toxicity and the fractional distribution of trace metals accumulated from contaminated sediments by the clam Scrobicularia plana exposed in the laboratory and the field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalman, J., E-mail: judit.kalman@uca.es [Department of Life Sciences, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Bonnail-Miguel, E. [Department of Physical-Chemistry, University of Cadiz, Poligono Industrial Rio San Pedro s/n, 11,510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Smith, B.D. [Department of Life Sciences, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Bury, N.R. [Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Science, King' s College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH (United Kingdom); Rainbow, P.S. [Department of Life Sciences, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    The relationship between the subcellular distribution of accumulated toxic metals into five operational fractions (subsequently combined into presumed detoxified and non-detoxified components) and toxicity in the clam Scrobicularia plana was investigated under different laboratory exposures. Clams were exposed to metal contaminated media (water and diet) and analysed for the partitioning of accumulated As, Cu and Zn into subcellular fractions. In general, metallothionein-like proteins, metal-rich granules and cellular debris in different proportions acted as main storage sites of accumulated metals in the clam soft tissues for these three metals. No significant differences were noted in the accumulation rates of As, Cu and Zn of groups of individuals with or without apparent signs of toxicity after up to 30 days of exposure to naturally contaminated sediment mixtures. There was, however, an increased proportional accumulation of Cu in the non-detoxified fraction with increased Cu accumulation rate in the clams, suggesting that the Cu uptake rate from contaminated sediments exceeded the combined rates of elimination and detoxification of Cu, with the subsequent likelihood for toxic effects in the clams. - Highlights: • Scrobicularia plana accumulated As, Cu and Zn from naturally toxic sediments. • Toxic metals were accumulated in detoxified and non-detoxified components. • Cu accumulation in the non-detoxified pool increased with increased Cu uptake rate. • Cu uptake rate exceeded combined loss and detoxification rates to cause toxicity.

  6. Toxicity and the fractional distribution of trace metals accumulated from contaminated sediments by the clam Scrobicularia plana exposed in the laboratory and the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between the subcellular distribution of accumulated toxic metals into five operational fractions (subsequently combined into presumed detoxified and non-detoxified components) and toxicity in the clam Scrobicularia plana was investigated under different laboratory exposures. Clams were exposed to metal contaminated media (water and diet) and analysed for the partitioning of accumulated As, Cu and Zn into subcellular fractions. In general, metallothionein-like proteins, metal-rich granules and cellular debris in different proportions acted as main storage sites of accumulated metals in the clam soft tissues for these three metals. No significant differences were noted in the accumulation rates of As, Cu and Zn of groups of individuals with or without apparent signs of toxicity after up to 30 days of exposure to naturally contaminated sediment mixtures. There was, however, an increased proportional accumulation of Cu in the non-detoxified fraction with increased Cu accumulation rate in the clams, suggesting that the Cu uptake rate from contaminated sediments exceeded the combined rates of elimination and detoxification of Cu, with the subsequent likelihood for toxic effects in the clams. - Highlights: • Scrobicularia plana accumulated As, Cu and Zn from naturally toxic sediments. • Toxic metals were accumulated in detoxified and non-detoxified components. • Cu accumulation in the non-detoxified pool increased with increased Cu uptake rate. • Cu uptake rate exceeded combined loss and detoxification rates to cause toxicity

  7. Prediction of the bioaccumulation of PAHs in surface sediments of Bohai Sea, China and quantitative assessment of the related toxicity and health risk to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiafu; Dong, Han; Xu, Xiang; Han, Bin; Li, Xianguo; Zhu, Chenjian; Han, Chen; Liu, Shaopeng; Yang, Dandan; Xu, Qian; Zhang, Dahai

    2016-03-15

    Assessing the health risk of PAHs in sediments was quite difficult because sediment occurred in sea floor, and it was very hard to contact with them directly for humans. This study was attempted to reveal the relationship between concentrations of PAHs in surface sediments and health risk of seafood consumers. The transfer (bioaccumulation) of PAHs from surface sediment into benthic organisms was predicted. Source contributions to PAHs and related toxicity and health risks (from intake of PAHs-contaminated benthic organisms) were studied based on PMF model and Monte Carlo simulation, respectively. Total concentrations of PAHs (TPAHs) ranged from 149.40 to 1211.97 ng g(-1) in sediments of Bohai Sea (BS), China. Petroleum and vehicular emission, coal combustion and coke oven constituted 40.0%, 32.2% and 27.8% of PAHs, respectively, but contributed 53.0%, 22.8% and 24.2% of toxicity posed by PAHs in sediment. For children, teens and adults, the 95th percentile carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks were below the threshold values of 10(-6) and 1.0, respectively, suggesting no potential health risk. Sensitivity analysis suggested that exposure duration (ED) and PAH concentrations (CS) were the two most sensitive parameters in risk assessment. The results provided a method to evaluate the quality of sediments and the potential health risk related to PAHs in marine sediments. PMID:26856644

  8. Assessment of sediment metal contamination in the Mar Menor coastal lagoon (SE Spain: Metal distribution, toxicity, bioaccumulation and benthic community structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mar Menor coastal lagoon is one of the largest of the Mediterranean Sea. Ancient mining activities in the mountains near its southern basin have resulted in metal contamination in the sediment. The metal bioavailability of these sediments was determined through laboratory toxicity bioassays using three Mediterranean sea urchin species and two amphipod species, and by means of field bioaccumulation measurements involving the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa. The effect of sediment metal contamination on benthic communities was assessed through benthic infaunal analyses, applying classical descriptive parameters and multivariate techniques. The sediments affected by the mining activities presented high levels of toxicity and metals were also accumulated in the seagrass tissues, pointing to metal bioavailability. Although the classical benthic indices were not clear indicators of disturbance, the multivariate techniques applied provided more consistent conclusions.

  9. [Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contaminations in surface sediments from Zhalong wetland, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Wen; Xie, Qi-Lai; Wang, Yan; Xu, Yue; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2011-08-01

    Soxhlet extraction, silica gel alumina column for separation and clean up and gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for qualitative and quantitative analysis were used for study environmental behavior of 15 priority PAHs of twelve surface sediment samples collected from Zhalong wetland, Heilongjiang Province. The objectives of this study were to identify the PAHs contamination level, composition pattern, pollution sources and pathways, and to assess the ecological risk of PAHs to aquatic life in Zhalong wetland. The total concentrations of 15 priority PAHs ranged form 31.9 to 290 ng/g (dry weight), with a mean value of 130 ng/g. The PAHs profiles were dominated by two-to four-ring compounds which accounted for 90% of total PAHs. Phenanthrene, fluorine, fluoranthene, and pyrene represented the highest fractions in all surface sediment samples. Comparing with other results from wetlands and lakes in China or other countries, the PAH concentrations level in Zhalong wetland surface sediments were relatively low, in the same range of Lharu wetland. The linear regression analysis showed that the concentrations of PAHs were significantly correlated to the sediment total organic carbon (TOC) content (R2 = 0.87). PAHs contamination might mainly came from biomass and coal combustion. After long range atmospheric transport and deposition, the released PAHs finally accumulated into wetland sediment. Ecology risk assessment indicated that phenanthrene and fluorine had exhibited a tendency of accumulation on surface sediment of Zhalong wetland, which would exert negative toxic effect on aquatic organism. PMID:22619977

  10. Geochemical characterization and environmental status of Makirina Bay sediments (northern Dalmatia, Republic of Croatia)

    OpenAIRE

    Komar, Darja; Dolenec, Matej; Lambaša Belak, Živana; Slavica Matešić, Sanja; Lojen, Sonja; Kniewald, Goran; Vrhovnik, Petra; Dolenec, Tadej; Rogan Šmuc, Nastja

    2015-01-01

    This research focuses on determination of the mineralogical composition, geochemical characteristics and evaluationof pollution status of the Makirina Bay sediments. Calculated enrichment factor (EF) values show no enrichment (< 1) for Cd, Ni, and Zn, minor enrichment (< 3) for As, Cu, and Pb, and minor to moderate enrichment for Mo. The resultsof the sequential leaching procedure for the aforementioned potentially toxic elements (PTE) indicates that the mobilityand bioavailability characteri...

  11. Characterization of heavy metal concentrations in the sediments of three freshwater rivers in Huludao City, Northeast China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuli River, Cishan River, and Lianshan River are three freshwater rivers flowing through Huludao City, in a region of northeast China strongly affected by industrialization. Contamination assessment has never been conducted in a comprehensive way. For the first time, the contamination of three rivers impacted by different sources in the same city was compared. This work investigated the distribution and sources of Hg, Pb, Cd, Zn and Cu in the surface sediments of Wuli River, Cishan River, and Lianshan River, and assessed heavy metal toxicity risk with the application of two different sets of Sediment Quality Guideline (SQG) indices (effect range low/effect range median values, ERL/ERM; and threshold effect level/probable effect level, TEL/PEL). Furthermore, this study used a toxic unit approach to compare and gauge the individual and combined metal contamination for Hg, Pb, Cd, Zn and Cu. Results showed that Hg contamination in the sediments of Wuli River originated from previous sediment contamination of the chlor-alkali producing industry, and Pb, Cd, Zn and Cu contamination was mainly derived from atmospheric deposition and unknown small pollution sources. Heavy metal contamination to Cishan River sediments was mainly derived from Huludao Zinc Plant, while atmospheric deposition, sewage wastewater and unknown small pollution were the primary sources for Lianshan River. The potential acute toxicity in sediment of Wuli River may be primarily due to Hg contamination. Hg is the major toxicity contributor, accounting for 53.3-93.2%, 7.9-54.9% to total toxicity in Wuli River and Lianshan River, respectively, followed by Cd. In Cishan River, Cd is the major sediment toxicity contributor, however, accounting for 63.2-66.9% of total toxicity. - Sediment in Wuli River, Cishan River, and Lianshan River has been contaminated by heavy metals and adverse effects would be expected frequently in Wuli River and Cishan River

  12. Agglomeration, sedimentation, and cellular toxicity of alumina nanoparticles in cell culture medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytotoxicity of alumina nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated for a wide range of concentration (25–200 μg/mL) and incubation time (0–72 h) using floating cells (THP-1) and adherent cells (J774A.1, A549, and 293). Alumina NPs were gradually agglomerated over time although a significant portion of sedimentation occurred at the early stage within 6 h. A decrease of the viability was found in floating (THP-1) and adherent (J774A.1 and A549) cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, the time-dependent decrease in cell viability was observed only in adherent cells (J774A.1 and A549), which is predominantly related with the sedimentation of alumina NPs in cell culture medium. The uptake of alumina NPs in macrophages and an increased cell-to-cell adhesion in adherent cells were observed. There was no significant change in the viability of 293 cells. This in vitro test suggests that the agglomeration and sedimentation of alumina NPs affected cellular viability depending on cell types such as monocytes (THP-1), macrophages (J774A.1), lung carcinoma cells (A549), and embryonic kidney cells (293).

  13. Microscale characterization of sulfur speciation in lake sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Teng; Arnold, William A; Toner, Brandy M

    2013-02-01

    Prairie pothole lakes (PPLs) are naturally sulfur-enriched wetlands in the glaciated prairie region of North America. High sulfate levels and dynamic hydrogeochemistry in combination render PPLs a unique environment to explore the speciation of sedimentary sulfur (S). The goals of this research were to define and quantify the solid-phase S pools in PPL sediments and track seasonal dynamics of S speciation. A quantitative X-ray microprobe method was developed based on S 1s X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and multienergy X-ray fluorescence mapping. Three S pools-pyritic S, reduced organic S (organic mono- and disulfide), and oxidized S (inorganic sulfate, ester sulfate, and sulfonate)-were identified in PPL sediments. No significant seasonal variation was evident for total S, but S speciation showed a seasonal response. During the spring-summer transition, the reduced organic S decreased from 55 to 15 mol %, with a concomitant rise in the oxidized S. During the summer-fall transition, the trend reversed and the reduced organic S grew to 75 mol % at the expense of the oxidized S. The pyritic S, on the other hand, remained relatively constant (∼22 mol %) over time. The seasonal changes in S speciation have strong potential to force the cycling of elements such as mercury in prairie wetlands. PMID:23282039

  14. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Susana M; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Guilhermino, Lúcia; Ribeiro, Rui

    2006-01-01

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Müller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified by comparing it to that of lethality, upon cadmium exposure. The influence of environmental conditions prevailing during exposure (salinity, temperature, substrate, light regime, and food availability) on postexposure feeding was also addressed. The potential of this in situ assay was then investigated by deploying organisms at ten sites, located in reference and contaminated Portuguese estuaries. Organism recovery ranged between 90% and 100% and a significant postexposure feeding depression (16.3-72.7%) was observed at all contaminated sites relatively to references. PMID:16002194

  15. Characterization and bacterial toxicity of lanthanum oxide bulk and nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brabu Balusamy; Yamuna Gowri Kandhasamy; Anitha Senthamizhan; Gopalakrishnan Chandrasekaran; Murugan Siva Subramanian; Kumaravel Tirukalikundram S

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the bacterial toxicity of lanthanum oxide micron and nano sized particles using shake flask method against gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli,Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria.Particle size,morphology and chemical composition were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS).Resuits indicated that lanthanum oxide nanoparticles showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus,but not against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.It was speculated that lanthanum oxide produced this effect by interacting with the gram-positive bacterial cell wall.Furthermore,lanthanum oxide bulk particles were found to enhance the pyocyanin pigment production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  16. Toxic metals in WEEE: Characterization and substance flow analysis in waste treatment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has received extensive attention as a secondary source of metals. Because WEEE also contains toxic substances such as heavy metals, appropriate management of these substances is important in the recycling and treatment of WEEE. As a basis for discussion toward better management of WEEE, this study characterizes various types of WEEE in terms of toxic metal contents. The fate of various metals contained in WEEE, including toxic metals, was also investigated in actual waste treatment processes. Cathode-ray tube televisions showed the highest concentration and the largest total amount of toxic metals such as Ba, Pb, and Sb, so appropriate recycling and disposal of these televisions would greatly contribute to better management of toxic metals in WEEE. A future challenge is the management of toxic metals in mid-sized items such as audio/visual and ICT equipment because even though the concentrations were not high in these items, the total amount of toxic metals contained in them is not negligible. In the case of Japan, such mid-sized WEEE items as well as small electronic items are subject to municipal solid waste treatment. A case study showed that a landfill was the main destination of toxic metals contained in those items in the current treatment systems. The case study also showed that changes in the flows of toxic metals will occur when treatment processes are modified to emphasize resource recovery. Because the flow changes might lead to an increase in the amount of toxic metals released to the environment, the flows of toxic metals and the materials targeted for resource recovery should be considered simultaneously. - Highlights: ► Appropriate management of toxic metals contained in WEEE is important during recycling and treatment of WEEE. ► CRT TVs contain large amount of toxic metals with high concentration and thus appropriate management is highly important. ► Mid-sized equipment is a future target for

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF ANAEROBIC DECHLORINATING CONSORTIA DERIVED FROM AQUATIC SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four methanogenic consortia, which degraded 2-chlorophenol, 3-chlorophenol, 2-chlorobenzoate, and 3-chlorobenzoate, respectively; and one nitrate-reducing consortium which degraded 3-chlorobenzoate were characterized. Degradative activity in these consortia has been maintained in...

  18. Toxic metals in WEEE: characterization and substance flow analysis in waste treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguchi, Masahiro; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Terazono, Atsushi

    2013-10-01

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has received extensive attention as a secondary source of metals. Because WEEE also contains toxic substances such as heavy metals, appropriate management of these substances is important in the recycling and treatment of WEEE. As a basis for discussion toward better management of WEEE, this study characterizes various types of WEEE in terms of toxic metal contents. The fate of various metals contained in WEEE, including toxic metals, was also investigated in actual waste treatment processes. Cathode-ray tube televisions showed the highest concentration and the largest total amount of toxic metals such as Ba, Pb, and Sb, so appropriate recycling and disposal of these televisions would greatly contribute to better management of toxic metals in WEEE. A future challenge is the management of toxic metals in mid-sized items such as audio/visual and ICT equipment because even though the concentrations were not high in these items, the total amount of toxic metals contained in them is not negligible. In the case of Japan, such mid-sized WEEE items as well as small electronic items are subject to municipal solid waste treatment. A case study showed that a landfill was the main destination of toxic metals contained in those items in the current treatment systems. The case study also showed that changes in the flows of toxic metals will occur when treatment processes are modified to emphasize resource recovery. Because the flow changes might lead to an increase in the amount of toxic metals released to the environment, the flows of toxic metals and the materials targeted for resource recovery should be considered simultaneously. PMID:22921510

  19. Sequential application of chelating agents and innovative surfactants for the enhanced electroremediation of real sediments from toxic metals and PAHs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahladakis, John N; Lekkas, Nikolaos; Smponias, Andreas; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2014-06-01

    This study focused on the sequential application of a chelating agent (citric acid) followed by a surfactant in the simultaneous electroremediation of real contaminated sediments from toxic metals and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, the efficiency evaluation of two innovative non-ionic surfactants, commercially known as Poloxamer 407 and Nonidet P40, was investigated. The results indicated a removal efficacy of approximately 43% and 48% for the summation of PAHs (SUM PAHs), respectively for the aforementioned surfactants, much better than the one obtained by the use of Tween 80 (nearly 21%). Individual PAHs (e.g. fluorene) were removed in percentages that reached almost 84% and 92% in the respective electrokinetic experiments when these new surfactants were introduced. In addition, the combined-enhanced sequential electrokinetic treatment with citric acid improved dramatically the removal of Zn and As, compared to the unenhanced run, but did not favor the other toxic metals examined. Since no improvement in metal removal percentages occurred when Tween 80 was used, significant contribution to this matter should also be attributed to the solubilization capacity of these innovative, in electrokinetic remediation, non-ionic surfactants. PMID:24321329

  20. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Mueller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified by comparing it to that of lethality, upon cadmium exposure. The influence of environmental conditions prevailing during exposure (salinity, temperature, substrate, light regime, and food availability) on postexposure feeding was also addressed. The potential of this in situ assay was then investigated by deploying organisms at ten sites, located in reference and contaminated Portuguese estuaries. Organism recovery ranged between 90% and 100% and a significant postexposure feeding depression (16.3-72.7%) was observed at all contaminated sites relatively to references. - A new sub-lethal toxicity assay is presented for marine invertebrates

  1. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Susana M. [Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar (ICBAS), Departamento de Estudos de Populacoes, Largo Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Moreira-Santos, Matilde [Instituto do Ambiente e Vida, Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Largo Marques de Pombal, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal); Guilhermino, Lucia [Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar (ICBAS), Departamento de Estudos de Populacoes, Largo Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Ribeiro, Rui [Instituto do Ambiente e Vida, Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Largo Marques de Pombal, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: rui.ribeiro@zoo.uc.pt

    2006-01-15

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Mueller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified by comparing it to that of lethality, upon cadmium exposure. The influence of environmental conditions prevailing during exposure (salinity, temperature, substrate, light regime, and food availability) on postexposure feeding was also addressed. The potential of this in situ assay was then investigated by deploying organisms at ten sites, located in reference and contaminated Portuguese estuaries. Organism recovery ranged between 90% and 100% and a significant postexposure feeding depression (16.3-72.7%) was observed at all contaminated sites relatively to references. - A new sub-lethal toxicity assay is presented for marine invertebrates.

  2. Distribution and toxicity of current-use insecticides in sediment of a lake receiving waters from areas in transition to urbanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current-use insecticides including organophosphate (OPs) and synthetic pyrethroid (SPs) insecticides were analyzed in 35 sediment samples collected from Chaohu Lake in China, where a transition from a traditional agricultural to a modern urbanized society is ongoing. Total concentrations of five OPs and eight SPs ranged from 0.029 to 0.681 ng/g dry weight and 0.016–301 ng/g dry weight, respectively. Toxic unit analysis showed that 13% of the sediment samples likely produced over 50% of the mortality for benthic invertebrates. Analysis also showed that cypermethrin was the principal contributor to the toxicity. Spatial distribution evaluation implied that OPs were mainly from non-point sources associated with agricultural activities. Conversely, SPs may have been derived from runoff of inflowing rivers through urban regions, as their concentrations were well-correlated with concentrations of other urban-oriented contaminants. - Highlights: ► Though lower than urban sites, pyrethroid insecticides in Chaohu Lake, China may cause toxicity to benthic invertebrates. ► Concentrations of pyrethroids were well correlated with those of other urban-oriented contaminants, e.g. PAHs and LABs. ► Spatial distribution showed urban runoff was the major source of pyrethroids deposited in the lake sediment. ► Conversely, organophosphate insecticides were mainly associated with agricultural non-point sources. - Evaluation of the distribution, potential toxicity, and input sources of organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides in sediment from Chaohu Lake, China.

  3. Benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages and sediment toxicity testing in the Ely Creek watershed restoration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ely Creek watershed in Lee County, Virginia, contains an abundance of abandoned mined land (AML) seeps that contaminate the majority of the creek and its confluence into Big Stone Creek. Contaminated sediments had high concentrations of iron (∼10,000 mg/kg), aluminum (∼1,500 mg/kg), magnesium (∼400 mg/kg) and manganese (∼150 mg/kg). Copper and zinc generally ranged from 3 to 20 mg/kg. Benthic macroinvertebrates surveys at six of 20 sites sampled in the watershed yielded no macroinvertebrates, while eight others had total abundances of 1 to 9 organisms. Four reference sites contained ≥100 organisms and at least 14 different taxa. Laboratory, 10-day survival/impairment sediments tests with Daphnia magna did not support the field data. Mortality of 92 to 100% for D. magna occurred in samples collected from six cities. Daphnid reproduction was more sensitive than laboratory test organism survivorship; however, neither daphnid survivorship nor reproduction were good predictors of taxa richness. Laboratory test concerns included the use of a reference diluent water rather than site specific diluent water

  4. Arsenic fractionation and mineralogical characterization of sediments in the Cold Lake area of Alberta, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elevated arsenic (As > 0.01 mg L−1) in some domestic well water in the Cold Lake area of Alberta, Canada is of great concern for public health. To determine possible sources of groundwater As, sediments (n = 135) collected from five different locations (up to ∼ 300 m depth) in the area were characterized. Total As concentrations in the sediments varied from ∼ 1 to 35 mg kg−1. Sediments derived from shale contained high As (∼ 13 mg kg−1; n = 14), particularly the shale of Lea Park formation where maximum average As was ∼ 32 mg kg−1 (n = 2). Unoxidized sediments of Grand Centre (24.9 ± 4.2 mg kg−1 As) and Bonnyville (19.9 ± 1.8 mg kg−1 As) formations also contained high As. Sequential extraction procedure (SEP) revealed the dominance of exchangeable and specifically adsorbed As (6 to 46% of total As) in the sediments of varying As concentrations (0.8 to 35.4 mg kg−1 As). The high As sediments (> 7 mg kg−1 As) also contained significant amount of sulfide bound As (11 to 34% of total As), while low As (< 7 mg kg−1 As) sediments had crystalline oxide minerals bound As (25 to 75% of total As) as major phases. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses confirmed the presence of pyrite, and μ-XRD analysis signaled the presence of arsenopyrite in sediments containing ∼ 20 mg kg−1 As. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy analysis suggested dominance of arsenite (AsIII; ∼ 60 to 90% of total As) in all the sediments. These findings may help to devise strategies to investigate mechanisms of As release into the groundwater. - Highlights: • High arsenic was found in sediments derived from shale. • Arsenic was mainly found in exchangeable and sulfide bound phases. • Pyrite and arsenopyrite minerals were found in high arsenic sediments. • Sulfide minerals in the sediments could be the potential source of groundwater As

  5. Arsenic fractionation and mineralogical characterization of sediments in the Cold Lake area of Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javed, Muhammad Babar, E-mail: mjaved@ualberta.ca; Kachanoski, Gary, E-mail: gary.kachanoski@mun.ca; Siddique, Tariq, E-mail: tariq.siddique@ualberta.ca

    2014-12-01

    Elevated arsenic (As > 0.01 mg L{sup −1}) in some domestic well water in the Cold Lake area of Alberta, Canada is of great concern for public health. To determine possible sources of groundwater As, sediments (n = 135) collected from five different locations (up to ∼ 300 m depth) in the area were characterized. Total As concentrations in the sediments varied from ∼ 1 to 35 mg kg{sup −1}. Sediments derived from shale contained high As (∼ 13 mg kg{sup −1}; n = 14), particularly the shale of Lea Park formation where maximum average As was ∼ 32 mg kg{sup −1} (n = 2). Unoxidized sediments of Grand Centre (24.9 ± 4.2 mg kg{sup −1} As) and Bonnyville (19.9 ± 1.8 mg kg{sup −1} As) formations also contained high As. Sequential extraction procedure (SEP) revealed the dominance of exchangeable and specifically adsorbed As (6 to 46% of total As) in the sediments of varying As concentrations (0.8 to 35.4 mg kg{sup −1} As). The high As sediments (> 7 mg kg{sup −1} As) also contained significant amount of sulfide bound As (11 to 34% of total As), while low As (< 7 mg kg{sup −1} As) sediments had crystalline oxide minerals bound As (25 to 75% of total As) as major phases. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses confirmed the presence of pyrite, and μ-XRD analysis signaled the presence of arsenopyrite in sediments containing ∼ 20 mg kg{sup −1} As. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy analysis suggested dominance of arsenite (AsIII; ∼ 60 to 90% of total As) in all the sediments. These findings may help to devise strategies to investigate mechanisms of As release into the groundwater. - Highlights: • High arsenic was found in sediments derived from shale. • Arsenic was mainly found in exchangeable and sulfide bound phases. • Pyrite and arsenopyrite minerals were found in high arsenic sediments. • Sulfide minerals in the sediments could be the potential source of groundwater As.

  6. Results of Water and Sediment Toxicity Tests and Chemical Analyses Conducted at the Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Waste Unit, January 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, W.L.

    1999-06-02

    The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Operable Unit consists of two inactive rubble pits (631-1G and 631-3G) that have been capped, and one active burning rubble pit (631-2G), where wooden pallets and other non-hazardous debris are periodically burned. The inactive rubble pits may have received hazardous materials, such as asbestos, batteries, and paint cans, as well as non-hazardous materials, such as ash, paper, and glass. In an effort to determine if long term surface water flows of potentially contaminated water from the 631-1G, 631-3G, and 631-2G areas have resulted in an accumulation of chemical constituents at toxic levels in the vicinity of the settling basin and wetlands area, chemical analyses for significant ecological preliminary constituents of concern (pCOCs) were performed on aqueous and sediment samples. In addition, aquatic and sediment toxicity tests were performed in accordance with U.S. EPA methods (U.S. EPA 1989, 1994). Based on the results of the chemical analyses, unfiltered water samples collected from a wetland and settling basins located adjacent to the CSBRP Operable Unit exceed Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for aluminum, barium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium at one or more of the four locations that were sampled. The water contained very high concentrations of clay particles that were present as suspended solids. A substantial portion of the metals were present as filterable particulates, bound to the clay particles, and were therefore not biologically available. Based on dissolved metal concentrations, the wetland and settling basin exceeded TRVs for aluminum and barium. However, the background reference location also exceeded the TRV for barium, which suggests that this value may be too low, based on local geochemistry. The detection limits for both total and dissolved mercury were higher than the TRV, so it was not possible to determine if the TRV for mercury was exceeded. Dissolved metal levels of chromium, copper

  7. Chemical characterization of sediment "Legacy P" in watershed streams - implications for P loading under land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audette, Yuki; O'Halloran, Ivan; Voroney, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Transfer of dissolved phosphorus (P) in runoff water via streams is regulated mainly by both stream sediment P adsorption and precipitation processes. The adsorption capacity of stream sediments acting as a P sink was a great benefit to preserving water quality in downstream lakes in the past, as it minimized the effects of surplus P loading from watershed streams. However, with long-term continued P loading the capacity of the sediments to store P has diminished, and eventually converted stream sediments from P sinks to sources of dissolved P. This accumulation of 'legacy P' in stream sediments has become the major source of dissolved P and risk to downstream water quality. Agricultural best management practices (BMP) for P typically attempt to minimize the transfer of P from farmland. However, because of the limitation in sediment P adsorption capacity, adoption of BMPs, such as reduction of external P loading, may not result in an immediate improvement in water quality. The goal of the research is to chemically characterize the P forms contributing to legacy P in stream sediments located in the watershed connecting to Cook's Bay, one of three basins of Lake Simcoe, Ontario, Canada. This watershed receives the largest amount of external P loading and has the highest rate of sediment build-up, both of which are attributed to agriculture. Water samples were collected monthly at six study sites from October 2015 for analysis of pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, total P, dissolved reactive P, particulate P, total N, NH4-N, NO3-N, TOC and other elements including Al, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, S, Na, K and Zn. Sediment core samples were collected in November 2015 and will continue to be collected in March, July and October 2016. Various forms of P in five vertical sections were characterized by sequential fractionation and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy techniques. Pore water, sediment texture and clay identification were performed. The concentration of total P in water samples

  8. Toxic elements in free-living freshwater fish, water and sediments in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szkoda Józef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Samples for analysis were collected from 10 areas, including the major Polish rivers and lakes, with different sources of environmental pollution (industrial, municipal, and farming. The materials was taken from the lakes of Mazury, located in a non-industrialised region, from the Brda River, an area impacted by pig farms, from the lakes of Lipczyno Wielkie/Pomerania, from the Wkra River, an area impacted by poultry farms, from the Dunajec River at the Roznowski Reservoir, from the Vistula River at Cracow and Warsaw, from the Odra River at Wroclaw and the Warta River estuary, and also from Rybnik Power Station Reservoir. Concentrations of Pb, Cd, Hg, and As were analysed in 397 fish muscle and 128 sediment samples using an atomic absorption spectrometry technique. The analytical procedures were covered by a quality assurance programme. It was demonstrated that the average concentrations of lead, cadmium, and arsenic in fish were in the low hundredths and thousandths of a mg/kg and never exceeded permitted limits established for food. Higher values of these elements were found in fish from bodies of water located in the zone of influence of large urban agglomerations, especially the Cracow region. High concentrations of lead and cadmium were also found in Vistula River sediments near Cracow, where the maximum values were 134.10 mg/kg and 21.24 mg/kg dry weight for lead and cadmium respectively. The average concentration of mercury in a predatory fish muscle (0.179 mg/kg was almost twice as high as in the omnivorous fish (0.103 mg/kg. Only a single fish sample exceeded the maximum limit for this metal (0.50 mg/kg and did not present a risk to consumers’ health.

  9. Characterization of methane hydrate host sediments using synchrotron-computed microtomography (CMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K.W.; Feng, H.; Tomov, S.; Winters, W.J.; Prodanovic, M.; Mahajan, D.

    2007-01-01

    The hydrate-sediment interaction is an important aspect of gas hydrate studies that needs further examination. We describe here the applicability of the computed microtomography (CMT) technique that utilizes an intense X-ray synchrotron source to characterize sediment samples, two at various depths from the Blake Ridge area (a well-known hydrate-prone region) and one from Georges Bank, that once contained methane trapped as hydrates. Detailed results of the tomographic analysis performed on the deepest sample (667??m) from Blake Ridge are presented as 2-D and 3-D images which show several mineral constituents, the internal grain/pore microstructure, and, following segmentation into pore and grain space, a visualization of the connecting pathways through the pore-space of the sediment. Various parameters obtained from the analysis of the CMT data are presented for all three sediment samples. The micro-scale porosity values showed decreasing trend with increasing depth for all three samples that is consistent with the previously reported bulk porosity data. The 3-D morphology, pore-space pathways, porosity, and permeability values are also reported for all three samples. The application of CMT is now being expanded to the laboratory-formed samples of hydrate in sediments as well as field samples of methane hydrate bearing sediments.

  10. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  11. Chronic toxicity of contaminated sediments on reproduction and histopathology of the crustacean Gammarus fossarum and relationship with the chemical contamination and in vitro effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurova, Edita; Hilscherova, Klara; Sidlova-Stepankova, Tereza; Blaha, Ludek [Faculty of Science, RECETOX, Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Masaryk Univ., Brno (Czech Republic); Koehler, Heinz R. [Animal Physiological Ecology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Triebskorn, Rita [Steinbeis-Transfer Center for Ecotoxicology and Ecophysiology, Rottenburg (Germany); Jungmann, Dirk [Inst. of Hydrobiology, Dresden Univ. of Tech. (Germany); Giesy, John P. [Dept. of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences and Toxicology Centre, Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Zoology Dept., National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, and Center for Integrative Toxicology Center, and Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Biology and Chemistry Dept., City Univ. of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); School of the Environment, Nanjing Univ. (China)

    2010-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate possible relationships between the sediment contaminants and the occurrence of intersex in situ. Two of the studied sediments were from polluted sites with increased occurrence of intersex crustaceans (Lake Pilnok, black coal mining area in the Czech Republic, inhabited by the crayfish Pontastacus leptodactylus population with 18% of intersex; creek Lockwitzbach in Germany with Gammarus fossarum population with about 7% of intersex). Materials and methods Sediments were studied by a combined approach that included (1) determination of concentrations of metals and traditionally analyzed organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); (2) examination of the in vitro potencies to activate aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), estrogen (ER), and androgen receptor-mediated responses; and (3) in vivo whole sediment exposures during a 12-week reproduction toxicity study with benthic amphipod G. fossarum. (orig.)

