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Sample records for characterization monte-carlo-based image

  1. Experimental Component Characterization, Monte-Carlo-Based Image Generation and Source Reconstruction for the Neutron Imaging System of the National Ignition Facility

    Barrera, C A; Moran, M J

    2007-08-21

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is one of seven ignition target diagnostics under development for the National Ignition Facility. The NIS is required to record hot-spot (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (6-10 MeV) images with a resolution of 10 microns and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10 at the 20% contour. The NIS is a valuable diagnostic since the downscattered neutrons reveal the spatial distribution of the cold fuel during an ignition attempt, providing important information in the case of a failed implosion. The present study explores the parameter space of several line-of-sight (LOS) configurations that could serve as the basis for the final design. Six commercially available organic scintillators were experimentally characterized for their light emission decay profile and neutron sensitivity. The samples showed a long lived decay component that makes direct recording of a downscattered image impossible. The two best candidates for the NIS detector material are: EJ232 (BC422) plastic fibers or capillaries filled with EJ399B. A Monte Carlo-based end-to-end model of the NIS was developed to study the imaging capabilities of several LOS configurations and verify that the recovered sources meet the design requirements. The model includes accurate neutron source distributions, aperture geometries (square pinhole, triangular wedge, mini-penumbral, annular and penumbral), their point spread functions, and a pixelated scintillator detector. The modeling results show that a useful downscattered image can be obtained by recording the primary peak and the downscattered images, and then subtracting a decayed version of the former from the latter. The difference images need to be deconvolved in order to obtain accurate source distributions. The images are processed using a frequency-space modified-regularization algorithm and low-pass filtering. The resolution and SNR of these sources are quantified by using two surrogate sources. The simulations show that all LOS

  2. Comparative evaluations of the Monte Carlo-based light propagation simulation packages for optical imaging

    Lin Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo simulation of light propagation in turbid medium has been studied for years. A number of software packages have been developed to handle with such issue. However, it is hard to compare these simulation packages, especially for tissues with complex heterogeneous structures. Here, we first designed a group of mesh datasets generated by Iso2Mesh software, and used them to cross-validate the accuracy and to evaluate the performance of four Monte Carlo-based simulation packages, including Monte Carlo model of steady-state light transport in multi-layered tissues (MCML, tetrahedron-based inhomogeneous Monte Carlo optical simulator (TIMOS, Molecular Optical Simulation Environment (MOSE, and Mesh-based Monte Carlo (MMC. The performance of each package was evaluated based on the designed mesh datasets. The merits and demerits of each package were also discussed. Comparative results showed that the TIMOS package provided the best performance, which proved to be a reliable, efficient, and stable MC simulation package for users.

  3. Monte Carlo-based tail exponent estimator

    Barunik, Jozef; Vacha, Lukas

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we propose a new approach to estimation of the tail exponent in financial stock markets. We begin the study with the finite sample behavior of the Hill estimator under α-stable distributions. Using large Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the Hill estimator overestimates the true tail exponent and can hardly be used on samples with small length. Utilizing our results, we introduce a Monte Carlo-based method of estimation for the tail exponent. Our proposed method is not sensitive to the choice of tail size and works well also on small data samples. The new estimator also gives unbiased results with symmetrical confidence intervals. Finally, we demonstrate the power of our estimator on the international world stock market indices. On the two separate periods of 2002-2005 and 2006-2009, we estimate the tail exponent.

  4. Monte Carlo based dosimetry and treatment planning for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    Zamenhof, R.G.; Brenner, J.F.; Wazer, D.E.; Madoc-Jones, H.; Clement, S.D.; Harling, O.K.; Yanch, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Monte Carlo based dosimetry and computer-aided treatment planning for neutron capture therapy have been developed to provide the necessary link between physical dosimetric measurements performed on the MITR-II epithermal-neutron beams and the need of the radiation oncologist to synthesize large amounts of dosimetric data into a clinically meaningful treatment plan for each individual patient. Monte Carlo simulation has been employed to characterize the spatial dose distributions within a skull/brain model irradiated by an epithermal-neutron beam designed for neutron capture therapy applications. The geometry and elemental composition employed for the mathematical skull/brain model and the neutron and photon fluence-to-dose conversion formalism are presented. A treatment planning program, NCTPLAN, developed specifically for neutron capture therapy, is described. Examples are presented illustrating both one and two-dimensional dose distributions obtainable within the brain with an experimental epithermal-neutron beam, together with beam quality and treatment plan efficacy criteria which have been formulated for neutron capture therapy. The incorporation of three-dimensional computed tomographic image data into the treatment planning procedure is illustrated

  5. Efficient sampling algorithms for Monte Carlo based treatment planning

    DeMarco, J.J.; Solberg, T.D.; Chetty, I.; Smathers, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    Efficient sampling algorithms are necessary for producing a fast Monte Carlo based treatment planning code. This study evaluates several aspects of a photon-based tracking scheme and the effect of optimal sampling algorithms on the efficiency of the code. Four areas were tested: pseudo-random number generation, generalized sampling of a discrete distribution, sampling from the exponential distribution, and delta scattering as applied to photon transport through a heterogeneous simulation geometry. Generalized sampling of a discrete distribution using the cutpoint method can produce speedup gains of one order of magnitude versus conventional sequential sampling. Photon transport modifications based upon the delta scattering method were implemented and compared with a conventional boundary and collision checking algorithm. The delta scattering algorithm is faster by a factor of six versus the conventional algorithm for a boundary size of 5 mm within a heterogeneous geometry. A comparison of portable pseudo-random number algorithms and exponential sampling techniques is also discussed

  6. Monte Carlo based dosimetry and treatment planning for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    Zamenhof, R.G.; Clement, S.D.; Harling, O.K.; Brenner, J.F.; Wazer, D.E.; Madoc-Jones, H.; Yanch, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Monte Carlo based dosimetry and computer-aided treatment planning for neutron capture therapy have been developed to provide the necessary link between physical dosimetric measurements performed on the MITR-II epithermal-neutron beams and the need of the radiation oncologist to synthesize large amounts of dosimetric data into a clinically meaningful treatment plan for each individual patient. Monte Carlo simulation has been employed to characterize the spatial dose distributions within a skull/brain model irradiated by an epithermal-neutron beam designed for neutron capture therapy applications. The geometry and elemental composition employed for the mathematical skull/brain model and the neutron and photon fluence-to-dose conversion formalism are presented. A treatment planning program, NCTPLAN, developed specifically for neutron capture therapy, is described. Examples are presented illustrating both one and two-dimensional dose distributions obtainable within the brain with an experimental epithermal-neutron beam, together with beam quality and treatment plan efficacy criteria which have been formulated for neutron capture therapy. The incorporation of three-dimensional computed tomographic image data into the treatment planning procedure is illustrated. The experimental epithermal-neutron beam has a maximum usable circular diameter of 20 cm, and with 30 ppm of B-10 in tumor and 3 ppm of B-10 in blood, it produces a beam-axis advantage depth of 7.4 cm, a beam-axis advantage ratio of 1.83, a global advantage ratio of 1.70, and an advantage depth RBE-dose rate to tumor of 20.6 RBE-cGy/min (cJ/kg-min). These characteristics make this beam well suited for clinical applications, enabling an RBE-dose of 2,000 RBE-cGy/min (cJ/kg-min) to be delivered to tumor at brain midline in six fractions with a treatment time of approximately 16 minutes per fraction

  7. An Application of Monte-Carlo-Based Sensitivity Analysis on the Overlap in Discriminant Analysis

    S. Razmyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Discriminant analysis (DA is used for the measurement of estimates of a discriminant function by minimizing their group misclassifications to predict group membership of newly sampled data. A major source of misclassification in DA is due to the overlapping of groups. The uncertainty in the input variables and model parameters needs to be properly characterized in decision making. This study combines DEA-DA with a sensitivity analysis approach to an assessment of the influence of banks’ variables on the overall variance in overlap in a DA in order to determine which variables are most significant. A Monte-Carlo-based sensitivity analysis is considered for computing the set of first-order sensitivity indices of the variables to estimate the contribution of each uncertain variable. The results show that the uncertainties in the loans granted and different deposit variables are more significant than uncertainties in other banks’ variables in decision making.

  8. GPU-Monte Carlo based fast IMRT plan optimization

    Yongbao Li

    2014-03-01

    , Shi F, Jiang S, Jia X. GPU-Monte Carlo based fast IMRT plan optimization. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(2:020244. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0202.44

  9. Implementation of a Monte Carlo based inverse planning model for clinical IMRT with MCNP code

    He, Tongming Tony

    2003-01-01

    Inaccurate dose calculations and limitations of optimization algorithms in inverse planning introduce systematic and convergence errors to treatment plans. This work was to implement a Monte Carlo based inverse planning model for clinical IMRT aiming to minimize the aforementioned errors. The strategy was to precalculate the dose matrices of beamlets in a Monte Carlo based method followed by the optimization of beamlet intensities. The MCNP 4B (Monte Carlo N-Particle version 4B) code was modified to implement selective particle transport and dose tallying in voxels and efficient estimation of statistical uncertainties. The resulting performance gain was over eleven thousand times. Due to concurrent calculation of multiple beamlets of individual ports, hundreds of beamlets in an IMRT plan could be calculated within a practical length of time. A finite-sized point source model provided a simple and accurate modeling of treatment beams. The dose matrix calculations were validated through measurements in phantoms. Agreements were better than 1.5% or 0.2 cm. The beamlet intensities were optimized using a parallel platform based optimization algorithm that was capable of escape from local minima and preventing premature convergence. The Monte Carlo based inverse planning model was applied to clinical cases. The feasibility and capability of Monte Carlo based inverse planning for clinical IMRT was demonstrated. Systematic errors in treatment plans of a commercial inverse planning system were assessed in comparison with the Monte Carlo based calculations. Discrepancies in tumor doses and critical structure doses were up to 12% and 17%, respectively. The clinical importance of Monte Carlo based inverse planning for IMRT was demonstrated

  10. A Monte Carlo-based model for simulation of digital chest tomo-synthesis

    Ullman, G.; Dance, D. R.; Sandborg, M.; Carlsson, G. A.; Svalkvist, A.; Baath, M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to calculate synthetic digital chest tomo-synthesis projections using a computer simulation model based on the Monte Carlo method. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was scanned in a computed tomography scanner, segmented and included in the computer model to allow for simulation of realistic high-resolution X-ray images. The input parameters to the model were adapted to correspond to the VolumeRAD chest tomo-synthesis system from GE Healthcare. Sixty tomo-synthesis projections were calculated with projection angles ranging from + 15 to -15 deg. The images from primary photons were calculated using an analytical model of the anti-scatter grid and a pre-calculated detector response function. The contributions from scattered photons were calculated using an in-house Monte Carlo-based model employing a number of variance reduction techniques such as the collision density estimator. Tomographic section images were reconstructed by transferring the simulated projections into the VolumeRAD system. The reconstruction was performed for three types of images using: (i) noise-free primary projections, (ii) primary projections including contributions from scattered photons and (iii) projections as in (ii) with added correlated noise. The simulated section images were compared with corresponding section images from projections taken with the real, anthropomorphic phantom from which the digital voxel phantom was originally created. The present article describes a work in progress aiming towards developing a model intended for optimisation of chest tomo-synthesis, allowing for simulation of both existing and future chest tomo-synthesis systems. (authors)

  11. Monte Carlo based toy model for fission process

    Kurniadi, R.; Waris, A.; Viridi, S.

    2014-01-01

    There are many models and calculation techniques to obtain visible image of fission yield process. In particular, fission yield can be calculated by using two calculations approach, namely macroscopic approach and microscopic approach. This work proposes another calculation approach in which the nucleus is treated as a toy model. Hence, the fission process does not represent real fission process in nature completely. The toy model is formed by Gaussian distribution of random number that randomizes distance like the distance between particle and central point. The scission process is started by smashing compound nucleus central point into two parts that are left central and right central points. These three points have different Gaussian distribution parameters such as mean (μ CN , μ L , μ R ), and standard deviation (σ CN , σ L , σ R ). By overlaying of three distributions, the number of particles (N L , N R ) that are trapped by central points can be obtained. This process is iterated until (N L , N R ) become constant numbers. Smashing process is repeated by changing σ L and σ R , randomly

  12. A Monte Carlo Based Spent Fuel Analysis Safeguards Strategy Assessment

    Fensin, Michael L.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Sandoval, Nathan P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, E540, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Safeguarding nuclear material involves the detection of diversions of significant quantities of nuclear materials, and the deterrence of such diversions by the risk of early detection. There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium in spent fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthening the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies ability to safeguards nuclear facilities, shipper/receiver difference, input accountability at reprocessing facilities and burnup credit at repositories. Many NDA techniques exist for measuring signatures from spent fuel; however, no single NDA technique can, in isolation, quantify elemental plutonium and other actinides of interest in spent fuel. A study has been undertaken to determine the best integrated combination of cost effective techniques for characterizing Pu mass in spent fuel for nuclear safeguards. A standardized assessment process was developed to compare the effective merits and faults of 12 different detection techniques in order to integrate a few techniques and to down-select among the techniques in preparation for experiments. The process involves generating a basis burnup/enrichment/cooling time dependent spent fuel assembly library, determining and identifying limiting diversion scenarios, developing detector models and quantifying the capability of each NDA technique. Because hundreds of input and output files must be managed in the couplings of data transitions for the different facets of the assessment process, a graphical user interface (GUI) was development that automates the process. This GUI allows users to visually create diversion scenarios with varied replacement materials, and generate a MCNPX fixed source detector assessment input file. The end result of the assembly library assessment is to select a set of common source terms and diversion scenarios for quantifying the capability of each of the 12 NDA techniques. We present here

  13. Poster - 20: Detector selection for commissioning of a Monte Carlo based electron dose calculation algorithm

    Anusionwu, Princess [Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg Canada (Canada); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg Canada (Canada); Alpuche Aviles, Jorge E. [Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg Canada (Canada); Pistorius, Stephen [Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg Canada (Canada); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg Canada (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Objective: Commissioning of a Monte Carlo based electron dose calculation algorithm requires percentage depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles which can be measured with multiple detectors. Electron dosimetry is commonly performed with cylindrical chambers but parallel plate chambers and diodes can also be used. The purpose of this study was to determine the most appropriate detector to perform the commissioning measurements. Methods: PDDs and beam profiles were measured for beams with energies ranging from 6 MeV to 15 MeV and field sizes ranging from 6 cm × 6 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. Detectors used included diodes, cylindrical and parallel plate ionization chambers. Beam profiles were measured in water (100 cm source to surface distance) and in air (95 cm source to detector distance). Results: PDDs for the cylindrical chambers were shallower (1.3 mm averaged over all energies and field sizes) than those measured with the parallel plate chambers and diodes. Surface doses measured with the diode and cylindrical chamber were on average larger by 1.6 % and 3% respectively than those of the parallel plate chamber. Profiles measured with a diode resulted in penumbra values smaller than those measured with the cylindrical chamber by 2 mm. Conclusion: The diode was selected as the most appropriate detector since PDDs agreed with those measured with parallel plate chambers (typically recommended for low energies) and results in sharper profiles. Unlike ion chambers, no corrections are needed to measure PDDs, making it more convenient to use.

  14. Monte Carlo-based investigation of water-equivalence of solid phantoms at 137Cs energy

    Vishwakarma, Ramkrushna S.; Palani Selvam, T.; Sahoo, Sridhar; Mishra, Subhalaxmi; Chourasiya, Ghanshyam

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of solid phantom materials such as solid water, virtual water, plastic water, RW1, polystyrene, and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) for their equivalence to liquid water at 137 Cs energy (photon energy of 662 keV) under full scatter conditions is carried out using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. Monte Carlo-based EGSnrc code system was used in the work to calculate distance-dependent phantom scatter corrections. The study also includes separation of primary and scattered dose components. Monte Carlo simulations are carried out using primary particle histories up to 5 x 10 9 to attain less than 0.3% statistical uncertainties in the estimation of dose. Water equivalence of various solid phantoms such as solid water, virtual water, RW1, PMMA, polystyrene, and plastic water materials are investigated at 137 Cs energy under full scatter conditions. The investigation reveals that solid water, virtual water, and RW1 phantoms are water equivalent up to 15 cm from the source. Phantom materials such as plastic water, PMMA, and polystyrene phantom materials are water equivalent up to 10 cm. At 15 cm from the source, the phantom scatter corrections are 1.035, 1.050, and 0.949 for the phantoms PMMA, plastic water, and polystyrene, respectively. (author)

  15. New Monte Carlo-based method to evaluate fission fraction uncertainties for the reactor antineutrino experiment

    Ma, X.B., E-mail: maxb@ncepu.edu.cn; Qiu, R.M.; Chen, Y.X.

    2017-02-15

    Uncertainties regarding fission fractions are essential in understanding antineutrino flux predictions in reactor antineutrino experiments. A new Monte Carlo-based method to evaluate the covariance coefficients between isotopes is proposed. The covariance coefficients are found to vary with reactor burnup and may change from positive to negative because of balance effects in fissioning. For example, between {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu, the covariance coefficient changes from 0.15 to −0.13. Using the equation relating fission fraction and atomic density, consistent uncertainties in the fission fraction and covariance matrix were obtained. The antineutrino flux uncertainty is 0.55%, which does not vary with reactor burnup. The new value is about 8.3% smaller. - Highlights: • The covariance coefficients between isotopes vs reactor burnup may change its sign because of two opposite effects. • The relation between fission fraction uncertainty and atomic density are first studied. • A new MC-based method of evaluating the covariance coefficients between isotopes was proposed.

  16. Monte Carlo based treatment planning for modulated electron beam radiation therapy

    Lee, Michael C. [Radiation Physics Division, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)]. E-mail: mclee@reyes.stanford.edu; Deng Jun; Li Jinsheng; Jiang, Steve B.; Ma, C.-M. [Radiation Physics Division, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2001-08-01

    A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system for modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) is presented. This new variation of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) utilizes an electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) to deliver non-uniform intensity maps at several electron energies. In this way, conformal dose distributions are delivered to irregular targets located a few centimetres below the surface while sparing deeper-lying normal anatomy. Planning for MERT begins with Monte Carlo generation of electron beamlets. Electrons are transported with proper in-air scattering and the dose is tallied in the phantom for each beamlet. An optimized beamlet plan may be calculated using inverse-planning methods. Step-and-shoot leaf sequences are generated for the intensity maps and dose distributions recalculated using Monte Carlo simulations. Here, scatter and leakage from the leaves are properly accounted for by transporting electrons through the eMLC geometry. The weights for the segments of the plan are re-optimized with the leaf positions fixed and bremsstrahlung leakage and electron scatter doses included. This optimization gives the final optimized plan. It is shown that a significant portion of the calculation time is spent transporting particles in the leaves. However, this is necessary since optimizing segment weights based on a model in which leaf transport is ignored results in an improperly optimized plan with overdosing of target and critical structures. A method of rapidly calculating the bremsstrahlung contribution is presented and shown to be an efficient solution to this problem. A homogeneous model target and a 2D breast plan are presented. The potential use of this tool in clinical planning is discussed. (author)

  17. Development of Monte Carlo-based pebble bed reactor fuel management code

    Setiadipura, Topan; Obara, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new Monte Carlo-based fuel management code for OTTO cycle pebble bed reactor was developed. • The double-heterogeneity was modeled using statistical method in MVP-BURN code. • The code can perform analysis of equilibrium and non-equilibrium phase. • Code-to-code comparisons for Once-Through-Then-Out case were investigated. • Ability of the code to accommodate the void cavity was confirmed. - Abstract: A fuel management code for pebble bed reactors (PBRs) based on the Monte Carlo method has been developed in this study. The code, named Monte Carlo burnup analysis code for PBR (MCPBR), enables a simulation of the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle of a PBR from the running-in phase to the equilibrium condition. In MCPBR, a burnup calculation based on a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, MVP-BURN, is coupled with an additional utility code to be able to simulate the OTTO cycle of PBR. MCPBR has several advantages in modeling PBRs, namely its Monte Carlo neutron transport modeling, its capability of explicitly modeling the double heterogeneity of the PBR core, and its ability to model different axial fuel speeds in the PBR core. Analysis at the equilibrium condition of the simplified PBR was used as the validation test of MCPBR. The calculation results of the code were compared with the results of diffusion-based fuel management PBR codes, namely the VSOP and PEBBED codes. Using JENDL-4.0 nuclide library, MCPBR gave a 4.15% and 3.32% lower k eff value compared to VSOP and PEBBED, respectively. While using JENDL-3.3, MCPBR gave a 2.22% and 3.11% higher k eff value compared to VSOP and PEBBED, respectively. The ability of MCPBR to analyze neutron transport in the top void of the PBR core and its effects was also confirmed

  18. Development of a hybrid multi-scale phantom for Monte-Carlo based internal dosimetry

    Marcatili, S.; Villoing, D.; Bardies, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: in recent years several phantoms were developed for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry in clinical and preclinical settings. Voxel-based models (Zubal, Max/Fax, ICRP110) were developed to reach a level of realism that could not be achieved by mathematical models. In turn, 'hybrid' models (XCAT, MOBY/ROBY, Mash/Fash) allow a further degree of versatility by offering the possibility to finely tune each model according to various parameters. However, even 'hybrid' models require the generation of a voxel version for Monte-Carlo modeling of radiation transport. Since absorbed dose simulation time is strictly related to geometry spatial sampling, a compromise should be made between phantom realism and simulation speed. This trade-off leads on one side in an overestimation of the size of small radiosensitive structures such as the skin or hollow organs' walls, and on the other hand to unnecessarily detailed voxellization of large, homogeneous structures. The Aim of this work is to develop a hybrid multi-resolution phantom model for Geant4 and Gate, to better characterize energy deposition in small structures while preserving reasonable computation times. Materials and Methods: we have developed a pipeline for the conversion of preexisting phantoms into a multi-scale Geant4 model. Meshes of each organ are created from raw binary images of a phantom and then voxellized to the smallest spatial sampling required by the user. The user can then decide to re-sample the internal part of each organ, while leaving a layer of smallest voxels at the edge of the organ. In this way, the realistic shape of the organ is maintained while reducing the voxel number in the inner part. For hollow organs, the wall is always modeled using the smallest voxel sampling. This approach allows choosing different voxel resolutions for each organ according to a specific application. Results: preliminary results show that it is possible to

  19. SU-E-T-595: Design of a Graphical User Interface for An In-House Monte Carlo Based Treatment Planning System: Planning and Contouring Tools

    EMAM, M; Eldib, A; Lin, M; Li, J; Chibani, O; Ma, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: An in-house Monte Carlo based treatment planning system (MC TPS) has been developed for modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT). Our preliminary MERT planning experience called for a more user friendly graphical user interface. The current work aimed to design graphical windows and tools to facilitate the contouring and planning process. Methods: Our In-house GUI MC TPS is built on a set of EGS4 user codes namely MCPLAN and MCBEAM in addition to an in-house optimization code, which was named as MCOPTIM. Patient virtual phantom is constructed using the tomographic images in DICOM format exported from clinical treatment planning systems (TPS). Treatment target volumes and critical structures were usually contoured on clinical TPS and then sent as a structure set file. In our GUI program we developed a visualization tool to allow the planner to visualize the DICOM images and delineate the various structures. We implemented an option in our code for automatic contouring of the patient body and lungs. We also created an interface window displaying a three dimensional representation of the target and also showing a graphical representation of the treatment beams. Results: The new GUI features helped streamline the planning process. The implemented contouring option eliminated the need for performing this step on clinical TPS. The auto detection option for contouring the outer patient body and lungs was tested on patient CTs and it was shown to be accurate as compared to that of clinical TPS. The three dimensional representation of the target and the beams allows better selection of the gantry, collimator and couch angles. Conclusion: An in-house GUI program has been developed for more efficient MERT planning. The application of aiding tools implemented in the program is time saving and gives better control of the planning process

  20. Monte Carlo based performance assessment of different animal PET architectures using pixellated CZT detectors

    Visvikis, D.; Lefevre, T.; Lamare, F.; Kontaxakis, G.; Santos, A.; Darambara, D.

    2006-01-01

    The majority of present position emission tomography (PET) animal systems are based on the coupling of high-density scintillators and light detectors. A disadvantage of these detector configurations is the compromise between image resolution, sensitivity and energy resolution. In addition, current combined imaging devices are based on simply placing back-to-back and in axial alignment different apparatus without any significant level of software or hardware integration. The use of semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors is a promising alternative to scintillators for gamma-ray imaging systems. At the same time CZT detectors have the potential properties necessary for the construction of a truly integrated imaging device (PET/SPECT/CT). The aims of this study was to assess the performance of different small animal PET scanner architectures based on CZT pixellated detectors and compare their performance with that of state of the art existing PET animal scanners. Different scanner architectures were modelled using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Particular scanner design characteristics included an overall cylindrical scanner format of 8 and 24 cm in axial and transaxial field of view, respectively, and a temporal coincidence window of 8 ns. Different individual detector modules were investigated, considering pixel pitch down to 0.625 mm and detector thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Modified NEMA NU2-2001 protocols were used in order to simulate performance based on mouse, rat and monkey imaging conditions. These protocols allowed us to directly compare the performance of the proposed geometries with the latest generation of current small animal systems. Results attained demonstrate the potential for higher NECR with CZT based scanners in comparison to scintillator based animal systems

  1. Iterative reconstruction using a Monte Carlo based system transfer matrix for dedicated breast positron emission tomography

    Saha, Krishnendu [Ohio Medical Physics Consulting, Dublin, Ohio 43017 (United States); Straus, Kenneth J.; Glick, Stephen J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Chen, Yu. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    To maximize sensitivity, it is desirable that ring Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems dedicated for imaging the breast have a small bore. Unfortunately, due to parallax error this causes substantial degradation in spatial resolution for objects near the periphery of the breast. In this work, a framework for computing and incorporating an accurate system matrix into iterative reconstruction is presented in an effort to reduce spatial resolution degradation towards the periphery of the breast. The GATE Monte Carlo Simulation software was utilized to accurately model the system matrix for a breast PET system. A strategy for increasing the count statistics in the system matrix computation and for reducing the system element storage space was used by calculating only a subset of matrix elements and then estimating the rest of the elements by using the geometric symmetry of the cylindrical scanner. To implement this strategy, polar voxel basis functions were used to represent the object, resulting in a block-circulant system matrix. Simulation studies using a breast PET scanner model with ring geometry demonstrated improved contrast at 45% reduced noise level and 1.5 to 3 times resolution performance improvement when compared to MLEM reconstruction using a simple line-integral model. The GATE based system matrix reconstruction technique promises to improve resolution and noise performance and reduce image distortion at FOV periphery compared to line-integral based system matrix reconstruction.

  2. Experimental validation of a rapid Monte Carlo based micro-CT simulator

    Colijn, A P; Zbijewski, W; Sasov, A; Beekman, F J

    2004-01-01

    We describe a newly developed, accelerated Monte Carlo simulator of a small animal micro-CT scanner. Transmission measurements using aluminium slabs are employed to estimate the spectrum of the x-ray source. The simulator incorporating this spectrum is validated with micro-CT scans of physical water phantoms of various diameters, some containing stainless steel and Teflon rods. Good agreement is found between simulated and real data: normalized error of simulated projections, as compared to the real ones, is typically smaller than 0.05. Also the reconstructions obtained from simulated and real data are found to be similar. Thereafter, effects of scatter are studied using a voxelized software phantom representing a rat body. It is shown that the scatter fraction can reach tens of per cents in specific areas of the body and therefore scatter can significantly affect quantitative accuracy in small animal CT imaging

  3. Response matrix Monte Carlo based on a general geometry local calculation for electron transport

    Ballinger, C.T.; Rathkopf, J.A.; Martin, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    A Response Matrix Monte Carlo (RMMC) method has been developed for solving electron transport problems. This method was born of the need to have a reliable, computationally efficient transport method for low energy electrons (below a few hundred keV) in all materials. Today, condensed history methods are used which reduce the computation time by modeling the combined effect of many collisions but fail at low energy because of the assumptions required to characterize the electron scattering. Analog Monte Carlo simulations are prohibitively expensive since electrons undergo coulombic scattering with little state change after a collision. The RMMC method attempts to combine the accuracy of an analog Monte Carlo simulation with the speed of the condensed history methods. Like condensed history, the RMMC method uses probability distributions functions (PDFs) to describe the energy and direction of the electron after several collisions. However, unlike the condensed history method the PDFs are based on an analog Monte Carlo simulation over a small region. Condensed history theories require assumptions about the electron scattering to derive the PDFs for direction and energy. Thus the RMMC method samples from PDFs which more accurately represent the electron random walk. Results show good agreement between the RMMC method and analog Monte Carlo. 13 refs., 8 figs

  4. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system calculation engine for microbeam radiation therapy.

    Martinez-Rovira, I; Sempau, J; Prezado, Y

    2012-05-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a synchrotron radiotherapy technique that explores the limits of the dose-volume effect. Preclinical studies have shown that MRT irradiations (arrays of 25-75-μm-wide microbeams spaced by 200-400 μm) are able to eradicate highly aggressive animal tumor models while healthy tissue is preserved. These promising results have provided the basis for the forthcoming clinical trials at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The first step includes irradiation of pets (cats and dogs) as a milestone before treatment of human patients. Within this context, accurate dose calculations are required. The distinct features of both beam generation and irradiation geometry in MRT with respect to conventional techniques require the development of a specific MRT treatment planning system (TPS). In particular, a Monte Carlo (MC)-based calculation engine for the MRT TPS has been developed in this work. Experimental verification in heterogeneous phantoms and optimization of the computation time have also been performed. The penelope/penEasy MC code was used to compute dose distributions from a realistic beam source model. Experimental verification was carried out by means of radiochromic films placed within heterogeneous slab-phantoms. Once validation was completed, dose computations in a virtual model of a patient, reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, were performed. To this end, decoupling of the CT image voxel grid (a few cubic millimeter volume) to the dose bin grid, which has micrometer dimensions in the transversal direction of the microbeams, was performed. Optimization of the simulation parameters, the use of variance-reduction (VR) techniques, and other methods, such as the parallelization of the simulations, were applied in order to speed up the dose computation. Good agreement between MC simulations and experimental results was achieved, even at the interfaces between two

  5. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system calculation engine for microbeam radiation therapy

    Martinez-Rovira, I.; Sempau, J.; Prezado, Y. [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain) and ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Laboratoire Imagerie et modelisation en neurobiologie et cancerologie, UMR8165, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Universites Paris 7 et Paris 11, Bat 440., 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a synchrotron radiotherapy technique that explores the limits of the dose-volume effect. Preclinical studies have shown that MRT irradiations (arrays of 25-75-{mu}m-wide microbeams spaced by 200-400 {mu}m) are able to eradicate highly aggressive animal tumor models while healthy tissue is preserved. These promising results have provided the basis for the forthcoming clinical trials at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The first step includes irradiation of pets (cats and dogs) as a milestone before treatment of human patients. Within this context, accurate dose calculations are required. The distinct features of both beam generation and irradiation geometry in MRT with respect to conventional techniques require the development of a specific MRT treatment planning system (TPS). In particular, a Monte Carlo (MC)-based calculation engine for the MRT TPS has been developed in this work. Experimental verification in heterogeneous phantoms and optimization of the computation time have also been performed. Methods: The penelope/penEasy MC code was used to compute dose distributions from a realistic beam source model. Experimental verification was carried out by means of radiochromic films placed within heterogeneous slab-phantoms. Once validation was completed, dose computations in a virtual model of a patient, reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, were performed. To this end, decoupling of the CT image voxel grid (a few cubic millimeter volume) to the dose bin grid, which has micrometer dimensions in the transversal direction of the microbeams, was performed. Optimization of the simulation parameters, the use of variance-reduction (VR) techniques, and other methods, such as the parallelization of the simulations, were applied in order to speed up the dose computation. Results: Good agreement between MC simulations and experimental results was achieved, even at

  6. Monte Carlo-based dose reconstruction in a rat model for scattered ionizing radiation investigations.

    Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Anna; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-09-01

    In radiation biology, rats are often irradiated, but the precise dose distributions are often lacking, particularly in areas that receive scatter radiation. We used a non-dedicated set of resources to calculate detailed dose distributions, including doses to peripheral organs well outside of the primary field, in common rat exposure settings. We conducted a detailed dose reconstruction in a rat through an analog to the conventional human treatment planning process. The process consisted of: (i) Characterizing source properties of an X-ray irradiator system, (ii) acquiring a computed tomography (CT) scan of a rat model, and (iii) using a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation engine to generate the dose distribution within the rat model. We considered cranial and liver irradiation scenarios where the rest of the body was protected by a lead shield. Organs of interest were the brain, liver and gonads. The study also included paired scenarios where the dose to adjacent, shielded rats was determined as a potential control for analysis of bystander effects. We established the precise doses and dose distributions delivered to the peripheral organs in single and paired rats. Mean doses to non-targeted organs in irradiated rats ranged from 0.03-0.1% of the reference platform dose. Mean doses to the adjacent rat peripheral organs were consistent to within 10% those of the directly irradiated rat. This work provided details of dose distributions in rat models under common irradiation conditions and established an effective scenario for delivering only scattered radiation consistent with that in a directly irradiated rat.

  7. An exercise in model validation: Comparing univariate statistics and Monte Carlo-based multivariate statistics

    Weathers, J.B.; Luck, R.; Weathers, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of mathematical models used by practicing engineers is increasing due to the growing availability of sophisticated mathematical modeling tools and ever-improving computational power. For this reason, the need to define a well-structured process for validating these models against experimental results has become a pressing issue in the engineering community. This validation process is partially characterized by the uncertainties associated with the modeling effort as well as the experimental results. The net impact of the uncertainties on the validation effort is assessed through the 'noise level of the validation procedure', which can be defined as an estimate of the 95% confidence uncertainty bounds for the comparison error between actual experimental results and model-based predictions of the same quantities of interest. Although general descriptions associated with the construction of the noise level using multivariate statistics exists in the literature, a detailed procedure outlining how to account for the systematic and random uncertainties is not available. In this paper, the methodology used to derive the covariance matrix associated with the multivariate normal pdf based on random and systematic uncertainties is examined, and a procedure used to estimate this covariance matrix using Monte Carlo analysis is presented. The covariance matrices are then used to construct approximate 95% confidence constant probability contours associated with comparison error results for a practical example. In addition, the example is used to show the drawbacks of using a first-order sensitivity analysis when nonlinear local sensitivity coefficients exist. Finally, the example is used to show the connection between the noise level of the validation exercise calculated using multivariate and univariate statistics.

  8. An exercise in model validation: Comparing univariate statistics and Monte Carlo-based multivariate statistics

    Weathers, J.B. [Shock, Noise, and Vibration Group, Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding, P.O. Box 149, Pascagoula, MS 39568 (United States)], E-mail: James.Weathers@ngc.com; Luck, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mississippi State University, 210 Carpenter Engineering Building, P.O. Box ME, Mississippi State, MS 39762-5925 (United States)], E-mail: Luck@me.msstate.edu; Weathers, J.W. [Structural Analysis Group, Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding, P.O. Box 149, Pascagoula, MS 39568 (United States)], E-mail: Jeffrey.Weathers@ngc.com

    2009-11-15

    The complexity of mathematical models used by practicing engineers is increasing due to the growing availability of sophisticated mathematical modeling tools and ever-improving computational power. For this reason, the need to define a well-structured process for validating these models against experimental results has become a pressing issue in the engineering community. This validation process is partially characterized by the uncertainties associated with the modeling effort as well as the experimental results. The net impact of the uncertainties on the validation effort is assessed through the 'noise level of the validation procedure', which can be defined as an estimate of the 95% confidence uncertainty bounds for the comparison error between actual experimental results and model-based predictions of the same quantities of interest. Although general descriptions associated with the construction of the noise level using multivariate statistics exists in the literature, a detailed procedure outlining how to account for the systematic and random uncertainties is not available. In this paper, the methodology used to derive the covariance matrix associated with the multivariate normal pdf based on random and systematic uncertainties is examined, and a procedure used to estimate this covariance matrix using Monte Carlo analysis is presented. The covariance matrices are then used to construct approximate 95% confidence constant probability contours associated with comparison error results for a practical example. In addition, the example is used to show the drawbacks of using a first-order sensitivity analysis when nonlinear local sensitivity coefficients exist. Finally, the example is used to show the connection between the noise level of the validation exercise calculated using multivariate and univariate statistics.

  9. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system.

    Ma, Jiasen; Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100,000 spots with a target volume of ∼ 1000 cm(3) and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and

  10. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system

    Ma, Jiasen, E-mail: ma.jiasen@mayo.edu; Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. Methods: An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. Results: For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100 000 spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cm{sup 3} and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. Conclusions: A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45

  11. Monte Carlo-based QA for IMRT of head and neck cancers

    Tang, F.; Sham, J.; Ma, C.-M.; Li, J.-S.

    2007-06-01

    It is well-known that the presence of large air cavity in a dense medium (or patient) introduces significant electronic disequilibrium when irradiated with megavoltage X-ray field. This condition may worsen by the possible use of tiny beamlets in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs), in particular those based on the pencil-beam method, do not provide accurate dose computation for the lungs and other cavity-laden body sites such as the head and neck. In this paper we present the use of Monte Carlo (MC) technique for dose re-calculation of IMRT of head and neck cancers. In our clinic, a turn-key software system is set up for MC calculation and comparison with TPS-calculated treatment plans as part of the quality assurance (QA) programme for IMRT delivery. A set of 10 off-the-self PCs is employed as the MC calculation engine with treatment plan parameters imported from the TPS via a graphical user interface (GUI) which also provides a platform for launching remote MC simulation and subsequent dose comparison with the TPS. The TPS-segmented intensity maps are used as input for the simulation hence skipping the time-consuming simulation of the multi-leaf collimator (MLC). The primary objective of this approach is to assess the accuracy of the TPS calculations in the presence of air cavities in the head and neck whereas the accuracy of leaf segmentation is verified by fluence measurement using a fluoroscopic camera-based imaging device. This measurement can also validate the correct transfer of intensity maps to the record and verify system. Comparisons between TPS and MC calculations of 6 MV IMRT for typical head and neck treatments review regional consistency in dose distribution except at and around the sinuses where our pencil-beam-based TPS sometimes over-predicts the dose by up to 10%, depending on the size of the cavities. In addition, dose re-buildup of up to 4% is observed at the posterior nasopharyngeal

  12. Bathymetry and composition of Titan's Ontario Lacus derived from Monte Carlo-based waveform inversion of Cassini RADAR altimetry data

    Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Hayes, A. G.; Poggiali, V.; Lunine, J. I.; Lorenz, R. D.; Seu, R.; Le Gall, A.; Notarnicola, C.; Mitchell, K. L.; Malaska, M.; Birch, S. P. D.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, the Cassini RADAR was used to sound hydrocarbon lakes and seas on Saturn's moon Titan. Since the initial discovery of echoes from the seabed of Ligeia Mare, the second largest liquid body on Titan, a dedicated radar processing chain has been developed to retrieve liquid depth and microwave absorptivity information from RADAR altimetry of Titan's lakes and seas. Herein, we apply this processing chain to altimetry data acquired over southern Ontario Lacus during Titan fly-by T49 in December 2008. The new signal processing chain adopts super resolution techniques and dedicated taper functions to reveal the presence of reflection from Ontario's lakebed. Unfortunately, the extracted waveforms from T49 are often distorted due to signal saturation, owing to the extraordinarily strong specular reflections from the smooth lake surface. This distortion is a function of the saturation level and can introduce artifacts, such as signal precursors, which complicate data interpretation. We use a radar altimetry simulator to retrieve information from the saturated bursts and determine the liquid depth and loss tangent of Ontario Lacus. Received waveforms are represented using a two-layer model, where Cassini raw radar data are simulated in order to reproduce the effects of receiver saturation. A Monte Carlo based approach along with a simulated waveform look-up table is used to retrieve parameters that are given as inputs to a parametric model which constrains radio absorption of Ontario Lacus and retrieves information about the dielectric properties of the liquid. We retrieve a maximum depth of 50 m along the radar transect and a best-fit specific attenuation of the liquid equal to 0.2 ± 0.09 dB m-1 that, when converted into loss tangent, gives tanδ = 7 ± 3 × 10-5. When combined with laboratory measured cryogenic liquid alkane dielectric properties and the variable solubility of nitrogen in ethane-methane mixtures, the best-fit loss tangent is consistent with a

  13. Estimation of miniature forest parameters, species, tree shape, and distance between canopies by means of Monte-Carlo based radiative transfer model with forestry surface model

    Ding, Y.; Arai, K.

    2007-01-01

    A method for estimation of forest parameters, species, tree shape, distance between canopies by means of Monte-Carlo based radiative transfer model with forestry surface model is proposed. The model is verified through experiments with the miniature model of forest, tree array of relatively small size of trees. Two types of miniature trees, ellipse-looking and cone-looking canopy are examined in the experiments. It is found that the proposed model and experimental results show a coincidence so that the proposed method is validated. It is also found that estimation of tree shape, trunk tree distance as well as distinction between deciduous or coniferous trees can be done with the proposed model. Furthermore, influences due to multiple reflections between trees and interaction between trees and under-laying grass are clarified with the proposed method

  14. Monte Carlo based estimation of organ and effective doses to patients undergoing hysterosalpingography and retrograde urethrography fluoroscopy procedures

    Ngaile, J. E.; Msaki, P. K.; Kazema, R. R.

    2018-04-01

    Contrast investigations of hysterosalpingography (HSG) and retrograde urethrography (RUG) fluoroscopy procedures remain the dominant diagnostic tools for the investigation of infertility in females and urethral strictures in males, respectively, owing to the scarcity and high cost of services of alternative diagnostic technologies. In light of the radiological risks associated with contrast based investigations of the genitourinary tract systems, there is a need to assess the magnitude of radiation burden imparted to patients undergoing HSG and RUG fluoroscopy procedures in Tanzania. The air kerma area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time, number of images, organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing HSG and RUG procedures were obtained from four hospitals. The KAP was measured using a flat transmission ionization chamber, while the organ and effective doses were estimated using the knowledge of the patient characteristics, patient related exposure parameters, geometry of examination, KAP and Monte Carlo calculations (PCXMC). The median values of KAP for the HSG and RUG were 2.2 Gy cm2 and 3.3 Gy cm2, respectively. The median organ doses in the present study for the ovaries, urinary bladder and uterus for the HSG procedures, were 1.0 mGy, 4.0 mGy and 1.6 mGy, respectively, while for urinary bladder and testes of the RUG were 3.4 mGy and 5.9 mGy, respectively. The median values of effective doses for the HSG and RUG procedures were 0.65 mSv and 0.59 mSv, respectively. The median values of effective dose per hospital for the HSG and RUG procedures had a range of 1.6-2.8 mSv and 1.9-5.6 mSv, respectively, while the overall differences between individual effective doses across the four hospitals varied by factors of up to 22.0 and 46.7, respectively for the HSG and RUG procedures. The proposed diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for the HSG and RUG were for KAP 2.8 Gy cm2 and 3.9 Gy cm2, for fluoroscopy time 0.8 min and 0.9 min, and for number of images 5 and 4

  15. Monte-Carlo based assessment of MAGIC, MAGICAUG, PAGATUG and PAGATAUG polymer gel dosimeters for ovaries and uterus organ dosimetry in brachytherapy, nuclear medicine and Tele-therapy.

    Adinehvand, Karim; Rahatabad, Fereidoun Nowshiravan

    2018-06-01

    Calculation of 3D dose distribution during radiotherapy and nuclear medicine helps us for better treatment of sensitive organs such as ovaries and uterus. In this research, we investigate two groups of normoxic dosimeters based on meta-acrylic acid (MAGIC and MAGICAUG) and polyacrylamide (PAGATUG and PAGATAUG) for brachytherapy, nuclear medicine and Tele-therapy in their sensitive and critical role as organ dosimeters. These polymer gel dosimeters are compared with soft tissue while irradiated by different energy photons in therapeutic applications. This comparison has been simulated by Monte-Carlo based MCNPX code. ORNL phantom-Female has been used to model the critical organs of kidneys, ovaries and uterus. Right kidney is proposed to be the source of irradiation and another two organs are exposed to this irradiation. Effective atomic numbers of soft tissue, MAGIC, MAGICAUG, PAGATUG and PAGATAUG are 6.86, 7.07, 6.95, 7.28, and 7.07 respectively. Results show the polymer gel dosimeters are comparable to soft tissue for using in nuclear medicine and Tele-therapy. Differences between gel dosimeters and soft tissue are defined as the dose responses. This difference is less than 4.1%, 22.6% and 71.9% for Tele-therapy, nuclear medicine and brachytherapy respectively. The results approved that gel dosimeters are the best choice for ovaries and uterus in nuclear medicine and Tele-therapy respectively. Due to the slight difference between the effective atomic numbers of these polymer gel dosimeters and soft tissue, these polymer gels are not suitable for brachytherapy since the dependence of photon interaction to atomic number, for low energy brachytherapy, had been so effective. Also this dependence to atomic number, decrease for photoelectric and increase for Compton. Therefore polymer gel dosimeters are not a good alternative to soft tissue replacement in brachytherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. SU-E-T-256: Development of a Monte Carlo-Based Dose-Calculation System in a Cloud Environment for IMRT and VMAT Dosimetric Verification

    Fujita, Y [Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are techniques that are widely used for treating cancer due to better target coverage and critical structure sparing. The increasing complexity of IMRT and VMAT plans leads to decreases in dose calculation accuracy. Monte Carlo simulations are the most accurate method for the determination of dose distributions in patients. However, the simulation settings for modeling an accurate treatment head are very complex and time consuming. The purpose of this work is to report our implementation of a simple Monte Carlo simulation system in a cloud-computing environment for dosimetric verification of IMRT and VMAT plans. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian Clinac linear accelerator were performed using the BEAMnrc code, and dose distributions were calculated using the DOSXYZnrc code. Input files for the simulations were automatically generated from DICOM RT files by the developed web application. We therefore must only upload the DICOM RT files through the web interface, and the simulations are run in the cloud. The calculated dose distributions were exported to RT Dose files that can be downloaded through the web interface. The accuracy of the calculated dose distribution was verified by dose measurements. Results: IMRT and VMAT simulations were performed and good agreement results were observed for measured and MC dose comparison. Gamma analysis with a 3% dose and 3 mm DTA criteria shows a mean gamma index value of 95% for the studied cases. Conclusion: A Monte Carlo-based dose calculation system has been successfully implemented in a cloud environment. The developed system can be used for independent dose verification of IMRT and VMAT plans in routine clinical practice. The system will also be helpful for improving accuracy in beam modeling and dose calculation in treatment planning systems. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25861057.

  17. WE-DE-201-05: Evaluation of a Windowless Extrapolation Chamber Design and Monte Carlo Based Corrections for the Calibration of Ophthalmic Applicators

    Hansen, J; Culberson, W; DeWerd, L [University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center, Madison, WI (United States); Soares, C [NIST (retired), Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test the validity of a windowless extrapolation chamber used to measure surface dose rate from planar ophthalmic applicators and to compare different Monte Carlo based codes for deriving correction factors. Methods: Dose rate measurements were performed using a windowless, planar extrapolation chamber with a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y Tracerlab RA-1 ophthalmic applicator previously calibrated at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Capacitance measurements were performed to estimate the initial air gap width between the source face and collecting electrode. Current was measured as a function of air gap, and Bragg-Gray cavity theory was used to calculate the absorbed dose rate to water. To determine correction factors for backscatter, divergence, and attenuation from the Mylar entrance window found in the NIST extrapolation chamber, both EGSnrc Monte Carlo user code and Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) were utilized. Simulation results were compared with experimental current readings from the windowless extrapolation chamber as a function of air gap. Additionally, measured dose rate values were compared with the expected result from the NIST source calibration to test the validity of the windowless chamber design. Results: Better agreement was seen between EGSnrc simulated dose results and experimental current readings at very small air gaps (<100 µm) for the windowless extrapolation chamber, while MCNP results demonstrated divergence at these small gap widths. Three separate dose rate measurements were performed with the RA-1 applicator. The average observed difference from the expected result based on the NIST calibration was −1.88% with a statistical standard deviation of 0.39% (k=1). Conclusion: EGSnrc user code will be used during future work to derive correction factors for extrapolation chamber measurements. Additionally, experiment results suggest that an entrance window is not needed in order for an extrapolation

  18. SU-E-T-256: Development of a Monte Carlo-Based Dose-Calculation System in a Cloud Environment for IMRT and VMAT Dosimetric Verification

    Fujita, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are techniques that are widely used for treating cancer due to better target coverage and critical structure sparing. The increasing complexity of IMRT and VMAT plans leads to decreases in dose calculation accuracy. Monte Carlo simulations are the most accurate method for the determination of dose distributions in patients. However, the simulation settings for modeling an accurate treatment head are very complex and time consuming. The purpose of this work is to report our implementation of a simple Monte Carlo simulation system in a cloud-computing environment for dosimetric verification of IMRT and VMAT plans. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian Clinac linear accelerator were performed using the BEAMnrc code, and dose distributions were calculated using the DOSXYZnrc code. Input files for the simulations were automatically generated from DICOM RT files by the developed web application. We therefore must only upload the DICOM RT files through the web interface, and the simulations are run in the cloud. The calculated dose distributions were exported to RT Dose files that can be downloaded through the web interface. The accuracy of the calculated dose distribution was verified by dose measurements. Results: IMRT and VMAT simulations were performed and good agreement results were observed for measured and MC dose comparison. Gamma analysis with a 3% dose and 3 mm DTA criteria shows a mean gamma index value of 95% for the studied cases. Conclusion: A Monte Carlo-based dose calculation system has been successfully implemented in a cloud environment. The developed system can be used for independent dose verification of IMRT and VMAT plans in routine clinical practice. The system will also be helpful for improving accuracy in beam modeling and dose calculation in treatment planning systems. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25861057

  19. A study to determine the differences between the displayed dose values for two full-field digital mammography units and values calculated using a range of Monte-Carlo-based techniques: A phantom study

    Borg, M.; Badr, I.; Royle, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Modern full-field digital mammography (FFDM) units display the mean glandular dose (MGD) and the entrance or incident air kerma (K) to the breast following each exposure. Information on how these values are calculated is limited and knowing how displayed MGD values compare and correlate to conventional Monte-Carlo-based methods is useful. From measurements done on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms, it has been shown that displayed and calculated MGD values are similar for thin to medium thicknesses and appear to differ with larger PMMA thicknesses. As a result, a multiple linear regression analysis on the data was performed to generate models by which displayed MGD values on the two FFDM units included in the study may be converted to the Monte-Carlo values calculated by conventional methods. These models should be a useful tool for medical physicists requiring MGD data from FFDM units included in this paper and should reduce the survey time spent on dose calculations. (authors)

  20. SCINFUL-QMD: Monte Carlo based computer code to calculate response function and detection efficiency of a liquid organic scintillator for neutron energies up to 3 GeV

    Satoh, Daiki; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Ishibashi, Kenji

    2006-11-01

    The Monte Carlo based computer code SCINFUL-QMD has been developed to evaluate response function and detection efficiency of a liquid organic scintillator for neutrons from 0.1 MeV to 3 GeV. This code is a modified version of SCINFUL that was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1988, to provide a calculated full response anticipated for neutron interactions in a scintillator. The upper limit of the applicable energy was extended from 80 MeV to 3 GeV by introducing the quantum molecular dynamics incorporated with the statistical decay model (QMD+SDM) in the high-energy nuclear reaction part. The particles generated in QMD+SDM are neutron, proton, deuteron, triton, 3 He nucleus, alpha particle, and charged pion. Secondary reactions by neutron, proton, and pion inside the scintillator are also taken into account. With the extension of the applicable energy, the database of total cross sections for hydrogen and carbon nuclei were upgraded. This report describes the physical model, computational flow and how to use the code. (author)

  1. SU-F-T-560: Measurement of Dose Blurring Effect Due to Respiratory Motion for Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Using Monte Carlo Based Calculation Algorithm

    Badkul, R; Pokhrel, D; Jiang, H; Lominska, C; Wang, F; Ramanjappa, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Intra-fractional tumor motion due to respiration may potentially compromise dose delivery for SBRT of lung tumors. Even sufficient margins are used to ensure there is no geometric miss of target volume, there is potential dose blurring effect may present due to motion and could impact the tumor coverage if motions are larger. In this study we investigated dose blurring effect of open fields as well as Lung SBRT patients planned using 2 non-coplanar dynamic conformal arcs(NCDCA) and few conformal beams(CB) calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) based algorithm utilizing phantom with 2D-diode array(MapCheck) and ion-chamber. Methods: SBRT lung patients were planned on Brainlab-iPlan system using 4D-CT scan and ITV were contoured on MIP image set and verified on all breathing phase image sets to account for breathing motion and then 5mm margin was applied to generate PTV. Plans were created using two NCDCA and 4-5 CB 6MV photon calculated using XVMC MC-algorithm. 3 SBRT patients plans were transferred to phantom with MapCheck and 0.125cc ion-chamber inserted in the middle of phantom to calculate dose. Also open field 3×3, 5×5 and 10×10 were calculated on this phantom. Phantom was placed on motion platform with varying motion from 5, 10, 20 and 30 mm with duty cycle of 4 second. Measurements were carried out for open fields as well 3 patients plans at static and various degree of motions. MapCheck planar dose and ion-chamber reading were collected and compared with static measurements and computed values to evaluate the dosimetric effect on tumor coverage due to motion. Results: To eliminate complexity of patients plan 3 simple open fields were also measured to see the dose blurring effect with the introduction of motion. All motion measured ionchamber values were normalized to corresponding static value. For open fields 5×5 and 10×10 normalized central axis ion-chamber values were 1.00 for all motions but for 3×3 they were 1 up to 10mm motion and 0.97 and 0

  2. TH-A-19A-12: A GPU-Accelerated and Monte Carlo-Based Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Optimization System

    Ma, J; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Beltran, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a clinically applicable intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization system that utilizes more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation, rather than analytical dose calculation. Methods: A very fast in-house graphics processing unit (GPU) based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified gradient based optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVH). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve the spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that Result from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution and large number of proton spots. The dose effects were studied particularly in cases with heterogeneous materials in comparison with the commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Results: For a relatively large and complex three-field bi-lateral head and neck case (i.e. >100K spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cc and multiple surrounding critical structures), the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation can be done in a clinically viable time frame (i.e. less than 15 minutes) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The DVHs of the MC TPS plan compare favorably with those of a commercial treatment planning system. Conclusion: A GPU accelerated and MC-based IMPT optimization system was developed. The dose calculation and plan optimization can be performed in less than 15 minutes on a hardware system costing less than 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and optimization makes the system easily expandable to robust and multi-criteria optimization. This work was funded in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  3. TH-A-19A-12: A GPU-Accelerated and Monte Carlo-Based Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Optimization System

    Ma, J; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Beltran, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a clinically applicable intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization system that utilizes more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation, rather than analytical dose calculation. Methods: A very fast in-house graphics processing unit (GPU) based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified gradient based optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVH). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve the spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that Result from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution and large number of proton spots. The dose effects were studied particularly in cases with heterogeneous materials in comparison with the commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Results: For a relatively large and complex three-field bi-lateral head and neck case (i.e. >100K spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cc and multiple surrounding critical structures), the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation can be done in a clinically viable time frame (i.e. less than 15 minutes) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The DVHs of the MC TPS plan compare favorably with those of a commercial treatment planning system. Conclusion: A GPU accelerated and MC-based IMPT optimization system was developed. The dose calculation and plan optimization can be performed in less than 15 minutes on a hardware system costing less than 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and optimization makes the system easily expandable to robust and multi-criteria optimization. This work was funded in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc

  4. Monte Carlo-Based Tail Exponent Estimator

    Baruník, Jozef; Vácha, Lukáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2010, č. 6 (2010), s. 1-26 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/09/0965; GA ČR GD402/09/H045; GA ČR GP402/08/P207 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Hill estimator * α-stable distributions * tail exponent estimation Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/E/barunik-0342493.pdf

  5. Monte Carlo based radial shield design of typical PWR reactor

    Gul, Anas; Khan, Rustam; Qureshi, M. Ayub; Azeem, Muhammad Waqar; Raza, S.A. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Stummer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Atominst.

    2017-04-15

    This paper presents the radiation shielding model of a typical PWR (CNPP-II) at Chashma, Pakistan. The model was developed using Monte Carlo N Particle code [2], equipped with ENDF/B-VI continuous energy cross section libraries. This model was applied to calculate the neutron and gamma flux and dose rates in the radial direction at core mid plane. The simulated results were compared with the reference results of Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute (SNERDI).

  6. Monte Carlo based radial shield design of typical PWR reactor

    Gul, Anas; Khan, Rustam; Qureshi, M. Ayub; Azeem, Muhammad Waqar; Raza, S.A. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Stummer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Atominst.

    2016-11-15

    Neutron and gamma flux and dose equivalent rate distribution are analysed in radial and shields of a typical PWR type reactor based on the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The ENDF/B-VI continuous energy cross-section library has been employed for the criticality and shielding analysis. The computed results are in good agreement with the reference results (maximum difference is less than 56 %). It implies that MCNP5 a good tool for accurate prediction of neutron and gamma flux and dose rates in radial shield around the core of PWR type reactors.

  7. A Monte Carlo based spent fuel analysis safeguards strategy assessment

    Fensin, Michael L.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Sandoval, Nathan P.

    2009-01-01

    Safeguarding nuclear material involves the detection of diversions of significant quantities of nuclear materials, and the deterrence of such diversions by the risk of early detection. There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium in spent fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthening the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies ability to safeguards nuclear facilities, shipper/receiver difference, input accountability at reprocessing facilities and burnup credit at repositories. Many NDA techniques exist for measuring signatures from spent fuel; however, no single NDA technique can, in isolation, quantify elemental plutonium and other actinides of interest in spent fuel. A study has been undertaken to determine the best integrated combination of cost effective techniques for quantifying plutonium mass in spent fuel for nuclear safeguards. A standardized assessment process was developed to compare the effective merits and faults of 12 different detection techniques in order to integrate a few techniques and to down-select among the techniques in preparation for experiments. The process involves generating a basis burnup/enrichment/cooling time dependent spent fuel assembly library, creating diversion scenarios, developing detector models and quantifying the capability of each NDA technique. Because hundreds of input and output files must be managed in the couplings of data transitions for the different facets of the assessment process, a graphical user interface (GUI) was development that automates the process. This GUI allows users to visually create diversion scenarios with varied replacement materials, and generate a MCNPX fixed source detector assessment input file. The end result of the assembly library assessment is to select a set of common source terms and diversion scenarios for quantifying the capability of each of the 12 NDA techniques. We present here the generalized assessment process, the techniques employed to automate the coupled facets of the assessment process, and the standard burnup/enrichment/cooling time dependent spent fuel assembly library. We also clearly define the diversion scenarios that will be analyzed during the standardized assessments. Though this study is currently limited to generic PWR assemblies, it is expected that the results of the assessment will yield an adequate spent fuel analysis strategy knowledge that will help the down-select process for other reactor types

  8. Clinical dosimetry in photon radiotherapy. A Monte Carlo based investigation

    Wulff, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Practical clinical dosimetry is a fundamental step within the radiation therapy process and aims at quantifying the absorbed radiation dose within a 1-2% uncertainty. To achieve this level of accuracy, corrections are needed for calibrated and air-filled ionization chambers, which are used for dose measurement. The procedures of correction are based on cavity theory of Spencer-Attix and are defined in current dosimetry protocols. Energy dependent corrections for deviations from calibration beams account for changed ionization chamber response in the treatment beam. The corrections applied are usually based on semi-analytical models or measurements and are generally hard to determine due to their magnitude of only a few percents or even less. Furthermore the corrections are defined for fixed geometrical reference-conditions and do not apply to non-reference conditions in modern radiotherapy applications. The stochastic Monte Carlo method for the simulation of radiation transport is becoming a valuable tool in the field of Medical Physics. As a suitable tool for calculation of these corrections with high accuracy the simulations enable the investigation of ionization chambers under various conditions. The aim of this work is the consistent investigation of ionization chamber dosimetry in photon radiation therapy with the use of Monte Carlo methods. Nowadays Monte Carlo systems exist, which enable the accurate calculation of ionization chamber response in principle. Still, their bare use for studies of this type is limited due to the long calculation times needed for a meaningful result with a small statistical uncertainty, inherent to every result of a Monte Carlo simulation. Besides heavy use of computer hardware, techniques methods of variance reduction to reduce the needed calculation time can be applied. Methods for increasing the efficiency in the results of simulation were developed and incorporated in a modern and established Monte Carlo simulation environment. The efficiency of ionization chamber calculations could be improved by several orders of magnitude. Using the developed methods, current clinical dosimetry protocols for the determination of absorbed dose to water under reference conditions in photon beams were reviewed. Calculations of correction factors were performed and compared to the currently existing data. It could be shown that the calculated values are in agreement with recent data, mainly based on calorimetric measurements, but partially deviate from currently used data in dosimetry protocols by ∝1%. Reason for these discrepancies are outdated theories and measurements for the single underlying perturbations. Sources of uncertainties in the calculated results based on Monte Carlo simulations were investigated, also considering uncertainties in underlying cross sections as input for these calculations. It could be shown that following a conservative estimation, systematic uncertainties of ≤1% might be adherent to the calculated results, a fact that is barely considered in recent works. Ion chambers under non-reference conditions were investigated with the use of a virtual model of a clinical linear accelerator. Besides developing a procedure for commissioning the model i.e. adapting it to measurements with respect to primary electron characteristics, these calculations aimed at answering the question how ionization chambers behave in non-reference geometrical conditions. It turned out that commonly used ionization chambers show only small changes in response under non-reference conditions when fulfilling the condition of charged particle equilibrium. In contrast, whenever charged particle disequilibrium and high dose gradients exists, i.e. in the penumbra of a small radiation field, a strong change in detector response might occur. The applicability of the Spencer-Attix theory under these severe conditions was tested. It could be shown that, within a 1% uncertainty, the application of the Spencer-Attix theory with corresponding perturbation factors is valid. A further investigation of these conditions when measuring dose profiles was used to determine the type of detector with minimal change in response for regions of charged particle dis-equilibrium and high dose gradients. In terms of penumbra broadening, radiochromic film shows the smallest deviation from dose to water. Monte Carlo simulations will replace or at least extend the existing data in clinical dosimetry protocols in order to reduce the uncertainty in radiotherapy. For corrections under non-reference conditions as occuring in modern radiotherapy techniques, Monte Carlo calculations will be a crucial part. This work and the developed methods accordingly form an important step towards reduced uncertainties in radiotherapy for cancer treatment.

  9. Monte Carlo based diffusion coefficients for LMFBR analysis

    Van Rooijen, Willem F.G.; Takeda, Toshikazu; Hazama, Taira

    2010-01-01

    A method based on Monte Carlo calculations is developed to estimate the diffusion coefficient of unit cells. The method uses a geometrical model similar to that used in lattice theory, but does not use the assumption of a separable fundamental mode used in lattice theory. The method uses standard Monte Carlo flux and current tallies, and the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP was used without modifications. Four models are presented to derive the diffusion coefficient from tally results of flux and partial currents. In this paper the method is applied to the calculation of a plate cell of the fast-spectrum critical facility ZEBRA. Conventional calculations of the diffusion coefficient diverge in the presence of planar voids in the lattice, but our Monte Carlo method can treat this situation without any problem. The Monte Carlo method was used to investigate the influence of geometrical modeling as well as the directional dependence of the diffusion coefficient. The method can be used to estimate the diffusion coefficient of complicated unit cells, the limitation being the capabilities of the Monte Carlo code. The method will be used in the future to confirm results for the diffusion coefficient obtained of the Monte Carlo code. The method will be used in the future to confirm results for the diffusion coefficient obtained with deterministic codes. (author)

  10. Monte Carlo Based Framework to Support HAZOP Study

    Danko, Matej; Frutiger, Jerome; Jelemenský, Ľudovít

    2017-01-01

    deviations in process parameters simultaneously, thereby bringing an improvement to the Hazard and Operability study (HAZOP), which normally considers only one at a time deviation in process parameters. Furthermore, Monte Carlo filtering was then used to identify operability and hazard issues including...

  11. Monte Carlo-based simulation of dynamic jaws tomotherapy

    Sterpin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Q.; Lu, W.; Mackie, T. R.; Vynckier, S. [Department of Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 54 Avenue Hippocrate, 1200 Brussels, Belgium and Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); TomoTherapy Inc., 1240 Deming Way, Madison, Wisconsin 53717 (United States); 21 Century Oncology., 1240 D' onofrio, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 (United States); TomoTherapy Inc., 1240 Deming Way, Madison, Wisconsin 53717 and Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, St-Luc University Hospital, 10 Avenue Hippocrate, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Original TomoTherapy systems may involve a trade-off between conformity and treatment speed, the user being limited to three slice widths (1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 cm). This could be overcome by allowing the jaws to define arbitrary fields, including very small slice widths (<1 cm), which are challenging for a beam model. The aim of this work was to incorporate the dynamic jaws feature into a Monte Carlo (MC) model called TomoPen, based on the MC code PENELOPE, previously validated for the original TomoTherapy system. Methods: To keep the general structure of TomoPen and its efficiency, the simulation strategy introduces several techniques: (1) weight modifiers to account for any jaw settings using only the 5 cm phase-space file; (2) a simplified MC based model called FastStatic to compute the modifiers faster than pure MC; (3) actual simulation of dynamic jaws. Weight modifiers computed with both FastStatic and pure MC were compared. Dynamic jaws simulations were compared with the convolution/superposition (C/S) of TomoTherapy in the ''cheese'' phantom for a plan with two targets longitudinally separated by a gap of 3 cm. Optimization was performed in two modes: asymmetric jaws-constant couch speed (''running start stop,'' RSS) and symmetric jaws-variable couch speed (''symmetric running start stop,'' SRSS). Measurements with EDR2 films were also performed for RSS for the formal validation of TomoPen with dynamic jaws. Results: Weight modifiers computed with FastStatic were equivalent to pure MC within statistical uncertainties (0.5% for three standard deviations). Excellent agreement was achieved between TomoPen and C/S for both asymmetric jaw opening/constant couch speed and symmetric jaw opening/variable couch speed, with deviations well within 2%/2 mm. For RSS procedure, agreement between C/S and measurements was within 2%/2 mm for 95% of the points and 3%/3 mm for 98% of the points, where dose is greater than 30% of the prescription dose (gamma analysis). Dose profiles acquired in transverse and longitudinal directions through the center of the phantom were also compared with excellent agreement (2%/2 mm) between all modalities. Conclusions: The combination of weights modifiers and interpolation allowed implementing efficiently dynamic jaws and dynamic couch features into TomoPen at a minimal cost in terms of efficiency (simulation around 8 h on a single CPU).

  12. Monte Carlo-based simulation of dynamic jaws tomotherapy

    Sterpin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Q.; Lu, W.; Mackie, T. R.; Vynckier, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Original TomoTherapy systems may involve a trade-off between conformity and treatment speed, the user being limited to three slice widths (1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 cm). This could be overcome by allowing the jaws to define arbitrary fields, including very small slice widths (<1 cm), which are challenging for a beam model. The aim of this work was to incorporate the dynamic jaws feature into a Monte Carlo (MC) model called TomoPen, based on the MC code PENELOPE, previously validated for the original TomoTherapy system. Methods: To keep the general structure of TomoPen and its efficiency, the simulation strategy introduces several techniques: (1) weight modifiers to account for any jaw settings using only the 5 cm phase-space file; (2) a simplified MC based model called FastStatic to compute the modifiers faster than pure MC; (3) actual simulation of dynamic jaws. Weight modifiers computed with both FastStatic and pure MC were compared. Dynamic jaws simulations were compared with the convolution/superposition (C/S) of TomoTherapy in the ''cheese'' phantom for a plan with two targets longitudinally separated by a gap of 3 cm. Optimization was performed in two modes: asymmetric jaws-constant couch speed (''running start stop,'' RSS) and symmetric jaws-variable couch speed (''symmetric running start stop,'' SRSS). Measurements with EDR2 films were also performed for RSS for the formal validation of TomoPen with dynamic jaws. Results: Weight modifiers computed with FastStatic were equivalent to pure MC within statistical uncertainties (0.5% for three standard deviations). Excellent agreement was achieved between TomoPen and C/S for both asymmetric jaw opening/constant couch speed and symmetric jaw opening/variable couch speed, with deviations well within 2%/2 mm. For RSS procedure, agreement between C/S and measurements was within 2%/2 mm for 95% of the points and 3%/3 mm for 98% of the points, where dose is greater than 30% of the prescription dose (gamma analysis). Dose profiles acquired in transverse and longitudinal directions through the center of the phantom were also compared with excellent agreement (2%/2 mm) between all modalities. Conclusions: The combination of weights modifiers and interpolation allowed implementing efficiently dynamic jaws and dynamic couch features into TomoPen at a minimal cost in terms of efficiency (simulation around 8 h on a single CPU).

  13. Comprehensive quantification of signal-to-noise ratio and g-factor for image-based and k-space-based parallel imaging reconstructions.

    Robson, Philip M; Grant, Aaron K; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Sodickson, Daniel K; McKenzie, Charles A

    2008-10-01

    Parallel imaging reconstructions result in spatially varying noise amplification characterized by the g-factor, precluding conventional measurements of noise from the final image. A simple Monte Carlo based method is proposed for all linear image reconstruction algorithms, which allows measurement of signal-to-noise ratio and g-factor and is demonstrated for SENSE and GRAPPA reconstructions for accelerated acquisitions that have not previously been amenable to such assessment. Only a simple "prescan" measurement of noise amplitude and correlation in the phased-array receiver, and a single accelerated image acquisition are required, allowing robust assessment of signal-to-noise ratio and g-factor. The "pseudo multiple replica" method has been rigorously validated in phantoms and in vivo, showing excellent agreement with true multiple replica and analytical methods. This method is universally applicable to the parallel imaging reconstruction techniques used in clinical applications and will allow pixel-by-pixel image noise measurements for all parallel imaging strategies, allowing quantitative comparison between arbitrary k-space trajectories, image reconstruction, or noise conditioning techniques. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Neutronic parameters characterization of the TRIGA IPR-R1 using scale 6.0 (KENO VI)

    Faria, Victor; Miro, Rafael; Verdu, Gumersindo; Barrachina, Teresa; Silva, Clarysson A. Mello da; Pereira, Claubia

    2011-01-01

    KENO-VI is a Monte Carlo based transport code used to obtain the criticality of a nuclear system. A model built using this code in the SCALE6.0 software system was developed for the characterization of neutronic parameters of the IPR-R1 TRIGA research reactor. A comparison with experimental values and those calculated with a MCNP code model could be then attained with the purpose to validate this methodology. (author)

  15. Neutronic parameters characterization of the TRIGA IPR-R1 using scale 6.0 (KENO VI)

    Faria, Victor; Miro, Rafael; Verdu, Gumersindo; Barrachina, Teresa [Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety (ISIRYM), Universitat Politecnica de València (Spain); Silva, Clarysson A. Mello da; Pereira, Claubia [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Dalle, Hugo Moura [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    KENO-VI is a Monte Carlo based transport code used to obtain the criticality of a nuclear system. A model built using this code in the SCALE6.0 software system was developed for the characterization of neutronic parameters of the IPR-R1 TRIGA research reactor. A comparison with experimental values and those calculated with a MCNP code model could be then attained with the purpose to validate this methodology. (author)

  16. Imaging systems and materials characterization

    Murr, L.E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a broad background for the historical development and modern applications of light optical metallography, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, field-ion microscopy and several forms of scanning probe microscopes. Numerous case examples illustrating especially synergistic applications of these imaging systems are provided to demonstrate materials characterization especially in the context of structure-property-performance issues which define materials science and engineering

  17. Drusen Characterization with Multimodal Imaging

    Spaide, Richard F.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Multimodal imaging findings and histological demonstration of soft drusen, cuticular drusen, and subretinal drusenoid deposits provided information used to develop a model explaining their imaging characteristics. Purpose To characterize the known appearance of cuticular drusen, subretinal drusenoid deposits (reticular pseudodrusen), and soft drusen as revealed by multimodal fundus imaging; to create an explanatory model that accounts for these observations. Methods Reported color, fluorescein angiographic, autofluorescence, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images of patients with cuticular drusen, soft drusen, and subretinal drusenoid deposits were reviewed, as were actual images from affected eyes. Representative histological sections were examined. The geometry, location, and imaging characteristics of these lesions were evaluated. A hypothesis based on the Beer-Lambert Law of light absorption was generated to fit these observations. Results Cuticular drusen appear as numerous uniform round yellow-white punctate accumulations under the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Soft drusen are larger yellow-white dome-shaped mounds of deposit under the RPE. Subretinal drusenoid deposits are polymorphous light-grey interconnected accumulations above the RPE. Based on the model, both cuticular and soft drusen appear yellow due to the removal of shorter wavelength light by a double pass through the RPE. Subretinal drusenoid deposits, which are located on the RPE, are not subjected to short wavelength attenuation and therefore are more prominent when viewed with blue light. The location and morphology of extracellular material in relationship to the RPE, and associated changes to RPE morphology and pigmentation, appeared to be primary determinants of druse appearance in different imaging modalities. Conclusion Although cuticular drusen, subretinal drusenoid deposits, and soft drusen are composed of common components, they are distinguishable

  18. Dental imaging characterization of micropigs

    Lee, H.Y.; Choi, M.H.; Chang, J.H.; Jung, J.H.; Kim, M.E.; Lee, N.S.; Kim, J.Y.; Choi, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Recently the micropig has been developed as human disease model. The dental and orofacial region of micropig is similar to that of humans, so it has been used for testing implant materials and techniques. The purpose of this study is on dental image at each age using radiography and computed tomography. Total twenty-two male micropigs, two or three animals of each 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months old, were given radiographic examinations. After general anesthesia, extra- and intra-oral radiographic technique and computed tomographic scans were performed to assess the dental characterization of micropigs. The total deciduous dental formula comprised 28 teeth and was depicted as Di 3/3, Dc 1/1, Dp 3/3. The total permanent dental formula comprised 44 teeth and was depicted as I 3/3, C 1/1, P 4/4, M 3/3. Hypodontia of the first premolars was common in the micropig. The permanent teeth erupted from 3 to 24 month after birth. The sequence of eruption of the permanent teeth was M1, P1, I3, C, M2, I1 + P3 + P4, P2, I2, M3. Dental imaging enables visualization of the unerupted teeth and gives more information about the development of the teeth. The growth pattern of the teeth obtained through radiographic and computed tomographic examination provides basic data in the micropig as animal model for dental research

  19. Image characterization of computed radiography

    Candeias, Janaina P.; Saddock, Aline; Oliveira, Davi F.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2007-01-01

    The digital radiographic image became a reality as of the 80's decade. Since then, several works have been developed with the aim of reducing the exposure time to ionizing radiation obtaining in this way an excellent image quality with a minimum exposure. In the Computerized Radiography, the conventional film is substituted for Image Plate (IP) which consists of a radiosensitive layer of phosphor crystals on a polyester backing plate. The unique design makes it reusable and easy to handle. When exposed, the IP accumulates and stores the irradiated radioactive energy. In order to qualify a computerized radiography system it is necessary to evaluate the Image Plate. In this work it was performed a series of experimental procedures with the aim of evaluating the responses characteristics for different plates. For this purpose it was used a computerized radiographic system CR Tower Scanner - GE, with three different types of IPs, all of them manufactured by GE, whose nomenclatures are IPC, IPX and IPS. It was used the Rhythm Acquire and Review programs for image acquisition and treatment, respectively. (author)

  20. Characterization of the energy-dependent uncertainty and correlation in silicon neutron displacement damage metrics

    Griffin Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous treatment of the uncertainty in the underlying nuclear data on silicon displacement damage metrics is presented. The uncertainty in the cross sections and recoil atom spectra are propagated into the energy-dependent uncertainty contribution in the silicon displacement kerma and damage energy using a Total Monte Carlo treatment. An energy-dependent covariance matrix is used to characterize the resulting uncertainty. A strong correlation between different reaction channels is observed in the high energy neutron contributions to the displacement damage metrics which supports the necessity of using a Monte Carlo based method to address the nonlinear nature of the uncertainty propagation.

  1. Image characterization metrics for muon tomography

    Luo, Weidong; Lehovich, Andre; Anashkin, Edward; Bai, Chuanyong; Kindem, Joel; Sossong, Michael; Steiger, Matt

    2014-05-01

    Muon tomography uses naturally occurring cosmic rays to detect nuclear threats in containers. Currently there are no systematic image characterization metrics for muon tomography. We propose a set of image characterization methods to quantify the imaging performance of muon tomography. These methods include tests of spatial resolution, uniformity, contrast, signal to noise ratio (SNR) and vertical smearing. Simulated phantom data and analysis methods were developed to evaluate metric applicability. Spatial resolution was determined as the FWHM of the point spread functions in X, Y and Z axis for 2.5cm tungsten cubes. Uniformity was measured by drawing a volume of interest (VOI) within a large water phantom and defined as the standard deviation of voxel values divided by the mean voxel value. Contrast was defined as the peak signals of a set of tungsten cubes divided by the mean voxel value of the water background. SNR was defined as the peak signals of cubes divided by the standard deviation (noise) of the water background. Vertical smearing, i.e. vertical thickness blurring along the zenith axis for a set of 2 cm thick tungsten plates, was defined as the FWHM of vertical spread function for the plate. These image metrics provided a useful tool to quantify the basic imaging properties for muon tomography.

  2. Relevant Scatterers Characterization in SAR Images

    Chaabouni, Houda; Datcu, Mihai

    2006-11-01

    Recognizing scenes in a single look meter resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, requires the capability to identify relevant signal signatures in condition of variable image acquisition geometry, arbitrary objects poses and configurations. Among the methods to detect relevant scatterers in SAR images, we can mention the internal coherence. The SAR spectrum splitted in azimuth generates a series of images which preserve high coherence only for particular object scattering. The detection of relevant scatterers can be done by correlation study or Independent Component Analysis (ICA) methods. The present article deals with the state of the art for SAR internal correlation analysis and proposes further extensions using elements of inference based on information theory applied to complex valued signals. The set of azimuth looks images is analyzed using mutual information measures and an equivalent channel capacity is derived. The localization of the "target" requires analysis in a small image window, thus resulting in imprecise estimation of the second order statistics of the signal. For a better precision, a Hausdorff measure is introduced. The method is applied to detect and characterize relevant objects in urban areas.

  3. Multichannel imager for littoral zone characterization

    Podobna, Yuliya; Schoonmaker, Jon; Dirbas, Joe; Sofianos, James; Boucher, Cynthia; Gilbert, Gary

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes an approach to utilize a multi-channel, multi-spectral electro-optic (EO) system for littoral zone characterization. Advanced Coherent Technologies, LLC (ACT) presents their EO sensor systems for the surf zone environmental assessment and potential surf zone target detection. Specifically, an approach is presented to determine a Surf Zone Index (SZI) from the multi-spectral EO sensor system. SZI provides a single quantitative value of the surf zone conditions delivering an immediate understanding of the area and an assessment as to how well an airborne optical system might perform in a mine countermeasures (MCM) operation. Utilizing consecutive frames of SZI images, ACT is able to measure variability over time. A surf zone nomograph, which incorporates targets, sensor, and environmental data, including the SZI to determine the environmental impact on system performance, is reviewed in this work. ACT's electro-optical multi-channel, multi-spectral imaging system and test results are presented and discussed.

  4. Laboratory Characterization of an Imaging Reflectometer System

    Munsat, T.; Mazzucato, E.; Park, H.; Domier, C.W.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Donne, A.J.H.; Pol, M. van de

    2003-01-01

    While microwave reflectometry has proven to be a sensitive tool for measuring electron density fluctuations in many circumstances, it has also been shown to have limited viability for core measurements and/or conditions of strong turbulence. To this end, a new instrument based on 2-D imaging reflectometry has been developed to measure density fluctuations over an extended plasma region in the TEXTOR tokamak. Laboratory characterization of this instrument has been performed using corrugated reflecting targets as an approximation to plasma reflections including 2-D turbulent fluctuations of various magnitude and poloidal wavenumber. Within this approximation, the imaging reflectometer can recover the spectral and spatial characteristics of the reflection layer lost to or otherwise inaccessible to conventional techniques

  5. The spectral imaging facility: Setup characterization

    De Angelis, Simone, E-mail: simone.deangelis@iaps.inaf.it; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Manzari, Paola Olga [Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Ammannito, Eleonora [Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095-1567 (United States); Di Iorio, Tatiana [ENEA, UTMEA-TER, Rome (Italy); Liberati, Fabrizio [Opto Service SrL, Campagnano di Roma (RM) (Italy); Tarchi, Fabio; Dami, Michele; Olivieri, Monica; Pompei, Carlo [Selex ES, Campi Bisenzio (Italy); Mugnuolo, Raffaele [Italian Space Agency, ASI, Spatial Geodesy Center, Matera (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    The SPectral IMager (SPIM) facility is a laboratory visible infrared spectrometer developed to support space borne observations of rocky bodies of the solar system. Currently, this laboratory setup is used to support the DAWN mission, which is in its journey towards the asteroid 1-Ceres, and to support the 2018 Exo-Mars mission in the spectral investigation of the Martian subsurface. The main part of this setup is an imaging spectrometer that is a spare of the DAWN visible infrared spectrometer. The spectrometer has been assembled and calibrated at Selex ES and then installed in the facility developed at the INAF-IAPS laboratory in Rome. The goal of SPIM is to collect data to build spectral libraries for the interpretation of the space borne and in situ hyperspectral measurements of planetary materials. Given its very high spatial resolution combined with the imaging capability, this instrument can also help in the detailed study of minerals and rocks. In this paper, the instrument setup is first described, and then a series of test measurements, aimed to the characterization of the main subsystems, are reported. In particular, laboratory tests have been performed concerning (i) the radiation sources, (ii) the reference targets, and (iii) linearity of detector response; the instrumental imaging artifacts have also been investigated.

  6. Reporting and analyzing statistical uncertainties in Monte Carlo-based treatment planning

    Chetty, Indrin J.; Rosu, Mihaela; Kessler, Marc L.; Fraass, Benedick A.; Haken, Randall K. ten; Kong, Feng-Ming; McShan, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate methods of reporting and analyzing statistical uncertainties in doses to targets and normal tissues in Monte Carlo (MC)-based treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Methods for quantifying statistical uncertainties in dose, such as uncertainty specification to specific dose points, or to volume-based regions, were analyzed in MC-based treatment planning for 5 lung cancer patients. The effect of statistical uncertainties on target and normal tissue dose indices was evaluated. The concept of uncertainty volume histograms for targets and organs at risk was examined, along with its utility, in conjunction with dose volume histograms, in assessing the acceptability of the statistical precision in dose distributions. The uncertainty evaluation tools were extended to four-dimensional planning for application on multiple instances of the patient geometry. All calculations were performed using the Dose Planning Method MC code. Results: For targets, generalized equivalent uniform doses and mean target doses converged at 150 million simulated histories, corresponding to relative uncertainties of less than 2% in the mean target doses. For the normal lung tissue (a volume-effect organ), mean lung dose and normal tissue complication probability converged at 150 million histories despite the large range in the relative organ uncertainty volume histograms. For 'serial' normal tissues such as the spinal cord, large fluctuations exist in point dose relative uncertainties. Conclusions: The tools presented here provide useful means for evaluating statistical precision in MC-based dose distributions. Tradeoffs between uncertainties in doses to targets, volume-effect organs, and 'serial' normal tissues must be considered carefully in determining acceptable levels of statistical precision in MC-computed dose distributions

  7. Determination of the spatial response of neutron based analysers using a Monte Carlo based method

    Tickner, James

    2000-01-01

    One of the principal advantages of using thermal neutron capture (TNC, also called prompt gamma neutron activation analysis or PGNAA) or neutron inelastic scattering (NIS) techniques for measuring elemental composition is the high penetrating power of both the incident neutrons and the resultant gamma-rays, which means that large sample volumes can be interrogated. Gauges based on these techniques are widely used in the mineral industry for on-line determination of the composition of bulk samples. However, attenuation of both neutrons and gamma-rays in the sample and geometric (source/detector distance) effects typically result in certain parts of the sample contributing more to the measured composition than others. In turn, this introduces errors in the determination of the composition of inhomogeneous samples. This paper discusses a combined Monte Carlo/analytical method for estimating the spatial response of a neutron gauge. Neutron propagation is handled using a Monte Carlo technique which allows an arbitrarily complex neutron source and gauge geometry to be specified. Gamma-ray production and detection is calculated analytically which leads to a dramatic increase in the efficiency of the method. As an example, the method is used to study ways of reducing the spatial sensitivity of on-belt composition measurements of cement raw meal

  8. Accuracy assessment of a new Monte Carlo based burnup computer code

    El Bakkari, B.; ElBardouni, T.; Nacir, B.; ElYounoussi, C.; Boulaich, Y.; Meroun, O.; Zoubair, M.; Chakir, E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new burnup code called BUCAL1 was developed. ► BUCAL1 uses the MCNP tallies directly in the calculation of the isotopic inventories. ► Validation of BUCAL1 was done by code to code comparison using VVER-1000 LEU Benchmark Assembly. ► Differences from BM value were found to be ± 600 pcm for k ∞ and ±6% for the isotopic compositions. ► The effect on reactivity due to the burnup of Gd isotopes is well reproduced by BUCAL1. - Abstract: This study aims to test for the suitability and accuracy of a new home-made Monte Carlo burnup code, called BUCAL1, by investigating and predicting the neutronic behavior of a “VVER-1000 LEU Assembly Computational Benchmark”, at lattice level. BUCAL1 uses MCNP tally information directly in the computation; this approach allows performing straightforward and accurate calculation without having to use the calculated group fluxes to perform transmutation analysis in a separate code. ENDF/B-VII evaluated nuclear data library was used in these calculations. Processing of the data library is performed using recent updates of NJOY99 system. Code to code comparisons with the reported Nuclear OECD/NEA results are presented and analyzed.

  9. Kinetic-Monte-Carlo-Based Parallel Evolution Simulation Algorithm of Dust Particles

    Xiaomei Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution simulation of dust particles provides an important way to analyze the impact of dust on the environment. KMC-based parallel algorithm is proposed to simulate the evolution of dust particles. In the parallel evolution simulation algorithm of dust particles, data distribution way and communication optimizing strategy are raised to balance the load of every process and reduce the communication expense among processes. The experimental results show that the simulation of diffusion, sediment, and resuspension of dust particles in virtual campus is realized and the simulation time is shortened by parallel algorithm, which makes up for the shortage of serial computing and makes the simulation of large-scale virtual environment possible.

  10. PELE:  Protein Energy Landscape Exploration. A Novel Monte Carlo Based Technique.

    Borrelli, Kenneth W; Vitalis, Andreas; Alcantara, Raul; Guallar, Victor

    2005-11-01

    Combining protein structure prediction algorithms and Metropolis Monte Carlo techniques, we provide a novel method to explore all-atom energy landscapes. The core of the technique is based on a steered localized perturbation followed by side-chain sampling as well as minimization cycles. The algorithm and its application to ligand diffusion are presented here. Ligand exit pathways are successfully modeled for different systems containing ligands of various sizes:  carbon monoxide in myoglobin, camphor in cytochrome P450cam, and palmitic acid in the intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein. These initial applications reveal the potential of this new technique in mapping millisecond-time-scale processes. The computational cost associated with the exploration is significantly less than that of conventional MD simulations.

  11. TH-E-BRE-08: GPU-Monte Carlo Based Fast IMRT Plan Optimization

    Li, Y; Tian, Z; Shi, F; Jiang, S; Jia, X [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) plan optimization needs pre-calculated beamlet dose distribution. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of high computation speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions, particularly in cases with high levels of inhomogeneity, may mislead optimization, hindering the resulting plan quality. It is desire to use Monte Carlo (MC) methods for beamlet dose calculations. Yet, the long computational time from repeated dose calculations for a number of beamlets prevents this application. It is our objective to integrate a GPU-based MC dose engine in lung IMRT optimization using a novel two-steps workflow. Methods: A GPU-based MC code gDPM is used. Each particle is tagged with an index of a beamlet where the source particle is from. Deposit dose are stored separately for beamlets based on the index. Due to limited GPU memory size, a pyramid space is allocated for each beamlet, and dose outside the space is neglected. A two-steps optimization workflow is proposed for fast MC-based optimization. At first step, rough beamlet dose calculations is conducted with only a small number of particles per beamlet. Plan optimization is followed to get an approximated fluence map. In the second step, more accurate beamlet doses are calculated, where sampled number of particles for a beamlet is proportional to the intensity determined previously. A second-round optimization is conducted, yielding the final Result. Results: For a lung case with 5317 beamlets, 10{sup 5} particles per beamlet in the first round, and 10{sup 8} particles per beam in the second round are enough to get a good plan quality. The total simulation time is 96.4 sec. Conclusion: A fast GPU-based MC dose calculation method along with a novel two-step optimization workflow are developed. The high efficiency allows the use of MC for IMRT optimizations.

  12. A new Monte Carlo-based treatment plan optimization approach for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Li, Yongbao; Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Song, Ting; Wu, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yaqiang; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2015-04-07

    Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) plan optimization needs beamlet dose distributions. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of their high computational speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions may mislead the optimization process and hinder the resulting plan quality. To solve this problem, the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method has been used to compute all beamlet doses prior to the optimization step. The conventional approach samples the same number of particles from each beamlet. Yet this is not the optimal use of MC in this problem. In fact, there are beamlets that have very small intensities after solving the plan optimization problem. For those beamlets, it may be possible to use fewer particles in dose calculations to increase efficiency. Based on this idea, we have developed a new MC-based IMRT plan optimization framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculation and plan optimization. At each dose calculation step, the particle numbers for beamlets were adjusted based on the beamlet intensities obtained through solving the plan optimization problem in the last iteration step. We modified a GPU-based MC dose engine to allow simultaneous computations of a large number of beamlet doses. To test the accuracy of our modified dose engine, we compared the dose from a broad beam and the summed beamlet doses in this beam in an inhomogeneous phantom. Agreement within 1% for the maximum difference and 0.55% for the average difference was observed. We then validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one lung IMRT case. It was found that the conventional scheme required 10(6) particles from each beamlet to achieve an optimization result that was 3% difference in fluence map and 1% difference in dose from the ground truth. In contrast, the proposed scheme achieved the same level of accuracy with on average 1.2 × 10(5) particles per beamlet. Correspondingly, the computation time including both MC dose calculations and plan optimizations was reduced by a factor of 4.4, from 494 to 113 s, using only one GPU card.

  13. Discrete Spin Vector Approach for Monte Carlo-based Magnetic Nanoparticle Simulations

    Senkov, Alexander; Peralta, Juan; Sahay, Rahul

    The study of magnetic nanoparticles has gained significant popularity due to the potential uses in many fields such as modern medicine, electronics, and engineering. To study the magnetic behavior of these particles in depth, it is important to be able to model and simulate their magnetic properties efficiently. Here we utilize the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm with a discrete spin vector model (in contrast to the standard continuous model) to model the magnetic hysteresis of a set of protected pure iron nanoparticles. We compare our simulations with the experimental hysteresis curves and discuss the efficiency of our algorithm.

  14. Monte Carlo based statistical power analysis for mediation models: methods and software.

    Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    The existing literature on statistical power analysis for mediation models often assumes data normality and is based on a less powerful Sobel test instead of the more powerful bootstrap test. This study proposes to estimate statistical power to detect mediation effects on the basis of the bootstrap method through Monte Carlo simulation. Nonnormal data with excessive skewness and kurtosis are allowed in the proposed method. A free R package called bmem is developed to conduct the power analysis discussed in this study. Four examples, including a simple mediation model, a multiple-mediator model with a latent mediator, a multiple-group mediation model, and a longitudinal mediation model, are provided to illustrate the proposed method.

  15. An automated Monte-Carlo based method for the calculation of cascade summing factors

    Jackson, M.J., E-mail: mark.j.jackson@awe.co.uk; Britton, R.; Davies, A.V.; McLarty, J.L.; Goodwin, M.

    2016-10-21

    A versatile method has been developed to calculate cascade summing factors for use in quantitative gamma-spectrometry analysis procedures. The proposed method is based solely on Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) nuclear data, an X-ray energy library, and accurate efficiency characterisations for single detector counting geometries. The algorithm, which accounts for γ–γ, γ–X, γ–511 and γ–e{sup −} coincidences, can be applied to any design of gamma spectrometer and can be expanded to incorporate any number of nuclides. Efficiency characterisations can be derived from measured or mathematically modelled functions, and can accommodate both point and volumetric source types. The calculated results are shown to be consistent with an industry standard gamma-spectrometry software package. Additional benefits including calculation of cascade summing factors for all gamma and X-ray emissions, not just the major emission lines, are also highlighted. - Highlights: • Versatile method to calculate coincidence summing factors for gamma-spectrometry analysis. • Based solely on ENSDF format nuclear data and detector efficiency characterisations. • Enables generation of a CSF library for any detector, geometry and radionuclide. • Improves measurement accuracy and reduces acquisition times required to meet MDA.

  16. Monte Carlo; based validation of the ENDF/MC2-II/SDX cell homogenization path

    Wade, D.C.

    1978-11-01

    The results are summarized of a program of validation of the unit cell homogenization prescriptions and codes used for the analysis of Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) fast breeder reactor critical experiments. The ZPR drawer loading patterns comprise both plate type and pin-calandria type unit cells. A prescription is used to convert the three dimensional physical geometry of the drawer loadings into one dimensional calculational models. The ETOE-II/MC 2 -II/SDX code sequence is used to transform ENDF/B basic nuclear data into unit cell average broad group cross sections based on the 1D models. Cell average, broad group anisotropic diffusion coefficients are generated using the methods of Benoist or of Gelbard. The resulting broad (approx. 10 to 30) group parameters are used in multigroup diffusion and S/sub n/ transport calculations of full core XY or RZ models which employ smeared atom densities to represent the contents of the unit cells

  17. Monte Carlo-based development of a shield and total background estimation for the COBRA experiment

    Heidrich, Nadine

    2014-11-01

    The COBRA experiment aims for the measurement of the neutrinoless double beta decay and thus for the determination the effective Majorana mass of the neutrino. To be competitive with other next-generation experiments the background rate has to be in the order of 10 -3 counts/kg/keV/yr, which is a challenging criterion. This thesis deals with the development of a shield design and the calculation of the expected total background rate for the large scale COBRA experiment containing 13824 6 cm 3 CdZnTe detectors. For the development of a shield single-layer and multi-layer shields were investigated and a shield design was optimized concerning high-energy muon-induced neutrons. As the best design the combination of 10 cm boron doped polyethylene as outermost layer, 20 cm lead and 10 cm copper as innermost layer were determined. It showed the best performance regarding neutron attenuation as well as (n, γ) self-shielding effects leading to a negligible background rate of less than 2.10 -6 counts/kg/keV/yr. Additionally. the shield with a thickness of 40 cm is compact and costeffective. In the next step the expected total background rate was computed taking into account individual setup parts and various background sources including natural and man-made radioactivity, cosmic ray-induced background and thermal neutrons. Furthermore, a comparison of measured data from the COBRA demonstrator setup with Monte Carlo data was used to calculate reliable contamination levels of the single setup parts. The calculation was performed conservatively to prevent an underestimation. In addition, the contribution to the total background rate regarding the individual detector parts and background sources was investigated. The main portion arise from the Delrin support structure, the Glyptal lacquer followed by the circuit board of the high voltage supply. Most background events originate from particles with a quantity of 99 % in total. Regarding surface events a contribution of 26.8 % was determined. Altogether, a background of less than 54.10 -3 counts/kg/keV/yr was determined showing the potential of the COBRA experiment.

  18. Monte Carlo based water/medium stopping-power ratios for various ICRP and ICRU tissues

    Fernandez-Varea, Jose M; Carrasco, Pablo; Panettieri, Vanessa; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2007-01-01

    Water/medium stopping-power ratios, s w,m , have been calculated for several ICRP and ICRU tissues, namely adipose tissue, brain, cortical bone, liver, lung (deflated and inflated) and spongiosa. The considered clinical beams were 6 and 18 MV x-rays and the field size was 10 x 10 cm 2 . Fluence distributions were scored at a depth of 10 cm using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. The collision stopping powers for the studied tissues were evaluated employing the formalism of ICRU Report 37 (1984 Stopping Powers for Electrons and Positrons (Bethesda, MD: ICRU)). The Bragg-Gray values of s w,m calculated with these ingredients range from about 0.98 (adipose tissue) to nearly 1.14 (cortical bone), displaying a rather small variation with beam quality. Excellent agreement, to within 0.1%, is found with stopping-power ratios reported by Siebers et al (2000a Phys. Med. Biol. 45 983-95) for cortical bone, inflated lung and spongiosa. In the case of cortical bone, s w,m changes approximately 2% when either ICRP or ICRU compositions are adopted, whereas the stopping-power ratios of lung, brain and adipose tissue are less sensitive to the selected composition. The mass density of lung also influences the calculated values of s w,m , reducing them by around 1% (6 MV) and 2% (18 MV) when going from deflated to inflated lung

  19. Monte-Carlo-based uncertainty propagation with hierarchical models—a case study in dynamic torque

    Klaus, Leonard; Eichstädt, Sascha

    2018-04-01

    For a dynamic calibration, a torque transducer is described by a mechanical model, and the corresponding model parameters are to be identified from measurement data. A measuring device for the primary calibration of dynamic torque, and a corresponding model-based calibration approach, have recently been developed at PTB. The complete mechanical model of the calibration set-up is very complex, and involves several calibration steps—making a straightforward implementation of a Monte Carlo uncertainty evaluation tedious. With this in mind, we here propose to separate the complete model into sub-models, with each sub-model being treated with individual experiments and analysis. The uncertainty evaluation for the overall model then has to combine the information from the sub-models in line with Supplement 2 of the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. In this contribution, we demonstrate how to carry this out using the Monte Carlo method. The uncertainty evaluation involves various input quantities of different origin and the solution of a numerical optimisation problem.

  20. Monte Carlo based geometrical model for efficiency calculation of an n-type HPGe detector

    Padilla Cabal, Fatima, E-mail: fpadilla@instec.c [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, ' Quinta de los Molinos' Ave. Salvador Allende, esq. Luaces, Plaza de la Revolucion, Ciudad de la Habana, CP 10400 (Cuba); Lopez-Pino, Neivy; Luis Bernal-Castillo, Jose; Martinez-Palenzuela, Yisel; Aguilar-Mena, Jimmy; D' Alessandro, Katia; Arbelo, Yuniesky; Corrales, Yasser; Diaz, Oscar [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, ' Quinta de los Molinos' Ave. Salvador Allende, esq. Luaces, Plaza de la Revolucion, Ciudad de la Habana, CP 10400 (Cuba)

    2010-12-15

    A procedure to optimize the geometrical model of an n-type detector is described. Sixteen lines from seven point sources ({sup 241}Am, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 22}Na, {sup 60}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 152}Eu) placed at three different source-to-detector distances (10, 20 and 30 cm) were used to calibrate a low-background gamma spectrometer between 26 and 1408 keV. Direct Monte Carlo techniques using the MCNPX 2.6 and GEANT 4 9.2 codes, and a semi-empirical procedure were performed to obtain theoretical efficiency curves. Since discrepancies were found between experimental and calculated data using the manufacturer parameters of the detector, a detail study of the crystal dimensions and the geometrical configuration is carried out. The relative deviation with experimental data decreases from a mean value of 18-4%, after the parameters were optimized.

  1. Monte Carlo-based development of a shield and total background estimation for the COBRA experiment

    Heidrich, Nadine

    2014-11-15

    The COBRA experiment aims for the measurement of the neutrinoless double beta decay and thus for the determination the effective Majorana mass of the neutrino. To be competitive with other next-generation experiments the background rate has to be in the order of 10{sup -3} counts/kg/keV/yr, which is a challenging criterion. This thesis deals with the development of a shield design and the calculation of the expected total background rate for the large scale COBRA experiment containing 13824 6 cm{sup 3} CdZnTe detectors. For the development of a shield single-layer and multi-layer shields were investigated and a shield design was optimized concerning high-energy muon-induced neutrons. As the best design the combination of 10 cm boron doped polyethylene as outermost layer, 20 cm lead and 10 cm copper as innermost layer were determined. It showed the best performance regarding neutron attenuation as well as (n, γ) self-shielding effects leading to a negligible background rate of less than 2.10{sup -6} counts/kg/keV/yr. Additionally. the shield with a thickness of 40 cm is compact and costeffective. In the next step the expected total background rate was computed taking into account individual setup parts and various background sources including natural and man-made radioactivity, cosmic ray-induced background and thermal neutrons. Furthermore, a comparison of measured data from the COBRA demonstrator setup with Monte Carlo data was used to calculate reliable contamination levels of the single setup parts. The calculation was performed conservatively to prevent an underestimation. In addition, the contribution to the total background rate regarding the individual detector parts and background sources was investigated. The main portion arise from the Delrin support structure, the Glyptal lacquer followed by the circuit board of the high voltage supply. Most background events originate from particles with a quantity of 99 % in total. Regarding surface events a contribution of 26.8 % was determined. Altogether, a background of less than 54.10{sup -3} counts/kg/keV/yr was determined showing the potential of the COBRA experiment.

  2. Markov models for digraph panel data : Monte Carlo-based derivative estimation

    Schweinberger, Michael; Snijders, Tom A. B.

    2007-01-01

    A parametric, continuous-time Markov model for digraph panel data is considered. The parameter is estimated by the method of moments. A convenient method for estimating the variance-covariance matrix of the moment estimator relies on the delta method, requiring the Jacobian matrix-that is, the

  3. Monte Carlo based simulation of LIAC intraoperative radiotherapy accelerator along with beam shaper applicator

    N Heidarloo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative electron radiotherapy is one of the radiotherapy methods that delivers a high single fraction of radiation dose to the patient in one session during the surgery. Beam shaper applicator is one of the applicators that is recently employed with this radiotherapy method. This applicator has a considerable application in treatment of large tumors. In this study, the dosimetric characteristics of the electron beam produced by LIAC intraoperative radiotherapy accelerator in conjunction with this applicator have been evaluated through Monte Carlo simulation by MCNP code. The results showed that the electron beam produced by the beam shaper applicator would have the desirable dosimetric characteristics, so that the mentioned applicator can be considered for clinical purposes. Furthermore, the good agreement between the results of simulation and practical dosimetry, confirms the applicability of Monte Carlo method in determining the dosimetric parameters of electron beam  intraoperative radiotherapy

  4. Development of a Monte-Carlo based method for calculating the effect of stationary fluctuations

    Pettersen, E. E.; Demazire, C.; Jareteg, K.

    2015-01-01

    equivalent problems nevertheless requires the possibility to modify the macroscopic cross-sections, and we use the work of Kuijper, van der Marck and Hogenbirk to define group-wise macroscopic cross-sections in MCNP [1]. The method is illustrated in this paper at a frequency of 1 Hz, for which only the real...

  5. A Monte Carlo-based treatment-planning tool for ion beam therapy

    Böhlen, T T; Dosanjh, M; Ferrari, A; Haberer, T; Parodi, K; Patera, V; Mairan, A

    2013-01-01

    Ion beam therapy, as an emerging radiation therapy modality, requires continuous efforts to develop and improve tools for patient treatment planning (TP) and research applications. Dose and fluence computation algorithms using the Monte Carlo (MC) technique have served for decades as reference tools for accurate dose computations for radiotherapy. In this work, a novel MC-based treatment-planning (MCTP) tool for ion beam therapy using the pencil beam scanning technique is presented. It allows single-field and simultaneous multiple-fields optimization for realistic patient treatment conditions and for dosimetric quality assurance for irradiation conditions at state-of-the-art ion beam therapy facilities. It employs iterative procedures that allow for the optimization of absorbed dose and relative biological effectiveness (RBE)-weighted dose using radiobiological input tables generated by external RBE models. Using a re-implementation of the local effect model (LEM), theMCTP tool is able to perform TP studies u...

  6. Fast online Monte Carlo-based IMRT planning for the MRI linear accelerator

    Bol, G. H.; Hissoiny, S.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2012-03-01

    The MRI accelerator, a combination of a 6 MV linear accelerator with a 1.5 T MRI, facilitates continuous patient anatomy updates regarding translations, rotations and deformations of targets and organs at risk. Accounting for these demands high speed, online intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) re-optimization. In this paper, a fast IMRT optimization system is described which combines a GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engine for online beamlet generation and a fast inverse dose optimization algorithm. Tightly conformal IMRT plans are generated for four phantom cases and two clinical cases (cervix and kidney) in the presence of the magnetic fields of 0 and 1.5 T. We show that for the presented cases the beamlet generation and optimization routines are fast enough for online IMRT planning. Furthermore, there is no influence of the magnetic field on plan quality and complexity, and equal optimization constraints at 0 and 1.5 T lead to almost identical dose distributions.

  7. CARMEN: a system Monte Carlo based on linear programming from direct openings

    Ureba, A.; Pereira-Barbeiro, A. R.; Jimenez-Ortega, E.; Baeza, J. A.; Salguero, F. J.; Leal, A.

    2013-01-01

    The use of Monte Carlo (MC) has shown an improvement in the accuracy of the calculation of the dose compared to other analytics algorithms installed on the systems of business planning, especially in the case of non-standard situations typical of complex techniques such as IMRT and VMAT. Our treatment planning system called CARMEN, is based on the complete simulation, both the beam transport in the head of the accelerator and the patient, and simulation designed for efficient operation in terms of the accuracy of the estimate and the required computation times. (Author)

  8. Monte Carlo based demonstration of sufficiently dimensioned shielding for a Co-60 testing facility

    Wind, Michael; Beck, Peter; Latocha, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The electrical properties of electronic equipment can be changed in an ionized radiation field. The knowledge of these changes is necessary for applications in space, in air traffic and nuclear medicine. Experimental tests will be performed in Co-60 radiation fields in the irradiation facility (TEC facility) of the Seibersdorf Labor GmbH that is in construction. The contribution deals with a simulation that is aimed to calculate the local dose rate within and outside the building for demonstration of sufficient dimensioning of the shielding in compliance with the legal dose rate limits.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of targeted screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Monte Carlo-based estimates.

    Pentikäinen, T J; Sipilä, T; Rissanen, P; Soisalon-Soininen, S; Salo, J

    2000-01-01

    This article reports a cost-effectiveness analysis of targeted screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). A major emphasis was on the estimation of distributions of costs and effectiveness. We performed a Monte Carlo simulation using C programming language in a PC environment. Data on survival and costs, and a majority of screening probabilities, were from our own empirical studies. Natural history data were based on the literature. Each screened male gained 0.07 life-years at an incremental cost of FIM 3,300. The expected values differed from zero very significantly. For females, expected gains were 0.02 life-years at an incremental cost of FIM 1,100, which was not statistically significant. Cost-effectiveness ratios and their 95% confidence intervals were FIM 48,000 (27,000-121,000) and 54,000 (22,000-infinity) for males and females, respectively. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the results for males were stable. Individual variation in life-year gains was high. Males seemed to benefit from targeted AAA screening, and the results were stable. As far as the cost-effectiveness ratio is considered acceptable, screening for males seemed to be justified. However, our assumptions about growth and rupture behavior of AAAs might be improved with further clinical and epidemiological studies. As a point estimate, females benefited in a similar manner, but the results were not statistically significant. The evidence of this study did not justify screening of females.

  10. An automated Monte-Carlo based method for the calculation of cascade summing factors

    Jackson, M. J.; Britton, R.; Davies, A. V.; McLarty, J. L.; Goodwin, M.

    2016-10-01

    A versatile method has been developed to calculate cascade summing factors for use in quantitative gamma-spectrometry analysis procedures. The proposed method is based solely on Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) nuclear data, an X-ray energy library, and accurate efficiency characterisations for single detector counting geometries. The algorithm, which accounts for γ-γ, γ-X, γ-511 and γ-e- coincidences, can be applied to any design of gamma spectrometer and can be expanded to incorporate any number of nuclides. Efficiency characterisations can be derived from measured or mathematically modelled functions, and can accommodate both point and volumetric source types. The calculated results are shown to be consistent with an industry standard gamma-spectrometry software package. Additional benefits including calculation of cascade summing factors for all gamma and X-ray emissions, not just the major emission lines, are also highlighted.