  12. Multi-property characterization chamber for geophysical-hydrological investigations of hydrate bearing sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Choi, Jeong-Hoon; Dai, Sheng

    2014-08-01

    With the increase in the interest of producing natural gas from methane hydrates as well as potential risks of massive hydrate dissociation in the context of global warming, studies have recently shifted from pure hydrate crystals to hydrates in sediments. Such a research focus shift requires a series of innovative laboratory devices that are capable of investigating various properties of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS). This study introduces a newly developed high pressure testing chamber, i.e., multi-property characterization chamber (MPCC), that allows simultaneous investigation of a series of fundamental properties of HBS, including small-strain stiffness (i.e., P- and S-waves), shear strength, large-strain deformation, stress-volume responses, and permeability. The peripheral coolant circulation system of the MPCC permits stable and accurate temperature control, while the core holder body, made of aluminum, enables X-ray computer tomography scanning to be easily employed for structural and morphological characterization of specimens. Samples of hydrate-bearing sediments are held within a rubber sleeve inside the chamber. The thick sleeve is more durable and versatile than thin membranes while also being much softer than oedometer-type chambers that are incapable of enabling flow tests. Bias introduced by the rubber sleeve during large deformation tests are also calibrated both theoretically and experimentally. This system provides insight into full characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments in the laboratory, as well as pressure core technology in the field. PMID:25173288

  13. Multi-property characterization chamber for geophysical-hydrological investigations of hydrate bearing sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increase in the interest of producing natural gas from methane hydrates as well as potential risks of massive hydrate dissociation in the context of global warming, studies have recently shifted from pure hydrate crystals to hydrates in sediments. Such a research focus shift requires a series of innovative laboratory devices that are capable of investigating various properties of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS). This study introduces a newly developed high pressure testing chamber, i.e., multi-property characterization chamber (MPCC), that allows simultaneous investigation of a series of fundamental properties of HBS, including small-strain stiffness (i.e., P- and S-waves), shear strength, large-strain deformation, stress-volume responses, and permeability. The peripheral coolant circulation system of the MPCC permits stable and accurate temperature control, while the core holder body, made of aluminum, enables X-ray computer tomography scanning to be easily employed for structural and morphological characterization of specimens. Samples of hydrate-bearing sediments are held within a rubber sleeve inside the chamber. The thick sleeve is more durable and versatile than thin membranes while also being much softer than oedometer-type chambers that are incapable of enabling flow tests. Bias introduced by the rubber sleeve during large deformation tests are also calibrated both theoretically and experimentally. This system provides insight into full characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments in the laboratory, as well as pressure core technology in the field

  14. Impact of a flood disaster on sediment toxicity in a major river system - the Elbe flood 2002 as a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ecotoxicological implications of a flooding disaster were investigated with the exceptional Elbe flood in August 2002 as an example. Sediment samples were taken shortly after the flood at 37 sites. For toxicity assessment the midge Chironomus riparius (Insecta) and the mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gastropoda) were exposed to the sediment samples for 28 days. For a subset of 19 sampling sites, the contamination level and the biological response of both species were also recorded before the flood in 2000. The direct comparison of biological responses at identical sites revealed significant differences for samples taken before and immediately after the flood. After flood sediments of the river Elbe caused both higher emergence rates in the midge and higher numbers of embryos in the mudsnail. Contrary to expectations the toxicity of the sediments decreased after the flood, probably because of a dilution of toxic substances along the river Elbe and a reduction in bioavailability of pollutants as a result of increasing TOC values after the flood. - The extraordinary Elbe flood in August 2002 did not result in an overall increase of environmental contamination

  15. History and sensitivity comparison of two standard whole-sediment toxicity tests with crustaceans: the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens microbiotest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Cooman W.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review first details the development of the test procedures with Hyalella azteca which historically emerged as one of the recommended test species for whole-sediment assays and its gradual standardization and endorsement by national and international organizations. The sensitivity and precision of the H. azteca test for application on chemicals and on real world sediments is discussed. The review subsequently addresses the development of the whole sediment microbiotest with the ostracod crustacean Heterocypris incongruens with larvae of this test species hatched from dormant eggs (cysts, rendering this assay stock culture/maintenance free. The application of the 6-day ostracod microbiotest on sediments in Canada and in Belgium is discussed, as well as its endorsement by the ISO subsequent to an extensive international interlaboratory ring test. The sensitivity of the amphipod and ostracod tests is compared by data from studies in which both assays were applied in parallel. A comparison of more than 1000 ostracod/amphipod data pairs of a 12-year river sediment monitoring study in Flanders/Belgium confirmed that both whole-sediment assays have a similar sensitivity and that the 6-day ostracod microbiotest is a valuable and cost-effective alternative to the 10−14 day amphipod test for evaluation of the toxic hazard of polluted sediments.

  16. Decline in sediment contamination by persistent toxic substances from the outfall of wastewater treatment plant: Effectiveness of legislative actions in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiangzi; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Badejo, Abimbola C; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Shen, Aihua; Lee, Sunggyu; Jeong, Yunsun; Choi, Minkyu; Moon, Hyo-Bang

    2016-06-01

    Legacy and new persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in sediments near a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) outfall in a semi-enclosed bay, to investigate the current contamination and temporal changes in these contaminants associated with regulation activities in Korea. The concentrations of most of the POPs showed clear decreasing trends with an increase in the distance from the WWTP outfall, indicating that the WWTP discharges greatly contributed to the sediment contamination by POPs. Highly significant correlations were found for most of the POPs, indicating a common source for sediment contamination. Significant declines were found in the concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and PAHs in the sediments collected between 2005 and 2013. This result suggested that legislative actions (regulation of the PCDD/Fs in flue gas, total pollution load management, and whole effluent toxicity for WWTP discharges) and change of fuels, were likely to be effective at reducing the POP and PAH levels in sediments during the past several years. The different compositional profiles of the PCDD/Fs and PAHs between 2005 and 2013 implied changes in and/or additional sources of these contaminants. Despite a decline in the PCDD/Fs over time, the present levels of PCDD/Fs in the sediment exceeded some of the sediment quality guidelines suggested by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. PMID:27031806

  17. The extraction and characterization of humic substances from Philippine sources. Part 2: Philippine waters and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) from freshwater estuarine and marine sediment and water samples were extracted and characterized by ash content, elemental composition and UV-visible and IR spectroscopy. The H/C and N/C atomic ratios for marine sediment HAs were in the range (1.14-1.42) and (0.094-0.160) respectively; the H/C and N/C ratios for freshwater sediment HAs were (1.24-1.30) and (0.074-0.120) respectively. The IR spectra for the FAs showed a greater proportion of polar oxygen containing functional groups compared to the HAs. (author). 21 refs.; 19 figs.; 6 tabs

  18. Characterization of Baker Fjord region through its heavy metal content on sediments (Central Chilean Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Ahumada

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of heavy metals content (Ba, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sr and Zn in sediments of the Baker Fjord and surrounding channels in the central region of the Chilean fjords (47°45'S, 48°15'S is analyzed. The aim of the study was characterized the patterns of abundance and distribution of these metals in surface sediments. The area corresponds to a poorly studied zone with low human activity. Distribution patterns would be influenced by rainfall conditions (local erosion, fluvial (continental sediments carried by rivers, glacier (glacier flour and estuarine circulation. Cluster analysis allows differentiation among the sampled sites and group with similar characteristics. Finally, the concentrations found were contrasted with average values of metamorphic rocks and show with some certainty that the values found for calendar for this area and the greatest concentrations are the result of natural enrichment.

  19. ISDD: A computational model of particle sedimentation, diffusion and target cell dosimetry for in vitro toxicity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisler William B

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The difficulty of directly measuring cellular dose is a significant obstacle to application of target tissue dosimetry for nanoparticle and microparticle toxicity assessment, particularly for in vitro systems. As a consequence, the target tissue paradigm for dosimetry and hazard assessment of nanoparticles has largely been ignored in favor of using metrics of exposure (e.g. μg particle/mL culture medium, particle surface area/mL, particle number/mL. We have developed a computational model of solution particokinetics (sedimentation, diffusion and dosimetry for non-interacting spherical particles and their agglomerates in monolayer cell culture systems. Particle transport to cells is calculated by simultaneous solution of Stokes Law (sedimentation and the Stokes-Einstein equation (diffusion. Results The In vitro Sedimentation, Diffusion and Dosimetry model (ISDD was tested against measured transport rates or cellular doses for multiple sizes of polystyrene spheres (20-1100 nm, 35 nm amorphous silica, and large agglomerates of 30 nm iron oxide particles. Overall, without adjusting any parameters, model predicted cellular doses were in close agreement with the experimental data, differing from as little as 5% to as much as three-fold, but in most cases approximately two-fold, within the limits of the accuracy of the measurement systems. Applying the model, we generalize the effects of particle size, particle density, agglomeration state and agglomerate characteristics on target cell dosimetry in vitro. Conclusions Our results confirm our hypothesis that for liquid-based in vitro systems, the dose-rates and target cell doses for all particles are not equal; they can vary significantly, in direct contrast to the assumption of dose-equivalency implicit in the use of mass-based media concentrations as metrics of exposure for dose-response assessment. The difference between equivalent nominal media concentration exposures on a

  20. ISDD: A Computational Model of Particle Sedimentation, Diffusion and Target Cell Dosimetry for In Vitro Toxicity Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinderliter, Paul M.; Minard, Kevin R.; Orr, Galya; Chrisler, William B.; Thrall, Brian D.; Pounds, Joel G.; Teeguarden, Justin G.

    2010-11-30

    Background: The difficulty of directly measuring cellular dose is a significant obstacle to application of target tissue dosimetry for nanoparticle and microparticle toxicity assessment. As a consequence, the target tissue paradigm for dosimetry and hazard assessment of nanoparticles has largely been ignored in favor of using metrics of exposure (e.g. μg particle/mL culture medium, particle surface area/mL, particle number/mL). We have developed a computational model of solution particokinetics (sedimentation, diffusion) and dosimetry for non-interacting spherical particles and their agglomerates in monolayer cell culture systems. Particle transport to cells is calculated by simultaneous solution of Stokes Law (sedimentation) and the Stokes-Einstein equation (diffusion). Results: The In vitro Sedimentation, Diffusion and Dosimetry model (ISDD) was tested against measured transport rates or cellular doses for multiple sizes of polystyrene spheres (20-1100 nm), 35 nm amorphous silica, and large agglomerates of 30 nm iron oxide particles. Overall, without adjusting any parameters, model predicted doses were in close agreement with the experimental data, differing from as little as 5% to as much as three-fold, but in most cases approximately two-fold, within the limits of the accuracy of the measurement systems. Applying the model, we generalize the effects of particle size, particle density, agglomeration state and agglomerate characteristics on target cell dosimetry in vitro. Conclusions: Our results confirm our hypothesis that the dose-rates for all particles are not equal, but can vary significantly, in direct contrast to the assumption of dose-equivalency implicit in the use of mass-based media concentrations as metrics of exposure for dose-response assessment. The difference between equivalent nominal media concentration exposures on a μg/mL basis and target cell doses on a particle surface area or number basis can be as high as three to six orders of magnitude

  1. Distribution of toxic trace elements in soil/sediment in post-Katrina New Orleans and the Louisiana Delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provided a comprehensive assessment of seven toxic trace elements (As, Pb, V, Cr, Cd, Cu, and Hg) in the soil/sediment of Katrina affected greater New Orleans region 1 month after the recession of flood water. Results indicated significant contamination of As and V and non-significant contamination of Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg and Pb at most sampling sites. Compared to the reported EPA Region 6 soil background inorganic levels, except As, the concentrations of other six elements had greatly increased throughout the studied area; St. Bernard Parish and Plaquemines Parish showed greater contamination than other regions. Comparison between pre- and post-Katrina data in similar areas, and data for surface, shallow, and deep samples indicated that the trace element distribution in post-Katrina New Orleans was not obviously attributed to the flooding. This study suggests that more detailed study of As and V contamination at identified locations is needed. - This article provides an in-depth assessment of the contamination of As, Pb, V, Cr, Cd, Cu, and Hg in post-Katrina greater New Orleans region

  2. High resolution characterization of uranium in sediments by DGT and DET techniques ACA-S-12-2197

    OpenAIRE

    Gregušová, M. (Michaela); Dočekal, B. (Bohumil)

    2013-01-01

    Diffusive equilibrium (DET) and diffusive gradient in thin film (DGT) techniques with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection of elements were applied to characterize uranium, manganese, iron and 238U/235U isotopic ratio depth profiles in sediment pore water at high spatial resolution and to monitor uranium uptake/remobilization processes in uranium spiked sediment core samples under laboratory, well controlled conditions. Modified constrained sediment DGT probes, packed...

  3. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of furosemide-functionalized ferrite on the sedimentation behavior of starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanikumar, S.; Meenarathi, B.; Kannammal, L.; Anbarasan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Furosemide-functionalized nanoferrite was synthesized and characterized by various analytical techniques. The furosemide-functionalized ferrite was used to settle down the starch particles under three different pH. Thus, obtained starch/Fe3O4 nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), fluorescence spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The sedimentation velocity of starch in the presence of furosemide-functionalized Fe3O4 was critically compared with the available literature value and the results are discussed in detail. The high sedimentation velocity of starch under the influence of gravitational force and the external magnetic force is studied. The starch-coated ferrites exhibited the lower vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) value. This novel research work will bring out a new methodology in the field of starch materials.

  4. SEDIMENT YIELD MODELING FOR SINGLE STORM EVENTS BASED ON HEAVY-DISCHARGE STAGE CHARACTERIZED BY STABLE SEDIMENT CONCENTRATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The relation between runoff volume and sediment yield for individual events in a given watershed receives little attention compared to the relation between water discharge and sediment yield, though it may underlie the event-based sediment-yield model for large-size watershed. The data observed at 12 experimental subwatersheds in the Dalihe river watershed in hilly areas of Loess Plateau, North China,was selected to develop and validate the relation. The peak flow is often considered as an important factor affecting event sediment yield. However, in the study areas, sediment concentration remains relatively constant when water discharge exceeds a certain critical value, implying that the heavier flow is not accompanied with the higher sediment transport capacity. Hence, only the runoff volume factor was considered in the sediment-yield model. As both the total sediment and runoff discharge were largely produced during the heavy-discharge stage, and the sediment concentration was negligibly variable during this stage, a proportional function can be used to model the relation between event runoff volume and sediment yield for a given subwatershed. The applicability of this model at larger spatial scales was also discussed, and it was found that for the Yaoxinzhuang station at the Puhe River basin, which controls a drainage area of 2264km2, a directly proportional relation between event runoff volume and sediment yield may also exist.

  5. Characterization of sediment dynamics in an estuary environment using acoustic techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Hermand, J.-P.; L. Perichon; Verbanck, M.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, acoustic-based methods have been developed to characterize the dynamical behavior of loose sediments and bed deposits in very shallow water environments. In this paper, we present preliminary results on the estimation of the dynamic changes in an estuarine environment using data from dual-frequency echosounding at high resolution and contemporaneous hydrological measurements including suspended matter concentration, density subbottom profiling, and data assimilation based on ...

  6. Vertical profile, source apportionment, and toxicity of PAHs in sediment cores of a wharf near the coal-based steel refining industrial zone in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Ju, Yun-Ru; Dong, Cheng-Di

    2016-03-01

    Three sediment cores were collected from a wharf near a coal-based steel refining industrial zone in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Analyses for 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of the US Environmental Protection Agency priority list in the core sediment samples were conducted using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The vertical profiles of PAHs in the core sediments were assessed, possible sources and apportionment were identified, and the toxicity risk of the core sediments was determined. The results from the sediment analyses showed that total concentrations of the 16 PAHs varied from 11774 ± 4244 to 16755 ± 4593 ng/g dry weight (dw). Generally, the vertical profiles of the PAHs in the sediment cores exhibited a decreasing trend from the top to the lower levels of the S1 core and an increasing trend of PAHs from the top to the lower levels of the S2 and S3 cores. Among the core sediment samples, the five- and six-ring PAHs were predominantly in the S1 core, ranging from 42 to 54 %, whereas the composition of the PAHs in the S2 and S3 cores were distributed equally across three groups: two- and three-ring, four-ring, and five- and six-ring PAHs. The results indicated that PAH contamination at the site of the S1 core had a different source. The molecular indices and principal component analyses with multivariate linear regression were used to determine the source contributions, with the results showing that the contributions of coal, oil-related, and vehicle sources were 38.6, 35.9, and 25.5 %, respectively. A PAH toxicity assessment using the mean effect range-median quotient (m-ERM-q, 0.59-0.79), benzo[a]pyrene toxicity equivalent (TEQ(carc), 1466-1954 ng TEQ/g dw), and dioxin toxicity equivalent (TEQ(fish), 3036-4174 pg TEQ/g dw) identified the wharf as the most affected area. The results can be used for regular monitoring, and future pollution prevention and management should target the coal-based industries in this region for pollution

  7. Characterization of a Flood Event through a Sediment Analysis: The Tescio River Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Di Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the hydrological analysis and grain size characteristics of fluvial sediments in a river basin and their combination to characterize a flood event. The overall objective of the research is the development of a practical methodology based on experimental surveys to reconstruct the hydraulic history of ungauged river reaches on the basis of the modifications detected on the riverbed during the dry season. The grain size analysis of fluvial deposits usually requires great technical and economical efforts and traditional sieving based on physical sampling is not appropriate to adequately represent the spatial distribution of sediments in a wide area of a riverbed with a reasonable number of samples. The use of photographic sampling techniques, on the other hand, allows for the quick and effective determination of the grain size distribution, through the use of a digital camera and specific graphical algorithms in large river stretches. A photographic sampling is employed to characterize the riverbed in a 3 km ungauged reach of the Tescio River, a tributary of the Chiascio River, located in central Italy, representative of many rivers in the same geographical area. To this end, the particle size distribution is reconstructed through the analysis of digital pictures of the sediments taken on the riverbed in dry conditions. The sampling has been performed after a flood event of known duration, which allows for the identification of the removal of the armor in one section along the river reach under investigation. The volume and composition of the eroded sediments made it possible to calculate the average flow rate associated with the flood event which caused the erosion, by means of the sediment transport laws and the hydrological analysis of the river basin. A hydraulic analysis of the river stretch under investigation was employed to verify the validity of the proposed procedure.

  8. Determination of volatile, toxic hydrogen phosphides in the sediments of the Elbe river, the Elbe estuaries and the Heligoland Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution and concentraion of phosphines in the sediments of the Elbe river were determined by selective preparation and analysis. The concentration of phosphines in one kilogram wet sediment was in the range of 0.1 to 57 n g with the bulking, anaerobic mud from harbors having the highest and the sandy, aerobic sediments having the lowest concentrations. Phosphines in fluvial sediments were detected successfully for the first time applying the method described. (orig.)

  9. Data Summary for the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) was to quantify potential human health risks associated with Department of Energy (DOE)-related contamination of surface sediments in Watts Bar Reservoir (WBR). An estimated 700 Ci of {sup 137}Cs and 325 Ci of {sup 60}Co were released from White Oak Lake into the Clinch River between 1949 and 1992 (DOE, 1988). A number of previous studies have documented sediment contamination in the deep-water sediments but no study specifically targeted the near-shore environment, which has the most potential for exposure to humans.

  10. Data Summary for the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) was to quantify potential human health risks associated with Department of Energy (DOE)-related contamination of surface sediments in Watts Bar Reservoir (WBR). An estimated 700 Ci of 137Cs and 325 Ci of 60Co were released from White Oak Lake into the Clinch River between 1949 and 1992 (DOE, 1988). A number of previous studies have documented sediment contamination in the deep-water sediments but no study specifically targeted the near-shore environment, which has the most potential for exposure to humans

  11. Characterization of metal kinetics and bioavailability using diffusive gradients in thin films technique in sediments of Taihu Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Kun; Han, Xuejiao; Zhao, Jian; Qiao, Fei; Li, Zicheng; Yu, Tao

    2016-06-01

    For an improved understanding of the metal behavior between the sediment and overlaying water of Taihu Lake, the technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) was used to characterize the DGT measured concentration in sediments and release kinetics of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in representative lake parts. Spatially, the DGT-measured concentration of heavy metals showed that Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr, and Pb had higher concentrations in the northern lake than in the eastern Lake Taihu. The order of the release flux for the studied metals from sediments to overlaying water was Zn>Cu>Ni, Cr>Pb>Cd (pbioavailability in lake sediments. PMID:26938153

  12. Characterization of sediments from Voglajna and Savinja rivers – preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Frančišković-Bilinski

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary mineralogical, geochemical and Mössbauer studies of six surface sediments (fraction <63 μm from Voglajna and Savinja rivers (Slovenia are reported for the first time. The location was chosen because of two reasons. One was possible pollution due to industry in Celje. Another was presumed high concentration of iron (later found 2.8 – 5.6 %, easily studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. XRD data showed that quartz is present in all samples. Other minerals are different in different locations. Iron can be present in Fe-chlorite and in montmorillonite, found by XRD as trace minerals. Microelements were determined by ICP-MS method. Sediment of Voglajna near Štore contain the highest concentrations of S, P, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cu, Mo, Sb, W and Hg. Sediment of Savinja at Tremerje contain the highest concentrations of Zn, Cd, Ag and Au. These results indicate industrial pollution around Celje. Further characterization of Fe (II and Fe (III was performed by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature. Spectra were fitted with two and in one case with three doublets. In addition to the presence of two doublets, two magnetic sextets are present in the sediment of Voglajna at Štore, suggesting minor quantity of Fe3O4. The Fe (III / Fe (II ratio decreases downstream the Voglajna river. The work is in progress on additional sampling stations.

  13. Characterization of trace organic contaminants in marine sediment from Yeongil Bay, Korea: 1. Instrumental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) pesticides (HCB, HCHs, CHLs, and DDTs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols (APs), and bisphenol A (BPA) were measured in 26 marine sediments collected from Yeongil Bay, Korea, in order to characterize their spatial distribution and sources. PCBs (2.85-26.5 ng/g, dry wt.) were detected mainly in the inner bay locations Mean OC pesticide ranged from 1.16 ng/g dry wt. for HCH to 0.05 ng/g dry wt. for HCB). PAH concentrations ranged from <10.0 to 1870 (mean: 309) ng/g dry wt., and were predominated 3- and 4-ring congeners. Concentrations of APs, such as nonylphenol, octylphenol, butylphenol (means 89.1, 4.61, 11.0 ng/g dry wt., respectively), were greater at locations proximal to municipal wastewater discharges. Concentrations of PCBs and PAHs were great near shipyards and industrial complexes. Vertical profiles of PAHs and APs indicated that they have been associated with sediments since the 1950s. - Among various sediment contaminant classes measured, nonylphenol and PAHs are responsible for the variability among sampling sites, suggesting the existence of multiple sources in Yeongil Bay sediment

  14. Size graded sediment dynamics: from the processes characterization to the transport modelling in the English Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is the implementation of a sediment transport model in the English Channel. The design of such a model requires the identification of the physical processes, their modelling and their in-situ validation. Because of the sedimentary particularities of the study area, modelling of the mechanical behaviour of a non uniform mixture of sediments and particularly of the fine grains within a coarse matrix is required. This study focused on the characterization of the relevant processes by acquisition of experimental and in-situ data. Data acquired in hydro-sedimentary conditions comparable to those found in the English Channel are scarce. A new instrument and image processing technique were specifically conceived and implemented in-situ to observe and measure, with a high temporal resolution, the dynamics of a strongly heterogeneous mixture of particles in a grain-size scale. The data collected compared well with several existing formulations. One of these formulations was chosen to be adapted. The transfer dynamics of fine grains in coarse sediments and their depth of penetration were acquired from stratigraphic samples. The sediment transport model deals with multi-size grains and multi sedimentary layers, it is forced by swell and currents, and accounts for bead load and suspended load transports. It was applied to realistic scenarios for the English Channel. (author)

  15. Characterization of the potential impact of metal contaminated sediments on aquatic plants and insects at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tim's Branch is an ephemeral second order tributary of Upper Three Runs Creek at the Savannah River Site (SRS). At present, Tim's Branch is the receiving stream for eight NPDES outfalls. Historic contamination of Tim's Branch through untreated discharges has resulted in significant levels of natural uranium, nickel, aluminum, mercury, copper, lead, chromium, and zinc in the stream sediments and flood plain. Indigenous plant and chironomid species in the area were identified. Sediment, benthic invertebrate and aquatic plant samples were harvested from several sites to determine metal concentrations. Physical and chemical parameters of sediment including acid volatile sulfides, pH, oxidation/reduction potential, organic carbon and particle size distribution were assessed to determine their influence on metal bioavailability. Laboratory tests indicated that significant levels of heavy metals are translocated from sediment to Hydrilla verticillata with a concurrent elevation of plant peroxidase activity. Laboratory sediment toxicity bioassays were also performed with laboratory-reared Chironomus tentans. In situ sediment toxicity bioassays were performed with indigenous chironomids and plants to validate laboratory results

  16. Benthic organism and marine toxic substances and pollutants collected using net and sediment sampler casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in Gulf of Mexico from 23 July 1979 to 13 December 1980 (NODC Accession 8200103)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and marine toxic substances and pollutants were collected using net, sediment sampler, and other instruments from the NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and...

  17. Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants collected using net and sediment samplers from the MT MITCHELL and other platforms from 22 May 1974 to 27 May 1974 (NODC Accession 7800886)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants were collected using sediment sampler and net casts in the coastal waters of the East coast of US. Data...

  18. Marine toxic substances and pollutants data from sediment corer and other instruments from the NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the Caribbean Sea from 16 July 1980 to 29 November 1987 (NODC Accession 8800013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and pollutants data were collected using sediment corer and other instruments in the Caribbean Sea from the NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other...

  19. Marine toxic substances and pollutants data collected using sediment corer and other instruments from the NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in Gulf of Mexico and other Sea areas from 05 February 1979 to 30 October 1987 (NODC Accession 8700038)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substances and pollutants data were collected using sediment corer and other instruments in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and other Sea areas from...

  20. Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants collected using sediment sampler and net casts from the GUS III and EXCELLENCE in the Gulf of Mexico from 24 May 1978 to 26 February 1979 (NODC Accession 7900304)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants were collected using sediment sampler and net casts in the Gulf of Mexico. Data were submitted by Texas...

  1. Data compilation for assessing sediment and toxic chemical loads from the Green River to the lower Duwamish Waterway, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kathleen E.; Black, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Between February and June 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey collected representative samples of whole water, suspended sediment, and (or) bed sediment from a single strategically located site on the Duwamish River, Washington, during seven periods of different flow conditions. Samples were analyzed by Washington-State-accredited laboratories for a large suite of compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other semivolatile compounds, polychlorinated biphenyl Aroclors and the 209 congeners, metals, dioxins/furans, volatile organic compounds, pesticides, butyltins, hexavalent chromium, and total organic carbon. Chemical concentrations associated with bulk bed sediment (<2 mm) and fine bed sediment (<62.5 μm) fractions were compared to chemical concentrations associated with suspended sediment. Bulk bed sediment concentrations generally were lower than fine bed sediment and suspended-sediment concentrations. Concurrent with the chemistry sampling, additional parameters were measured, including instantaneous river discharge, suspended-sediment concentration, sediment particle-size distribution, and general water-quality parameters. From these data, estimates of instantaneous sediment and chemical loads from the Green River to the Lower Duwamish Waterway were calculated.

  2. Characterization of Combinatorial Effects of Toxic Substances by Cell Cultivation in Micro Segmented Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, J.; Kürsten, D.; Funfak, A.; Schneider, S.; Köhler, J. M.

    This chapter reviews the application of micro segmented flow for the screening of toxic effects on bacteria, eukaryotic microorganisms, human cells and multicellular systems. Besides, the determination of complete dose/response functions of toxic substances with a minimum of cells and chemicals, it is reviewed how two- and multi-dimensional concentration spaces can be screened in order to evaluate combinatorial effects of chemicals on cells. The challenge for the development of new and miniaturized methods is derived from the increase of the number of different used substances in technique, agriculture and medicine, from the increasing release of new substances and nanomaterials into our environment and from the improvement of the insight of toxicity of natural substances and the interferences between different substances resulting in toxic effects on different organisms, cells and tissues. The application of two-dimensional toxicological screenings on selected examples of effector combinations is described. Examples for the detection of an independent, an additive and a synergistic interference between two substances are given. In addition, it is shown that the screening for toxicological effects in complete two-dimensional concentration spaces allows the detection of complex response behaviour—for example, the formation of tolerances and stimulation peaks—which thereby can be characterized. The characterization of interference of toxic organic substances with silver nanoparticles is reported as an example for the potential of micro segmented-flow technique for evaluating the toxicological impact of new materials. Finally, it is demonstrated that the technique can be applied for different organisms like simple bacteria, single cell alga such as Chlorella vulgaris and multicellular systems up to the development of complete organisms beginning from eggs.

  3. Characterization of Direct Push Vadose Zone Sediments from the T and TY Waste Management Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains all the geochemical and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from 5 direct push characterization holes emplaced to investigate vadose zone contamination associated with leaks from tanks 241-TY-105 (UPR-200-W-152) and 241-TY-106 (UPR-200-W-153). Tank 241-TY-105 is estimated to have leaked 35,000 gal of tributyl phosphate (TBP) waste from the uranium recovery process to the vadose zone in 1960. Tank 241-TY-106 is estimated to have leaked 20,000 gal of TBP-uranium recovery waste to the vadose zone in 1959. Although several drywells in the vicinity of tank 241-TY-106 contain measurable quantities of cesium-137 and/or cobalt-60, their relatively low concentrations indicate that the contaminant inventory in the vadose zone around tank 241-TY-106 is quite small. Additionally, this report contains all the geochemical and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from 7 direct push characterization holes emplaced to investigate vadose zone contamination associated with an overfill event and leak from tank 241-T-101.

  4. Toxicity of copper-spiked sediments to Tubifex tubifex (Oligochaeta, Tubificidae): Comparison of the 28-day reproductive bioassay with an early-life-stage bioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchi, M.; Pasteris, A.; Bonomi, G. (Univ. degli Studi di Bologna (Italy). Dipt. di Biologia Evoluzionistica Sperimentale); Reynoldson, T.B. (Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario (Canada). National Water Research Inst.)

    1999-06-01

    Two sediment bioassay methods using Tubifex tubifex (Mueller, 1774) as the test species were compared. The first was an adult reproduction test, the second an early-life-stage survival test. The duration of both bioassays is 28 d and the amount of work required was similar; they may be useful alternatives to each other in different circumstances (e.g., the early life stage bioassay could be carried out with smaller volumes of sediment). The two bioassays were performed simultaneously on copper-spiked sediments. Sediments from two freshwater and two terrestrial sites were used; five separate, nonsimultaneous experiments were performed, one for each sediment or soil and a further experiment with soil with a good supplement. In the adult bioassay, there were large differences in the production of cocoons, eggs, and young among the control treatments of the five experiments. There were also major differences in the NOEC and LOEC for copper between the tested substrates. The early life stage bioassay appears to be less sensitive to copper toxicity than the adult reproductive bioassay since NOECs and LOECs are higher for early survival than for the most sensitive endpoints of the adult bioassay in three experiments out of five.

  5. Sediment toxicity data from the NOAA National Status and Trends Program, March 1991 to July 1996 (NODC Accession 9800146)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As part of its bioeffects assessment program. NOAA has begun a series of surveys of the toxicity and other biological effects of toxicants in selected bays and...

  6. Experimental characterization and modelling of acoustic velocity and electrical resistance in hydrate bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.; Zhang, W.; Liu, Y.; Ren, S. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    In the development of gas hydrate resources, characterization of natural gas hydrate bearing sediments is important. Solid hydrates fill the voids of the matrix formed by sand grains and change their cementation condition, which have a significant impact on the resistance and sound velocity of the sand matrix. Acoustic velocity and electrical resistivity are important methods in well-logging of conventional oil/gas reservoirs. They can also be effectively utilized in the characterization of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. Solid hydrates fill the voids between sand grains and change the cementation condition of the sand matrix, which can enhance the propagation of sounds, increasing the sound velocity. Since electric ions are excluded in hydrate, hydrate formation can change the distribution and mobility of electrolytes in sub sea sediments, which will affect the resistance of the sand matrix. This paper presented a study that involved experiments that measured the acoustic P-wave velocity and electrical properties of sandpacks with methane hydrate formed under simulated subsea sediment conditions. The paper discussed the key findings of the experiments in order to correlate the resistivity and acoustic P-wave velocity with hydrate saturation in porous media. The effects of hydrate on the resistivity and ultrasonic velocity of hydrate bearing sand matrix were revealed and modeled. It was concluded that the resistivity of the sandpack bearing with hydrate slightly decreased when hydrate saturation was low, probably because of the hydrate's ion exclusion effect. An increased resistivity with higher hydrate saturation could be explained by a blockage mechanism of hydrates formed in the pores. 11 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  7. Characterization of slipped sediments from a loess landslide, Kulcs, Central-Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udvardi, Beatrix; Kovács, István; Füri, Judit; Kónya, Péter; Horváth, Zsolt; Besnyi, Anikó; Földvári, Mária; Koloszár, László; Fedor, Ferenc; Horváth, Judit; Ács, Péter; Fancsik, Tamás; Szabó, Csaba

    2014-05-01

    The area of the Danube High Bluffs in Central Hungary is frequently affected by recent landslide activity where landslides have largely been associated with slope deposits, including various Pleistocene sediments as well as the underlying Pannonian layers. Studies , however, have revealed that intense rainfall episodes and flooding periods trigger landslides in the area [1,2]. In this study, we report the results of a case study about the collapsed structure in the toe and at the bulge of Kulcs landslide. Beside field recordings, previous geotechnical data of Rácalmás-Kulcs area were reinterpreted. A broad range of analytical techniques were employed for the characterization of sediments on the surface and in 6 boreholes on a small area (100 m x 30 m) affected by landslide movements along riverbank. Sediments from boreholes comprise grey silty flood plain sediment, old weathered loess with loess dolls, fine grained brown paleosoils, red clay, carbonate cemented layers and sand/sandstone. Sandwich-like sediment structure and grain size distribution with high amount of clay and silt (clay, silty clay loam and silt loam texture) are present that affect the flow of underground water. Samples mainly contain quartz (17-62%), carbonates (calcite >dolomite; 0-50%), muscovite and illite (0-25 %) and subordinate amount of chlorite, montmorillonite, feldspars, kaolinite, goethite. The borehole which was drilled outside of the area, affected by the landslide, shows different sediment structure. Weathering indices and major chemical composition of most of the samples show similar values to Pleistocene-Pannonian sequences from Hungary, excluding Na2O and MnO [3]. The high CPA values (93-98 %) in the paleosoil unit reflect a highly weathered paleosoil. The low values of Na2O/Al2O3 and K2O/Al2O3 with respect to average Upper Continental Crust composition indicating the removal of more soluble elements. These results are helpful to reveal the cause of landslides and trace sliding

  8. Physicochemical characterization and toxicity of decursin and their derivatives from Angelica gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Bimit; Chae, Jung-Woo; Baek, In-Hwan; Song, Gyu-Yong; Song, Jin-Sook; Cho, Seong-Kwon; Kwon, Kwang-Il

    2012-01-01

    Angelica gigas NAKAI is used to treat dysmenorrhea, amenorrhea, menopause, abdominal pain, injuries, migraine, and arthritis. The present study provided a physicochemical and toxicological characterization of compounds in A. gigas NAKAI (decursin, decursinol angelate, diketone decursin, ether decursin, epoxide decursin and oxim decursin). Diketone decursin (173.16 μg/mL) and epoxide decursin (122.12 μg/mL) exhibited >100 μg/mL kinetic solubility after applying nephelometry, suggesting a highly soluble compound. The Student’s t-test revealed significant differences in the pKa ranges of the compounds by automatic titration from capillary electrophoresis (pautomatic titration analysis. A parallel artificial membrane permeability assay demonstrated permeability coefficients of <10 x 10⁻⁶ cm/s for all of the compounds, suggesting poor permeability. Ether decursin exhibited a toxic effect after being applied to mouse (NIH 3T3, EC₅₀: 57.9 μM) and human (HT-29, EC₅₀: 36.1 μM; Hep-G2, EC₅₀: 4.92 μM) cells. Additionally, epoxide and oxim decursin were toxic through acute oral toxicity (four and three deaths of Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice) and mutation toxicity testing by applying Salmonella typhimurium cells with and without S9. Although diketone decursin exhibited less permeability, it is potentially valuable pharmacological compound that should be investigated. PMID:22791156

  9. Toxicity Appraisal of Untreated Dyeing Industry Wastewater Based on Chemical Characterization and Short Term Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Javeed, Aqeel; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Sharif, Ali; Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Bushra; Khan, Abdul Muqeet; Altaf, Imran

    2016-04-01

    Characterizing wastewaters only on a chemical basis may be insufficient owing to their complex nature. The purpose of this study was to assess toxicity of textile dyeing wastewater based on analytical techniques and short term toxicity based bioassays. In this study, screening of the fractionated wastewater through GC-MS showed the presence of phenols, phthalic acid derivatives and chlorpyrifos. Metal analysis revealed that chromium, arsenic and mercury were present in amounts higher than the wastewater discharge limits. Textile dyeing wastewater was found to be highly mutagenic in the Ames test. DNA damage in sheep lymphocytes decreased linearly with an increase in the dilution of wastewater. MTT assay showed that 8.3 percent v/v wastewater decreased cell survival percentage to 50 %. It can be concluded from this study that short term toxicity tests such as Ames test, in vitro comet assay, and cytotoxicity assays may serve as useful indicators of wastewater pollution along with their organic and inorganic chemical characterizations. PMID:26920697

  10. The impact of sediment bioturbation by secondary organisms on metal bioavailability, bioaccumulation and toxicity to target organisms in benthic bioassays: Implications for sediment quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remaili, Timothy M; Simpson, Stuart L; Amato, Elvio D; Spadaro, David A; Jarolimek, Chad V; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-01-01

    Bioturbation alters the properties of sediments and modifies contaminant bioavailability to benthic organisms. These naturally occurring disturbances are seldom considered during the assessment of sediment quality. We investigated how the presence (High bioturbation) and absence (Low bioturbation) of a strongly bioturbating amphipod within three different sediments influenced metal bioavailability, survival and bioaccumulation of metals to the bivalve Tellina deltoidalis. The concentrations of dissolved copper decreased and manganese increased with increased bioturbation. For copper a strong correlation was observed between increased bivalve survival (53-100%) and dissolved concentrations in the overlying water. Increased bioturbation intensity resulted in greater tissue concentrations for chromium and zinc in some test sediments. Overall, the results highlight the strong influence that the natural bioturbation activities from one organism may have on the risk contaminants pose to other organisms within the local environment. The characterisation of field-based exposure conditions concerning the biotic or abiotic resuspension of sediments and the rate of attenuation of released contaminants through dilution or readsorption may enable laboratory-based bioassay designs to be adapted to better match those of the assessed environment. PMID:26589100

  11. Evaluation of the threat of marine CO2 leakage-associated acidification on the toxicity of sediment metals to juvenile bivalves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Short-term tests using juveniles of bivalves to study the effects of CO2 dissolved. • CO2 causes effects if the threshold concentration of the organism is overlapped. • Flows of escaped CO2 would affect the geochemical composition of sediment–seawater. • CO2-induced acidification would affect differently to marine sediment toxicity. - Abstract: The effects of the acidification associated with CO2 leakage from sub-seabed geological storage was studied by the evaluation of the short-term effects of CO2-induced acidification on juveniles of the bivalve Ruditapes philippinarum. Laboratory scale experiments were performed using a CO2-bubbling system designed to conduct ecotoxicological assays. The organisms were exposed for 10 days to elutriates of sediments collected in different littoral areas that were subjected to various pH treatments (pH 7.1, 6.6, 6.1). The acute pH-associated effects on the bivalves were observed, and the dissolved metals in the elutriates were measured. The median toxic effect pH was calculated, which ranged from 6.33 to 6.45. The amount of dissolved Zn in the sediment elutriates increased in parallel with the pH reductions and was correlated with the proton concentrations. The pH, the pCO2 and the dissolved metal concentrations (Zn and Fe) were linked with the mortality of the exposed bivalves

  12. Characterization of ZnS thin films synthesized through a non-toxic precursors chemical bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, C.A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Concepción, Edmundo Larenas 270, Concepción 4070409 (Chile); Sandoval-Paz, M.G. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Physics and Mathematics, University of Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Cabello, G. [Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, University of Bío-Bío, Campus Fernando May, Chillán (Chile); Flores, M.; Fernández, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Physics and Mathematics, University of Chile, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Carrasco, C., E-mail: ccarrascoc@udec.cl [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Concepción, Edmundo Larenas 270, Concepción 4070409 (Chile)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • High quality ZnS thin films have been deposited by chemical bath deposition technique from a non-toxic precursor’s solution. • Nanocrystalline ZnS thin films with large band gap energy were synthesized without using ammonia. • Evidence that the growing of the thin films is carried out by means of hydroxide mechanism was found. • The properties of these ZnS thin films are similar and in some cases better than the corresponding ones produced using toxic precursors such as ammonia. - Abstract: In solar cells, ZnS window layer deposited by chemical bath technique can reach the highest conversion efficiency; however, precursors used in the process normally are materials highly volatile, toxic and harmful to the environment and health (typically ammonia and hydrazine). In this work the characterization of ZnS thin films deposited by chemical bath in a non-toxic alkaline solution is reported. The effect of deposition technique (growth in several times) on the properties of the ZnS thin film was studied. The films exhibited a high percentage of optical transmission (greater than 80%); as the deposition time increased a decreasing in the band gap values from 3.83 eV to 3.71 eV was observed. From chemical analysis, the presence of ZnS and Zn(OH){sub 2} was identified and X-ray diffraction patterns exhibited a clear peak corresponding to ZnS hexagonal phase (1 0 3) plane, which was confirmed by electron diffraction patterns. From morphological studies, compact samples with well-defined particles, low roughness, homogeneous and pinhole-free in the surface were observed. From obtained results, it is evident that deposits of ZnS–CBD using a non-toxic solution are suitable as window layer for TFSC.

  13. Characterization of ZnS thin films synthesized through a non-toxic precursors chemical bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • High quality ZnS thin films have been deposited by chemical bath deposition technique from a non-toxic precursor’s solution. • Nanocrystalline ZnS thin films with large band gap energy were synthesized without using ammonia. • Evidence that the growing of the thin films is carried out by means of hydroxide mechanism was found. • The properties of these ZnS thin films are similar and in some cases better than the corresponding ones produced using toxic precursors such as ammonia. - Abstract: In solar cells, ZnS window layer deposited by chemical bath technique can reach the highest conversion efficiency; however, precursors used in the process normally are materials highly volatile, toxic and harmful to the environment and health (typically ammonia and hydrazine). In this work the characterization of ZnS thin films deposited by chemical bath in a non-toxic alkaline solution is reported. The effect of deposition technique (growth in several times) on the properties of the ZnS thin film was studied. The films exhibited a high percentage of optical transmission (greater than 80%); as the deposition time increased a decreasing in the band gap values from 3.83 eV to 3.71 eV was observed. From chemical analysis, the presence of ZnS and Zn(OH)2 was identified and X-ray diffraction patterns exhibited a clear peak corresponding to ZnS hexagonal phase (1 0 3) plane, which was confirmed by electron diffraction patterns. From morphological studies, compact samples with well-defined particles, low roughness, homogeneous and pinhole-free in the surface were observed. From obtained results, it is evident that deposits of ZnS–CBD using a non-toxic solution are suitable as window layer for TFSC

  14. Characterizing Constituents of Sediment Phosphorus Fractionation in a Freshwater Shallow Lake System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao PU; Jing XIE; Hongguang CHENG; Shengtian YANG; Lu LU

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize constituents of phosphorus (P) fractionation as wel as reciprocities among factors in sediments of a freshwater shal ow lake. [Method] Surface sediment was discretely sampled at 24 sites through Van Veen grabs. Based on a modified sequential extraction scheme, P fractionation was determined as Fe/Al bound P (Fe/Al-P), Ca bound P (Ca-P), solute and re-ductive P (S/R-P) and organic P (OP). Curve estimation and Pearson product-mo-ment correlation were employed for statistical analysis. [Result] Total P (TP) content ranged from 443 to 774 mg/kg. Inorganic P (IP) was the major component of TP, of which Ca-P was dominated with an average of 51%±9.7%. Average contents of P fractionation were in the fol owing order: Ca-P(51%) > OP(29%) > S/R-P(8%) >Fe/Al-P(7%). The molar ratio of Fe to P was 11 - 20, close to the threshold value of P leaching. [Conclusion] In freshwater shal ow lakes, IP and Ca-P were prone to be relatively high, whereas Fe/Al-P was low compared with deep lakes. Occurrence of spatial y monotonic gradient indicated the primary causation of anthropogenic sources. Imminent sediment P liberation was also expected. Close associations a-mong TP, Fe/Al-P and Ca-P, implying that anthropogenic P was mainly bound to metals in particulates. Significant correlations of TOC and P fractionation highlighted endogenous mechanism and authigenic origin in sediments.

  15. Characterization and evolution of the sediments of a Mediterranean coastal lagoon located next to a former mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gregorio; Muñoz-Vera, Ana

    2015-11-15

    Coastal lagoons are ecosystems that are relatively enclosed water bodies under the influence of both the terrestrial and the marine environment, being vulnerable to human impacts. Human activities, such as mining extraction, are significant anthropogenic coastal stressors that can negatively affect ecosystems and communities. In light of the above, the objective of this research is to examine the influence of metal mining activities on the composition of sediments of a Mediterranean coastal lagoon, named Mar Menor. This paper presents a comprehensive characterization for grain size, mineralogy, geochemistry and organic matter of sediments of this coastal lagoon, investigating their variation along space and time. Sedimentation dynamics are ruling clearly the grain size predominant in each area of the Mar Menor coastal lagoon, determining the existence of entrainment, transport and sedimentation areas. For minerals, elements and organic matter, sedimentation dynamics are also determining their distribution. PMID:26371846

  16. Aquatic Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanville, W. D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of aquatic sediments and its effect upon water quality, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) sediment water interchange; (2) chemical and physical characterization; and (3) heavy water in sediments. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  17. Bioaccumulation, subcellular distribution and toxicity of sediment-associated copper in the ragworm Nereis diversicolor: The relative importance of aqueous copper, copper oxide nanoparticles and microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sediment-dwelling ragworm, Nereis diversicolor was exposed to sediment spiked with aqueous Cu (CuAq, CuCl2), CuO nanoparticles (CuONP) or CuO microparticles (CuOMicro) at 150 μg Cu g−1 dw sediment for 10d. Exposures to CuAq and CuOMicro caused mortality (62.5 and 37.5%, respectively), whereas mean burrowing time increased during exposure to CuAq and CuONP from 0.12 h (controls) to 19.3 and 12.2 h, respectively. All Cu treatments bioaccumulated, especially CuAq (up to 4 times more than the other treatments). Cu was roughly equally distributed among the five subcellular fractions in controls and worms exposed to CuONP or CuOMicro. In contrast, ≈50% of accumulated Cu in CuAq exposed worms was found in metal rich granules and significantly more Cu was present in heat-denatured proteins and organelles than in worms exposed to CuOMicro or in controls. Our results suggest that Cu form affects its bioaccumulation and subsequent toxicity and detoxification in a polychaete like N. diversicolor. - Highlights: • CuAq exposure resulted in Cu body burden up to 4 times higher than CuONP and CuOMicro. • CuAq was the most toxic (62.5% mortality) of the treatments tested. • Subcellular Cu distribution after CuAq exposure differed significantly from control. • Cu in CuAq exposed worms was mainly found in metal rich granules (≈50%). - CuAq was more bioavailable and toxic, and showed a different subcellular distribution compared to the particulate forms tested (CuONP and CuOMicro)

  18. Data summary for the near-shore sediment characterization task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, D.A.; Hargrove, W.W.; Campbell, K.R.; Wood, M.A.; Rash, C.D.

    1994-10-01

    This report presents the results of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The goals of the task were to (1) determine the extent to which near-shore surface sediments are contaminated by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and (2) provide data for the Watts Bar Reservoir Interagency Permitting Group (WBRIPG) to evaluate the human health risks from exposure to sediments during and following dredging operations. The data collected for this task are also to be used in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RLTS) for the CR-ERP operable units (Lower Watts Bar and Clinch River) to characterize the human health risk associated with exposure to near-shore sediments throughout the Watts Bar Reservoir.

  19. Data summary for the near-shore sediment characterization task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The goals of the task were to (1) determine the extent to which near-shore surface sediments are contaminated by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and (2) provide data for the Watts Bar Reservoir Interagency Permitting Group (WBRIPG) to evaluate the human health risks from exposure to sediments during and following dredging operations. The data collected for this task are also to be used in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RLTS) for the CR-ERP operable units (Lower Watts Bar and Clinch River) to characterize the human health risk associated with exposure to near-shore sediments throughout the Watts Bar Reservoir

  20. Characterization of Direct Push Vadose Zone Sediments from the 241-U Single-Shell Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Iovin, Cristian; Clayton, Ray E.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Clayton, Eric T.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Orr, Robert D.

    2007-12-20

    The overall goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., are 1) to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities, 2) to identify and evaluate the efficacy of interim measures, and 3) to aid, via collection of geochemical information and data, the future decisions that must be made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the near-term operations, future waste retrieval, and final closure activities for the single-shell tank Waste Management Areas (WMAs). For a more complete discussion of the goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, see the overall work plan, Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (DOE 1999). Specific details on the rationale for activities performed at WMA U are found in Crumpler (2003). To meet these goals, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform detailed analyses of vadose zone sediment collected within the U Single-Shell Tank Farm. Specifically, this report contains all the geochemical and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from ten direct push characterization holes emplaced to investigate vadose zone contamination associated with potential leaks within the 241-U Single-Shell Tank Farm. Specific tanks targeted during this characterization campaign included tanks 241-U-104/241-U-105, 241-U-110, and 241-U-112. Additionally, this report compiles data from direct push samples collected north of tank 241-U-201, as well as sediment collected from the background borehole (C3393). After evaluating all the characterization and analytical data, there is no question that the vadose zone in the vicinity of tanks 241-U-104 and 241-U-105 has been contaminated by tank-related waste. This observation is not new, as gamma logging of drywells in the area has identified uranium contamination at the

  1. Spatial and vertical distributions of heavy metals and their potential toxicity levels in various beach sediments from high-background-radiation area, Kerala, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Graphical representation shows that concentrations of Cd and Pb and all the calculated indexes might have been influenced by the amount of total organic content and the Ni and Zn concentrations might have been influenced by sediment grain size (silt and clay). - Highlights: • Most of the metals are higher in S1 and other higher values are erratically distributed. • Moderate and severe degree of ecological risk is observed in different layers. • Surface and first feet samples had 21%, third feet samples had 49% of probability of toxicity. • Most of the studied metals and all calculated indexes are higher in third feet samples. • The calculated indexes might have been influenced by amount of total organic content. - Abstract: The spatial and vertical distribution of heavy metals and the sediment characteristics of beaches in Kerala, India (the upper surface sediments and the first, second and third one-foot-thick strata) were assessed in this study. The concentrations of most of the studied metals were highest at sampling site S1 (Cochin). The measured concentrations were compared with background and toxicological reference values. The results show that definite adverse biological effects are possible at most of the sampling sites due to the high Pb levels. Three different indexes were calculated to investigate the potential toxicity level. Most of the studied metals and all calculated indexes were highest in the third foot of sediment. Multivariate statistical analyses were performed and suggested that particular heavy metals, e.g., Pb, Cd, Cr and Ni, may represent contamination from a common source. The Cd and Pb concentrations and all the calculated index values show a relationship with the content of organic matter. The results of the present study suggest the recommendation that a systematic analysis is needed to monitor heavy metal levels in the studied area

  2. Assessment of trace metal contamination level and toxicity in sediments from coastal regions of West Bengal, eastern part of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca; Mondal, Priyanka; Mitra, Soumita; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar

    2015-12-30

    The work investigated concentration of trace metals in surface sediments (0-10 cm; Mangrove Wetland (SMW), eastern coastal part of India. The trace metal concentrations in sediments exhibited an overall decreasing trend as follows: Cr (21.2-60.9)>Cu (11.60-102.47)>Ni (19.10-52.60)>Pb (7.09-183.88)>As (4.41-11.46)>Cd (0.02-4.4)>Ag (0.02-0.87). Both the geo-accumulation index (Igeo) and contamination factor (CF) values revealed significant pollution by Ag, Cd and Pb at Nurpur of HRE. Potential Ecological Risk Index (RI) (61.21 ± 112.40) showed wide range of variations from low (19.76) to serious (463.20) ecological risk. A positive significant correlation was found between metals and organic carbon in sediments. The ecological risk associated with the trace metals in sediment was considered on the consensus based Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs). The work suggests that the trace metals present in sediments posed adverse effects on the sediment-dwelling organisms. PMID:26581818

  3. Characterization of sediments laid on Solimoes/Amazonas river flood plains, using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes sediment analysis with high light elements fraction using dispersive energy X-ray fluorescence technique with radioisotopic excitation, The proposed procedure is based on the Fundamental Parameters for analytical elements (Z ≥ 13) evaluation, and coherent and incoherent scattered radiation for quantification of the light fraction of the matrix (Z < 13). Laid sediments samples on Solimoes/Amazonas river flood plains were analyzed, determining simultaneously the Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Fe, Sc, V, Mn, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr and Zr element concentrations, thus allowing chemical characterization and spatial variability, and some mineralogical and weathering sediments aspects. (author). 15 refs., 11 tabs

  4. Relevance of the bioavailable fraction of DDT and its metabolites in freshwater sediment toxicity: New insight into the mode of action of these chemicals on Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforzini, Susanna; Governa, Daniela; Boeri, Marta; Oliveri, Laura; Oldani, Alessandro; Vago, Fabio; Viarengo, Aldo; Borrelli, Raffaella

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the toxicity of lake sediments contaminated with DDT and its metabolites DDD and DDE (collectively, DDX) was evaluated with widely used toxicity tests (i.e., Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, and Lumbriculus variegatus) and with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model organism that is also suitable for studying pollutant-induced alterations at the molecular and cellular levels. Although the DDX concentration in the sediments was high (732.5 ppb), the results suggested a minimal environmental risk; in fact, no evidence of harmful effects was found using the different bioassays or when we considered the results of more sensitive sublethal biomarkers in D. discoideum amoebae. In line with the biological results, the chemical data showed that the concentration of DDX in the pore water (in general a highly bioavailable phase) showed a minimal value (0.0071ppb). To confirm the importance of the bioavailability of the toxic chemicals in determining their biological effects and to investigate the mechanisms of DDX toxicity, we exposed D. discoideum amoebae to 732.5ppb DDX in water solution. DDX had no effect on cell viability; however, a strong reduction in amoebae replication rate was observed, which depended mainly on a reduction in endocytosis rate and on lysosomal and mitochondrial alterations. In the presence of a moderate and transient increase in reactive oxygen species, the glutathione level in DDX-exposed amoebae drastically decreased. These results highlight that studies of the bioavailability of pollutants in environmental matrices and their biological effects are essential for site-specific ecological risk assessment. Moreover, glutathione depletion in DDX-exposed organisms is a new finding that could open the possibility of developing new pesticide mixtures that are more effective against DDT-resistant malaria vectors. PMID:27340883

  5. Metagenomic and geochemical characterization of pockmarked sediments overlaying the Troll petroleum reservoir in the North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håvelsrud Othilde

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pockmarks (depressions in the seabed have been discovered throughout the world’s oceans and are often related to hydrocarbon seepage. Although high concentrations of pockmarks are present in the seabed overlaying the Troll oil and gas reservoir in the northern North Sea, geological surveys have not detected hydrocarbon seepage in this area at the present time. In this study we have used metagenomics to characterize the prokaryotic communities inhabiting the surface sediments in the Troll area in relation to geochemical parameters, particularly related to hydrocarbon presence. We also investigated the possibility of increased potential for methane oxidation related to the pockmarks. Five metagenomes from pockmarks and plain seabed sediments were sequenced by pyrosequencing (Roche/454 technology. In addition, two metagenomes from seabed sediments geologically unlikely to be influenced by hydrocarbon seepage (the Oslofjord were included. The taxonomic distribution and metabolic potential of the metagenomes were analyzed by multivariate analysis and statistical comparisons to reveal variation within and between the two sampling areas. Results The main difference identified between the two sampling areas was an overabundance of predominantly autotrophic nitrifiers, especially Nitrosopumilus, and oligotrophic marine Gammaproteobacteria in the Troll metagenomes compared to the Oslofjord. Increased potential for degradation of hydrocarbons, especially aromatic hydrocarbons, was detected in two of the Troll samples: one pockmark sample and one from the plain seabed. Although presence of methanotrophic organisms was indicated in all samples, no overabundance in pockmark samples compared to the Oslofjord samples supports no, or only low level, methane seepage in the Troll pockmarks at the present time. Conclusions Given the relatively low content of total organic carbon and great depths of hydrocarbon containing sediments in the Troll

  6. Potential toxicities of sediments at point source discharge sites along the Upper Mississippi National Wildlife and Fish Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Thirty-one sediment samples collected in the vicinity of twenty regulated discharge points within Pools 4 through 10 of the Upper Mississippi River National...

  7. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program: Magnitude and Extent of Sediment Toxicity of South Carolina and Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surficial sediment samples were collected from 162 locations within five estuaries - Charleston Harbor, Winyah Bay, Leadenwah Creek, Savannah River, and St. Simons...

  8. Degradation study of pesticides by direct photolysis - Structural characterization and potential toxicity of photo products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesticides belong to the large family of organic pollutants. In general, they are intended to fight against crop pests. Distribution of pesticides in nature creates pollution in DIFFERENT compartments of the biosphere (water, soil and air) and can induce acute toxic effects on human beings of the terrestrial and aquatic living biomass. It is now shown that some pesticides are endocrine disruptors and are particularly carcinogenic and mutagenic effects in humans. Pesticides can undergo various processes of transformation in the natural life cycle (biodegradation, volatilization, solar radiation ...) or following applied in the sectors of natural water purification and treatment stations sewage treatment. The presence of degradation products of pesticides in our environment is even more alarming that their structures and potential toxicities generally unknown. Molecules belonging to two families of pesticides were selected for this study: herbicides, represented by metolachlor, and fungicides represented by procymidone, pyrimethanil and boscalid. The first part of the thesis focused on the development of an analytical strategy to characterize the structures of compounds from degradation by photolysis of pesticides. The second part focused on estimating the toxicity of degradation products using a test database in silico. Identification of degradation products was achieved through two complementary analysis techniques: the gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer ''multi-stage'' (GC-MSn) and liquid chromatography coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS). The estimation of the toxicity of the degradation products was performed using the TEST program QSAR recently developed to try to predict the toxicity of molecules. The strategy of the structural elucidation of degradation products of pesticides studied is based on studying of the mechanisms of fragmentation of parent molecules of the degradation products. The molar mass of parent

  9. [Characterizing the toxicity interaction of the binary mixture between DMSO and pesticide by the multi-effect residual analysis (MERA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Xiang-Chen; Liu, Shu-Shen; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Three groups of binary mixtures between dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and three widely used pesticides, dimethoate (DIM), dichlorvos (DIC), and metalaxyl (MET), were respectively constructed by using the direct equipartition ray design (EquRay). The luminescent inhibition toxicities of single chemical and binary mixtures to Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. -Q67 were determined by the microplate toxicity analysis (MTA). Selecting the concentration addition (CA) model as an additive reference, we developed a new multi-effect residual analysis (MERA) to quantitatively characterize the deviation of the observed toxicity from that predicted by the CA model, i. e. the degree of toxicity interaction. It was shown that the toxicity interactions between DMSO and pesticide were dominated by antagonism, and the highest antagonism distributed between -23% and -15%. The concentration ranges where antagonism existed and the degree of antagonism were influenced by the components in the mixture, the concentration ratios of the components, and the effect level. A comparison of the MERA with the conventional isobologram and the extended toxic unit summation revealed that the MERA characterizes the degree of toxicity interaction in the view of effect, with less limitation by different concentration ratios or effect levels. Therefore, the MERA can be used to evaluate the complex toxicity interactions taking place in binary mixtures. PMID:23487948

  10. Development and application of sediment contact bioassays for the investigation of acute and mechanism specific toxicity with Danio rerio embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Schiwy, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Sediments are a major issue for many scientists and authorities due to their close linkage to the aquatic food web and their potential to accumulate pollutants. Therefore, the European Water Framework Directive (EWFD) implements a daughter directive, which requires from the member states that the concentration of 33 priority pollutants should not increase above levels given by environmental quality standards defined in the regulation for sediments and biota. However, there is still need for b...

  11. Characterization of humic acids extracted from the sediments of the various rivers and lakes in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Mengchang; SHI Yehong; LIN Chunye

    2008-01-01

    The humic acids (HAs) isolated from the sediments of the various rivers, lakes, and reservoirs in China were studied using elemental analyzer, fourier transform infrared (FF-IR), and CP/MAS 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The results showed that the HAs were characterized by some common chemical and physicochemical properties, but they also pose some differences in the C-containing functional groups. The C/N, C/H, O/C, and O/H ratios differ widely for the various HAs, showing that the elemental composition of the HAs from the various sediments was different due to the different environmental conditions. All HAs show similar spectra with different intense absorbance in the region of 4000-2000 cm-1, suggesting that they have very similar structures and functional groups. The absorbance region between 1900 and 400 cm-1 also showed similar spectra with different intense absorbance,different relative intensities, and some relevant differences for the various HAs. The total aromaticities for the six HAs varied from 23.1% to 41.8%. The differences in the elemental composition and functional groups for the various HAs were attributed to their different biogeochemical origins. The HAs in the sediments from Taihu Lake (one freshwater shallow lake with heavy eutrophication),the Pearl River (the tropical river), and the Liao River (located at the joint of the temperate zone and cold-temperate zone) showed different structural properties due to their different geographical and climate zones. These different properties for the six HAs were expected to affect the sorption, distributions, and fates of heavy metals and organic chemicals.

  12. MOBILIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS GENERATED FROM CEMENT LEACHATES MOVING THROUGH A SRS SANDY SEDIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Seaman, J.

    2011-09-20

    Naturally occurring mobile colloids are ubiquitous and are involved in many important processes in the subsurface zone. For example, colloid generation and subsequent mobilization represent a possible mechanism for the transport of contaminants including radionuclides in the subsurface environments. For colloid-facilitated transport to be significant, three criteria must be met: (1) colloids must be generated; (2) contaminants must associate with the colloids preferentially to the immobile solid phase (aquifer); and (3) colloids must be transported through the groundwater or in subsurface environments - once these colloids start moving they become 'mobile colloids'. Although some experimental investigations of particle release in natural porous media have been conducted, the detailed mechanisms of release and re-deposition of colloidal particles within natural porous media are poorly understood. Even though this vector of transport is known, the extent of its importance is not known yet. Colloid-facilitated transport of trace radionuclides has been observed in the field, thus demonstrating a possible radiological risk associated with the colloids. The objective of this study was to determine if cementitious leachate would promote the in situ mobilization of natural colloidal particles from a SRS sandy sediment. The intent was to determine whether cementitious surface or subsurface structure would create plumes that could produce conditions conducive to sediment dispersion and mobile colloid generation. Column studies were conducted and the cation chemistries of influents and effluents were analyzed by ICP-OES, while the mobilized colloids were characterized using XRD, SEM, EDX, PSD and Zeta potential. The mobilization mechanisms of colloids in a SRS sandy sediment by cement leachates were studied.

  13. Carbon nanotubes affect the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to denitrification in marine sediments by altering cellular internalization of nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Huang, Haining; Li, Xu

    2016-06-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway for nitrate transformation in marine sediments, and this process has been observed to be negatively affected by engineered nanomaterials. However, previous studies only focused on the potential effect of a certain type of nanomaterial on microbial denitrification. Here we show that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) to denitrification in marine sediments is highly affected by the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It was found that the removal efficiency of total NOX‑-N (NO3‑-N and NO2‑-N) in the presence of CuO NPs was only 62.3%, but it increased to 81.1% when CNTs appeared in this circumstance. Our data revealed that CuO NPs were more easily attached to CNTs rather than cell surface because of the lower energy barrier (3.5 versus 36.2 kT). Further studies confirmed that the presence of CNTs caused the formation of large, incompact, non-uniform dispersed, and more negatively charged CuO-CNTs heteroaggregates, and thus reduced the nanoparticle internalization by cells, leading to less toxicity to metabolism of carbon source, generation of reduction equivalent, and activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results indicate that assessing nanomaterial-induced risks in real circumstances needs to consider the “mixed” effects of nanomaterials.

  14. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples.

  15. Characterization of bacterial communities in sediments receiving various wastewater effluents with high-throughput sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen

    2014-04-01

    454 Pyrosequencing was applied to examine bacterial communities in sediment samples collected from a river receiving effluent discharge from rural domestic sewage (RDS) and various factories, including a tannery (TNS), clothing plant (CTS), and button factory (BTS), respectively. For each sample, 4,510 effective sequences were selected and utilized to do the bacterial diversity and abundance analysis, respectively. In total, 1,288, 2,036, 1,800, and 2,150 operational taxonomic units were obtained at 3% distance cutoff in TNS, CTS, BTS, and RDS, respectively. Bacterial phylotype richness in RDS was higher than the other samples, and TNS had the least richness. The most predominant class in the TNS, CTS, and BTS samples is Betaproteobacteria. Cyanobacteria (no_rank) is the most predominant one in the RDS sample. Circa 31% sequences in TNS were affiliated with the Rhodocyclales order. In the four samples, Aeromonas, Arcobacter, Clostridium, Legionella, Leptospira, Mycobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Treponema genera containing pathogenic bacteria were detected. Characterization of bacterial communities in sediments from various downstream branches indicated that distinct wastewater effluents have similar potential to reduce the natural variability in river ecosystems and contribute to the river biotic homogenization. PMID:24477925

  16. Source characterization using compound composition and stable carbon isotope ratio of PAHs in sediments from lakes, harbor, and shipping waterway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular compositions and compound specific stable carbon isotope ratios of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) isolated from sediments were used to characterize possible sources of contamination at an urban lake, a harbor, a shipping waterway, and a relatively undisturbed remote lake in the northwest United States. Total PAH concentrations in urban lake sediments ranged from 66.0 to 16,500 μg g-1 dry wt. with an average of 2600 μg g-1, which is ∼ 50, 100, and 400 times higher on average than PAH in harbor (48 μg g-1 on average), shipping waterway (26 μg g-1), and remote lake (7 μg g-1) sediments, respectively. The PAH distribution patterns, methyl phenanthrene/phenanthrene ratios, and a pyrogenic index at the sites suggest a pyrogenic origin for PAHs. Source characterization using principal component analysis and various molecular indices including C2-dibenzothiophenes/C2-phenanthrenes, C3-dibenzothiophenes/C3-phenanthrenes, and C2-chrysenes/C2-phenanthrenes ratios, was able to differentiate PAH deposited in sediments from the four sites. The uniqueness of the source of the sediment PAHs from urban lake was also illustrated by compound specific stable carbon isotope analysis. It was concluded that urban lake sediments are accumulating PAH from sources that are unique from contamination detected at nearby sites in the same watershed

  17. Bioaccumulation, subcellular distribution and toxicity of sediment-associated copper in the ragworm Nereis diversicolor: The relative importance of aqueous copper, copper oxide nanoparticles and microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thit, Amalie; Banta, Gary T; Selck, Henriette

    2015-07-01

    The sediment-dwelling ragworm, Nereis diversicolor was exposed to sediment spiked with aqueous Cu (CuAq, CuCl2), CuO nanoparticles (CuONP) or CuO microparticles (CuOMicro) at 150 μg Cu g(-1) dw sediment for 10d. Exposures to CuAq and CuOMicro caused mortality (62.5 and 37.5%, respectively), whereas mean burrowing time increased during exposure to CuAq and CuONP from 0.12 h (controls) to 19.3 and 12.2 h, respectively. All Cu treatments bioaccumulated, especially CuAq (up to 4 times more than the other treatments). Cu was roughly equally distributed among the five subcellular fractions in controls and worms exposed to CuONP or CuOMicro. In contrast, ≈50% of accumulated Cu in CuAq exposed worms was found in metal rich granules and significantly more Cu was present in heat-denatured proteins and organelles than in worms exposed to CuOMicro or in controls. Our results suggest that Cu form affects its bioaccumulation and subsequent toxicity and detoxification in a polychaete like N. diversicolor. PMID:25800937

  18. Evaluation of the threat of marine CO{sub 2} leakage-associated acidification on the toxicity of sediment metals to juvenile bivalves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basallote, M. Dolores, E-mail: dolores.basallote@uca.es [Cátedra UNESCO/UNITWIN WiCop, Departamento de Química-Física, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cádiz, Polígono Río San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain); Rodríguez-Romero, Araceli [Departamento de Ecología y Gestión Costera, Instituto de Ciencias Marinas de Andalucía (CSIC), Campus Río San Pedro, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain); De Orte, Manoela R.; Del Valls, T. Ángel; Riba, Inmaculada [Cátedra UNESCO/UNITWIN WiCop, Departamento de Química-Física, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cádiz, Polígono Río San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Short-term tests using juveniles of bivalves to study the effects of CO{sub 2} dissolved. • CO{sub 2} causes effects if the threshold concentration of the organism is overlapped. • Flows of escaped CO{sub 2} would affect the geochemical composition of sediment–seawater. • CO{sub 2}-induced acidification would affect differently to marine sediment toxicity. - Abstract: The effects of the acidification associated with CO{sub 2} leakage from sub-seabed geological storage was studied by the evaluation of the short-term effects of CO{sub 2}-induced acidification on juveniles of the bivalve Ruditapes philippinarum. Laboratory scale experiments were performed using a CO{sub 2}-bubbling system designed to conduct ecotoxicological assays. The organisms were exposed for 10 days to elutriates of sediments collected in different littoral areas that were subjected to various pH treatments (pH 7.1, 6.6, 6.1). The acute pH-associated effects on the bivalves were observed, and the dissolved metals in the elutriates were measured. The median toxic effect pH was calculated, which ranged from 6.33 to 6.45. The amount of dissolved Zn in the sediment elutriates increased in parallel with the pH reductions and was correlated with the proton concentrations. The pH, the pCO{sub 2} and the dissolved metal concentrations (Zn and Fe) were linked with the mortality of the exposed bivalves.

  19. Organic persistent toxic substances in soils, waters and sediments along an altitudinal gradient at Mt. Sagarmatha, Himalayas, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzella, Licia; Poma, Giulia; De Paolis, Adolfo; Roscioli, Claudio; Viviano, Gaetano

    2011-10-01

    Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are important classes of compounds of serious environmental concern. These compounds were measured in waters, sediments and soils from several high altitude sites in the Sagarmatha National Park (Nepal) and included in the Himalayan ridge. In water samples, low-level substituted PCBs and PBDEs, along with more volatile PAHs, were the most common contaminants. In sediment and soil samples, the PCB profile was mainly composed of medium-level chlorinated congeners and significantly correlated with altitude. The PAH profile for water and soil samples showed the main contribution of pyrogenic PAHs due to emissions of solid combustion, whereas the profile for sediments indicated the main contribution of pyrogenic PAHs from gasoline emissions. The PAH levels measured in Himalayan samples must be considered as low to medium contaminated, whereas the regarded Himalayan stations can be considered undisturbed remote areas concerning PCB, PBDE and OC compounds. PMID:21752503

  20. Lethal and sublethal responses to a sediment bound toxicant by two oligochaetes from Lake Michigan: stylodrilus heringianus and limnodrilus hoffmeisteri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-term lethal, and short and long-term sublethal responses by Stylodrilus heringianus (Lumbriculidae) and Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri (Tubificidae) to sediments dosed with endrin were measured in single and mixed species tests. Ninety-six hour LC50 values were 2588 +/- 1974 and 2757 +/- 995 ug/g dry weight sediment for S. heringianus and L. hoffmeisteri respectively. Ninety-six hour EC50 burrowing avoidance values (concentration where 50% do not burrow) were one to two orders of magnitude lower than the LC50's. Short-term mixed species LC50 data suggested that L. hoffmeisteri may benefit from the presence of S. heringianus. Long-term sublethal responses were quantified by measuring sediment reworking rates (the rate at which subsurface sediments are egested at the surface and re-buried) in laboratory microcosms. Rates were determined by monitoring a gamma-emitting 137Cesium marker layer with a well-collimated NaI detector. Sediment endrin concentrations ranged from 3 ng/g to 82 ug/g in six 1300 hour experiments. For S. heringianus, reworking rates were stimulated at low concentrations during the first half of experiments, followed by gradual decreases relative to controls. Stimulation of L. hoffmeisteri reworking was not observed. At high concentrations, early reworking rates were reduced for both species, followed by dramatic decreases later on. In mixed species experiments at high concentrations, the presence of S. heringianus enhanced the reworking of L. hoffmeisteri, although the reverse was not observed. Decreased mortality and increased post experimental dry weights of L. hoffmeisteri in mixed, relative to single species tests were also observed. Generally, post experimental worm weights were inversely related to sediment endrin loads, and bioconcentration factors for S. heringianus (10-40) were approximately fourfold that of L. hoffmeisteri (1-10)

  1. Hydraulic anisotropy characterization of pneumatic-fractured sediments using azimuthal self potential gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, D.N.; Slater, L.D.; Schnell, D.L.; Herman, G.C.