  11. Monte Carlo based electron treatment planning and cutout output factor calculations

    Mitrou, Ellis

    Electron radiotherapy (RT) offers a number of advantages over photons. The high surface dose, combined with a rapid dose fall-off beyond the target volume presents a net increase in tumor control probability and decreases the normal tissue complication for superficial tumors. Electron treatments are normally delivered clinically without previously calculated dose distributions due to the complexity of the electron transport involved and greater error in planning accuracy. This research uses Monte Carlo (MC) methods to model clinical electron beams in order to accurately calculate electron beam dose distributions in patients as well as calculate cutout output factors, reducing the need for a clinical measurement. The present work is incorporated into a research MC calculation system: McGill Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MMCTP) system. Measurements of PDDs, profiles and output factors in addition to 2D GAFCHROMICRTM EBT2 film measurements in heterogeneous phantoms were obtained to commission the electron beam model. The use of MC for electron TP will provide more accurate treatments and yield greater knowledge of the electron dose distribution within the patient. The calculation of output factors could invoke a clinical time saving of up to 1 hour per patient.

  12. Design and evaluation of a Monte Carlo based model of an orthovoltage treatment system

    Penchev, Petar; Maeder, Ulf; Fiebich, Martin; Zink, Klemens; University Hospital Marburg

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a flexible framework of an orthovoltage treatment system capable of calculating and visualizing dose distributions in different phantoms and CT datasets. The framework provides a complete set of various filters, applicators and X-ray energies and therefore can be adapted to varying studies or be used for educational purposes. A dedicated user friendly graphical interface was developed allowing for easy setup of the simulation parameters and visualization of the results. For the Monte Carlo simulations the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code package was used. Building the geometry was accomplished with the help of the EGSnrc C++ class library. The deposited dose was calculated according to the KERMA approximation using the track-length estimator. The validation against measurements showed a good agreement within 4-5% deviation, down to depths of 20% of the depth dose maximum. Furthermore, to show its capabilities, the validated model was used to calculate the dose distribution on two CT datasets. Typical Monte Carlo calculation time for these simulations was about 10 minutes achieving an average statistical uncertainty of 2% on a standard PC. However, this calculation time depends strongly on the used CT dataset, tube potential, filter material/thickness and applicator size.

  13. Metrological characterization of 3D imaging devices

    Guidi, G.

    2013-04-01

    Manufacturers often express the performance of a 3D imaging device in various non-uniform ways for the lack of internationally recognized standard requirements for metrological parameters able to identify the capability of capturing a real scene. For this reason several national and international organizations in the last ten years have been developing protocols for verifying such performance. Ranging from VDI/VDE 2634, published by the Association of German Engineers and oriented to the world of mechanical 3D measurements (triangulation-based devices), to the ASTM technical committee E57, working also on laser systems based on direct range detection (TOF, Phase Shift, FM-CW, flash LADAR), this paper shows the state of the art about the characterization of active range devices, with special emphasis on measurement uncertainty, accuracy and resolution. Most of these protocols are based on special objects whose shape and size are certified with a known level of accuracy. By capturing the 3D shape of such objects with a range device, a comparison between the measured points and the theoretical shape they should represent is possible. The actual deviations can be directly analyzed or some derived parameters can be obtained (e.g. angles between planes, distances between barycenters of spheres rigidly connected, frequency domain parameters, etc.). This paper shows theoretical aspects and experimental results of some novel characterization methods applied to different categories of active 3D imaging devices based on both principles of triangulation and direct range detection.

  14. Ore minerals textural characterization by hyperspectral imaging

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Picone, Nicoletta; Serranti, Silvia

    2013-02-01

    The utilization of hyperspectral detection devices, for natural resources mapping/exploitation through remote sensing techniques, dates back to the early 1970s. From the first devices utilizing a one-dimensional profile spectrometer, HyperSpectral Imaging (HSI) devices have been developed. Thus, from specific-customized devices, originally developed by Governmental Agencies (e.g. NASA, specialized research labs, etc.), a lot of HSI based equipment are today available at commercial level. Parallel to this huge increase of hyperspectral systems development/manufacturing, addressed to airborne application, a strong increase also occurred in developing HSI based devices for "ground" utilization that is sensing units able to play inside a laboratory, a processing plant and/or in an open field. Thanks to this diffusion more and more applications have been developed and tested in this last years also in the materials sectors. Such an approach, when successful, is quite challenging being usually reliable, robust and characterised by lower costs if compared with those usually associated to commonly applied analytical off- and/or on-line analytical approaches. In this paper such an approach is presented with reference to ore minerals characterization. According to the different phases and stages of ore minerals and products characterization, and starting from the analyses of the detected hyperspectral firms, it is possible to derive useful information about mineral flow stream properties and their physical-chemical attributes. This last aspect can be utilized to define innovative process mineralogy strategies and to implement on-line procedures at processing level. The present study discusses the effects related to the adoption of different hardware configurations, the utilization of different logics to perform the analysis and the selection of different algorithms according to the different characterization, inspection and quality control actions to apply.

  15. Feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials : part 1.

    2012-06-06

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials. Two rapid, relatively low cost image-based methods were developed for determining the grain size distribution of soils and aggregates. The first method, calle...

  16. Feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials : part 4.

    2012-06-06

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials. Two rapid, relatively low cost image-based methods were developed for determining the grain size distribution of soils and aggregates. The first method, calle...

  17. Feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials : part 5.

    2012-05-06

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials. Two rapid, relatively low cost image-based methods were developed for determining the grain size distribution of soils and aggregates. The first method, calle...

  18. Feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials : part 3.

    2012-06-06

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials. Two rapid, relatively low cost image-based methods were developed for determining the grain size distribution of soils and aggregates. The first method, calle...

  19. Feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials : part 2.

    2012-06-06

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials. Two rapid, relatively low cost image-based methods were developed for determining the grain size distribution of soils and aggregates. The first method, calle...

  20. Feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials : part 6.

    2012-06-06

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of digital imaging to characterize earth materials. Two rapid, relatively low cost image-based methods were developed for determining the grain size distribution of soils and aggregates. The first method, calle...

  1. Image-based characterization of foamed polymeric tissue scaffolds

    Mather, Melissa L; Morgan, Stephen P; Crowe, John A; White, Lisa J; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Tai, Hongyun; Howdle, Steven M; Kockenberger, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Tissue scaffolds are integral to many regenerative medicine therapies, providing suitable environments for tissue regeneration. In order to assess their suitability, methods to routinely and reproducibly characterize scaffolds are needed. Scaffold structures are typically complex, and thus their characterization is far from trivial. The work presented in this paper is centred on the application of the principles of scaffold characterization outlined in guidelines developed by ASTM International. Specifically, this work demonstrates the capabilities of different imaging modalities and analysis techniques used to characterize scaffolds fabricated from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) using supercritical carbon dioxide. Three structurally different scaffolds were used. The scaffolds were imaged using: scanning electron microscopy, micro x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and terahertz pulsed imaging. In each case two-dimensional images were obtained from which scaffold properties were determined using image processing. The findings of this work highlight how the chosen imaging modality and image-processing technique can influence the results of scaffold characterization. It is concluded that in order to obtain useful results from image-based scaffold characterization, an imaging methodology providing sufficient contrast and resolution must be used along with robust image segmentation methods to allow intercomparison of results

  2. Characterizing POLG ataxia: clinics, electrophysiology and imaging.

    Synofzik, Matthis; Srulijes, Karin; Godau, Jana; Berg, Daniela; Schöls, Ludger

    2012-12-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) cause a highly pleomorphic disease spectrum, and reports about their frequencies in ataxia populations yield equivocal results. This leads to uncertainties about the role of POLG genetics in the workup of patients with unexplained ataxia. A comprehensive characterization of POLG-associated ataxia (POLG-A) will help guide genetic diagnostics and advance our understanding of the disease processes underlying POLG-A. Thirteen patients with POLG-A were assessed by standardized clinical investigation, nerve conduction studies, motor-evoked potentials, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transcranial sonography (TCS). The findings were compared with 13 matched patients with Friedreich's ataxia (FA). In addition to the well-known POLG-associated features of chronic external ophthalmoplegia (100 %), areflexia to the lower extremity (100 %), impaired vibration sense (100 %), bilateral ptosis (69 %) and epilepsy (38 %), also hyperkinetic movement disorders were frequent in POLG-A patients, including chorea (31 %), dystonia (31 %) and myoclonus (23 %). Similar to FA, polyneuropathy was of sensory axonal type (100 %). In contrast to FA, none of the POLG-A patients showed impaired central motor conduction. TCS demonstrated less enlargement of the fourth ventricle and more diffuse cerebellar hyperechogenicity in POLG-A. Corresponding to TCS, MRI revealed no or only mild cerebellar atrophy in most POLG-A patients (85 %). POLG ataxia presents with the clinical characteristics of both afferent and cerebellar ataxia. Cerebellar alterations diffusely involve various parts of the cerebellum, yet cerebellar atrophy is generally mild. POLG-A presents with a high load of distinct non-ataxia features, namely, sensory neuropathy, external ophthalmoplegia, ptosis, epilepsy and/or hyperkinetic movement disorders. Involvement of the corticospinal tract, however, is rare.

  3. Characterization of lens based photoacoustic imaging system

    Kalloor Joseph Francis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Some of the challenges in translating photoacoustic (PA imaging to clinical applications includes limited view of the target tissue, low signal to noise ratio and the high cost of developing real-time systems. Acoustic lens based PA imaging systems, also known as PA cameras are a potential alternative to conventional imaging systems in these scenarios. The 3D focusing action of lens enables real-time C-scan imaging with a 2D transducer array. In this paper, we model the underlying physics in a PA camera in the mathematical framework of an imaging system and derive a closed form expression for the point spread function (PSF. Experimental verification follows including the details on how to design and fabricate the lens inexpensively. The system PSF is evaluated over a 3D volume that can be imaged by this PA camera. Its utility is demonstrated by imaging phantom and an ex vivo human prostate tissue sample.

  4. Characterization of lens based photoacoustic imaging system.

    Francis, Kalloor Joseph; Chinni, Bhargava; Channappayya, Sumohana S; Pachamuthu, Rajalakshmi; Dogra, Vikram S; Rao, Navalgund

    2017-12-01

    Some of the challenges in translating photoacoustic (PA) imaging to clinical applications includes limited view of the target tissue, low signal to noise ratio and the high cost of developing real-time systems. Acoustic lens based PA imaging systems, also known as PA cameras are a potential alternative to conventional imaging systems in these scenarios. The 3D focusing action of lens enables real-time C-scan imaging with a 2D transducer array. In this paper, we model the underlying physics in a PA camera in the mathematical framework of an imaging system and derive a closed form expression for the point spread function (PSF). Experimental verification follows including the details on how to design and fabricate the lens inexpensively. The system PSF is evaluated over a 3D volume that can be imaged by this PA camera. Its utility is demonstrated by imaging phantom and an ex vivo human prostate tissue sample.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging of teeth for dentine imaging and enamel characterization

    Periyasamy, Vijitha; Rangaraj, Mani; Pramanik, Manojit

    2018-02-01

    Early detection of dental caries, cracks and lesions is needed to prevent complicated root canal treatment and tooth extraction procedures. Resolution of clinically used x-ray imaging is low, hence optical imaging techniques such as optical coherence tomography, fluorescence imaging, and Raman imaging are widely experimented for imaging dental structures. Photoacoustic effect is used in photon induced photoacoustic streaming technique to debride the root canal. In this study, the extracted teeth were imaged using photoacoustic tomography system at 1064 nm. The degradation of enamel and dentine is an indicator of onset of dental caries. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was used to study the tooth enamel. Images were acquired using acoustic resolution PAM system. This was done to identify microscopic cracks and dental lesion at different anatomical sites (crown and cementum). The PAM tooth profile is an indicator of calcium distribution which is essential for demineralization studies.

  6. Egypt satellite images for land surface characterization

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    images used for mapping the vegetation cover types and other land cover types in Egypt. The mapping ranges from 1 km resolution to 30 m resolution. The aim is to provide satellite image mapping with land surface characteristics relevant for roughness mapping.......Satellite images provide information on the land surface properties. From optical remote sensing images in the blue, green, red and near-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum it is possible to identify a large number of surface features. The report briefly describes different satellite...

  7. Performance simulation of a MRPC-based PET imaging system

    Roy, A.; Banerjee, A.; Biswas, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Das, G.; Saha, S.

    2014-10-01

    The less expensive and high resolution Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) opens up a new possibility to find an efficient alternative detector for the Time of Flight (TOF) based Positron Emission Tomography, where the sensitivity of the system depends largely on the time resolution of the detector. In a layered structure, suitable converters can be used to increase the photon detection efficiency. In this work, we perform a detailed GEANT4 simulation to optimize the converter thickness towards improving the efficiency of photon conversion. A Monte Carlo based procedure has been developed to simulate the time resolution of the MRPC-based system, making it possible to simulate its response for PET imaging application. The results of the test of a six-gap MRPC, operating in avalanche mode, with 22Na source have been discussed.

  8. Continuous Dimensionality Characterization of Image Structures

    Felsberg, Michael; Kalkan, Sinan; Krüger, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    gradient field. By making use of a cone structure and barycentric co-ordinates, we can associate three confidences to the three different ideal cases of intrinsic dimensions corresponding to homogeneous image patches, edge-like structures and junctions. The main novelty of our approach......Intrinsic dimensionality is a concept introduced by statistics and later used in image processing to measure the dimensionality of a data set. In this paper, we introduce a continuous representation of the intrinsic dimension of an image patch in terms of its local spectrum or, equivalently, its...... is the representation of confidences as prior probabilities which can be used within a probabilistic framework. To show the potential of our continuous representation, we highlight applications in various contexts such as image structure classification, feature detection and localisation, visual scene statistics...

  9. Statistical characterization and segmentation of drusen in fundus images.

    Santos-Villalobos, H; Karnowski, T P; Aykac, D; Giancardo, L; Li, Y; Nichols, T; Tobin, K W; Chaum, E

    2011-01-01

    Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a disease of the retina associated with aging. AMD progression in patients is characterized by drusen, pigmentation changes, and geographic atrophy, which can be seen using fundus imagery. The level of AMD is characterized by standard scaling methods, which can be somewhat subjective in practice. In this work we propose a statistical image processing approach to segment drusen with the ultimate goal of characterizing the AMD progression in a data set of longitudinal images. The method characterizes retinal structures with a statistical model of the colors in the retina image. When comparing the segmentation results of the method between longitudinal images with known AMD progression and those without, the method detects progression in our longitudinal data set with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.99.

  10. Statistical Characterization and Segmentation of Drusen in Fundus Images

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Aykac, Deniz [ORNL; Giancardo, Luca [ORNL; Li, Yaquin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Trent L [ORNL; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Chaum, Edward [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01

    Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a disease of the retina associated with aging. AMD progression in patients is characterized by drusen, pigmentation changes, and geographic atrophy, which can be seen using fundus imagery. The level of AMD is characterized by standard scaling methods, which can be somewhat subjective in practice. In this work we propose a statistical image processing approach to segment drusen with the ultimate goal of characterizing the AMD progression in a data set of longitudinal images. The method characterizes retinal structures with a statistical model of the colors in the retina image. When comparing the segmentation results of the method between longitudinal images with known AMD progression and those without, the method detects progression in our longitudinal data set with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.99.

  11. Are T2-weighted images necessary in renal mass characterization?

    Dann, Phoebe; Thakur, Ravi; Chin, Deanne; Krinsky, Glenn; Israel, Gary M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine what role T2-weighted images play in characterizing renal masses. Methods: Forty-four pathologically proven renal masses (34 renal cell carcinomas, 8 oncocytomas, 1 metanephric adenoma, 1 angiomyolipoma without macroscopic fat) and 38 simple renal cysts were evaluated with T1- and T2-weighted images at 1.5 T. Two independent and blinded readers initially characterized all masses using only the T1-weighed images (in- and opposed-phase chemical shift, unenhanced frequency-selective fat-suppressed, gadolinium-enhanced frequency-selective fat-suppressed and subtraction images) and placed each mass into one of three categories: nonsurgical, in need of follow-up, or surgical. The masses were then re-evaluated with the addition of the T2-weighted images. It was determined if the T2-weighted images changed the initial classification. Results: Forty-three of the 44 (98%) pathologically proven renal masses were characterized as a surgical mass using only the T1-weighted images. The remaining renal mass (a renal cell carcinoma) was characterized as a mass in which follow-up exams would be suggested. Thirty-eight of 38 (100%) simple renal cysts were correctly characterized using only the T1-weighted images. The T2-weighted images did not change the initial interpretation of the T1-weighted images in any of the cases. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that T2-weighted images are not necessary in the evaluation of all renal masses and are specifically not necessary in the differentiation of solid and cystic renal neoplasms from simple renal cysts

  12. Soil structure characterized using computed tomographic images

    Zhanqi Cheng; Stephen H. Anderson; Clark J. Gantzer; J. W. Van Sambeek

    2003-01-01

    Fractal analysis of soil structure is a relatively new method for quantifying the effects of management systems on soil properties and quality. The objective of this work was to explore several methods of studying images to describe and quantify structure of soils under forest management. This research uses computed tomography and a topological method called Multiple...

  13. Microwave Breast Imaging System Prototype with Integrated Numerical Characterization

    Mark Haynes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of experimental microwave breast imaging systems and the need to properly model them have motivated our development of an integrated numerical characterization technique. We use Ansoft HFSS and a formalism we developed previously to numerically characterize an S-parameter- based breast imaging system and link it to an inverse scattering algorithm. We show successful reconstructions of simple test objects using synthetic and experimental data. We demonstrate the sensitivity of image reconstructions to knowledge of the background dielectric properties and show the limits of the current model.

  14. Interface areas complexity characterization of echographic images

    Capri, Arnaud [LVR, Orleans University, IUT de Bourges, 63 avenue de Lattre de Tassigny, 18020 Bourges (France); SINTERS GROUP SAS, 5 rue Paul Mesple, BP 1311, 31106 ToulouseCedex 01 (France)]. E-mail: Arnaud.Capri@bourges.univ-orleans.fr; Vincent, Nicole [CRIP5-SIP, Rene Descartes University-Paris 5, 45 rue des Saints-Peres, 75270 Paris Cedex 06 (France); Vieyres, Pierre [LVR, Orleans University, IUT de Bourges, 63 avenue de Lattre de Tassigny, 18020 Bourges (France); Poisson, Gerard [LVR, Orleans University, IUT de Bourges, 63 avenue de Lattre de Tassigny, 18020 Bourges (France); Makris, Pascal [LI, University Francois Rabelais of Tours, 64 avenue Jean Portalis, 37200 Tours (France)

    2006-12-20

    The telemedicine concept integrates images, video acquisition and video transfer which are usually managed by using a standard videoconference system. Very often, the initial blur of echography pictures makes it difficult to use standard segmentation techniques such as snakes or Sobel filters which aid the doctor in making his decision. In medical echography practice, contour properties of an organ are often more relevant to decipher the presence of pathologies than the exact lineout of the contour itself. The processing, via the fuzzy approach, enables us to subdivide an image in different classes: one gathering the homogeneous zones (pixels belonging to a medium) and the other gathering more heterogeneous zones (e.g. transition between two media). Complexity measurement of each region can be approximated by the calculation of a fractal dimension. Thus, we can obtain interface complexity without having to extract the interfaces themselves. Finally, the link between fractal dimension and fuzzy rate is carried out.

  15. Interface areas complexity characterization of echographic images

    Capri, Arnaud; Vincent, Nicole; Vieyres, Pierre; Poisson, Gerard; Makris, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    The telemedicine concept integrates images, video acquisition and video transfer which are usually managed by using a standard videoconference system. Very often, the initial blur of echography pictures makes it difficult to use standard segmentation techniques such as snakes or Sobel filters which aid the doctor in making his decision. In medical echography practice, contour properties of an organ are often more relevant to decipher the presence of pathologies than the exact lineout of the contour itself. The processing, via the fuzzy approach, enables us to subdivide an image in different classes: one gathering the homogeneous zones (pixels belonging to a medium) and the other gathering more heterogeneous zones (e.g. transition between two media). Complexity measurement of each region can be approximated by the calculation of a fractal dimension. Thus, we can obtain interface complexity without having to extract the interfaces themselves. Finally, the link between fractal dimension and fuzzy rate is carried out

  16. Starshades for Exoplanet Imaging and Characterization

    Kasdin, N. J.; Vanderbei, R. J.; Shaklan, S.; Lisman, D.; Thomson, M.; Cady, E.; Macintosh, B.; Sirbu, D.; Lo, A.

    2014-01-01

    An external occulter is a satellite employing a large screen, or starshade, that flies in formation with a spaceborne telescope to provide the starlight suppression needed for detecting and characterizing exoplanets. Among the advantages of using an occulter are the broadband allowed for characterization and the removal of light before entering the observatory, greatly relaxing the requirements on the telescope and instrument. In this presentation I will explain how star shades achieve high contrast through precise design and control of their shape and how we develop an error budget to establish requirements on the manufacturing and control. Raising the technology readiness level of starshades requires a sequence of activities to verify approaches to manufacturing, deployment, test, and analysis. The SAT-TDEM program has been instrumental in raising the readiness level of the most critical technology. In particular, I will show the results of our first TDEM in 2010-2012 that verified a full scale petal could be built and measured to the needed accuracy for 10 orders of magnitude of contrast. Our second TDEM in 2012-2014 verified that a starshade could be deployed and the petals could be placed to the required position to better than 1 mm. Finally, laboratory experiments have verified the optical modeling used to predict starshade performance to better than 1e-10.

  17. The Digital Image Processing And Quantitative Analysis In Microscopic Image Characterization

    Ardisasmita, M. Syamsa

    2000-01-01

    Many electron microscopes although have produced digital images, but not all of them are equipped with a supporting unit to process and analyse image data quantitatively. Generally the analysis of image has to be made visually and the measurement is realized manually. The development of mathematical method for geometric analysis and pattern recognition, allows automatic microscopic image analysis with computer. Image processing program can be used for image texture and structure periodic analysis by the application of Fourier transform. Because the development of composite materials. Fourier analysis in frequency domain become important for measure the crystallography orientation. The periodic structure analysis and crystal orientation are the key to understand many material properties like mechanical strength. stress, heat conductivity, resistance, capacitance and other material electric and magnetic properties. In this paper will be shown the application of digital image processing in microscopic image characterization and analysis in microscopic image

  18. Characterization of encapsulated quantum dots via electron channeling contrast imaging

    Deitz, Julia I.; McComb, David W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Carnevale, Santino D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); De Graef, Marc [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Grassman, Tyler J., E-mail: grassman.5@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2016-08-08

    A method for characterization of encapsulated epitaxial quantum dots (QD) in plan-view geometry using electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is presented. The efficacy of the method, which requires minimal sample preparation, is demonstrated with proof-of-concept data from encapsulated (sub-surface) epitaxial InAs QDs within a GaAs matrix. Imaging of the QDs under multiple diffraction conditions is presented, establishing that ECCI can provide effectively identical visualization capabilities as conventional two-beam transmission electron microscopy. This method facilitates rapid, non-destructive characterization of sub-surface QDs giving immediate access to valuable nanostructural information.

  19. Fractal characterization of brain lesions in CT images

    Jauhari, Rajnish K.; Trivedi, Rashmi; Munshi, Prabhat; Sahni, Kamal

    2005-01-01

    Fractal Dimension (FD) is a parameter used widely for classification, analysis, and pattern recognition of images. In this work we explore the quantification of CT (computed tomography) lesions of the brain by using fractal theory. Five brain lesions, which are portions of CT images of diseased brains, are used for the study. These lesions exhibit self-similarity over a chosen range of scales, and are broadly characterized by their fractal dimensions

  20. Capacitive Imaging For Skin Characterization and Solvent Penetration

    Xiao, P; Zhang, X; Bontozoglou, C

    2016-01-01

    Capacitive contact imaging has shown potential in measuring skin properties including hydration, micro relief analysis, as well as solvent penetration measurements . Through calibration we can also measure the absolute permittivity of the skin, and from absolute permittivity we then work out the absolute water content (or solvent content) in skin. In this paper, we present our latest study of capacitive contact imaging for skin characterization, i.e. skin hydration and skin damages etc. The r...

  1. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Renal Lesion Characterization

    Elif Karadeli

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: The technique has the advantage that it is non-invasive without need for gadolinium administration, takes about 2 minute. This method provides qualitative and quantitative infomation on tissue characterization. DA-MRI and ADC values are important for characterization of renal lesions. Especially, utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the patients with risk for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF could be beneficial. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(1: 27-36

  2. Spatial characterization of nanotextured surfaces by visual color imaging

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Murthy, Swathi; Madsen, Morten H.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method using an ordinary color camera to characterize nanostructures from the visual color of the structures. The method provides a macroscale overview image from which micrometer-sized regions can be analyzed independently, hereby revealing long-range spatial variations...

  3. Characterization of a neutron imaging setup at the INES facility

    Durisi, E. A.; Visca, L.; Albertin, F.; Brancaccio, R.; Corsi, J.; Dughera, G.; Ferrarese, W.; Giovagnoli, A.; Grassi, N.; Grazzi, F.; Lo Giudice, A.; Mila, G.; Nervo, M.; Pastrone, N.; Prino, F.; Ramello, L.; Re, A.; Romero, A.; Sacchi, R.; Salvemini, F.; Scherillo, A.; Staiano, A.

    2013-10-01

    The Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) located at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (Didcot, United Kingdom) provides a thermal neutron beam mainly used for diffraction analysis. A neutron transmission imaging system was also developed for beam monitoring and for aligning the sample under investigation. Although the time-of-flight neutron diffraction is a consolidated technique, the neutron imaging setup is not yet completely characterized and optimized. In this paper the performance for neutron radiography and tomography at INES of two scintillator screens read out by two different commercial CCD cameras is compared in terms of linearity, signal-to-noise ratio, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution. In addition, the results of neutron radiographies and a tomography of metal alloy test structures are presented to better characterize the INES imaging capabilities of metal artifacts in the cultural heritage field.

  4. Characterization of a neutron imaging setup at the INES facility

    Durisi, E.A., E-mail: elisabettaalessandra.durisi@unito.it [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Visca, L. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Albertin, F.; Brancaccio, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Corsi, J. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dughera, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Ferrarese, W. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Giovagnoli, A.; Grassi, N. [Fondazione Centro per la Conservazione ed il Restauro dei Beni Culturali “La Venaria Reale”, Piazza della Repubblica, 10078 Venaria Reale, Torino (Italy); Grazzi, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Lo Giudice, A.; Mila, G. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); and others

    2013-10-21

    The Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) located at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (Didcot, United Kingdom) provides a thermal neutron beam mainly used for diffraction analysis. A neutron transmission imaging system was also developed for beam monitoring and for aligning the sample under investigation. Although the time-of-flight neutron diffraction is a consolidated technique, the neutron imaging setup is not yet completely characterized and optimized. In this paper the performance for neutron radiography and tomography at INES of two scintillator screens read out by two different commercial CCD cameras is compared in terms of linearity, signal-to-noise ratio, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution. In addition, the results of neutron radiographies and a tomography of metal alloy test structures are presented to better characterize the INES imaging capabilities of metal artifacts in the cultural heritage field. -- Highlights: A full characterization of the present INES imaging set-up was carried out. Two CCD cameras and two scintillators (ZnS/{sup 6}LiF) of different thicknesses were tested. Linearity, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution were determined. Radiographies of steep wedges were performed using the highest dynamic range setup. Tomography of a bronze cube was performed using the best spatial resolution setup.

  5. Characterization of a neutron imaging setup at the INES facility

    Durisi, E.A.; Visca, L.; Albertin, F.; Brancaccio, R.; Corsi, J.; Dughera, G.; Ferrarese, W.; Giovagnoli, A.; Grassi, N.; Grazzi, F.; Lo Giudice, A.; Mila, G.

    2013-01-01

    The Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) located at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (Didcot, United Kingdom) provides a thermal neutron beam mainly used for diffraction analysis. A neutron transmission imaging system was also developed for beam monitoring and for aligning the sample under investigation. Although the time-of-flight neutron diffraction is a consolidated technique, the neutron imaging setup is not yet completely characterized and optimized. In this paper the performance for neutron radiography and tomography at INES of two scintillator screens read out by two different commercial CCD cameras is compared in terms of linearity, signal-to-noise ratio, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution. In addition, the results of neutron radiographies and a tomography of metal alloy test structures are presented to better characterize the INES imaging capabilities of metal artifacts in the cultural heritage field. -- Highlights: A full characterization of the present INES imaging set-up was carried out. Two CCD cameras and two scintillators (ZnS/ 6 LiF) of different thicknesses were tested. Linearity, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution were determined. Radiographies of steep wedges were performed using the highest dynamic range setup. Tomography of a bronze cube was performed using the best spatial resolution setup

  6. Characterization of porcine eyes based on autofluorescence lifetime imaging

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; Morgado, António Miguel; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a non-invasive imaging technique with ideal characteristics for biological applications. In this study, we propose to characterize three major structures of the porcine eye, the cornea, crystalline lens, and retina using two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2PE-FLIM). Samples were imaged using a laser-scanning microscope, consisting of a broadband sub-15 femtosecond (fs) near-infrared laser. Signal detection was performed using a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector (PML-16PMT). Therefore, spectral analysis of the fluorescence lifetime data was possible. To ensure a correct spectral analysis of the autofluorescence lifetime data, the spectra of the individual endogenous fluorophores were acquired with the 16-channel PMT and with a spectrometer. All experiments were performed within 12h of the porcine eye enucleation. We were able to image the cornea, crystalline lens, and retina at multiple depths. Discrimination of each structure based on their autofluorescence intensity and lifetimes was possible. Furthermore, discrimination between different layers of the same structure was also possible. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first time that 2PE-FLIM was used for porcine lens imaging and layer discrimination. With this study we further demonstrated the feasibility of 2PE-FLIM to image and differentiate three of the main components of the eye and its potential as an ophthalmologic technique.

  7. Characterization of modulated time-of-flight range image sensors

    Payne, Andrew D.; Dorrington, Adrian A.; Cree, Michael J.; Carnegie, Dale A.

    2009-01-01

    A number of full field image sensors have been developed that are capable of simultaneously measuring intensity and distance (range) for every pixel in a given scene using an indirect time-of-flight measurement technique. A light source is intensity modulated at a frequency between 10-100 MHz, and an image sensor is modulated at the same frequency, synchronously sampling light reflected from objects in the scene (homodyne detection). The time of flight is manifested as a phase shift in the illumination modulation envelope, which can be determined from the sampled data simultaneously for each pixel in the scene. This paper presents a method of characterizing the high frequency modulation response of these image sensors, using a pico-second laser pulser. The characterization results allow the optimal operating parameters, such as the modulation frequency, to be identified in order to maximize the range measurement precision for a given sensor. A number of potential sources of error exist when using these sensors, including deficiencies in the modulation waveform shape, duty cycle, or phase, resulting in contamination of the resultant range data. From the characterization data these parameters can be identified and compensated for by modifying the sensor hardware or through post processing of the acquired range measurements.

  8. A Monte Carlo based development of a cavity theory for solid state detectors irradiated in electron beams

    Mobit, P.

    2002-01-01

    Recent Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the assumption in the small cavity theory (and the extension of the small cavity theory by Spencer-Attix) that the cavity does not perturb the electron fluence is seriously flawed. For depths beyond d max not only is there a significant difference between the energy spectra in the medium and in the solid cavity materials but there is also a significant difference in the number of low-energy electrons which cannot travel across the solid cavity and hence deposit their dose in it (i.e. stopper electrons whose residual range is less than the cavity thickness). The number of these low-energy electrons that are not able to travel across the solid state cavity increases with depth and effective thickness of the detector. This also invalidates the assumption in the small cavity theory that most of the dose deposited in a small cavity is delivered by crossers. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, a new cavity theory for solid state detectors irradiated in electron beams has been proposed as: D med (p)=D det (p) x s S-A med.det x gamma(p) e x S T , where D med (p) is the dose to the medium at point, p, D det (p) is the average detector dose to the same point, s S-A med.det is the Spencer-Attix mass collision stopping power ratio of the medium to the detector material, gamma(p) e is the electron fluence perturbation correction factor and S T is a stopper-to-crosser correction factor to correct for the dependence of the stopper-to-crosser ratio on depth and the effective cavity size. Monte Carlo simulations have been computed for all the terms in this equation. The new cavity theory has been tested against the Spencer-Attix cavity equation as the small cavity limiting case and also Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between this new cavity theory and Monte Carlo simulations is within 0.3%. (author)

  9. TU-EF-304-07: Monte Carlo-Based Inverse Treatment Plan Optimization for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Li, Y; Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Song, T; Wu, Z; Liu, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is increasingly used in proton therapy. For IMPT optimization, Monte Carlo (MC) is desired for spots dose calculations because of its high accuracy, especially in cases with a high level of heterogeneity. It is also preferred in biological optimization problems due to the capability of computing quantities related to biological effects. However, MC simulation is typically too slow to be used for this purpose. Although GPU-based MC engines have become available, the achieved efficiency is still not ideal. The purpose of this work is to develop a new optimization scheme to include GPU-based MC into IMPT. Methods: A conventional approach using MC in IMPT simply calls the MC dose engine repeatedly for each spot dose calculations. However, this is not the optimal approach, because of the unnecessary computations on some spots that turned out to have very small weights after solving the optimization problem. GPU-memory writing conflict occurring at a small beam size also reduces computational efficiency. To solve these problems, we developed a new framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculations and plan optimizations. At each dose calculation step, the particles were sampled from different spots altogether with Metropolis algorithm, such that the particle number is proportional to the latest optimized spot intensity. Simultaneously transporting particles from multiple spots also mitigated the memory writing conflict problem. Results: We have validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one prostate case. The total computation time of our method was ∼5–6 min on one NVIDIA GPU card, including both spot dose calculation and plan optimization, whereas a conventional method naively using the same GPU-based MC engine were ∼3 times slower. Conclusion: A fast GPU-based MC dose calculation method along with a novel optimization workflow is developed. The high efficiency makes it attractive for clinical usages

  10. SU-E-T-175: Clinical Evaluations of Monte Carlo-Based Inverse Treatment Plan Optimization for Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Chi, Y; Li, Y; Tian, Z; Gu, X; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pencil-beam or superposition-convolution type dose calculation algorithms are routinely used in inverse plan optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). However, due to their limited accuracy in some challenging cases, e.g. lung, the resulting dose may lose its optimality after being recomputed using an accurate algorithm, e.g. Monte Carlo (MC). It is the objective of this study to evaluate the feasibility and advantages of a new method to include MC in the treatment planning process. Methods: We developed a scheme to iteratively perform MC-based beamlet dose calculations and plan optimization. In the MC stage, a GPU-based dose engine was used and the particle number sampled from a beamlet was proportional to its optimized fluence from the previous step. We tested this scheme in four lung cancer IMRT cases. For each case, the original plan dose, plan dose re-computed by MC, and dose optimized by our scheme were obtained. Clinically relevant dosimetric quantities in these three plans were compared. Results: Although the original plan achieved a satisfactory PDV dose coverage, after re-computing doses using MC method, it was found that the PTV D95% were reduced by 4.60%–6.67%. After re-optimizing these cases with our scheme, the PTV coverage was improved to the same level as in the original plan, while the critical OAR coverages were maintained to clinically acceptable levels. Regarding the computation time, it took on average 144 sec per case using only one GPU card, including both MC-based beamlet dose calculation and treatment plan optimization. Conclusion: The achieved dosimetric gains and high computational efficiency indicate the feasibility and advantages of the proposed MC-based IMRT optimization method. Comprehensive validations in more patient cases are in progress.

  11. Dose enhancement in radiotherapy of small lung tumors using inline magnetic fields: A Monte Carlo based planning study

    Oborn, B. M., E-mail: brad.oborn@gmail.com [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Ge, Y. [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hardcastle, N. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Metcalfe, P. E. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2500, Australia and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia); Keall, P. J. [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To report on significant dose enhancement effects caused by magnetic fields aligned parallel to 6 MV photon beam radiotherapy of small lung tumors. Findings are applicable to future inline MRI-guided radiotherapy systems. Methods: A total of eight clinical lung tumor cases were recalculated using Monte Carlo methods, and external magnetic fields of 0.5, 1.0, and 3 T were included to observe the impact on dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and gross tumor volume (GTV). Three plans were 6 MV 3D-CRT plans while 6 were 6 MV IMRT. The GTV’s ranged from 0.8 to 16 cm{sup 3}, while the PTV’s ranged from 1 to 59 cm{sup 3}. In addition, the dose changes in a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom were investigated for small beams. The central 20 cm of this phantom contained either water or lung density insert. Results: For single beams, an inline magnetic field of 1 T has a small impact in lung dose distributions by reducing the lateral scatter of secondary electrons, resulting in a small dose increase along the beam. Superposition of multiple small beams leads to significant dose enhancements. Clinically, this process occurs in the lung tissue typically surrounding the GTV, resulting in increases to the D{sub 98%} (PTV). Two isolated tumors with very small PTVs (3 and 6 cm{sup 3}) showed increases in D{sub 98%} of 23% and 22%. Larger PTVs of 13, 26, and 59 cm{sup 3} had increases of 9%, 6%, and 4%, describing a natural fall-off in enhancement with increasing PTV size. However, three PTVs bounded to the lung wall showed no significant increase, due to lack of dose enhancement in the denser PTV volume. In general, at 0.5 T, the GTV mean dose enhancement is around 60% lower than that at 1 T, while at 3 T, it is 5%–60% higher than 1 T. Conclusions: Monte Carlo methods have described significant and predictable dose enhancement effects in small lung tumor plans for 6 MV radiotherapy when an external inline magnetic field is included. Results of this study indicate that future clinical inline MRI-guided radiotherapy systems will be able to deliver a dosimetrically superior treatment to small (PTV < 15 cm{sup 3}), isolated lung tumors over non-MRI-Linac systems. This increased efficacy coincides with the reimbursement in the United States of lung CT screening and the likely rapid growth in the number of patients with small lung tumors to be treated with radiotherapy.

  12. Commissioning and Validation of the First Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculation Algorithm Commercial Treatment Planning System in Mexico

    Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Hernandez-Bojorquez, M.; Galvan de la Cruz, O. O.; Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the beam data commissioning and dose calculation validation of the first Monte Carlo (MC) based treatment planning system (TPS) installed in Mexico. According to the manufacturer specifications, the beam data commissioning needed for this model includes: several in-air and water profiles, depth dose curves, head-scatter factors and output factors (6x6, 12x12, 18x18, 24x24, 42x42, 60x60, 80x80 and 100x100 mm 2 ). Radiographic and radiochromic films, diode and ionization chambers were used for data acquisition. MC dose calculations in a water phantom were used to validate the MC simulations using comparisons with measured data. Gamma index criteria 2%/2 mm were used to evaluate the accuracy of MC calculations. MC calculated data show an excellent agreement for field sizes from 18x18 to 100x100 mm 2 . Gamma analysis shows that in average, 95% and 100% of the data passes the gamma index criteria for these fields, respectively. For smaller fields (12x12 and 6x6 mm 2 ) only 92% of the data meet the criteria. Total scatter factors show a good agreement ( 2 ) that show a error of 4.7%. MC dose calculations are accurate and precise for clinical treatment planning up to a field size of 18x18 mm 2 . Special care must be taken for smaller fields.

  13. Monte Carlo-based validation of the ENDF/MC2-II/SDX cell homogenization path

    Wade, D.C.

    1979-04-01

    The results are presented of a program of validation of the unit cell homogenization prescriptions and codes used for the analysis of Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) fast breeder reactor critical experiments. The ZPR drawer loading patterns comprise both plate type and pin-calandria type unit cells. A prescription is used to convert the three dimensional physical geometry of the drawer loadings into one dimensional calculational models. The ETOE-II/MC 2 -II/SDX code sequence is used to transform ENDF/B basic nuclear data into unit cell average broad group cross sections based on the 1D models. Cell average, broad group anisotropic diffusion coefficients are generated using the methods of Benoist or of Gelbard. The resulting broad (approx. 10 to 30) group parameters are used in multigroup diffusion and S/sub n/ transport calculations of full core XY or RZ models which employ smeared atom densities to represent the contents of the unit cells

  14. Experimental verification of a commercial Monte Carlo-based dose calculation module for high-energy photon beams

    Kuenzler, Thomas; Fotina, Irina; Stock, Markus; Georg, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    The dosimetric performance of a Monte Carlo algorithm as implemented in a commercial treatment planning system (iPlan, BrainLAB) was investigated. After commissioning and basic beam data tests in homogenous phantoms, a variety of single regular beams and clinical field arrangements were tested in heterogeneous conditions (conformal therapy, arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy including simultaneous integrated boosts). More specifically, a cork phantom containing a concave-shaped target was designed to challenge the Monte Carlo algorithm in more complex treatment cases. All test irradiations were performed on an Elekta linac providing 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beams. Absolute and relative dose measurements were performed with ion chambers and near tissue equivalent radiochromic films which were placed within a transverse plane of the cork phantom. For simple fields, a 1D gamma (γ) procedure with a 2% dose difference and a 2 mm distance to agreement (DTA) was applied to depth dose curves, as well as to inplane and crossplane profiles. The average gamma value was 0.21 for all energies of simple test cases. For depth dose curves in asymmetric beams similar gamma results as for symmetric beams were obtained. Simple regular fields showed excellent absolute dosimetric agreement to measurement values with a dose difference of 0.1% ± 0.9% (1 standard deviation) at the dose prescription point. A more detailed analysis at tissue interfaces revealed dose discrepancies of 2.9% for an 18 MV energy 10 x 10 cm 2 field at the first density interface from tissue to lung equivalent material. Small fields (2 x 2 cm 2 ) have their largest discrepancy in the re-build-up at the second interface (from lung to tissue equivalent material), with a local dose difference of about 9% and a DTA of 1.1 mm for 18 MV. Conformal field arrangements, arc therapy, as well as IMRT beams and simultaneous integrated boosts were in good agreement with absolute dose measurements in the heterogeneous phantom. For the clinical test cases, the average dose discrepancy was 0.5% ± 1.1%. Relative dose investigations of the transverse plane for clinical beam arrangements were performed with a 2D γ-evaluation procedure. For 3% dose difference and 3 mm DTA criteria, the average value for γ >1 was 4.7% ± 3.7%, the average γ 1% value was 1.19 ± 0.16 and the mean 2D γ-value was 0.44 ± 0.07 in the heterogeneous phantom. The iPlan MC algorithm leads to accurate dosimetric results under clinical test conditions.

  15. Posture-specific phantoms representing female and male adults in Monte Carlo-based simulations for radiological protection

    Cassola, V. F.; Kramer, R.; Brayner, C.; Khoury, H. J.

    2010-08-01

    Does the posture of a patient have an effect on the organ and tissue absorbed doses caused by x-ray examinations? This study aims to find the answer to this question, based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of commonly performed x-ray examinations using adult phantoms modelled to represent humans in standing as well as in the supine posture. The recently published FASH (female adult mesh) and MASH (male adult mesh) phantoms have the standing posture. In a first step, both phantoms were updated with respect to their anatomy: glandular tissue was separated from adipose tissue in the breasts, visceral fat was separated from subcutaneous fat, cartilage was segmented in ears, nose and around the thyroid, and the mass of the right lung is now 15% greater than the left lung. The updated versions are called FASH2_sta and MASH2_sta (sta = standing). Taking into account the gravitational effects on organ position and fat distribution, supine versions of the FASH2 and the MASH2 phantoms have been developed in this study and called FASH2_sup and MASH2_sup. MC simulations of external whole-body exposure to monoenergetic photons and partial-body exposure to x-rays have been made with the standing and supine FASH2 and MASH2 phantoms. For external whole-body exposure for AP and PA projection with photon energies above 30 keV, the effective dose did not change by more than 5% when the posture changed from standing to supine or vice versa. Apart from that, the supine posture is quite rare in occupational radiation protection from whole-body exposure. However, in the x-ray diagnosis supine posture is frequently used for patients submitted to examinations. Changes of organ absorbed doses up to 60% were found for simulations of chest and abdomen radiographs if the posture changed from standing to supine or vice versa. A further increase of differences between posture-specific organ and tissue absorbed doses with increasing whole-body mass is to be expected.

  16. A Monte Carlo based decision-support tool for assessing generation portfolios in future carbon constrained electricity industries

    Vithayasrichareon, Peerapat; MacGill, Iain F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel decision-support tool for assessing future generation portfolios in an increasingly uncertain electricity industry. The tool combines optimal generation mix concepts with Monte Carlo simulation and portfolio analysis techniques to determine expected overall industry costs, associated cost uncertainty, and expected CO 2 emissions for different generation portfolio mixes. The tool can incorporate complex and correlated probability distributions for estimated future fossil-fuel costs, carbon prices, plant investment costs, and demand, including price elasticity impacts. The intent of this tool is to facilitate risk-weighted generation investment and associated policy decision-making given uncertainties facing the electricity industry. Applications of this tool are demonstrated through a case study of an electricity industry with coal, CCGT, and OCGT facing future uncertainties. Results highlight some significant generation investment challenges, including the impacts of uncertain and correlated carbon and fossil-fuel prices, the role of future demand changes in response to electricity prices, and the impact of construction cost uncertainties on capital intensive generation. The tool can incorporate virtually any type of input probability distribution, and support sophisticated risk assessments of different portfolios, including downside economic risks. It can also assess portfolios against multi-criterion objectives such as greenhouse emissions as well as overall industry costs. - Highlights: ► Present a decision support tool to assist generation investment and policy making under uncertainty. ► Generation portfolios are assessed based on their expected costs, risks, and CO 2 emissions. ► There is tradeoff among expected cost, risks, and CO 2 emissions of generation portfolios. ► Investment challenges include economic impact of uncertainties and the effect of price elasticity. ► CO 2 emissions reduction depends on the mix of generation technologies within the portfolio.

  17. Monte Carlo-based subgrid parameterization of vertical velocity and stratiform cloud microphysics in ECHAM5.5-HAM2

    J. Tonttila

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A new method for parameterizing the subgrid variations of vertical velocity and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC is presented for general circulation models (GCMs. These parameterizations build on top of existing parameterizations that create stochastic subgrid cloud columns inside the GCM grid cells, which can be employed by the Monte Carlo independent column approximation approach for radiative transfer. The new model version adds a description for vertical velocity in individual subgrid columns, which can be used to compute cloud activation and the subgrid distribution of the number of cloud droplets explicitly. Autoconversion is also treated explicitly in the subcolumn space. This provides a consistent way of simulating the cloud radiative effects with two-moment cloud microphysical properties defined at subgrid scale. The primary impact of the new parameterizations is to decrease the CDNC over polluted continents, while over the oceans the impact is smaller. Moreover, the lower CDNC induces a stronger autoconversion of cloud water to rain. The strongest reduction in CDNC and cloud water content over the continental areas promotes weaker shortwave cloud radiative effects (SW CREs even after retuning the model. However, compared to the reference simulation, a slightly stronger SW CRE is seen e.g. over mid-latitude oceans, where CDNC remains similar to the reference simulation, and the in-cloud liquid water content is slightly increased after retuning the model.

  18. Size dependent thermal hysteresis in spin crossover nanoparticles reflected within a Monte Carlo based Ising-like model

    Atitoaie, Alexandru; Tanasa, Radu; Enachescu, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    Spin crossover compounds are photo-magnetic bistable molecular magnets with two states in thermodynamic competition: the diamagnetic low-spin state and paramagnetic high-spin state. The thermal transition between the two states is often accompanied by a wide hysteresis, premise for possible application of these materials as recording media. In this paper we study the influence of the system's size on the thermal hysteresis loops using Monte Carlo simulations based on an Arrhenius dynamics applied for an Ising like model with long- and short-range interactions. We show that using appropriate boundary conditions it is possible to reproduce both the drop of hysteresis width with decreasing particle size, the hysteresis shift towards lower temperatures and the incomplete transition, as in the available experimental data. The case of larger systems composed by several sublattices is equally treated reproducing the shrinkage of the hysteresis loop's width experimentally observed. - Highlights: ► A study concerning size effects in spin crossover nanoparticles hysteresis is presented. ► An Ising like model with short- and long-range interactions and Arrhenius dynamics is employed. ► In open boundary system the hysteresis width decreases with particle size. ► With appropriate environment, hysteresis loop is shifted towards lower temperature and transition is incomplete.

  19. TH-A-19A-06: Site-Specific Comparison of Analytical and Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculations

    Schuemann, J; Grassberger, C; Paganetti, H; Dowdell, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of complex patient geometries on the capability of analytical dose calculation algorithms to accurately predict dose distributions and to verify currently used uncertainty margins in proton therapy. Methods: Dose distributions predicted by an analytical pencilbeam algorithm were compared with Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) using TOPAS. 79 complete patient treatment plans were investigated for 7 disease sites (liver, prostate, breast, medulloblastoma spine and whole brain, lung and head and neck). A total of 508 individual passively scattered treatment fields were analyzed for field specific properties. Comparisons based on target coverage indices (EUD, D95, D90 and D50) were performed. Range differences were estimated for the distal position of the 90% dose level (R90) and the 50% dose level (R50). Two-dimensional distal dose surfaces were calculated and the root mean square differences (RMSD), average range difference (ARD) and average distal dose degradation (ADD), the distance between the distal position of the 80% and 20% dose levels (R80- R20), were analyzed. Results: We found target coverage indices calculated by TOPAS to generally be around 1–2% lower than predicted by the analytical algorithm. Differences in R90 predicted by TOPAS and the planning system can be larger than currently applied range margins in proton therapy for small regions distal to the target volume. We estimate new site-specific range margins (R90) for analytical dose calculations considering total range uncertainties and uncertainties from dose calculation alone based on the RMSD. Our results demonstrate that a reduction of currently used uncertainty margins is feasible for liver, prostate and whole brain fields even without introducing MC dose calculations. Conclusion: Analytical dose calculation algorithms predict dose distributions within clinical limits for more homogeneous patients sites (liver, prostate, whole brain). However, we recommend treatment plan verification using Monte Carlo simulations for patients with complex geometries

  20. Full Monte Carlo-Based Biologic Treatment Plan Optimization System for Intensity Modulated Carbon Ion Therapy on Graphics Processing Unit.

    Qin, Nan; Shen, Chenyang; Tsai, Min-Yu; Pinto, Marco; Tian, Zhen; Dedes, Georgios; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve B; Parodi, Katia; Jia, Xun

    2018-01-01

    One of the major benefits of carbon ion therapy is enhanced biological effectiveness at the Bragg peak region. For intensity modulated carbon ion therapy (IMCT), it is desirable to use Monte Carlo (MC) methods to compute the properties of each pencil beam spot for treatment planning, because of their accuracy in modeling physics processes and estimating biological effects. We previously developed goCMC, a graphics processing unit (GPU)-oriented MC engine for carbon ion therapy. The purpose of the present study was to build a biological treatment plan optimization system using goCMC. The repair-misrepair-fixation model was implemented to compute the spatial distribution of linear-quadratic model parameters for each spot. A treatment plan optimization module was developed to minimize the difference between the prescribed and actual biological effect. We used a gradient-based algorithm to solve the optimization problem. The system was embedded in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system under a client-server architecture to achieve a user-friendly planning environment. We tested the system with a 1-dimensional homogeneous water case and 3 3-dimensional patient cases. Our system generated treatment plans with biological spread-out Bragg peaks covering the targeted regions and sparing critical structures. Using 4 NVidia GTX 1080 GPUs, the total computation time, including spot simulation, optimization, and final dose calculation, was 0.6 hour for the prostate case (8282 spots), 0.2 hour for the pancreas case (3795 spots), and 0.3 hour for the brain case (6724 spots). The computation time was dominated by MC spot simulation. We built a biological treatment plan optimization system for IMCT that performs simulations using a fast MC engine, goCMC. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that full MC-based IMCT inverse planning has been achieved in a clinically viable time frame. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. TU-EF-304-07: Monte Carlo-Based Inverse Treatment Plan Optimization for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Li, Y [Tsinghua University, Beijing, Beijing (China); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Song, T [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Wu, Z; Liu, Y [Tsinghua University, Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is increasingly used in proton therapy. For IMPT optimization, Monte Carlo (MC) is desired for spots dose calculations because of its high accuracy, especially in cases with a high level of heterogeneity. It is also preferred in biological optimization problems due to the capability of computing quantities related to biological effects. However, MC simulation is typically too slow to be used for this purpose. Although GPU-based MC engines have become available, the achieved efficiency is still not ideal. The purpose of this work is to develop a new optimization scheme to include GPU-based MC into IMPT. Methods: A conventional approach using MC in IMPT simply calls the MC dose engine repeatedly for each spot dose calculations. However, this is not the optimal approach, because of the unnecessary computations on some spots that turned out to have very small weights after solving the optimization problem. GPU-memory writing conflict occurring at a small beam size also reduces computational efficiency. To solve these problems, we developed a new framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculations and plan optimizations. At each dose calculation step, the particles were sampled from different spots altogether with Metropolis algorithm, such that the particle number is proportional to the latest optimized spot intensity. Simultaneously transporting particles from multiple spots also mitigated the memory writing conflict problem. Results: We have validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one prostate case. The total computation time of our method was ∼5–6 min on one NVIDIA GPU card, including both spot dose calculation and plan optimization, whereas a conventional method naively using the same GPU-based MC engine were ∼3 times slower. Conclusion: A fast GPU-based MC dose calculation method along with a novel optimization workflow is developed. The high efficiency makes it attractive for clinical usages.

  2. TH-A-19A-06: Site-Specific Comparison of Analytical and Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculations

    Schuemann, J; Grassberger, C; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Dowdell, S [Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District, Wollongong (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of complex patient geometries on the capability of analytical dose calculation algorithms to accurately predict dose distributions and to verify currently used uncertainty margins in proton therapy. Methods: Dose distributions predicted by an analytical pencilbeam algorithm were compared with Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) using TOPAS. 79 complete patient treatment plans were investigated for 7 disease sites (liver, prostate, breast, medulloblastoma spine and whole brain, lung and head and neck). A total of 508 individual passively scattered treatment fields were analyzed for field specific properties. Comparisons based on target coverage indices (EUD, D95, D90 and D50) were performed. Range differences were estimated for the distal position of the 90% dose level (R90) and the 50% dose level (R50). Two-dimensional distal dose surfaces were calculated and the root mean square differences (RMSD), average range difference (ARD) and average distal dose degradation (ADD), the distance between the distal position of the 80% and 20% dose levels (R80- R20), were analyzed. Results: We found target coverage indices calculated by TOPAS to generally be around 1–2% lower than predicted by the analytical algorithm. Differences in R90 predicted by TOPAS and the planning system can be larger than currently applied range margins in proton therapy for small regions distal to the target volume. We estimate new site-specific range margins (R90) for analytical dose calculations considering total range uncertainties and uncertainties from dose calculation alone based on the RMSD. Our results demonstrate that a reduction of currently used uncertainty margins is feasible for liver, prostate and whole brain fields even without introducing MC dose calculations. Conclusion: Analytical dose calculation algorithms predict dose distributions within clinical limits for more homogeneous patients sites (liver, prostate, whole brain). However, we recommend treatment plan verification using Monte Carlo simulations for patients with complex geometries.