    2009-01-01

    The pneumatic fracturing technique is used to enhance the permeability and porosity of tight unconsolidated soils (e.g. clays), thereby improving the effectiveness of remediation treatments. Azimuthal self potential gradient (ASPG) surveys were performed on a compacted, unconsolidated clay block in order to evaluate their potential to delineate contaminant migration pathways in a mechanically-induced fracture network. Azimuthal resistivity (ARS) measurements were also made for comparative purposes. Following similar procedures to those used in the field, compressed kaolinite sediments were pneumatically fractured and the resulting fracture geometry characterized from strike analysis of visible fractures combined with strike data from optical borehole televiewer (BHTV) imaging. We subsequently injected a simulated treatment (electrolyte/dye) into the fractures. Both ASPG and ARS data exhibit anisotropic geoelectric signatures resulting from the fracturing. Self potentials observed during injection of electrolyte are consistent with electrokinetic theory and previous laboratory results on a fracture block model. Visual (polar plot) analysis and linear regression of cross plots show ASPG lobes are correlated with azimuths of high fracture strike density, evidence that the ASPG anisotropy is a proxy measure of hydraulic anisotropy created by the pneumatic fracturing. However, ARS data are uncorrelated with fracture strike maxima and resistivity anisotropy is probably dominated by enhanced surface conduction along azimuths of weak 'starter paths' formed from pulverization of the clay and increases in interfacial surface area. We find the magnitude of electrokinetic SP scales with the applied N2 gas pressure gradient (??PN2) for any particular hydraulically-active fracture set and that the positive lobe of the ASPG anomaly indicates the flow direction within the fracture network. These findings demonstrate the use of ASPG in characterizing the effectiveness of (1

  2. Hydraulic anisotropy characterization of pneumatic-fractured sediments using azimuthal self potential gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, DeBonne N.; Slater, Lee D.; Schnell, Deborah L.; Herman, Gregory C.

    2009-01-01

    The pneumatic fracturing technique is used to enhance the permeability and porosity of tight unconsolidated soils (e.g. clays), thereby improving the effectiveness of remediation treatments. Azimuthal self potential gradient (ASPG) surveys were performed on a compacted, unconsolidated clay block in order to evaluate their potential to delineate contaminant migration pathways in a mechanically-induced fracture network. Azimuthal resistivity (ARS) measurements were also made for comparative purposes. Following similar procedures to those used in the field, compressed kaolinite sediments were pneumatically fractured and the resulting fracture geometry characterized from strike analysis of visible fractures combined with strike data from optical borehole televiewer (BHTV) imaging. We subsequently injected a simulated treatment (electrolyte/dye) into the fractures. Both ASPG and ARS data exhibit anisotropic geoelectric signatures resulting from the fracturing. Self potentials observed during injection of electrolyte are consistent with electrokinetic theory and previous laboratory results on a fracture block model. Visual (polar plot) analysis and linear regression of cross plots show ASPG lobes are correlated with azimuths of high fracture strike density, evidence that the ASPG anisotropy is a proxy measure of hydraulic anisotropy created by the pneumatic fracturing. However, ARS data are uncorrelated with fracture strike maxima and resistivity anisotropy is probably dominated by enhanced surface conduction along azimuths of weak 'starter paths' formed from pulverization of the clay and increases in interfacial surface area. We find the magnitude of electrokinetic SP scales with the applied N 2 gas pressure gradient (Δ PN2) for any particular hydraulically-active fracture set and that the positive lobe of the ASPG anomaly indicates the flow direction within the fracture network. These findings demonstrate the use of ASPG in characterizing the effectiveness of (1

  3. Characterization of size, anisotropy, and density heterogeneity of nanoparticles by sedimentation velocity

    KAUST Repository

    Demeler, Borries

    2014-08-05

    A critical problem in materials science is the accurate characterization of the size dependent properties of colloidal inorganic nanocrystals. Due to the intrinsic polydispersity present during synthesis, dispersions of such materials exhibit simultaneous heterogeneity in density ρ, molar mass M, and particle diameter d. The density increments ∂ρ/∂d and ∂ρ/∂M of these nanoparticles, if known, can then provide important information about crystal growth and particle size distributions. For most classes of nanocrystals, a mixture of surfactants is added during synthesis to control their shape, size, and optical properties. However, it remains a challenge to accurately determine the amount of passivating ligand bound to the particle surface post synthesis. The presence of the ligand shell hampers an accurate determination of the nanocrystal diameter. Using CdSe and PbS semiconductor nanocrystals, and the ultrastable silver nanoparticle (M4Ag 44(p-MBA)30), as model systems, we describe a Custom Grid method implemented in UltraScan-III for the characterization of nanoparticles and macromolecules using sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation. We show that multiple parametrizations are possible, and that the Custom Grid method can be generalized to provide high resolution composition information for mixtures of solutes that are heterogeneous in two out of three parameters. For such cases, our method can simultaneously resolve arbitrary two-dimensional distributions of hydrodynamic parameters when a third property can be held constant. For example, this method extracts partial specific volume and molar mass from sedimentation velocity data for cases where the anisotropy can be held constant, or provides anisotropy and partial specific volume if the molar mass is known. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. Antibiofilm Activity, Compound Characterization, and Acute Toxicity of Extract from a Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Musbah Alasil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of many antimicrobial agents is currently decreasing; therefore, it is important to search for alternative therapeutics. Our study was carried out to assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity using microtiter plate assay, to characterize the bioactive compounds using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detection and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and to test the oral acute toxicity on Sprague Dawley rats of extract derived from a novel bacterial species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI. Our results indicate that the crude extract and its three identified compounds exhibit strong antibiofilm activity against a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Three potential compounds were identified including an amino acid antibiotic C8H20N3O4P (MW 253.237, phospholipase A2 inhibitor C21H36O5 (MW 368.512, and an antibacterial agent C14H11N3O2 (MW 253.260. The acute toxicity test indicates that the mortality rate among all rats was low and that the biochemical parameters, hematological profile, and histopathology examination of liver and kidneys showed no significant differences between experimental groups P>0.05. Overall, our findings suggest that the extract and its purified compounds derived from novel Paenibacillus sp. are nontoxic exhibiting strong antibiofilm activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens that can be useful towards new therapeutic management of biofilm-associated infections.

  5. Microcosm investigations of stormwater pond sediment toxicity to embryonic and larval amphibians: Variation in sensitivity among species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snodgrass, Joel W. [Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252 (United States)], E-mail: jsnodgrass@towson.edu; Casey, Ryan E. [Department of Chemistry, Towson University, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252 (United States); Joseph, Debra; Simon, Judith A. [Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Stormwater ponds have become common features of modern development and often represent significant amounts of open space in urbanized areas. Although stormwater ponds may provide habitat for wildlife, factors responsible for producing variation in wildlife use of ponds have received limited attention. To investigate the role of variation in species tolerances of pollutants in structuring pond-breeding amphibian assemblages, we exposed species tolerant (Bufo americanus) and not tolerant (Rana sylvatica) of urbanization to pond sediments in laboratory microcosms. Pond microcosms had elevated sediment metal levels and chloride water concentrations. Among R. sylvatica embryos, exposure to pond sediments resulted in 100% mortality. In contrast, B. americanus embryos and larvae experienced only sublethal effects (i.e., reduced size at metamorphosis) due to pond sediment exposure. Our results suggest variation in pollutant tolerance among early developmental stages of amphibians may act in concert with terrestrial habitat availability to structure amphibian assemblages associated with stormwater ponds. - Variation among species in sensitivity to pollutants can influence stormwater pond amphibian assemblages.

  6. Microcosm investigations of stormwater pond sediment toxicity to embryonic and larval amphibians: Variation in sensitivity among species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stormwater ponds have become common features of modern development and often represent significant amounts of open space in urbanized areas. Although stormwater ponds may provide habitat for wildlife, factors responsible for producing variation in wildlife use of ponds have received limited attention. To investigate the role of variation in species tolerances of pollutants in structuring pond-breeding amphibian assemblages, we exposed species tolerant (Bufo americanus) and not tolerant (Rana sylvatica) of urbanization to pond sediments in laboratory microcosms. Pond microcosms had elevated sediment metal levels and chloride water concentrations. Among R. sylvatica embryos, exposure to pond sediments resulted in 100% mortality. In contrast, B. americanus embryos and larvae experienced only sublethal effects (i.e., reduced size at metamorphosis) due to pond sediment exposure. Our results suggest variation in pollutant tolerance among early developmental stages of amphibians may act in concert with terrestrial habitat availability to structure amphibian assemblages associated with stormwater ponds. - Variation among species in sensitivity to pollutants can influence stormwater pond amphibian assemblages

  7. Environmental Risk Assessment Based on High-Resolution Spatial Maps of Potentially Toxic Elements Sampled on Stream Sediments of Santiago, Cape Verde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina M. S. Cabral Pinto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical mapping is the base knowledge to identify the regions of the planet with critical contents of potentially toxic elements from either natural or anthropogenic sources. Sediments, soils and waters are the vehicles which link the inorganic environment to life through the supply of essential macro and micro nutrients. The chemical composition of surface geological materials may cause metabolic changes which may favor the occurrence of endemic diseases in humans. In order to better understand the relationships between environmental geochemistry and public health, we present environmental risk maps of some harmful elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn in the stream sediments of Santiago, Cape Verde, identifying the potentially harmful areas in this island. The Estimated Background Values (EBV of Cd, Co, Cr, Ni and V were found to be above the Canadian guidelines for any type of use of stream sediments and also above the target values of the Dutch and United States guidelines. The Probably Effect Concentrations (PEC, above which harmful effects are likely in sediment dwelling organisms, were found for Cr and Ni. Some associations between the geological formations of the island and the composition of stream sediments were identified and confirmed by descriptive statistics and by Principal Component Analysis (PCA. The EBV spatial distribution of the metals and the results of PCA allowed us to establish relationships between the EBV maps and the geological formations. The first two PCA modes indicate that heavy metals in Santiago stream sediments are mainly originated from weathering of underlying bedrocks. The first metal association (Co, V, Cr, and Mn; first PCA mode consists of elements enriched in basic rocks and compatible elements. The second association of variables (Zn and Cd as opposed to Ni; second PCA mode appears to be strongly controlled by the composition of alkaline volcanic rocks and pyroclastic rocks. So, the

  8. Site-specific sediment clean-up objectives developed by the sediment quality triad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment chemistry, sediment toxicity, and benthic macroinvertebrate community data were collected and evaluated in concert (1) to characterize adverse effects of hydrocarbon and metal contaminants in the sediments of a small inlet of Superior Bay, Lake Superior and a tributary creek and (2) to derive numeric objectives for the clean up of this system. Sediments from reference locations and eight study sites were analyzed for a range of contaminants, including hydrocarbons (measured both as diesel range organics (DRO) and oil and grease), lead, chromium, and ammonia. A range of sediment toxicity was observed across the eight study sites using a variety of tests and endpoints: Hyalella azteca (10 day survival and growth), Chironomus tentans (10 day survival and growth), Ceriodaphnia dubia (48 hour survival), and Daphnia magna (48 hour survival and 10 day survival and reproduction). A range of alterations of the benthic macroinvertebrate community compared with communities from reference locations were observed. Benthic community alterations were summarized quantitatively by taxa richness and Shannon-Weiner mean diversity. Lowest effect levels determined through this study included 150 microg/g dry sediment for DRO (as measured in this study) and 40 microg/g dry sediment for lead. Effects thresholds determined through this study included 1,500 microg/g dry sediment for DRO and 90 microg/g dry sediment for lead. These levels and concentrations measured in relevant reference locations are being used to define objectives for sediment clean up in the inlet and creek

  9. Development and Characterization of Stable Sediment-Free Anaerobic Bacterial Enrichment Cultures That Dechlorinate Aroclor 1260

    OpenAIRE

    Bedard, Donna L.; Bailey, Jessica J.; Reiss, Brandon L.; Jerzak, Greta Van Slyke

    2006-01-01

    We have developed sediment-free anaerobic enrichment cultures that dechlorinate a broad spectrum of highly chlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The cultures were developed from Aroclor 1260-contaminated sediment from the Housatonic River in Lenox, MA. Sediment slurries were primed with 2,6-dibromobiphenyl to stimulate Process N dechlorination (primarily meta dechlorination), and sediment was gradually removed by successive transfers (10%) to minimal medium. The cultures grow on pyruv...

  10. Characterization of sediment layer composition in a shallow lake: from open water zones to reed belt areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogelbauer, I.; Loiskandl, W.

    2015-03-01

    Lake sediment characterization, a prerequisite for the vulnerability assessment of lake ecosystems, demands reliable in situ methods for the characterization of the sediment layer composition. A unified characterization of lake sediments within lake ecotopes (open water, open water patches within the reed, and the reed) is still a challenge. Each ecotope is covered by different classical scientific disciplines (hydrography and terrestrial remote sensing to soil physics) with their specific characterization methods. Recently, a complementary tool that bridges the gap between land and hydrographic surveying methods was introduced. It is a non-acoustic device that combines two soil physical sensors (a capacitive sensor and a cone penetrometer) and GNSS-positioning in a measuring system (CSPS). The CSPS enables rapid in situ delineation of water-mud-consolidated lakebed interfaces. The system was successfully applied across ecotopes at the Neusiedler See, a well-mixed shallow lake rich in fine-grained sediments. The geo-referenced vertical CSPS profiles show ecotope-specific layer composition. The effects of wind-induced turbidity, particle size, and electrical conductivity were analysed. The water-mud interface was precisely delineated at the open water due to a persistent high water content gradient, equivalent to a lutocline. The penetration resistance (PR) for open water showed either a shallow and highly compacted consolidated lakebed or a consolidated lakebed with a partially compacted layer above, while in the reed the PR smoothly increased until reaching the deepest penetration depths.

  11. Solid-waste leach characteristics and contaminant-sediment interactions. Volume 1, Batch leach and adsorption tests and sediment characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; LeGore, V.L.; Cantrell, K.J.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; Campbell, J.A.; Amonette, J.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Conca, J.L. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Wood, M.I. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The objectives of this report and subsequent volumes include describing progress on (1) development of conceptual-release models for Hanford Site defense solid-waste forms; (2) optimization of experimental methods to quantify the release from contaminants from solid wastes and their subsequent interactions with unsaturated sediments; and (3) creation of empirical data for use as provisional source term and retardation factors that become input parameters for performance assessment analyses for future Hanford disposal units and baseline risk assessments for inactive and existing disposal units.

  12. Characterization of trace organic contaminants in marine sediment from Yeongil Bay, Korea: 2. Dioxin-like and estrogenic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Chul-Hwan [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (Oceanography), College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Khim, Jong Seong [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (Oceanography), College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jskocean@snu.ac.kr; Villeneuve, Daniel L. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804-2595 (United States); Kannan, Kurunthachalam [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health and Toxicology, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State Plaza, PO Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Giesy, John P. [National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Department of Zoology, and Institute for Environmental Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2006-07-15

    This study employed mechanism-specific in vitro bioassays to help characterize the occurrence and distribution of dioxin-like and estrogenic contaminants in sediment from Yeongil Bay, Korea. Approximately 85% of the sediments tested induced significant dioxin-like activity in the H4IIE-luc bioassay, while approximately 50% induced significant estrogenic activity in the MVLN bioassay. Instrumentally-derived estimates of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and 17{beta}-estradiol equivalents tended to underestimate the magnitude of response observed in the bioassays, suggesting that compounds detected by chemical analysis did not account for all the activity associated with Yeongil Bay sediments, or that non-additive interactions were occurring. The greatest dioxin-like and estrogenic activity was associated with the mid-polarity Florisil fractions (F2) expected to contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as well as chlorinated dioxins and furans. As in previous studies of Korean coastal sediment, more polar fractions (F3) generated more modest responses both in terms of magnitude and the number of samples responding. -- In vitro bioassay responses observed for Yeongil Bay surficial sediment and sediment core extracts showed the greatest dioxin-like and estrogenic activities in the mid-polarity fraction containing PAHs as well as chlorinated dioxins and furans.

  13. Physical chemistry and radiochemistry characterization of sediment dust in Colonia and Soriano provinces in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work is characterized dust settled in the Departments of Colon ia and Soriano in Uruguay as a result of unusual events that occurred in July 2010. In order to identify the dust settled physicochemical characterization was carried out an analysis by X-ray fluorescence energy dispersive (EDXRF) spectrometry and analysis by High Resolution Gamma. With the results obtained by EDXRF was calculated using the enrichment factor matrix Mason. Macroscopic analysis indicated that this is a homogeneous sample of ocher-beige. The microscopic analysis showed the presence of sediment sandy silt with clasts of quartz and feldspar. The chemical composition indicated the presence of an inorganic material composed mainly of Al and Si, Fe, Mn and Ca lesser percentage was observed the presence of S, Cl, P, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As , Br, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, Pb, Th. The enrichment factor calculation showed that the elements As and Zn are enriched by a factor greater than 40. Gamma spectrometry analysis of high resolution and natural radionuclides were identified including the presence of high concentrations of 7Be activity, indicating that such material has been transported by air. Digital simulations were performed using the back trajectory model - Noaa HYSPLIT Model attempt to identify the source of the event.

  14. Lichen and bryophyte species diversity on toxic substrates in the abandoned sedimentation basins of Chvaletice and Bukovina

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palice, Zdeněk; Soldán, Z.

    1. Praha : Academia, 2004 - (Kovář, P.), s. 200-221 ISBN 80-200-1279-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/93/2256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : toxic substrates * colonization * pioneer vegetation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  15. Organic persistent toxic substances in soils, waters and sediments along an altitudinal gradient at Mt. Sagarmatha, Himalayas, Nepal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are important classes of compounds of serious environmental concern. These compounds were measured in waters, sediments and soils from several high altitude sites in the Sagarmatha National Park (Nepal) and included in the Himalayan ridge. In water samples, low-level substituted PCBs and PBDEs, along with more volatile PAHs, were the most common contaminants. In sediment and soil samples, the PCB profile was mainly composed of medium-level chlorinated congeners and significantly correlated with altitude. The PAH profile for water and soil samples showed the main contribution of pyrogenic PAHs due to emissions of solid combustion, whereas the profile for sediments indicated the main contribution of pyrogenic PAHs from gasoline emissions. The PAH levels measured in Himalayan samples must be considered as low to medium contaminated, whereas the regarded Himalayan stations can be considered undisturbed remote areas concerning PCB, PBDE and OC compounds. - Highlights: → POPs were measured in environmental samples from remote lakes in the Himalaya ridge. → It was confirmed the hypothesis of Long-Range Atmospheric Transport for lighter POPs. → PAH levels in Himalayan samples must be considered as low to medium contaminated. → The stations can be considered undisturbed remote areas concerning PCB, PBDE and OCC. - Organic PTSs in environmental matrices in remote regions of the Himalayan ridge.

  16. Organic persistent toxic substances in soils, waters and sediments along an altitudinal gradient at Mt. Sagarmatha, Himalayas, Nepal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzzella, Licia, E-mail: guzzella@irsa.cnr.it [IRSA-CNR, via del Mulino 19, 20047 Brugherio (Italy); Poma, Giulia; De Paolis, Adolfo; Roscioli, Claudio; Viviano, Gaetano [IRSA-CNR, via del Mulino 19, 20047 Brugherio (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are important classes of compounds of serious environmental concern. These compounds were measured in waters, sediments and soils from several high altitude sites in the Sagarmatha National Park (Nepal) and included in the Himalayan ridge. In water samples, low-level substituted PCBs and PBDEs, along with more volatile PAHs, were the most common contaminants. In sediment and soil samples, the PCB profile was mainly composed of medium-level chlorinated congeners and significantly correlated with altitude. The PAH profile for water and soil samples showed the main contribution of pyrogenic PAHs due to emissions of solid combustion, whereas the profile for sediments indicated the main contribution of pyrogenic PAHs from gasoline emissions. The PAH levels measured in Himalayan samples must be considered as low to medium contaminated, whereas the regarded Himalayan stations can be considered undisturbed remote areas concerning PCB, PBDE and OC compounds. - Highlights: > POPs were measured in environmental samples from remote lakes in the Himalaya ridge. > It was confirmed the hypothesis of Long-Range Atmospheric Transport for lighter POPs. > PAH levels in Himalayan samples must be considered as low to medium contaminated. > The stations can be considered undisturbed remote areas concerning PCB, PBDE and OCC. - Organic PTSs in environmental matrices in remote regions of the Himalayan ridge.

  17. Toxic heavy metals in sediments, seawater, and molluscs in the eastern and western coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Shi, Zhen; Zhang, Jingping; Jiang, Zhijian; Wang, Fei; Huang, Xiaoping

    2016-05-01

    Heavy metal concentrations and distribution were studied in sediments, seawater, and molluscs, and the possible heavy metal sources in the coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China were discussed. The results showed that the concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cr in sediments in eastern coastal waters were generally higher than those in the western coastal waters. However, concentrations of most metals in seawater and molluscs in western waters were higher than in the eastern waters, which was tightly related to the local economics and urbanization development, especially, the different industrial structure in two regions. The main heavy metal sources were attributed to the industrial and agricultural effluent, domestic sewage, and even waste gas. Furthermore, heavy metal contamination assessment indicated that high contamination levels of Cd, Zn, and Pb occurred in sediments in local areas, especially in the bays and harbors. The metal accumulation levels by molluscs ranked following the order of Cd > Cu > As > Zn > Pb > Cr, and the ecological risks introduced by heavy metals in different areas were in the order of Zhanjiang > Yangmao > Shantou > Shanhui. PMID:27126438

  18. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane-mediated surface functionalization of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and in vitro toxicity assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Shige Wang1, Shihui Wen2, Mingwu Shen2, Rui Guo2, Xueyan Cao2, Jianhua Wang3, Xiangyang Shi1,2,41State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, 2College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 4Centro de Química da Madeira, Universidade da Madeira, Campus da Penteada, Funchal, PortugalBackground: We report on aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS-mediated surface modification of nanohydroxyapatite with different surface functional groups for potential biomedical applications. In this study, nanohydroxyapatite covalently linked with APTS (n-HA-APTS was reacted with acetic anhydride or succinic anhydride to produce neutralized (n-HA-APTS.Ac or negatively charged (n-HA-APTS.SAH nanohydroxyapatite, respectively. Nanohydroxyapatite formed with amine, acetyl, and carboxyl groups was extensively characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements.Results: In vitro 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay revealed that the slight toxicity of the amine-functionalized n-HA-APTS could be eliminated by post-functionalization of APTS amines to form acetyl and carboxyl groups. Blood compatibility assessment demonstrated that the negligible hemolytic activity of the pristine nanohydroxyapatite particles did not appreciably change after APTS-mediated surface functionalization.Conclusion: APTS-mediated functionalization of nanohydroxyapatite with different surface groups may be useful for further functionalization of nanohydroxyapatite with biologically active materials, thereby providing possibilities for a broad range of

  19. Historical records from dated sediment cores reveal the multidecadal dynamic of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum in the Bay of Brest (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klouch, Khadidja Z; Schmidt, Sabine; Andrieux-Loyer, Françoise; Le Gac, Mickaël; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Qui-Minet, Zujaila N; Quéré, Julien; Bigeard, Estelle; Guillou, Laure; Siano, Raffaele

    2016-07-01

    The multiannual dynamic of the cyst-forming and toxic marine dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum was studied over a time scale of about 150 years by a paleoecological approach based on ancient DNA (aDNA) quantification and cyst revivification data obtained from two dated sediment cores of the Bay of Brest (Brittany, France). The first genetic traces of the species presence in the study area dated back to 1873 ± 6. Specific aDNA could be quantified by a newly developed real-time PCR assay in the upper core layers, in which the germination of the species (in up to 17-19-year-old sediments) was also obtained. In both cores studied, our quantitative paleogenetic data showed a statistically significant increasing trend in the abundance of A. minutum ITS1 rDNA copies over time, corroborating three decades of local plankton data that have documented an increasing trend in the species cell abundance. By comparison, paleogenetic data of the dinoflagellate Scrippsiella donghaienis did not show a coherent trend between the cores studied, supporting the hypothesis of the existence of a species-specific dynamic of A. minutum in the study area. This work contributes to the development of paleoecological research, further showing its potential for biogeographical, ecological and evolutionary studies on marine microbes. PMID:27162179

  20. Building Toxic Metal Characterization and Decontamination Report: Area 6, Building 914

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Industrial Hygiene

    2011-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to outline the toxic metal characterization and decontamination efforts in Area 6, Building 914. This includes the initial building inspection, the hotspot sampling, results/findings, building cleanup, and the verification sampling. Building 914 is a steel light frame building that was constructed in 1992. It is about 16,454 square feet, and five employees are assigned to this building. According to the building's floor plan blueprints, it could be inferred that this building was once a Wiremen/Lineman shop. In 2002-2004, the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office embarked on a broad characterization of beryllium (Be) surface concentrations throughout the North Las Vegas Facility, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), and ancillary facilities like the Special Technologies Laboratory, Remote Sensing Laboratory, etc. Building 914 was part of this characterization. The results of the 2002 study illustrated that the metal housekeeping limits were within acceptable limits and from a Be standpoint, the building was determined to be fit for occupancy. On March 2, 2011, based on a request from Building 914 users, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) Industrial Hygiene (IH) collected bulk samples from the southwest corner of Building 914 at heights above 6 feet where black dust had been noticed on this particular wall. IH conducted surface swipe sampling of the area and analyzed the samples for toxic metals, namely, beryllium (Be), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), and manganese (Mn). The sample results indicated values two to four times above the housekeeping threshold for Be, Cd, Cr, Pb, and Mn. Subsequently, the facility was closed and posted; the necessary personnel were notified; and controls were instituted for ingress and egress of the building. On March 17, 2011, IH performed an extensive sampling event involving the entire warehouse in accordance with NSTec Organization Procedure OP-P250

  1. Human Health Risk Assessment of Artisanal Miners Exposed to Toxic Chemicals in Water and Sediments in the Prestea Huni Valley District of Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiri, Samuel; Yeboah, Philip O.; Osae, Shiloh; Adu-kumi, Sam; Cobbina, Samuel J.; Armah, Frederick A.; Ason, Benjamin; Antwi, Edward; Quansah, Reginald

    2016-01-01

    A human health risk assessment of artisanal miners exposed to toxic metals in water bodies and sediments in the PresteaHuni Valley District of Ghana was carried out in this study, in line with US EPA risk assessment guidelines. A total of 70 water and 30 sediment samples were collected from surface water bodies in areas impacted by the operations of artisanal small-scale gold mines in the study area and analyzed for physico-chemical parameters such as pH, TDS, conductivity, turbidity as well as metals and metalloids such as As, Cd, Hg and Pb at CSIR—Water Research Institute using standard methods for the examination of wastewater as outlined by American Water Works Association (AWWA). The mean concentrations of As, Cd, Hg and Pb in water samples ranged from 15 μg/L to 325 μg/L (As), 0.17 μg/L to 340 μg/L (Cd), 0.17 μg/L to 122 μg/L (Pb) and 132 μg/L to 866 μg/L (Hg), respectively. These measured concentrations of arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were used as input parameters to calculate the cancer and non-cancer health risks from exposure to these metals in surface water bodies and sediments based on an occupational exposure scenario using central tendency exposure (CTE) and reasonable maximum exposure (RME) parameters. The results of the non-cancer human health risk assessment for small-scale miners working around river Anikoko expressed in terms of hazard quotients based on CTE parameters are as follows: 0.04 (Cd), 1.45 (Pb), 4.60 (Hg) and 1.98 (As); while cancer health risk faced by ASGM miners in Dumase exposed to As in River Mansi via oral ingestion of water is 3.1 × 10−3. The hazard quotient results obtained from this study in most cases were above the HQ guidance value of 1.0, furthermore the cancer health risk results were found to be higher than the USEPA guidance value of 1 × 10−4 to 1 × 10−6. These findings call for case-control epidemiological studies to establish the relationship between exposure to the

  2. Human Health Risk Assessment of Artisanal Miners Exposed to Toxic Chemicals in Water and Sediments in the PresteaHuni Valley District of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Obiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A human health risk assessment of artisanal miners exposed to toxic metals in water bodies and sediments in the PresteaHuni Valley District of Ghana was carried out in this study, in line with US EPA risk assessment guidelines. A total of 70 water and 30 sediment samples were collected from surface water bodies in areas impacted by the operations of artisanal small-scale gold mines in the study area and analyzed for physico-chemical parameters such as pH, TDS, conductivity, turbidity as well as metals and metalloids such as As, Cd, Hg and Pb at CSIR—Water Research Institute using standard methods for the examination of wastewater as outlined by American Water Works Association (AWWA. The mean concentrations of As, Cd, Hg and Pb in water samples ranged from 15 μg/L to 325 μg/L (As, 0.17 μg/L to 340 μg/L (Cd, 0.17 μg/L to 122 μg/L (Pb and 132 μg/L to 866 μg/L (Hg, respectively. These measured concentrations of arsenic (As, mercury (Hg, cadmium (Cd and lead (Pb were used as input parameters to calculate the cancer and non-cancer health risks from exposure to these metals in surface water bodies and sediments based on an occupational exposure scenario using central tendency exposure (CTE and reasonable maximum exposure (RME parameters. The results of the non-cancer human health risk assessment for small-scale miners working around river Anikoko expressed in terms of hazard quotients based on CTE parameters are as follows: 0.04 (Cd, 1.45 (Pb, 4.60 (Hg and 1.98 (As; while cancer health risk faced by ASGM miners in Dumase exposed to As in River Mansi via oral ingestion of water is 3.1 × 10−3. The hazard quotient results obtained from this study in most cases were above the HQ guidance value of 1.0, furthermore the cancer health risk results were found to be higher than the USEPA guidance value of 1 × 10−4 to 1 × 10−6. These findings call for case-control epidemiological studies to establish the relationship between exposure to the

  3. Human Health Risk Assessment of Artisanal Miners Exposed to Toxic Chemicals in Water and Sediments in the Prestea Huni Valley District of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiri, Samuel; Yeboah, Philip O; Osae, Shiloh; Adu-Kumi, Sam; Cobbina, Samuel J; Armah, Frederick A; Ason, Benjamin; Antwi, Edward; Quansah, Reginald

    2016-01-01

    A human health risk assessment of artisanal miners exposed to toxic metals in water bodies and sediments in the PresteaHuni Valley District of Ghana was carried out in this study, in line with US EPA risk assessment guidelines. A total of 70 water and 30 sediment samples were collected from surface water bodies in areas impacted by the operations of artisanal small-scale gold mines in the study area and analyzed for physico-chemical parameters such as pH, TDS, conductivity, turbidity as well as metals and metalloids such as As, Cd, Hg and Pb at CSIR-Water Research Institute using standard methods for the examination of wastewater as outlined by American Water Works Association (AWWA). The mean concentrations of As, Cd, Hg and Pb in water samples ranged from 15 μg/L to 325 μg/L (As), 0.17 μg/L to 340 μg/L (Cd), 0.17 μg/L to 122 μg/L (Pb) and 132 μg/L to 866 μg/L (Hg), respectively. These measured concentrations of arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were used as input parameters to calculate the cancer and non-cancer health risks from exposure to these metals in surface water bodies and sediments based on an occupational exposure scenario using central tendency exposure (CTE) and reasonable maximum exposure (RME) parameters. The results of the non-cancer human health risk assessment for small-scale miners working around river Anikoko expressed in terms of hazard quotients based on CTE parameters are as follows: 0.04 (Cd), 1.45 (Pb), 4.60 (Hg) and 1.98 (As); while cancer health risk faced by ASGM miners in Dumase exposed to As in River Mansi via oral ingestion of water is 3.1 × 10(-3). The hazard quotient results obtained from this study in most cases were above the HQ guidance value of 1.0, furthermore the cancer health risk results were found to be higher than the USEPA guidance value of 1 × 10(-4) to 1 × 10(-6). These findings call for case-control epidemiological studies to establish the relationship between exposure to the

  4. Toxic Metals Enrichment in the Surficial Sediments of a Eutrophic Tropical Estuary (Cochin Backwaters, Southwest Coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations and distributions of trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in surficial sediments of the Cochin backwaters were studied during both monsoon and pre-monsoon periods. Spatial variations were in accordance with textural charaterstics and organic matter content. A principal component analysis distinguished three zones with different metal accumulation capacity: (i highest levels in north estuary, (ii moderate levels in central zone, and (iii lowest levels in southern part. Trace metal enrichments are mainly due to anthropogenic contribution of industrial, domestic, and agricultural effluents, whose effect is enhanced by settling of metals due to organic flocculation and inorganic precipitation associated with salinity changes. Enrichments factors using Fe as a normalizer showed that metal contamination was the product of anthropogenic activities. An assessment of degree of pollution-categorized sediments as moderately polluted with Cu and Pb, moderately-to-heavily polluted with Zn, and heavily-to-extremely polluted with Cd. Concentrations at many sites largely exceed NOAA ERL (e.g., Cu, Cr, and Pb or ERM (e.g., Cd, Ni, and Zn. This means that adverse effects for benthic organisms are possible or even highly probable.

  5. Distribution and solid-phase speciation of toxic heavy metals of bed sediments of Bharali tributary of Brahmaputra River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Raza Rafiqul; Goswami, K G; Kusre, B C; Sarma, K P

    2011-06-01

    Heavy metal (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Cd) concentrations and their chemical speciations were investigated for the first time in bed sediments of Bharali River, a major tributary of the Brahmaputra River of the Eastern Himalayas. Levels of Fe, Mn, Pb, and Cd in the bed sediments were much below the average Indian rivers; however, Cu and Zn exhibit levels on the higher side. Enrichment factors (EF) of all metals was greater than 1 and a higher trend of EF was seen in the abandoned channel for most metals. Pb showed maximum EF of 32 at site near an urban center. The geoaccumulation indices indicate that Bharali river is moderately polluted. The metals speciations, done by a sequential extraction regime, show that Cd, Cu, and Pb exhibit considerable presence in the exchangeable and carbonate fraction, thereby showing higher mobility and bioavailability. On the other hand, Ni, Mn, and Fe exhibit greater presence in the residual fraction and Zn was dominant in the Fe-Mn oxide phase. Inter-species correlations at three sites did not show similar trends for metal pairs indicating potential variations in the contributing sources. PMID:20700650

  6. CHARACTERIZATION AND CAUSATION OF RUNOFF AND SEDIMENT VARIATION IN THE JIALINGJIANG RIVER BASIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Jialingjiang River basin is one of the main sediment contributing areas in the upper reaches of the Changjiang River. Great changes have taken place in the runoffand sediment discharge in recent years.Comparing the data of 1991-2003 with the data of 1954-1990, the annual runoff of the Jialingjiang River basin decreased by 23%, and the suspended sediment transport decreased by 74% or 105 million tons. The main factors affecting the reduction include a decrease in rainfall, sediment detention of hydraulic structures, soil and water conservation activities, sedimentation and sand dredging in the river channel. Thorough investigation and analysis of the contribution of each factor to the sediment decrease at Beibei Station was determined for the first time. The following are the contributing percentages for each factor: a decrease in runoff accounted for 32.9%; soil and water conservation measures accounted for 16.4%; sediment detention of hydraulic structures accounted for 30.5%;sedimentation, river channel sand dredging, and other factors accounted for 20.2%. These findings are very important for forecasting the trend of inflow sediment discharge variation.