  3. Two computational approaches for Monte Carlo based shutdown dose rate calculation with applications to the JET fusion machine

    Petrizzi, L.; Batistoni, P.; Migliori, S. [Associazione EURATOM ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Chen, Y.; Fischer, U.; Pereslavtsev, P. [Association FZK-EURATOM Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Loughlin, M. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX (United Kingdom); Secco, A. [Nice Srl Via Serra 33 Camerano Casasco AT (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    In deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion plasmas neutrons are produced causing activation of JET machine components. For safe operation and maintenance it is important to be able to predict the induced activation and the resulting shut down dose rates. This requires a suitable system of codes which is capable of simulating both the neutron induced material activation during operation and the decay gamma radiation transport after shut-down in the proper 3-D geometry. Two methodologies to calculate the dose rate in fusion devices have been developed recently and applied to fusion machines, both using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. FZK has developed a more classical approach, the rigorous 2-step (R2S) system in which MCNP is coupled to the FISPACT inventory code with an automated routing. ENEA, in collaboration with the ITER Team, has developed an alternative approach, the direct 1 step method (D1S). Neutron and decay gamma transport are handled in one single MCNP run, using an ad hoc cross section library. The intention was to tightly couple the neutron induced production of a radio-isotope and the emission of its decay gammas for an accurate spatial distribution and a reliable calculated statistical error. The two methods have been used by the two Associations to calculate the dose rate in five positions of JET machine, two inside the vacuum chamber and three outside, at cooling times between 1 second and 1 year after shutdown. The same MCNP model and irradiation conditions have been assumed. The exercise has been proposed and financed in the frame of the Fusion Technological Program of the JET machine. The scope is to supply the designers with the most reliable tool and data to calculate the dose rate on fusion machines. Results showed that there is a good agreement: the differences range between 5-35%. The next step to be considered in 2003 will be an exercise in which the comparison will be done with dose-rate data from JET taken during and shortly after the deuterium-tritium experiment (DTE1) in 1997. Large computing power, both in terms of amount of data handling and storage and the CPU computing time is needed by the two methods, partly due to the complexity of the problem. With parallel versions of the MCNP code, running on two different platforms, a satisfying accuracy of the calculation has been reached in reasonable times. (authors)

  4. Two computational approaches for Monte Carlo based shutdown dose rate calculation with applications to the JET fusion machine

    Petrizzi, L.; Batistoni, P.; Migliori, S.; Chen, Y.; Fischer, U.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Loughlin, M.; Secco, A.

    2003-01-01

    In deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion plasmas neutrons are produced causing activation of JET machine components. For safe operation and maintenance it is important to be able to predict the induced activation and the resulting shut down dose rates. This requires a suitable system of codes which is capable of simulating both the neutron induced material activation during operation and the decay gamma radiation transport after shut-down in the proper 3-D geometry. Two methodologies to calculate the dose rate in fusion devices have been developed recently and applied to fusion machines, both using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. FZK has developed a more classical approach, the rigorous 2-step (R2S) system in which MCNP is coupled to the FISPACT inventory code with an automated routing. ENEA, in collaboration with the ITER Team, has developed an alternative approach, the direct 1 step method (D1S). Neutron and decay gamma transport are handled in one single MCNP run, using an ad hoc cross section library. The intention was to tightly couple the neutron induced production of a radio-isotope and the emission of its decay gammas for an accurate spatial distribution and a reliable calculated statistical error. The two methods have been used by the two Associations to calculate the dose rate in five positions of JET machine, two inside the vacuum chamber and three outside, at cooling times between 1 second and 1 year after shutdown. The same MCNP model and irradiation conditions have been assumed. The exercise has been proposed and financed in the frame of the Fusion Technological Program of the JET machine. The scope is to supply the designers with the most reliable tool and data to calculate the dose rate on fusion machines. Results showed that there is a good agreement: the differences range between 5-35%. The next step to be considered in 2003 will be an exercise in which the comparison will be done with dose-rate data from JET taken during and shortly after the deuterium-tritium experiment (DTE1) in 1997. Large computing power, both in terms of amount of data handling and storage and the CPU computing time is needed by the two methods, partly due to the complexity of the problem. With parallel versions of the MCNP code, running on two different platforms, a satisfying accuracy of the calculation has been reached in reasonable times. (authors)

  5. Development of a practical Monte Carlo based fuel management system for the Penn State University Breazeale Research Reactor (PSBR)

    Tippayakul, Chanatip; Ivanov, Kostadin; Frederick Sears, C.

    2008-01-01

    A practical fuel management system for the he Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Research Reactor (PSBR) based on the advanced Monte Carlo methodology was developed from the existing fuel management tool in this research. Several modeling improvements were implemented to the old system. The improved fuel management system can now utilize the burnup dependent cross section libraries generated specifically for PSBR fuel and it is also able to update the cross sections of these libraries by the Monte Carlo calculation automatically. Considerations were given to balance the computation time and the accuracy of the cross section update. Thus, certain types of a limited number of isotopes, which are considered 'important', are calculated and updated by the scheme. Moreover, the depletion algorithm of the existing fuel management tool was replaced from the predictor only to the predictor-corrector depletion scheme to account for burnup spectrum changes during the burnup step more accurately. An intermediate verification of the fuel management system was performed to assess the correctness of the newly implemented schemes against HELIOS. It was found that the agreement of both codes is good when the same energy released per fission (Q values) is used. Furthermore, to be able to model the reactor at various temperatures, the fuel management tool is able to utilize automatically the continuous cross sections generated at different temperatures. Other additional useful capabilities were also added to the fuel management tool to make it easy to use and be practical. As part of the development, a hybrid nodal diffusion/Monte Carlo calculation was devised to speed up the Monte Carlo calculation by providing more converged initial source distribution for the Monte Carlo calculation from the nodal diffusion calculation. Finally, the fuel management system was validated against the measured data using several actual PSBR core loadings. The agreement of the predicted core excess reactivities and the measured values is found to be good considering the measurement uncertainties

  6. MO-FG-202-08: Real-Time Monte Carlo-Based Treatment Dose Reconstruction and Monitoring for Radiotherapy

    Tian, Z; Shi, F; Gu, X; Tan, J; Hassan-Rezaeian, N; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Graves, Y [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This proof-of-concept study is to develop a real-time Monte Carlo (MC) based treatment-dose reconstruction and monitoring system for radiotherapy, especially for the treatments with complicated delivery, to catch treatment delivery errors at the earliest possible opportunity and interrupt the treatment only when an unacceptable dosimetric deviation from our expectation occurs. Methods: First an offline scheme is launched to pre-calculate the expected dose from the treatment plan, used as ground truth for real-time monitoring later. Then an online scheme with three concurrent threads is launched while treatment delivering, to reconstruct and monitor the patient dose in a temporally resolved fashion in real-time. Thread T1 acquires machine status every 20 ms to calculate and accumulate fluence map (FM). Once our accumulation threshold is reached, T1 transfers the FM to T2 for dose reconstruction ad starts to accumulate a new FM. A GPU-based MC dose calculation is performed on T2 when MC dose engine is ready and a new FM is available. The reconstructed instantaneous dose is directed to T3 for dose accumulation and real-time visualization. Multiple dose metrics (e.g. maximum and mean dose for targets and organs) are calculated from the current accumulated dose and compared with the pre-calculated expected values. Once the discrepancies go beyond our tolerance, an error message will be send to interrupt the treatment delivery. Results: A VMAT Head-and-neck patient case was used to test the performance of our system. Real-time machine status acquisition was simulated here. The differences between the actual dose metrics and the expected ones were 0.06%–0.36%, indicating an accurate delivery. ∼10Hz frequency of dose reconstruction and monitoring was achieved, with 287.94s online computation time compared to 287.84s treatment delivery time. Conclusion: Our study has demonstrated the feasibility of computing a dose distribution in a temporally resolved fashion in real-time and quantitatively and dosimetrically monitoring the treatment delivery.

  7. Data and image fusion for geometrical cloud characterization

    Thorne, L.R.; Buch, K.A.; Sun, Chen-Hui; Diegert, C.

    1997-04-01

    Clouds have a strong influence on the Earth`s climate and therefore on climate change. An important step in improving the accuracy of models that predict global climate change, general circulation models, is improving the parameterization of clouds and cloud-radiation interactions. Improvements in the next generation models will likely include the effect of cloud geometry on the cloud-radiation parameterizations. We have developed and report here methods for characterizing the geometrical features and three-dimensional properties of clouds that could be of significant value in developing these new parameterizations. We developed and report here a means of generating and imaging synthetic clouds which we used to test our characterization algorithms; a method for using Taylor`s hypotheses to infer spatial averages from temporal averages of cloud properties; a computer method for automatically classifying cloud types in an image; and a method for producing numerical three-dimensional renderings of cloud fields based on the fusion of ground-based and satellite images together with meteorological data.

  8. Application of radiological imaging methods to radioactive waste characterization

    Tessaro, Ana Paula Gimenes; Souza, Daiane Cristini B. de; Vicente, Roberto, E-mail: aptessaro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Radiological imaging technologies are most frequently used for medical diagnostic purposes but are also useful in materials characterization and other non-medical applications in research and industry. The characterization of radioactive waste packages or waste samples can also benefit from these techniques. In this paper, the application of some imaging methods is examined for the physical characterization of radioactive wastes constituted by spent ion-exchange resins and activated charcoal beds stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Department of IPEN. These wastes are generated when the filter media of the water polishing system of the IEA-R1 Nuclear Research Reactor is no longer able to maintain the required water quality and are replaced. The IEA-R1 is a 5MW pool-type reactor, moderated and cooled by light water, and fission and activation products released from the reactor core must be continuously removed to prevent activity buildup in the water. The replacement of the sorbents is carried out by pumping from the filter tanks into several 200 L drums, each drum getting a variable amount of water. Considering that the results of radioanalytical methods to determine the concentrations of radionuclides are usually expressed on dry basis,the amount of water must be known to calculate the total activity of each package. At first sight this is a trivial problem that demanded, however some effort to be solved. The findings on this subject are reported in this paper. (author)

  9. Characterization of clinical-imaging characteristics of the binswanger's disease

    Rodriguez Mutuberria, Livan; Serra Valdes, Yusimi

    2002-01-01

    A review was made to go deep into the understanding of vascular dementias that behave as the second cause of dementia in practice. Binswanger's disease is one of the most important among them. Its detection has progressively increased with the continual improvement of the radiological diagnostic tools that allow to identify the ischemic damage of the hemispherical cerebral white matter and the presence of lacunar infarctions. It is a disease of chronic course and inexorably progressive that is characterized by the association of subcortical cognitive dysfunction, evidence of cerebrovascular disease, Parkinsonian rigidity and vesicle dysfunction with a characteristic imaging picture. The clinical picture and the main imaging characteristics are explained in this paper and the pathogens of the disease is briefly described

  10. Integrated global digital image correlation for interface delamination characterization

    Hoefnagels, Johan P.M.

    2013-07-23

    Interfacial delamination is a key reliability challenge in composites and micro-electronic systems due to (high-density) integration of dissimilar materials. Predictive finite element models are used to minimize delamination failures during design, but require accurate interface models to capture (irreversible) crack initiation and propagation behavior observed in experiments. Therefore, an Integrated Global Digital Image Correlation (I-GDIC) strategy is developed for accurate determination of mechanical interface behavior from in-situ delamination experiments. Recently, a novel miniature delamination setup was presented that enables in-situ microscopic characterization of interface delamination while sensitively measuring global load-displacement curves for all mode mixities. Nevertheless, extraction of detailed mechanical interface behavior from measured images is challenging, because deformations are tiny and measurement noise large. Therefore, an advanced I-GDIC methodology is developed which correlates the image patterns by only deforming the images using kinematically-admissible \\'eigenmodes\\' that correspond to the few parameters controlling the interface tractions in an analytic description of the crack tip deformation field, thereby greatly enhancing accuracy and robustness. This method is validated on virtual delamination experiments, simulated using a recently developed self-adaptive cohesive zone (CZ) finite element framework. © The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2014.

  11. Raman characterization of high temperature materials using an imaging detector

    Rosenblatt, G.M.; Veirs, D.K.

    1989-03-01

    The characterization of materials by Raman spectroscopy has been advanced by recent technological developments in light detectors. Imaging photomultiplier-tube detectors are now available that impart position information in two dimensions while retaining photon-counting sensitivity, effectively greatly reducing noise. The combination of sensitivity and reduced noise allows smaller amounts of material to be analyzed. The ability to observe small amount of material when coupled with position information makes possible Raman characterization in which many spatial elements are analyzed simultaneously. Raman spectroscopy making use of these capabilities has been used, for instance, to analyze the phases present in carbon films and fibers and to map phase-transformed zones accompanying crack propagation in toughened zirconia ceramics. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Characterization of European sword blades through neutron imaging techniques

    Salvemini, F.; Grazzi, F.; Peetermans, S.; Gener, M.; Lehmann, E. H.; Zoppi, M.

    2014-09-01

    In the present work, we have studied two European rapier blades, dating back to the period ranging from the Late Renaissance to the Early Modern Age (about 17th to 18th century). In order to determine variation in quality and differences in technology, a study was undertaken with the purpose to observe variations in the blade microstructure (and consequently in the construction processes). The samples, which in the present case were expendable, have been investigated, preliminarily, through standard metallography and then by means of white beam and energy-selective neutron imaging. The comparison of the results, using the two techniques, turned out to be satisfactory, with a substantial quantitative agreement of the results obtained with the two techniques, and show the complementarity of the two methods. Metallography has been considered up to now the method of choice for metal material characterization. The correspondence between the two methods, as well as the non-invasive character of the neutron-based techniques and its possibility to obtain 3D reconstruction, candidate neutron imaging as an important and quantitatively reliable technique for metal characterization.

  13. Diffusion-weighted imaging in characterization of cystic pancreatic lesions

    Sandrasegaran, K., E-mail: ksandras@iupui.edu [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Akisik, F.M.; Patel, A.A.; Rydberg, M. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Cramer, H.M.; Agaram, N.P. [Department of Pathology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Schmidt, C.M. [Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Aim: To evaluate whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can characterize or predict the malignant potential of cystic pancreatic lesions. Materials and methods: Retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) database over a 2-year period revealed 136 patients with cystic pancreatic lesions. Patients with DWI studies and histological confirmation of cystic mass were included. In patients with known pancreatitis, lesions with amylase content of >1000 IU/l that resolved on subsequent scans were included as pseudocysts. ADC of cystic lesions was measured by two independent reviewers. These values were then compared to categorize these lesions as benign or malignant using conventional MRI sequences. Results: Seventy lesions were analysed: adenocarcinoma (n = 4), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN; n = 28), mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN; n = 9), serous cystadenoma (n = 16), and pseudocysts (n = 13). There was no difference between ADC values of malignant and non-malignant lesions (p = 0.06), between mucinous and serous tumours (p = 0.12), or between IPMN and MCN (p = 0.42). ADC values for low-grade IPMN were significantly higher than those for high-grade or invasive IPMN (p = 0.03). Conclusion: ADC values may be helpful in deciding the malignant potential of IPMN. However, they are not useful in differentiating malignant from benign lesions or for characterizing cystic pancreatic lesions.

  14. Characterization of a PET Camera Optimized for Prostate Imaging

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi; Hu, Jicun; Wang, G.C.; Wilson, David; Oh, Sang; Huesman, RonaldH.; Derenzo, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01

    We present the characterization of a positron emission tomograph for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair of external curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis). The distance between detector banks adjusts to allow patient access and to position the detectors as closely as possible for maximum sensitivity with patients of various sizes. Each bank is composed of two axial rows of 20 HR+ block detectors for a total of 80 detectors in the camera. The individual detectors are angled in the transaxial plane to point towards the prostate to reduce resolution degradation in that region. The detectors are read out by modified HRRT data acquisition electronics. Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our dedicated-prostate camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less background (less randoms and lower scatter fraction) and a lower cost. We have completed construction of the camera. Characterization data and reconstructed images of several phantoms are shown. Sensitivity of a point source in the center is 946 cps/mu Ci. Spatial resolution is 4 mm FWHM in the central region

  15. TH-CD-207A-08: Simulated Real-Time Image Guidance for Lung SBRT Patients Using Scatter Imaging

    Redler, G; Cifter, G; Templeton, A; Lee, C; Bernard, D; Liao, Y; Zhen, H; Turian, J; Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive Monte Carlo-based model for the acquisition of scatter images of patient anatomy in real-time, during lung SBRT treatment. Methods: During SBRT treatment, images of patient anatomy can be acquired from scattered radiation. To rigorously examine the utility of scatter images for image guidance, a model is developed using MCNP code to simulate scatter images of phantoms and lung cancer patients. The model is validated by comparing experimental and simulated images of phantoms of different complexity. The differentiation between tissue types is investigated by imaging objects of known compositions (water, lung, and bone equivalent). A lung tumor phantom, simulating materials and geometry encountered during lung SBRT treatments, is used to investigate image noise properties for various quantities of delivered radiation (monitor units(MU)). Patient scatter images are simulated using the validated simulation model. 4DCT patient data is converted to an MCNP input geometry accounting for different tissue composition and densities. Lung tumor phantom images acquired with decreasing imaging time (decreasing MU) are used to model the expected noise amplitude in patient scatter images, producing realistic simulated patient scatter images with varying temporal resolution. Results: Image intensity in simulated and experimental scatter images of tissue equivalent objects (water, lung, bone) match within the uncertainty (∼3%). Lung tumor phantom images agree as well. Specifically, tumor-to-lung contrast matches within the uncertainty. The addition of random noise approximating quantum noise in experimental images to simulated patient images shows that scatter images of lung tumors can provide images in as fast as 0.5 seconds with CNR∼2.7. Conclusions: A scatter imaging simulation model is developed and validated using experimental phantom scatter images. Following validation, lung cancer patient scatter images are simulated. These simulated

  16. TH-CD-207A-08: Simulated Real-Time Image Guidance for Lung SBRT Patients Using Scatter Imaging

    Redler, G; Cifter, G; Templeton, A; Lee, C; Bernard, D; Liao, Y; Zhen, H; Turian, J; Chu, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive Monte Carlo-based model for the acquisition of scatter images of patient anatomy in real-time, during lung SBRT treatment. Methods: During SBRT treatment, images of patient anatomy can be acquired from scattered radiation. To rigorously examine the utility of scatter images for image guidance, a model is developed using MCNP code to simulate scatter images of phantoms and lung cancer patients. The model is validated by comparing experimental and simulated images of phantoms of different complexity. The differentiation between tissue types is investigated by imaging objects of known compositions (water, lung, and bone equivalent). A lung tumor phantom, simulating materials and geometry encountered during lung SBRT treatments, is used to investigate image noise properties for various quantities of delivered radiation (monitor units(MU)). Patient scatter images are simulated using the validated simulation model. 4DCT patient data is converted to an MCNP input geometry accounting for different tissue composition and densities. Lung tumor phantom images acquired with decreasing imaging time (decreasing MU) are used to model the expected noise amplitude in patient scatter images, producing realistic simulated patient scatter images with varying temporal resolution. Results: Image intensity in simulated and experimental scatter images of tissue equivalent objects (water, lung, bone) match within the uncertainty (∼3%). Lung tumor phantom images agree as well. Specifically, tumor-to-lung contrast matches within the uncertainty. The addition of random noise approximating quantum noise in experimental images to simulated patient images shows that scatter images of lung tumors can provide images in as fast as 0.5 seconds with CNR∼2.7. Conclusions: A scatter imaging simulation model is developed and validated using experimental phantom scatter images. Following validation, lung cancer patient scatter images are simulated. These simulated

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF DIESEL SPRAY IMAGES USING A SHAPE PROCESSING METHODOLOGY

    Cecile Petit

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In Diesel engines, a key element in achieving a clean and efficient combustion process is a proper fuel-air mixing, which is a consequence of the fuel spray development and fuel-air interaction inside the engine combustion chamber. The spray structure and behavior are classically described by the length (penetration and width (angle of the spray plume but these parameters do not give any clue on the geometrical injection center and on the spray symmetry. The purpose of this paper is to find out original tools to characterize the Diesel spray: the virtual spray origin is the geometrical injection center, which may (or may not coincide with the injector axis. Another interesting point is the description of the Diesel spray in terms of symmetry: the spray plume internal and external symmetry characterize the spray and the injector performance. Our approach is first to find out the virtual spray origin: after the image segmentation, the spray is coded with the Freeman code and with an original shape coding from which the moments are derived. The symmetry axes are then computed and the spray plumes are discarded (or not for the virtual spray origin computation, which is derived from a Voronoi diagram. The last step is the internal and external spray plume symmetry characterization thanks to correlation and mathematical distances.

  18. The imaging performance of flash memory masks characterized with AIMS

    van Setten, Eelco; Wismans, Onno; Grim, Kees; Finders, Jo; Dusa, Mircea; Birkner, Robert; Richter, Rigo; Scherübl, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    Flash memory is an important driver of the lithography roadmap, with its dramatic acceleration in dimensional shrink, pushing for ever smaller feature sizes. The introduction of hyper-NA immersion lithography has brought the 45nm node and below within reach for memory makers using single exposure. At these feature sizes mask topology and the material properties of the film stack on the mask play an important role on imaging performance. Furthermore, the break up of the array pitch regularity in the NAND-type flash memory cell by two thick wordlines and a central space, leads to feature-center placement (overlay) errors, that are inherent to the design. An integral optimization approach is needed to mitigate these effects and to control both the CD and placement errors tightly. In this paper we will show that aerial image measurements at mask-level are useful for characterizing the gate layer of a NAND-Flash design before exposure. The aerial image measurements are performed with the AIMSTM 45-193i. and compared to CD measurements on the wafer obtained with an XT:1900Gi hyper-NA immersion system. An excellent correlation is demonstrated for feature-center placement errors and CD variations across the mask (see Figure 1) for several features in the gate layer down to 40nm half pitch. This shows the potential to use aerial image measurements at mask-level in combination with correction techniques on the photomask, like the CDC200 tool in combination with exposure tool correction techniques, such as DoseMapperTM, to improve both across field and across wafer CD uniformity of critical layers.

  19. Characterization of extrusion flow using particle image velocimetry

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the characterization of polymer flows within an extrusion die using particle image velocimetry (PIV in very constraining conditions (high temperature, pressure and velocity. Measurements were realized on semi-industrial equipments in order to have test conditions close to the industrial ones. Simple flows as well as disrupted ones were studied in order to determine the capabilities and the limits of the method. The analysis of the velocity profiles pointed out significant wall slip, which was confirmed by rheological measurements based on Mooney's method. Numerical simulations were used to connect the two sets of measurements and to simulate complex velocity profiles for comparison to the experimental ones. A good agreement was found between simulations and experiments providing wall slip is taken into account in the simulation.

  20. Detection and characterization with short TI inversion recovery MR imaging

    Komata, Kaori (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-10-01

    Short TI inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (STIR-MRI) with spin echo (SE) T1- and T2-weighted images of the pelvis was investigated to evaluate its usefulness in detecting and characterizing endometriosis. Thirty-one women suspected of having the disease were studied in detail. MR findings with and without STIR-MRI were correlated with the results of laparotomy (27 women) and laparoscopy (4 women). Surgery revealed endometriosis in 29 women (17 ovarian chocolate cysts, 22 intestinal adhesions, 14 cul-de-sac obliterations and 12 adenomyosis). The other two women did not have endometriosis (uterine prolapse in one and submucosal leiomyoma in one). An ovarian chocolate cyst was diagnosed when a T1-elongated lesion showed shading, loculus or a low intensity rim on SE MR images, and a low intensity rim on STIR-MRI. Only 12 of the 17 chocolate cysts and neither of the two hemorrhagic corpus lutein cysts were correctly diagnosed on SE MR images, whereas 18 of these 19 cysts were correctly diagnosed because of the low intensity rim on STIR-MRI. In the pathological analysis, the rim was found to be a fibrous capsule and there were many macrophages which phagocytized hemosiderin. For the assessment of ovarian chocolate cysts, accuracy improved from 63.2% to 94.7%. As for the adhesion between the intestine and the uterus, specificity improved from 61.9% to 90.5% and accuracy improved from 67.7% to 93.5% when STRI-MRI was used. For the assessment of the cul-de-sac obliteration, accuracy improved from 67.7% to 83.8% although [chi][sup 2] analysis showed no significance. The major factors for the improved accuracy with STIR-MRI are the decrease of the motion artifact owing to the suppression of the fat signal, decreased chemical shift artifact and accurate differentiation of fat from hemorrhagic component. Therefore, STIR-MRI is a useful and reliable procedure and should be used together with SE T1-, T2-weighted images for the assessment of endometriosis. (author).

  1. Detection and characterization with short TI inversion recovery MR imaging

    Komata, Kaori

    1994-01-01

    Short TI inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (STIR-MRI) with spin echo (SE) T1- and T2-weighted images of the pelvis was investigated to evaluate its usefulness in detecting and characterizing endometriosis. Thirty-one women suspected of having the disease were studied in detail. MR findings with and without STIR-MRI were correlated with the results of laparotomy (27 women) and laparoscopy (4 women). Surgery revealed endometriosis in 29 women (17 ovarian chocolate cysts, 22 intestinal adhesions, 14 cul-de-sac obliterations and 12 adenomyosis). The other two women did not have endometriosis (uterine prolapse in one and submucosal leiomyoma in one). An ovarian chocolate cyst was diagnosed when a T1-elongated lesion showed shading, loculus or a low intensity rim on SE MR images, and a low intensity rim on STIR-MRI. Only 12 of the 17 chocolate cysts and neither of the two hemorrhagic corpus lutein cysts were correctly diagnosed on SE MR images, whereas 18 of these 19 cysts were correctly diagnosed because of the low intensity rim on STIR-MRI. In the pathological analysis, the rim was found to be a fibrous capsule and there were many macrophages which phagocytized hemosiderin. For the assessment of ovarian chocolate cysts, accuracy improved from 63.2% to 94.7%. As for the adhesion between the intestine and the uterus, specificity improved from 61.9% to 90.5% and accuracy improved from 67.7% to 93.5% when STRI-MRI was used. For the assessment of the cul-de-sac obliteration, accuracy improved from 67.7% to 83.8% although χ 2 analysis showed no significance. The major factors for the improved accuracy with STIR-MRI are the decrease of the motion artifact owing to the suppression of the fat signal, decreased chemical shift artifact and accurate differentiation of fat from hemorrhagic component. Therefore, STIR-MRI is a useful and reliable procedure and should be used together with SE T1-, T2-weighted images for the assessment of endometriosis. (author)

  2. Synthesis And Characterization Of Mebrofenin For Hepatobiliary Imaging

    Purwoko; Tamat, Swasono R.; Yunita, Fitri; Kristanti, Eti

    2003-01-01

    Mebrofenin labeled with Technetium-99m is a new radiopharmaceutical having superior and ideal characteristic as a hepatobiliary-imaging agent. The synthesis and characterization of Mebrofenin (3-Bromo-2,4,6-trimethyl acetanilido iminodiacetic acid) as IDA derivative has been carried out involving three steps of reaction i.e. : acetyllization of 2,4,6-Trimethyl aniline to get 2,4,6-trimethyl chloro acetanilide which upon bromination gives the intermediate bromotrimethyl derivative and [mally by nucleophilic substitution this intermediate product with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) gives mebrofenin. The acetylation and bromination reactions were carried out in acetic acid condition while the substitution was carried out by reflux for 5 hours in ethanol and water adjusted at pH 11. The ethanol was then removed under low pressure, and the unreacted compound was removed by filtration. The filtrate was adjusted to pH 2 - 2.5, and the resulting mebrofenin was isolated by filtration and recrystallized 3 times in ethanol. Characterization of the mebrofenin product was performed by observing its melting point (197-l99 o C), ultra violet and infra red spectra as well as mass spectrometric and high performance liquid chromatographic analysis. The results showed that the product was highly pure and the yield was around 20%

  3. Characterization of snow, ice and neve by image processing

    Gay, Michel

    1999-01-01

    It is now recognized that human activities, by the extent they have achieved since the industrial era, are likely to alter the Earth's climate (IPCC, 1996). Paleo climate and the climate change models show that the polar caps are particularly sensitive to global climate change. They are more likely to play an important role but unknown on the sea level. The positive term of mass balance of polar ice sheets is the accumulation of snow, whereas the negative term is formed by the flow of ice into the oceans. The size of the polar ice caps and their hostile environment limit the amount of available field data. Only satellite remote sensing is able to provide information on geographical scales as large as Antarctica or the Arctic and allows regular monitoring over time. But to be easily interpreted, in order to deduce the snowpack characteristics observed from space (size, shape of grains, surface roughness... ), satellite data should be validated and inverted using simplified parameters. Prior to the establishment of these relations, it is necessary to develop a snow reflectance model (thesis C. Leroux 1996) taking into account the physical and optical characteristics of the snow, and a microwave emissivity model (thesis Surdyck S. 1993) that provide volume information on the morphology of the snowpack. The snowpack is characterized by several physical parameters that depend on the depth: temperature, density, size and shape of grains mainly. It is therefore essential to establish a robust and simple parameterization of the size and shape of snow grains from their observation. Image processing allows to establish these relationships and allows automatic processing of a large number of data independent of the observer. Another glaciological problem of firn is the interpretation of data obtained from the analysis of trapped air bubbles in the gas. This study implies, in particular, the dating of the ice in the firn at the close off, is necessary to determine the age of

  4. Mammographic quantitative image analysis and biologic image composition for breast lesion characterization and classification

    Drukker, Karen, E-mail: kdrukker@uchicago.edu; Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A. [Radiology Department, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Flowers, Chris I. [Department of Radiology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Drukteinis, Jennifer S. [Department of Radiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether biologic image composition of mammographic lesions can improve upon existing mammographic quantitative image analysis (QIA) in estimating the probability of malignancy. Methods: The study population consisted of 45 breast lesions imaged with dual-energy mammography prior to breast biopsy with final diagnosis resulting in 10 invasive ductal carcinomas, 5 ductal carcinomain situ, 11 fibroadenomas, and 19 other benign diagnoses. Analysis was threefold: (1) The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method, “QIA alone,” (2) the three-compartment breast (3CB) composition measure—derived from the dual-energy mammography—of water, lipid, and protein thickness were assessed, “3CB alone”, and (3) information from QIA and 3CB was combined, “QIA + 3CB.” Analysis was initiated from radiologist-indicated lesion centers and was otherwise fully automated. Steps of the QIA and 3CB methods were lesion segmentation, characterization, and subsequent classification for malignancy in leave-one-case-out cross-validation. Performance assessment included box plots, Bland–Altman plots, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions (invasive and DCIS) was 0.81 (standard error 0.07) for the “QIA alone” method, 0.72 (0.07) for “3CB alone” method, and 0.86 (0.04) for “QIA+3CB” combined. The difference in AUC was 0.043 between “QIA + 3CB” and “QIA alone” but failed to reach statistical significance (95% confidence interval [–0.17 to + 0.26]). Conclusions: In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of the composition of breast lesions and their periphery appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between different benign and malignant lesion types.

  5. Burnout prediction using advance image analysis coal characterization techniques

    Edward Lester; Dave Watts; Michael Cloke [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). School of Chemical Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2003-07-01

    The link between petrographic composition and burnout has been investigated previously by the authors. However, these predictions were based on 'bulk' properties of the coal, including the proportion of each maceral or the reflectance of the macerals in the whole sample. Combustion studies relating burnout with microlithotype analysis, or similar, remain less common partly because the technique is more complex than maceral analysis. Despite this, it is likely that any burnout prediction based on petrographic characteristics will become more accurate if it includes information about the maceral associations and the size of each particle. Chars from 13 coals, 106-125 micron size fractions, were prepared using a Drop Tube Furnace (DTF) at 1300{degree}C and 200 millisecond and 1% Oxygen. These chars were then refired in the DTF at 1300{degree}C 5% oxygen and residence times of 200, 400 and 600 milliseconds. The progressive burnout of each char was compared with the characteristics of the initial coals. This paper presents an extension of previous studies in that it relates combustion behaviour to coals that have been characterized on a particle by particle basis using advanced image analysis techniques. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Characterizing Young Giant Planets with the Gemini Planet Imager: An Iterative Approach to Planet Characterization

    Marley, Mark

    2015-01-01

    After discovery, the first task of exoplanet science is characterization. However experience has shown that the limited spectral range and resolution of most directly imaged exoplanet data requires an iterative approach to spectral modeling. Simple, brown dwarf-like models, must first be tested to ascertain if they are both adequate to reproduce the available data and consistent with additional constraints, including the age of the system and available limits on the planet's mass and luminosity, if any. When agreement is lacking, progressively more complex solutions must be considered, including non-solar composition, partial cloudiness, and disequilibrium chemistry. Such additional complexity must be balanced against an understanding of the limitations of the atmospheric models themselves. For example while great strides have been made in improving the opacities of important molecules, particularly NH3 and CH4, at high temperatures, much more work is needed to understand the opacity of atomic Na and K. The highly pressure broadened fundamental band of Na and K in the optical stretches into the near-infrared, strongly influencing the spectral shape of Y and J spectral bands. Discerning gravity and atmospheric composition is difficult, if not impossible, without both good atomic opacities as well as an excellent understanding of the relevant atmospheric chemistry. I will present examples of the iterative process of directly imaged exoplanet characterization as applied to both known and potentially newly discovered exoplanets with a focus on constraints provided by GPI spectra. If a new GPI planet is lacking, as a case study I will discuss HR 8799 c and d will explain why some solutions, such as spatially inhomogeneous cloudiness, introduce their own additional layers of complexity. If spectra of new planets from GPI are available I will explain the modeling process in the context of understanding these new worlds.

  7. Tomosynthesis Breast Imaging Early Detection and Characterization of Breast Cancer

    Hamberg, Leena

    2000-01-01

    A digital tomosynthesis mammography method was developed with which to obtain tomographic images of the breast by acquiring a series of low radiation dose images as the x-ray tube moves in an arc above the breast...

  8. Characterization of European Lacquers by Terahertz (THz) Reflectometric Imaging

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Christensen, Mads C.

    2013-01-01

    In this study a European lacquerware replica has been investigated by terahertz (THz) reflectometric imaging. The inspected lacquerware is a wooden panel covered by multiple complex layers of lacquers and plaster. Utilizing pulsed Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) in reflection mode, we obs...

  9. Role of tissue harmonic imaging in characterization of cystic renallesions

    Mohammed, A.; Sandhu, Manavjit S.; Lal, A.; Sodhi, Kushaljit S.; Sud, K.; Kohli, Harbir S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to determine the utility of tissue harmonic imaging inevaluating cystic renal lesions and to compare these findings withconventional ultrasound guidance (USG) and CT. Thirty patients, detected withcystic renal lesions on routine USG (over a period of 18 months from July2004 to December 2005) at the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education andResearch Chandigarh, Chandigarh, India) were included in this study. Allpatients underwent a conventional gray scale ultrasound study (GSI), followedby tissue harmonic imaging (THI) sonography on the same machine (advancetechnology limited high definition imaging 5000). Computed tomography ofabdomen was carried out within one week of the ultrasound examinations. Allimages were evaluated for size, number and location of lesions. The findingsof THI sonography, conventional USG and CT of abdomen were recorded in theirrespective proformas. The images obtained by GSI, THI and contrast enhancedCT were also evaluated for image, quality, lesion conspicuity and fluid-soliddifferentiation. Tissue harmonic imaging showed better image quality in 27 of34 lesions, improvement in lesion conspicuity was found in 27 of 34 cysticlesions and an improved solid-fluid differentiation in 30 of 34 lesions whencompared to GSI. The THI provided additional information as compared to GSIin 8 patients. The grading of CT scan was significantly higher in overallimage quality (p=0.007) and lesion conspicuity (p=0.004), but wasnon-significant for fluid-solid differentiation (p=0.23). Tissue harmonicimaging provides better image quality, lesion delineation and superiorcharacterization than conventional gray scale sonography. (author)

  10. The characterization of an economic and portable LED-based photoacoustic imaging system to facilitate molecular imaging

    Ali Hariri

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging (PAI is a non-invasive, high-resolution hybrid imaging modality that combines optical excitation and ultrasound detection. PAI can image endogenous chromophores (melanin, hemoglobin, etc. and exogenous contrast agents in different medical applications. However, most current equipment uses sophisticated and complicated OPO lasers with tuning and stability features inconsistent with broad clinical deployment. As the number of applications of PAI in medicine increases, there is an urgent need to make the imaging equipment more compact, portable, and affordable. Here, portable light emitting diode – based photoacoustic imaging (PLED-PAI was introduced and characterized in terms of system specifications, light source characterizations, photoacoustic spatial/temporal resolution, and penetration. The system uses two LED arrays attached to the sides of a conventional ultrasound transducer. The LED pulse repetition rate is tunable between 1 K Hz, 2 K Hz, 3 K Hz, and 4 K Hz. The axial resolution was 0.268 mm, and the lateral resolution was between 0.55 and 0.59 mm. The system could detect optical absorber (pencil lead at a depth of 3.2 cm and the detection limits of indocyanine green (ICG and methylene blue (MB were 9 μM and 0.78 mM. In vivo imaging of labeled human mesenchymal stem cells was achieved to confirm compatibility with small animal imaging. The characterization we report here may have value to other groups evaluating commercially available photoacoustic imaging equipment. Keywords: Portable photoacoustic imaging, LED, Optoacoustic imaging, Molecular imaging

  11. Image analysis of ocular fundus for retinopathy characterization

    Ushizima, Daniela; Cuadros, Jorge

    2010-02-05

    Automated analysis of ocular fundus images is a common procedure in countries as England, including both nonemergency examination and retinal screening of patients with diabetes mellitus. This involves digital image capture and transmission of the images to a digital reading center for evaluation and treatment referral. In collaboration with the Optometry Department, University of California, Berkeley, we have tested computer vision algorithms to segment vessels and lesions in ground-truth data (DRIVE database) and hundreds of images of non-macular centric and nonuniform illumination views of the eye fundus from EyePACS program. Methods under investigation involve mathematical morphology (Figure 1) for image enhancement and pattern matching. Recently, we have focused in more efficient techniques to model the ocular fundus vasculature (Figure 2), using deformable contours. Preliminary results show accurate segmentation of vessels and high level of true-positive microaneurysms.

  12. Forty-five degree backscattering-mode nonlinear absorption imaging in turbid media.

    Cui, Liping; Knox, Wayne H

    2010-01-01

    Two-color nonlinear absorption imaging has been previously demonstrated with endogenous contrast of hemoglobin and melanin in turbid media using transmission-mode detection and a dual-laser technology approach. For clinical applications, it would be generally preferable to use backscattering mode detection and a simpler single-laser technology. We demonstrate that imaging in backscattering mode in turbid media using nonlinear absorption can be obtained with as little as 1-mW average power per beam with a single laser source. Images have been achieved with a detector receiving backscattered light at a 45-deg angle relative to the incoming beams' direction. We obtain images of capillary tube phantoms with resolution as high as 20 microm and penetration depth up to 0.9 mm for a 300-microm tube at SNR approximately 1 in calibrated scattering solutions. Simulation results of the backscattering and detection process using nonimaging optics are demonstrated. A Monte Carlo-based method shows that the nonlinear signal drops exponentially as the depth increases, which agrees well with our experimental results. Simulation also shows that with our current detection method, only 2% of the signal is typically collected with a 5-mm-radius detector.

  13. Colorization and automated segmentation of human T2 MR brain images for characterization of soft tissues.

    Muhammad Attique

    Full Text Available Characterization of tissues like brain by using magnetic resonance (MR images and colorization of the gray scale image has been reported in the literature, along with the advantages and drawbacks. Here, we present two independent methods; (i a novel colorization method to underscore the variability in brain MR images, indicative of the underlying physical density of bio tissue, (ii a segmentation method (both hard and soft segmentation to characterize gray brain MR images. The segmented images are then transformed into color using the above-mentioned colorization method, yielding promising results for manual tracing. Our color transformation incorporates the voxel classification by matching the luminance of voxels of the source MR image and provided color image by measuring the distance between them. The segmentation method is based on single-phase clustering for 2D and 3D image segmentation with a new auto centroid selection method, which divides the image into three distinct regions (gray matter (GM, white matter (WM, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF using prior anatomical knowledge. Results have been successfully validated on human T2-weighted (T2 brain MR images. The proposed method can be potentially applied to gray-scale images from other imaging modalities, in bringing out additional diagnostic tissue information contained in the colorized image processing approach as described.

  14. Integrated global digital image correlation for interface delamination characterization

    Hoefnagels, Johan P.M.; Blaysat, Benoî t; Lubineau, Gilles; Geers, Marc G D

    2013-01-01

    , but require accurate interface models to capture (irreversible) crack initiation and propagation behavior observed in experiments. Therefore, an Integrated Global Digital Image Correlation (I-GDIC) strategy is developed for accurate determination of mechanical

  15. Tomosynthesis Breast Imaging: Early Detection and Characterization of Breast Cancer

    Hamberg, Leena

    1999-01-01

    Our aim for the second year of this grant was to investigate the tomosynthetic image quality by performing experimental studies using the specially developed phantoms and to quantitate tomosynthesis...

  16. Scanners and drillers: Characterizing expert visual search through volumetric images

    Drew, Trafton; Vo, Melissa Le-Hoa; Olwal, Alex; Jacobson, Francine; Seltzer, Steven E.; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2013-01-01

    Modern imaging methods like computed tomography (CT) generate 3-D volumes of image data. How do radiologists search through such images? Are certain strategies more efficient? Although there is a large literature devoted to understanding search in 2-D, relatively little is known about search in volumetric space. In recent years, with the ever-increasing popularity of volumetric medical imaging, this question has taken on increased importance as we try to understand, and ultimately reduce, errors in diagnostic radiology. In the current study, we asked 24 radiologists to search chest CTs for lung nodules that could indicate lung cancer. To search, radiologists scrolled up and down through a “stack” of 2-D chest CT “slices.” At each moment, we tracked eye movements in the 2-D image plane and coregistered eye position with the current slice. We used these data to create a 3-D representation of the eye movements through the image volume. Radiologists tended to follow one of two dominant search strategies: “drilling” and “scanning.” Drillers restrict eye movements to a small region of the lung while quickly scrolling through depth. Scanners move more slowly through depth and search an entire level of the lung before moving on to the next level in depth. Driller performance was superior to the scanners on a variety of metrics, including lung nodule detection rate, percentage of the lung covered, and the percentage of search errors where a nodule was never fixated. PMID:23922445

  17. Calibration, characterization, and first results with the Ocean PHILLS hyperspectral imager

    Davis, Curtiss O.; Kappus, Mary E.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.; Fisher, John; Antoniades, John A.; Carney, Megan

    1999-10-01

    The Ocean Portable Hyperspectral Imager for Low-Light spectroscopy (Ocean PHILLS), is a new hyperspectral imager specifically designed for imaging the coastal ocean. It uses a thinned, backside illuminated CCD for high sensitivity, and an all-reflective spectrograph with a convex grating in an Offner configuration to produce a distortion free image. Here we describe the instrument design and present the results of laboratory calibration and characterization and example results from a two week field experiment imaging the coastal waters off Lee Stocking, Island, Bahamas.

  18. Automatic Microaneurysm Detection and Characterization Through Digital Color Fundus Images

    Martins, Charles; Veras, Rodrigo; Ramalho, Geraldo; Medeiros, Fatima; Ushizima, Daniela

    2008-08-29

    Ocular fundus images can provide information about retinal, ophthalmic, and even systemic diseases such as diabetes. Microaneurysms (MAs) are the earliest sign of Diabetic Retinopathy, a frequently observed complication in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Robust detection of MAs in digital color fundus images is critical in the development of automated screening systems for this kind of disease. Automatic grading of these images is being considered by health boards so that the human grading task is reduced. In this paper we describe segmentation and the feature extraction methods for candidate MAs detection.We show that the candidate MAs detected with the methodology have been successfully classified by a MLP neural network (correct classification of 84percent).

  19. Evolution of a Benthic Imaging System From a Towed Camera to an Automated Habitat Characterization System

    2008-09-01

    automated processing of images for color correction, segmentation of foreground targets from sediment and classification of targets to taxonomic category...element in the development of HabCam as a tool for habitat characterization is the automated processing of images for color correction, segmentation of

  20. Characterizing Complexity of Containerized Cargo X-ray Images

    Wang, Guangxing; Martz, Harry; Glenn, Steven; Divin, Charles; Birrer, Nat

    2016-01-01

    X-ray imaging can be used to inspect cargos imported into the United States. In order to better understand the performance of X-ray inspection systems, the X-ray characteristics (density, complexity) of cargo need to be quantified. In this project, an image complexity measure called integrated power spectral density (IPSD) was studied using both DNDO engineered cargos and stream-of-commerce (SOC) cargos. A joint distribution of cargo density and complexity was obtained. A support vector machine was used to classify the SOC cargos into four categories to estimate the relative fractions.

  1. Characterizing Complexity of Containerized Cargo X-ray Images

    Wang, Guangxing [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, Harry [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glenn, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Divin, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Birrer, Nat [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-19

    X-ray imaging can be used to inspect cargos imported into the United States. In order to better understand the performance of X-ray inspection systems, the X-ray characteristics (density, complexity) of cargo need to be quantified. In this project, an image complexity measure called integrated power spectral density (IPSD) was studied using both DNDO engineered cargos and stream-of-commerce (SOC) cargos. A joint distribution of cargo density and complexity was obtained. A support vector machine was used to classify the SOC cargos into four categories to estimate the relative fractions.

  2. Characterization of 3 to 5 Micron Thermal Imagers and Analysis of Narrow Band Images

    Quek, Yew S

    2004-01-01

    ...) and the Minimum Resolvable Temperature (MRT). An available thermal imager, the Cincinnati Electronics IRRIS-256LN, and a newly purchased thermal imager, the Indigo Systems Merlin InSb Laboratory Camera, were investigated and compared...

  3. Phase image characterization of ventricular contraction in left anterior hemiblock

    Ono, Akifumi; Mizuno, Haruyoshi; Tahara, Yorio; Ishikawa, Kyozo

    1991-01-01

    We investigated whether or not left anterior hemiblock is present in patients with left axis deviation using first-harmonic Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool images. Gated blood-pool images were taken in 50 patients without contraction abnormality. They included 14 normal subjects, 8 patients with right bundle branch block (RBBB), 20 with left axis deviation (LAD) and 8 with both RBBB and LAD (RBBB+LAD). ECG gated blood-pool scans were acquired in the anterior and 'best septal' left anterior oblique projections. First, the phase images were displayed cinematically as a continuous-loop movie. Next, for quantitative analysis of the phase image, the whole left ventricular and left ventricular high lateral regions of interest were drawn. The 'regional phase shift' (RPS) was then defined as {RPS=A-a} where 'A' is the mean value of the whole left ventricular phase angles and 'a' is that of phase angles in the high lateral region. The left ventricular phase changes and the RPSs in the RBBB and LAD groups were similar to those in the normal group. In the RBBB+LAD group, the latest phase changes occurred in the high anterolateral region. The RPSs of this group were significantly lower than those in the other 3 groups (p<0.01). These data suggest that left anterior hemiblock might coexist with RBBB in patients with RBBB+LAD, whereas left anterior hemiblock might not exist in the majority of patients with LAD alone. (author)

  4. A geophysical toolbox for imaging and characterization of a landfill

    Konstantaki, L.A.; Ghose, R.; Draganov, D.S.; Heimovaara, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Leachate and gas are a product of biochemical reactions occurring inside the landfill. Treatment technologies (e.g., recirculation of leachate) are developed to reduce the production of leachate. Imaging the location of the wet and gas pockets inside the landfill can help improve the treatment

  5. Characterization of human breast cancer tissues by infrared imaging.

    Verdonck, M; Denayer, A; Delvaux, B; Garaud, S; De Wind, R; Desmedt, C; Sotiriou, C; Willard-Gallo, K; Goormaghtigh, E

    2016-01-21

    Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled to microscopy (IR imaging) has shown unique advantages in detecting morphological and molecular pathologic alterations in biological tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of IR imaging as a diagnostic tool to identify characteristics of breast epithelial cells and the stroma. In this study a total of 19 breast tissue samples were obtained from 13 patients. For 6 of the patients, we also obtained Non-Adjacent Non-Tumor tissue samples. Infrared images were recorded on the main cell/tissue types identified in all breast tissue samples. Unsupervised Principal Component Analyses and supervised Partial Least Square Discriminant Analyses (PLS-DA) were used to discriminate spectra. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to evaluate the performance of PLS-DA models. Our results show that IR imaging coupled with PLS-DA can efficiently identify the main cell types present in FFPE breast tissue sections, i.e. epithelial cells, lymphocytes, connective tissue, vascular tissue and erythrocytes. A second PLS-DA model could distinguish normal and tumor breast epithelial cells in the breast tissue sections. A patient-specific model reached particularly high sensitivity, specificity and MCC rates. Finally, we showed that the stroma located close or at distance from the tumor exhibits distinct spectral characteristics. In conclusion FTIR imaging combined with computational algorithms could be an accurate, rapid and objective tool to identify/quantify breast epithelial cells and differentiate tumor from normal breast tissue as well as normal from tumor-associated stroma, paving the way to the establishment of a potential complementary tool to ensure safe tumor margins.

  6. The characterization of an economic and portable LED-based photoacoustic imaging system to facilitate molecular imaging.

    Hariri, Ali; Lemaster, Jeanne; Wang, Junxin; Jeevarathinam, AnanthaKrishnan S; Chao, Daniel L; Jokerst, Jesse V

    2018-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a non-invasive, high-resolution hybrid imaging modality that combines optical excitation and ultrasound detection. PAI can image endogenous chromophores (melanin, hemoglobin, etc.) and exogenous contrast agents in different medical applications. However, most current equipment uses sophisticated and complicated OPO lasers with tuning and stability features inconsistent with broad clinical deployment. As the number of applications of PAI in medicine increases, there is an urgent need to make the imaging equipment more compact, portable, and affordable. Here, portable light emitting diode - based photoacoustic imaging (PLED-PAI) was introduced and characterized in terms of system specifications, light source characterizations, photoacoustic spatial/temporal resolution, and penetration. The system uses two LED arrays attached to the sides of a conventional ultrasound transducer. The LED pulse repetition rate is tunable between 1 K Hz, 2 K Hz, 3 K Hz, and 4 K Hz. The axial resolution was 0.268 mm, and the lateral resolution was between 0.55 and 0.59 mm. The system could detect optical absorber (pencil lead) at a depth of 3.2 cm and the detection limits of indocyanine green (ICG) and methylene blue (MB) were 9 μM and 0.78 mM. In vivo imaging of labeled human mesenchymal stem cells was achieved to confirm compatibility with small animal imaging. The characterization we report here may have value to other groups evaluating commercially available photoacoustic imaging equipment.

  7. Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy

    Granja, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz; Opalka, Lukas [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Martisikova, Maria; Gwosch, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jakubek, Jan [Advacam, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-07-07

    Imaging in ion beam therapy is an essential and increasingly significant tool for treatment planning and radiation and dose deposition verification. Efforts aim at providing precise radiation field characterization and online monitoring of radiation dose distribution. A review is given of the research and methodology of quantum-imaging, composition, spectral and directional characterization of the mixed-radiation fields in proton and light ion beam therapy developed by the IEAP CTU Prague and HIT Heidelberg group. Results include non-invasive imaging of dose deposition and primary beam online monitoring.

  8. Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy

    Granja, Carlos; Opalka, Lukas; Martisikova, Maria; Gwosch, Klaus; Jakubek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Imaging in ion beam therapy is an essential and increasingly significant tool for treatment planning and radiation and dose deposition verification. Efforts aim at providing precise radiation field characterization and online monitoring of radiation dose distribution. A review is given of the research and methodology of quantum-imaging, composition, spectral and directional characterization of the mixed-radiation fields in proton and light ion beam therapy developed by the IEAP CTU Prague and HIT Heidelberg group. Results include non-invasive imaging of dose deposition and primary beam online monitoring.

  9. Rf-synchronized imaging for particle and photon beam characterizations

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1993-07-01

    The usefulness of imaging electro-optics for rf-driven accelerators can be enhanced by synchronizing the instruments to the system fundamental frequency or an appropriate subharmonic. This step allows one to obtain micropulse bunch length and phase during a series of linac bunches or storage ring passes. Several examples now exist of the use of synchroscan and dual-sweep streak cameras and/or image dissector tubes to access micropulse scale phenomena (10 to 30 ps) during linac and storage ring operations in the US, Japan, and Europe. As space permits, selections will be presented from the list of phase stability phenomena on photoelectric injectors, micropulse length during a macropulse, micropulse elongation effects, transverse Wakefield effects within a micropulse, and submicropulse phenomena on a stored beam. Potential applications to the subsystems of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) will be briefly addressed.

  10. The preparation and characterization of peptide's lung cancer imaging agent

    Liu Jianfeng; Chu Liping; Wang Yan; Wang Yueying; Liu Jinjian; Wu Hongying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To screen in vivo lung cancer specific binding seven peptides by T7 phage display peptide library, so as to prepare peptide's lung cancer early diagnostic agent. Methods: Use phage display in vivo technology, the 7-peptide phage that binding the lung cancer specifically was obtained, then the DNA sequence was measured and the seven peptide was synthesized. After labeled by 125 I, the seven peptide was injected into mice via vein and the distribution was observed. Results: One peptide was obtained by four rounds screening, and the peptide can bind lung cancer tissue specifically. Two hours after injection get the best imaging of lung cancer, metabolism of peptide in mice is fast, the distribution in vivo is decrease six hours and almost disappear 20 hours after injection. Conclusion: The peptide can image and diagnose lung cancer better. (authors)

  11. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Structural Characterization with 3-T MR Imaging.