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Four Gram-PositiveNickel-Tolerant Microorganisms from Contaminated Riparian Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Khijniak, Tatiana V.; Gentry, Terry J.; Novak, Michelle T.; Sowder, Andrew G.; Zhou, Jizhong Z.; Bertsch, PaulM.; Morris, Pamela J.

    2006-08-30

    Microbial communities from riparian sediments contaminatedwith high levels of Ni and U were examined for metal-tolerantmicroorganisms. Isolation of four aerobic Ni-tolerant, Gram-positiveheterotrophic bacteria indicated selection pressure from Ni. Theseisolates were identified as Arthrobacter oxydans NR-1, Streptomycesgalbus NR-2, Streptomyces aureofaciens NR-3, and Kitasatosporacystarginea NR-4 based on partial 16S rDNA sequences. A functional genemicroarray containing gene probes for functions associated withbiogeochemical cycling, metal homeostasis, and organic contaminantdegradation showed little overlap among the four isolates. Fifteen of thegenes were detected in all four isolates with only two of these relatedto metal resistance, specifically to tellurium. Each of the four isolatesalso displayed resistance to at least one of six antibiotics tested, withresistance to kanamycin, gentamycin, and ciprofloxacin observed in atleast two of the isolates. Further characterization of S. aureofaciensNR-3 and K. cystarginea NR-4 demonstrated that both isolates expressed Nitolerance constitutively. In addition, both were able to grow in higherconcentrations of Ni at pH 6 as compared to pH 7 (42.6 and 8.5 mM Ni atpH 6 and 7, respectively). Tolerance to Cd, Co, and Zn was also examinedin these two isolates; a similar pH-dependent metal tolerance wasobserved when grown with Co and Zn. Neither isolate was tolerant to Cd.These findings suggest that Ni is exerting a selection pressure at thissite for metal-resistant actinomycetes.

  8. Cloning, expression and characterization of a novel esterase from a South China Sea sediment metagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Fuchao; Chen, Huaxin; Zhao, Jin; Yan, Jinfei; Jiang, Peng; Li, Ronggui; Zhu, Baoli

    2015-07-01

    Lipolytic enzymes, including esterases and lipases, represent a group of hydrolases that catalyze the cleavage and formation of ester bonds. A novel esterase gene, scsEst01, was cloned from a South China Sea sediment metagenome. The scsEst01 gene consisted of 921 bp encoding 307 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence shared less than 90% identity with other lipolytic enzymes in the NCBI nonredundant protein database. ScsEst01 was successfully co-expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) with chaperones (dnaK-dnaJ-grpE) to prevent the formation of inclusion bodies. The recombinant protein was purified on an immobilized metal ion affinity column containing chelating Sepharose charged with Ni2+. The enzyme was characterized using p -nitrophenol butyrate as a substrate. ScsEst01 had the highest lipolytic activity at 35°C and pH 8.0, indicative of a meso-thermophilic alkaline esterase. ScsEst01 was thermostable at 20°C. The lipolytic activity of scsEst01 was strongly increased by Fe2+, Mn2+ and 1% Tween 80 or Tween 20.

  9. Size characterization by Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation of silica particles used as food additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Four types of SiO2 particles were characterized by SdFFF, PCS and EM techniques. •Clusters of 10 nm nanoparticles were found in some SiO2 samples. •A method was set up to extract SiO2 particles from food matrices. •The effects of the carrier solution composition on SdFFF separations were evaluated. •Particle size distributions were obtained from SiO2 particles extracted from foodstuffs. -- Abstract: Four types of SiO2, available on the market as additives in food and personal care products, were size characterized using Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF), SEM, TEM and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). The synergic use of the different analytical techniques made it possible, for some samples, to confirm the presence of primary nanoparticles (10 nm) organized in clusters or aggregates of different dimension and, for others, to discover that the available information is incomplete, particularly that regarding the presence of small particles. A protocol to extract the silica particles from a simple food matrix was set up, enriching (0.25%, w w−1) a nearly silica-free instant barley coffee powder with a known SiO2 sample. The SdFFF technique, in conjunction with SEM observations, made it possible to identify the added SiO2 particles and verify the new particle size distribution. The SiO2 content of different powdered foodstuffs was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS); the concentrations ranged between 0.006 and 0.35% (w w−1). The protocol to isolate the silica particles was so applied to the most SiO2-rich commercial products and the derived suspensions were separated by SdFFF; SEM and TEM observations supported the size analyses while GFAAS determinations on collected fractions permitted element identification

  10. Isolation and characterization of potential antibiotic producing actinomycetes from water and sediments of Lake Tana, Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gebreselema Gebreyohannes; Feleke Moges; Samuel Sahile; Nagappan Raja

    2013-01-01

    To isolate, evaluate and characterize potential antibiotic producing actinomycetes from water and sediments of Lake Tana, Ethiopia. Methods: A total of 31 strains of actinomycetes were isolated and tested against Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strains by primary screening. In the primary screening, 11 promising isolates were identified and subjected to solid state and submerged state fermentation methods to produce crude extracts. The fermented biomass was extracted by organic solvent extraction method and tested against bacterial strains by disc and agar well diffusion methods. The isolates were characterized by using morphological, physiological and biochemical methods. Results: The result obtained from agar well diffusion method was better than disc diffusion method. The crude extract showed higher inhibition zone against Gram positive bacteria than Gram negative bacteria. One-way analysis of variance confirmed most of the crude extracts were statistically significant at 95% confidence interval. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of crude extracts were 1.65 mg/mL and 3.30 mg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus, and 1.84 mg/mL and 3.80 mg/mL against Escherichia coli respectively. The growth of aerial and substrate mycelium varied in different culture media used. Most of the isolates were able to hydrolysis starch and urea; able to survive at 5% concentration of sodium chloride; optimum temperature for their growth was 30 °C. Conclusions: The results of the present study revealed that freshwater actinomycetes of Lake Tana appear to have immense potential as a source of antibacterial compounds.

  11. Re-Defining the Subsurface Biosphere: Characterization of Fungal Populations from Energy Limited Deep Marine Subsurface Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, B. K.; Ariza, M.; St. Peter, C.; Hoffman, C.; Edwards, K. J.; Mills, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    The detection and characterization of metabolically active fungal populations within the deep marine subsurface will alter current ecosystem models that are limited to bacterial and archaeal populations. Although marine fungi have been studied for over fifty years, a detailed description of fungal populations within the deep subsurface is lacking. Fungi possess metabolic pathways capable of utilizing previously considered non-bioavailable energy reserves. Therefore, metabolically active fungi would occupy a unique niche within subsurface ecosystems, with the potential to provide an organic carbon source for heterotrophic prokaryotic populations not currently being considered in subsurface energy budgets. Sediments from the South Pacific Gyre subsurface, one of the most energy-limited environments on Earth, were collected during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Anaerobic and aerobic sediment slurry cultures using fresh sediment began directly following the completion of the Expedition (December 2010). From these cultures, multiple fungal lineages have been isolated on several media types that vary in carbon concentrations. Physical growth parameters of these subsurface fungal isolates were determined and compared to previously characterized lineages. Additionally, the overall diversity of metabolically active and dormant fungal populations was determined using high throughput sequencing of nucleic acids extracted from in situ cryopreserved South Pacific Gyre sediments. This project provides a robust step in determining the importance and impact of fungal populations within the marine subsurface biosphere.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nano fibers for its application in the adsorption of toxic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of carbon nano fibers (CNF's) by diverse techniques as the electric arc, laser ablation, or chemical deposition in vapor phase, among other, they have been so far used from final of the 90's. However, the synthesis method by discharge Glow arc of alternating current and high frequency developed by Pacheco and collaborators, is a once alternative for its obtaining. In the plasma Application Laboratory (LAP) of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (INlN) it was designed and manufactured a reactor of alternating current and high frequency that produces a Glow arc able to synthesize carbon nano fibers. Its were carried out nano fibers synthesis with different catalysts to different proportions and with distinct conditions of vacuum pressure and methane flow until obtaining the best nano fibers samples and for it, this nano structures were characterized by Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray Diffraction, Raman spectrometry and EDS spectrometry. Once found the optimal conditions for the nano fibers production its were contaminated with NO2 toxic gas and it was determined if they present adsorption, for it was used the thermal gravimetric analysis technique. This work is divided in three parts, in the first one, conformed by the chapters 1, at the 3, they are considered the foundations of the carbon nano fibers, their history, their characteristics, growth mechanisms, synthesis techniques, the thermal gravimetric analysis principles and the adsorption properties of the nano fibers. In the second part, consistent of the chapters 4 and 5, the methodology of synthesis and characterization of the nano fibers is provided. Finally, in third part its were carried out the activation energy calculation, the adsorption of the CNF's is analyzed and the conclusions are carried out. The present study evaluates the adsorption of environmental gas pollutants as the nitrogen oxides on carbon nano fibers at environmental or near conditions. Also, they

  13. Isolation and characterization of a new Bacillus thuringiensis strain with a promising toxicity against Lepidopteran pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukedi, Hanen; Sellami, Sameh; Ktari, Sonia; Belguith-Ben Hassan, Najeh; Sellami-Boudawara, Tahya; Tounsi, Slim; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna

    2016-01-01

    Insecticides derived from Bacillus thuringiensis are gaining worldwide importance as environmentally desirable alternatives to chemicals for the control of pests in public health and agriculture. Isolation and characterization of new strains with higher and broader spectrum of activity is an ever growing field. In the present work, a novel Tunisian B. thuringiensis isolate named BLB459 was characterized and electrophoresis assay showed that among a collection of 200 B. thuringiensis strains, the plasmid profile of BLB459 was distinctive. SmaI-PFGE typing confirmed the uniqueness of the DNA pattern of this strain, compared with BUPM95 and HD1 reference strains. PCR and sequencing assays revealed that BLB459 harbored three cry genes (cry30, cry40 and cry54) corresponding to the obtained molecular sizes in the protein pattern. Interestingly, PCR-RFLP assay demonstrated the originality of the BLB459 cry30-type gene compared to the other published cry30 genes. Insecticidal bioassays showed that BLB459 spore-crystal suspension was highly toxic to both Ephestia kuehniella and Spodoptera littoralis with LC50 values of about 64 (53-75) and 80 (69-91) μg of toxin cm(-2), respectively, comparing with that of the commercial strain HD1 used as reference. Important histopathological effects of BLB459 δ-endotoxins on the two tested larvae midguts were detected, traduced by the vacuolization of the apical cells, the damage of microvilli, and the disruption of epithelial cells. These results proved that BLB459 strain could be of a great interest for lepidopteran biocontrol. PMID:27242138

  14. Conjugation, characterization and toxicity of lipophosphoglycan-polyacrylic acid conjugate for vaccination against leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topuzogullari, Murat; Cakir Koc, Rabia; Dincer Isoglu, Sevil; Bagirova, Melahat; Akdeste, Zeynep; Elcicek, Serhat; Oztel, Olga N; Yesilkir Baydar, Serap; Canim Ates, Sezen; Allahverdiyev, Adil M

    2013-01-01

    Research on the conjugates of synthetic polyelectrolytes with antigenic molecules, such as proteins, peptides, or carbohydrates, is an attractive area due to their highly immunogenic character in comparison to classical adjuvants. For example, polyacrylic acid (PAA) is a weak polyelectrolyte and has been used in several biomedical applications such as immunological studies, drug delivery, and enzyme immobilization. However, to our knowledge, there are no studies that document immune-stimulant properties of PAA in Leishmania infection. Therefore, we aimed to develop a potential vaccine candidate against leishmaniasis by covalently conjugating PAA with an immunologically vital molecule of lipophosphoglycan (LPG) found in Leishmania parasites. In the study, LPG and PAA were conjugated by a multi-step procedure, and final products were analyzed with GPC and MALDI-TOF MS techniques. In cytotoxicity experiments, LPG-PAA conjugates did not indicate toxic effects on L929 and J774 murine macrophage cells. We assume that LPG-PAA conjugate can be a potential vaccine candidate, and will be immunologically characterized in further studies to prove its potential. PMID:23731716

  15. Characterization of diagenetic siderites formed in recent and ancient ferruginous sediments of Lake Towuti, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillemin, Aurele; Kallmeyer, Jens; Wagner, Dirk; Kemnitz, Helga; Wirth, Richard; Luecke, Andreas; Mayr, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Authigenic minerals in lacustrine settings can be formed in the water column and within the sediment, abiotically and/or triggered by biological activity. Such minerals have been used as paleosalinity and paleoproductivity proxies, reflecting trophic state, and/or early diagenetic conditions. They have also been considered as potential biosignatures of past and present microbial activity. Here we present a study from Lake Towuti, a deep tectonic basin in Sulawesi, Indonesia. Its geographic position makes it a prime location to record paleoclimatic changes in the tropical Western Pacific warm pool in its sedimentary sequence. The ultramafic rocks and surrounding lateritic soils in the catchment area supply considerable amounts of iron and other metals to the lake. These elements further restrain primary productivity along with the development of specific microbial metabolic pathways involved in early diagenesis. Lake Towuti is stratified with anoxic conditions below 130 m, allowing metal reduction processes to take place in the hypolimnion. The extreme scarcity of sulphate and nitrate/nitrite make Lake Towuti's bottom waters a modern analogue for the Archaean Ocean. It was therefore chosen as a drilling target by the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP). In May to July 2015, the Towuti Drilling Project recovered a total >1000 m of sediment core from three drilling sites, including a 114 m long core drilled with a contamination tracer dedicated to geomicrobiological studies. Heavy mineral fractions were extracted from core catcher samples and siderite crystals (FeCO3) were selected from different depths. Characterization of their habitus was achieved via SEM and TEM imaging. Preliminary results show that siderites grow from amorphous into nanocrystalline phases and form twinned aggregates developing into mosaic monocrystals with depth. Gradual filling of vugs and microporosity were observed along with inclusions of magnetite nanocrystals. Work in

  16. Comprehensive assessment of toxic metals in urban and suburban street deposited sediments (SDSs) in the biggest metropolitan area of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of toxic metals, i.e. As, Hg, Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr, in urban and suburban SDSs were investigated comparatively in the biggest metropolitan area of China, Shanghai. Results showed that all of the metals except As were accumulated greatly, much higher than background values. Geo-accumulation index indicated that metal contamination in urban SDSs was generally heavier than that in suburban SDSs. Potential ecological risk index demonstrated that overall risks caused by metals were considerable. Cd contributed 52% to the overall risk. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that in urban SDSs, Zn, Ni, Cd, Pb, Cu and Cr were related to traffic and industry; coal combustion led to elevated levels of Hg; soil parent materials controlled As contents. In suburban SDSs, Pb, Cu, As and Cd largely originated from traffic pollution; Zn, Ni and Cr were associated with industrial contaminants; Hg was mainly from domestic solid waste. - Sources and contamination characteristics of toxic metals in urban and suburban SDSs were different due to the varied levels of human activity intensity.

  17. Characterization of uranium and plutonium in surface-waters and sediments collected at the Rocky Flats Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was initiated to characterize actinides in environmental samples collected at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) measurement techniques were used to measure the plutonium and uranium content of water and sediment samples collected from the ponds used to control surface-waters on-site at RFP. TIMS was also used to separate the uranium into anthropogenic and naturally occurring components. The results of these studies are presented

  18. Mining-related sediment and soil contamination in a large Superfund site: Characterization, habitat implications, and remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.; Drake, K. D.

    2016-01-01

    Historical mining activity (1850–1970) in the now inactive Tri-State Mining District provided an ongoing source of lead and zinc to the environment including the US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site located in Cherokee County, southeast Kansas, USA. The resultant contamination adversely affected biota and caused human health problems and risks. Remediation in the Superfund site requires an understanding of the magnitude and extent of contamination. To provide some of the required information, a series of sediment and soil investigations were conducted in and near the Superfund site to characterize lead and zinc contamination in the aquatic and floodplain environments along the main-stem Spring River and its major tributaries. In the Superfund site, the most pronounced lead and zinc contamination, with concentrations that far exceed sediment quality guidelines associated with potential adverse biological effects, was measured for streambed sediments and floodplain soils located within or downstream from the most intensive mining-affected areas. Tributary streambeds and floodplains in affected areas are heavily contaminated with some sites having lead and zinc concentrations that are an order of magnitude (or more) greater than the sediment quality guidelines. For the main-stem Spring River, the streambed is contaminated but the floodplain is mostly uncontaminated. Measured lead and zinc concentrations in streambed sediments, lakebed sediments, and floodplain soils documented a persistence of the post-mining contamination on a decadal timescale. These results provide a basis for the prioritization, development, and implementation of plans to remediate contamination in the affected aquatic and floodplain environments within the Superfund site.

  19. Characterization of submarine canyon bathymetries in northern Ionian Sea, Italy, using sediment geochemical variation induced by transportation distance and basin depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesco, Perri; Tohru, Ohta; Salvatore, Critelli

    2015-07-01

    Geochemical data of marine mud sediments collected from the Esaro, Neto and Corigliano canyons in the northern Ionian Sea (southern Italy) were investigated in order to characterize canyon bathymetry types. Mud sample compositions analyzed by the principal component analysis (PCA) provided useful information for the morphology of the depositional area of the northern Ionian Sea. The use of sediment geochemical data as well as transportation distance and depth as input variables for PCA enabled the extraction of following latent variables: basin depth (PC1), sedimentation rate (PC2) and transportation distance (PC3). Based on these results, we further developed geochemical indices that can estimate basin depth (F1), sedimentation rate (F2) and transportation distance (F3); these functions can be solely calculated from the elemental concentration data of the mud samples. Since these F1, F2 and F3 functions are mathematically independent variables, they facilitate more precise characterization of individual canyon types. That is, the Esaro Canyon is regarded as a sediment-starved deep canyon characterized by a single source area; the Neto Canyon can be seen as a deeply sloped submarine apron system and sediments are mainly supplied by the sediment gravity flows; the Corigliano Canyon is characterized by multiple sources and moderately sloped system, whose sediments disperse mainly by traction currents. These interpretations are concordant with the basin bathymetry of the studied area. Therefore, F1, F2 and F3 functions might be applicable to any oceanic basins.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Four Gram-Positive Nickel-Tolerant Microorganisms from Contaminated Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nostrand, J. D.; Khijniak, T. V.; Gentry, T. J.; Novak, M. T.; Sowder, A. G.; Zhou, J. Z.; Bertsch, P. M.; Morris, P. J.

    2007-01-01

    Microbial communities from riparian sediments contaminated with high levels of Ni and U were examined for metal-tolerant microorganisms. Isolation of four aerobic Ni-tolerant, Gram-positive heterotrophic bacteria indicated selection pressure from Ni. These isolates were identified as Arthrobacter oxydans NR-1, Streptomyces galbus NR-2, Streptomyces aureofaciens NR-3, and Kitasatospora cystarginea NR-4 based on partial 16S rDNA sequences. A functional gene microarray containing gene probes for functions associated with biogeochemical cycling, metal homeostasis, and organic contaminant degradation showed little overlap among the four isolates. Fifteen of the genes were detected in all four isolates with only two of these related to metal resistance, specifically to tellurium. Each of the four isolates also displayed resistance to at least one of six antibiotics tested, with resistance to kanamycin, gentamycin, and ciprofloxacin observed in at least two of the isolates. Further characterization of S. aureofaciens NR-3 and K. cystarginea NR-4 demonstrated that both isolates expressed Ni tolerance constitutively. In addition, both were able to grow in higher concentrations of Ni at pH 6 as compared with pH 7 (42.6 and 8.5 mM Ni at pH 6 and 7, respectively). Tolerance to Cd, Co, and Zn was also examined in these two isolates; a similar pH-dependent metal tolerance was observed when grown with Co and Zn. Neither isolate was tolerant to Cd. These findings suggest that Ni is exerting a selection pressure at this site for metal-resistant actinomycetes.

  1. Concentrations and chemical forms of potentially toxic metals in road-deposited sediments from different zones of Hangzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Mingkui; WANG Hao

    2009-01-01

    The 25 road-deposited sediments were collected from five different land-use zones (industrial, residential, commercial, park, and countryside) in Hangzhou, China. The concentrations of metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in these samples were determined using the ICP-AES after digestion with the mixture of HNO3-HF-HCl (aqua regia), and chemically fractionated using the modified BCR (the European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure. The highest metal concentration level was detected in the sample from industrial zone and commercial zone having heavy traffic. While the lowest metal level was noted in the street dust sample from residential zone, park, and countryside zone. The mobility sequence based on the sum of the BCR sequential extraction stages was: Zn (80.28%), Pb (78.68%), Cd (77.66%) > Cu (73.34%) > Mn (67.92%) > Co (41.66%) > Ni (30.36%) > Cr (21.56%), Fe (20.86%). Correlation analysis and principal component analysis were applied to the data matrix to evaluate the analytical results and to identify the possible pollution sources of metals. Factor analysis showed that these areas were mainly contaminated by three sources, namely lithology, traffic, and industry.

  2. Isolation and characterization of toxic proteins from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, S V; Laure, C J; Giglio, J R

    1983-01-01

    Through gel filtration on Sephadex G-25 and chromatography on CM-cellulose-52 five toxic proteins, electrophoretically pure, were isolated from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus and partially characterized, as follows: 1. Toxin T1 VIII, with 61 amino acid residues, mol. wt 6675 and amino terminal sequence Lys-Glx-Gly-Tyr-Leu-Met-Asx-His-Glx-Gly-Cys-Lys-; 2. Toxin T1VI with amino acid residues, mol. wt. 7549 and amino terminal sequence Gly-His-Phe-Gly-Lys; 3. Toxin T2III(I), with 63 amino acid residues, mol. wt. 7216 and amino terminal sequence Lys-Lys-Asx-Gly-Tyr-Pro-Val-Cys-Cys-Ser-; 4. Toxin T2IV, which is apparently identical to toxin T1VIII above, since it showed the same elution volume in chromatography on CM-cellulose-52, the same N-terminal Lys and the same electrophoretic mobility as T1VIII; 5. Toxin T1IV, a not previously described toxin from the venom of T. serrulatus, with 45 amino acid residues, mol. wt. 5188 and amino terminal sequence Lys-Glx-Gly-Tyr-Leu-, identical to the first five residues of T1VIII, although with a lower molecular weight. The pharmacological study of T1VIII in guinea pig vas deferens showed a pre-junctional sensitizing action, evidenced by a decrease of the dose-response curves to adrenaline and acetylcholine, with no increase of the maximum. This effect may be due to the liberation of noradrenaline. PMID:6857710

  3. Limitations of toxicity characterization in life cycle assessment: Can adverse outcome pathways provide a new foundation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Kurt A; Collier, Zachary A; Mayo, Michael L; Stanley, Jacob K; Gong, Ping; Chappell, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has considerable merit for holistic evaluation of product planning, development, production, and disposal, with the inherent benefit of providing a forecast of potential health and environmental impacts. However, a technical review of current life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) methods revealed limitations within the biological effects assessment protocols, including: simplistic assessment approaches and models; an inability to integrate emerging types of toxicity data; a reliance on linear impact assessment models; a lack of methods to mitigate uncertainty; and no explicit consideration of effects in species of concern. The purpose of the current study is to demonstrate that a new concept in toxicological and regulatory assessment, the adverse outcome pathway (AOP), has many useful attributes of potential use to ameliorate many of these problems, to expand data utility and model robustness, and to enable more accurate and defensible biological effects assessments within LCIA. Background, context, and examples have been provided to demonstrate these potential benefits. We additionally propose that these benefits can be most effectively realized through development of quantitative AOPs (qAOPs) crafted to meet the needs of the LCIA framework. As a means to stimulate qAOP research and development in support of LCIA, we propose 3 conceptual classes of qAOP, each with unique inherent attributes for supporting LCIA: 1) mechanistic, including computational toxicology models; 2) probabilistic, including Bayesian networks and supervised machine learning models; and 3) weight of evidence, including models built using decision-analytic methods. Overall, we have highlighted a number of potential applications of qAOPs that can refine and add value to LCIA. As the AOP concept and support framework matures, we see the potential for qAOPs to serve a foundational role for next-generation effects characterization within LCIA. Integr Environ Assess Manag

  4. NEW GIS WATERSHED ANALYSIS TOOLS FOR SOIL CHARACTERIZATION AND EROSION AND SEDIMENTATION MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive procedure for computing soil erosion and sediment delivery metrics has been developed which utilizes a suite of automated scripts and a pair of processing-intensive executable programs operating on a personal computer platform.

  5. Microbial toxicity and characterization of DNAN (bio)transformation product mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Christopher I; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Alvarez-Nieto, Cristina; Abrell, Leif; Chorover, Jon; Field, Jim A

    2016-07-01

    2,4-Dinitroanisole (DNAN) is an emerging insensitive munitions compound. It undergoes rapid (bio)transformation in soils and anaerobic sludge. The primary transformation pathway catalyzed by a combination of biotic and abiotic factors is nitrogroup reduction followed by coupling of reactive intermediates to form azo-dimers. Additional pathways include N-acetylation and O-demethoxylation. Toxicity due to (bio)transformation products of DNAN has received little attention. In this study, the toxicity of DNAN (bio)transformation monomer products and azo-dimer and trimer surrogates to acetoclastic methanogens and the marine bioluminescent bacterium, Allivibrio fischeri, were evaluated. Methanogens were severely inhibited by 3-nitro-4-methoxyaniline (MENA), with a 50%-inhibiting concentration (IC50) of 25 μM, which is more toxic than DNAN with the same assay, but posed a lower toxicity to Allivibrio fischeri (IC50 = 219 μM). On the other hand, N-(5-amino-2-methoxyphenyl) acetamide (Ac-DAAN) was the least inhibitory test-compound for both microbial targets. Azo-dimer and trimer surrogates were very highly toxic to both microbial systems, with a toxicity similar or stronger than that of DNAN. A semi-quantitative LC-QTOF-MS method was employed to determine product mixture profiles at different stages of biotransformation, and compared with the microbial toxicity of the product-mixtures formed. Methanogenic toxicity increased due to putative reactive nitroso-intermediates as DNAN was reduced. However, the inhibition later attenuated as dimers became the predominant products in the mixtures. In contrast, A. fischeri tolerated the initial biotransformation products but were highly inhibited by the predominant azo-dimer products formed at longer incubation times, suggesting these ultimate products are more toxic than DNAN. PMID:27085064

  6. Characterization of federated oil fractions used for the PTAC project to study the petroleum fraction-specific toxicity to soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1998, the Petroleum Technology Alliance of Canada (PTAC) and the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) launched an important research project for the oil and gas industry entitled A Fraction-Specific Toxicity and Derivation of Recommended Soil Quality Guidelines for Crude Oil in Agricultural Soils. The objective was to generate useful and relevant data that could be used to develop soil quality guidelines for petroleum hydrocarbon residuals in agricultural soils. The oil used in the study was Federated crude oil which was fractionated into four fractions using a distillation method. The fraction-based approach was used to support ecologically-relevant, risk-based, soil quality criteria for the protection of environmental health. This paper presented the nominal carbon number and boiling point ranges of these fractions and described the distillation procedures for producing the fractions from the Federated crude oil. The paper also presented the detailed chemical characterization results of each distillation fraction. The toxicity of the crude oil mixture to plants and soil invertebrates was also assessed using standardized toxicity tests. Tests were also conducted to assess the toxicity of fractions of the crude oil and the toxic interactions of the fractions responsible for a significant proportion of the toxicity. Phase 2 of the project was designed to determine if hydrocarbon residuals exceeding 1000 μg/g and weathered for short or long periods of time, posed an ecotoxicological risk or impaired soil physical, chemical and biological properties such that productivity of the agricultural soils was compromised. The objectives of phase 2 were to amend differently textured soils in field plots at sites with fresh crude oil and to monitor their toxicity to terrestrial organisms using laboratory-based ecotoxicity tests. The study showed that because of the nature of the chemical composition of hydrocarbons (such as boiling points, nominal carbon range

  7. Hydrogeophysical characterization of shallow unconsolidated sediments for the artificial groundwater recharge in a water curtain cultivation area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jehyun; Hwang, Seho; Won, Byeongho; Kim, Yongcheol

    2013-04-01

    A water curtain cultivation system is usually used to offer a stable heat source using a geothermal heat of groundwater. However, it may cause groundwater drawdown by an excessive use of groundwater such as over-pumping. Therefore, as part of an effort to develop a sustainable water curtain system, artificial groundwater recharge is projected to minimize groundwater shortage problem and recover groundwater level. Geophysical approaches are systematically applied to characterize unconsolidated sediments and riverside porous aquifers for the artificial groundwater recharge in a water curtain cultivation area. Resistivity survey is applied to map the distribution of subsurface structure, especially unconsolidated sediments. A series of test holes are drilled, and water level, temperature, and groundwater electrical conductivity are monitored to characterize hydrogeological properties of the site. The natural gamma and induction profiles enable us to estimate stratigraphic cross section and interpret inter-borehole. Borehole compensated neutron porosity is derived for a small-diameter, dual-detector neutron logs. Consequently, geophysical methods could enhance knowledge of the physical properties of unconsolidated sediments, and they are expected to evaluate injection feasibility of artificial groundwater recharge systems to the sustainable water resource management.

  8. Metabolic disruption due to contaminant exposure (Characterizing the toxicity of metabolic disruptors in juvenile chinook)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is an ongoing series of studies to examine the toxicity of various common contaminants that have the potential to affect metabolic homeostasis in salmon. We...

  9. Electrophoretic Extraction and Proteomic Characterization of Proteins Buried in Marine Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli K. Moore

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Proteins are the largest defined molecular component of marine organic nitrogen, and hydrolysable amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, are important components of particulate nitrogen in marine sediments. In oceanic systems, the largest contributors are phytoplankton proteins, which have been tracked from newly produced bloom material through the water column to surface sediments in the Bering Sea, but it is not known if proteins buried deeper in sediment systems can be identified with confidence. Electrophoretic gel protein extraction methods followed by proteomic mass spectrometry and database searching were used as the methodology to identify buried phytoplankton proteins in sediments from the 8–10 cm section of a Bering Sea sediment core. More peptides and proteins were identified using an SDS-PAGE tube gel than a standard 1D flat gel or digesting the sediment directly with trypsin. The majority of proteins identified correlated to the marine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana, rather than bacterial protein sequences, indicating an algal source not only dominates the input, but also the preserved protein fraction. Abundant RuBisCO and fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c binding proteins were identified, supporting algal sources of these proteins and reinforcing the proposed mechanisms that might protect proteins for long time periods. Some preserved peptides were identified in unexpected gel molecular weight ranges, indicating that some structural changes or charge alteration influenced the mobility of these products during electrophoresis isolation. Identifying buried photosystem proteins suggests that algal particulate matter is a significant fraction of the preserved organic carbon and nitrogen pools in marine sediments.

  10. Characterization of anaerobic chloroethene-dehalogenating activity in several subsurface sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skeen, R.S.; Gao, J.; Hooker, B.S.; Quesenberry, R.D.

    1996-11-01

    Anaerobic microcosms of subsurface soils from four locations were used to investigate the separate effects of several electron donors on tetrachloroethylene (PCE) dechlorination activity. The substrates tested were methanol, formate, lactate, acetate, and sucrose. Various levels of sulfate-reducing, acetogenic, fermentative, and methanogenic activity were observed in all sediments. PCE dechlorination was detected in all microcosms, but the amount of dehalogenation varied by several orders of magnitude. Trichloroethylene was the primary dehalogenation product; however, small amounts of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride were also detected in several microcosms. Lactate-amended microcosms showed large amounts of dehalogenation. in three of the four sediments. One of the two sediments which showed positive activity with lactate also had large amounts of delialogenation with methanol. Sucrose, formate, and acetate also stimulated large amounts of delialogenation in one sediment that showed activity with lactate. These results suggest that lactate may be an appropriate substrate for screening sediments for PCE or TCE delialogenation activity, but that the microbial response is not sufficient for complete in situ bioremediation. A detailed study of the Victoria activity revealed that delialogenation rates were more similar to the Cornell culture than to rates measured for methanogens, or a methanol-enriched sediment culture. This may suggest that these sediments contain a highly efficient delialogenation activity similar to the Cornell culture. This assertion is supported further by the fact that an average of 3% of added reducing equivalents could be diverted to dehalogenation in tests which were conducted using PCE-saturated hexadecane as a constant source of PCE during incubation. Further evidence is needed to confirm this premise. The application of these results to in situ bioremediation of highly contaminated areas are discussed.

  11. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments from C Waste Management Area: Investigation of the C-152 Transfer Line Leak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Lanigan, David C.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Clayton, Ray E.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Iovin, Cristian; Clayton, Eric T.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Orr, Robert D.

    2008-09-11

    The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in January 2007. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within waste management area (WMA) C. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physiochemical characterization data compiled on vadose zone sediment recovered from direct-push samples collected around the site of an unplanned release (UPR), UPR-200-E-82, adjacent to the 241-C-152 Diversion Box located in WMA C.

  12. Sediment characterization in intertidal zone of the Bourgneuf bay using the Automatic Modified Gaussian Model (AMGM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpoorter, C.; Carrère, V.; Combe, J.-P.; Le Corre, L.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding of the uppermost layer of cohesive sediment beds provides important clues for predicting future sediment behaviours. Sediment consolidation, grain size, water content and biological slimes (EPS: extracellular polymeric substances) were found to be significant factors influencing erosion resistance. The surface spectral signatures of mudflat sediments reflect such bio-geophysical parameters. The overall shape of the spectrum, also called a continuum, is a function of grain size and moisture content. Composition translates into specific absorption features. Finally, the chlorophyll-a concentration derived from the strength of the absorption at 675 nm, is a good proxy for biofilm biomass. Bourgneuf Bay site, south of the Loire river estuary, France, was chosen to represent a range of physical and biological influences on sediment erodability. Field spectral measurements and samples of sediments were collected during various field campaigns. An ASD Fieldspec 3 spectroradiometer was used to produce sediment reflectance hyperspectra in the wavelength range 350-2500 nm. We have developed an automatic procedure based on the Modified Gaussian Model that uses, as the first step, the Spectroscopic Derivative Analysis (SDA) to extract from spectra the bio-geophysical properties on mudflat sediments (Verpoorter et al., 2007). This AMGM algorithm is a powerfull tool to deconvolve spectra into two components, first gaussian curves for the absorptions bands, and second a straight line in the wavenumber range for the continuum. We are investigating the possibility of including other approaches, as the inverse gaussian band centred on 2800 nm initially developed by Whiting et al., (2006) to estimate water content. Additionally, soils samples were analysed to determine moisture content, grain size (laser grain size analyses), organic matter content, carbonate content (calcimetry) and clay content. X-ray diffraction analysis was performed on selected non

  13. Integrating mercury injection and nitrogen adsorption data to characterize marine sediment pore systems: An example from the Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, H.; Thomas, B.

    2013-12-01

    Fine-grained, clay-rich marine sediments typically exhibit complex pore geometries due to the presence of high-aspect-ratio clay particles, nannofossils, and diagenetically altered grain fragments. The pore systems in these sediments have a wide range of shapes and may contain significant pore volume in mesopores (1-25 nm radius) and micropores (pore size measurements difficult, even in samples with high porosity. Porosity values from mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) measurements performed on samples from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Sites C0011, C0012, and C0018 in the Nankai Trough offshore Japan were compared to porosity determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in the laboratory. The MICP porosities were systematically lower than the NMR porosities by up to 26% of the NMR porosity value. This porosity mismatch is due to the presence of pores with radii smaller than the effective lower limit of MICP measurements, which is 10-40 nm for this data set. Nitrogen gas adsorption offers a means to characterize pores between ~0.87 nm and ~100 nm radius, thus measuring the portion of the pore size distribution not investigated by MICP measurements. Combining MICP and nitrogen gas adsorption data yields a more complete characterization of the pore system of marine sediments. Merged MICP and nitrogen gas adsorption data obtained for the Nankai Trough samples yield porosity values that more accurately match the NMR porosity values, indicating that the entire pore space of the samples can be measured by a combination of the two techniques. These samples possess significant quantities of porosity below the resolution of MICP (>10% of pore volume), even in samples with porosity exceeding 65%. This work illustrates the complexity of marine sediment pore systems even at shallow depths of burial, and provides a new method for assessing pore sizes in scientific ocean drilling studies.

  14. Characterization of arsenic-contaminated aquifer sediments from eastern Croatia by ion microbeam, PIXE and ICP-OES techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •ICP-OES and PIXE used in the characterization of As-contaminated sediments. •Observed high correlations between the results obtained by those techniques. •Discrepancies observed for Mn, and for the highest As concentrations. •Microbeam analyses showed As association with sulphides and iron. -- Abstract: Groundwater arsenic contamination has been evidenced in eastern Croatia and hydrochemical results suggest that the occurrence of arsenic in the groundwater depends on the local geology, hydrogeology, and geochemical characteristics of the aquifer. In order to perform the sediment characterization and to investigate arsenic association with the other elements in the sediments, 10 samples from two boreholes (PVc-3 and Gundinci 1) in eastern Croatia were analyzed using two techniques: PIXE (without sample pre-treatment) and ICP-OES (after digestion), as well by ion microbeam analyses. The results of the PIXE and ICP-OES techniques showed quite good agreement; however, greater discrepancies were observed at the higher arsenic and manganese mass ratios. According to both techniques, higher As mass ratios were observed in the sediments from the PVc-3 core (up to 651 mg/kg and 491 mg/kg using PIXE and ICP-OES analyses respectively) than from the Gundinci 1 core (up to 60 mg/kg using both techniques). Although arsenic association with Fe is expected, no correlation was observed. The microbeam analyses demonstrated that arsenic is associated with sulphides and iron in the most As-contaminated sample from the PVc-3 core, while this relationship was not evident in the most As-contaminated sample from the Gundinci 1 borehole

  15. Relating groundwater and sediment chemistry to microbial characterization at a BTEX-contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Center for Manufacturing Science is investigating bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon at a site in Belleville, Michigan. As part of this study we examined the microbial communities to help elucidate biodegradative processes currently active at the site. We observed high densities of aerobic hydrocarbon degraders and denitrifiers in the less-contaminated sediments. Low densities of iron and sulfate reducers were measured in the same sediments. In contrast, the highly-contaminated sediments showed low densities of aerobic hydrocarbon degraders and denitrifiers and high densities of iron and sulfate reducers. Methanogens were also found in these highly-contaminated sediments. These contaminated sediments also showed a higher biomass, by phospholipid fatty acids, and greater ratios of phospholipid fatty acids which indicate stress within the microbial community. Aquifer chemistry analyses indicated that the more-contaminated area was more reduced and had lower sulfate than the less-contaminated area. These conditions suggest that the subsurface environment at the highly-contaminated area had progressed into sulfate reduction and methanogensis. The less-contaminated area, although less reduced, also appeared to be progressing into primarily iron- and sulfate-reducing microbial communities. The proposed treatment to stimulate bioremediation includes addition of oxygen and nitrate. Groundwater chemistry and microbial analyses revealed significant differences resulted from the injection of dissolved oxygen and nitrate in the subsurface. These differences included increases in pH and Eh and large decreases in BTEX, dissolved iron, and sulfate concentrations at the injection well

  16. PCB congener sorption to carbonaceous sediment components: Macroscopic comparison and characterization of sorption kinetics and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to sediment is a key process in determining their mobility, bioavailability, and chemical decomposition in aquatic environments. In order to examine the validity of currently used interpretation approaches for PCBs sorption, comparative results on 2-chlorobiphenyl sorption to carbonaceous components in sediments (activated carbon, carbon black, coal, soot, graphite, flyash, wood) were macroscopically correlated with the structural, morphological, crystallographic, and compositional properties of the carbonaceous components. Since the Freundlich sorption constant, KF (L kg-1) spanned several orders of magnitude, ranging from log KF of 6.13-5.27 for activated carbon, 5.04 for carbon black, 3.83 for coal to 3.08 for wood, organic carbon partitioning approach should be more specifically categorized, considering the various forms, nature and origins of organic carbon in sediment. Sorption rate constants and fraction parameters, which were numerically defined from empirical kinetic model with fast and slow sorption fractions, were closely related to the physicochemical properties of the carbonaceous components. Sorption interpretation approaches with a specific property and viewpoint, such as organic carbon partitioning, soot carbon distribution, or surface area correlation, did not properly explain the overall results on sorption capacity, fast and slow sorption kinetics, and partitioning coefficient. It is also important to emphasize the heterogeneous nature of sediment and the difficulties of encompassing the partitioning among its carbonaceous components.

  17. Characterizing long-term hydrologic-response and sediment-transport for the R-5 catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, Christopher S; Loague, Keith

    2008-01-01

    Recently there have been several calls to establish long-term data collection networks to monitor near-surface hydrologic response and landscape evolution. The focus of this paper is a long-term dataset from the International Hydrologic Decade (1965-1974). The small upland catchment, known as R-5, located near Chickasha, Olahoma, has been the subject of considerable attention within the event-based hydrologic modeling community for more than 30 yr. Here, for the first time, 8 yr of continuous near-surface hydrologic-response and sediment-transport data are analyzed to show trends in the catchment's long-term behavior. The datasets include precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, soil-water content, infiltration, water discharge, and sediment discharge. Potential and actual evapotranspiration rates were estimated and used to calculate an average annual water balance for the catchment. Findings include, for example, that rainfall intensity rarely exceeds the threshold for Horton-type runoff, soil-water content is both spatially and temporally variable, and the water and sediment discharge rates are positively correlated. The R-5 data provide a unique opportunity to test (and refine) process-based models of continuous hydrologic response and sediment transport at the catchment scale for applications in the emerging fields of hydroecology and hydrogeomorphology. PMID:18948471

  18. Oil characterization and distribution in shoreline sediments of Pensacola Bay, Florida following the Deepwater Horizon spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrier islands of Northwest Florida were heavily oiled during the Deepwater Horizon spill, but less is known about the impacts to the shorelines of the associated estuaries. Shoreline sediment oiling was investigated at 18 sites within the Pensacola Bay, Florida system prior to...

  19. Geochemistry and mineralogy approaches to characterize brick and its lake sediments sources: Antioch Roman City (Southern Turkey)

    OpenAIRE

    El Ouahabi, Meriam; Hubert, Aurelia; Benjelloun, Yacine; Chene, Grégoire; Strivay, David; De Sigoyer, Julia; Pamir, Hatice; Karabacak, Volkan; FAGEL, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The Roman aqueduct of Antioch-on-the-Orontes (Southern Turkey) is situated close to the Antioch city. This last is located near the Amik Lake (Lake of Antioch) and close to the junction between the active Dead Sea fault and the East Anatolian fault. During the Roman period, the Amik Plain was more densely occupied than at any time in its history [1]. The study focuses on the bricks and the lake sediments characterization in order to determine the source area as well as the technical productio...

  20. Characterizing Lacustrine Sediment that Records the Matuyama/Brunhes Polarity Transition at Bishop, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Joseph; Bergeron, Jennifer; Mailloux, Brian; Kenna, Timothy

    2013-04-01

    We are doing a study of the physical and chemical properties of exposed lacustrine sediment deposited in Pleistocene Owens Lake near Bishop, CA (37.3˚ N, 241.5˚ E) that was used in an investigation of the Matuyama/Brunhes (M/B) polarity transition (Liddicoat, 1993). The study complements one of similar lacustrine sediment that records the Mono Lake Excursion in the Mono Basin, CA (38.0˚ N, 240.8˚ E) where field strength (Coe and Liddicoat, 1994) and percentage of inorganic carbon seem to be contributing factors on the ability of magnetic grains to accurately record field direction when the field is changing rapidly. For instance, there is an inverse relationship between the percentage of total inorganic carbon (TIC) and the mobility of magnetic grains that preserve the remanence - the greater the percentage of TIC, the less likely grains become realigned when the field directions change (Spokowski et al., 2011). At Bishop, as in the Mono Basin, the sediment is unweathered fine- to medium-grain sand, silt, and volcanic ash from a nearby granitic (Sierra Nevada) and volcanic provenance (Lajoie, 1968), and the dominant magnetic mineral is magnetite (Liddicoat and Coe, 1979; Liddicoat, 1993). The Bishop Ash, dated by K/Ar at about 0.68 m.y. (Dalrymple et al., 1965), is in conformable contact with the lake sediments, which are exposed in the former bank of the Owens River. At Bishop we are using samples that record reverse (Matuyama), transitional, and normal (Brunhes) polarity that were demagnetized in an alternating field. The percentage of grains with a diameter less than 63 micrometers is about 40 percent in the reversely magnetized sediment and about 65 percent in the sediment that records transitional or normal polarity. These percentages differ somewhat from those in the Mono Basin where the percentage is about 80. The percentage of total organic carbon (TOC) does not exceed about 3 percent in the Owens Lake sediment and it is slightly less in the Mono Basin

  1. Characterization of the environmental quality of sediments from two estuarine systems based on different in-vitro bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Denise; Pujol, Silvia; Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet; Tauler, Romà; Bebianno, Maria João; Porte, Cinta

    2014-05-01

    This study characterizes the environmental quality of sediments from the Arade and Guadiana estuaries using different in-vitro bioassays: a) fish hepatoma cell line (PLHC-1) to determine cytotoxicity and presence of CYP1A and oxidative stress inducing agents; b) gonad subcellular fractions from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) to detect compounds that are likely to act as endocrine disrupters by interfering with the synthesis of androgens (CYP17, CYP11β) and estrogens (CYP19). Approximately 60% of extracts from the Arade estuary were cytotoxic when tested at 60 mg eQsed/mL, while only one sample from Guadiana showed cytotoxicity. Sediments from Arade collected close to harbours and waste water effluents were enriched with CYP1A inducing agents, while those from the upper Guadiana induced oxidative stress in PLHC-1 cells. On the other hand, several extracts from both estuaries were able to significantly inhibit CYP17, CYP11β and CYP19 activities in gonad subcellular fractions of sea bass, which indicates the presence of endocrine disrupters, particularly in several sites from the Arade estuary. Overall, the study highlights the usefulness of in-vitro bioassays to identify those sediments that could pose risk to aquatic organisms and that require further action to improve their environmental quality. PMID:24140013

  2. Sediment and process water characterization in support of 300 Area North Process Pond physical soil washing test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sediments in the 300 Area North Process Pond are being considered for clean-up using soil washing processes. Prior to site clean-up several preliminary pilot-scale physical washing campaigns were performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) staff in the summer of 1993. WHC used equipment that was obtained from the US Environmental Protection Agency. Specific details are found in the 300-FF-1 Physical Separations CERCLA Treatability Test Plan. Physical soil washing includes separation and proper containment of the contaminant-rich fines and residual liquid effluent and release of the coarse ''clean'' fraction, should it meet minimum performance levels for residual contaminant concentration to the site being cleaned. A goal of the demonstration is to concentrate the contaminants into ≤10% of the soil volume excavated and, therefore, to release ≥90% of the soil back to the site as clean soil. To support interpretation of the WHC soil washing treatability study, PNL performed some sediment and process water characterization on samples taken during three major and one small campaign. This report documents particle-size distributions in various field washed piles, and chemical and gama emitting radionuclide contents as a function of particle-size distribution for the field washed sediments and contents in the spent process water. All of the particle fractions were separated by wet sieving, but two field samples were also subjected to dry sieving and attrition scrubbing followed by wet sieving

  3. Characterization of a deep-sea sediment metagenomic clone that produces water-soluble melanin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yali; Lai, Xintian; He, Xiaocui; Cao, Lixiang; Zeng, Zhirui; Zhang, Jiong; Zhou, Shining

    2009-01-01

    To access to the microbial genetic resources of deep-sea sediment by a culture-independent approach, the sediment DNA was extracted and cloned into fosmid vector (pCC1FOS) generating a library of 39,600 clones with inserts of 24-45 kb. The clone fss6 producing red-brown pigment was isolated and characterized. The pigment was identified as melanin according to its physico-chemical characteristics. Subcloning and sequences analyses of fss6 demonstrated that one open reading frame (ORF2) was responsible for the pigment production. The deduced protein from ORF2 revealed significant amino acid similarity to the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) from deep-sea bacteria Idiomarina loihiensis. Further study demonstrated that the production of melanin was correlated with homogentistic acid (HGA). The p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate produced by the Escherichia coli host was converted to HGA through the oxidation reaction of introduced HPPD. The results demonstrate that expression of DNA extracted directly from the environment might generate applicable microbial gene products. The construction and analysis of the metagenomic library from deep-sea sediment contributed to our understanding for the reservoir of unexploited deep-sea microorganisms. PMID:18648877

  4. Characterization of organic matter source in the sediment of Lake Soyang, in view of land uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Su Jin; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Gal, Jong Ku; Lee, Dong Hun; Lee, Won-Seok; Choi, Jong-Woo; Shin, Kyung Hoon

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotope analysis is applied to surface and core sediment from artificial deep reservoir Soyang, Korea for the identification of sources of organic matters. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of POM(>20μm), the soils of forest area and alpine agriculture area were also analyzed as estimated sources.δ13C of surface sediment were -26.88˜-26.28‰. δ15N were increased from downstream to upstream(2.5˜4.63‰). C/N ratio at downstream were 8˜10, and 16˜22 at upstream. These results indicate that dominance input of the terrestrial organic matters in upstream area. It might be caused by huge delivery of the soil and terrestrial higher plant residue through the turbid current runoff from alpine agriculture area. In contrast, surface sediment of downstream relatively seems to be influenced by algal organic matter. In core sediment collected from the central area of downstream near by a dam, δ13C and δ15N of below 15cm were around -26‰ and 3‰ respectively. However, above the 15cm, δ13C and δ15N trend were increased up to -24.6‰, 5.8‰ respectively. These results demonstrate that forest origin organic matter could be dominant below the 15cm. However, turbid current input has been increased due to the enlarged alpine agriculture area since 1990s. Therefore the soil organic matter derived from alpine agriculture regions should be predominant in the upper sediment of the core. Consequently, in this study, organic matter distribution and its origin in Lake Soyang can be clarified using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope values in additional to lipid biomarker analysis.

  5. Characterization of Airborne Particles in an Electronic Waste Recycling Facility and Their Toxicity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improper disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) can lead to release of toxic chemicals into the environment and also may pose health risks. Thus, recycling e-waste, instead of landfilling, is considered to be an effective way to reduce pollutant release and exposure. However, lit...

  6. Building and characterizing regional and global emission inventories of toxic pollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cucurachi, Stefano; Sala, Serenella; Laurent, Alexis; Heijungs, Reinout

    2014-01-01

    in the world, the current work explores different opportunities to compile representative inventories of toxic emissions. In this study, we build global and European emission inventories using three extrapolation proxies, namely the gross domestic product, the emissions of carbon dioxide, and the...

  7. Characterization of 200-UP-1 Aquifer Sediments and Results of Sorption-Desorption Tests Using Spiked Uncontaminated Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Brown, Christopher F.; Legore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2005-11-16

    Core characterization showed only 4 out of 13 core liner samples were intact samples and that the others were slough material. The intact samples showed typical Ringold Unit E characteristics such as being dominated by gravel and sand. Moderately reducing conditions are inferred in some core from borehole C4299. This reducing condition was caused by the hard tool process used to drill the wells. One core showed significant presence of ferric iron oxide/clay coatings on the gravels. There were no highly contaminated sediments found in the cores from the three new boreholes in UP-1 operable unit, especially for uranium. The presence of slough and ''flour'' caused by hard tooling is a serious challenge to obtaining field relevant sediments for use in geochemical experiments to determine the adsorption-desorption tendencies of redox sensitive elements such as uranium. The adsorption of COCs on intact Ringold Formation sediments and Fe/clay coatings showed that most of the anionic contaminants [Tc(VII), Se(VI), U(VI), Cr(VI), and I(-I)] did not adsorbed very well compared to cationic [Np(V), Sr(II), and Cs(I)] radionuclides. The high hydrous iron oxide content in Fe/clay coatings caused the highest Kd values for U and Np, suggesting these hydrous oxides are the key solid adsorbent in the sediments. Enhanced adsorption behavior for Tc, and Cr and perhaps Se on the sediments was considered an ?artifact? result caused by the induced reducing conditions from the hard tool drilling. Additional U(VI) adsorption Kd studies were performed on Ringold Formation sediments to develop more robust Kd data base for U. The <2 mm size separates of three UP-1 sediments showed a linear U(VI) adsorption isotherm up 1 ppm of total U(VI) concentration in solution. The additional U(VI) Kds obtained from varying carbonate concentration indicated that U(VI) adsorption was strongly influenced by the concentration of carbonate in solution. U(VI) adsorption decreased with

  8. {sup 210}Pb geochronology and chemical characterization of sediment cores from lakes of the Parana river alluvial plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, L.F.L.; Damatto, S.R.; Scapin, M.A. [IPEN - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (Brazil); Remor, M.B.; Sampaio, S.C. [UNIOESTE - Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The flood plain of the upper Parana River is located among the lakes formed by the Brazilian hydroelectric plants being the last part of the Parana river, in Brazil, where there is an ecosystem with interaction river-flood plain. This flood plain has considerable habitat variability, with great diversity of terrestrial and aquatic species, and the floods are the main factor that regulates the operation of this ecosystem. The seasonality of the flood pulses is mainly influenced by the El Nino phenomenon, which increases precipitation in the drainage basin of the flood plain of the upper Parana River. Because of its unique characteristics this ecosystem is the subject of intense study since 1980, mainly from the ecological point of view. Therefore, two sediment cores were collected in the ponds formed by the floods, Patos pond and Garcas pond, in order to characterize the sediment chemically and evaluate a possible historic contamination. The trace element concentrations As, Ba, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Hf, La, Lu, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb and Zn (mg.kg{sup -1}) and the major elements Si, Al, Fe, Ti, K, Ca, Mg, P, V, Mn, and Na (%) were determined in the sediment cores dated by {sup 210}Pb method, using instrumental neutron activation analysis, X-ray fluorescence and gross beta counting, respectively. The results obtained for the elements Ce, Cr, Cs, La, Nd, Sc, Sm and Th are higher than the values of Upper Continental Crust for both ponds. The sedimentation rates obtained for Garca pond, 0.77 cm.y{sup -1}, and Patos pond, 0.62 cm.y{sup -1} are in agreement with studies performed in sedimentary environments similar to the present work, such as Brazilian wetland Pantanal. The enrichment factor and the geo-accumulation index were used to assess the presence of anthropogenic sources of pollution. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  9. 210Pb geochronology and chemical characterization of sediment cores from lakes of the Parana river alluvial plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flood plain of the upper Parana River is located among the lakes formed by the Brazilian hydroelectric plants being the last part of the Parana river, in Brazil, where there is an ecosystem with interaction river-flood plain. This flood plain has considerable habitat variability, with great diversity of terrestrial and aquatic species, and the floods are the main factor that regulates the operation of this ecosystem. The seasonality of the flood pulses is mainly influenced by the El Nino phenomenon, which increases precipitation in the drainage basin of the flood plain of the upper Parana River. Because of its unique characteristics this ecosystem is the subject of intense study since 1980, mainly from the ecological point of view. Therefore, two sediment cores were collected in the ponds formed by the floods, Patos pond and Garcas pond, in order to characterize the sediment chemically and evaluate a possible historic contamination. The trace element concentrations As, Ba, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Hf, La, Lu, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb and Zn (mg.kg-1) and the major elements Si, Al, Fe, Ti, K, Ca, Mg, P, V, Mn, and Na (%) were determined in the sediment cores dated by 210Pb method, using instrumental neutron activation analysis, X-ray fluorescence and gross beta counting, respectively. The results obtained for the elements Ce, Cr, Cs, La, Nd, Sc, Sm and Th are higher than the values of Upper Continental Crust for both ponds. The sedimentation rates obtained for Garca pond, 0.77 cm.y-1, and Patos pond, 0.62 cm.y-1 are in agreement with studies performed in sedimentary environments similar to the present work, such as Brazilian wetland Pantanal. The enrichment factor and the geo-accumulation index were used to assess the presence of anthropogenic sources of pollution. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  10. Phytotoxkit® and Ostracodtoxkit® tests for assessing the toxicity of sediment samples with high concentration of heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Molina, Jose; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2010-05-01

    To estimate the risk of contaminants, chemical methods need to be complemented with biological methods. Ecotoxicological testing may be a useful approach for assessing the toxicity as a complement to chemical analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and applicability of two bioassays representing multiple trophic levels, for the preliminary ecotoxicological screening of sediments from sites contaminated by mining activities: a chronic toxicity test with the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens and a phytotoxicity test using Lepidium sativum, Sorghum saccharatum and Sinapis alba seeds. For this study, 30 soils samples were collected from the Sierra Minera (Murcia, SE Spain) for general analytical determinations and the total metal content (Pb, Zn, Cd and As) was determined. The Phytotoxkit® test measures the decrease in (or the absence of) seed germination and of the growth of the young roots after 3 days of exposure of seeds of selected higher plants to a contaminated matrix compared with the controls germinated in a reference soil. The plants selected for the Phytotoxkit® microbiotest were: the monocotyl Sorghum saccharatum (Sorgho) and the dicotyls Lepidium sativum (Garden cress) and Sinapis alba (mustard) (Phytotoxkit®, 2004). The percent inhibition of seed germination (SG) and root growth inhibition (RI) for each plant were calculated. Ostracodtoxkit® test consists of placing freshly hatched ostracod neonates in multiwell cups in 2 ml synthetic freshwater, with 300 µl sediment and 3x107 algal cells (Selenastrum capricornutum). After 6 days, incubation at 25 °C in darkness, the mortality of test organisms was determined (Ostracodtoxkit® FTM, 2001) and growth inhibition was calculated. Soil samples showed a mean pH value of 6.0 in water and 5.7 in KCl. The EC varied from 1.0 dS m-1 to 56.2 dS m-1, with a mean value of 17.7 dS m-1. The mean value for Pb was 0.84 mg kg-1, 10593 mg kg-1 for Zn, 23.18 mg kg-1 for Cd and 0.16 mg kg-1 for As

  11. Spatial and depth wise characterization of radionuclides and minerals in various beach sediments from high background radiation area, Kerala, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity concentrations (238U, 232Th and 40K) and mineralogical characterization of different layer (upper surface, first, second and third feet) Kerala beach sediments have been assessed with an aim of evaluating the radioactivity content profile, its relation to specific minerals and their distributions (spatial and depth wise). The eight different radiological indices are calculated for all samples and compared with either recommended values or the world average values of radioactivity content of the three primordial radionuclides to assess the complete radiological profile of the sediments. The radioactivity study suggests that the average specific activities of radionuclides (238U and 232Th) are higher than the world average values as given in UNSCEAR reports and all radiological parameters in all layer samples are more than the recommended safety levels. These results are on the expected lines since the samples are from a well-known high background radiation area. Using FTIR, mineralogical characteristics of the sediments were analyzed and the extinction coefficient is calculated to find the relative distribution of major minerals. The calculated values show that the amount of major minerals decreases in the order of quartz>calcite>kaolinite>microcline feldspar in all layers. To confirm the results obtained from FTIR, XRD analysis was also carried out. The observations made through the XRD technique are matched with FTIR observations. Statistical analyses (cluster and factor analysis) are carried out to assess the relation between the radionuclides and minerals, and also assess their distribution patterns in different layers. The analyses suggest that the concentration of 40K may have a strong association with the light mineral calcite and also suggest that spatial distributions of 40K and calcite are almost similar in every layer. The concentrations of 238U, 232Th and absorbed dose rate are evenly distributed (spatial) and other variables are randomly

  12. Characterization of marine sediments from Antarctica using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In present investigations 17 major, minor ad trace elements were determined by XRF in a number of sea bottom sediment samples collected from the sea in the vicinity of Jinnah Station in Antarctica. Full listing of results is presented and discussed as well. The evaluation of precision and accuracy was performed with the use of IAEA SRM (IAEA-SD-M2) and the obtained results are in good agreement with the literature values. In order to find correlation and similarities among the sediment samples. The analytical data was submitted to statistical treatment and subsequently for geochemical interpretation Antarctica is considered to be one of the most uncontaminated areas of the world with respect to materials deriving from man activities or migration from other continents. Environmental samples from Antarctica are thus only representative of events of geological history of the continent to project the degree of pollution influx in future profile. (author) 5 tabs

  13. Chemical characterization of suspensions and sediments in the North Sea and Scheldt estuary

    OpenAIRE

    Van Alsenoy, V.; van der Put, A.; Bernard, P.; Van Grieken, R.

    1989-01-01

    From December 1987 to July 1988, more than 80 sediment and 20 suspension samples were collected in the river Scheldt and along the Belgian coast. The concentration in the bulk and the clay/silt fraction of the following elements was using X-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption spectrometry: K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd and Hg. The relative abundance of the fractions

  14. Characterizing contrasting soils and sediments with semispecific actinomycete r-DNA PCR primers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hill, P.; Krištůfek, Václav; Caballero, S.; Kroetsch, D. J.; Rauch, Ota

    České Budějovice: Institute of Soil Biology AS CR, 2004, s. 88-92. ISBN 80-86525-03-1. [Present methods for investigation of microbial community biodiversity in soils and substrates. Methodological workshop /9./. České Budějovice (CZ), 02.03.2004-03.03.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : contrasting soils * sediments * semispecific actinomycete r-DNA PCR primers Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  15. Characterizing the sediment bed in terms of resistance to motion: Toward an improved model of saltation thresholds for aeolian transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Brandon L.; Namikas, Steven L.

    2015-12-01

    Models of aeolian transport thresholds generate a wide range of predictions, and error in threshold modeling leads to uncertainty in predicting aeolian events. This paper proposes a new characterization of the representative grain size for use in prediction of transport thresholds. This characterization is based on the distribution of resistance to motion in the sediment bed. The traditional grain size distribution uses a mean diameter to represent the sediment bed. However, the distribution of inertial forces resisting motion is not linearly proportional to the distribution of grain diameters, so that an arithmetic mean does not adequately represent the distribution of the resisting forces. A simple relation of shear stress to weight force is used to represent the threshold condition. Based on comparison with threshold observations drawn from the literature, the model provides reliable predictions of threshold stress and shear velocity for dry quartz grains over a wide range of grain sizes. Given that the dataset was drawn from studies employing a variety of experimental conditions and techniques, and that these studies spanned a range of nearly eight decades, the model is considered to provide a robust approximation of threshold conditions.

  16. Review on physical and chemical characterizations of contaminated sediments from urban stormwater infiltration basins within the framework of the French observatory for urban hydrology (SOERE URBIS)

    OpenAIRE

    El Mufleh, Amelène; Bechet, Béatrice; Ruban, Véronique; Legret, Michel; Clozel, Blandine; Barraud, Sylvie; GONZALEZ MERCHAN, Carolina; BEDELL, Jean-Philippe; DELOLME, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Urban stormwater infiltration basins are designed to hold runoff from impervious surfaces and allow the settling of sediments and associated pollutants. However concerns have been expressed about the environmental impacts that may be exerted by the trapped pollutants on groundwater, soils and ecosystems. In this context, sediment characterization represents a key issue for local authorities in terms of management strategies. During the last two decades, several studies were launched including...

  17. Machine learning for toxicity characterization of organic chemical emissions using USEtox database: Learning the structure of the input space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvuglia, Antonino; Kanevski, Mikhail; Benetto, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    Toxicity characterization of chemical emissions in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a complex task which usually proceeds via multimedia (fate, exposure and effect) models attached to models of dose-response relationships to assess the effects on target. Different models and approaches do exist, but all require a vast amount of data on the properties of the chemical compounds being assessed, which are hard to collect or hardly publicly available (especially for thousands of less common or newly developed chemicals), therefore hampering in practice the assessment in LCA. An example is USEtox, a consensual model for the characterization of human toxicity and freshwater ecotoxicity. This paper places itself in a line of research aiming at providing a methodology to reduce the number of input parameters necessary to run multimedia fate models, focusing in particular to the application of the USEtox toxicity model. By focusing on USEtox, in this paper two main goals are pursued: 1) performing an extensive exploratory analysis (using dimensionality reduction techniques) of the input space constituted by the substance-specific properties at the aim of detecting particular patterns in the data manifold and estimating the dimension of the subspace in which the data manifold actually lies; and 2) exploring the application of a set of linear models, based on partial least squares (PLS) regression, as well as a nonlinear model (general regression neural network--GRNN) in the seek for an automatic selection strategy of the most informative variables according to the modelled output (USEtox factor). After extensive analysis, the intrinsic dimension of the input manifold has been identified between three and four. The variables selected as most informative may vary according to the output modelled and the model used, but for the toxicity factors modelled in this paper the input variables selected as most informative are coherent with prior expectations based on scientific knowledge

  18. Behavioral, clinical, and pathological characterization of acid metalliferous water toxicity in mallards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isanhart, John P; Wu, Hongmei; Pandher, Karamjeet; MacRae, Russell K; Cox, Stephen B; Hooper, Michael J

    2011-11-01

    From September to November 2000, United States Fish and Wildlife Service biologists investigated incidents involving 221 bird deaths at 3 mine sites located in New Mexico and Arizona. These bird deaths primarily involved passerine and waterfowl species and were assumed to be linked to consumption of acid metalliferous water (AMW). Because all of the carcasses were found in or near pregnant leach solution ponds, tailings ponds, and associated lakes or storm water retention basins, an acute-toxicity study was undertaken using a synthetic AMW (SAMW) formulation based on the contaminant profile of a representative pond believed to be responsible for avian mortalities. An acute oral-toxicity trial was performed with a mixed-sex group of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). After a 24-h pretreatment food and water fast, gorge drinking was evident in both SAMW treatment and control groups, with water consumption rates greatest during the initial drinking periods. Seven of nine treated mallards were killed in extremis within 12 h after the initiation of dose. Total lethal doses of SAMW ranged from 69.8 to 270.1 mL/kg (mean ± SE 127.9 ± 27.1). Lethal doses of SAMW were consumed in as few as 20 to 40 min after first exposure. Clinical signs of SAMW toxicity included increased serum uric acid, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, potassium, and P levels. PCV values of SAMW-treated birds were also increased compared with control mallards. Histopathological lesions were observed in the esophagus, proventriculus, ventriculus, and duodenum of SAMW-treated mallards, with the most distinctive being erosion and ulceration of the kaolin of the ventriculus, ventricular hemorrhage and/or congestion, and duodenal hemorrhage. Clinical, pathological, and tissue-residue results from this study are consistent with literature documenting acute metal toxicosis, especially copper (Cu), in avian species and provide useful diagnostic profiles for AMW toxicity or mortality events. Blood and

  19. Molecular and immunological characterization of gluten proteins isolated from oat cultivars that differ in toxicity for celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Real

    Full Text Available A strict gluten-free diet (GFD is the only currently available therapeutic treatment for patients with celiac disease (CD. Traditionally, treatment with a GFD has excluded wheat, barley and rye, while the presence of oats is a subject of debate. The most-recent research indicates that some cultivars of oats can be a safe part of a GFD. In order to elucidate the toxicity of the prolamins from oat varieties with low, medium, and high CD toxicity, the avenin genes of these varieties were cloned and sequenced, and their expression quantified throughout the grain development. At the protein level, we have accomplished an exhaustive characterization and quantification of avenins by RP-HPLC and an analysis of immunogenicity of peptides present in prolamins of different oat cultivars. Avenin sequences were classified into three different groups, which have homology with S-rich prolamins of Triticeae. Avenin proteins presented a lower proline content than that of wheat gliadin; this may contribute to the low toxicity shown by oat avenins. The expression of avenin genes throughout the development stages has shown a pattern similar to that of prolamins of wheat and barley. RP-HPLC chromatograms showed protein peaks in the alcohol-soluble and reduced-soluble fractions. Therefore, oat grains had both monomeric and polymeric avenins, termed in this paper gliadin- and glutenin-like avenins. We found a direct correlation between the immunogenicity of the different oat varieties and the presence of the specific peptides with a higher/lower potential immunotoxicity. The specific peptides from the oat variety with the highest toxicity have shown a higher potential immunotoxicity. These results suggest that there is wide range of variation of potential immunotoxicity of oat cultivars that could be due to differences in the degree of immunogenicity in their sequences.

  20. Molecular and immunological characterization of gluten proteins isolated from oat cultivars that differ in toxicity for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Ana; Comino, Isabel; de Lorenzo, Laura; Merchán, Francisco; Gil-Humanes, Javier; Giménez, María J; López-Casado, Miguel Ángel; Torres, M Isabel; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina; Barro, Francisco; Pistón, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    A strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only currently available therapeutic treatment for patients with celiac disease (CD). Traditionally, treatment with a GFD has excluded wheat, barley and rye, while the presence of oats is a subject of debate. The most-recent research indicates that some cultivars of oats can be a safe part of a GFD. In order to elucidate the toxicity of the prolamins from oat varieties with low, medium, and high CD toxicity, the avenin genes of these varieties were cloned and sequenced, and their expression quantified throughout the grain development. At the protein level, we have accomplished an exhaustive characterization and quantification of avenins by RP-HPLC and an analysis of immunogenicity of peptides present in prolamins of different oat cultivars. Avenin sequences were classified into three different groups, which have homology with S-rich prolamins of Triticeae. Avenin proteins presented a lower proline content than that of wheat gliadin; this may contribute to the low toxicity shown by oat avenins. The expression of avenin genes throughout the development stages has shown a pattern similar to that of prolamins of wheat and barley. RP-HPLC chromatograms showed protein peaks in the alcohol-soluble and reduced-soluble fractions. Therefore, oat grains had both monomeric and polymeric avenins, termed in this paper gliadin- and glutenin-like avenins. We found a direct correlation between the immunogenicity of the different oat varieties and the presence of the specific peptides with a higher/lower potential immunotoxicity. The specific peptides from the oat variety with the highest toxicity have shown a higher potential immunotoxicity. These results suggest that there is wide range of variation of potential immunotoxicity of oat cultivars that could be due to differences in the degree of immunogenicity in their sequences. PMID:23284616

  1. Sediment toxicity in Savannah Harbor

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Savannah Harbor, located near the mouth of the Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina, is impacted by industrial and municipal effluents. Contaminants released...