    Li, Shiguang; Huang, Xiaoqi; Li, Lingjiang; Du, Fei; Li, Jing; Bi, Feng; Lui, Su; Turner, Jessica A; Sweeney, John A; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To explore cerebral alterations related to the emergence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by using three-dimensional T1-weighted imaging and also to explore the relationship of gray and white matter abnormalities and the anatomic changes with clinical severity and duration of time since the trauma. Materials and Methods Informed consent was provided, and the prospective study was approved by the ethics committee of the West China Hospital. Recruited were 67 patients with PTSD and 78 adult survivors without PTSD 7-15 months after a devastating earthquake in western China. All participants underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with a 3-T imager to obtain anatomic images. Cortical thickness and volumes of 14 subcortical gray matter structures and five subregions of the corpus callosum were analyzed with software. Statistical differences between patients with PTSD and healthy survivors were evaluated with a general linear model. Averaged data from the regions with volumetric or cortical thickness differences between groups were extracted in each individual to examine correlations between morphometric measures and clinical profiles. Results Patients with PTSD showed greater cortical thickness in the right superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, and left precuneus (P PTSD severity was positively correlated with cortical thickness in the left precuneus (r = 0.332; P = .008). The volumes of posterior corpus callosum were negatively correlated with PTSD ratings in all survivors (r = -0.210; P = .013) and with cortical thickness of the left precuneus in patients with PTSD (r = -0.302; P = .017). Conclusion Results indicate that patients with PTSD had alterations in both cerebral gray matter and white matter compared with individuals who experienced similar psychologic trauma from the same stressor. Importantly, early in the course of PTSD, gray matter changes were in the form of increased, not decreased, cortical thickness, which may have

  12. Giant right atrial myxoma: characterization with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Ridge, Carole A

    2012-02-01

    A 53-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 2-week history of dyspnoea and chest pain. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography was performed to exclude acute pulmonary embolism (PE). This demonstrated a large right atrial mass and no evidence of PE. Transthoracic echocardiography followed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a mobile right atrial mass. Surgical resection was then performed confirming a giant right atrial myxoma. We describe the typical clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features of right atrial myxoma.

  13. Statistical characterization of speckle noise in coherent imaging systems

    Yaroslavsky, Leonid; Shefler, A.

    2003-05-01

    Speckle noise imposes fundamental limitation on image quality in coherent radiation based imaging and optical metrology systems. Speckle noise phenomena are associated with properties of objects to diffusely scatter irradiation and with the fact that in recording the wave field, a number of signal distortions inevitably occur due to technical limitations inherent to hologram sensors. The statistical theory of speckle noise was developed with regard to only limited resolving power of coherent imaging devices. It is valid only asymptotically as much as the central limit theorem of the probability theory can be applied. In applications this assumption is not always applicable. Moreover, in treating speckle noise problem one should also consider other sources of the hologram deterioration. In the paper, statistical properties of speckle due to the limitation of hologram size, dynamic range and hologram signal quantization are studied by Monte-Carlo simulation for holograms recorded in near and far diffraction zones. The simulation experiments have shown that, for limited resolving power of the imaging system, widely accepted opinion that speckle contrast is equal to one holds only for rather severe level of the hologram size limitation. For moderate limitations, speckle contrast changes gradually from zero for no limitation to one for limitation to less than about 20% of hologram size. The results obtained for the limitation of the hologram sensor"s dynamic range and hologram signal quantization reveal that speckle noise due to these hologram signal distortions is not multiplicative and is directly associated with the severity of the limitation and quantization. On the base of the simulation results, analytical models are suggested.

  14. Spectral and imaging characterization of tabletop X-ray lasers

    Dunn, J.; Osterheld, A.L.; Moon, S.J.; Fournier, K.B.; Nilsen, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.; Skobelev, I.Yu.; Magunov, A.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); MISDC of VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo (Russian Federation); Shlyaptsev, V.N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). DAS

    2001-07-01

    We have performed L-shell spectroscopy and one-dimensional (1-D) imaging of a line focus plasma from a laser-heated Fe polished slab using the tabletop COMET laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These plasmas are used to generate a Ne-like Fe transient gain X-ray laser that is recorded simultaneously. A spherically-curved crystal spectrometer gives high resolution X-ray spectra of the n=3-2 and n=4-2 resonance lines with 1-D spatial resolution along the line focus. Spectra are presented for different laser pulse conditions. In addition, a variety of X-ray imaging techniques are described. We discuss imaging results from a double-slit X-ray camera with a spherically-curved crystal spectrometer. We show a high resolution Fe K-{alpha} spectrum from the X-ray laser target that indicates the presence of hot electrons in the X-ray laser plasma. (orig.)

  15. An Adaptive Method For Texture Characterization In Medical Images Implemented on a Parallel Virtual Machine

    Socrates A. Mylonas

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the application of a new texture characterization algorithm for the segmentation of medical ultrasound images. The morphology of these images poses significant problems for the application of traditional image processing techniques and their analysis has been the subject of research for several years. The basis of the algorithm is an optimum signal modelling algorithm (Least Mean Squares-based, which estimates a set of parameters from small image regions. The algorithm has been converted to a structure suitable for implementation on a Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM consisting of a Network of Workstations (NoW, to improve processing speed. Tests were initially carried out on standard textured images. This paper describes preliminary results of the application of the algorithm in texture discrimination and segmentation of medical ultrasound images. The images examined are primarily used in the diagnosis of carotid plaques, which are linked to the risk of stroke.

  16. Characterization of Soft Tissue Tumors by Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    Pekcevik, Yeliz; Kahya, Mehmet Onur; Kaya, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a noninvasive method for investigation of tumor histological content. It has been applied for some musculoskeletal tumors and reported to be useful. The aim of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of benign and malignant soft tissue tumors and to determine if ADC can help differentiate these tumors. DWI was performed on 25 histologically proven soft tissue masses. It was obtained with a single-shot echo-planar imaging technique using a 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) machine. The mean ADC values were calculated. We grouped soft tissue tumors as benign cystic, benign solid or mixed, malignant cystic and malignant solid or mixed tumors and compared mean ADC values between these groups. There was only one patient with a malignant cystic tumor and was not included in the statistical analysis. The median ADC values of benign and malignant tumors were 2.31 ± 1.29 and 0.90 ± 0.70 (median ± interquartile range), respectively. The mean ADC values were different between benign and malignant tumors (P = 0.031). Benign cystic tumors had significantly higher ADC values than benign solid or mixed tumors and malignant solid or mixed tumors (p values were < 0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Malignant solid or mixed tumors had lower ADC values than benign solid or mixed tumors (P = 0.02). Our preliminary results have shown that although there is some overlap between benign and malignant tumors, adding DWI, MR imaging to routine soft tissue tumor protocols may improve diagnostic accuracy

  17. New antifouling platform characterized by single-molecule imaging.

    Ryu, Ji Young; Song, In Taek; Lau, K H Aaron; Messersmith, Phillip B; Yoon, Tae-Young; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-03-12

    Antifouling surfaces have been widely studied for their importance in medical devices and industry. Antifouling surfaces mostly achieved by methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) have shown biomolecular adsorption less than 1 ng/cm(2) which was measured by surface analytical tools such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), or optical waveguide lightmode (OWL) spectroscopy. Herein, we utilize a single-molecule imaging technique (i.e., an ultimate resolution) to study antifouling properties of functionalized surfaces. We found that about 600 immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are adsorbed. This result corresponds to ∼5 pg/cm(2) adsorption, which is far below amount for the detection limit of the conventional tools. Furthermore, we developed a new antifouling platform that exhibits improved antifouling performance that shows only 78 IgG molecules adsorbed (∼0.5 pg/cm(2)). The antifouling platform consists of forming 1 nm TiO2 thin layer, on which peptidomimetic antifouling polymer (PMAP) is robustly anchored. The unprecedented antifouling performance can potentially revolutionize a variety of research fields such as single-molecule imaging, medical devices, biosensors, and others.

  18. New Antifouling Platform Characterized by Single-Molecule Imaging

    2015-01-01

    Antifouling surfaces have been widely studied for their importance in medical devices and industry. Antifouling surfaces mostly achieved by methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) have shown biomolecular adsorption less than 1 ng/cm2 which was measured by surface analytical tools such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), or optical waveguide lightmode (OWL) spectroscopy. Herein, we utilize a single-molecule imaging technique (i.e., an ultimate resolution) to study antifouling properties of functionalized surfaces. We found that about 600 immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are adsorbed. This result corresponds to ∼5 pg/cm2 adsorption, which is far below amount for the detection limit of the conventional tools. Furthermore, we developed a new antifouling platform that exhibits improved antifouling performance that shows only 78 IgG molecules adsorbed (∼0.5 pg/cm2). The antifouling platform consists of forming 1 nm TiO2 thin layer, on which peptidomimetic antifouling polymer (PMAP) is robustly anchored. The unprecedented antifouling performance can potentially revolutionize a variety of research fields such as single-molecule imaging, medical devices, biosensors, and others. PMID:24503420

  19. Ultrasound Imaging Techniques for Spatiotemporal Characterization of Composition, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties in Tissue Engineering.

    Deng, Cheri X; Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound techniques are increasingly being used to quantitatively characterize both native and engineered tissues. This review provides an overview and selected examples of the main techniques used in these applications. Grayscale imaging has been used to characterize extracellular matrix deposition, and quantitative ultrasound imaging based on the integrated backscatter coefficient has been applied to estimating cell concentrations and matrix morphology in tissue engineering. Spectral analysis has been employed to characterize the concentration and spatial distribution of mineral particles in a construct, as well as to monitor mineral deposition by cells over time. Ultrasound techniques have also been used to measure the mechanical properties of native and engineered tissues. Conventional ultrasound elasticity imaging and acoustic radiation force imaging have been applied to detect regions of altered stiffness within tissues. Sonorheometry and monitoring of steady-state excitation and recovery have been used to characterize viscoelastic properties of tissue using a single transducer to both deform and image the sample. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography uses separate ultrasound transducers to produce a more potent deformation force to microscale characterization of viscoelasticity of hydrogel constructs. These ultrasound-based techniques have high potential to impact the field of tissue engineering as they are further developed and their range of applications expands.

  20. Characterization of nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    Shan, Liang; Chopra, Arvind; Leung, Kam; Eckelman, William C.; Menkens, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    The development of molecular imaging agents is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion. As of October 2011, ∼4,800 newly developed agents have been synthesized and characterized in vitro and in animal models of human disease. Despite this rapid progress, the transfer of these agents to clinical practice is rather slow. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health launched the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agents Database (MICAD) in 2005 to provide freely accessible online information regarding molecular imaging probes and contrast agents for the imaging community. While compiling information regarding imaging agents published in peer-reviewed journals, the MICAD editors have observed that some important information regarding the characterization of a contrast agent is not consistently reported. This makes it difficult for investigators to evaluate and meta-analyze data generated from different studies of imaging agents, especially for the agents based on nanoparticles. This article is intended to serve as a guideline for new investigators for the characterization of preclinical studies performed with nanoparticle-based MRI contrast agents. The common characterization parameters are summarized into seven categories: contrast agent designation, physicochemical properties, magnetic properties, in vitro studies, animal studies, MRI studies, and toxicity. Although no single set of parameters is suitable to define the properties of the various types of contrast agents, it is essential to ensure that these agents meet certain quality control parameters at the preclinical stage, so that they can be used without delay for clinical studies.

  1. Characterization of two Japanese ancient swords through neutron imaging

    Grazzi, Francesco; Zoppi, Marco; Salvemini, Filomena; Kaestner, Anders; Lehmann, Eberhard; Civita, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Japanese blades are culturally interesting objects both from the stylistic point of view and because of their fantastic performances. In this work, we present new results, using a non-invasive approach, concerning these peculiar artefacts. Two integer Japanese swords, pertaining to Kyoto (987-1596) and Shinto (1596-1781) periods have been analysed through neutron-imaging techniques. The experiments have been performed at the ICON beam line, operating at the spallation neutron source SINQ, Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. The reconstruction of projection data into neutron tomographic slices or volumes, allowed us to identify some very peculiar characteristics, related to the forging methods and to the different thermal treatments applied to produce the cutting edge and its unique feature. (author)

  2. SLAP lesions: Anatomy, clinical presentation, MR imaging diagnosis and characterization

    Chang, Debra [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 W. Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); MedRay Imaging and Fraser Health Authority, Vancouver, BC (Canada)], E-mail: cbchung@ucsd.edu; Mohana-Borges, Aurea; Borso, Maya; Chung, Christine B. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 W. Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    ABSTRACT: Superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) tears are an abnormality of the superior labrum usually centered on the attachment of the long head of the biceps tendon. Tears are commonly caused by repetitive overhead motion or fall on an outstretched arm. SLAP lesions can lead to shoulder pain and instability. Clinical diagnosis is difficult thus imaging plays a key diagnostic role. The normal anatomic variability of the capsulolabral complex can make SLAP lesions a diagnostic challenge. Concurrent shoulder injuries are often present including rotator cuff tears, cystic changes or marrow edema in the humeral head, capsular laxity, Hill-Sachs or Bankart lesion. The relevant anatomy, capsulolabral anatomic variants, primary and secondary findings of SLAP tears including MR arthrography findings, types of SLAP lesions and a practical approach to labral lesions are reviewed.

  3. Characterizing Dusty Debris Disks with the Gemini Planet Imager

    Chen, Christine; Arriaga, Pauline; Bruzzone, Sebastian; Choquet, Elodie; Debes, John H.; Donaldson, Jessica; Draper, Zachary; Duchene, Gaspard; Esposito, Thomas; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; Hinkley, Sasha; Hughes, A. Meredith; Kalas, Paul; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Lawler, Samantha; Matthews, Brenda C.; Mazoyer, Johan; Metchev, Stanimir A.; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nesvold, Erika; Padgett, Deborah; Patience, Jenny; Perrin, Marshall D.; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyro, Fredrik; Rodigas, Timothy; Schneider, Glenn; Soummer, Remi; Song, Inseok; Stark, Chris; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Wilner, David J.

    2017-01-01

    We have been awarded 87 hours of Gemini Observatory time to obtain multi-wavelength observations of HST resolved debris disks using the Gemini Planet Imager. We have executed ~51 hours of telescope time during the 2015B-2016B semesters observing 12 nearby, young debris disks. We have been using the GPI Spec and Pol modes to better constrain the properties of the circumstellar dust, specifically, measuring the near-infrared total intensity and polarization fraction colors, and searching for solid-state spectral features of nearby beta Pic-like disks. We expect that our observations will allow us to break the degeneracy among the particle properties such as composition, size, porosity, and shape. We present some early results from our observations.

  4. Imaging and Analytical Approaches for Characterization of Soil Mineral Weathering

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Arey, Bruce; Varga, Tamas; Miller, Micah; Kovarik, Libor

    2017-07-01

    Soil minerals weathering is the primary natural source of nutrients necessary to sustain productivity in terrestrial ecosystems. Soil microbial communities increase soil mineral weathering and mineral-derived nutrient availability through physical and chemical processes. Rhizosphere, the zone immediately surrounding plant roots, is a biogeochemical hotspot with microbial activity, soil organic matter production, mineral weathering, and secondary phase formation all happening in a small temporally ephemeral zone of steep geochemical gradients. The detailed exploration of the micro-scale rhizosphere is essential to our better understanding of large-scale processes in soils, such as nutrient cycling, transport and fate of soil components, microbial-mineral interactions, soil erosion, soil organic matter turnover and its molecular-level characterization, and predictive modeling.

  5. Quantitative roughness characterization and 3D reconstruction of electrode surface using cyclic voltammetry and SEM image

    Dhillon, Shweta; Kant, Rama, E-mail: rkant@chemistry.du.ac.in

    2013-10-01

    Area measurements from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and image from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to characterize electrode statistical morphology, 3D surface reconstruction and its electroactivity. SEM images of single phased materials correspond to two-dimensional (2D) projections of 3D structures, leading to an incomplete characterization. Lack of third dimension information in SEM image is circumvented using equivalence between denoised SEM image and CV area measurements. This CV-SEM method can be used to estimate power spectral density (PSD), width, gradient, finite fractal nature of roughness and local morphology of the electrode. We show that the surface morphological statistical property like distribution function of gradient can be related to local electro-activity. Electrode surface gradient micrographs generated here can provide map of electro-activity sites. Finally, the densely and uniformly packed small gradient over the Pt-surface is the determining criterion for high intrinsic electrode activity.

  6. Quantitative roughness characterization and 3D reconstruction of electrode surface using cyclic voltammetry and SEM image

    Dhillon, Shweta; Kant, Rama

    2013-01-01

    Area measurements from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and image from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to characterize electrode statistical morphology, 3D surface reconstruction and its electroactivity. SEM images of single phased materials correspond to two-dimensional (2D) projections of 3D structures, leading to an incomplete characterization. Lack of third dimension information in SEM image is circumvented using equivalence between denoised SEM image and CV area measurements. This CV-SEM method can be used to estimate power spectral density (PSD), width, gradient, finite fractal nature of roughness and local morphology of the electrode. We show that the surface morphological statistical property like distribution function of gradient can be related to local electro-activity. Electrode surface gradient micrographs generated here can provide map of electro-activity sites. Finally, the densely and uniformly packed small gradient over the Pt-surface is the determining criterion for high intrinsic electrode activity.

  7. Characterization of the new neutron imaging and materials science facility IMAT

    Minniti, Triestino; Watanabe, Kenichi; Burca, Genoveva; Pooley, Daniel E.; Kockelmann, Winfried

    2018-04-01

    IMAT is a new cold neutron imaging and diffraction instrument located at the second target station of the pulsed neutron spallation source ISIS, UK. A broad range of materials science and materials testing areas will be covered by IMAT. We present the characterization of the imaging part, including the energy-selective and energy-dispersive imaging options, and provide the basic parameters of the radiography and tomography instrument. In particular, detailed studies on mono and bi-dimensional neutron beam flux profiles, neutron flux as a function of the neutron wavelength, spatial and energy dependent neutron beam uniformities, guide artifacts, divergence and spatial resolution, and neutron pulse widths are provided. An accurate characterization of the neutron beam at the sample position, located 56 m from the source, is required to optimize collection of radiographic and tomographic data sets and for performing energy-dispersive neutron imaging via time-of-flight methods in particular.

  8. Diagnosis and Characterization of Patellofemoral Instability: Review of Available Imaging Modalities.

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Thawait, Gaurav K; Tanaka, Miho J; Demehri, Shadpour

    2017-06-01

    Patellofemoral instability (PI) is defined as single or multiple episodes of patellar dislocation. Imaging modalities are useful for characterization of patellar malalignment, maltracking, underlying morphologic abnormalities, and stabilizing soft-tissue injuries. Using these findings, orthopedic surgeons can decide when to operate, determine the best operation, and measure degree of correction postoperatively in PI patients. Also, these methods assist with PI diagnosis in some suspicious cases. Magnetic resonance imaging is the preferred method especially in the setting of acute dislocations. Multidetector computed tomography allows a more accurate assessment for malalignment such as patellar tilt and lateral subluxation and secondary osteoarthritis. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging and 4-dimensional computed tomography have been introduced for better kinematic assessment of the patellofemoral maltracking during extension-flexion motions. In this review article, we will discuss the currently available evidence regarding both the conventional and the novel imaging modalities that can be used for diagnosis and characterization of PI.

  9. Three-dimensional cloud characterization from paired whole-sky imaging cameras

    Allmen, M.; Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) cloud characterization permits the derivation of important cloud geometry properties such as fractional cloudiness, mean cloud and clear length, aspect ratio, and the morphology of cloud cover. These properties are needed as input to the hierarchical diagnosis (HD) and instantaneous radiative transfer (IRF) models, to validate sub-models for cloud occurrence and formation, and to Central Site radiative flux calculations. A full 3-D characterization will eventually require the integration of disparate Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) data sources: whole-sky imagers (WSIs), radar, satellites, ceilometers, volume-imaging lidar, and other sensors. In this paper, we demonstrate how an initial 3-D cloud property, cloud base height, can be determined from fusing paired times series of images from two whole-sky imagers

  10. High Definition Confocal Imaging Modalities for the Characterization of Tissue-Engineered Substitutes.

    Mayrand, Dominique; Fradette, Julie

    2018-01-01

    Optimal imaging methods are necessary in order to perform a detailed characterization of thick tissue samples from either native or engineered tissues. Tissue-engineered substitutes are featuring increasing complexity including multiple cell types and capillary-like networks. Therefore, technical approaches allowing the visualization of the inner structural organization and cellular composition of tissues are needed. This chapter describes an optical clearing technique which facilitates the detailed characterization of whole-mount samples from skin and adipose tissues (ex vivo tissues and in vitro tissue-engineered substitutes) when combined with spectral confocal microscopy and quantitative analysis on image renderings.

  11. Optical design and system characterization of an imaging microscope at 121.6 nm

    Gao, Weichuan; Finan, Emily; Kim, Geon-Hee; Kim, Youngsik; Milster, Thomas D.

    2018-03-01

    We present the optical design and system characterization of an imaging microscope prototype at 121.6 nm. System engineering processes are demonstrated through the construction of a Schwarzschild microscope objective, including tolerance analysis, fabrication, alignment, and testing. Further improvements on the as-built system with a correction phase plate are proposed and analyzed. Finally, the microscope assembly and the imaging properties of the prototype are demonstrated.

  12. Development and characterization of a handheld hyperspectral Raman imaging probe system for molecular characterization of tissue on mesoscopic scales.

    St-Arnaud, Karl; Aubertin, Kelly; Strupler, Mathias; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Grosset, Andrée-Anne; Petrecca, Kevin; Trudel, Dominique; Leblond, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a promising cancer detection technique for surgical guidance applications. It can provide quantitative information relating to global tissue properties associated with structural, metabolic, immunological, and genetic biochemical phenomena in terms of molecular species including amino acids, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acid (DNA). To date in vivo Raman spectroscopy systems mostly included probes and biopsy needles typically limited to single-point tissue interrogation over a scale between 100 and 500 microns. The development of wider field handheld systems could improve tumor localization for a range of open surgery applications including brain, ovarian, and skin cancers. Here we present a novel Raman spectroscopy implementation using a coherent imaging bundle of fibers to create a probe capable of reconstructing molecular images over mesoscopic fields of view. Detection is performed using linear scanning with a rotation mirror and an imaging spectrometer. Different slits widths were tested at the entrance of the spectrometer to optimize spatial and spectral resolution while preserving sufficient signal-to-noise ratios to detect the principal Raman tissue features. The nonbiological samples, calcite and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), were used to characterize the performance of the system. The new wide-field probe was tested on ex vivo samples of calf brain and swine tissue. Raman spectral content of both tissue types were validated with data from the literature and compared with data acquired with a single-point Raman spectroscopy probe. The single-point probe was used as the gold standard against which the new instrument was benchmarked as it has already been thoroughly validated for biological tissue characterization. We have developed and characterized a practical noncontact handheld Raman imager providing tissue information at a spatial resolution of 115 microns over a field of view >14 mm 2 and a spectral resolution of 6 cm -1 over

  13. Characterization of the onboard imaging unit for the first clinical magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy system

    Hu, Yanle, E-mail: Hu.Yanle@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona 85054 (United States); Rankine, Leith; Green, Olga L.; Kashani, Rojano; Li, H. Harold; Li, Hua; Rodriguez, Vivian; Santanam, Lakshmi; Wooten, H. Omar; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Nana, Roger; Shvartsman, Shmaryu; Victoria, James; Dempsey, James F. [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, Ohio 44146 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To characterize the performance of the onboard imaging unit for the first clinical magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods: The imaging performance characterization included four components: ACR (the American College of Radiology) phantom test, spatial integrity, coil signal to noise ratio (SNR) and uniformity, and magnetic field homogeneity. The ACR phantom test was performed in accordance with the ACR phantom test guidance. The spatial integrity test was evaluated using a 40.8 × 40.8 × 40.8 cm{sup 3} spatial integrity phantom. MR and computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired and coregistered. Objects were identified around the surfaces of 20 and 35 cm diameters of spherical volume (DSVs) on both the MR and CT images. Geometric distortion was quantified using deviation in object location between the MR and CT images. The coil SNR test was performed according to the national electrical manufacturers association (NEMA) standards MS-1 and MS-9. The magnetic field homogeneity test was measured using field camera and spectral peak methods. Results: For the ACR tests, the slice position error was less than 0.10 cm, the slice thickness error was less than 0.05 cm, the resolved high-contrast spatial resolution was 0.09 cm, the resolved low-contrast spokes were more than 25, the image intensity uniformity was above 93%, and the percentage ghosting was less than 0.22%. All were within the ACR recommended specifications. The maximum geometric distortions within the 20 and 35 cm DSVs were 0.10 and 0.18 cm for high spatial resolution three-dimensional images and 0.08 and 0.20 cm for high temporal resolution two dimensional cine images based on the distance-to-phantom-center method. The average SNR was 12.0 for the body coil, 42.9 for the combined torso coil, and 44.0 for the combined head and neck coil. Magnetic field homogeneities at gantry angles of 0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° were 23.55, 20.43, 18.76, 19

  14. Characterization of the onboard imaging unit for the first clinical magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy system

    Hu, Yanle; Rankine, Leith; Green, Olga L.; Kashani, Rojano; Li, H. Harold; Li, Hua; Rodriguez, Vivian; Santanam, Lakshmi; Wooten, H. Omar; Mutic, Sasa; Nana, Roger; Shvartsman, Shmaryu; Victoria, James; Dempsey, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the performance of the onboard imaging unit for the first clinical magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods: The imaging performance characterization included four components: ACR (the American College of Radiology) phantom test, spatial integrity, coil signal to noise ratio (SNR) and uniformity, and magnetic field homogeneity. The ACR phantom test was performed in accordance with the ACR phantom test guidance. The spatial integrity test was evaluated using a 40.8 × 40.8 × 40.8 cm 3 spatial integrity phantom. MR and computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired and coregistered. Objects were identified around the surfaces of 20 and 35 cm diameters of spherical volume (DSVs) on both the MR and CT images. Geometric distortion was quantified using deviation in object location between the MR and CT images. The coil SNR test was performed according to the national electrical manufacturers association (NEMA) standards MS-1 and MS-9. The magnetic field homogeneity test was measured using field camera and spectral peak methods. Results: For the ACR tests, the slice position error was less than 0.10 cm, the slice thickness error was less than 0.05 cm, the resolved high-contrast spatial resolution was 0.09 cm, the resolved low-contrast spokes were more than 25, the image intensity uniformity was above 93%, and the percentage ghosting was less than 0.22%. All were within the ACR recommended specifications. The maximum geometric distortions within the 20 and 35 cm DSVs were 0.10 and 0.18 cm for high spatial resolution three-dimensional images and 0.08 and 0.20 cm for high temporal resolution two dimensional cine images based on the distance-to-phantom-center method. The average SNR was 12.0 for the body coil, 42.9 for the combined torso coil, and 44.0 for the combined head and neck coil. Magnetic field homogeneities at gantry angles of 0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° were 23.55, 20.43, 18.76, 19

  15. Towards factor analysis exploration applied to positron emission tomography functional imaging for breast cancer characterization

    Rekik, W.; Ketata, I.; Sellami, L.; Ben slima, M.; Ben Hamida, A.; Chtourou, K.; Ruan, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the factor analysis when applied to a dynamic sequence of medical images obtained using nuclear imaging modality, Positron Emission Tomography (PET). This latter modality allows obtaining information on physiological phenomena, through the examination of radiotracer evolution during time. Factor analysis of dynamic medical images sequence (FADMIS) estimates the underlying fundamental spatial distributions by factor images and the associated so-called fundamental functions (describing the signal variations) by factors. This method is based on an orthogonal analysis followed by an oblique analysis. The results of the FADMIS are physiological curves showing the evolution during time of radiotracer within homogeneous tissues distributions. This functional analysis of dynamic nuclear medical images is considered to be very efficient for cancer diagnostics. In fact, it could be applied for cancer characterization, vascularization as well as possible evaluation of response to therapy.

  16. Detection and characterization of exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) via thermography and image processing

    Avdelidis, Nicolas; Kappatos, Vassilios; Georgoulas, George

    2017-01-01

    of commonly measurement tools and methods. Thermography has been used successfully as a research detection tool in medicine for the last 6 decades but very limited work has been reported on EIMD area. The main purpose of this research is to assess and characterize EIMD, using thermography and image processing...... techniques. The first step towards that goal is to develop a reliable segmentation technique to isolate the region of interest (ROI). A semi-automatic image processing software was designed and regions of the left and right leg based on superpixels were segmented. The image is segmented into a number...... of regions and the user is able to intervene providing the regions which belong to each of the two legs. In order to validate the image processing software, an extensive experimental investigation was carried out, acquiring thermographic images of the rectus femoris muscle before, immediately post and 24, 48...

  17. Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU)-fueled SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear reactor simulation with the Monte-Carlo based MCNP 4A code

    Pierre, J.R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Following the commissioning of the Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) Fuelled SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor at the Royal Military College-College Militaire Royal (RMC-CMR), excess reactivity measurements were conducted over a range of temperature and power. The results showed a maximum excess reactivity of 3.37 mk at 33 o C. Several deterministic models using computer codes like WIMS-CRNL, CITATION, TRIVAC and DRAGON have been used to try to reproduce the excess reactivity and temperature trend of both the LEU and HEU SLOWPOKE-2 reactors. The best simulations had been obtained at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal. They were able to reproduce the temperature trend of their HEU-fuelled reactor using TRIVAC calculations, but this model over-estimated the absolute value of the excess reactivity by 119 mk. Although calculations using DRAGON did not reproduce the temperature trend as well as TRIVAC, these calculations represented a significant improvement on the absolute value at 20 o C reducing the discrepancy to 13 mk. Given the advance in computer technology, a probabilistic approach was tried in this work, using the Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System MCNP 4A, to model the RMC-CMR SLOWPOKE-2 reactor.

  18. Monte Carlo based investigations of electron contamination from telecobalt unit head in build up region and its impact on surface dose.

    Jagtap, A S; Palani Selvam, T; Patil, B J; Chavan, S T; Pethe, S N; Kulkarni, Gauri; Dahiwale, S S; Bhoraskar, V N; Dhole, S D

    2016-12-01

    A Telecobalt unit has wide range of applications in cancer treatments and is used widely in many countries all around the world. Estimation of surface dose in Cobalt-60 teletherapy machine becomes important since clinically useful photon beam consist of contaminated electrons during the patient treatment. EGSnrc along with the BEAMnrc user code was used to model the Theratron 780E telecobalt unit. Central axis depth dose profiles including surface doses have been estimated for the field sizes of 0×0, 6×6, 10×10, 15×15, 20×20, 25×25, 30×30cm 2 and at Source-to-surface distance (SSD) of 60 and 80cm. Surface dose was measured experimentally by the Gafchromic RTQA2 films and are in good agreement with the simulation results. The central axis depth dose data are compared with the data available from the British Journal of Radiology report no. 25. Contribution of contaminated electrons has also been calculated using Monte Carlo simulation by the different parts of the Cobalt-60 head for different field size and SSD's. Moreover, depth dose curve in zero area field size is calculated by extrapolation method and compared with the already published data. They are found in good agreement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Monte Carlo-based investigations on the impact of removing the flattening filter on beam quality specifiers for photon beam dosimetry.

    Czarnecki, Damian; Poppe, Björn; Zink, Klemens

    2017-06-01

    The impact of removing the flattening filter in clinical electron accelerators on the relationship between dosimetric quantities such as beam quality specifiers and the mean photon and electron energies of the photon radiation field was investigated by Monte Carlo simulations. The purpose of this work was to determine the uncertainties when using the well-known beam quality specifiers or energy-based beam specifiers as predictors of dosimetric photon field properties when removing the flattening filter. Monte Carlo simulations applying eight different linear accelerator head models with and without flattening filter were performed in order to generate realistic radiation sources and calculate field properties such as restricted mass collision stopping power ratios (L¯/ρ)airwater, mean photon and secondary electron energies. To study the impact of removing the flattening filter on the beam quality correction factors k Q , this factor for detailed ionization chamber models was calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. Stopping power ratios (L¯/ρ)airwater and k Q values for different ionization chambers as a function of TPR1020 and %dd(10) x were calculated. Moreover, mean photon energies in air and at the point of measurement in water as well as mean secondary electron energies at the point of measurement were calculated. The results revealed that removing the flattening filter led to a change within 0.3% in the relationship between %dd(10) x and (L¯/ρ)airwater, whereby the relationship between TPR1020 and (L¯/ρ)airwater changed up to 0.8% for high energy photon beams. However, TPR1020 was a good predictor of (L¯/ρ)airwater for both types of linear accelerator with energies filter within 1.1% and 1.6% was observed for TPR1020 and %dd(10) x respectively. The results of this study have shown that removing the flattening filter led to a change in the relationship between the well-known beam quality specifiers and dosimetric quantities at the point of measurement, namely (L¯/ρ)airwater, mean photon and electron energy. Furthermore, the results show that a beam profile correction is important for dose measurements with large ionization chambers in flattening filter free beams. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. SU-E-T-632: Preliminary Study On Treating Nose Skin Using Energy and Intensity Modulated Electron Beams with Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculations

    Jin, L; Eldib, A; Li, J; Price, R; Ma, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Uneven nose surfaces and air cavities underneath and the use of bolus present complexity and dose uncertainty when using a single electron energy beam to plan treatments of nose skin with a pencil beam-based planning system. This work demonstrates more accurate dose calculation and more optimal planning using energy and intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) delivered with a pMLC. Methods: An in-house developed Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculation/optimization planning system was employed for treatment planning. Phase space data (6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV) were used as an input source for MC dose calculations for the linac. To reduce the scatter-caused penumbra, a short SSD (61 cm) was used. Our previous work demonstrates good agreement in percentage depth dose and off-axis dose between calculations and film measurement for various field sizes. A MERT plan was generated for treating the nose skin using a patient geometry and a dose volume histogram (DVH) was obtained. The work also shows the comparison of 2D dose distributions between a clinically used conventional single electron energy plan and the MERT plan. Results: The MERT plan resulted in improved target dose coverage as compared to the conventional plan, which demonstrated a target dose deficit at the field edge. The conventional plan showed higher dose normal tissue irradiation underneath the nose skin while the MERT plan resulted in improved conformity and thus reduces normal tissue dose. Conclusion: This preliminary work illustrates that MC-based MERT planning is a promising technique in treating nose skin, not only providing more accurate dose calculation, but also offering an improved target dose coverage and conformity. In addition, this technique may eliminate the necessity of bolus, which often produces dose delivery uncertainty due to the air gaps that may exist between the bolus and skin

  1. A Monte Carlo-based method to estimate radiation dose from spiral CT: from phantom testing to patient-specific models

    Jarry, G; De Marco, J J; Beifuss, U; Cagnon, C H; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and test a method to estimate the relative and absolute absorbed radiation dose from axial and spiral CT scans using a Monte Carlo approach. Initial testing was done in phantoms and preliminary results were obtained from a standard mathematical anthropomorphic model (MIRD V) and voxelized patient data. To accomplish this we have modified a general purpose Monte Carlo transport code (MCNP4B) to simulate the CT x-ray source and movement, and then to calculate absorbed radiation dose in desired objects. The movement of the source in either axial or spiral modes was modelled explicitly while the CT system components were modelled using published information about x-ray spectra as well as information provided by the manufacturer. Simulations were performed for single axial scans using the head and body computed tomography dose index (CTDI) polymethylmethacrylate phantoms at both central and peripheral positions for all available beam energies and slice thicknesses. For comparison, corresponding physical measurements of CTDI in phantom were made with an ion chamber. To obtain absolute dose values, simulations and measurements were performed in air at the scanner isocentre for each beam energy. To extend the verification, the CT scanner model was applied to the MIRD V model and compared with published results using similar technical factors. After verification of the model, the generalized source was simulated and applied to voxelized models of patient anatomy. The simulated and measured absolute dose data in phantom agreed to within 2% for the head phantom and within 4% for the body phantom at 120 and 140 kVp; this extends to 8% for the head and 9% for the body phantom across all available beam energies and positions. For the head phantom, the simulated and measured absolute dose data agree to within 2% across all slice thicknesses at 120 kVp. Our results in the MIRD phantom agree within 11% of all the different organ dose values published by the UK's ImPACT group for a scan using an equivalent scanner, kVp, collimation, pitch and mAs. The CT source model was shown to calculate both a relative and absolute radiation dose distribution throughout the entire volume in a patient-specific matrix geometry. Results of initial testing are promising and application to patient models was shown to be feasible

  2. Fast-NPS-A Markov Chain Monte Carlo-based analysis tool to obtain structural information from single-molecule FRET measurements

    Eilert, Tobias; Beckers, Maximilian; Drechsler, Florian; Michaelis, Jens

    2017-10-01

    The analysis tool and software package Fast-NPS can be used to analyse smFRET data to obtain quantitative structural information about macromolecules in their natural environment. In the algorithm a Bayesian model gives rise to a multivariate probability distribution describing the uncertainty of the structure determination. Since Fast-NPS aims to be an easy-to-use general-purpose analysis tool for a large variety of smFRET networks, we established an MCMC based sampling engine that approximates the target distribution and requires no parameter specification by the user at all. For an efficient local exploration we automatically adapt the multivariate proposal kernel according to the shape of the target distribution. In order to handle multimodality, the sampler is equipped with a parallel tempering scheme that is fully adaptive with respect to temperature spacing and number of chains. Since the molecular surrounding of a dye molecule affects its spatial mobility and thus the smFRET efficiency, we introduce dye models which can be selected for every dye molecule individually. These models allow the user to represent the smFRET network in great detail leading to an increased localisation precision. Finally, a tool to validate the chosen model combination is provided. Programme Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/7ztzj63r68.1 Licencing provisions: Apache-2.0 Programming language: GUI in MATLAB (The MathWorks) and the core sampling engine in C++ Nature of problem: Sampling of highly diverse multivariate probability distributions in order to solve for macromolecular structures from smFRET data. Solution method: MCMC algorithm with fully adaptive proposal kernel and parallel tempering scheme.

  3. Monte-Carlo based comparison of the personal dose for emplacement scenarios of spent nuclear fuel casks in generic deep geological repositories

    Suarez, Hector Sauri; Becker, Franz; Metz, Volker [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE); Pang, Bo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE); Shenzhen Univ. (China). College of Physics and Energy

    2017-06-15

    In the operational phase of a deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste, the radiation field in the vicinity of a waste cask is influenced by the backscattered radiation of the surrounding walls of the emplacement drift. For a comparison of disposal of spent nuclear fuel in various host rocks, it is of interest to investigate the influence of the surrounding materials on the radiation field and the personal radiation exposure. In this generic study individual dosimetry of personnel involved in emplacement of casks with spent nuclear fuel in drifts in rock salt and in a clay formation was modelled.

  4. A virtual photon source model of an Elekta linear accelerator with integrated mini MLC for Monte Carlo based IMRT dose calculation.

    Sikora, M; Dohm, O; Alber, M

    2007-08-07

    A dedicated, efficient Monte Carlo (MC) accelerator head model for intensity modulated stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning is needed to afford a highly accurate simulation of tiny IMRT fields. A virtual source model (VSM) of a mini multi-leaf collimator (MLC) (the Elekta Beam Modulator (EBM)) is presented, allowing efficient generation of particles even for small fields. The VSM of the EBM is based on a previously published virtual photon energy fluence model (VEF) (Fippel et al 2003 Med. Phys. 30 301) commissioned with large field measurements in air and in water. The original commissioning procedure of the VEF, based on large field measurements only, leads to inaccuracies for small fields. In order to improve the VSM, it was necessary to change the VEF model by developing (1) a method to determine the primary photon source diameter, relevant for output factor calculations, (2) a model of the influence of the flattening filter on the secondary photon spectrum and (3) a more realistic primary photon spectrum. The VSM model is used to generate the source phase space data above the mini-MLC. Later the particles are transmitted through the mini-MLC by a passive filter function which significantly speeds up the time of generation of the phase space data after the mini-MLC, used for calculation of the dose distribution in the patient. The improved VSM model was commissioned for 6 and 15 MV beams. The results of MC simulation are in very good agreement with measurements. Less than 2% of local difference between the MC simulation and the diamond detector measurement of the output factors in water was achieved. The X, Y and Z profiles measured in water with an ion chamber (V = 0.125 cm(3)) and a diamond detector were used to validate the models. An overall agreement of 2%/2 mm for high dose regions and 3%/2 mm in low dose regions between measurement and MC simulation for field sizes from 0.8 x 0.8 cm(2) to 16 x 21 cm(2) was achieved. An IMRT plan film verification was performed for two cases: 6 MV head&neck and 15 MV prostate. The simulation is in agreement with film measurements within 2%/2 mm in the high dose regions (> or = 0.1 Gy = 5% D(max)) and 5%/2 mm in low dose regions (<0.1 Gy).

  5. CARMEN: a system Monte Carlo based on linear programming from direct openings; CARMEN: Un sistema de planficiacion Monte Carlo basado en programacion lineal a partir de aberturas directas

    Ureba, A.; Pereira-Barbeiro, A. R.; Jimenez-Ortega, E.; Baeza, J. A.; Salguero, F. J.; Leal, A.

    2013-07-01

    The use of Monte Carlo (MC) has shown an improvement in the accuracy of the calculation of the dose compared to other analytics algorithms installed on the systems of business planning, especially in the case of non-standard situations typical of complex techniques such as IMRT and VMAT. Our treatment planning system called CARMEN, is based on the complete simulation, both the beam transport in the head of the accelerator and the patient, and simulation designed for efficient operation in terms of the accuracy of the estimate and the required computation times. (Author)

  6. A Monte-Carlo-Based Method for the Optimal Placement and Operation Scheduling of Sewer Mining Units in Urban Wastewater Networks

    Eleftheria Psarrou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressures on water resources, which have increased significantly nowadays mainly due to rapid urbanization, population growth and climate change impacts, necessitate the development of innovative wastewater treatment and reuse technologies. In this context, a mid-scale decentralized technology concerning wastewater reuse is that of sewer mining. It is based on extracting wastewater from a wastewater system, treating it on-site and producing recycled water applicable for non-potable uses. Despite the technology’s considerable benefits, several challenges hinder its implementation. Sewer mining disturbs biochemical processes inside sewers and affects hydrogen sulfide build-up, resulting in odor, corrosion and health-related problems. In this study, a tool for optimal sewer mining unit placement aiming to minimize hydrogen sulfide production is presented. The Monte-Carlo method coupled with the Environmental Protection Agency’s Storm Water Management Model (SWMM is used to conduct multiple simulations of the network. The network’s response when sewage is extracted from it is also examined. Additionally, the study deals with optimal pumping scheduling. The overall methodology is applied in a sewer network in Greece providing useful results. It can therefore assist in selecting appropriate locations for sewer mining implementation, with the focus on eliminating hydrogen sulfide-associated problems while simultaneously ensuring that higher water needs are satisfied.

  7. SU-F-T-81: Treating Nose Skin Using Energy and Intensity Modulated Electron Beams with Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculation

    Jin, L; Fan, J; Eldib, A; Price, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treating nose skin with an electron beam is of a substantial challenge due to uneven nose surfaces and tissue heterogeneity, and consequently could have a great uncertainty of dose accuracy on the target. This work explored the method using Monte Carlo (MC)-based energy and intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT), which would be delivered with a photon MLC in a standard medical linac (Artiste). Methods: The traditional treatment on the nose skin involves the usage of a bolus, often with a single energy electron beam. This work avoided using the bolus, and utilized mixed energies of electron beams. An in-house developed Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculation/optimization planning system was employed for treatment planning. Phase space data (6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV) were used as an input source for MC dose calculations for the linac. To reduce the scatter-caused penumbra, a short SSD (61 cm) was used. A clinical case of the nose skin, which was previously treated with a single 9 MeV electron beam, was replanned with the MERT method. The resultant dose distributions were compared with the plan previously clinically used. The dose volume histogram of the MERT plan is calculated to examine the coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) and critical structure doses. Results: The target coverage and conformality in the MERT plan are improved as compared to the conventional plan. The MERT can provide more sufficient target coverage and less normal tissue dose underneath the nose skin. Conclusion: Compared to the conventional treatment technique, using MERT for the nose skin treatment has shown the dosimetric advantages in the PTV coverage and conformality. In addition, this technique eliminates the necessity of the cutout and bolus, which makes the treatment more efficient and accurate.

  8. Report of the AAPM Task Group No. 105: Issues associated with clinical implementation of Monte Carlo-based photon and electron external beam treatment planning

    Chetty, Indrin J.; Curran, Bruce; Cygler, Joanna E.; DeMarco, John J.; Ezzell, Gary; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Kawrakow, Iwan; Keall, Paul J.; Liu, Helen; Ma, C.-M. Charlie; Rogers, D. W. O.; Seuntjens, Jan; Sheikh-Bagheri, Daryoush; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2007-01-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has been shown through many research studies to calculate accurate dose distributions for clinical radiotherapy, particularly in heterogeneous patient tissues where the effects of electron transport cannot be accurately handled with conventional, deterministic dose algorithms. Despite its proven accuracy and the potential for improved dose distributions to influence treatment outcomes, the long calculation times previously associated with MC simulation rendered this method impractical for routine clinical treatment planning. However, the development of faster codes optimized for radiotherapy calculations and improvements in computer processor technology have substantially reduced calculation times to, in some instances, within minutes on a single processor. These advances have motivated several major treatment planning system vendors to embark upon the path of MC techniques. Several commercial vendors have already released or are currently in the process of releasing MC algorithms for photon and/or electron beam treatment planning. Consequently, the accessibility and use of MC treatment planning algorithms may well become widespread in the radiotherapy community. With MC simulation, dose is computed stochastically using first principles; this method is therefore quite different from conventional dose algorithms. Issues such as statistical uncertainties, the use of variance reduction techniques, the ability to account for geometric details in the accelerator treatment head simulation, and other features, are all unique components of a MC treatment planning algorithm. Successful implementation by the clinical physicist of such a system will require an understanding of the basic principles of MC techniques. The purpose of this report, while providing education and review on the use of MC simulation in radiotherapy planning, is to set out, for both users and developers, the salient issues associated with clinical implementation and experimental verification of MC dose algorithms. As the MC method is an emerging technology, this report is not meant to be prescriptive. Rather, it is intended as a preliminary report to review the tenets of the MC method and to provide the framework upon which to build a comprehensive program for commissioning and routine quality assurance of MC-based treatment planning systems

  9. Characterization of liver metastases: the efficacy of biphasic magnetic resonance imaging with ferucarbotran-enhancement

    Hong, H.S.; Byun, J.H.; Won, H.J.; Kim, K.W.; Lee, S.S.; Lee, M.G.; Yun, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of biphasic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver with ferucarbotran-enhancement for the characterization of hepatic metastases. Materials and methods: Thirty-six patients underwent MRI of the liver with separate acquisition of double-contrast enhancement consisting of gadolinium and ferucarbotran. A total of 106 focal hepatic lesions (51 metastases, 31 cysts, 23 haemangiomas, and one eosinophilic abscess) were included. Two sets of MRI were analysed: (1) ferucarbotran set: ferucarbotran-enhanced T1-weighted (T1W) dynamic imaging combined with ferucarbotran-enhanced T2*-weighted (T2*W) delayed imaging and (2) double set: gadolinium-enhanced T1W dynamic imaging combined with ferucarbotran-enhanced T2*W delayed imaging. The diagnostic accuracy of the two sets was evaluated using alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Sensitivity and specificity were compared using the McNemar test. The enhancement pattern of focal hepatic lesions was analysed on gadolinium and ferucarbotran-enhanced T1W dynamic imaging. Results: There was no significant difference in the accuracy of characterizing hepatic metastases between the two sets. Sensitivity and specificity were not significantly different between the sets (p > 0.05). Peripheral rim enhancement was exhibited in 57% of metastatic lesions on ferucarbotran-enhanced T1W dynamic imaging. The majority (96%) of hepatic haemangiomas demonstrated typical peripheral nodular enhancement with progression on ferucarbotran-enhanced T1W dynamic imaging and were easily differentiated from metastases. Conclusion: Biphasic MRI of the liver with ferucarbotran-enhancement alone provided comparable diagnostic efficacy to double-contrast MRI for the characterization of hepatic metastases.

  10. Characterization of Vocal Fold Vibration in Sulcus Vocalis Using High-Speed Digital Imaging

    Yamauchi, Akihito; Yokonishi, Hisayuki; Imagawa, Hiroshi; Sakakibara, Ken-Ichi; Nito, Takaharu; Tayama, Niro; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize vocal fold vibrations in sulcus vocalis by high-speed digital imaging (HSDI) and to clarify the correlations between HSDI-derived parameters and traditional vocal parameters. Method: HSDI was performed in 20 vocally healthy subjects (8 men and 12 women) and…

  11. Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter Hyperspectral Microscope Imaging Method for Characterizing Spectra from Foodborne Pathogens.

    Hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method, which provides both spatial and spectral characteristics of samples, can be effective for foodborne pathogen detection. The acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF)-based HMI method can be used to characterize spectral properties of biofilms formed by Salmon...

  12. Parametric imaging for characterizing focal liver lesions in contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    Rognin, Nicolas G; Arditi, Marcel; Mercier, Laurent; Frinking, Peter J A; Schneider, Michel; Perrenoud, Geneviève; Anaye, Anass; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Tranquart, François

    2010-11-01

    The differentiation between benign and malignant focal liver lesions plays an important role in diagnosis of liver disease and therapeutic planning of local or general disease. This differentiation, based on characterization, relies on the observation of the dynamic vascular patterns (DVP) of lesions with respect to adjacent parenchyma, and may be assessed during contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging after a bolus injection. For instance, hemangiomas (i.e., benign lesions) exhibit hyper-enhanced signatures over time, whereas metastases (i.e., malignant lesions) frequently present hyperenhanced foci during the arterial phase and always become hypo-enhanced afterwards. The objective of this work was to develop a new parametric imaging technique, aimed at mapping the DVP signatures into a single image called a DVP parametric image, conceived as a diagnostic aid tool for characterizing lesion types. The methodology consisted in processing a time sequence of images (DICOM video data) using four consecutive steps: (1) pre-processing combining image motion correction and linearization to derive an echo-power signal, in each pixel, proportional to local contrast agent concentration over time; (2) signal modeling, by means of a curve-fitting optimization, to compute a difference signal in each pixel, as the subtraction of adjacent parenchyma kinetic from the echopower signal; (3) classification of difference signals; and (4) parametric image rendering to represent classified pixels as a support for diagnosis. DVP parametric imaging was the object of a clinical assessment on a total of 146 lesions, imaged using different medical ultrasound systems. The resulting sensitivity and specificity were 97% and 91%, respectively, which compare favorably with scores of 81 to 95% and 80 to 95% reported in medical literature for sensitivity and specificity, respectively.

  13. Characterization of Japanese standards for myocardial sympathetic and metabolic imaging in comparison with perfusion imaging

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Okuda, Koichi; Yamashina, Shohei; Sakata, Kazuyuki; Momose, Mitsuru; Hashimoto, Jun; Kumita, Shinichiro; Kawano, Masaya

    2009-01-01

    The standard patterns of myocardial radiotracer distribution of 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and 123 I-β-methyl-p-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) should be defined in a Japanese population. The purpose of this study was to present and provide data on the characteristics of MIBG and BMIPP with respect to myocardial single photon emission computed tomography. The normal database included 123 I-MIBG and 123 I-BMIPP imaging and a 99 mTc-sestamibi/tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion study. The projection images were transferred by digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format and reconstructed and analyzed with polar maps. The projection data from multiple centers were successfully transferred to a common format for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction. When the average values were analyzed using a 17-segment model, MIBG uptake in the inferior and apical wall appeared to be slightly lower than anterior uptake (P 99m Tc-tracer uptake (P<0.05). Myocardial sympathetic nerve and metabolic scintigraphy data that were specific for the Japanese population were generated and found to be different from that of perfusion tracers. The normal database can serve as a standard for nuclear cardiology work conducted in Japan. (author)

  14. Novel low-dose imaging technique for characterizing atomic structures through scanning transmission electron microscope

    Su, Chia-Ping; Syu, Wei-Jhe; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Lai, Ping-Shan; Chen, Chien-Chun

    2017-08-01

    To investigate dislocations or heterostructures across interfaces is now of great interest to condensed matter and materials scientists. With the advances in aberration-corrected electron optics, the scanning transmission electron microscope has demonstrated its excellent capability of characterizing atomic structures within nanomaterials, and well-resolved atomic-resolution images can be obtained through long-exposure data acquisition. However, the sample drifting, carbon contamination, and radiation damage hinder further analysis, such as deriving three-dimensional (3D) structures from a series of images. In this study, a method for obtaining atomic-resolution images with significantly reduced exposure time was developed, using which an original high-resolution image with approximately one tenth the electron dose can be obtained by combining a fast-scan high-magnification image and a slow-scan low-magnification image. The feasibility of obtaining 3D atomic structures using the proposed approach was demonstrated through multislice simulation. Finally, the feasibility and accuracy of image restoration were experimentally verified. This general method cannot only apply to electron microscopy but also benefit to image radiation-sensitive materials using various light sources.

  15. New developments in image-based characterization of coated particle nuclear fuel

    Price, Jeffery R.; Aykac, Deniz; Hunn, John D.; Kercher, Andrew K.; Morris, Robert N.

    2006-02-01

    We describe in this paper new developments in the characterization of coated particle nuclear fuel using optical microscopy and digital imaging. As in our previous work, we acquire optical imagery of the fuel pellets in two distinct manners that we refer to as shadow imaging and cross-sectional imaging. In shadow imaging, particles are collected in a single layer on an optically transparent dish and imaged using collimated back-lighting to measure outer surface characteristics only. In cross-sectional imaging, particles are mounted in acrylic epoxy and polished to near-center to reveal the inner coating layers for measurement. For shadow imaging, we describe a curvaturebased metric that is computed from the particle boundary points in the FFT domain using a low-frequency parametric representation. We also describe how missing boundary points are approximated using band-limited interpolation so that the FFT can be applied. For cross-section imaging, we describe a new Bayesian-motivated segmentation scheme as well as a new technique to correct layer measurements for the fact that we cannot observe the true mid-plane of the approximately spherical particles.

  16. Characterization, prediction, and correction of geometric distortion in 3 T MR images

    Baldwin, Lesley N.; Wachowicz, Keith; Thomas, Steven D.; Rivest, Ryan; Gino Fallone, B.