  2. Fluorescence Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter Isolates from Sediments and the Association with Phenanthrene Binding Affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jin; Lee, Bo-Mi; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2014-05-01

    In this study, selected spectroscopic characteristics of sediment organic matter (SOM) were compared and discussed with respect to their different isolation methods, the source discrimination capabilities, and the association with the extent of phenanthrene binding. A total of 16 sediments were collected from three categorized locations including a costal lake, industrial areas, and the upper streams, each of which is likely influenced by the organic sources of algal production, industrial effluent, and terrestrial input, respectively. The spectroscopic properties related to aromatic structures and terrestrial humic acids were more pronounced for alkaline extractable organic matter (AEOM) isolates than for the SOM isolates based on water soluble extracts and porewater. The three categorized sampling locations were the most differentiated in the AEOM isolates, suggesting AEOM may be the most representative SOM isolates in describing the chemical properties and the organic sources of SOM. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) based on fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) showed that a combination of four fluorescent groups could represent all the fluorescence features of SOM. The three categorized sampling locations were well discriminated by the percent distributions of terrestrial and microbial humic-like fluorescent groups of the AEOM isolates. The relative distribution of terrestrial humic-like fluorophores was highly correlated with the extent of phenanthrene binding (r=0.676; phumic acids in SOM may contribute to the enhancement of binding with hydrophobic organic contaminants in sediments. Principal component analysis (PCA) further demonstrated that the extent of SOM's binding affinity might be affected by the degree of biological transformation in SOM as well as the abundance of aromatic carbon structures.

  3. Magnetic Characterization of Stream-Sediments From Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, Affected by Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, M. A.; Sinito, A. M.; Bidegain, J. C.; Gogorza, C. S.; Jurado, S.

    2001-12-01

    A wide urban area from Northeast of Buenos Aires Province is exposed to an important anthropogenic influence, mainly due to industrial activity. In this two water streams were chosen: one of them (Del Gato stream, G) next to La Plata City and the another one (El Pescado stream, P) on the outskirts of the city. Both streams have similar characteristics, although the first one (G) has a higher input of pollutants (fluvial effluents, fly ashes, solid wastes, etc.) than the last one (P). Sediments analyzed in this work are limes from continental origin of PostPampeano (Holocene). Although, some cores were affected by sandy-limy sediments with mollusc valves from Querandino Sea (Pleistocene - later Holocene) and limy sediments of chestnut color with calcareous concretions from the Ensenadense. Magnetic measurements and geochemical studies were carried out on the samples. Among the magnetic parameters, specific susceptibility (X), X frequency-dependence (Xfd%), X temperature-dependence, Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM), Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (IRM), Saturation IRM (SIRM), coercivity of remanence (Bcr), S ratio and SIRM/X ratio, Anhysteric Remanent Magnetization (ARM), Magnetic and Thermal Demagnetization were studied. The magnetic characteristics for both sites indicate the predominance of magnetically soft minerals on G site and relatively hard minerals on P site. Magnetite is the main magnetic carrier, Pseudo Single Domain and Single Domain grains were found. Chemical studies show (in some cases) a high concentration for some heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Ni and Fe) on the upper 22-cm. Contents of heavy metals and ARM were correlated. Very good correlation (R> 0.81) is found for Cu, Zn, Ni, Fe and the sum (of Pb, Cu, Zn and Ni), and a weaker correlation for Pb.

  4. Molecular Characterization of Functional and Phylogenetic Genes from Natural Populations of Methanotrophs in Lake Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Costello, Andria M.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    1999-01-01

    The 16S rRNA and pmoA genes from natural populations of methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) were PCR amplified from total community DNA extracted from Lake Washington sediments obtained from the area where peak methane oxidation occurred. Clone libraries were constructed for each of the genes, and approximately 200 clones from each library were analyzed by using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and the tetrameric restriction enzymes MspI, HaeIII, and HhaI. The PCR produc...

  5. Chemical characterization and 210Pb dating in wetland sediments from the Nhecolandia Pantanal Pond, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantanal, located in the central region of South America, is recognized as one of the world's largest freshwater wetlands. In order to verify possible changes in this environment, a study was undertaken in Nhecolandia Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Two sediment cores from the Salina do Meio pond (SM1 and SM2) and one core from a small flood land named Ba (B5) were collected in 2001. The elements As, Ba, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb, Zn and Zr were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Cluster and factorial analysis were applied to the chemical data. The sedimentation rate in the SM2 core was determined by 210Pb method and the mean value found was 0.61 cm x y-1. The results obtained in the present study showed that recent geochemical processes such as desorption, precipitation and dissolution can contribute for the high water alkalinity and salinity in the saline ponds. (author)

  6. Construction and characterization of gelonin and saporin plasmids for toxic gene-based cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyoung Ah; He, Huining; Yang, Victor C; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-05-01

    Toxic gene therapy (or suicidal gene therapy) is gaining enormous interest, specifically for the treatment of cancer. The success of this therapy lies in several crucial factors, including the potency of gene products to kill the transfected tumor cells and the transfection ability of the transfection vehicles. To address the potency problem, in the present study, we engineered two separate mammalian transfection plasmids (pSAP and pGEL) containing genes encoding ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs), gelonin and saporin. After the successful preparation and amplification of the plasmids, they were tested on various cancer cell lines (HeLa, U87, 9L, and MDA-MB-435) and a noncancerous cell line (293 HEK) using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as the transfection agent. Transfection studies performed under varying gene concentration, incubation time, and gene-to-PEI ratios revealed that, compared to the treatment of pGFP (GFP expression plasmid)/PEI, both pGEL/PEI and pSAP/PEI complexes could induce significantly augmented cytotoxic effects at only 2 μg/mL gene concentration. Importantly, these cytotoxic effects were observed universally in all tested cancer cell lines. Overall, this study demonstrated the potential of pGEL and pSAP as effective gene candidates for the toxic gene-based cancer therapy. PMID:27008027

  7. Characterization of the photodegradation products of metolachlor: structural elucidation, potential toxicity and persistence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous solutions of metolachlor and metolachlor-d6 were photolyzed with UV-visible radiations. The structures of 15 by-products of metolachlor were determined through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses using electron and chemical ionization combined with multistage mass spectrometry. The photolysis by-products of metolachlor resulted mainly from dehalogenation and hydroxylation, in some cases accompanied by cyclization. In silico tests for toxicity prediction showed that the toxicity of some photolysis products is expected to be greater than that of metolachlor. Persistence studies showed that the by-product relative abundances vary in large amounts with the irradiation time. The post-photolysis evolution of the solution was also studied, in order to determine the persistence of the main by-products. It allowed to establish that most of the by-products can be found more than 12h after the end of the photolysis, which is of a great concern as treated water is generally available for consumption only a few hours after treatment in most of industrial processes. (author)

  8. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments from C Waste Management Area: Investigation of the C-152 Transfer Line Leak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F; Serne, R JEFFREY; Bjornstad, Bruce N; Valenta, Michelle M; Lanigan, David C; Vickerman, Tanya S; Clayton, Ray E; Geiszler, Keith N; Iovin, Cristian; Clayton, Eric T; Kutynakov, I V; Baum, Steven R; Lindberg, Michael J; Orr, Robert D

    2007-02-05

    A geologic/geochemical investigation in the vicinity of UPR-200-E-82 was performed using pairs of cone-penetrometer probe holes. A total of 41 direct-push cone-penetrometer borings (19 pairs to investigate different high moisture zones in the same sampling location and 3 individual) were advanced to characterize vadose zone moisture and the distribution of contaminants. A total of twenty sample sets, containing up to two split-spoon liners and one grab sample, were delivered to the laboratory for characterization and analysis. The samples were collected around the documented location of the C-152 pipeline leak, and created an approximately 120-ft diameter circle around the waste site. UPR-200-E-82 was a loss of approximately 2,600 gallons of Cs-137 Recovery Process feed solution containing an estimated 11,300 Ci of cesium-137 and 5 Ci of technetium-99. Several key parameters that are used to identify subsurface contamination were measured, including: water extract pH, electrical conductivity, nitrate, technetium-99, sodium, and uranium concentrations and technetium-99 and uranium concentrations in acid extracts. All of the parameters, with the exception of electrical conductivity, were elevated in at least some of the samples analyzed as part of this study. Specifically, soil pH was elevated (from 8.69 to 9.99) in five samples collected northeast and southwest of the C-152 pipeline leak. Similarly, samples collected from these same cone-pentrometer holes contained significantly more water-extractable sodium (more than 50 g/g of dry sediment), uranium (as much as 7.66E-01 g/g of dry sediment), nitrate (up to 30 g/g of dry sediment), and technetium-99 (up to 3.34 pCi/g of dry sediment). Most of the samples containing elevated concentrations of water-extractable sodium also had decreased levels of water extractable calcium and or magnesium, indicating that tank-related fluids that were high in sodium did seep into the vadose zone near these probe holes. Several of the

  9. Integrated ecotoxicological assessment of marine sediments affected by land-based marine fish farm effluents: physicochemical, acute toxicity and benthic community analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C; Yáñez, E; Martín-Díaz, M L; Riba, I; DelValls, T A

    2013-08-01

    An integrated ecotoxicological assessment of marine sediments affected by land-based marine fish farm effluents was developed using physicochemical and benthic community structure analyses and standardised laboratory bioassays with bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), amphipods (Ampelisca brevicornis) and sea urchin larvae (Paracentrotus lividus). Intertidal sediment samples were collected at five sites of the Rio San Pedro (RSP) creek, from the aquaculture effluent to a clean site. The effective concentration (EC50) from bacterial bioluminescence and A. brevicornis survival on whole sediments and P. lividus larval developmental success on sediment elutriates were assessed. Numbers of species, abundance and Shannon diversity were the biodiversity indicators measured in benthic fauna of sediment samples. In parallel, redox potential, pH, organic matter and metal levels (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in the sediment and dissolved oxygen in the interstitial water were measured in situ. Water and sediment physicochemical analysis revealed the exhibition of a spatial gradient in the RSP, evidenced by hypoxia/anoxia, reduced and acidic conditions, high organic enrichment and metal concentrations at the most contaminated sites. Whereas, the benthic fauna biodiversity decreased the bioassays depicted decreases in EC50, A. brevicornis survival, P. lividus larval success at sampling sites closer to the studied fish farms. This study demonstrates that the sediments polluted by fish farm effluents may lead to alterations of the biodiversity of the exposed organisms. PMID:23681739

  10. Characterization of phenolic compounds of OMW: toxicity and degradability by yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Cristiana; João P. Ferreira; Lopes, Marlene; Falcão, Soraia; Peres, António M.; Cardoso, Susana M.; Belo, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    The characterization of Olive Mill Wastewaters (OMW), focusing the phenolic compounds, is one of the aims of the present work. As a first approach to characterize the phenolic compounds of OMW, the extraction methods used were: a liquid-liquid extraction by acidified ethyl acetate and a solid-liquid extraction with acidified methanol. The analysis of these extracts by reversed phase liquid chromatography confirmed that hydroxytyrosol was the most abundant phenolic compound in O...

  11. Neutron activation analysis on sediments from Victoria Land, Antarctica. Multi-elemental characterization of potential atmospheric dust sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elemental composition of 40 samples of mineral sediments collected in Victoria Land, Antarctica, in correspondence of ice-free sites, is presented. Concentration of 36 elements was determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis, INAA. The selection of 6 standard reference materials and the development of a specific analytical procedure allowed to reduce measurements uncertainties and to verify the reproducibility of the results. The decision to analyze sediment samples from Victoria Land ice-free areas is related to recent investigations regarding mineral dust content in the TALos Dome ICE core (159deg11'E; 72deg49'S, East Antarctica, Victoria Land), in which a coarse local fraction of dust was recognized. The characterization of Antarctic potential source areas of atmospheric mineral dust is the first step to identify the active sources of dust for the Talos Dome area and to reconstruct the atmospheric pathways followed by air masses in this region during different climatic periods. Principal components analysis was used to identify elements and samples correlations; attention was paid specially to rare earth elements (REE) and incompatible/compatible elements (ICE) in respect to iron, which proved to be the most discriminating elemental groups. The analysis of REE and ICE concentration profiles supported evidences of chemical weathering in ice-free areas of Victoria Land, whereas cold and dry climate conditions of the Talos Dome area and in general of East Antarctica. (author)

  12. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Borehole 41-09-39 in the S-SX Waste Management Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Wilson, Teresa C.; Wagnon, Kenneth B.; Williams, Bruce A.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 5.15. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole 41-09-39 installed adjacent to tank SX-109.

  13. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Slant Borehole SX-108 in the S-SX Waste Management Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Wilson, Teresa C.; Wagnon, Kenneth B.; Williams, Bruce A.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.17. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is the fourth in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from a slant borehole installed beneath tank SX-108 (or simply SX-108 slant borehole).

  14. Biomarker responsiveness in different tissues of caged Ruditapes philippinarum and its use within an integrated sediment quality assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomarkers comprising activities of biotransformation enzymes (ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase -EROD-, dibenzylfluorescein dealkylase -DBF-, glutathione S-transferase -GST), antioxidant enzymes (glutathione reductase -GR- and glutathione peroxidase -GPX), lipid peroxidation -LPO- and DNA strand breaks were analyzed in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum caged at Cadiz Bay, Santander Bay and Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (LPGC) Port (Spain). Sediments were characterized. Digestive gland was the most sensitive tissue to sediment contamination. In Cadiz Bay, changes in LPO regarding day 0 were related with metals. In LPGC Port, DBF, EROD, and GST activity responses suggested the presence of undetermined contaminants which might have led to DNA damage. In Santander Bay, PAHs were related with EROD activity, organic and metal contamination was found to be associated with GR and GST activities and DNA damage presented significant (p < 0.05) induction. R. philippinarum was sensitive to sediment contamination at biochemical level. Biomarkers allowed chemical exposure and sediment quality assessment. - Highlights: → Ruditapes philippinarum is sensitive to sediment contamination at biochemical level. → Digestive gland biomarkers showed the best correlations with sediment contaminants. → Presence of potentially toxic chemicals not analyzed in this research was unmasked. → Multivariate analysis allowed the identification of toxic xenobiotic and possible sources. → Inner area of Santander Bay presented the highest sediment toxicity. - Integration of Ruditapes philippinarum biomarker results and sediment chemistry distinguished xenobiotic exposure and sediment toxicity in coastal areas of Spain.

  15. Biomarker responsiveness in different tissues of caged Ruditapes philippinarum and its use within an integrated sediment quality assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos-Gomez, Julia, E-mail: julia.ramosgomez@uca.es [UNITWIN/UNESCO/WiCoP, Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de Cadiz, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Campus Universitario de Puerto Real, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Coz, Alberto; Viguri, Javier R. [Dpto. Ingenieria Quimica y Quimica Inorganica, ETSIIT, Universidad de Cantabria, Avda. los Castros, s/n 39005 Santander (Spain); Luque, Angel [Departamento de Biologia, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Gran Canaria, The Canary Islands (Spain); Martin-Diaz, M. Laura [UNITWIN/UNESCO/WiCoP, Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de Cadiz, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Campus Universitario de Puerto Real, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Centro Andaluz de Ciencia y Tecnologia Marinas (CACYTMAR), Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Universitario de Puerto Real, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); DelValls, T. Angel [UNITWIN/UNESCO/WiCoP, Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de Cadiz, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Campus Universitario de Puerto Real, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    Biomarkers comprising activities of biotransformation enzymes (ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase -EROD-, dibenzylfluorescein dealkylase -DBF-, glutathione S-transferase -GST), antioxidant enzymes (glutathione reductase -GR- and glutathione peroxidase -GPX), lipid peroxidation -LPO- and DNA strand breaks were analyzed in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum caged at Cadiz Bay, Santander Bay and Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (LPGC) Port (Spain). Sediments were characterized. Digestive gland was the most sensitive tissue to sediment contamination. In Cadiz Bay, changes in LPO regarding day 0 were related with metals. In LPGC Port, DBF, EROD, and GST activity responses suggested the presence of undetermined contaminants which might have led to DNA damage. In Santander Bay, PAHs were related with EROD activity, organic and metal contamination was found to be associated with GR and GST activities and DNA damage presented significant (p < 0.05) induction. R. philippinarum was sensitive to sediment contamination at biochemical level. Biomarkers allowed chemical exposure and sediment quality assessment. - Highlights: > Ruditapes philippinarum is sensitive to sediment contamination at biochemical level. > Digestive gland biomarkers showed the best correlations with sediment contaminants. > Presence of potentially toxic chemicals not analyzed in this research was unmasked. > Multivariate analysis allowed the identification of toxic xenobiotic and possible sources. > Inner area of Santander Bay presented the highest sediment toxicity. - Integration of Ruditapes philippinarum biomarker results and sediment chemistry distinguished xenobiotic exposure and sediment toxicity in coastal areas of Spain.

  16. Health and ecological risk-based characterization of soil and sediment contamination in shipyard with long-term use of DDT-containing antifouling paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) was a frequently occurring type of persistent organic environmental pollutant in China and DDT-containing antifouling paint could be the main contributor of DDT to shipyards and fishing harbors. A field survey was conducted in a shipyard in southern China to investigate the content and distribution of DDT in soil and sediments. Human health and screening-level ecological risk assessments were conducted for DDT contamination in soil and sediments and the results indicated that total DDT in all samples tested exceeded present advisory safe limits. Analysis of the composition and distribution implicated DDT-containing antifouling paint used for ship maintenance as an important source of DDT. Individual and cumulative health risks for residents exceeded the extra lifetime cancer risks of 10−6 and 10−5, mainly from exposure to soil, ingestion and dermal contact. DDT in sediments is associated with a high level of toxicity for the benthic community when > 99% of samples exceed the threshold concentration likely to be responsible for effects and severe effects. Further risk control for DDT is required to ensure safety for human health, the benthic community and the environment. - Highlights: ► DDT ranked high concentration both in sediments and soil in a shipyard. ► Composition analysis indicated DDT antifouling paint was the main source. ► High loading DDT in sediments resulted in high probability of ecological risks. ► Potential health risks for residents were mainly from the exposure of ingestion

  17. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 2: scattering signatures of Colorado River bed sediment in Marble and Grand Canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the statistical signatures of riverbed sediment in high-frequency acoustic backscatter, spatially explicit maps of the stochastic geometries (length- and amplitude-scales) of backscatter are related to patches of riverbed surfaces composed of known sediment types, as determined by geo-referenced underwater video observations. Statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be poor discriminators between sediment types. However, the variance of the power spectrum, and the intercept and slope from a power-law spectral form (termed the spectral strength and exponent, respectively) successfully discriminate between sediment types. A decision-tree approach was able to classify spatially heterogeneous patches of homogeneous sands, gravels (and sand-gravel mixtures), and cobbles/boulders with 95, 88, and 91% accuracy, respectively. Application to sites outside the calibration, and surveys made at calibration sites at different times, were plausible based on observations from underwater video. Analysis of decision trees built with different training data sets suggested that the spectral exponent was consistently the most important variable in the classification. In the absence of theory concerning how spatially variable sediment surfaces scatter high-frequency sound, the primary advantage of this data-driven approach to classify bed sediment over alternatives is that spectral methods have well understood properties and make no assumptions about the distributional form of the fluctuating component of backscatter over small spatial scales.

  18. Characterization of organic matter in a sediment Core near the Mataripe refinery, Bahia-Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Alexandre Barreto; de Souza, José Roberto Bispo; Zucchi, Maria do Rosário; de Azevedo, Antonio Expedito Gomes; de Argollo, Roberto Max

    2016-04-15

    A sediment core was taken from the Todos os Santos Bay, near the Mataripe Bahia-Brazil refinery. The results of dating, (210)Pb and (137)Cs methods, combined with organic indicators, Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), n-alkanes and total organic carbon (TOC), showed significant change with the start of production of the oil fields of Aratu, Itaparica and Dom João (1939-1947) and the construction of the Mataripe refinery (1949-1950). This event was marked by a series of significant changes, including an abrupt increase in TOC and the growth of PAH concentrations and the presence Unresolved/Resolved ratio (UR/R)>4 in n-alkanes fraction, which indicated that the contamination was of petrogenic origin. The δ(13)C of specific n-alkanes compounds showed gradual deplete with the depth. PMID:26920428

  19. Characterization of the sulfate-reducing bacterial population in sediments of acid mining lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With respect to remediation of acid mine drainage (AMD), concomitant alteration of redox conditions, formation of metal sulfides and alkalinity generation are of special interest. The majority of lakes formed in the Lusatian lignite mining district bear waters of low pH and high ionic strength. For several of these acid mining lakes, sulfate-reducing activities have been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to find out which bacteria are responsible for these activities, whether these SRB exhibit special traits to thrive under extreme conditions, and whether the population differed from those inhabiting freshwater and marine environments. For this purpose we estimated the most probable number (MPN) of culturable SRB in surface sediments of three mining lakes (ML) and obtained isolates from the same sites. The strains were characterised physiologically and phylogenetically. (orig.)

  20. Oil Characterization and Distribution in Florida Estuary Sediments Following the Deepwater Horizon Spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mace G. Barron

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Barrier islands of Northwest Florida were heavily oiled during the Deepwater Horizon spill, but less is known about the impacts to the shorelines of the associated estuaries. Shoreline sediment oiling was investigated at 18 sites within the Pensacola Bay, Florida system prior to impact, during peak oiling, and post-wellhead capping. Only two locations closest to the Gulf of Mexico had elevated levels of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH and total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. These samples showed a clear weathered crude oil signature, pattern of depletion of C9 to C19 alkanes and C0 to C4 naphthalenes, and geochemical biomarker ratios in concordance with weathered Macondo crude oil. All other locations and sample times showed only trace petroleum contamination. The results of this study are consistent with available satellite imagery and visual shoreline survey data showing heavy shoreline oiling limited to sandy beaches near the entrance to Pensacola Bay and shorelines of Santa Rosa Island.

  1. Study of environmental pollution and mineralogical characterization of sediment rivers from Brazilian coal mining acid drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Luis F.O., E-mail: felipeqma@hotmail.com [Environmental Science and Nanotechnology Department, Institute of Environmental Research and Human Development – IPADH, Capivari de Baixo, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Fdez- Ortiz de Vallejuelo, Silvia; Martinez-Arkarazo, Irantzu; Castro, Kepa [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of the Basque Country (EHU/UPV), P.O. Box 644, 48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Oliveira, Marcos L.S. [Environmental Science and Nanotechnology Department, Institute of Environmental Research and Human Development – IPADH, Capivari de Baixo, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Sampaio, Carlos H.; Brum, Irineu A.S. de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Escola de Engenharia, Departamento de Metalurgia, Centro de Tecnologia, Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500, Bairro Agronomia, CEP: 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Leão, Felipe B. de; Taffarel, Silvio R. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Madariaga, Juan M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of the Basque Country (EHU/UPV), P.O. Box 644, 48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain)

    2013-03-01

    Acid drainage from coal mines and metal mining is a major source of underground and surface water contamination in the world. The coal mining acid drainage (CMAD) from mine contains large amount of solids in suspension and a high content of sulphate and dissolved metals (Al, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Fe, etc.) that finally are deposited in the rivers. Since this problem can persist for centuries after mine abandonment, it is necessary to apply multidisciplinary methods to determine the potential risk in a determinate area. These multidisciplinary methods must include molecular and elemental analysis and finally all information must be studied statistically. This methodology was used in the case of coal mining acid drainage from the Tubarao River (Santa Catarina, Brazil). During molecular analysis, Raman Spectroscopy, electron bean, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been proven very useful for the study of minerals present in sediment rivers near this CMAD. The obtained spectra allow the precise identification of the minerals as jarosite, quartz, clays, etc. The elemental analysis (Al, As, Fe, K, Na, Ba, Mg, Mn, Ti, V, Zn, Ag, Co, Li, Mo, Ni, Se, Sn, W, B, Cr, Cu, Pb and Sr) was realised by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Statistical analysis (Principal Component Analysis) of these dates of concentration reveals the existence of different groups of samples with specific pollution profiles in different areas of the Tubarao River. Highlights: ► Increasing coal drainage sediments geochemical information will increase human health information in this area. ► Brazilian coal mining information will increase recuperation planning information. ► The nanominerals showed strong sorption ability to aqueous hazardous elements.

  2. Study of environmental pollution and mineralogical characterization of sediment rivers from Brazilian coal mining acid drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acid drainage from coal mines and metal mining is a major source of underground and surface water contamination in the world. The coal mining acid drainage (CMAD) from mine contains large amount of solids in suspension and a high content of sulphate and dissolved metals (Al, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Fe, etc.) that finally are deposited in the rivers. Since this problem can persist for centuries after mine abandonment, it is necessary to apply multidisciplinary methods to determine the potential risk in a determinate area. These multidisciplinary methods must include molecular and elemental analysis and finally all information must be studied statistically. This methodology was used in the case of coal mining acid drainage from the Tubarao River (Santa Catarina, Brazil). During molecular analysis, Raman Spectroscopy, electron bean, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been proven very useful for the study of minerals present in sediment rivers near this CMAD. The obtained spectra allow the precise identification of the minerals as jarosite, quartz, clays, etc. The elemental analysis (Al, As, Fe, K, Na, Ba, Mg, Mn, Ti, V, Zn, Ag, Co, Li, Mo, Ni, Se, Sn, W, B, Cr, Cu, Pb and Sr) was realised by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Statistical analysis (Principal Component Analysis) of these dates of concentration reveals the existence of different groups of samples with specific pollution profiles in different areas of the Tubarao River. Highlights: ► Increasing coal drainage sediments geochemical information will increase human health information in this area. ► Brazilian coal mining information will increase recuperation planning information. ► The nanominerals showed strong sorption ability to aqueous hazardous elements

  3. Characterization of organotypic ventral mesencephalic cultures from embryonic mice and protection against MPP toxicity by GDNF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, B; Gramsbergen, J B; Møller Dall, A; Rosenblad, C; Zimmer, J

    2005-01-01

    We characterized organotypic ventral mesencephalic (VM) cultures derived from embryonic day 12 (E12) mice (CBL57/bL6) in terms of number of dopaminergic neurons, cell soma size and dopamine production in relation to time in vitro and tested the effects of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) and...

  4. Organic chemicals, polychlorinated biphenyls, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, sediments, and toxic metals collected in the Puget Sound on 01 June 1999 (NODC Accession 0000054)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As a component of a three year cooperative effort of the Washington State Department of Ecology and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, sediments...

  5. Metals and cocoa products: a study on characterization of toxic and essential metals in chocolates (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a sophisticated analytical technique, atomic absorption spectrometer (both with FAAS and GFAAS modes of atomization), was used for analyzing essential and toxic metal (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb and Cd) contents in 32 commonly consumed cocoa products (chocolates) prepared by different national and multinational companies. Significant differences were observed between the micro element contents of the 32 varieties (P < 0.01). The risk posed by the quantity of heavy metals lead, cadmium and nickel present in cocoa products (chocolates) is of serious apprehension and weekly intake was calculated. The Concentration of Pb and Cd in cocoa powder is found to be highest 492 and 197 mu g/L followed by cocoa based chocolates 306 and 46.8 mu g/L, sugar based chocolates 209.8 and 40.3 mu g/L whereas it is least in milk based chocolates samples 88.3 and 33 mu g/L respectively. The concentration of Pb and Cd was found below the provisional tolerable weekly intake defined by FAO/WHO. All essential elements were assessed for their weekly intake with the dietary reference intakes. In order to validate our results, certified reference material (Wheat flour 1589, Milk powder A-11 and Milk Powder A-8) were analyzed for Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb and Cd levels. Determined concentrations were quite in good agreement with certified levels. Data was interpreted through cluster analysis and pattern recognition. (author)

  6. Azanonaboranes containing imidazole derivatives for boron neutron capture therapy: synthesis, characterization, and in vitro toxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zaria, Mohamed E; Genady, Afaf R; Gabel, Detlef

    2006-10-25

    A number of azanonaboranes containing imidazole derivatives have been synthesized by a ligand-exchange reaction. The exo-NH(2)R group of the azanonaborane of the type [(RH(2)N)B(8)H(11)NHR] can be exchanged by one hetero-nitrogen atom of the imidazole ring. In the case of histamine, the exchange takes place on the aliphatic amino group, the hetero-nitrogen atom of the imidazole ring or both of them. The products were confirmed by NMR, IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and mass spectrometry. The electron-withdrawing effect of the nitro group in 2-nitroimidazole is the main hindrance to achieve the exchange reaction. In vitro experiments were performed with B16 melanoma cells. A comparison of the biological properties of the products in which the B(8)N cluster is connected to the hetero-nitrogen atom of imidazole ring or the aliphatic NH(2) group showed that incorporation of B(8)N cluster unit into primary amino group increases the compound's toxicity. In contrast, this specificity for cytotoxicity effect was not observed in the case of histamine containing two B(8)N clusters which was relatively nontoxic and did not inhibit colony formation up to concentrations of 2 mM. PMID:16865752

  7. Surface engineering of silica nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery: characterization and cell toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, Tatiana; Kiill, Charlene P; de Souza, Ana Luiza R; Fangueiro, Joana F; Fernandes, Lisete; Doktorovová, Slavomira; Santos, Dario L; Garcia, Maria L; Gremião, Maria Palmira D; Souto, Eliana B; Silva, Amélia M

    2014-11-01

    The present work aimed at studying the interaction between insulin and SiNP surfaced with mucoadhesive polymers (chitosan, sodium alginate or polyethylene glycol) and the evaluation of their biocompatibility with HepG2 and Caco-2 cell lines, which mimic in vivo the target of insulin-loaded nanoparticles upon oral administration. Thus, a systematic physicochemical study of the surface-modified insulin-silica nanoparticles (Ins-SiNP) using mucoadhesive polymers has been described. The surfacing of nanoparticle involved the coating of silica nanoparticles (SiNP) with different mucoadhesive polymers, to achieve high contact between the systems and the gut mucosa to enhance the oral insulin bioavailability. SiNP were prepared by a modified Stöber method at room temperature via hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). Interaction between insulin and nanoparticles was assessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) studies. The high efficiency of nanoparticles' coating resulted in more stable system. FTIR spectra of insulin-loaded nanoparticles showed amide absorption bands which are characteristic of α-helix content. In general, all developed nanoparticles demonstrated high biocompatible, at the tested concentrations (50-500 μg/mL), revealing no or low toxicity in the two human cancer cell lines (HepG2 and Caco-2). In conclusion, the developed insulin-loaded SiNP surfaced with mucoadhesive polymers demonstrated its added value for oral administration of proteins. PMID:25466464

  8. Characterization of Morus species in respect to micro, macro, and toxic elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojković Marija M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the mineral composition of the extracts of the fruits, leaves and roots of white mulberry (Morus alba L. and black mulberry (Morus nigra L. grown in Serbia. All extract samples of white and black mulberry were analyzed for the content of micro (B, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Ni, Se, Sr, Zn, macro (Ca, Mg, Na, and toxic metals (Al, As, Cd, Hg, Pb by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES. The study revealed that parts of the plant had statistically significant impact on the levels of the examined elements among the two Morus species. All extracts contained high amounts of Ca, Mg, Na, B, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn. The studies showed that in the most of extracts dominant macro element was Mg (591- 1942 μg/g of dry extract, while dominant microelements were Zn, B, Cu in all extracts, except for the black mulberry leaves, whose extract was most abundant in Fe (143 μg/g of dry extract. The highest content of micro and macro elements was detected in the extract of black mulberry leaves. This work contributes to the knowledge of the nutritional properties of Morus species. The obtained results may be useful in the evaluation of new dietary and food products.[ Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31013

  9. Characterization of 200-UP-1 and 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit Aquifer Sediments and Batch Adsorption Distribution Coefficients for Contaminants of Concern--Fiscal Year 2006 Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of six core samples from 200-UP/ZP-1 OUs and two additional outcrop samples were characterized during FY2006 by PNNL. One sample (C4971) was identified as slough and not used, but the five other samples identified as intact core samples were used for further analyses. The C4977 sample is gravel-sandy silt and C4990 samples are fine-sandy silt from the Ringold formation. Although the sediments from these two boreholes have similar mineralogical composition, C4990 samples show higher values of Fe oxide content, clay/silt content, and surface area compared those in C4977. The measured Tc Kd values ranged 0-0.2 mg/L for both samples, while U(VI) Kd for C4990 (4.23 mg/L) is much higher than that for C4977 (0.76 mg/L). A key finding from the Kd measurements is that detailed sediment and pore water characterization is necessary to understand the variation in Kd values seen in the empirical batch tests. Without the ancillary characterization of the sediments and pore waters, one might form misleading interpretations of the mechanisms that control the Kd values. Thus, physical, geochemical, and hydrological characterization of the sediments and pore waters should be conducted to increase our understanding of the site-specific Kd measurements. More details for methods and results will be provided in the formal technical report in FY 2007.

  10. Physical-chemical characterization of sediments from Lapa Grande de Taquaracu archaeological site, MG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project the elemental concentrations of Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb and Zn were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in 60 sediment samples from Lapa Grande de Taquaracu archaeological site, located in MG State. The samples were provided by Dr. Astolfo Gomes de Mello Araujo from the Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, University of Sao Paulo. This site is a palaeoindian rockshelter located near Lagoa Santa karst with characteristics which could be used to test karst abandonment model during the Middle Holocene related to dry conditions. The results of elemental concentrations, interpreted by multivariate statistical analysis, showed the formation of three different compositional and well-defined groups. The variable selection study by means of Procrusts analysis was also carried out. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were also performed in 8 samples to study their mineralogical composition and they showed that there are distinctions in crystalline structure between the samples of the three elemental compositional groups, being quartz, calcite, dolomite and mica the main crystalline phases present in the samples. (author)

  11. Characterization of toxic impacts on living marine resources in tidal rivers of the Chesapeake Bay

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, M.H.; Hyland, J. L.; Key, P B; Wirth, E. F.; Balthis, W. L.; Cooksey, C.; K. Chung; Leight, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    In 1999, the Chesapeake Bay Program completed a survey of existing data on chemical contaminants and the potential for bioeffects in 38 tidal river systems of Chesapeake Bay. This review led to the identification of 20 areas for which there were insufficient data to adequately characterize the potential for contaminant bioeffects on the Bay’s living resources. The goal of the present study was to estimate the current status of ecological condition in five of these areas and thus help to...