    2007-01-01

    The work presented herein describes our methods and results for predicting, measuring and correcting geometric distortions in a 3 T clinical magnetic resonance (MR) scanner for the purpose of image guidance in radiation treatment planning. Geometric inaccuracies due to both inhomogeneities in the background field and nonlinearities in the applied gradients were easily visualized on the MR images of a regularly structured three-dimensional (3D) grid phantom. From a computed tomography scan, the locations of just under 10 000 control points within the phantom were accurately determined in three dimensions using a MATLAB-based computer program. MR distortion was then determined by measuring the corresponding locations of the control points when the phantom was imaged using the MR scanner. Using a reversed gradient method, distortions due to gradient nonlinearities were separated from distortions due to inhomogeneities in the background B 0 field. Because the various sources of machine-related distortions can be individually characterized, distortions present in other imaging sequences (for which 3D distortion cannot accurately be measured using phantom methods) can be predicted negating the need for individual distortion calculation for a variety of other imaging sequences. Distortions were found to be primarily caused by gradient nonlinearities and maximum image distortions were reported to be less than those previously found by other researchers at 1.5 T. Finally, the image slices were corrected for distortion in order to provide geometrically accurate phantom images

  17. Interlaced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system with real-time coregistration for ovarian tissue characterization

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2014-07-01

    Coregistered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic imaging are emerging techniques for mapping the echogenic anatomical structure of tissue and its corresponding optical absorption. We report a 128-channel imaging system with real-time coregistration of the two modalities, which provides up to 15 coregistered frames per second limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. In addition, the system integrates a compact transvaginal imaging probe with a custom-designed fiber optic assembly for in vivo detection and characterization of human ovarian tissue. We present the coregistered US and photoacoustic imaging system structure, the optimal design of the PC interfacing software, and the reconfigurable field programmable gate array operation and optimization. Phantom experiments of system lateral resolution and axial sensitivity evaluation, examples of the real-time scanning of a tumor-bearing mouse, and ex vivo human ovaries studies are demonstrated.

  18. Characterization of LiF-based soft X-ray imaging detectors by confocal fluorescence microscopy

    Bonfigli, F; Gaudio, P; Lupelli, I; Nichelatti, E; Richetta, M; Vincenti, M A; Montereali, R M

    2010-01-01

    X-ray microscopy represents a powerful tool to obtain images of samples with very high spatial resolution. The main limitation of this technique is represented by the poor spatial resolution of standard imaging detectors. We proposed an innovative high-performance X-ray imaging detector based on the visible photoluminescence of colour centres in lithium fluoride. In this work, a confocal microscope in fluorescence mode was used to characterize LiF-based imaging detectors measuring CC integrated visible fluorescence signals of LiF crystals and films (grown on several kinds of substrates) irradiated by soft X-rays produced by a laser plasma source in different exposure conditions. The results are compared with the CC photoluminescence spectra measured on the same samples and discussed.

  19. Characterization of Mechanical Properties of Tissue Scaffolds by Phase Contrast Imaging and Finite Element Modeling.

    Bawolin, Nahshon K; Dolovich, Allan T; Chen, Daniel X B; Zhang, Chris W J

    2015-08-01

    In tissue engineering, the cell and scaffold approach has shown promise as a treatment to regenerate diseased and/or damaged tissue. In this treatment, an artificial construct (scaffold) is seeded with cells, which organize and proliferate into new tissue. The scaffold itself biodegrades with time, leaving behind only newly formed tissue. The degradation qualities of the scaffold are critical during the treatment period, since the change in the mechanical properties of the scaffold with time can influence cell behavior. To observe in time the scaffold's mechanical properties, a straightforward method is to deform the scaffold and then characterize scaffold deflection accordingly. However, experimentally observing the scaffold deflection is challenging. This paper presents a novel study on characterization of mechanical properties of scaffolds by phase contrast imaging and finite element modeling, which specifically includes scaffold fabrication, scaffold imaging, image analysis, and finite elements (FEs) modeling of the scaffold mechanical properties. The innovation of the work rests on the use of in-line phase contrast X-ray imaging at 20 KeV to characterize tissue scaffold deformation caused by ultrasound radiation forces and the use of the Fourier transform to identify movement. Once deformation has been determined experimentally, it is then compared with the predictions given by the forward solution of a finite element model. A consideration of the number of separate loading conditions necessary to uniquely identify the material properties of transversely isotropic and fully orthotropic scaffolds is also presented, along with the use of an FE as a form of regularization.

  20. Analytical robustness of quantitative NIR chemical imaging for Islamic paper characterization

    Mahgoub, Hend; Gilchrist, John R.; Fearn, Thomas; Strlič, Matija

    2017-07-01

    Recently, spectral imaging techniques such as Multispectral (MSI) and Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) have gained importance in the field of heritage conservation. This paper explores the analytical robustness of quantitative chemical imaging for Islamic paper characterization by focusing on the effect of different measurement and processing parameters, i.e. acquisition conditions and calibration on the accuracy of the collected spectral data. This will provide a better understanding of the technique that can provide a measure of change in collections through imaging. For the quantitative model, special calibration target was devised using 105 samples from a well-characterized reference Islamic paper collection. Two material properties were of interest: starch sizing and cellulose degree of polymerization (DP). Multivariate data analysis methods were used to develop discrimination and regression models which were used as an evaluation methodology for the metrology of quantitative NIR chemical imaging. Spectral data were collected using a pushbroom HSI scanner (Gilden Photonics Ltd) in the 1000-2500 nm range with a spectral resolution of 6.3 nm using a mirror scanning setup and halogen illumination. Data were acquired at different measurement conditions and acquisition parameters. Preliminary results showed the potential of the evaluation methodology to show that measurement parameters such as the use of different lenses and different scanning backgrounds may not have a great influence on the quantitative results. Moreover, the evaluation methodology allowed for the selection of the best pre-treatment method to be applied to the data.

  1. Characterization of low-mass deformable mirrors and ASIC drivers for high-contrast imaging

    Mejia Prada, Camilo; Yao, Li; Wu, Yuqian; Roberts, Lewis C.; Shelton, Chris; Wu, Xingtao

    2017-09-01

    The development of compact, high performance Deformable Mirrors (DMs) is one of the most important technological challenges for high-contrast imaging on space missions. Microscale Inc. has fabricated and characterized piezoelectric stack actuator deformable mirrors (PZT-DMs) and Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) drivers for direct integration. The DM-ASIC system is designed to eliminate almost all cables, enabling a very compact optical system with low mass and low power consumption. We report on the optical tests used to evaluate the performance of the DM and ASIC units. We also compare the results to the requirements for space-based high-contrast imaging of exoplanets.

  2. A Stochastic Imaging Technique for Spatio-Spectral Characterization of Special Nuclear Material

    Hamel, Michael C.

    Radiation imaging is advantageous for detecting, locating and characterizing special nuclear material (SNM) in complex environments. A dual-particle imager (DPI) has been designed that is capable of detecting gamma-ray and neutron signatures from shielded SNM. The system combines liquid organic and NaI(Tl) scintillators to form a combined Compton and neutron scatter camera. Effective image reconstruction of detected particles is a crucial component for maximizing the performance of the system; however, a key deficiency exists in the widely used list-mode maximum-likelihood estimation-maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction technique. The steady-state solution produced by this iterative method will have poor quality compared to solutions produced with fewer iterations. A stopping condition is required to achieve a better solution but these conditions fail to achieve maximum image quality. Stochastic origin ensembles (SOE) imaging is a good candidate to address this problem as it uses Markov chain Monte Carlo to reach a stochastic steady-state solution that has image quality comparable to the best MLEM solution. The application of SOE to the DPI is presented in this work. SOE was originally applied in medical imaging applications with no mechanism to isolate spectral information based on location. This capability is critical for non-proliferation applications as complex radiation environments with multiple sources are often encountered. This dissertation extends the SOE algorithm to produce spatially dependent spectra and presents experimental result showing that the technique was effective for isolating a 4.1-kg mass of weapons grade plutonium (WGPu) when other neutron and gamma-ray sources were present. This work also demonstrates the DPI as an effective tool for localizing and characterizing highly enriched uranium (HEU). A series of experiments were performed with the DPI using a deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator, as well as

  3. Characterizing structures on borehole images and logging data of the Nankai trough accretionary prism: new insights

    Jurado, Maria Jose

    2016-04-01

    IODP has extensively used the D/V Chikyu to drill the Kumano portion of the Nankai Trough, including two well sites within the Kumano Basin. IODP Expeditions 338 and 348 drilled deep into the inner accretionary prism south of the Kii Peninsula collecting a suite of LWD data, including natural gamma ray, electrical resistivity logs and borehole images, suitable to characterize structures (fractures and faults) inside the accretionary prism. Structural interpretation and analysis of logging-while-drilling data in the deep inner prism revealed intense deformation of a generally homogenous lithology characterized by bedding that dips steeply (60-90°) to the NW, intersected by faults and fractures. Multiple phases of deformation are characterized. IODP Expedition borehole images and LWD data acquired in the last decade in previous and results of NantroSEIZE IODP Expeditions (314, 319) were also analyzed to investigate the internal geometries and structures of the Nankai Trough accretionary prism. This study focused mainly on the characterization of the different types of structures and their specific position within the accretionary prism structures. New structural constraints and methodologies as well as a new approach to the characterization of study of active structures inside the prism will be presented.

  4. Tissue Equivalent Phantom Design for Characterization of a Coherent Scatter X-ray Imaging System

    Albanese, Kathryn Elizabeth

    testing. Our imaging system has been able to define the location and composition of the various materials in the phantom. These phantoms were used to characterize the CACSSI system in terms of beam width and imaging technique. The result of this work showed accurate modeling and characterization of the phantoms through comparison of the tissue-equivalent form factors to those from literature. The physical construction of the phantoms, based on actual patient anatomy, was validated using mammography and computed tomography to visually compare the clinical images to those of actual patient anatomy.

  5. Purchase of a Raman and Photoluminescence Imaging System for Characterization of Advanced Electrochemical and Electronic Materials

    2016-01-05

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Funds were used to purchase a Renishaw inVia Reflex Spectrometer System for Raman and Photoluminescence spectral...Unlimited UU UU UU UU 05-01-2016 15-Aug-2014 14-Aug-2015 Final Report: Purchase of a Raman and Photoluminescence Imaging System for Characterization of...MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Raman spectroscopy

  6. Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models

    2015-02-01

    Bird , L. Yan, K. M. Vrotsos, K. W. Eliceiri, E. M. Vaughan, P. J. Keely, J. G. White, N. Ramanujam, Metabolic mapping of MCF10A human breast cells...1   Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0025 TITLE: Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary... Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models 5b. GRANT NUMBER BC112240 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Betty Diamond 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  7. Performance characterization of megavoltage computed tomography imaging on a helical tomotherapy unit

    Meeks, Sanford L.; Harmon, Joseph F. Jr.; Langen, Katja M.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2005-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy is an innovative means of delivering IGRT and IMRT using a device that combines features of a linear accelerator and a helical computed tomography (CT) scanner. The HI-ART II can generate CT images from the same megavoltage x-ray beam it uses for treatment. These megavoltage CT (MVCT) images offer verification of the patient position prior to and potentially during radiation therapy. Since the unit uses the actual treatment beam as the x-ray source for image acquisition, no surrogate telemetry systems are required to register image space to treatment space. The disadvantage to using the treatment beam for imaging, however, is that the physics of radiation interactions in the megavoltage energy range may force compromises between the dose delivered and the image quality in comparison to diagnostic CT scanners. The performance of the system is therefore characterized in terms of objective measures of noise, uniformity, contrast, and spatial resolution as a function of the dose delivered by the MVCT beam. The uniformity and spatial resolutions of MVCT images generated by the HI-ART II are comparable to that of diagnostic CT images. Furthermore, the MVCT scan contrast is linear with respect to the electron density of material imaged. MVCT images do not have the same performance characteristics as state-of-the art diagnostic CT scanners when one objectively examines noise and low-contrast resolution. These inferior results may be explained, at least partially, by the low doses delivered by our unit; the dose is 1.1 cGy in a 20 cm diameter cylindrical phantom. In spite of the poorer low-contrast resolution, these relatively low-dose MVCT scans provide sufficient contrast to delineate many soft-tissue structures. Hence, these images are useful not only for verifying the patient's position at the time of therapy, but they are also sufficient for delineating many anatomic structures. In conjunction with the ability to recalculate radiotherapy doses on

  8. Advanced imaging as a novel approach to the characterization of membranes for microfiltration applications

    Marroquin, Milagro

    The primary objectives of my dissertation were to design, develop and implement novel confocal microscopy imaging protocols for the characterization of membranes and highlight opportunities to obtain reliable and cutting-edge information of microfiltration membrane morphology and fouling processes. After a comprehensive introduction and review of confocal microscopy in membrane applications (Chapter 1), the first part of this dissertation (Chapter 2) details my work on membrane morphology characterization by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and the implementation of my newly developed CLSM cross-sectional imaging protocol. Depth-of-penetration limits were identified to be approximately 24 microns and 7-8 microns for mixed cellulose ester and polyethersulfone membranes, respectively, making it impossible to image about 70% of the membrane bulk. The development and implementation of my cross-sectional CLSM method enabled the imaging of the entire membrane cross-section. Porosities of symmetric and asymmetric membranes with nominal pore sizes in the range 0.65-8.0 microns were quantified at different depths and yielded porosity values in the 50-60% range. It is my hope and expectation that the characterization strategy developed in this part of the work will enable future studies of different membrane materials and applications by confocal microscopy. After demonstrating how cross-sectional CLSM could be used to fully characterize membrane morphologies and porosities, I applied it to the characterization of fouling occurring in polyethersulfone microfiltration membranes during the processing of solutions containing proteins and polysaccharides (Chapter 3). Through CLSM imaging, it was determined where proteins and polysaccharides deposit throughout polymeric microfiltration membranes when a fluid containing these materials is filtered. CLSM enabled evaluation of the location and extent of fouling by individual components (protein: casein and polysaccharide

  9. Synthesis and characterization of CdO/GrO nanolayer for in vivo imaging

    Abbas Pardakhty

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Nanomaterials are playing major roles in imaging by delivering large imaging payloads, yielding improved sensitivity. Nanoparticles have enabled significant advances in pre-clinical cancer research as drug delivery vectors. Inorganic nanoparticles such as CdO/GrO nanoparticles have novel optical properties that can be used to optimize the signal-to-background ratio. This paper reports on a novel processing route for preparation of CdO/GrO nanolayer and investigation of its optical properties for application in in vivo targeting and imaging.Materials and Methods: Nanostructures were synthesized by reacting cadmium acetate and graphene powder. The effects ofdifferent parameters such as power and time of irradiation were also studied. Finally, the efficiency of CdO/GrO nanostructures as an optical composite was investigated using photoluminescence spectrum irradiation. CdO/GrO nanostructures were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy.Results: According to SEM images, it was found that sublimation temperature had significant effect on morphology and layers. The spectrum shows an emission peak at 523 nm, indicating that CdO/GrO nanolayer can be used for in vivo imaging.Conclusion: The estimated optical band gap energy is an accepted value for application in in vivo imaging using a QD–CdO/GrO nanolayer.

  10. Benchmarking the x-ray phase contrast imaging for ICF DT ice characterization using roughened surrogates

    Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Moody, J; Koch, J; Mapoles, E; Montesanti, R; Youngblood, K; Letts, S; Nikroo, A; Sater, J; Atherton, J

    2008-06-26

    We use x-ray phase contrast imaging to characterize the inner surface roughness of DT ice layers in capsules planned for future ignition experiments. It is therefore important to quantify how well the x-ray data correlates with the actual ice roughness. We benchmarked the accuracy of our system using surrogates with fabricated roughness characterized with high precision standard techniques. Cylindrical artifacts with azimuthally uniform sinusoidal perturbations with 100 um period and 1 um amplitude demonstrated 0.02 um accuracy limited by the resolution of the imager and the source size of our phase contrast system. Spherical surrogates with random roughness close to that required for the DT ice for a successful ignition experiment were used to correlate the actual surface roughness to that obtained from the x-ray measurements. When comparing average power spectra of individual measurements, the accuracy mode number limits of the x-ray phase contrast system benchmarked against surface characterization performed by Atomic Force Microscopy are 60 and 90 for surrogates smoother and rougher than the required roughness for the ice. These agreement mode number limits are >100 when comparing matching individual measurements. We will discuss the implications for interpreting DT ice roughness data derived from phase-contrast x-ray imaging.

  11. Advantages and Limitations of Current Imaging Techniques for Characterizing Liposome Morphology

    Annie-Louise Robson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There are currently a number of imaging techniques available for evaluating the morphology of liposomes and other nanoparticles, with each having its own advantages and disadvantages that should be considered when interpreting data. Controlling and validating the morphology of nanoparticles is of key importance for the effective clinical translation of liposomal formulations. There are a number of physical characteristics of liposomes that determine their in vivo behavior, including size, surface characteristics, lamellarity, and homogeneity. Despite the great importance of the morphology of nanoparticles, it is generally not well-characterized and is difficult to control. Appropriate imaging techniques provide important details regarding the morphological characteristics of nanoparticles, and should be used in conjunction with other methods to assess physicochemical parameters. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and limitations of available imaging techniques used to evaluate liposomal formulations.

  12. Segmentation of nanotomographic cortical bone images for quantitative characterization of the osteoctyte lacuno-canalicular network

    Ciani, A.; Kewish, C. M. [Synchrotron Soleil, L’Orme des Merisiers, 91192 Saint-Aubin (France); Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Diaz, A.; Holler, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Pallu, S.; Achiou, Z.; Jennane, R.; Toumi, H.; Lespessailles, E. [Univ Orléans, I3MTO, Ea 4708, 45000 Orléans (France)

    2016-01-28

    A newly developed data processing method able to characterize the osteocytes lacuno-canalicular network (LCN) is presented. Osteocytes are the most abundant cells in the bone, living in spaces called lacunae embedded inside the bone matrix and connected to each other with an extensive network of canals that allows for the exchange of nutrients and for mechanotransduction functions. The geometrical three-dimensional (3D) architecture is increasingly thought to be related to the macroscopic strength or failure of the bone and it is becoming the focus for investigating widely spread diseases such as osteoporosis. To obtain 3D LCN images non-destructively has been out of reach until recently, since tens-of-nanometers scale resolution is required. Ptychographic tomography was validated for bone imaging in [1], showing clearly the LCN. The method presented here was applied to 3D ptychographic tomographic images in order to extract morphological and geometrical parameters of the lacuno-canalicular structures.

  13. High-speed infrared imaging for material characterization in experimental mechanics experiments

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Marcotte, Frédérick; Lagueux, Philippe; Farley, Vincent; Guyot, Éric; Morton, Vince

    2017-10-01

    Heat transfers are involved in many phenomena such as friction, tensile stress, shear stress and material rupture. Among the challenges encountered during the characterization of such thermal patterns is the need for both high spatial and temporal resolution. Infrared imaging provides information about surface temperature that can be attributed to the stress response of the material and breaking of chemical bounds. In order to illustrate this concept, tensile and shear tests were carried out on steel, aluminum and carbon fiber composite materials and monitored using high-speed (Telops FASTM2K) and high-definition (Telops HD-IR) infrared imaging. Results from split-Hopkinson experiments carried out on a polymer material at high strain-rate are also presented. The results illustrate how high-speed and high-definition infrared imaging in the midwave infrared (MWIR, 3 - 5 μm) spectral range can provide detailed information about the thermal properties of materials undergoing mechanical testing.

  14. Characterization of beam dynamics in the APS injector rings using time-resolved imaging techniques

    Yang, B.X.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Borland, M.

    1997-01-01

    Images taken with streak cameras and gated intensified cameras with both time (longitudinal) and spatial (transverse) resolution reveal a wealth of information about circular accelerators. The authors illustrate a novel technique by a sequence of dual-sweep streak camera images taken at a high dispersion location in the booster synchrotron, where the horizontal coordinate is strongly correlated with the particle energy and the open-quotes top-viewclose quotes of the beam gives a good approximation to the particle density distribution in the longitudinal phase space. A sequence of top-view images taken fight after injection clearly shows the beam dynamics in the phase space. We report another example from the positron accumulator ring for the characterization of its beam compression bunching with the 12th harmonic rf

  15. Characterization of platelet adhesion under flow using microscopic image sequence analysis.

    Machin, M; Santomaso, A; Cozzi, M R; Battiston, M; Mazzuccato, M; De Marco, L; Canu, P

    2005-07-01

    A method for quantitative analysis of platelet deposition under flow is discussed here. The model system is based upon perfusion of blood platelets over an adhesive substrate immobilized on a glass coverslip acting as the lower surface of a rectangular flow chamber. The perfusion apparatus is mounted onto an inverted microscope equipped with epifluorescent illumination and intensified CCD video camera. Characterization is based on information obtained from a specific image analysis method applied to continuous sequences of microscopical images. Platelet recognition across the sequence of images is based on a time-dependent, bidimensional, gaussian-like pdf. Once a platelet is located,the variation of its position and shape as a function of time (i.e., the platelet history) can be determined. Analyzing the history we can establish if the platelet is moving on the surface, the frequency of this movement and the distance traveled before its resumes the velocity of a non-interacting cell. Therefore, we can determine how long the adhesion would last which is correlated to the resistance of the platelet-substrate bond. This algorithm enables the dynamic quantification of trajectories, as well as residence times, arrest and release frequencies for a high numbers of platelets at the same time. Statistically significant conclusions on platelet-surface interactions can then be obtained. An image analysis tool of this kind can dramatically help the investigation and characterization of the thrombogenic properties of artificial surfaces such as those used in artificial organs and biomedical devices.

  16. A method to characterize structure and symmetry in low-resolution images of colloidal thin films

    McDonald, Matthew J; Yethiraj, Anand; Beaulieu, L Y

    2012-01-01

    A method is presented for characterizing particle centres, particle size and crystal symmetries with sub-pixel resolution from 8-bit digital images of colloidal thin films taken with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Digital images are converted to xyz data points by converting colour contrast to a numerical intensity. The data are then passed through a modified form of a Savitzky–Golay filter which allows particle centres to be determined. A subsequent routine is presented that, by analysing the weighted standard deviation and average intensity of the pixels along shifting rings, improves the accuracy of the detected particle centres and provides the radius of each particle. Obtaining the particle centres allows the symmetry of each particle (with respect to its neighbours) along with the mean crystal orientation to be obtained, all in one cohesive package. A key advantage of the method presented here is that it is very robust and works with both low- and high-resolution images—enabling, for example, routine quantitative analysis of SEM images. Because of the low level of user input, the method can be used to process a batch of images in order to characterize the evolution of samples. (paper)

  17. Curiosity’s robotic arm-mounted Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI): Characterization and calibration status

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Caplinger, Michael A.; Maki, Justin N.; Ravine, Michael A.; Ghaemi, F. Tony; McNair, Sean; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Duston, Brian M.; Wilson, Reg G.; Yingst, R. Aileen; Kennedy, Megan R.; Minitti, Michelle E.; Sengstacken, Aaron J.; Supulver, Kimberley D.; Lipkaman, Leslie J.; Krezoski, Gillian M.; McBride, Marie J.; Jones, Tessa L.; Nixon, Brian E.; Van Beek, Jason K.; Krysak, Daniel J.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    2015-01-01

    MAHLI (Mars Hand Lens Imager) is a 2-megapixel, Bayer pattern color CCD camera with a macro lens mounted on a rotatable turret at the end of the 2-meters-long robotic arm aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity. The camera includes white and longwave ultraviolet LEDs to illuminate targets at night. Onboard data processing services include focus stack merging and data compression. Here we report on the results and status of MAHLI characterization and calibration, covering the pre-launch period from August 2008 through the early months of the extended surface mission through February 2015. Since landing in Gale crater in August 2012, MAHLI has been used for a wide range of science and engineering applications, including distinction among a variety of mafic, siliciclastic sedimentary rocks; investigation of grain-scale rock, regolith, and eolian sediment textures and structures; imaging of the landscape; inspection and monitoring of rover and science instrument hardware concerns; and supporting geologic sample selection, extraction, analysis, delivery, and documentation. The camera has a dust cover and focus mechanism actuated by a single stepper motor. The transparent cover was coated with a thin film of dust during landing, thus MAHLI is usually operated with the cover open. The camera focuses over a range from a working distance of 2.04 cm to infinity; the highest resolution images are at 13.9 µm per pixel; images acquired from 6.9 cm show features at the same scale as the Mars Exploration Rover Microscopic Imagers at 31 µm/pixel; and 100 µm/pixel is achieved at a working distance of ~26.5 cm. The very highest resolution images returned from Mars permit distinction of high contrast silt grains in the 30–40 µm size range. MAHLI has performed well; the images need no calibration in order to achieve most of the investigation’s science and engineering goals. The positioning and repeatability of robotic arm placement of the MAHLI camera head have

  18. Characterization of statistical prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS): II. Application to dose reduction

    Lauzier, Pascal Thériault; Chen Guanghong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The ionizing radiation imparted to patients during computed tomography exams is raising concerns. This paper studies the performance of a scheme called dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS). The purpose of this study is to characterize the effects of a statistical model of x-ray detection in the DR-PICCS framework and its impact on spatial resolution. Methods: Both numerical simulations with known ground truth and in vivo animal dataset were used in this study. In numerical simulations, a phantom was simulated with Poisson noise and with varying levels of eccentricity. Both the conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and the PICCS algorithms were used to reconstruct images. In PICCS reconstructions, the prior image was generated using two different denoising methods: a simple Gaussian blur and a more advanced diffusion filter. Due to the lack of shift-invariance in nonlinear image reconstruction such as the one studied in this paper, the concept of local spatial resolution was used to study the sharpness of a reconstructed image. Specifically, a directional metric of image sharpness, the so-called pseudopoint spread function (pseudo-PSF), was employed to investigate local spatial resolution. Results: In the numerical studies, the pseudo-PSF was reduced from twice the voxel width in the prior image down to less than 1.1 times the voxel width in DR-PICCS reconstructions when the statistical model was not included. At the same noise level, when statistical weighting was used, the pseudo-PSF width in DR-PICCS reconstructed images varied between 1.5 and 0.75 times the voxel width depending on the direction along which it was measured. However, this anisotropy was largely eliminated when the prior image was generated using diffusion filtering; the pseudo-PSF width was reduced to below one voxel width in that case. In the in vivo study, a fourfold improvement in CNR was achieved while qualitatively maintaining sharpness

  19. Surface topography characterization using 3D stereoscopic reconstruction of SEM images

    Vedantha Krishna, Amogh; Flys, Olena; Reddy, Vijeth V.; Rosén, B. G.

    2018-06-01

    A major drawback of the optical microscope is its limitation to resolve finer details. Many microscopes have been developed to overcome the limitations set by the diffraction of visible light. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is one such alternative: it uses electrons for imaging, which have much smaller wavelength than photons. As a result high magnification with superior image resolution can be achieved. However, SEM generates 2D images which provide limited data for surface measurements and analysis. Often many research areas require the knowledge of 3D structures as they contribute to a comprehensive understanding of microstructure by allowing effective measurements and qualitative visualization of the samples under study. For this reason, stereo photogrammetry technique is employed to convert SEM images into 3D measurable data. This paper aims to utilize a stereoscopic reconstruction technique as a reliable method for characterization of surface topography. Reconstructed results from SEM images are compared with coherence scanning interferometer (CSI) results obtained by measuring a roughness reference standard sample. This paper presents a method to select the most robust/consistent surface texture parameters that are insensitive to the uncertainties involved in the reconstruction technique itself. Results from the two-stereoscopic reconstruction algorithms are also documented in this paper.

  20. Multispectral photoacoustic characterization of ICG and porcine blood using an LED-based photoacoustic imaging system

    Shigeta, Yusuke; Sato, Naoto; Kuniyil Ajith Singh, Mithun; Agano, Toshitaka

    2018-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging modality that has emerged over the last decade. In photoacoustic imaging, pulsed-light absorbed by the target emits ultrasound that can be detected using a conventional ultrasound array. This ultrasound data can be used to reconstruct the location and spatial details of the intrinsic/extrinsic light absorbers in the tissue. Recently we reported on the development of a multi-wavelength high frame-rate LED-based photoacoustic/ultrasound imaging system (AcousticX). In this work, we photoacoustically characterize the absorption spectrum of ICG and porcine blood using LED arrays with multiple wavelengths (405, 420, 470, 520, 620, 660, 690, 750, 810, 850, 925, 980 nm). Measurements were performed in a simple reflection mode configuration in which LED arrays where fixed on both sides of the linear array ultrasound probe. Phantom used consisted of micro-test tubes filled with ICG and porcine blood, which were placed in a tank filled with water. The photoacoustic spectrum obtained from our measurements matches well with the reference absorption spectrum. These results demonstrate the potential capability of our system in performing clinical/pre-clinical multispectral photoacoustic imaging.

  1. Characterization of orthogonal transfer array CCDs for the WIYN one degree imager

    Lesser, Michael; Ouellette, David; Boroson, Todd; Harbeck, Daniel; Martin, Pierre; Jacoby, George; Cavin, John; Sawyer, David; Boggs, Kasey; Bredthauer, Richard

    2012-03-01

    The WIYN One Degree Imager (ODI) will provide a one degree field of view for the WIYN 3.5 m telescope located on Kitt Peak near Tucson, Arizona. Its focal plane consists of an 8x8 grid of Orthogonal Transfer Array (OTA) CCD detectors. These detectors are the STA2200 OTA CCDs designed and fabricated by Semiconductor Technology Associates, Inc. and backside processed at the University of Arizona Imaging Technology Laboratory. Several lot runs of the STA2200 detectors have been fabricated. We have backside processed devices from these different lots and provide detector performance characterization, including noise, CTE, cosmetics, quantum efficiency, and some orthogonal transfer characteristics. We discuss the performance differences for the devices with different silicon thickness and resistivity. A fully buttable custom detector package has been developed for this project which allows hybridization of the silicon detectors directly onto an aluminum nitride substrate with an embedded pin grid array. This package is mounted on a silicon-aluminum alloy which provides a flat imaging surface of less than 20 microns peakvalley at the -100 C operating temperature. Characterization of the package performance, including low temperature profilometry, is described in this paper.

  2. Self characterization of a coded aperture array for neutron source imaging

    Volegov, P. L., E-mail: volegov@lanl.gov; Danly, C. R.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Fittinghoff, D. N. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the stagnation stage of inertial confinement fusion implosions. Since the neutron source is small (∼100 μm) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-μm resolution are 20-cm long, triangular tapers machined in gold foils. These gold foils are stacked to form an array of 20 apertures for pinhole imaging and three apertures for penumbral imaging. These apertures must be precisely aligned to accurately place the field of view of each aperture at the design location, or the location of the field of view for each aperture must be measured. In this paper we present a new technique that has been developed for the measurement and characterization of the precise location of each aperture in the array. We present the detailed algorithms used for this characterization and the results of reconstructed sources from inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments at NIF.

  3. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications.

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J; Caliste, D; Fernandez, B; Eon, D; Härtwig, J; Barbay, C; Mer-Calfati, C; Tranchant, N; Arnault, J C; Lafford, T A; Baruchel, J

    2017-04-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc. ) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples.

  4. Defect Characterization, Imaging, and Control in Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors and Devices

    Brillson, L. J.; Foster, G. M.; Cox, J.; Ruane, W. T.; Jarjour, A. B.; Gao, H.; von Wenckstern, H.; Grundmann, M.; Wang, B.; Look, D. C.; Hyland, A.; Allen, M. W.

    2018-03-01

    Wide-bandgap semiconductors are now leading the way to new physical phenomena and device applications at nanoscale dimensions. The impact of defects on the electronic properties of these materials increases as their size decreases, motivating new techniques to characterize and begin to control these electronic states. Leading these advances have been the semiconductors ZnO, GaN, and related materials. This paper highlights the importance of native point defects in these semiconductors and describes how a complement of spatially localized surface science and spectroscopy techniques in three dimensions can characterize, image, and begin to control these electronic states at the nanoscale. A combination of characterization techniques including depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, surface photovoltage spectroscopy, and hyperspectral imaging can describe the nature and distribution of defects at interfaces at both bulk and nanoscale surfaces, their metal interfaces, and inside nanostructures themselves. These features as well as temperature and mechanical strain inside wide-bandgap device structures at the nanoscale can be measured even while these devices are operating. These advanced capabilities enable several new directions for describing defects at the nanoscale, showing how they contribute to device degradation, and guiding growth processes to control them.

  5. The Automation and Exoplanet Orbital Characterization from the Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey

    Jinfei Wang, Jason; Graham, James; Perrin, Marshall; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry; Kalas, Paul; arriaga, Pauline; Chilcote, Jeffrey K.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Ruffio, Jean-Baptiste; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) Exoplanet Survey (GPIES) is a multi-year 600-star survey to discover and characterize young Jovian exoplanets and their planet forming environments. For large surveys like GPIES, it is critical to have a uniform dataset processed with the latest techniques and calibrations. I will describe the GPI Data Cruncher, an automated data processing framework that is able to generate fully reduced data minutes after the data are taken and can also reprocess the entire campaign in a single day on a supercomputer. The Data Cruncher integrates into a larger automated data processing infrastructure which syncs, logs, and displays the data. I will discuss the benefits of the GPIES data infrastructure, including optimizing observing strategies, finding planets, characterizing instrument performance, and constraining giant planet occurrence. I will also discuss my work in characterizing the exoplanets we have imaged in GPIES through monitoring their orbits. Using advanced data processing algorithms and GPI's precise astrometric calibration, I will show that GPI can achieve one milliarcsecond astrometry on the extensively-studied planet Beta Pic b. With GPI, we can confidently rule out a possible transit of Beta Pic b, but have precise timings on a Hill sphere transit, and I will discuss efforts to search for transiting circumplanetary material this year. I will also discuss the orbital monitoring of other exoplanets as part of GPIES.

  6. Characterization of cytochrome c as marker for retinal cell degeneration by uv/vis spectroscopic imaging

    Hollmach, Julia; Schweizer, Julia; Steiner, Gerald; Knels, Lilla; Funk, Richard H. W.; Thalheim, Silko; Koch, Edmund

    2011-07-01

    Retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration have become an important cause of visual loss depending on increasing life expectancy and lifestyle habits. Due to the fact that no satisfying treatment exists, early diagnosis and prevention are the only possibilities to stop the degeneration. The protein cytochrome c (cyt c) is a suitable marker for degeneration processes and apoptosis because it is a part of the respiratory chain and involved in the apoptotic pathway. The determination of the local distribution and oxidative state of cyt c in living cells allows the characterization of cell degeneration processes. Since cyt c exhibits characteristic absorption bands between 400 and 650 nm wavelength, uv/vis in situ spectroscopic imaging was used for its characterization in retinal ganglion cells. The large amount of data, consisting of spatial and spectral information, was processed by multivariate data analysis. The challenge consists in the identification of the molecular information of cyt c. Baseline correction, principle component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) were performed in order to identify cyt c within the spectral dataset. The combination of PCA and CA reveals cyt c and its oxidative state. The results demonstrate that uv/vis spectroscopic imaging in conjunction with sophisticated multivariate methods is a suitable tool to characterize cyt c under in situ conditions.

  7. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Sea Ice Characterization (SIC) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Sea Ice Characterization (SIC) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument...

  8. Screen film vs full-field digital mammography: image quality, detectability and characterization of lesions

    Obenauer, S.; Luftner-Nagel, S.; Heyden, D. von; Baum, F.; Grabbe, E.; Munzel, U.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare screen-film mammography (SFM) to full-field digital mammography (FFDM) regarding image quality as well as detectability and characterization of lesions using equivalent images of the same patient acquired with both systems. Two mammography units were used, one with a screen-film system (Senographe DMR) and the other with a digital detector (Senographe 2000D, both GEMS). Screen-film and digital mammograms were performed on 55 patients with cytologically or histologically proven tumors on the same day. Together with these, 75 digital mammograms of patients without tumor and the corresponding previous screen-film mammograms not older than 1.5 years were reviewed by three observers in a random order. Contrast, exposure, and the presence of artifacts were evaluated. Different details, such as the skin, the retromamillary region, and the parenchymal structures, were judged according to a three-point ranking scale. Finally, the detectability of microcalcifications and lesions were compared and correlated to histology. Image contrast was judged to be good in 76%, satisfactory in 20%, and unsatisfactory in 4% of screen-film mammograms. Digital mammograms were judged to be good in 99% and unsatisfactory in 1% of cases. Improper exposure of screen-film system occurred in 18% (10% overexposed and 8% underexposed). Digital mammograms were improperly exposed in 4% of all cases but were of acceptable quality after post-processing. Artifacts, most of them of no significance, were found in 78% of screen-film and in none of the digital mammograms. Different anatomical regions, such as the skin, the retromamillary region, and dense parenchymal areas, were better visualized in digital than in screen-film mammography. All malignant tumors were seen by the three radiologists; however, digital mammograms allowed a better characterization of these lesions to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADSZZZ;) categories (FFDM better than

  9. Characterization of impact damage in metallic/nonmetallic composites using x-ray computed tomography imaging

    Green, William H.; Wells, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    Characterizing internal impact damage in composites can be difficult, especially in structurally complex composites or those consisting of many materials. Many methods for nondestructive inspection/nondestructive testing (NDI/NDT) of materials have been known and in use for many years, including x-ray film, real-time, and digital radiographic techniques, and ultrasonic techniques. However, these techniques are generally not capable of three-dimensional (3D) mapping of complex damage patterns, which is necessary to visualize and understand damage cracking modes. Conventional x-ray radiography suffers from the loss of 3D information. Structural complexity and signal dispersion in materials with many interfaces significantly effect ultrasonic inspection techniques. This makes inspection scan interpretation difficult, especially in composites containing a number of different materials (i.e., polymer, ceramic, and metallic). X-ray computed tomography (CT) is broadly applicable to any material or test object through which a beam of penetrating radiation may be passed and detected, including metals, plastics, ceramics, metallic/nonmetallic composites, and assemblies. The principal advantage of CT is that it provides densitometric (that is, radiological density and geometry) images of thin cross sections through an object. Because of the absence of structural superposition, images are much easier to interpret than conventional radiological images. The user can quickly learn to read CT data because images correspond more closely to the way the human mind visualizes 3D structures than projection radiology (that is, film radiography, real-time radiography (RTR), and digital radiography (DR)). Any number of CT images, or slices, from scanning an object can be volumetrically reconstructed to produce a 3D attenuation map of the object. The 3D attenuation data can be rendered using multiplanar or 3D solid visualization. In multiplanar visualization there are four planes of view

  10. CHARACTERIZATION AND AUTOMATIC COUNTING OF F.I.S.H. SIGNALS IN 3-D TISSUE IMAGES

    Umesh PS Adiga

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of malignancy-related features often helps to determine the prognoses for patients with carcinomas. One technique, which is becoming increasingly important for assessing such prognostic features is that of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH. By counting the number of FISH signals in a stack of 2- D images of a tumor (which together constitute the 3-D image volume, it is possible to determine whether there has been any loss or gain of the target DNA sequences and thereby evaluate the stage of the disease. However, visual counting of the FISH signals in this way is a tedious, fatiguing and time-consuming task. Therefore, we have developed an automated system for the quantitative evaluation of FISH signals. We present and discuss the implementation of an image processing module that segments, characterizes and counts the FISH signals in 3-D images of thick prostate tumor tissue specimens. Possible errors in the automatic counting of signals are listed and ways to circumvent these errors are described. We define a feature vector for a FISH signal and describe how we have used the weighted feature vector to segment specific signals from noise artifacts. In addition, we present a method, which allows overlapping FISH signals to be distinguished by fitting a local Gaussian model around the intensity profile and studying the feature vector of each model. Our complete image processing module overcomes the problems of manual counting of FISH signals in 3-D images of tumor specimens, thereby providing improved diagnostic and prognostic capability in qualitative diagnostic pathology.

  11. CHARACTERIZING LANDSCAPE SPATIAL HETEROGENEITY USING SEMIVARIOGRAM PARAMETERS DERIVED FROM NDVI IMAGES

    Eduarda Martiniano de Oliveira Silveira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Assuming a relationship between landscape heterogeneity and measures of spatial dependence by using remotely sensed data, the aim of this work was to evaluate the potential of semivariogram parameters, derived from satellite images with different spatial resolutions, to characterize landscape spatial heterogeneity of forested and human modified areas. The NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index was generated in an area of Brazilian amazon tropical forest (1,000 km².We selected samples (1 x 1 km from forested and human modified areas distributed throughout the study area, to generate the semivariogram and extract the sill (σ²-overall spatial variability of the surface property and range (φ-the length scale of the spatial structures of objects parameters. The analysis revealed that image spatial resolution influenced the sill and range parameters. The average sill and range values increase from forested to human modified areas and the greatest between-class variation was found for LANDSAT 8 imagery, indicating that this image spatial resolution is the most appropriate for deriving sill and range parameters with the intention of describing landscape spatial heterogeneity. By combining remote sensing and geostatistical techniques, we have shown that the sill and range parameters of semivariograms derived from NDVI images are a simple indicator of landscape heterogeneity and can be used to provide landscape heterogeneity maps to enable researchers to design appropriate sampling regimes. In the future, more applications combining remote sensing and geostatistical features should be further investigated and developed, such as change detection and image classification using object-based image analysis (OBIA approaches.

  12. Characterization of Noise Signatures of Involuntary Head Motion in the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange Repository

    Caballero, Carla; Mistry, Sejal; Vero, Joe; Torres, Elizabeth B

    2018-01-01

    The variability inherently present in biophysical data is partly contributed by disparate sampling resolutions across instrumentations. This poses a potential problem for statistical inference using pooled data in open access repositories. Such repositories combine data collected from multiple research sites using variable sampling resolutions. One example is the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange repository containing thousands of imaging and demographic records from participants in the spectrum of autism and age-matched neurotypical controls. Further, statistical analyses of groups from different diagnoses and demographics may be challenging, owing to the disparate number of participants across different clinical subgroups. In this paper, we examine the noise signatures of head motion data extracted from resting state fMRI data harnessed under different sampling resolutions. We characterize the quality of the noise in the variability of the raw linear and angular speeds for different clinical phenotypes in relation to age-matched controls. Further, we use bootstrapping methods to ensure compatible group sizes for statistical comparison and report the ranges of physical involuntary head excursions of these groups. We conclude that different sampling rates do affect the quality of noise in the variability of head motion data and, consequently, the type of random process appropriate to characterize the time series data. Further, given a qualitative range of noise, from pink to brown noise, it is possible to characterize different clinical subtypes and distinguish them in relation to ranges of neurotypical controls. These results may be of relevance to the pre-processing stages of the pipeline of analyses of resting state fMRI data, whereby head motion enters the criteria to clean imaging data from motion artifacts. PMID:29556179

  13. Effect of crumb cellular structure characterized by image analysis on cake softness.

    Dewaest, Marine; Villemejane, Cindy; Berland, Sophie; Neron, Stéphane; Clement, Jérôme; Verel, Aliette; Michon, Camille

    2017-10-04

    Sponge cake is a cereal product characterized by an aerated crumb and appreciated for its softness. When formulating such product, it is interesting to be able to characterize the crumb structure using image analysis and to bring knowledge about the effects of the crumb cellular structure on its mechanical properties which contribute to softness. An image analysis method based on mathematical morphology was adapted from the one developed for bread crumb. In order to evaluate its ability to discriminate cellular structures, series of cakes were prepared using two rather similar emulsifiers but also using flours with different aging times before use. The mechanical properties of the crumbs of these different cakes were also characterized. It allowed a cell structure classification taking into account cell size and homogeneity, but also cell wall thickness and the number of holes in the walls. Interestingly, the cellular structure differences had a larger impact on the aerated crumb Young modulus than the wall firmness. Increasing the aging time of flour before use leads to the production of firmer crumbs due to coarser and inhomogeneous cellular structures. Changing the composition of the emulsifier may change the cellular structure and, depending on the type of the structural changes, have an impact on the firmness of the crumb. Cellular structure rather than cell wall firmness was found to impact cake crumb firmness. The new fast and automated tool for cake crumb structure analysis allows detecting quickly any change in cell size or homogeneity but also cell wall thickness and number of holes in the walls (openness degree). To obtain a softer crumb, it seems that options are to decrease the cell size and the cell wall thickness and/or to increase the openness degree. It is then possible to easily evaluate the effects of ingredients (flour composition, emulsifier …) or change in the process on the crumb structure and thus its softness. Moreover, this image

  14. Characterization of Noise Signatures of Involuntary Head Motion in the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange Repository

    Carla Caballero

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The variability inherently present in biophysical data is partly contributed by disparate sampling resolutions across instrumentations. This poses a potential problem for statistical inference using pooled data in open access repositories. Such repositories combine data collected from multiple research sites using variable sampling resolutions. One example is the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange repository containing thousands of imaging and demographic records from participants in the spectrum of autism and age-matched neurotypical controls. Further, statistical analyses of groups from different diagnoses and demographics may be challenging, owing to the disparate number of participants across different clinical subgroups. In this paper, we examine the noise signatures of head motion data extracted from resting state fMRI data harnessed under different sampling resolutions. We characterize the quality of the noise in the variability of the raw linear and angular speeds for different clinical phenotypes in relation to age-matched controls. Further, we use bootstrapping methods to ensure compatible group sizes for statistical comparison and report the ranges of physical involuntary head excursions of these groups. We conclude that different sampling rates do affect the quality of noise in the variability of head motion data and, consequently, the type of random process appropriate to characterize the time series data. Further, given a qualitative range of noise, from pink to brown noise, it is possible to characterize different clinical subtypes and distinguish them in relation to ranges of neurotypical controls. These results may be of relevance to the pre-processing stages of the pipeline of analyses of resting state fMRI data, whereby head motion enters the criteria to clean imaging data from motion artifacts.

  15. A new myocardial imaging agent: Synthesis, characterization, and biodistribution of gallium-68-BAT-TECH

    Kung, H.F.; Liu, B.L.; Mankoff, D.; Kung, M.P.; Billings, J.J.; Francesconi, L.; Alavi, A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to develop a new myocardial perfusion agent for positron emission tomography (PET), a new lipid-soluble gallium complex was evaluated. Synthesis, radiolabeling, characterization, and biodistribution of a unique gallium complex, [ 67 Ga]BAT-TECH (bis-aminoethanethiol-tetraethyl-cyclohexyl), are described. The complex formation between Ga+3 and BAT-TECH ligand is simple, rapid, and of high yield (greater than or equal to 95%). This process is amenable to kit formulation. The complex has a net charge of +1 and a Ga/ligand ratio of 1:1. Biodistribution in rats shows high uptake in the heart as well as in the liver. When [ 68 Ga] BAT-TECH was injected into a monkey, the heart and liver are clearly delineated by PET imaging, suggesting that this complex may be a possible tracer for myocardial perfusion imaging

  16. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    Kaiser Krista

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1 available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were characterized at the imaging plane for the ACRR's neutron radiography system for the 65:1, 125:1 and 250:1 apertures.

  17. [HRCT imaging characterized of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear in 45 cases].

    Wang, Jinling; Meng, Meijuan; Huan, Yi; Zhang, Jinsong

    2003-10-01

    To explore the high resolution CT (HRCT) image characterized of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear(CAIE), and its value in the diagnosis and treatment of CAIE. The clinic data and axial HRCT scans of CAIE in 45 cases were analyzed. In 45 CAIE patients, most of them were frequently associated with slowly progressive sensorineural hearing loss in childhood, 15 ears were fluctuating hearing loss. Seventeen ears were unilateral semicircular canal paralysis. HRCT showed that Michel type 3 cases(4 ears), Mondini type 25 cases(39 ears). Large vestibular aqueduct malformation not associated with anomalies of inner ears 13 cases(23 ears), anomalies of internal auditory canal 4 cases (5 ears). Thirteen ears were associated with outer and middle ear malformation. HRCT image has the important value in the diagnosis and treatment of CAIE, especially for the excerpt of indication of cochlear implantation.

  18. A Statistics-Based Material Property Analysis to Support TPS Characterization

    Copeland, Sean R.; Cozmuta, Ioana; Alonso, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate characterization of entry capsule heat shield material properties is a critical component in modeling and simulating Thermal Protection System (TPS) response in a prescribed aerothermal environment. The thermal decomposition of the TPS material during the pyrolysis and charring processes is poorly characterized and typically results in large uncertainties in material properties as inputs for ablation models. These material property uncertainties contribute to large design margins on flight systems and cloud re- construction efforts for data collected during flight and ground testing, making revision to existing models for entry systems more challenging. The analysis presented in this work quantifies how material property uncertainties propagate through an ablation model and guides an experimental test regimen aimed at reducing these uncertainties and characterizing the dependencies between properties in the virgin and charred states for a Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) based TPS. A sensitivity analysis identifies how the high-fidelity model behaves in the expected flight environment, while a Monte Carlo based uncertainty propagation strategy is used to quantify the expected spread in the in-depth temperature response of the TPS. An examination of how perturbations to the input probability density functions affect output temperature statistics is accomplished using a Kriging response surface of the high-fidelity model. Simulations are based on capsule configuration and aerothermal environments expected during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry sequence. We identify and rank primary sources of uncertainty from material properties in a flight-relevant environment, show the dependence on spatial orientation and in-depth location on those uncertainty contributors, and quantify how sensitive the expected results are.

  19. Characterization of a sequential pipeline approach to automatic tissue segmentation from brain MR Images

    Hou, Zujun; Huang, Su

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of gray matter and white matter in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is valuable for neuroradiology and clinical practice. Submission of large collections of MRI scans to pipeline processing is increasingly important. We characterized this process and suggest several improvements. To investigate tissue segmentation from brain MR images through a sequential approach, a pipeline that consecutively executes denoising, skull/scalp removal, intensity inhomogeneity correction and intensity-based classification was developed. The denoising phase employs a 3D-extension of the Bayes-Shrink method. The inhomogeneity is corrected by an improvement of the Dawant et al.'s method with automatic generation of reference points. The N3 method has also been evaluated. Subsequently the brain tissue is segmented into cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter and white matter by a generalized Otsu thresholding technique. Intensive comparisons with other sequential or iterative methods have been carried out using simulated and real images. The sequential approach with judicious selection on the algorithm selection in each stage is not only advantageous in speed, but also can attain at least as accurate segmentation as iterative methods under a variety of noise or inhomogeneity levels. A sequential approach to tissue segmentation, which consecutively executes the wavelet shrinkage denoising, scalp/skull removal, inhomogeneity correction and intensity-based classification was developed to automatically segment the brain tissue into CSF, GM and WM from brain MR images. This approach is advantageous in several common applications, compared with other pipeline methods. (orig.)

  20. Computer-Aided Characterization and Diagnosis of Diffuse Liver Diseases Based on Ultrasound Imaging: A Review.

    Bharti, Puja; Mittal, Deepti; Ananthasivan, Rupa

    2016-04-19

    Diffuse liver diseases, such as hepatitis, fatty liver, and cirrhosis, are becoming a leading cause of fatality and disability all over the world. Early detection and diagnosis of these diseases is extremely important to save lives and improve effectiveness of treatment. Ultrasound imaging, a noninvasive diagnostic technique, is the most commonly used modality for examining liver abnormalities. However, the accuracy of ultrasound-based diagnosis depends highly on expertise of radiologists. Computer-aided diagnosis systems based on ultrasound imaging assist in fast diagnosis, provide a reliable "second opinion" for experts, and act as an effective tool to measure response of treatment on patients undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we first describe appearance of liver abnormalities in ultrasound images and state the practical issues encountered in characterization of diffuse liver diseases that can be addressed by software algorithms. We then discuss computer-aided diagnosis in general with features and classifiers relevant to diffuse liver diseases. In later sections of this paper, we review the published studies and describe the key findings of those studies. A concise tabular summary comparing image database, features extraction, feature selection, and classification algorithms presented in the published studies is also exhibited. Finally, we conclude with a summary of key findings and directions for further improvements in the areas of accuracy and objectiveness of computer-aided diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Activated sludge characterization through microscopy: A review on quantitative image analysis and chemometric techniques

    Mesquita, Daniela P. [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Amaral, A. Luís [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Instituto Politécnico de Coimbra, ISEC, DEQB, Rua Pedro Nunes, Quinta da Nora, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Ferreira, Eugénio C., E-mail: ecferreira@deb.uminho.pt [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2013-11-13

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Quantitative image analysis shows potential to monitor activated sludge systems. •Staining techniques increase the potential for detection of operational problems. •Chemometrics combined with quantitative image analysis is valuable for process monitoring. -- Abstract: In wastewater treatment processes, and particularly in activated sludge systems, efficiency is quite dependent on the operating conditions, and a number of problems may arise due to sludge structure and proliferation of specific microorganisms. In fact, bacterial communities and protozoa identification by microscopy inspection is already routinely employed in a considerable number of cases. Furthermore, quantitative image analysis techniques have been increasingly used throughout the years for the assessment of aggregates and filamentous bacteria properties. These procedures are able to provide an ever growing amount of data for wastewater treatment processes in which chemometric techniques can be a valuable tool. However, the determination of microbial communities’ properties remains a current challenge in spite of the great diversity of microscopy techniques applied. In this review, activated sludge characterization is discussed highlighting the aggregates structure and filamentous bacteria determination by image analysis on bright-field, phase-contrast, and fluorescence microscopy. An in-depth analysis is performed to summarize the many new findings that have been obtained, and future developments for these biological processes are further discussed.

  2. MORPHOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SAND FRACTION IN A SAND GRAIN IMAGE CAPTURE SYSTEM1

    Lucimar Arruda Viana

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Morphology studies assume significant importance in analysis of phenomena of granular systems packaging, in particular with a view to the use of the technique of soil stabilization named particle size correction in forest roads. In this context, this study aimed to develop and operationalize a Sand Grain Image Capture System and, hereby, determine the morphological indices of the sand fractions of two sandy soils called João Pinheiro (JP and Cachoeira da Prata (CP. Soil samples, air-dried, were sieved (2.0 mm nominal mesh size for removal of gravels. The materials that passed through the sieve were subjected to dispersion, washing in 0.053 mm nominal mesh size sieve, removal of organic matter and iron oxides to obtain the clean sand fractions. Subsequently, each soil sample was sieved for separation into twelve classes, between the diameters of 0.149 mm and 1.190 mm, using a Rotap shaker. Next, tests were carried out to characterize the morphometric attributes of the twelve classes of sand fractions of the soils studied. For validation of the performance of the Sand Grain Image Capture System, the results were compared to those obtained using a standard procedure for image analysis. The analysis of the results led to the following conclusions: (i the sand fraction of the JP soil presented higher values for the morphometric indices roundness, elongation and compactness compared to sand fraction of the CP soil; and (ii the Sand Grain Image Capture System worked properly, with practicality.

  3. Crystal and source characterization for the Crystal Backlighter Imager capability at the National Ignition Facility

    Krauland, C. M.; Hall, G. N.; Buscho, J. G.; Hibbard, R.; McCarville, T. J.; Lowe-Webb, R.; Ayers, S. L.; Kalantar, D.; Kohut, T.; Kemp, G. E.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Landen, O. L.; Brewster, T. N.; Piston, K.

    2017-10-01

    The Crystal Backlighter Imager (CBI) is a very narrow bandwidth ( 10 eV) x-ray radiography system that uses Bragg reflection from a spherically-curved crystal at near normal incidence. This diagnostic has the capability to image late in an ICF implosion because it only requires the brightness of the backlighter to be larger than the capsule self-emission in that narrow bandwidth. While the limited bandwidth is advantageous for this reason, it also requires that the effective energy of the backlighter atomic line is known to 1 eV accuracy for proper crystal alignment. Any Doppler shift in the line energy must be understood for the imaging system to work. The work presented details characterization experiments done at the Jupiter Laser Facility with a Si (8 6 2) crystal that will be used with a Selenium backlighter in the NIF CBI diagnostic. We used the spherically-bent crystals to image a small ( 200 µm) He α source generated by the Janus laser on a Se foil. Scanning Bragg angles over multiple shots allowed us to map out the spectral line intensity distribution for optimal alignment in NIF. A subsequent Doppler shift measurement using CBI on NIF will also be presented with complementary HYDRA modeling for both experiments. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by General Atomics under Contract DE-NA0001808.

  4. Comparison of machine learned approaches for thyroid nodule characterization from shear wave elastography images

    Pereira, Carina; Dighe, Manjiri; Alessio, Adam M.

    2018-02-01

    Various Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems have been developed that characterize thyroid nodules using the features extracted from the B-mode ultrasound images and Shear Wave Elastography images (SWE). These features, however, are not perfect predictors of malignancy. In other domains, deep learning techniques such as Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have outperformed conventional feature extraction based machine learning approaches. In general, fully trained CNNs require substantial volumes of data, motivating several efforts to use transfer learning with pre-trained CNNs. In this context, we sought to compare the performance of conventional feature extraction, fully trained CNNs, and transfer learning based, pre-trained CNNs for the detection of thyroid malignancy from ultrasound images. We compared these approaches applied to a data set of 964 B-mode and SWE images from 165 patients. The data were divided into 80% training/validation and 20% testing data. The highest accuracies achieved on the testing data for the conventional feature extraction, fully trained CNN, and pre-trained CNN were 0.80, 0.75, and 0.83 respectively. In this application, classification using a pre-trained network yielded the best performance, potentially due to the relatively limited sample size and sub-optimal architecture for the fully trained CNN.

  5. Magentic resonance imaging and characterization of normal and abnormal intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces: Initial observations

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Kelly, W.; Kjos, B.; Newton, T.H.; Norman, D.; Dillon, W.; Sobel, D.

    1985-01-01

    A retrospective review of twenty-five normal MRI brain studies performed with the spin-echo technique focused special attention on the ventricular and extraventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and revealed unique signal intensity characteristics in the two locations. In addition, MRI studies of ten patients with abnormal extraaxial fluid collections either missed with CT or indistinguishable from CSF on CT images were also analyzed. MRI is more sensitive when compared to CT in evaluating the composition of CSF. Unique signal intensity characterizes the two major CSF compartments and presumably reflects their known but subtle difference in protein concentration (10-15 mg%). Normal variant or abnormal developmental fluid collections can be better characterized with MRI than with CT. These preliminary observations are offered in view of their implications for patient management and suggest further investigation. (orig.)

  6. Image-Based Three-Dimensional Analysis to Characterize the Texture of Porous Scaffolds

    Diana Massai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to characterize the microstructure of composite scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration containing different ratios of chitosan/gelatin blend and bioactive glasses. Starting from realistic 3D models of the scaffolds reconstructed from micro-CT images, the level of heterogeneity of scaffold architecture is evaluated performing a lacunarity analysis. The results demonstrate that the presence of the bioactive glass component affects not only macroscopic features such as porosity, but mainly scaffold microarchitecture giving rise to structural heterogeneity, which could have an impact on the local cell-scaffold interaction and scaffold performances. The adopted approach allows to investigate the scale-dependent pore distribution within the scaffold and the related structural heterogeneity features, providing a comprehensive characterization of the scaffold texture.

  7. Characterization of a direct detection device imaging camera for transmission electron microscopy

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare, E-mail: amilazzo@ncmir.ucsd.edu [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Moldovan, Grigore [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Lanman, Jason [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Jin, Liang; Bouwer, James C. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Klienfelder, Stuart [University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Xuong, Nguyen-Huu [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The complete characterization of a novel direct detection device (DDD) camera for transmission electron microscopy is reported, for the first time at primary electron energies of 120 and 200 keV. Unlike a standard charge coupled device (CCD) camera, this device does not require a scintillator. The DDD transfers signal up to 65 lines/mm providing the basis for a high-performance platform for a new generation of wide field-of-view high-resolution cameras. An image of a thin section of virus particles is presented to illustrate the substantially improved performance of this sensor over current indirectly coupled CCD cameras.

  8. Characterization of a direct detection device imaging camera for transmission electron microscopy

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Moldovan, Grigore; Lanman, Jason; Jin, Liang; Bouwer, James C.; Klienfelder, Stuart; Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Kirkland, Angus I.; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu

    2010-01-01

    The complete characterization of a novel direct detection device (DDD) camera for transmission electron microscopy is reported, for the first time at primary electron energies of 120 and 200 keV. Unlike a standard charge coupled device (CCD) camera, this device does not require a scintillator. The DDD transfers signal up to 65 lines/mm providing the basis for a high-performance platform for a new generation of wide field-of-view high-resolution cameras. An image of a thin section of virus particles is presented to illustrate the substantially improved performance of this sensor over current indirectly coupled CCD cameras.

  9. Characterizing the inflammatory tissue response to acute myocardial infarction by clinical multimodality noninvasive imaging.

    Wollenweber, Tim; Roentgen, Philipp; Schäfer, Andreas; Schatka, Imke; Zwadlo, Caroline; Brunkhorst, Thomas; Berding, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann; Bengel, Frank M

    2014-09-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) triggers a systemic inflammatory response which determines subsequent healing. Experimentally, cardiac positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have been used successfully to obtain mechanistic insights. We explored the translational potential in patients early after MI. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance were performed in 15 patients sources of inflammatory cells. Positron emission tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance multimodality characterization of the acutely infarcted, inflamed myocardium may provide multiparametric end points for clinical studies aiming at support of infarct healing. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Characterization of the Mucor circinelloides life cycle by on-line image analysis

    Lübbehüsen, Tina Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Mcintyre, Mhairi

    2003-01-01

    in and between the different morphological forms of the organism.Methods and Results: Mycelial growth and the transformation of hyphae into chains of arthrospores were characterized by image analysis techniques and described quantitatively. The influence of the nature (glucose and xylose) and concentration......-through cell, and combined with fluorescent microscopy which allowed new insights to bud formation. Additionally, numbers and distribution of nuclei in arthrospores, hyphae and yeasts were studied.Conclusions: The results give essential information on the morphological development of the organism...

  11. The Airborne Visible / Infrared Imaging Spectrometer AVIS: Design, Characterization and Calibration

    Wolfram Mauser

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The Airborne Visible / Infrared imaging Spectrometer AVIS is a hyperspectralimager designed for environmental monitoring purposes. The sensor, which wasconstructed entirely from commercially available components, has been successfullydeployed during several experiments between 1999 and 2007. We describe the instrumentdesign and present the results of laboratory characterization and calibration of the system’ssecond generation, AVIS-2, which is currently being operated. The processing of the datais described and examples of remote sensing reflectance data are presented.

  12. Scatter correction, intermediate view estimation and dose characterization in megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    Sramek, Benjamin Koerner

    The ability to deliver conformal dose distributions in radiation therapy through intensity modulation and the potential for tumor dose escalation to improve treatment outcome has necessitated an increase in localization accuracy of inter- and intra-fractional patient geometry. Megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using the treatment beam and onboard electronic portal imaging device is one option currently being studied for implementation in image-guided radiation therapy. However, routine clinical use is predicated upon continued improvements in image quality and patient dose delivered during acquisition. The formal statement of hypothesis for this investigation was that the conformity of planned to delivered dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy could be further enhanced through the application of kilovoltage scatter correction and intermediate view estimation techniques to megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging, and that normalized dose measurements could be acquired and inter-compared between multiple imaging geometries. The specific aims of this investigation were to: (1) incorporate the Feldkamp, Davis and Kress filtered backprojection algorithm into a program to reconstruct a voxelized linear attenuation coefficient dataset from a set of acquired megavoltage cone-beam CT projections, (2) characterize the effects on megavoltage cone-beam CT image quality resulting from the application of Intermediate View Interpolation and Intermediate View Reprojection techniques to limited-projection datasets, (3) incorporate the Scatter and Primary Estimation from Collimator Shadows (SPECS) algorithm into megavoltage cone-beam CT image reconstruction and determine the set of SPECS parameters which maximize image quality and quantitative accuracy, and (4) evaluate the normalized axial dose distributions received during megavoltage cone-beam CT image acquisition using radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in anthropomorphic pelvic and head and

  13. Application of image flow cytometry for the characterization of red blood cell morphology

    Pinto, Ruben N.; Sebastian, Joseph A.; Parsons, Michael; Chang, Tim C.; Acker, Jason P.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2017-02-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) stored in hypothermic environments for the purpose of transfusion have been documented to undergo structural and functional changes over time. One sign of the so-called RBC storage lesion is irreversible damage to the cell membrane. Consequently, RBCs undergo a morphological transformation from regular, deformable biconcave discocytes to rigid spheroechinocytes. The spherically shaped RBCs lack the deformability to efficiently enter microvasculature, thereby reducing the capacity of RBCs to oxygenate tissue. Blood banks currently rely on microscope techniques that include fixing, staining and cell counting in order to morphologically characterize RBC samples; these methods are labor intensive and highly subjective. This study presents a novel, high-throughput RBC morphology characterization technique using image flow cytometry (IFC). An image segmentation template was developed to process 100,000 images acquired from the IFC system and output the relative spheroechinocyte percentage. The technique was applied on samples extracted from two blood bags to monitor the morphological changes of the RBCs during in vitro hypothermic storage. The study found that, for a given sample of RBCs, the IFC method was twice as fast in data acquisition, and analyzed 250-350 times more RBCs than the conventional method. Over the lifespan of the blood bags, the mean spheroechinocyte population increased by 37%. Future work will focus on expanding the template to segregate RBC images into more subpopulations for the validation of the IFC method against conventional techniques; the expanded template will aid in establishing quantitative links between spheroechinocyte increase and other RBC storage lesion characteristics.

  14. Integrated automated nanomanipulation and real-time cellular surface imaging for mechanical properties characterization

    Eslami, Sohrab; Zareian, Ramin; Jalili, Nader

    2012-10-01

    Surface microscopy of individual biological cells is essential for determining the patterns of cell migration to study the tumor formation or metastasis. This paper presents a correlated and effective theoretical and experimental technique to automatically address the biophysical and mechanical properties and acquire live images of biological cells which are of interest in studying cancer. In the theoretical part, a distributed-parameters model as the comprehensive representation of the microcantilever is presented along with a model of the contact force as a function of the indentation depth and mechanical properties of the biological sample. Analysis of the transfer function of the whole system in the frequency domain is carried out to characterize the stiffness and damping coefficients of the sample. In the experimental section, unlike the conventional atomic force microscope techniques basically using the laser for determining the deflection of microcantilever's tip, a piezoresistive microcantilever serving as a force sensor is implemented to produce the appropriate voltage and measure the deflection of the microcantilever. A micromanipulator robotic system is integrated with the MATLAB® and programmed in such a way to automatically control the microcantilever mounted on the tip of the micromanipulator to achieve the topography of biological samples including the human corneal cells. For this purpose, the human primary corneal fibroblasts are extracted and adhered on a sterilized culture dish and prepared to attain their topographical image. The proposed methodology herein allows an approach to obtain 2D quality images of cells being comparatively cost effective and extendable to obtain 3D images of individual cells. The characterized mechanical properties of the human corneal cell are furthermore established by comparing and validating the phase shift of the theoretical and experimental results of the frequency response.

  15. Quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography for noncontact mechanical characterization of myocardium

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L.; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V.; Martin, James F.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging low-coherence imaging technique that provides noninvasive assessment of tissue biomechanics with high spatial resolution. Among various OCE methods, the capability of quantitative measurement of tissue elasticity is of great importance for tissue characterization and pathology detection across different samples. Here we report a quantitative OCE technique, termed quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (Q-SWI-OCT), which enables noncontact measurement of tissue Young's modulus based on the ultra-fast imaging of the shear wave propagation inside the sample. A focused air-puff device is used to interrogate the tissue with a low-pressure short-duration air stream that stimulates a localized displacement with the scale at micron level. The propagation of this tissue deformation in the form of shear wave is captured by a phase-sensitive OCT system running with the scan of the M-mode imaging over the path of the wave propagation. The temporal characteristics of the shear wave is quantified based on the cross-correlation of the tissue deformation profiles at all the measurement locations, and linear regression is utilized to fit the data plotted in the domain of time delay versus wave propagation distance. The wave group velocity is thus calculated, which results in the quantitative measurement of the Young's modulus. As the feasibility demonstration, experiments are performed on tissuemimicking phantoms with different agar concentrations and the quantified elasticity values with Q-SWI-OCT agree well with the uniaxial compression tests. For functional characterization of myocardium with this OCE technique, we perform our pilot experiments on ex vivo mouse cardiac muscle tissues with two studies, including 1) elasticity difference of cardiac muscle under relaxation and contract conditions and 2) mechanical heterogeneity of the heart introduced by the muscle fiber orientation. Our results suggest the

  16. Characterizing water fingering phenomena in soils using magnetic resonance imaging and multifractal theory

    A. Posadas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The study of water movement in soils is of fundamental importance in hydrologic science. It is generally accepted that in most soils, water and solutes flow through unsaturated zones via preferential paths or fingers. This paper combines magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with both fractal and multifractal theory to characterize preferential flow in three dimensions. A cubic double-layer column filled with fine and coarse textured sand was placed into a 500 gauss MRI system. Water infiltration through the column (0.15×0.15×0.15 m3 was recorded in steady state conditions. Twelve sections with a voxel volume of 0.1×0.1×10 mm3 each were obtained and characterized using fractal and multifractal theory. The MRI system provided a detailed description of the preferential flow under steady state conditions and was also useful in understanding the dynamics of the formation of the fingers. The f(α multifractal spectrum was very sensitive to the variation encountered at each horizontally-oriented slice of the column and provided a suitable characterization of the dynamics of the process identifying four spatial domains. In conclusion, MRI and fractal and multifractal analysis were able to characterize and describe the preferential flow process in soils. Used together, the two methods provide a good alternative to study flow transport phenomena in soils and in porous media.

  17. Inverse method for effects characterization from ultrasonic b-scan images

    Faur, M.

    1999-02-01

    In service inspections of French nuclear pressure water reactor vessels are carried out automatically in complete immersion from the inside by means of ultrasonic focused probes working in the pulse echo mode. Concern has been expressed about the capabilities of performing non destructive evaluation of the Outer Surface Defects (OSD), i.e. defects located in the vicinity of the outer surface of the inspected components. OSD are insonified by both a direct field that passes through the inner surface (water/steel) of the component containing the defect and a secondary field reflected from the outer surface. Consequently, the Bscan images, containing the signatures of such defects, are complicated and their interpretation is a difficult task. This work deals with extraction of the maximum available information for characterizing OSD from ultrasonic Bscan images. Our main objectives are to obtain the type of OSD and their geometric parameters by means of two specific inverse methods. The first method is used for the identification of the geometrical parameters of the equivalent planar OSD from segmented Bscan images. Ultrasonic equivalent defect sizing model-based methods may be used to size a defect in a material by obtaining a best-fit simple equivalent shape that matches the ultrasonic observed data. We illustrate the application of such an equivalent sizing OSD method that is based on a simplified direct model. The major drawback of this identification method, as used to date, is that only a part of the useful information contained into original Bscan image, i.e. segmented Bscan image, is used for defect characterization. Moreover, it requires the availability of defect classification information (i.e. if the defect is volumetric or planer, e. g. a crack or a lack of fusion), which, generally, may be as difficult to obtain as the defect parameters themselves. Therefore, we propose a parameter estimation method for extracting complementary information on the defect

  18. Characterization of a novel EPID designed for simultaneous imaging and dose verification in radiotherapy

    Blake, Samuel J.; McNamara, Aimee L.; Deshpande, Shrikant; Holloway, Lois; Greer, Peter B.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Vial, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Standard amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (a-Si EPIDs) are x-ray imagers used frequently in radiotherapy that indirectly detect incident x-rays using a metal plate and phosphor screen. These detectors may also be used as two-dimensional dosimeters; however, they have a well-characterized nonwater-equivalent dosimetric response. Plastic scintillating (PS) fibers, on the other hand, have been shown to respond in a water-equivalent manner to x-rays in the energy range typically encountered during radiotherapy. In this study, the authors report on the first experimental measurements taken with a novel prototype PS a-Si EPID developed for the purpose of performing simultaneous imaging and dosimetry in radiotherapy. This prototype employs an array of PS fibers in place of the standard metal plate and phosphor screen. The imaging performance and dosimetric response of the prototype EPID were evaluated experimentally and compared to that of the standard EPID.Methods: Clinical 6 MV photon beams were used to first measure the detector sensitivity, linearity of dose response, and pixel noise characteristics of the prototype and standard EPIDs. Second, the dosimetric response of each EPID was evaluated relative to a reference water-equivalent dosimeter by measuring the off-axis and field size response in a nontransit configuration, along with the off-axis, field size, and transmission response in a transit configuration using solid water blocks. Finally, the imaging performance of the prototype and standard EPIDs was evaluated quantitatively by using an image quality phantom to measure the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution of images acquired with each detector, and qualitatively by using an anthropomorphic phantom to acquire images representative of human anatomy.Results: The prototype EPID's sensitivity was 0.37 times that of the standard EPID. Both EPIDs exhibited responses that were linear with delivered dose over a range of 1

  19. Diagnostic Accuracy of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Characterizing Lung Masses

    Inan, Nagihan; Arslan, Arzu; Donmez, Muhammed; Sarisoy, Hasan Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    Background Imaging plays a critical role not only in the detection, but also in the characterization of lung masses as benign or malignant. Objectives To determine the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. Patients and Methods Ninety-four masses were included in this prospective study. Five dynamic series of T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FFE) images were obtained, followed by a T1-weighted FFE sequence in the late phase (5th minutes). Contrast enhancement patterns in the early (25th second) and late (5th minute) phase images were evaluated. For the quantitative evaluation, signal intensity (SI)-time curves were obtained and the maximum relative enhancement, wash-in rate, and time-to-peak enhancement of masses in both groups were calculated. Results The early phase contrast enhancement patterns were homogeneous in 78.2% of the benign masses, while heterogeneous in 74.4% of the malignant tumors. On the late phase images, 70.8% of the benign masses showed homogeneous enhancement, while most of the malignant masses showed heterogeneous enhancement (82.4%). During the first pass, the maximum relative enhancement and wash-in rate values of malignant masses were significantly higher than those of the benign masses (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). The cutoff value at 15% yielded a sensitivity of 85.4%, specificity of 61.2%, and positive predictive value of 68.7% for the maximum relative enhancement. Conclusion Contrast enhancement patterns and SI-time curve analysis of MRI are helpful in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. PMID:27703654

  20. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging characterization of slings for female stress urinary incontinence.

    Giri, Subhasis K

    2012-01-31

    PURPOSE: The aim was to characterize different types of slings such as autologous rectus fascia (ARF), porcine dermis (PD) and tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) in the early postoperative period with regard to its visibility and location by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between October 2003 and June 2007, total of 60 patients underwent MRI after a sling procedure. Thirty-six patients had ARF slings. Twelve patients had a PD sling and 12 had a TVT. All patients had pelvic MRI 6-8 hr postoperatively. Six patients in the ARF sling group had both preoperative and postoperative images at 6 hr and 3 months. MRI images were analyzed with regard to visibility and location. All data were collected prospectively. RESULTS: ARF slings were clearly visible in both T1W and T2W images. ARF appeared as low signal intensity area with surrounding high signal intensity due to fat attached to the rectus fascia in the MRI images obtained 6 hr after the procedure. Although the fatty component of the sling was diminished but was still visible on MRI scan 3 months postoperatively. On the other hand PD and TVT sling materials were not visible by MRI. Most of the ARF slings were located just below the bladder neck. CONCLUSIONS: The ARF sling is easily identifiable on MRI in the early postoperative period primarily because of the fat attached to the autologous rectus fascia. However, depiction of the PD and TVT slings in the early postoperative period is very poor.

  1. Role of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in characterization of cervical lesions

    Salik, E.; Islim, F.; Ciftci, G.; Bayramoglu, S.; Sever, N.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Characterization of neck lesions is usually not possible without histopathological examination. Objective: To evaluate whether adhesion diffusion coefficient (ADC) values calculated from diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging can be used to characterize neck lesions. Material and methods: Diffusion-weighted echo planar MR imaging with b factors of 0, 500 and 1000 sec/mm 2 was prospectively performed with a 1.5 T MR unit in 119 neck lesions in 119 patients. ADC values were measured by 2 radiologists independently on an independent workstation console. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated. The mean ADC values were compared using Mann-whitney u test. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the mean ADC values of benign and malign solid lesions (1.13±0.62 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s and 0.82±0.21 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s respectively). There was no malign lesion with an ADC value more than 1.15 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. The mean ADC value of malignant lymphomas (0.61±0.14 x 10 -3 ) was significantly smaller than the mean ADC values of other cervical lymphadenopathies. But there was no statistically significant difference between the mean ADC values of reactive, granulomatous and metastatic lymph nodes. Conclusion: ADC values cannot totally distinguish the histopathological subgroups of the neck lesions but shows significant differences between malign and benign lesions.

  2. X-ray imaging characterization of active edge silicon pixel sensors

    Ponchut, C; Ruat, M; Kalliopuska, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was the experimental characterization of edge effects in active-edge silicon pixel sensors, in the frame of X-ray pixel detectors developments for synchrotron experiments. We produced a set of active edge pixel sensors with 300 to 500 μm thickness, edge widths ranging from 100 μm to 150 μm, and n or p pixel contact types. The sensors with 256 × 256 pixels and 55 × 55 μm 2 pixel pitch were then bump-bonded to Timepix readout chips for X-ray imaging measurements. The reduced edge widths makes the edge pixels more sensitive to the electrical field distribution at the sensor boundaries. We characterized this effect by mapping the spatial response of the sensor edges with a finely focused X-ray synchrotron beam. One of the samples showed a distortion-free response on all four edges, whereas others showed variable degrees of distortions extending at maximum to 300 micron from the sensor edge. An application of active edge pixel sensors to coherent diffraction imaging with synchrotron beams is described

  3. Characterization of sildenafil citrate tablets of different sources by near infrared chemical imaging and chemometric tools.

    Sabin, Guilherme P; Lozano, Valeria A; Rocha, Werickson F C; Romão, Wanderson; Ortiz, Rafael S; Poppi, Ronei J

    2013-11-01

    The chemical imaging technique by near infrared spectroscopy was applied for characterization of formulations in tablets of sildenafil citrate of six different sources. Five formulations were provided by Brazilian Federal Police and correspond to several trademarks of prohibited marketing and one was an authentic sample of Viagra. In a first step of the study, multivariate curve resolution was properly chosen for the estimation of the distribution map of concentration of the active ingredient in tablets of different sources, where the chemical composition of all excipients constituents was not truly known. In such cases, it is very difficult to establish an appropriate calibration technique, so that only the information of sildenafil is considered independently of the excipients. This determination was possible only by reaching the second-order advantage, where the analyte quantification can be performed in the presence of unknown interferences. In a second step, the normalized histograms of images from active ingredient were grouped according to their similarities by hierarchical cluster analysis. Finally it was possible to recognize the patterns of distribution maps of concentration of sildenafil citrate, distinguishing the true formulation of Viagra. This concept can be used to improve the knowledge of industrial products and processes, as well as, for characterization of counterfeit drugs. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Characterization of hydrogel microstructure using laser tweezers particle tracking and confocal reflection imaging

    Kotlarchyk, M A; Botvinick, E L; Putnam, A J

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used as extracellular matrix mimetics for applications in tissue engineering and increasingly as cell culture platforms with which to study the influence of biophysical and biochemical cues on cell function in 3D. In recent years, a significant number of studies have focused on linking substrate mechanical properties to cell function using standard methodologies to characterize the bulk mechanical properties of the hydrogel substrates. However, current understanding of the correlations between the microstructural mechanical properties of hydrogels and cell function in 3D is poor, in part because of a lack of appropriate techniques. Here we have utilized a laser tracking system, based on passive optical microrheology instrumentation, to characterize the microstructure of viscoelastic fibrin clots. Trajectories and mean square displacements were observed as bioinert PEGylated (PEG: polyethylene glycol) microspheres (1, 2 or 4.7 μm in diameter) diffused within confined pores created by the protein phase of fibrin hydrogels. Complementary confocal reflection imaging revealed microstructures comprised of a highly heterogeneous fibrin network with a wide range of pore sizes. As the protein concentration of fibrin gels was increased, our quantitative laser tracking measurements showed a corresponding decrease in particle mean square displacements with greater resolution and sensitivity than conventional imaging techniques. This platform-independent method will enable a more complete understanding of how changes in substrate mechanical properties simultaneously influence other microenvironmental parameters in 3D cultures.

  5. Fluvial particle characterization using artificial neural network and spectral image processing

    Shrestha, Bim Prasad; Gautam, Bijaya; Nagata, Masateru

    2008-03-01

    Sand, chemical waste, microbes and other solid materials flowing with the water bodies are of great significance to us as they cause substantial impact to different sectors including drinking water management, hydropower generation, irrigation, aquatic life preservation and various other socio-ecological factors. Such particles can't completely be avoided due to the high cost of construction and maintenance of the waste-treatment methods. A detailed understanding of solid particles in surface water system can have benefit in effective, economic, environmental and social management of water resources. This paper describes an automated system of fluvial particle characterization based on spectral image processing that lead to the development of devices for monitoring flowing particles in river. Previous research in coherent field has shown that it is possible to automatically classify shapes and sizes of solid particles ranging from 300-400 μm using artificial neural networks (ANN) and image processing. Computer facilitated with hyper spectral and multi spectral images using ANN can further classify fluvial materials into organic, inorganic, biodegradable, bio non degradable and microbes. This makes the method attractive for real time monitoring of particles, sand and microorganism in water bodies at strategic locations. Continuous monitoring can be used to determine the effect of socio-economic activities in upstream rivers, or to monitor solid waste disposal from treatment plants and industries or to monitor erosive characteristic of sand and its contribution to degradation of efficiency of hydropower plant or to identify microorganism, calculate their population and study the impact of their presence. Such system can also be used to characterize fluvial particles for planning effective utilization of water resources in micro-mega hydropower plant, irrigation, aquatic life preservation etc.

  6. Multiscale characterization of pore spaces using multifractals analysis of scanning electronic microscopy images of carbonates

    M. S. Jouini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pore spaces heterogeneity in carbonates rocks has long been identified as an important factor impacting reservoir productivity. In this paper, we study the heterogeneity of carbonate rocks pore spaces based on the image analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM data acquired at various magnifications. Sixty images of twelve carbonate samples from a reservoir in the Middle East were analyzed. First, pore spaces were extracted from SEM images using a segmentation technique based on watershed algorithm. Pores geometries revealed a multifractal behavior at various magnifications from 800x to 12 000x. In addition, the singularity spectrum provided quantitative values that describe the degree of heterogeneity in the carbonates samples. Moreover, for the majority of the analyzed samples, we found low variations (around 5% in the multifractal dimensions for magnifications between 1700x and 12 000x. Finally, these results demonstrate that multifractal analysis could be an appropriate tool for characterizing quantitatively the heterogeneity of carbonate pore spaces geometries. However, our findings show that magnification has an impact on multifractal dimensions, revealing the limit of applicability of multifractal descriptions for these natural structures.

  7. Characterizing the behavior of scattered radiation in multi-energy x-ray imaging

    Sossin, Artur, E-mail: artur.sossin@gmail.com [CEA-LETI MINATEC Grenoble, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Rebuffel, V.; Tabary, J. [CEA-LETI MINATEC Grenoble, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Létang, J.M.; Freud, N. [Univ Lyon, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, UJM-Saint Etienne, CNRS, Inserm, Centre Léon Bérard, CREATIS UMR 5220 U1206, F-69373 Lyon (France); Verger, L. [CEA-LETI MINATEC Grenoble, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2017-04-01

    Scattered radiation results in various undesirable effects in medical diagnostics, non-destructive testing (NDT) and security x-ray imaging. Despite numerous studies characterizing this phenomenon and its effects, the knowledge of its behavior in the energy domain remains limited. The present study aims at summarizing some key insights on scattered radiation originating from the inspected object. In addition, various simulations and experiments with limited collimation on both simplified and realistic phantoms were conducted in order to study scatter behavior in multi-energy x-ray imaging. Results showed that the spectrum shape of the scatter component can be considered preserved in the first approximation across the image plane for various acquisition geometries and phantoms. The variations exhibited by the scatter spectrum were below 10% for most examined cases. Furthermore, the corresponding spectrum shape proved to be also relatively invariant for different experimental angular projections of one of the examined phantoms. The observed property of scattered radiation can potentially lead to the decoupling of spatial and energy scatter components, which can in turn enable speed ups in scatter simulations and reduce the complexity of scatter correction.

  8. Multimodal fluorescence molecular imaging for in vivo characterization of skin cancer using endogenous and exogenous fluorophores

    Miller, Jessica P.; Habimana-Griffin, LeMoyne; Edwards, Tracy S.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Similarity of skin cancer with many benign skin pathologies requires reliable methods to detect and differentiate the different types of these lesions. Previous studies have explored the use of disparate optical techniques to identify and estimate the invasive nature of melanoma and basal cell carcinoma with varying outcomes. Here, we used a concerted approach that provides complementary information for rapid screening and characterization of tumors, focusing on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Assessment of in vivo autofluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging of endogenous fluorophores that are excitable at longer wavelengths (480 nm) than conventional NADH and FAD revealed a decrease in the short FLT component for SCC compared to normal skin, with mean values of 0.57±0.026 ns and 0.61±0.021 ns, respectively (p=0.004). Subsequent systemic administration of a near-infrared fluorescent molecular probe in SCC bearing mice, followed by the implementation of image processing methods on data acquired from two-dimensional and three-dimensional fluorescence molecular imaging, allowed us to estimate the tumor volume and depth, as well as quantify the fluorescent probe in the tumor. The result suggests the involvement of lipofuscin-like lipopigments and riboflavin in SCC metabolism and serves as a model for staging SCC.

  9. Characterization of Crystallographic Structures Using Bragg-Edge Neutron Imaging at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Gian Song

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, wavelength-dependent neutron radiography, also known as Bragg-edge imaging, has been employed as a non-destructive bulk characterization method due to its sensitivity to coherent elastic neutron scattering that is associated with crystalline structures. Several analysis approaches have been developed to quantitatively determine crystalline orientation, lattice strain, and phase distribution. In this study, we report a systematic investigation of the crystal structures of metallic materials (such as selected textureless powder samples and additively manufactured (AM Inconel 718 samples, using Bragg-edge imaging at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS. Firstly, we have implemented a phenomenological Gaussian-based fitting in a Python-based computer called iBeatles. Secondly, we have developed a model-based approach to analyze Bragg-edge transmission spectra, which allows quantitative determination of the crystallographic attributes. Moreover, neutron diffraction measurements were carried out to validate the Bragg-edge analytical methods. These results demonstrate that the microstructural complexity (in this case, texture plays a key role in determining the crystallographic parameters (lattice constant or interplanar spacing, which implies that the Bragg-edge image analysis methods must be carefully selected based on the material structures.

  10. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  11. Characterizing canopy biochemistry from imaging spectroscopy and its application to ecosystem studies

    Kokaly, R.F.; Asner, Gregory P.; Ollinger, S.V.; Martin, M.E.; Wessman, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    For two decades, remotely sensed data from imaging spectrometers have been used to estimate non-pigment biochemical constituents of vegetation, including water, nitrogen, cellulose, and lignin. This interest has been motivated by the important role that these substances play in physiological processes such as photosynthesis, their relationships with ecosystem processes such as litter decomposition and nutrient cycling, and their use in identifying key plant species and functional groups. This paper reviews three areas of research to improve the application of imaging spectrometers to quantify non-pigment biochemical constituents of plants. First, we examine recent empirical and modeling studies that have advanced our understanding of leaf and canopy reflectance spectra in relation to plant biochemistry. Next, we present recent examples of how spectroscopic remote sensing methods are applied to characterize vegetation canopies, communities and ecosystems. Third, we highlight the latest developments in using imaging spectrometer data to quantify net primary production (NPP) over large geographic areas. Finally, we discuss the major challenges in quantifying non-pigment biochemical constituents of plant canopies from remotely sensed spectra.

  12. Polyp Detection, Characterization, and Management Using Narrow-Band Imaging with/without Magnification

    Takahiro Utsumi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Narrow-band imaging (NBI is a new imaging technology that was developed in 2006 and has since spread worldwide. Because of its convenience, NBI has been replacing the role of chromoendoscopy. Here we review the efficacy of NBI with/without magnification for detection, characterization, and management of colorectal polyps, and future perspectives for the technology, including education. Recent studies have shown that the next-generation NBI system can detect significantly more colonic polyps than white light imaging, suggesting that NBI may become the modality of choice from the beginning of screening. The capillary pattern revealed by NBI, and the NBI International Colorectal Endoscopic classification are helpful for prediction of histology and for estimating the depth of invasion of colorectal cancer. However, NBI with magnifying colonoscopy is not superior to magnifying chromoendoscopy for estimation of invasion depth. Currently, therefore, chromoendoscopy should also be performed additionally if deep submucosal invasive cancer is suspected. If endoscopists become able to accurately estimate colorectal polyp pathology using NBI, this will allow adenomatous polyps to be resected and discarded; thus, reducing both the risk of polypectomy and costs. In order to achieve this goal, a suitable system for education and training in in vivo diagnostics will be necessary.

  13. Characterizing the energy output generated by a standard electric detonator using shadowgraph imaging

    Petr, V.; Lozano, E.

    2017-09-01

    This paper overviews a complete method for the characterization of the explosive energy output from a standard detonator. Measurements of the output of explosives are commonly based upon the detonation parameters of the chemical energy content of the explosive. These quantities provide a correct understanding of the energy stored in an explosive, but they do not provide a direct measure of the different modes in which the energy is released. This optically based technique combines high-speed and ultra-high-speed imaging to characterize the casing fragmentation and the detonator-driven shock load. The procedure presented here could be used as an alternative to current indirect methods—such as the Trauzl lead block test—because of its simplicity, high data accuracy, and minimum demand for test repetition. This technique was applied to experimentally measure air shock expansion versus time and calculating the blast wave energy from the detonation of the high explosive charge inside the detonator. Direct measurements of the shock front geometry provide insight into the physics of the initiation buildup. Because of their geometry, standard detonators show an initial ellipsoidal shock expansion that degenerates into a final spherical wave. This non-uniform shape creates variable blast parameters along the primary blast wave. Additionally, optical measurements are validated using piezoelectric pressure transducers. The energy fraction spent in the acceleration of the metal shell is experimentally measured and correlated with the Gurney model, as well as to several empirical formulations for blasts from fragmenting munitions. The fragment area distribution is also studied using digital particle imaging analysis and correlated with the Mott distribution. Understanding the fragmentation distribution plays a critical role when performing hazard evaluation from these types of devices. In general, this technique allows for characterization of the detonator within 6-8% error

  14. Characterization of zinc alloy by sheet bulging test with analytical models and digital image correlation

    Vitu, L.; Laforge, N.; Malécot, P.; Boudeau, N.; Manov, S.; Milesi, M.

    2018-05-01

    Zinc alloys are used in a wide range of application such as electronics, automotive and building construction. Their various shapes are generally obtained by metal forming operation such as stamping. Therefore, it is important to characterize the material with adequate characterization tests. Sheet Bulging Test (SBT) is well recognized in the metal forming community. Different theoretical models of the literature for the evaluation of thickness and radius of the deformed sheet in SBT have been studied in order to get the hardening curve of different materials. These theoretical models present the advantage that the experimental procedure is very simple. But Koç et al. showed their limitation, since the combination of thickness and radius evaluations depend on the material. As Zinc alloys are strongly anisotropic with a special crystalline structure, a procedure is adopted for characterizing the hardening curve of a Zinc alloy. The anisotropy is first studied with tensile test, and SBT with elliptical dies is also investigated. Parallel to this, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) measures are carried out. The results obtained from theoretical models and DIC measures are compared. Measures done on post-mortem specimens complete the comparisons. Finally, DIC measures give better results and the resulting hardening curve of the studied zinc alloy is provided.

  15. Characterization of human breast disease using phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and proton magnetic resonance imaging

    Merchant, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis provides the fundamental characterization and differentiation of breast tissues using in vivo and ex vivo MR techniques in the hope that these techniques and experimental findings will be used on a larger scale and in a predictive manner in order to improve the specificity of diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. In this dissertation, clinical studies were performed using proton magnetic resonance imaging and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectro-scopy ( 31 P MRS) to characterize and differentiate malignant breast tumors, benign breast tumors and normal breast tissues in vivo. These studies were carried out following the methodical characterization of chemical extracts of malignant breast tumor, benign breast tumor and normal breast parenchymal surgical tissue specimens using high resolution 31 P MRS. Alterations in breast tissue metabolism, as a result of pathological processes, were postulated to be responsible for measurable differences between malignant breast tumors, benign breast tumors and normal breast tissues using magnetic resonance techniques. (author). 365 refs.; 37 figs.; 25 tabs

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of PET and SPECT imaging of {sup 90}Y

    Takahashi, Akihiko, E-mail: takahsr@hs.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Sasaki, Masayuki [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Himuro, Kazuhiko; Yamashita, Yasuo; Komiya, Isao [Division of Radiology, Department of Medical Technology, Kyushu University Hospital, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Baba, Shingo [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Yittrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) is traditionally thought of as a pure beta emitter, and is used in targeted radionuclide therapy, with imaging performed using bremsstrahlung single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, because {sup 90}Y also emits positrons through internal pair production with a very small branching ratio, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is also available. Because of the insufficient image quality of {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung SPECT, PET imaging has been suggested as an alternative. In this paper, the authors present the Monte Carlo-based simulation–reconstruction framework for {sup 90}Y to comprehensively analyze the PET and SPECT imaging techniques and to quantitatively consider the disadvantages associated with them. Methods: Our PET and SPECT simulation modules were developed using Monte Carlo simulation of Electrons and Photons (MCEP), developed by Dr. S. Uehara. PET code (MCEP-PET) generates a sinogram, and reconstructs the tomography image using a time-of-flight ordered subset expectation maximization (TOF-OSEM) algorithm with attenuation compensation. To evaluate MCEP-PET, simulated results of {sup 18}F PET imaging were compared with the experimental results. The results confirmed that MCEP-PET can simulate the experimental results very well. The SPECT code (MCEP-SPECT) models the collimator and NaI detector system, and generates the projection images and projection data. To save the computational time, the authors adopt the prerecorded {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung photon data calculated by MCEP. The projection data are also reconstructed using the OSEM algorithm. The authors simulated PET and SPECT images of a water phantom containing six hot spheres filled with different concentrations of {sup 90}Y without background activity. The amount of activity was 163 MBq, with an acquisition time of 40 min. Results: The simulated {sup 90}Y-PET image accurately simulated the experimental results. PET image is visually

  17. Characterization of system-related geometric distortions in MR images employed in Gamma Knife radiosurgery applications

    Pappas, E. P.; Seimenis, I.; Moutsatsos, A.; Georgiou, E.; Nomikos, P.; Karaiskos, P.

    2016-10-01

    This work provides characterization of system-related geometric distortions present in MRIs used in Gamma Knife (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment planning. A custom-made phantom, compatible with the Leksell stereotactic frame model G and encompassing 947 control points (CPs), was utilized. MR images were obtained with and without the frame, thus allowing discrimination of frame-induced distortions. In the absence of the frame and following compensation for field inhomogeneities, measured average CP disposition owing to gradient nonlinearities was 0.53 mm. In presence of the frame, contrarily, detected distortion was greatly increased (up to about 5 mm) in the vicinity of the frame base due to eddy currents induced in the closed loop of its aluminum material. Frame-related distortion was obliterated at approximately 90 mm from the frame base. Although the region with the maximum observed distortion may not lie within the GK treatable volume, the presence of the frame results in distortion of the order of 1.5 mm at a 7 cm distance from the center of the Leksell space. Additionally, severe distortions observed outside the treatable volume could possibly impinge on the delivery accuracy mainly by adversely affecting the registration process (e.g. the position of the lower part of the N-shaped fiducials used to define the stereotactic space may be miss-registered). Images acquired with a modified version of the frame developed by replacing its front side with an acrylic bar, thus interrupting the closed aluminum loop and reducing the induced eddy currents, were shown to benefit from relatively reduced distortion. System-related distortion was also identified in patient MR images. Using corresponding CT angiography images as a reference, an offset of 1.1 mm was detected for two vessels lying in close proximity to the frame base, while excellent spatial agreement was observed for a vessel far apart from the frame base.

  18. Biofouling patterns in spacer filled channels: High resolution imaging for characterization of heterogeneous biofilms

    Staal, Marc

    2017-08-15

    Biofilms develop in heterogeneous patterns at a µm scale up to a cm scale, and patterns become more pronounced when biofilms develop under complex hydrodynamic flow regimes. Spatially heterogeneous biofilms are especially known in spiral wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane filtration systems used for desalination and wastewater reuse to produce high quality (drinking) water. These spiral wound membrane modules contain mesh-like spacer structures used to create an intermembrane space and improve water mixing. Spacers create inhomogeneous water flow patterns resulting in zones favouring biofilm growth, possibly leading to biofouling thus hampering water production. Oxygen sensing planar optodes were used to visualize variations in oxygen decrease rates (ODR). ODR is an indication of biofilm activity. In this study, ODR images of multiple repetitive spacer areas in a membrane fouling simulator were averaged to produce high resolution, low noise ODR images. Averaging 40 individual spacer areas improved the ODR distribution image significantly and allowed comparison of biofilm patterning over a spacer structure at different positions in an RO filter. This method clearly showed that most active biofilm accumulated on and in direct vicinity of the spacer. The averaging method was also used to calculate the deviation of ODR patterning from individual spacer areas to the average ODR pattern, proposing a new approach to determine biofilm spatial heterogeneity. This study showed that the averaging method can be applied and that the improved, averaged ODR images can be used as an analytical, in-situ, non-destructive method to assess and quantify the effect of membrane installation operational parameters or different spacer geometries on biofilm development in spiral wound membrane systems characterized by complex hydrodynamic conditions.

  19. Characterization and Applications of a CdZnTe-Based Gamma-Ray Imager

    Galloway, Michelle Lee

    Detection of electromagnetic radiation in the form of gamma rays provides a means to discover the presence of nuclear sources and the occurrence of highly-energetic events that occur in our terrestrial and astrophysical environment. The highly penetrative nature of gamma rays allows for probing into objects and regions that are obscured at other wavelengths. The detection and imaging of gamma rays relies upon an understanding of the ways in which these high-energy photons interact with matter. The applications of gamma-ray detection and imaging are numerous. Astrophysical observation of gamma rays expands our understanding of the Universe in which we live. Terrestrial detection and imaging of gamma rays enable environmental monitoring of radioactivity. This allows for identification and localization of nuclear materials to prevent illicit trafficking and to ultimately protect against harmful acts. This dissertation focusses on the development and characterization of a gamma-ray detection and imaging instrument and explores its capabilities for the aforementioned applications. The High Efficiency Multimode Imager, HEMI, is a prototype instrument that is based on Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) semiconductor detectors. The detectors are arranged in a two-planar configuration to allow for both Compton and coded-aperture imaging. HEMI was initially developed as a prototype instrument to demonstrate its capabilities for nuclear threat detection, spectroscopy, and imaging. The 96-detector instrument was developed and fully characterized within the laboratory environment, yielding a system energy resolution of 2.4% FWHM at 662 keV, an angular resolution of 9.5 deg. FWHM at 662 keV in Compton mode, and a 10.6 deg. angular resolution in coded aperture mode. After event cuts, the effective area for Compton imaging of the 662 keV photopeak is 0.1 cm 22. Imaging of point sources in both Compton and coded aperture modes have been demonstrated. The minimum detectable activity of

  20. Preclinical In vivo Imaging for Fat Tissue Identification, Quantification, and Functional Characterization.

    Marzola, Pasquina; Boschi, Federico; Moneta, Francesco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Zancanaro, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Localization, differentiation, and quantitative assessment of fat tissues have always collected the interest of researchers. Nowadays, these topics are even more relevant as obesity (the excess of fat tissue) is considered a real pathology requiring in some cases pharmacological and surgical approaches. Several weight loss medications, acting either on the metabolism or on the central nervous system, are currently under preclinical or clinical investigation. Animal models of obesity have been developed and are widely used in pharmaceutical research. The assessment of candidate drugs in animal models requires non-invasive methods for longitudinal assessment of efficacy, the main outcome being the amount of body fat. Fat tissues can be either quantified in the entire animal or localized and measured in selected organs/regions of the body. Fat tissues are characterized by peculiar contrast in several imaging modalities as for example Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) that can distinguish between fat and water protons thank to their different magnetic resonance properties. Since fat tissues have higher carbon/hydrogen content than other soft tissues and bones, they can be easily assessed by Computed Tomography (CT) as well. Interestingly, MRI also discriminates between white and brown adipose tissue (BAT); the latter has long been regarded as a potential target for anti-obesity drugs because of its ability to enhance energy consumption through increased thermogenesis. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) performed with 18 F-FDG as glucose analog radiotracer reflects well the metabolic rate in body tissues and consequently is the technique of choice for studies of BAT metabolism. This review will focus on the main, non-invasive imaging techniques (MRI, CT, and PET) that are fundamental for the assessment, quantification and functional characterization of fat deposits in small laboratory animals. The contribution of optical techniques, which are currently regarded with

  1. Preclinical in vivo imaging for fat tissue identification, quantification and functional characterization

    Pasquina Marzola

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Localization, differentiation and quantitative assessment of fat tissues have always collected the interest of researchers. Nowadays, these topics are even more relevant as obesity (the excess of fat tissue is considered a real pathology requiring in some cases pharmacological and surgical approaches. Several weight loss medications, acting either on the metabolism or on the central nervous system, are currently under preclinical or clinical investigation. Animal models of obesity have been developed which are widely used in pharmaceutical research. The assessment of candidate drugs in animal models requires non-invasive methods for longitudinal assessment of efficacy, the main outcome being the amount of body fat. Fat tissues can be either quantified in the entire animal or localized and measured in selected organs/regions of the body. Fat tissues are characterized by peculiar contrast in several imaging modalities as for example Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI that can distinguish between fat and water protons thank to their different magnetic resonance properties. Since fat tissues have higher carbon/hydrogen content than other soft tissues and bones, they can be easily assessed by Computed Tomography (CT as well. Interestingly, MRI also discriminates between white and brown adipose tissue; the latter has long been regarded as a potential target for anti-obesity drugs because of its ability to enhance energy consumption through increased thermogenesis. Positron Emission Tomography (PET performed with 18F-FDG as glucose analogue radiotracer reflects well the metabolic rate in body tissues and consequently is the technique of choice for studies of BAT metabolism. This review will focus on the main, non-invasive imaging techniques (MRI, CT and PET that are fundamental for the assessment, quantification and functional characterization of fat deposits in small laboratory animals. The contribution of optical techniques, which are currently regarded

  2. Characterization of nanowires by coherent X-ray diffractive imaging and ptychography

    Dzhigaev, Dmitry

    2017-03-01

    Imaging techniques are of paramount importance for our understanding of the universe. From galaxies and stars explored by huge telescopes down to micro and nanostructures studied by microscopes, imaging systems provide invaluable scientific information. When an object under investigation has a size of about 100 nanometers, X-rays become a perfect probe for non-destructive imaging. The manufacturing process of image forming lenses for X-rays becomes much more complicated comparing to optical ones. Therefore, ''lensless'' techniques which rely on the coherent properties of radiation were developed. With third generation of synchrotron sources highly coherent and intense X-ray beams became widely accessible. They are used in new imaging methods such as coherent X-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI) and X-ray ptychography. Modern nanotechnology opens a wide spectrum of possible applications in different branches of physics, chemistry, biology and engineering. At the nanoscale, matter has different physical and chemical properties compared to the macroscale bulk material. The continuing trend of miniaturization of functional components in semiconductor industry brings new challenges both in growth and characterization methods. This Thesis is focused on application of coherent diffractive imaging methods to reveal the structure of single semiconductor nanowires (NWs). They have been attracting significant attention for a couple of decades due to their efficient strain relaxation properties. And since the strain plays a significant role in NW performance the projects carried out in this work are oriented on Bragg CXDI approaches. Three distinct projects were carried out during my research activity at DESY research center of the Helmholtz Association. Experimental work was performed at P06 and P10 beamlines at PETRA III synchrotron. The first part of this Thesis extends the application of the three-dimensional (3D) Bragg CXDI to strain field mapping in a single InP NW with a

  3. Characterization of nanowires by coherent X-ray diffractive imaging and ptychography

    Dzhigaev, Dmitry

    2017-03-15

    Imaging techniques are of paramount importance for our understanding of the universe. From galaxies and stars explored by huge telescopes down to micro and nanostructures studied by microscopes, imaging systems provide invaluable scientific information. When an object under investigation has a size of about 100 nanometers, X-rays become a perfect probe for non-destructive imaging. The manufacturing process of image forming lenses for X-rays becomes much more complicated comparing to optical ones. Therefore, ''lensless'' techniques which rely on the coherent properties of radiation were developed. With third generation of synchrotron sources highly coherent and intense X-ray beams became widely accessible. They are used in new imaging methods such as coherent X-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI) and X-ray ptychography. Modern nanotechnology opens a wide spectrum of possible applications in different branches of physics, chemistry, biology and engineering. At the nanoscale, matter has different physical and chemical properties compared to the macroscale bulk material. The continuing trend of miniaturization of functional components in semiconductor industry brings new challenges both in growth and characterization methods. This Thesis is focused on application of coherent diffractive imaging methods to reveal the structure of single semiconductor nanowires (NWs). They have been attracting significant attention for a couple of decades due to their efficient strain relaxation properties. And since the strain plays a significant role in NW performance the projects carried out in this work are oriented on Bragg CXDI approaches. Three distinct projects were carried out during my research activity at DESY research center of the Helmholtz Association. Experimental work was performed at P06 and P10 beamlines at PETRA III synchrotron. The first part of this Thesis extends the application of the three-dimensional (3D) Bragg CXDI to strain field mapping in a

  4. Automation of aggregate characterization using laser profiling and digital image analysis

    Kim, Hyoungkwan

    2002-08-01

    Particle morphological properties such as size, shape, angularity, and texture are key properties that are frequently used to characterize aggregates. The characteristics of aggregates are crucial to the strength, durability, and serviceability of the structure in which they are used. Thus, it is important to select aggregates that have proper characteristics for each specific application. Use of improper aggregate can cause rapid deterioration or even failure of the structure. The current standard aggregate test methods are generally labor-intensive, time-consuming, and subject to human errors. Moreover, important properties of aggregates may not be captured by the standard methods due to a lack of an objective way of quantifying critical aggregate properties. Increased quality expectations of products along with recent technological advances in information technology are motivating new developments to provide fast and accurate aggregate characterization. The resulting information can enable a real time quality control of aggregate production as well as lead to better design and construction methods of portland cement concrete and hot mix asphalt. This dissertation presents a system to measure various morphological characteristics of construction aggregates effectively. Automatic measurement of various particle properties is of great interest because it has the potential to solve such problems in manual measurements as subjectivity, labor intensity, and slow speed. The main efforts of this research are placed on three-dimensional (3D) laser profiling, particle segmentation algorithms, particle measurement algorithms, and generalized particle descriptors. First, true 3D data of aggregate particles obtained by laser profiling are transformed into digital images. Second, a segmentation algorithm and a particle measurement algorithm are developed to separate particles and process each particle data individually with the aid of various kinds of digital image

  5. Non-Destructive Spent Fuel Characterization with Semiconducting Gallium Arsinde Neutron Imaging Arrays

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Gersch, Holly K.; Sanders, Jeffrey D.; Lee, John C.; Hammig, Mark D.; Hartman, Michael R.; Yong Hong Yang; Klann, Raymond T.; Elzen, Brian Van Der; Lindsay, John T.; Simpson, Philip A.

    2002-01-01

    High resistivity bulk grown GaAs has been used to produce thermal neutron imaging devices for use in neutron radiography and characterizing burnup in spent fuel. The basic scheme utilizes a portable Sb/Be source for monoenergetic (24 keV) neutron radiation source coupled to an Fe filter with a radiation hard B-coated pixellated GaAs detector array as the primary neutron detector. The coated neutron detectors have been tested for efficiency and radiation hardness in order to determine their fitness for the harsh environments imposed by spent fuel. Theoretical and experimental results are presented, showing detector radiation hardness, expected detection efficiency and the spatial resolution from such a scheme. A variety of advanced neutron detector designs have been explored, with experimental results achieving 13% thermal neutron detection efficiency while projecting the possibility of over 30% thermal neutron detection efficiency

  6. Characterization of total ionizing dose damage in COTS pinned photodiode CMOS image sensors

    Wang, Zujun, E-mail: wangzujun@nint.ac.cn; Ma, Wuying; Huang, Shaoyan; Yao, Zhibin; Liu, Minbo; He, Baoping; Sheng, Jiangkun; Xue, Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); Liu, Jing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan (China)

    2016-03-15

    The characterization of total ionizing dose (TID) damage in COTS pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) is investigated. The radiation experiments are carried out at a {sup 60}Co γ-ray source. The CISs are produced by 0.18-μm CMOS technology and the pixel architecture is 8T global shutter pixel with correlated double sampling (CDS) based on a 4T PPD front end. The parameters of CISs such as temporal domain, spatial domain, and spectral domain are measured at the CIS test system as the EMVA 1288 standard before and after irradiation. The dark current, random noise, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), photo response non-uniformity (PRNU), overall system gain, saturation output, dynamic range (DR), signal to noise ratio (SNR), quantum efficiency (QE), and responsivity versus the TID are reported. The behaviors of the tested CISs show remarkable degradations after radiation. The degradation mechanisms of CISs induced by TID damage are also analyzed.