  12. Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ''baseline'' risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site

  13. Gene expression profiling in liver and testis of rats to characterize the toxicity of triazole fungicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four triazole fungicides were studied using toxicogenomic techniques to identify potential mechanisms of action. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed for 14 days by gavage with fluconazole, myclobutanil, propiconazole, or triadimefon. Following exposure, serum was collected for hormone measurements, and liver and testes were collected for histology, enzyme biochemistry, or gene expression profiling. Body and testis weights were unaffected, but liver weights were significantly increased by all four triazoles, and hepatocytes exhibited centrilobular hypertrophy. Myclobutanil exposure increased serum testosterone and decreased sperm motility, but no treatment-related testis histopathology was observed. We hypothesized that gene expression profiles would identify potential mechanisms of toxicity and used DNA microarrays and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to generate profiles. Triazole fungicides are designed to inhibit fungal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 51 enzyme but can also modulate the expression and function of mammalian CYP genes and enzymes. Triazoles affected the expression of numerous CYP genes in rat liver and testis, including multiple Cyp2c and Cyp3a isoforms as well as other xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME) and transporter genes. For some genes, such as Ces2 and Udpgtr2, all four triazoles had similar effects on expression, suggesting possible common mechanisms of action. Many of these CYP, XME and transporter genes are regulated by xeno-sensing nuclear receptors, and hierarchical clustering of CAR/PXR-regulated genes demonstrated the similarities of toxicogenomic responses in liver between all four triazoles and in testis between myclobutanil and triadimefon. Triazoles also affected expression of multiple genes involved in steroid hormone metabolism in the two tissues. Thus, gene expression profiles helped identify possible toxicological mechanisms of the triazole fungicides

  14. Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

  15. Estimation of carbonate concentration and characterization of marine sediments by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Veerasingam, S.; Venkatachalapathy, R.

    Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa – 403 004, India 2Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar- 608 002, Tamil Nadu, India Email: physicssingam@gmail.com veerasingams@nio.org 3Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University... of the classical methods for molecular characterization of organic and inorganic species. This standing is due to its sensitivity to the chemical composition and architecture of molecules. The basic principle of the FTIR spectroscopic technique is that those...

  16. Toxicity, antioxidant activity and phytochemical characterization of Coccoloba mollis roots and leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Iuri Bezerra de Barros; Queli Cristina Fidelis; Juliana Feijo de Souza Daniel; Jurandir Pereira Pinto; Audrey Alesandra Stinhen Garcia Lonni; Gideão Silva Ribeiro; Raimundo Braz- Filho; Norton Resende de Araújo; Dalva Trevisan Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Coccoloba mollis is a plant that is used in medicine in Londrina, Brazil. The root extract showed stronger activity against A. salina (68.5 μg/mL) than did the leaf extract (1342 μg mL), and demonstrated good activity when compared with the positive control (16.24 μg /mL). The antioxidant potential (Diphenylpicrylhydrazyl – DPPH) of root and leaf extracts was comparable to that of commonly used BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene). In the chemical characterization the compounds identified were a mi...

  17. Characterization of phenolic compounds of OMW: toxicity and degrability by yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Cristiana; Ferreira, João P.; Lopes, Marlene; Falcão, Soraia; Peres, António M.; Cardoso, Susana M.; Belo, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    The olive oil extraction, performed by the 3-phases process, results on a large amount of an effluent, usually known as Olive Mill Wastewater (OMW). It is mainly produced in the Mediterranean area, with the exception of Spain that is one of the major producers but mostly use the 2-phases process. OMW represents a major environmental problem due to its high organic content, being characterized by a strong acidic smell and an intensive brown to dark color due to the presence of b...

  18. The use of multivariate analysis to link sediment contamination and toxicity data to establish sediment quality guidelines: an example in the Gulf of Cadiz (Spain); El uso del analisis multivariante en la union de datos de toxicidad y contaminacion para establecer guias de calidad de sedimento: Un ejemplo en la Bahia de Cadiz (Espana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Valls, T. Angel; Forja, Jesus M [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad de Cadiz, Cadiz, (Spain); Gomez-Parra, Abelardo [Instituto de Ciencias Marinas de Andalucia, CSIC, Puerto Real, Cadiz, (Spain)

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate marine sediment quality in the Gulf of Cadiz, chemical concentration and toxicity test endpoints from sediments were linked using multivariate analysis. Sediment samples were collected synoptically at seven stations in two littoral ecosystems of the Gulf of Cadiz (five in the Bay of Cadiz and two in the salt marsh of the Barbate River), and subjected to six separate, replicated sediment toxicity tests and comprehensive sediment chemistry analyses. The toxic effects of sediments were tested using three operational sediment phases: whole sediment, using the estuarine amphipod Microdeutopus gryllotalpa (10 d static: survival) and the estuarine clam Ruditapes philippinaru (48 h static: survival) and of the marine fish Sparus aurata (48 h static. Survival); and interstitial water, using populations of the estuarine rotifer Brachionus Plicatilis (7 d static: Population decline) and of the marine bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum (Microtox ). To evaluate the levels of contamination, the concentrations in the sediments of organic carbon, 14 trace metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Ag, Hg, As, Sn, V, Ni, Co and Cr) and the surfactant linear alkylbenzenesulphonate (LAS) were measured. The results of the toxicity tests were compared in a dose-response relationship between sites, demonstrating a general agreement between the toxicity values determined by all the tests, except in the case of interstitial water toxicity (principally due to toxic mixtures of trace metals). Data derived from sediment chemistry and bioassays were assembled by multivariate statistical techniques (PCA and factor analysis), showing that the two data types could be represented by only five factors corresponding to five overlapping chemical-biological effect relations. Positive prevalence of these factors in the cases studied was used to establish those ranges in chemical concentrations associated with adverse effects. The sediment quality guidelines, in terms of concentrations at or below

  19. Review on physical and chemical characterizations of contaminated sediments from urban stormwater infiltration basins within the framework of the French observatory for urban hydrology (SOERE URBIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mufleh, Amelène; Béchet, Béatrice; Ruban, Véronique; Legret, Michel; Clozel, Blandine; Barraud, Sylvie; Gonzalez-Merchan, Carolina; Bedell, Jean-Philippe; Delolme, Cécile

    2014-04-01

    Urban stormwater infiltration basins are designed to hold runoff from impervious surfaces and allow the settling of sediments and associated pollutants. However concerns have been expressed about the environmental impacts that may be exerted by the trapped pollutants on groundwater, soils and ecosystems. In this context, sediment characterization represents a key issue for local authorities in terms of management strategies. During the last two decades, several studies were launched including either physical or chemical characterization of stormwater sediments but without real synthesis of data and methods used. Consequently, there is an important need for reviewing the current experimental techniques devoted to the physico-chemical characterization of sediment. The review is based on the outcomes of two experimental sites for which long term monitoring and data collection have been done: the Cheviré basin (near Nantes) and the Django Reinhardt basin (near Lyon). The authors summarize the studies dealing with bulk properties, pollutant contents, their potential mobility and speciation. This paper aims at promoting the significant progresses that were made through a multidisciplinary approach involving multi-scaled and combined experimental techniques. PMID:24453012

  20. Characterization of Five Zoonotic Streptococcus suis Strains from Germany, Including One Isolate from a Recent Fatal Case of Streptococcal Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome in a Hunter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Hudemann, Christoph; Hossain, Hamid M; Hewer, Angela; Tello, Khodr; Bandorski, Dirk; Rohde, Manfred; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Baums, Christoph Georg

    2015-12-01

    A Streptococcus suis isolate from a German hunter with streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (STSLS) and four additional zoonotic isolates were genotyped as mrp(+) epf* (variant 1890) sly(+) cps2(+). All five zoonotic German strains were characterized by high multiplication in human blood samples ex vivo, but induction of only low levels of proinflammatory cytokines compared to a Chinese STSLS strain. PMID:26424844

  1. Distribution, enrichment, and potential toxicity of trace metals in the surface sediments of Sundarban mangrove ecosystem, Bangladesh: a baseline study before Sundarban oil spill of December, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Alok; Ramanathan, Al; Prasad, M B K; Datta, Dilip; Kumar, Manoj; Sappal, Swati Mohan

    2016-05-01

    The distribution, enrichment, and ecotoxicity potential of Bangladesh part of Sundarban mangrove was investigated for eight trace metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn) using sediment quality assessment indices. The average concentration of trace metals in the sediments exceeded the crustal abundance suggesting sources other than natural in origin. Additionally, the trace metals profile may be a reflection of socio-economic development in the vicinity of Sundarban which further attributes trace metals abundance to the anthropogenic inputs. A total of eleven surficial sediment samples were collected along a vertical transect along the freshwater-saline water gradient. The sediment samples were digested using EPA 3051 method and were analyzed on ICP-MS. Geo-accumulation index suggests moderately polluted sediment quality with respect to Ni and As and background concentrations for Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Co, As, and Cd. Contamination factor analysis suggested low contamination by Zn, Cr, Co, and Cd, moderate by Fe, Mn, Cu, and Pb while Ni and As show considerable and high contamination, respectively. Enrichment factors for Ni, Pb, and As suggests high contamination from either biota or anthropogenic inputs besides natural enrichment. As per the three sediment quality guidelines, Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni, Co, and As would be more of a concern with respect to ecotoxicological risk in the Sundarban mangroves. The correlation between various physiochemical variables and trace metals suggested significant role of fine grained particles (clay) in trace metal distribution whereas owing to low organic carbon content in the region the organic complexation may not be playing significant role in trace metal distribution in the Sundarban mangroves. PMID:26822216

  2. Geno-toxicity assay of sediment and water samples from the Upper Silesia post-mining areas, Poland by means of Allium-test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geras' kin, S.; Oudalova, A.; Michalik, B.; Dikareva, N.; Dikarev, V. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology & Agroecology RAAS, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    Genotoxic potential of two environmental compartments (water and sediment) from the Upper Silesia Coal Basin (USCB), Poland were evaluated and compared by employing root meristem cells of Allium cepa. The clear genotoxic effect of water and sediment sampled was shown, with an important contribution of severe types of cytogenetic abnormalities. The most biologically relevant pollutants were revealed through multivariate statistical analysis of relationships between biological effects registered and the environment contamination. Overall, results of simultaneous use of conventional monitoring methods and biological tests suggested that contemporary levels of persistent pollutants in post-mining areas of the USCB may enhance the risk both for human health and biological components of natural ecosystems.

  3. Toxicity, antioxidant activity and phytochemical characterization of Coccoloba mollis roots and leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuri Bezerra de Barros

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Coccoloba mollis is a plant that is used in medicine in Londrina, Brazil. The root extract showed stronger activity against A. salina (68.5 μg/mL than did the leaf extract (1342 μg mL, and demonstrated good activity when compared with the positive control (16.24 μg /mL. The antioxidant potential (Diphenylpicrylhydrazyl – DPPH of root and leaf extracts was comparable to that of commonly used BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene. In the chemical characterization the compounds identified were a mixture of long chain hydrocarbons, carboxyl esters and 3-taraxerone from leaf ethanolic extract and two anthraquinones (emodin and physcion from the root one. Phytochemical screening using pharmacognostic methodology revealed the presence of flavonoids and tannins in leaves and roots. Anthraquinones only in the roots. While this analysis resulted negative for alkaloids, coumarins, saponins and simple phenolics. We conclude that the identified emodin and physcion in roots extract, corroborate with the anti-stress action and the use for memory loss attributed by popular use of this medicinal plant in the Londrina region.

  4. Process-diagnostic patterns of chlorobiphenyl congeners in two radiochronologically characterized sediment cores from the northern Baffin Bay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, O.; Axelman, J.; Broman, D.;

    2001-01-01

    sediments, corresponding to the past 170 years, in a single dated core from the Baffin Bay shelf. Fluxes of the dominant individual congeners in the surface sediments were 20-100 mug m(-2) d(-1). Combining these data with the sediment data from the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, it appears that...... the PCB distribution in Arctic surface sediments is governed by the organic carbon (OC) content of the sediments. The historical development of the PCB congener fingerprint suggests that the modern sediments are enriched in medium-chlorinated congeners, implying that there are at least two significant......, consistent with a temperature-driven global fractionation process. The significant presence of PCB in historical archives pre-dating the organochlorine society, as observed in this and several previous studies, awaits a fuller explanation. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  5. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the C Tank Farm: Borehole C4297 and RCRA Borehole 299-E27-22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. JEFFREY; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Parker, Kent E.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2006-10-18

    The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) C. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole C4297, installed adjacent to Tank C-105, and from borehole 299-E27-22, installed directly north of the C Tank Farm. Sediments from borehole 299-E27-22 were considered to be background uncontaminated sediments against which to compare contaminated sediments for the C Tank Farm characterization effort. This report also presents our interpretation of the data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the C Tank Farm. The information presented in this report supports the A-AX, C and U Waste Management Area field investigation report(a) in preparation by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. A core log was generated for both boreholes and a geologic evaluation of all core samples was performed at the time of opening. Aliquots of sediment from the borehole core samples were analyzed and characterized in the laboratory for the following parameters: moisture content, gamma-emitting radionuclides, one-to-one water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, and 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of contaminants). Two key radiocontaminants

  6. Biodegradable polymeric system for cisplatin delivery: Development, in vitro characterization and investigation of toxicity profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Noor; Khare, Vaibhav; Dubey, Ravindra; Saneja, Ankit [Formulation and Drug Delivery Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Jammu (India); Kushwaha, Manoj; Singh, Gurdarshan; Sharma, Neelam; Chandan, Balkrishan [PK-PD-Toxicology Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Jammu (India); Gupta, Prem N., E-mail: pngupta10@gmail.com [Formulation and Drug Delivery Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Jammu (India)

    2014-05-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent anticancer agent used in the treatment of various solid tumors, however, its clinical use is limited due to severe adverse effects including nephrotoxicity. In this investigation cisplatin loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles were developed and characterized for various in vitro characteristics including size distribution, zeta potential, drug loading and release profile. PLGA nanoparticles were successfully developed as investigated using scanning electron microscopy and exhibited average particles size and zeta potential as 284.8 nm and − 15.8 mV, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry indicated an absence of any polymer–drug interactions. Cisplatin nanoparticles exhibited in vitro anticancer activity against A549 cells comparable to that of cisplatin solution. The biodistribution study in mice indicated that the kidney cisplatin level was significantly (p < 0.01) lower with cisplatin nanoparticles than cisplatin solution. Following two cycles of cisplatin treatment, a week apart, blood urea nitrogen level was found to be higher in case of cisplatin solution as compared to cisplatin nanoparticles. Further, there was a significant (p < 0.01) increase in plasma creatinine level in case of cisplatin solution as compared to cisplatin nanoparticles. Histopathological examination of kidney from cisplatin nanoparticles treated group revealed no kidney damage, however, a sign of nephrotoxicity was observed in the case of cisplatin solution. The results suggest that PLGA nanoparticle based formulation could be a potential option for cisplatin delivery. - Highlights: • Cisplatin is detected by LCMS following complexation with DDTC. • Nanoparticles showed lower cisplatin accumulation in the kidney. • Nephrotoxicity was evaluated by BUN and creatinine level and by histopathology. • Nanoparticles exhibited lower nephrotoxicity.

  7. Assessment of heavy metal contamination levels and toxicity in sediments and fishes from the Mediterranean Sea (southern coast of Sfax, Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohra, Ben Salem; Habib, Ayadi

    2016-07-01

    Contamination of heavy metals in sediment is regarded as a global crisis with a large share in industrializing cities like Sfax (Tunisia). Seven heavy metals such as Cadmium (Cd), Copper (Cu), Iron (Fe), Mercury (Hg), Nickel (Ni), Lead (Pb), and Zinc (Zn), and one metalloid such as Arsenic (As) in sediments and fish (D. annularis, L. aurata, and S. vulgaris) were investigated from the Southern coast of Sfax in Tunisia. The range of metals in sediments were 13.11-36; 4.42-7.92; 8.23-28.56; 50,564-11,956; 2.9-6.8; 9.13-30.51; 65.06-151.50, and 47-546 kg(-1) DW for As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn. The level of studied metals in sediment samples exceeded the limits of the quality assessment guidelines (SQGs). The potential ecological risk index (PERI) proved that the investigated region could pose moderate risk for the aquatic biota. Metal bioaccumulation in the fish muscles varied significantly among species. Indeed, S. vulgaris and D. annularis accumulated higher amount of metal than L. aurata. The target hazard quotients (THQ) of individual heavy metals in fish, except for As and Hg, revealed safe levels for human consumption. Nevertheless, the total THQ indexes exceeded 1 suggesting the combined effects on muscles fish, which may constitute a risk to population's health. PMID:27040542

  8. The remedial investigation of marine sediment at the United Heckathorn Superfund site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, P.J.; Kohn, N.P.; Gardiner, W.W.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    The former United Heckathom site in Richmond, California, was used to process and package chlorinated pesticides from the 1940s to the mid-1960s. These activities resulted in the contamination of upland soils and marine sediment in the adjacent waterways. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was requested by USEPA to conduct a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS). of the marine portion of the site. The objectives of this RI are to determine the extent of pesticide contamination in inner Richmond Harbor, estimate the total volume of contaminated sediment, characterize the subsurface geology; characterize the biological effects of contaminated sediment; and characterize the quality of effluent derived from dewatered sediment through treatability testing. Sediment cores were collected from 53 stations. Vertical subsamples from each sediment core were analyzed for chlorinated pesticides. Sediment from selected cores was also analyzed for other contaminants. Younger Bay Mud (YBM) sediment from multiple stations was mixed to form composite samples representing various segments of the study area. These composites were used for solid-phase toxicity and bioaccumulation tests, and the preparation of liquid-phase samples for treatability testing. The probable quality of effluent produced by dewatering sediment was evaluated by chemical and toxicological testing of suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) and elutriate samples.

  9. Multibiomarker toxicity characterization of uranium mine drainages to the fish Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa, M L; Antunes, S C; Pereira, R; Gonçalves, F J M; Nunes, B

    2016-07-01

    The release of acidic effluents, naturally enriched in metals and radionuclides, is the main legacy of uranium mines. Generally, metals dissolved by these acidic effluents can cause significant alterations in exposed organisms, with distinct toxicological outcomes. In this study, 72 individuals of the freshwater fish species Carassius auratus were exposed in situ for different periods (8, 16, 24, and 48 h) to water from a pond (treatment pond (TP)) with a chemically treated effluent and a reference pond (PRP), in the vicinity of the Cunha Baixa uranium mine (Portugal). Comparing the water of the two ponds, the PRP pond was characterized by higher pH and oxygen values and lower conductivity and hardness values. Regarding total metal concentrations, among others, magnesium (56,000 μg/L), sodium (17,400 μg/L), zinc (86 μg/L), manganese (6340 μg/L), and uranium (1380 μg/L) concentrations in the TP pond were above the values obtained for the PRP pond. The values of manganese and uranium exceeded the values of quality criteria established for surface waters for cyprinids and for irrigation purposes. After exposure to pond water, significant differences were recorded for several biomarkers: (i) between ponds for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with higher activities for animals from the PRP and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities that were particularly enhanced in animals from the TP pond; (ii) between ponds and exposure periods for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, since organisms from PRP pond presented always higher values than those from the TP pond, and among these, organisms exposed for the longer period presented a further depression in LDH activity; and (iii) between exposure periods for erythrocyte micronucleus. GSTs and LDH were the most sensitive biomarkers within the timeframe of the in situ assay performed. Despite the alleged efficacy of the chemical treatment (evidenced by a significantly lower pH), some metals persisted in the treated

  10. Characterization of Direct-Push Vadose Zone Sediments from the 241-B and 241-BX Tank Farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Iovin, Cristian; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Clayton, Eric T.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Orr, Robert D.

    2007-12-21

    Geochemical tests provide evidence for the transit of a plume of caustic waste solution through the sediment column at the Hanford 241-B and -BX Tank Farms. Direct-push samples recovered from boreholes surrounding Tanks 241-B-110 and 241-BX-102 and related waste transfer lines and diversion boxes included sediments typical of those previously recovered from other localities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford formation sediments are dominantly quartzo-feldspathic sands strewn with lithic fragments, displaying a range of particle size distributions and sorting characteristics. Some moderately well-sorted, fine-grained lithologies are interpreted as lenticular bodies irregularly dispersed in coarser-grained, more poorly sorted sediments. Tier I tests conducted on the vadose zone sediments revealed an inverse correlation between moisture content and sediment size fraction (i.e., there is greater moisture content in finer-grained sediments). The Tier I tests also showed that the pore water solutions were likely sodium-rich, moderately saline, and possessed higher pH values than background (untainted) sediments. These data are characteristic of sediments that have encountered sodium-rich, saline, caustic waste solution, as documented in other reports at other suspect contamination sites around Hanford. Analyses of solutions from 1:1 water extracts reveal relatively balanced cation and anion concentrations, indicating that most of the geochemical species have been accounted for. The water extract data for affected sediments also indicate unusually high concentrations of aluminum, iron, and phosphorus. The relatively high concentrations of aluminum and iron may be the result of dissolution of secondary amorphous phases that precipitated after a reactive plume partially dissolved aluminum- and iron-bearing phases as it migrated through the sediment column. On the other hand, the presence of elevated concentrations of phosphorous may be the tell-tale signature of wastes

  11. Sevoflurane-Sulfobutylether-β-Cyclodextrin Complex: Preparation, Characterization, Cellular Toxicity, Molecular Modeling and Blood-Brain Barrier Transport Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Shityakov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation was to study the ability of sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBEβCD to form an inclusion complex with sevoflurane (SEV, a volatile anesthetic with poor water solubility. The inclusion complex was prepared, characterized and its cellular toxicity and blood-brain barrier (BBB permeation potential of the formulated SEV have also been examined for the purpose of controlled drug delivery. The SEV-SBEβCD complex was nontoxic to the primary brain microvascular endothelial (pEND cells at a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane. The inclusion complex exhibited significantly higher BBB permeation profiles as compared with the reference substance (propranolol concerning calculated apparent permeability values (Papp. In addition, SEV binding affinity to SBEβCD was confirmed by a minimal Gibbs free energy of binding (ΔGbind value of −1.727 ± 0.042 kcal·mol−1 and an average binding constant (Kb of 53.66 ± 9.24 mM indicating rapid drug liberation from the cyclodextrin amphiphilic cavity.

  12. Sevoflurane-Sulfobutylether-β-Cyclodextrin Complex: Preparation, Characterization, Cellular Toxicity, Molecular Modeling and Blood-Brain Barrier Transport Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shityakov, Sergey; Puskás, István; Pápai, Katalin; Salvador, Ellaine; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola; Broscheit, Jens-Albert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to study the ability of sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBEβCD) to form an inclusion complex with sevoflurane (SEV), a volatile anesthetic with poor water solubility. The inclusion complex was prepared, characterized and its cellular toxicity and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeation potential of the formulated SEV have also been examined for the purpose of controlled drug delivery. The SEV-SBEβCD complex was nontoxic to the primary brain microvascular endothelial (pEND) cells at a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane. The inclusion complex exhibited significantly higher BBB permeation profiles as compared with the reference substance (propranolol) concerning calculated apparent permeability values (Papp). In addition, SEV binding affinity to SBEβCD was confirmed by a minimal Gibbs free energy of binding (ΔGbind) value of -1.727 ± 0.042 kcal·mol-1 and an average binding constant (Kb) of 53.66 ± 9.24 mM indicating rapid drug liberation from the cyclodextrin amphiphilic cavity. PMID:26046323

  13. Characterization of forced degradation products of pazopanib hydrochloride by UHPLC-Q-TOF/MS and in silico toxicity prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Prinesh N; Kalariya, Pradipbhai D; Sharma, Mahesh; Garg, Prabha; Talluri, M V N Kumar; Gananadhamu, S; Srinivas, R

    2015-07-01

    Pazopanib (PZ), an anti-cancer drug, was subjected to forced degradation under hydrolytic (acid, base and neutral), oxidative, photolytic and thermal stress conditions as per International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. A selective stability indicating validated method was developed using a Waters Acquity UPLC HSS T3 (100 × 2.1 mm, 1.7 µm) column in gradient mode with ammonium acetate buffer (10 mM, pH 5.0) and acetonitrile. PZ was found to degrade only in photolytic conditions to produce six transformation products (TPs). All the TPs were identified and characterized by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry experiments in combination with accurate mass measurements. Plausible mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of TPs. In silico toxicity was predicted using TOPKAT and DEREK softwares for all the TPs. The TP, N4-(2,3-dimethyl-2H-indazol-6-yl)-N4-methylpyrimidine-2,4-diamine, was found to be genotoxic, whereas all other TPs with sulfonamide moiety were hepatotoxic. The data reported here are expected to be of significance as this study foresees the formation of one potential genotoxic and five hepatotoxic degradation/transformation products. PMID:26349647

  14. Identification and characterization of freshwater algae from a pollution gradient using rbcL sequencing and toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novis, Phil M; Halle, Cornelia; Wilson, Belinda; Tremblay, Louis A

    2009-10-01

    One approach in toxicity testing using microalgae is to assess the modulation of light energy absorbed as a result of exposure to contaminants. In this study, four strains of microalgae were isolated to obtain a variety of taxa for testing from sites receiving various levels of environmental stressors around Christchurch, New Zealand. The strains were characterized by partially sequencing rbcL, a routinely used gene in plant phylogenetics with a large existing database of strains. Based on morphological observation and gene sequences, the strains were identified as Chlorella sp., Neochloris sp., and Choricystis minor. The isolates were exposed to the herbicide glyphosate and the metal zinc, and their responses were measured using the ToxY-PAM system. Chlorella sp. was the most sensitive. Two strains of Choricystis minor were isolated from different ponds in an effluent gradient at a sewage treatment plant. Analysis of variance indicated that the isolate from the least contaminated pond was more sensitive to zinc (although regression analysis did not show this result). This suggests that the selective pressure exerted on algal strains by a contamination gradient over short a distance is detectable by both genetic and physiological methods, with implications for sourcing appropriate indicator organisms from the environment. PMID:19308636

  15. Synthesis characterization and toxicity of lanthanide complexes with schiff bases derived from S-benzoyl dithiocarbazate and aldehydes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New O:N:S and N:S donor ligands namely, S-benzoyl-N-(o-hydroxybenzaldehyde) dithiocarbazate, S-benzoyl-N-(N,N-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde ) dithiocarbazate, S-benzoyl-N(N-thiophene-2-aldehyde) dithiocarbazate and their complexes with La(III), Ce(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), Ho(III), Er(III), Yb(III), and Lu(III) have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, NMR and electronic spectroscopy. The nephelauxetic effect(1-βoverlined), bonding parameter, βoverlined, bsup(1/2) and Sinha covalency parameter δ, have been calculated. Their positive values indicate covalent nature of metal-ligand bond which is also supported by their molar conductances measured in nitrobenzene. Magnetic moment values exhibit paramagnetic nature of the complexes. Log K,ΔG, ΔH and ΔS values have also been ca lculated. Toxicity of the compounds has been evaluated against cockroaches and fungi(Aspergillus flavus and A. niger). The LD50 and % inhibition values demonstrate greater efficacy of the complexes than that of the free bases. (author). 4 tabs., 12 refs

  16. Lagos lagoon sediment organic extracts and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce embryotoxic, teratogenic and genotoxic effects in Danio rerio (zebrafish) embryos:Toxic effects of Lagos lagoon sediment extracts in Danio rerio embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Sogbanmu, Temitope; Nagy, Eszter; Phillips, David Hunter; Arlt, Volker Manfred; Otitoloju, Adebayo; Bury, Nicolas Richard

    2016-01-01

    An expansion of anthropogenic activity around Lagos lagoon, Nigeria has raised concerns over increasing contaminants entering the lagoon’s ecosystem. The embryotoxicity, teratogenicity and genotoxicity of sediment organic extracts from four sampling zones around Lagos lagoon, Ilaje, Iddo, Atlas Cove and Apapa, as well as the dominant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) identified in water measured during the wet season (naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene and a mixture of th...

  17. Sediment contamination and associates laboratory-measured bioaccumulation in New York/New Jersey waterways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosman, L.B. [Army Corps of Engineers, New York, NY (United States); Barrows, E.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Sediments from 10 New York/New Jersey waterways within the Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Long Island Sound were collected to depths representative of dredging activity. Composited core sediments representing each waterway were analyzed for metals, PAHs, PCBs, and pesticides. To assess bioaccumulation, sand worms (Nereis virens) and blunt-nose clams (Macoma nasuta) were exposed for 28 days to sediment composites and to New York Bight sediment. Tissues were analyzed for the same constituents as the sediment samples. The results highlight the range and magnitude of sediment contamination in NY/NJ waterways. Concentrations of some metals in sediments, compared with NY Bight sediment, were at least 10 times higher. Total PAHs reached 30,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). The sum of DDT, DDD, and DDE, the dominant pesticides, exceeded 3,000{micro}g/kg (dry weight). Total PCBs approached 3,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). Tissues exposed to sediments from several waterways bioaccumulated organic compounds at concentrations 10 times greater than those exposed to New York Bight sediments. Metals were bioaccumulated to a lesser degree. The presence and extent of bioaccumulated contaminants, along with sediment chemistry and benthic toxicity, create a profile characterizing each waterway.

  18. Characterization of sediment sources, sediment budget estimations, consequences and implications for populations in the Jatún Mayu watershed (Cochabamba, Bolivia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuignier, Jean-Marie; Penna, Ivanna; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Sudmeier-Rieux, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Natural and human-induced erosive processes shape landscape by transferring masses from the mountain to downstream areas. They also impact population both located in the source areas of sediments as well as urban areas settle on the depositional area. Mountain areas in Bolivia present high surface dynamics and high rates of rural migrations, causing e.g. a significant increase of population in Cochabamba city in the last 20 years. This work aims to estimate the sediment production on the Jatún Mayu (Pankuruma) watershed in Cochabamba department taking into account the different origins of sediments. The population of this region is predominantly rural and quechua speaking. The region of study consists in a mountain area situated in the Andes with altitudes ranging from 2500 to 4600m. Field work on July 2014 and high resolution satellite image interpretation (2004 & 2009) allowed us to map and measure landslides and gullies. Almost a hundred of landslides are recorded mostly around the river channel in the middle and the lower part of the valley and provide a moving surface estimated at 3,15km2. Most of the gullies are situated in the upper part of the valley where the vegetation is less abundant on low-sloping agricultural lands. Photogrammetric reconstructions using camera and drone were the main method used to characterise some strategic points along the river in order to get dimensions of landslides, gullies, as well as the riverbed roughness, as the final goal was to model the flooding prone area at the mouth of the watershed, were migrants have been settling for the last years. A total of 9 points of interests along the river bed were surveyed and for each of them a square surface equal to 25m2 was analysed. Approximately 250 pictures by area were needed to estimate roughness along the channel. A flood model has been performed, by using the Riverflo-2D software, to produce a susceptibility map of the downstream region.

  19. Facies characterization based on physical properties from downhole logging for the sediment record of Lake Van, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, H.; Wonik, T.; Kwiecien, O.

    2014-11-01

    significant depth shifts of up to 2.5 m between the composite profile based on the VCD and the downhole measurements in hole 2D of the Ahlat Ridge, (b) a correlation was difficult to ascertain from the vertical resolution of the downhole logging data and the extremely detailed core description in mm-scale, (c) mixed signals were obtained because of prevailing thin layers and intercalations of different lithotypes and (d) cluster analysis was difficult to perform because the contrast within the input data is too low (possibly background sedimentation) to distinguish between glacial and interglacial deposits. Tephra units are characterized by contrasting properties and differ mainly in their magnetic susceptibility, spectral gamma ray components (uranium, thorium and potassium) and XRF-intensities of calcium and zirconium. Tephra units have been linked to the dominant volcanic composition of the deposited tephra layers and partly to the volcanic sources. Depth trends are derived with prevailing basaltic deposits in the bottom part (128 m-210 m below lake floor) and are gradually outweighed by the highly differentiated (dacitic and rhyolitic/trachytic) products towards the top of the record.

  20. Haw River sediment quality assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report documents an evaluation of chemical contaminants in, and toxicity of, sediments collected from impoundments created by dams on the Haw River in Alamance...

  1. Vertical Segregation and Phylogenetic Characterization of Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in the Sediment of a Freshwater Aquaculture Pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shimin; Liu, Xingguo; Ma, Zhuojun; Liu, Qigen; Wu, Zongfan; Zeng, Xianlei; Shi, Xu; Gu, Zhaojun

    2016-01-01

    Pond aquaculture is the major freshwater aquaculture method in China. Ammonia-oxidizing communities inhabiting pond sediments play an important role in controlling culture water quality. However, the distribution and activities of ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities along sediment profiles are poorly understood in this specific environment. Vertical variations in the abundance, transcription, potential ammonia oxidizing rate, and community composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in sediment samples (0–50 cm depth) collected from a freshwater aquaculture pond were investigated. The concentrations of the AOA amoA gene were higher than those of the AOB by an order of magnitude, which suggested that AOA, as opposed to AOB, were the numerically predominant ammonia-oxidizing organisms in the surface sediment. This could be attributed to the fact that AOA are more resistant to low levels of dissolved oxygen. However, the concentrations of the AOB amoA mRNA were higher than those of the AOA by 2.5- to 39.9-fold in surface sediments (0–10 cm depth), which suggests that the oxidation of ammonia was mainly performed by AOB in the surface sediments, and by AOA in the deeper sediments, where only AOA could be detected. Clone libraries of AOA and AOB amoA sequences indicated that the diversity of AOA and AOB decreased with increasing depth. The AOB community consisted of two groups: the Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas clusters, and Nitrosomonas were predominant in the freshwater pond sediment. All AOA amoA gene sequences in the 0–2 cm deep sediment were grouped into the Nitrososphaera cluster, while other AOA sequences in deeper sediments (10–15 and 20–25 cm depths) were grouped into the Nitrosopumilus cluster. PMID:26834709

  2. Vertical segregation and phylogenetic characterization of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in the sediment of a freshwater aquaculture pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimin eLu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pond aquaculture is the major freshwater aquaculture method in China. Ammonia-oxidizing communities inhabiting pond sediments play an important role in controlling culture water quality. However, the distribution and activities of ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities along sediment profiles are poorly understood in this specific environment. Vertical variations in the abundance, transcription, potential ammonia oxidizing rate, and community composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA in sediment samples (0–50 cm depth collected from a freshwater aquaculture pond were investigated. The concentrations of the AOA amoA gene were higher than those of the AOB by an order of magnitude, which suggested that AOA, as opposed to AOB, were the numerically predominant ammonia-oxidizing organisms in the surface sediment. This could be attributed to the fact that AOA are more resistant to low levels of dissolved oxygen. However, the concentrations of the AOB amoA mRNA were higher than those of the AOA by 2.5–39.9-fold in surface sediments (0–10 cm depth, which suggests that the oxidation of ammonia was mainly performed by AOB in the surface sediments, and by AOA in the deeper sediments, where only AOA could be detected. Clone libraries of AOA and AOB amoA sequences indicated that the diversity of AOA and AOB decreased with increasing depth. The AOB community consisted of two groups: the Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas clusters, and Nitrosomonas were predominant in the freshwater pond sediment. All AOA amoA gene sequences in the 0–2 cm deep sediment were grouped into the Nitrososphaera cluster, while other AOA sequences in deeper sediments (10–15 and 20–25 cm depths were grouped into the Nitrosopumilus cluster.

  3. NONIDEAL TRANSPORT OF CONTAMINANTS IN HETEROGENEOUS POROUS MEDIA: CHARACTERIZING AND MODELING ASYMPTOTIC CONTAMINANT ELUTION TAILING FOR SEVERAL SOILS AND AQUIFER SEDIMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    A. Russo; G. R Johnson; Schnaar, G.; Brusseau, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    Miscible-displacement experiments were conducted to characterize long-