  7. Parametric techniques for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 1): T1 mapping.

    Perea Palazón, R J; Ortiz Pérez, J T; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Solé Arqués, M

    2016-01-01

    The development of myocardial fibrosis is a common process in the appearance of ventricular dysfunction in many heart diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to accurately evaluate the structure and function of the heart, and its role in the macroscopic characterization of myocardial fibrosis by late enhancement techniques has been widely validated clinically. Recent studies have demonstrated that T1-mapping techniques can quantify diffuse myocardial fibrosis and the expansion of the myocardial extracellular space in absolute terms. However, further studies are necessary to validate the usefulness of this technique in the early detection of tissue remodeling at a time when implementing early treatment would improve a patient's prognosis. This article reviews the state of the art for T1 mapping of the myocardium, its clinical applications, and its limitations. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Parametric methods for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 2): T2 mapping.

    Perea Palazón, R J; Solé Arqués, M; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Ortiz Pérez, J T

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is considered the reference technique for characterizing myocardial tissue; for example, T2-weighted sequences make it possible to evaluate areas of edema or myocardial inflammation. However, traditional sequences have many limitations and provide only qualitative information. Moreover, traditional sequences depend on the reference to remote myocardium or skeletal muscle, which limits their ability to detect and quantify diffuse myocardial damage. Recently developed magnetic resonance myocardial mapping techniques enable quantitative assessment of parameters indicative of edema. These techniques have proven better than traditional sequences both in acute cardiomyopathy and in acute ischemic heart disease. This article synthesizes current developments in T2 mapping as well as their clinical applications and limitations. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of a new series of fluorescent probes for imaging membrane order.

    Joanna M Kwiatek

    Full Text Available Visualization and quantification of lipid order is an important tool in membrane biophysics and cell biology, but the availability of environmentally sensitive fluorescent membrane probes is limited. Here, we present the characterization of the novel fluorescent dyes PY3304, PY3174 and PY3184, whose fluorescence properties are sensitive to membrane lipid order. In artificial bilayers, the fluorescence emission spectra are red-shifted between the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. Using ratiometric imaging we demonstrate that the degree of membrane order can be quantitatively determined in artificial liposomes as well as live cells and intact, live zebrafish embryos. Finally, we show that the fluorescence lifetime of the dyes is also dependent on bilayer order. These probes expand the current palate of lipid order-sensing fluorophores affording greater flexibility in the excitation/emission wavelengths and possibly new opportunities in membrane biology.

  10. Initial Work on the Characterization of Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing Using Software Image Analysis

    Jeremy Straub

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A current challenge in additive manufacturing (commonly known as 3D printing is the detection of defects. Detection of defects (or the lack thereof in bespoke industrial manufacturing may be safety critical and reduce or eliminate the need for testing of printed objects. In consumer and prototype printing, early defect detection may facilitate the printer taking corrective measures (or pausing printing and alerting a user, preventing the need to re-print objects after the compounding of a small error occurs. This paper considers one approach to defect detection. It characterizes the efficacy of using a multi-camera system and image processing software to assess printing progress (thus detecting completion failure defects and quality. The potential applications and extrapolations of this type of a system are also discussed.

  11. Application of image cytometry to characterize heterologous lipid flippases in yeast

    Jensen, Maria Stumph; Costa, Sara; Theorin, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Lipid flippases are integral membrane proteins that play a central role in moving lipids across cellular membranes. Some of these transporters are ATPases that couple lipid translocation to ATP hydrolysis, whereas others function without any discernible metabolic energy input. A growing number...... is typically monitored by flow cytometry, a costly and maintenance-intensive method. Here, we have optimized a protocol to use an automated image-based cell counter to accurately measure lipid uptake by heterologous lipid flippases expressed in yeast. The method was validated by comparison with the classical...... for characterization of lipid flippase activity, and should be readily adaptable to analyze a variety of other transport systems in yeast, parasites, and mammalian cells. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry....

  12. Strength analysis of support structure and characterization of prototype imaging portal monitor

    Khairul Handono; Alvano Yulian; Muhammad Awwaluddin

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical systems analysis and testing of control systems and data acquisition the prototype Portal Imaging Monitor Container has been conducted. Analysis of the mechanical system includes support holder important to maintain continuity of operations. While the analysis of the data acquisition system and electrically system done on the conveyor drive motor power supply. The purpose of the analysis and characterization for design improvements. The process of static analysis is done through a conveyor frame structure simulation in ANSYS 1.4 software. In the data acquisition system and the electrical system has been tested. From the results of the mechanical analysis showed that the design created has met the criteria of security and safety. While the data acquisition system testing the system can display the data through the Internet with either. (author)

  13. Eddy current imaging for electrical characterization of silicon solar cells and TCO layers

    Hwang, Byungguk; Hillmann, Susanne; Schulze, Martin; Klein, Marcus; Heuer, Henning

    2015-03-01

    Eddy Current Testing has been mainly used to determine defects of conductive materials and wall thicknesses in heavy industries such as construction or aerospace. Recently, high frequency Eddy Current imaging technology was developed. This enables the acquirement of information of different depth level in conductive thin-film structures by realizing proper standard penetration depth. In this paper, we summarize the state of the art applications focusing on PV industry and extend the analysis implementing achievements by applying spatially resolved Eddy Current Testing. The specific state of frequency and complex phase angle rotation demonstrates diverse defects from front to back side of silicon solar cells and characterizes homogeneity of sheet resistance in Transparent Conductive Oxide (TCO) layers. In order to verify technical feasibility, measurement results from the Multi Parameter Eddy Current Scanner, MPECS are compared to the results from Electroluminescence.

  14. Development and characterization of a TES optical imaging array for astrophysics applications

    Burney, J.; Bay, T.J.; Brink, P.L.; Cabrera, B.; Castle, J.P.; Romani, R.W.; Tomada, A.; Nam, S.W.; Miller, A.J.; Martinis, J.; Wang, E.; Kenny, T.; Young, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Our research group has successfully developed photon detectors capable of both time-stamping and energy-resolving individual photons at very high rates in a wide band from the near-IR through optical and into the near-UV. We have fabricated 32-pixel arrays of these Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) devices and have mounted them in an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator equipped with windows for direct imaging. We have characterized single pixel behavior; we have also begun operating multiple pixels simultaneously, starting the scaling process towards use of the full array. We emphasize the development of a metalized mask for our array that blocks photons from hitting the inter-pixel areas and reflects them onto the TESs. We also present calibration data on detector resolution, electronics noise, and optical alignment

  15. Fuzzy logic algorithm for quantitative tissue characterization of diffuse liver diseases from ultrasound images.

    Badawi, A M; Derbala, A S; Youssef, A M

    1999-08-01

    Computerized ultrasound tissue characterization has become an objective means for diagnosis of liver diseases. It is difficult to differentiate diffuse liver diseases, namely cirrhotic and fatty liver by visual inspection from the ultrasound images. The visual criteria for differentiating diffused diseases are rather confusing and highly dependent upon the sonographer's experience. This often causes a bias effects in the diagnostic procedure and limits its objectivity and reproducibility. Computerized tissue characterization to assist quantitatively the sonographer for the accurate differentiation and to minimize the degree of risk is thus justified. Fuzzy logic has emerged as one of the most active area in classification. In this paper, we present an approach that employs Fuzzy reasoning techniques to automatically differentiate diffuse liver diseases using numerical quantitative features measured from the ultrasound images. Fuzzy rules were generated from over 140 cases consisting of normal, fatty, and cirrhotic livers. The input to the fuzzy system is an eight dimensional vector of feature values: the mean gray level (MGL), the percentile 10%, the contrast (CON), the angular second moment (ASM), the entropy (ENT), the correlation (COR), the attenuation (ATTEN) and the speckle separation. The output of the fuzzy system is one of the three categories: cirrhosis, fatty or normal. The steps done for differentiating the pathologies are data acquisition and feature extraction, dividing the input spaces of the measured quantitative data into fuzzy sets. Based on the expert knowledge, the fuzzy rules are generated and applied using the fuzzy inference procedures to determine the pathology. Different membership functions are developed for the input spaces. This approach has resulted in very good sensitivities and specificity for classifying diffused liver pathologies. This classification technique can be used in the diagnostic process, together with the history

  16. Appearance and characterization of fruit image textures for quality sorting using wavelet transform and genetic algorithms.

    Khoje, Suchitra

    2018-02-01

    Images of four qualities of mangoes and guavas are evaluated for color and textural features to characterize and classify them, and to model the fruit appearance grading. The paper discusses three approaches to identify most discriminating texture features of both the fruits. In the first approach, fruit's color and texture features are selected using Mahalanobis distance. A total of 20 color features and 40 textural features are extracted for analysis. Using Mahalanobis distance and feature intercorrelation analyses, one best color feature (mean of a* [L*a*b* color space]) and two textural features (energy a*, contrast of H*) are selected as features for Guava while two best color features (R std, H std) and one textural features (energy b*) are selected as features for mangoes with the highest discriminate power. The second approach studies some common wavelet families for searching the best classification model for fruit quality grading. The wavelet features extracted from five basic mother wavelets (db, bior, rbior, Coif, Sym) are explored to characterize fruits texture appearance. In third approach, genetic algorithm is used to select only those color and wavelet texture features that are relevant to the separation of the class, from a large universe of features. The study shows that image color and texture features which were identified using a genetic algorithm can distinguish between various qualities classes of fruits. The experimental results showed that support vector machine classifier is elected for Guava grading with an accuracy of 97.61% and artificial neural network is elected from Mango grading with an accuracy of 95.65%. The proposed method is nondestructive fruit quality assessment method. The experimental results has proven that Genetic algorithm along with wavelet textures feature has potential to discriminate fruit quality. Finally, it can be concluded that discussed method is an accurate, reliable, and objective tool to determine fruit

  17. Electrical characterization of bolus material as phantom for use in electrical impedance and computed tomography fusion imaging

    Parvind Kaur Grewal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phantoms are widely used in medical imaging to predict image quality prior to clinical imaging. This paper discusses the possible use of bolus material, as a conductivity phantom, for validation and interpretation of electrical impedance tomography (EIT images. Bolus is commonly used in radiation therapy to mimic tissue. When irradiated, it has radiological characteristics similar to tissue. With increased research interest in CT/EIT fusion imaging there is a need to find a material which has both the absorption coefficient and electrical conductivity similar to biological tissues. In the present study the electrical properties, specifically resistivity, of various commercially available bolus materials were characterized by comparing their frequency response with that of in-vivo connective adipose tissue. It was determined that the resistivity of Gelatin Bolus is similar to in-vivo tissue in the frequency range 10 kHz to 1MHz and therefore has potential to be used in EIT/CT fusion imaging studies.

  18. Use of fluorine-18-BPA PET images and image registration to enhance radiation treatment planning for boron neutron capture therapy

    Khan, Mohammad Khurram

    The Monte-Carlo based simulation environment for radiation therapy (SERA) software is used to simulate the dose administered to a patient undergoing boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Point sampling of tumor tissue results in an estimate of a uniform boron concentration scaling factor of 3.5. Under conventional treatment protocols, this factor is used to scale the boron component of the dose linearly and homogenously within the tumor and target volumes. The average dose to the tumor cells by such a method could be improved by better methods of quantifying the in-vivo 10B biodistribution. A better method includes radiolabeling para-Boronophenylalanine (p-BPA) with 18F and imaging the pharmaceutical using positron emission tomography (PET). This biodistribution of 18F-BPA can then be used to better predict the average dose delivered to the tumor regions. This work uses registered 18F-BPA PET images to incorporate the in-vivo boron biodistribution within current treatment planning. The registered 18F-BPA PET images are then coupled in a new computer software, PET2MRI.m, to linearly scale the boron component of the dose. A qualititative and quantitative assessment of the dose contours is presented using the two approaches. Tumor volume, tumor axial extent, and target locations are compared between using MRI or PET images to define the tumor volume. In addition, peak-to-normal brain value at tumor axial center is determined for pre and post surgery patients using 18F-BPA PET images. The differences noted between the registered GBM tumor volumes (range: 34.04--136.36%), tumor axial extent (range: 20--150%), and the beam target location (1.27--4.29 cm) are significantly different. The peak-to-normal brain values are also determined at the tumor axial center using the 18F-BPA PET images. The peak-to-normal brain values using the last frame of the pre-surgery study for the GBM patients ranged from 2.05--3.4. For post surgery time weighted PET data, the peak

  19. Dynamic Characterizations of an 8-frame, Half-Strip, High-speed X-ray Microchannel Plate Imager

    Ken Moy; Ming Wu; Craig Kruschwitz; Aric Tibbits; Matt Griffin; Greg Rochau

    2008-01-01

    High-speed microchannel plate (MCP)-based imagers are critical detectors for x-ray diagnostics employed on Z-experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to measure time-resolved x-ray spectra and to image dynamic hohlraums. A multiframe design using eight half strips in one imager permits recordings of radiation events in discrete temporal snapshots to yield a time-evolved movie. We present data using various facilities to characterize the performance of this design. These characterization studies include DC and pulsed-voltage biased measurements in both saturated and linear operational regimes using an intense, short-pulsed UV laser. Electrical probe measurements taken to characterize the shape of the HV pulse propagating across the strips help to corroborate the spatial gain dependence

  20. AFM tip characterization by using FFT filtered images of step structures

    Yan, Yongda, E-mail: yanyongda@hit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Micro-systems and Micro-structures Manufacturing of Ministry of Education, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Center For Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Xue, Bo [Key Laboratory of Micro-systems and Micro-structures Manufacturing of Ministry of Education, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Center For Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen [Center For Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The measurement resolution of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is largely dependent on the radius of the tip. Meanwhile, when using AFM to study nanoscale surface properties, the value of the tip radius is needed in calculations. As such, estimation of the tip radius is important for analyzing results taken using an AFM. In this study, a geometrical model created by scanning a step structure with an AFM tip was developed. The tip was assumed to have a hemispherical cone shape. Profiles simulated by tips with different scanning radii were calculated by fast Fourier transform (FFT). By analyzing the influence of tip radius variation on the spectra of simulated profiles, it was found that low-frequency harmonics were more susceptible, and that the relationship between the tip radius and the low-frequency harmonic amplitude of the step structure varied monotonically. Based on this regularity, we developed a new method to characterize the radius of the hemispherical tip. The tip radii estimated with this approach were comparable to the results obtained using scanning electron microscope imaging and blind reconstruction methods. - Highlights: • The AFM tips with different radii were simulated to scan a nano-step structure. • The spectra of the simulation scans under different radii were analyzed. • The functions of tip radius and harmonic amplitude were used for evaluating tip. • The proposed method has been validated by SEM imaging and blind reconstruction.

  1. Characterizing amide proton transfer imaging in haemorrhage brain lesions using 3T MRI

    Jeong, Ha-Kyu [Philips Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea Basic Science Institute, Chungcheongbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyunghwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MRI Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhao, Yansong [Philips Healthcare, MR Clinical Science, Cleveland, OH (United States); Choi, Yoon Seong; Lee, Seung-Koo; Ahn, Sung Soo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to characterize amide proton transfer (APT)-weighted signals in acute and subacute haemorrhage brain lesions of various underlying aetiologies. Twenty-three patients with symptomatic haemorrhage brain lesions including tumorous (n = 16) and non-tumorous lesions (n = 7) were evaluated. APT imaging was performed and analyzed with magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR{sub asym}). Regions of interest were defined as the enhancing portion (when present), acute or subacute haemorrhage, and normal-appearing white matter based on anatomical MRI. MTR{sub asym} values were compared among groups and components using a linear mixed model. MTR{sub asym} values were 3.68 % in acute haemorrhage, 1.6 % in subacute haemorrhage, 2.65 % in the enhancing portion, and 0.38 % in normal white matter. According to the linear mixed model, the distribution of MTR{sub asym} values among components was not significantly different between tumour and non-tumour groups. MTR{sub asym} in acute haemorrhage was significantly higher than those in the other regions regardless of underlying pathology. Acute haemorrhages showed high MTR{sub asym} regardless of the underlying pathology, whereas subacute haemorrhages showed lower MTR{sub asym} than acute haemorrhages. These results can aid in the interpretation of APT imaging in haemorrhage brain lesions. (orig.)

  2. Feasibility of spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) for optically characterizing a preclinical oncology model.

    Tabassum, Syeda; Zhao, Yanyu; Istfan, Raeef; Wu, Junjie; Waxman, David J; Roblyer, Darren

    2016-10-01

    Determination of chemotherapy efficacy early during treatment would provide more opportunities for physicians to alter and adapt treatment plans. Diffuse optical technologies may be ideally suited to track early biological events following chemotherapy administration due to low cost and high information content. We evaluated the use of spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) to characterize a small animal tumor model in order to move towards the goal of endogenous optical monitoring of cancer therapy in a controlled preclinical setting. The effects of key measurement parameters including the choice of imaging spatial frequency and the repeatability of measurements were evaluated. The precision of SFDI optical property extractions over repeat mouse measurements was determined to be within 3.52% for move and replace experiments. Baseline optical properties and chromophore values as well as intratumor heterogeneity were evaluated over 25 tumors. Additionally, tumor growth and chemotherapy response were monitored over a 45 day longitudinal study in a small number of mice to demonstrate the ability of SFDI to track treatment effects. Optical scattering and oxygen saturation increased as much as 70% and 25% respectively in treated tumors, suggesting SFDI may be useful for preclinical tracking of cancer therapies.

  3. High-resolution multi-band imaging for validation and characterization of small Kepler planets

    Everett, Mark E.; Silva, David R.; Barclay, Thomas; Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Horch, Elliott P.; Crepp, Justin R.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution ground-based optical speckle and near-infrared adaptive optics images are taken to search for stars in close angular proximity to host stars of candidate planets identified by the NASA Kepler Mission. Neighboring stars are a potential source of false positive signals. These stars also blend into Kepler light curves, affecting estimated planet properties, and are important for an understanding of planets in multiple star systems. Deep images with high angular resolution help to validate candidate planets by excluding potential background eclipsing binaries as the source of the transit signals. A study of 18 Kepler Object of Interest stars hosting a total of 28 candidate and validated planets is presented. Validation levels are determined for 18 planets against the likelihood of a false positive from a background eclipsing binary. Most of these are validated at the 99% level or higher, including five newly validated planets in two systems: Kepler-430 and Kepler-431. The stellar properties of the candidate host stars are determined by supplementing existing literature values with new spectroscopic characterizations. Close neighbors of seven of these stars are examined using multi-wavelength photometry to determine their nature and influence on the candidate planet properties. Most of the close neighbors appear to be gravitationally bound secondaries, while a few are best explained as closely co-aligned field stars. Revised planet properties are derived for each candidate and validated planet, including cases where the close neighbors are the potential host stars.

  4. Modeling and characterization of a SPECT system with pinhole collimation for the imaging of small animals

    Auer, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    My thesis work focuses on the development of several quantitative reconstruction methods dedicated to small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). The latter is based on modeling the acquisition process of the 4-heads pinhole SPECT system available at Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC) and fully integrated to the AMISSA platform using Monte Carlo simulations. The system matrix approach, combined with the OS-EM iterative reconstruction algorithm, enabled to characterize the system performances and to compare it to the state of the art. Sensitivity of about 0,027% in the center of the field of view associated to a tomographic spatial resolution of 0, 875 ± 0, 025 mm were obtained. The major drawbacks of Monte Carlo methods led us to develop an efficient and simplified modeling of the physical effects occurring in the subject. My approach based on a system matrix decomposition, associated to a scatter pre-calculated database method, demonstrated an acceptable time for a daily imaging subject follow-up (∼ 1 h), leading to a personalized imaging reconstruction (article accepted). The inherent approximations of the scatter pre-calculated approach (first order scattering modeling and segmented emission) have a moderate impact on the recovery coefficients results, nevertheless a correction of about 10% was achieved. (author) [fr

  5. Characterization of the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating X-ray detector CIX

    Fink, Johannes

    2010-01-15

    The CIX detector is a direct converting hybrid pixel detector designed for medical X-ray imaging applications. Its de ning feature is the simultaneous operation of a photon counter as well as an integrator in every pixel cell. This novel approach o ers a dynamic range of more than five orders of magnitude, as well as the ability to directly obtain the average photon energy from the measured data. Several CIX 0.2 ASICs have been successfully connected to CdTe, CdZnTe and Si sensors. These detector modules were tested with respect to the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating concept under X-ray irradiation. Apart from a characterization of the intrinsic benefits of the CIX concept, the sensor performance was also investigated. Here, the two parallel signal processing concepts offer valuable insights into material related effects like polarization and temporal response. The impact of interpixel coupling effects like charge-sharing, Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescence was evaluated through simulations and measurements. (orig.)

  6. Electromagnetic characterization of white spruce at different moisture contents using synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Ingemi, Christopher M.; Owusu Twumasi, Jones; Yu, Tzuyang

    2018-03-01

    Detection and quantification of moisture content inside wood (timber) is key to ensuring safety and reliability of timber structures. Moisture inside wood attracts insects and fosters the development of fungi to attack the timber, causing significant damages and reducing the load bearing capacity during their design life. The use of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques (e.g., microwave/radar, ultrasonic, stress wave, and X-ray) for condition assessment of timber structures is a good choice. NDE techniques provide information about the level of deterioration and material properties of timber structures without obstructing their functionality. In this study, microwave/radar NDE technique was selected for the characterization of wood at different moisture contents. A 12 in-by-3.5 in-by-1.5 in. white spruce specimen (picea glauca) was imaged at different moisture contents using a 10 GHz synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor inside an anechoic chamber. The presence of moisture was found to increase the SAR image amplitude as expected. Additionally, integrated SAR amplitude was found beneficial in modeling the moisture content inside the wood specimen.

  7. Characterization of the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating X-ray detector CIX

    Fink, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The CIX detector is a direct converting hybrid pixel detector designed for medical X-ray imaging applications. Its de ning feature is the simultaneous operation of a photon counter as well as an integrator in every pixel cell. This novel approach o ers a dynamic range of more than five orders of magnitude, as well as the ability to directly obtain the average photon energy from the measured data. Several CIX 0.2 ASICs have been successfully connected to CdTe, CdZnTe and Si sensors. These detector modules were tested with respect to the imaging performance of the simultaneously counting and integrating concept under X-ray irradiation. Apart from a characterization of the intrinsic benefits of the CIX concept, the sensor performance was also investigated. Here, the two parallel signal processing concepts offer valuable insights into material related effects like polarization and temporal response. The impact of interpixel coupling effects like charge-sharing, Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescence was evaluated through simulations and measurements. (orig.)

  8. Characterization of unifocal liver lesions with pulse inversion harmonic imaging after Levovist injection: preliminary results

    Bertolotto, M.; Dalla Palma, L.; Quaia, E.; Locatelli, M.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate capabilities of pulse inversion harmonic imaging (PIHI) in characterization of unifocal liver lesions. We evaluated with PIHI (HDI5000, ATL, Bothell, Wash.) and spiral CT 46 consecutive patients with a single liver lesion identified by fundamental US [7 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), 2 cholangiocarcinomas, 7 focal nodular hyperplasias (FNH), 17 hemangiomas and 13 metastases]. The PIHI was performed before and 30 s, 2 and 4 min after bolus administration of Levovist (2.5 g, 300 mg/ml). Scans were digitally stored and reviewed using a dedicated software. Hepatocellular carcinoma was hyperechoic on 30-s scan, and hypoechoic (n = 5) or isoechoic (n = 2) on 2-min scan. Cholangiocarcinoma had inhomogeneous persistent enhancement. Focal nodular hyperplasia was hyperechoic (n = 5) or isoechoic (n = 2) on 30-s scan, hyperechoic (n = 4), isoechoic (n = 2) or slightly hypoechoic (n = 1) on 2-min scan. Large hemangioma revealed peripheral enhancement on 30-s scan which extended centripetally on 2-min scan. Small hemangioma appeared isoechoic on 2-min scan in all but two cases in which they were hypoechoic on 2-min scans and hyperechoic on 4-min scan. Metastasis was hypoechoic on all scans, 70 % with rim enhancement. Similar changes in enhancement pattern have been observed at spiral CT. The 30-s and the 2-min scans revealed a conclusive importance in characterization of HCC, cholangiocarcinoma, and large hemangioma. The 2-min scan often furnished enough information for characterization of small hemangioma and metastasis. The 4-min scan allowed characterization of two hemangiomas which appeared hypoechoic on 2-min scans. In the other cases it did not provide further information. Diagnosis of FNH is usually reached with Colour Doppler US; PIHI should be used when colour Doppler is biased by artefacts or when colour Doppler findings are not characteristic. Our results seem to show that PIHI could be a valuable alternative diagnostic

  9. Characterization of the Distance Relationship Between Localized Serotonin Receptors and Glia Cells on Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Brain Tissue.

    Jacak, Jaroslaw; Schaller, Susanne; Borgmann, Daniela; Winkler, Stephan M

    2015-08-01

    We here present two new methods for the characterization of fluorescent localization microscopy images obtained from immunostained brain tissue sections. Direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images of 5-HT1A serotonin receptors and glial fibrillary acidic proteins in healthy cryopreserved brain tissues are analyzed. In detail, we here present two image processing methods for characterizing differences in receptor distribution on glial cells and their distribution on neural cells: One variant relies on skeleton extraction and adaptive thresholding, the other on k-means based discrete layer segmentation. Experimental results show that both methods can be applied for distinguishing classes of images with respect to serotonin receptor distribution. Quantification of nanoscopic changes in relative protein expression on particular cell types can be used to analyze degeneration in tissues caused by diseases or medical treatment.

  10. Characterization of Fine Metal Particles Derived from Shredded WEEE Using a Hyperspectral Image System: Preliminary Results

    Candiani, Gabriele; Picone, Nicoletta; Pompilio, Loredana; Pepe, Monica; Colledani, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    Waste of electric and electronic equipment (WEEE) is the fastest-growing waste stream in Europe. The large amount of electric and electronic products introduced every year in the market makes WEEE disposal a relevant problem. On the other hand, the high abundance of key metals included in WEEE has increased the industrial interest in WEEE recycling. However, the high variability of materials used to produce electric and electronic equipment makes key metals’ recovery a complex task: the separation process requires flexible systems, which are not currently implemented in recycling plants. In this context, hyperspectral sensors and imaging systems represent a suitable technology to improve WEEE recycling rates and the quality of the output products. This work introduces the preliminary tests using a hyperspectral system, integrated in an automatic WEEE recycling pilot plant, for the characterization of mixtures of fine particles derived from WEEE shredding. Several combinations of classification algorithms and techniques for signal enhancement of reflectance spectra were implemented and compared. The methodology introduced in this study has shown characterization accuracies greater than 95%. PMID:28505070

  11. Characterization of NPP Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Reflective Solar Bands Dual Gain Anomaly

    Lee, Shihyan; McIntire, Jeff; Oudari, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    The Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) contains six dual gain bands in the reflective solar spectrum. The dual gain bands are designed to switch gain mode at pre-defined thresholds to achieve high resolution at low radiances while maintaining the required dynamic range for science. During pre-launch testing, an anomaly in the electronic response before transitioning from high to low gain was discovered and characterized. On-orbit, the anomaly was confirmed using MODIS data collected during Simultaneous Nadir Overpasses (SNOs). The analysis of the Earth scene data shows that dual gain anomaly can be determined at the orbital basis. To characterize the dual gain anomaly, the anomaly region and electronic offsets were tracked per week during the first 8 month of VIIRS operation. The temporal analysis shows the anomaly region can drift 20 DN and is impacted by detectors DC Restore. The estimated anomaly flagging regions cover 2.5 % of the high gain dynamic range and are consistent with prelaunch and on-orbit LUT. The prelaunch results had a smaller anomaly range (30-50 DN) and are likely the results of more stable electronics from the shorter data collection time. Finally, this study suggests future calibration efforts to focus on the anomaly's impact on science products and possible correction method to reduce uncertainties.

  12. Characterizing EPR-mediated passive drug targeting using contrast-enhanced functional ultrasound imaging.

    Theek, Benjamin; Gremse, Felix; Kunjachan, Sijumon; Fokong, Stanley; Pola, Robert; Pechar, Michal; Deckers, Roel; Storm, Gert; Ehling, Josef; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2014-05-28

    The Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect is extensively used in drug delivery research. Taking into account that EPR is a highly variable phenomenon, we have here set out to evaluate if contrast-enhanced functional ultrasound (ceUS) imaging can be employed to characterize EPR-mediated passive drug targeting to tumors. Using standard fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and two different protocols for hybrid computed tomography-fluorescence molecular tomography (CT-FMT), the tumor accumulation of a ~10 nm-sized near-infrared-fluorophore-labeled polymeric drug carrier (pHPMA-Dy750) was evaluated in CT26 tumor-bearing mice. In the same set of animals, two different ceUS techniques (2D MIOT and 3D B-mode imaging) were employed to assess tumor vascularization. Subsequently, the degree of tumor vascularization was correlated with the degree of EPR-mediated drug targeting. Depending on the optical imaging protocol used, the tumor accumulation of the polymeric drug carrier ranged from 5 to 12% of the injected dose. The degree of tumor vascularization, determined using ceUS, varied from 4 to 11%. For both hybrid CT-FMT protocols, a good correlation between the degree of tumor vascularization and the degree of tumor accumulation was observed, within the case of reconstructed CT-FMT, correlation coefficients of ~0.8 and p-values of EPR, and potentially also to pre-select patients likely to respond to passively tumor-targeted nanomedicine treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Dendrimer-stabilized bismuth sulfide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and potential computed tomography imaging applications.

    Fang, Yi; Peng, Chen; Guo, Rui; Zheng, Linfeng; Qin, Jinbao; Zhou, Benqing; Shen, Mingwu; Lu, Xinwu; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang

    2013-06-07

    We report here a general approach to synthesizing dendrimer-stabilized bismuth sulfide nanoparticles (Bi2S3 DSNPs) for potential computed tomography (CT) imaging applications. In this study, ethylenediamine core glycidol hydroxyl-terminated generation 4 poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (G4.NGlyOH) were used as stabilizers to first complex the Bi(III) ions, followed by reaction with hydrogen sulfide to generate Bi2S3 DSNPs. By varying the molar ratio of Bi atom to dendrimer, stable Bi2S3 DSNPs with an average size range of 5.2-5.7 nm were formed. The formed Bi2S3 DSNPs were characterized via different techniques. X-ray absorption coefficient measurements show that the attenuation of Bi2S3 DSNPs is much higher than that of iodine-based CT contrast agent at the same molar concentration of the active element (Bi versus iodine). 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability assay and hemolysis assay reveal that the formed Bi2S3 DSNPs are noncytotoxic and have a negligible hemolysis effect in the studied concentration range. Furthermore, we show that cells incubated with the Bi2S3 DSNPs are able to be imaged using CT, a prominent enhancement at the point of rabbit injected subcutaneously with the Bi2S3 DSNPs is able to be visualized via CT scanning, and the mouse's pulmonary vein can be visualized via CT after intravenous injection of the Bi2S3 DSNPs. With the good biocompatibility, enhanced X-ray attenuation property, and tunable dendrimer chemistry, the designed Bi2S3 DSNPs should be able to be further functionalized, allowing them to be used as a highly efficient contrast agent for CT imaging of different biological systems.

  14. AS30D Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Tumorigenicity and Preliminary Characterization by Imaging, Histopathology, and Immunohistochemistry

    Thompson, Scott M. [Mayo Clinic, Medical Scientist Training Program (United States); Callstrom, Matthew R. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Knudsen, Bruce [Mayo Clinic, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (United States); Anderson, Jill L. [Mayo Clinic, Division of Physiology and Bioengineering (United States); Butters, Kim A.; Grande, Joseph P. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (United States); Roberts, Lewis R. [Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Woodrum, David A., E-mail: woodrum.david@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-02-15

    This study was designed to determine the tumorigenicity of the AS30D HCC cell line following orthotopic injection into rat liver and preliminarily characterize the tumor model by both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) as well as histopathology and immunohistochemistry.MaterialsAS30D cell line in vitro proliferation was assessed by using MTT assay. Female rats (N = 5) underwent injection of the AS30D cell line into one site in the liver. Rats subsequently underwent MR imaging at days 7 and 14 to assess tumor establishment and volume. One rat underwent US of the liver at day 7. Rats were euthanized at day 7 or 14 and livers were subjected to gross, histopathologic (H and E), and immunohistochemical (CD31) analysis to assess for tumor growth and neovascularization. AS30D cell line demonstrated an in vitro doubling time of 33.2 {+-} 5.3 h. MR imaging demonstrated hyperintense T2-weighted and hypointense T1-weighted lesions with tumor induction in five of five and three of three sites at days 7 and 14, respectively. The mean (SD) tumor volume was 126.1 {+-} 36.2 mm{sup 3} at day 7 (N = 5). US of the liver demonstrated a well-circumscribed, hypoechoic mass and comparison of tumor dimensions agreed well with MRI. Analysis of H and E- and CD31-stained sections demonstrated moderate-high grade epithelial tumors with minimal tumor necrosis and evidence of diffuse intratumoral and peritumoral neovascularization by day 7. AS30D HCC cell line is tumorigenic following orthotopic injection into rat liver and can be used to generate an early vascularizing, slower-growing rat HCC tumor model.

  15. Characterization of atherosclerotic disease in thoracic aorta: A 3D, multicontrast vessel wall imaging study

    Zhou, Changwu [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Yuan, Chun [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chen, Huijun; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Rui [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang, Wei; Du, Fang [Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Li, Cheng, E-mail: cjr.licheng@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Zhao, Xihai, E-mail: xihaizhao@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics of plaque in the thoracic aorta using three dimensional multicontrast magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Elderly subjects (≥60 years) were recruited in this study. Thoracic aorta was imaged on a 3.0T MR scanner by acquiring multicontrast sequences. The plaque burden was evaluated by measuring lumen area, wall area, wall thickness, and normalized wall index. The presence or absence of plaque and intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH)/mural thrombus (MT) were identified. The characteristics of atherosclerosis among different thoracic aorta segments (AAO: ascending aorta; AOA: aortic arch, and DOA: descending aorta) were determined. Results: Of 66 recruited subjects (mean age 72.3 ± 6.2 years, 30 males), 55 (83.3%) had plaques in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of plaque in AAO, AOA, and DAO was 5.4%, 72.7%, and 71.2%, respectively. In addition, 21.2% of subjects were found to have lesions with IPH/MT in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of IPH/MT in segment of AAO, AOA and DAO was 0%, 13.6%, and 12.1%, respectively. The aortic wall showed the highest NWI in DAO (34.1% ± 4.8%), followed by AOA (31.2% ± 5%), and AAO (26.8% ± 3.3%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Three dimensional multicontrast MR imaging is capable of characterizing atherosclerotic plaques in the thoracic aorta. The findings of high prevalence of plaques and the presence of high risk plaques in the thoracic aorta suggest early screening for aortic vulnerable lesions in the elderly.

  16. AS30D Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Tumorigenicity and Preliminary Characterization by Imaging, Histopathology, and Immunohistochemistry

    Thompson, Scott M.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Knudsen, Bruce; Anderson, Jill L.; Butters, Kim A.; Grande, Joseph P.; Roberts, Lewis R.; Woodrum, David A.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the tumorigenicity of the AS30D HCC cell line following orthotopic injection into rat liver and preliminarily characterize the tumor model by both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) as well as histopathology and immunohistochemistry.MaterialsAS30D cell line in vitro proliferation was assessed by using MTT assay. Female rats (N = 5) underwent injection of the AS30D cell line into one site in the liver. Rats subsequently underwent MR imaging at days 7 and 14 to assess tumor establishment and volume. One rat underwent US of the liver at day 7. Rats were euthanized at day 7 or 14 and livers were subjected to gross, histopathologic (H and E), and immunohistochemical (CD31) analysis to assess for tumor growth and neovascularization. AS30D cell line demonstrated an in vitro doubling time of 33.2 ± 5.3 h. MR imaging demonstrated hyperintense T2-weighted and hypointense T1-weighted lesions with tumor induction in five of five and three of three sites at days 7 and 14, respectively. The mean (SD) tumor volume was 126.1 ± 36.2 mm 3 at day 7 (N = 5). US of the liver demonstrated a well-circumscribed, hypoechoic mass and comparison of tumor dimensions agreed well with MRI. Analysis of H and E- and CD31-stained sections demonstrated moderate-high grade epithelial tumors with minimal tumor necrosis and evidence of diffuse intratumoral and peritumoral neovascularization by day 7. AS30D HCC cell line is tumorigenic following orthotopic injection into rat liver and can be used to generate an early vascularizing, slower-growing rat HCC tumor model.

  17. Characterization of atherosclerotic disease in thoracic aorta: A 3D, multicontrast vessel wall imaging study

    Zhou, Changwu; Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le; Yuan, Chun; Chen, Huijun; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Rui; Wang, Wei; Du, Fang; Li, Cheng; Zhao, Xihai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics of plaque in the thoracic aorta using three dimensional multicontrast magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Elderly subjects (≥60 years) were recruited in this study. Thoracic aorta was imaged on a 3.0T MR scanner by acquiring multicontrast sequences. The plaque burden was evaluated by measuring lumen area, wall area, wall thickness, and normalized wall index. The presence or absence of plaque and intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH)/mural thrombus (MT) were identified. The characteristics of atherosclerosis among different thoracic aorta segments (AAO: ascending aorta; AOA: aortic arch, and DOA: descending aorta) were determined. Results: Of 66 recruited subjects (mean age 72.3 ± 6.2 years, 30 males), 55 (83.3%) had plaques in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of plaque in AAO, AOA, and DAO was 5.4%, 72.7%, and 71.2%, respectively. In addition, 21.2% of subjects were found to have lesions with IPH/MT in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of IPH/MT in segment of AAO, AOA and DAO was 0%, 13.6%, and 12.1%, respectively. The aortic wall showed the highest NWI in DAO (34.1% ± 4.8%), followed by AOA (31.2% ± 5%), and AAO (26.8% ± 3.3%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Three dimensional multicontrast MR imaging is capable of characterizing atherosclerotic plaques in the thoracic aorta. The findings of high prevalence of plaques and the presence of high risk plaques in the thoracic aorta suggest early screening for aortic vulnerable lesions in the elderly.

  18. Using Multispectral False Color Imaging to Characterize Tropical Cyclone Structure and Environment

    Cossuth, J.; Bankert, R.; Richardson, K.; Surratt, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL) tropical cyclone (TC) web page (http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/TC.html) has provided nearly two decades of near real-time access to TC-centric images and products by TC forecasters and enthusiasts around the world. Particularly, microwave imager and sounder information that is featured on this site provides crucial internal storm structure information by allowing users to perceive hydrometeor structure, providing key details beyond cloud top information provided by visible and infrared channels. Towards improving TC analysis techniques and helping advance the utility of the NRL TC webpage resource, new research efforts are presented. This work demonstrates results as well as the methodology used to develop new automated, objective satellite-based TC structure and intensity guidance and enhanced data fusion imagery products that aim to bolster and streamline TC forecast operations. This presentation focuses on the creation and interpretation of false color RGB composite imagery that leverages the different emissive and scattering properties of atmospheric ice, liquid, and vapor water as well as ocean surface roughness as seen by microwave radiometers. Specifically, a combination of near-realtime data and a standardized digital database of global TCs in microwave imagery from 1987-2012 is employed as a climatology of TC structures. The broad range of TC structures, from pinhole eyes through multiple eyewall configurations, is characterized as resolved by passive microwave sensors. The extraction of these characteristic features from historical data also lends itself to statistical analysis. For example, histograms of brightness temperature distributions allows a rigorous examination of how structural features are conveyed in image products, allowing a better representation of colors and breakpoints as they relate to physical features. Such climatological work also suggests steps to better inform the near-real time application of

  19. In vitro characterization of bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics using particle image velocimetry.

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yap, Choon-Hwai; Milligan, Nicole C; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2012-08-01

    The congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is associated with increased leaflet calcification, ascending aortic dilatation, aortic stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR). Although underlying genetic factors have been primarily implicated for these complications, the altered mechanical environment of BAVs could potentially accelerate these pathologies. The objective of the current study is to characterize BAV hemodynamics in an in vitro system. Two BAV models of varying stenosis and jet eccentricity and a trileaflet AV (TAV) were constructed from excised porcine AVs. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiments were conducted at physiological flow and pressure conditions to characterize fluid velocity fields in the aorta and sinus regions, and ensemble averaged Reynolds shear stress and 2D turbulent kinetic energy were calculated for all models. The dynamics of the BAV and TAV models matched the characteristics of these valves which are observed clinically. The eccentric and stenotic BAV showed the strongest systolic jet (V = 4.2 m/s), which impinged on the aortic wall on the non-fused leaflet side, causing a strong vortex in the non-fused leaflet sinus. The magnitudes of TKE and Reynolds stresses in both BAV models were almost twice as large as comparable values for TAV, and these maximum values were primarily concentrated around the central jet through the valve orifice. The in vitro model described here enables detailed characterization of BAV flow characteristics, which is currently challenging in clinical practice. This model can prove to be useful in studying the effects of altered BAV geometry on fluid dynamics in the valve and ascending aorta. These altered flows can be potentially linked to increased calcific responses from the valve endothelium in stenotic and eccentric BAVs, independent of concomitant genetic factors.

  20. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  1. X-Ray, Digital Imaging with Volumetric Density Measurement and Profiling, Applied to the Characterization of Waste Drums

    Huhtiniemi, I.; Gupta, N.; Halliwell, S.

    2006-01-01

    The European Commission's Joint Research Centre Ispra Site (JRC-Ispra) has initiated a decommissioning and waste management program that will span about two decades. The program includes a requirement to characterize the contents of about 6,500 radioactive, 220 litre waste drums whose documented history is incomplete. To render the characterization process more efficient, the drums will be initially divided into homogeneous groups, an activity that will be based on existing documentation and non-destructive examination (NDE) by X-ray digital imaging. This paper describes the X-ray imaging techniques chosen, and the planned performance validation of the equipment. (authors)

  2. Towards real-time topical detection and characterization of FDG dose infiltration prior to PET imaging

    Williams, Jason M.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Rani, Sudheer D.; Shone, Martha D.; Abramson, Vandana G.; Pendyala, Praveen; Chakravarthy, A.B.; Gorge, William J.; Knowland, Joshua G.; Lattanze, Ronald K.; Perrin, Steven R.; Scarantino, Charles W.; Townsend, David W.; Abramson, Richard G.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    To dynamically detect and characterize "1"8F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) dose infiltrations and evaluate their effects on positron emission tomography (PET) standardized uptake values (SUV) at the injection site and in control tissue. Investigational gamma scintillation sensors were topically applied to patients with locally advanced breast cancer scheduled to undergo limited whole-body FDG-PET as part of an ongoing clinical study. Relative to the affected breast, sensors were placed on the contralateral injection arm and ipsilateral control arm during the resting uptake phase prior to each patient's PET scan. Time-activity curves (TACs) from the sensors were integrated at varying intervals (0-10, 0-20, 0-30, 0-40, and 30-40 min) post-FDG and the resulting areas under the curve (AUCs) were compared to SUVs obtained from PET. In cases of infiltration, observed in three sensor recordings (30 %), the injection arm TAC shape varied depending on the extent and severity of infiltration. In two of these cases, TAC characteristics suggested the infiltration was partially resolving prior to image acquisition, although it was still apparent on subsequent PET. Areas under the TAC 0-10 and 0-20 min post-FDG were significantly different in infiltrated versus non-infiltrated cases (Mann-Whitney, p < 0.05). When normalized to control, all TAC integration intervals from the injection arm were significantly correlated with SUV_p_e_a_k and SUV_m_a_x measured over the infiltration site (Spearman ρ ≥ 0.77, p < 0.05). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, testing the ability of the first 10 min of post-FDG sensor data to predict infiltration visibility on the ensuing PET, yielded an area under the ROC curve of 0.92. Topical sensors applied near the injection site provide dynamic information from the time of FDG administration through the uptake period and may be useful in detecting infiltrations regardless of PET image field of view. This dynamic information may also

  3. Towards real-time topical detection and characterization of FDG dose infiltration prior to PET imaging

    Williams, Jason M.; Arlinghaus, Lori R. [Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Rani, Sudheer D. [Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Shone, Martha D. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Abramson, Vandana G. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Pendyala, Praveen [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nashville, TN (United States); Chakravarthy, A.B. [Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nashville, TN (United States); Gorge, William J.; Knowland, Joshua G.; Lattanze, Ronald K.; Perrin, Steven R. [Lucerno Dynamics, LLC, Morrisville, NC (United States); Scarantino, Charles W. [Lucerno Dynamics, LLC, Morrisville, NC (United States); University of North Carolina, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Townsend, David W. [Lucerno Dynamics, LLC, Morrisville, NC (United States); Technology and Research-National University of Singapore, Clinical Imaging Research Centre, Agency for Science, Singapore (Singapore); Abramson, Richard G. [Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Yankeelov, Thomas E. [The University of Texas at Austin, Institute for Computational and Engineering Sciences, and Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Internal Medicine, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-12-15

    To dynamically detect and characterize {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) dose infiltrations and evaluate their effects on positron emission tomography (PET) standardized uptake values (SUV) at the injection site and in control tissue. Investigational gamma scintillation sensors were topically applied to patients with locally advanced breast cancer scheduled to undergo limited whole-body FDG-PET as part of an ongoing clinical study. Relative to the affected breast, sensors were placed on the contralateral injection arm and ipsilateral control arm during the resting uptake phase prior to each patient's PET scan. Time-activity curves (TACs) from the sensors were integrated at varying intervals (0-10, 0-20, 0-30, 0-40, and 30-40 min) post-FDG and the resulting areas under the curve (AUCs) were compared to SUVs obtained from PET. In cases of infiltration, observed in three sensor recordings (30 %), the injection arm TAC shape varied depending on the extent and severity of infiltration. In two of these cases, TAC characteristics suggested the infiltration was partially resolving prior to image acquisition, although it was still apparent on subsequent PET. Areas under the TAC 0-10 and 0-20 min post-FDG were significantly different in infiltrated versus non-infiltrated cases (Mann-Whitney, p < 0.05). When normalized to control, all TAC integration intervals from the injection arm were significantly correlated with SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} measured over the infiltration site (Spearman ρ ≥ 0.77, p < 0.05). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, testing the ability of the first 10 min of post-FDG sensor data to predict infiltration visibility on the ensuing PET, yielded an area under the ROC curve of 0.92. Topical sensors applied near the injection site provide dynamic information from the time of FDG administration through the uptake period and may be useful in detecting infiltrations regardless of PET image field of view. This dynamic information

  4. Diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy in the characterization of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

    Balasubramanya, K.S.; Kovoor, J.M.E.; Jayakumar, P.N.; Ravishankar, S.; Kamble, R.B.; Panicker, J.; Nagaraja, D.

    2007-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is usually a monophasic illness characterized by multiple lesions involving gray and white matter. Quantitative MR techniques were used to characterize and stage these lesions. Eight patients (seven males and one female; mean age 19 years, range 5 to 36 years) were studied using conventional MRI (T2- and T1-weighted and FLAIR sequences), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and MRS ratios were calculated for the lesion and for normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). Three patients were imaged in the acute stage (within 7 days of the onset of neurological symptoms) and five in the subacute stage (after 7 days from the onset of symptoms). ADC values in NAWM were in the range 0.7-1.24 x 10 -3 mm/s 2 (mean 0.937 ± 0.17 mm/s 2 ). ADC values of ADEM lesions in the acute stage were in the range 0.37-0.68 x 10 -3 mm/s 2 (mean 0.56 ± 0.16 mm/s 2 ) and 1.01-1.31 x 10 -3 mm/s 2 (mean 1.24 ± 0.13 mm/s 2 ) in the subacute stage. MRS ratios were obtained for all patients. NAA/Cho ratios were in the range 1.1-3.5 (mean 1.93 ± 0.86) in the NAWM. NAA/Cho ratios within ADEM lesions in the acute stage were in the range 0.63-1.48 (mean 1.18 ± 0.48) and 0.29-0.84 (mean 0.49 ± 0.22) in the subacute stage. The ADC values, NAA/Cho and Cho/Cr ratios were significantly different between lesions in the acute and subacute stages (P < 0.001, P < 0.027, P < 0.047, respectively). ADC values were significantly different between lesions in the acute (P < 0.009) and subacute stages (P < 0.005) with NAWM. In addition, NAA/Cho and Cho/Cr ratios were significantly different between lesions in the subacute stage and NAWM (P < 0.006, P < 0.007, respectively). ADEM lesions were characterized in the acute stage by restricted diffusion and in the subacute stage by free diffusion and a decrease in NAA/Cho ratios. Restricted diffusion and progressive decrease in NAA

  5. Diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy in the characterization of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

    Balasubramanya, K.S.; Kovoor, J.M.E.; Jayakumar, P.N.; Ravishankar, S.; Kamble, R.B. [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Panicker, J.; Nagaraja, D. [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Neurology, Bangalore (India)

    2007-02-15

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is usually a monophasic illness characterized by multiple lesions involving gray and white matter. Quantitative MR techniques were used to characterize and stage these lesions. Eight patients (seven males and one female; mean age 19 years, range 5 to 36 years) were studied using conventional MRI (T2- and T1-weighted and FLAIR sequences), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and MRS ratios were calculated for the lesion and for normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). Three patients were imaged in the acute stage (within 7 days of the onset of neurological symptoms) and five in the subacute stage (after 7 days from the onset of symptoms). ADC values in NAWM were in the range 0.7-1.24 x 10{sup -3} mm/s{sup 2} (mean 0.937 {+-} 0.17 mm/s{sup 2}). ADC values of ADEM lesions in the acute stage were in the range 0.37-0.68 x 10{sup -3} mm/s{sup 2} (mean 0.56 {+-} 0.16 mm/s{sup 2}) and 1.01-1.31 x 10{sup -3} mm/s{sup 2} (mean 1.24 {+-} 0.13 mm/s{sup 2}) in the subacute stage. MRS ratios were obtained for all patients. NAA/Cho ratios were in the range 1.1-3.5 (mean 1.93 {+-} 0.86) in the NAWM. NAA/Cho ratios within ADEM lesions in the acute stage were in the range 0.63-1.48 (mean 1.18 {+-} 0.48) and 0.29-0.84 (mean 0.49 {+-} 0.22) in the subacute stage. The ADC values, NAA/Cho and Cho/Cr ratios were significantly different between lesions in the acute and subacute stages (P < 0.001, P < 0.027, P < 0.047, respectively). ADC values were significantly different between lesions in the acute (P < 0.009) and subacute stages (P < 0.005) with NAWM. In addition, NAA/Cho and Cho/Cr ratios were significantly different between lesions in the subacute stage and NAWM (P < 0.006, P < 0.007, respectively). ADEM lesions were characterized in the acute stage by restricted diffusion and in the subacute stage by free diffusion and a decrease in NAA/Cho ratios

  6. Characterization of mammographic masses based on level set segmentation with new image features and patient information

    Shi Jiazheng; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan Heangping; Ge Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Helvie, Mark A.; Nees, Alexis; Wu Yita; Wei Jun; Zhou Chuan; Zhang Yiheng; Cui Jing

    2008-01-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) for characterization of mammographic masses as malignant or benign has the potential to assist radiologists in reducing the biopsy rate without increasing false negatives. The purpose of this study was to develop an automated method for mammographic mass segmentation and explore new image based features in combination with patient information in order to improve the performance of mass characterization. The authors' previous CAD system, which used the active contour segmentation, and morphological, textural, and spiculation features, has achieved promising results in mass characterization. The new CAD system is based on the level set method and includes two new types of image features related to the presence of microcalcifications with the mass and abruptness of the mass margin, and patient age. A linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier with stepwise feature selection was used to merge the extracted features into a classification score. The classification accuracy was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The authors' primary data set consisted of 427 biopsy-proven masses (200 malignant and 227 benign) in 909 regions of interest (ROIs) (451 malignant and 458 benign) from multiple mammographic views. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used for training and testing. The new CAD system based on the level set segmentation and the new mammographic feature space achieved a view-based A z value of 0.83±0.01. The improvement compared to the previous CAD system was statistically significant (p=0.02). When patient age was included in the new CAD system, view-based and case-based A z values were 0.85±0.01 and 0.87±0.02, respectively. The study also demonstrated the consistency of the newly developed CAD system by evaluating the statistics of the weights of the LDA classifiers in leave-one-case-out classification. Finally, an independent test on the publicly available digital database for screening

  7. Modeling the dark current histogram induced by gold contamination in complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor image sensors

    Domengie, F., E-mail: florian.domengie@st.com; Morin, P. [STMicroelectronics Crolles 2 (SAS), 850 Rue Jean Monnet, 38926 Crolles Cedex (France); Bauza, D. [CNRS, IMEP-LAHC - Grenoble INP, Minatec: 3, rue Parvis Louis Néel, CS 50257, 38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France)

    2015-07-14

    We propose a model for dark current induced by metallic contamination in a CMOS image sensor. Based on Shockley-Read-Hall kinetics, the expression of dark current proposed accounts for the electric field enhanced emission factor due to the Poole-Frenkel barrier lowering and phonon-assisted tunneling mechanisms. To that aim, we considered the distribution of the electric field magnitude and metal atoms in the depth of the pixel. Poisson statistics were used to estimate the random distribution of metal atoms in each pixel for a given contamination dose. Then, we performed a Monte-Carlo-based simulation for each pixel to set the number of metal atoms the pixel contained and the enhancement factor each atom underwent, and obtained a histogram of the number of pixels versus dark current for the full sensor. Excellent agreement with the dark current histogram measured on an ion-implanted gold-contaminated imager has been achieved, in particular, for the description of the distribution tails due to the pixel regions in which the contaminant atoms undergo a large electric field. The agreement remains very good when increasing the temperature by 15 °C. We demonstrated that the amplification of the dark current generated for the typical electric fields encountered in the CMOS image sensors, which depends on the nature of the metal contaminant, may become very large at high electric field. The electron and hole emissions and the resulting enhancement factor are described as a function of the trap characteristics, electric field, and temperature.

  8. Characterization and Predictive Value of Near Infrared 2-Deoxyglucose Optical Imaging in Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    Cristiane de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Studying the uptake of 2-deoxy glucose (2-DG analogs such as 2-Deoxy-2-[18F] fluoroglucose (FDG is a common approach to identify and monitor malignancies and more recently chronic inflammation. While pancreatitis is a common cause for false positive results in human studies on pancreatic cancer using FDG, the relevance of these findings to acute pancreatitis (AP is unknown. FDG has a short half-life. Thus, with an aim to accurately characterize the metabolic demand of the pancreas during AP in real-time, we studied the uptake of the non-radioactive, near infrared fluorescence labelled 2-deoxyglucose analog, IRDye® 800CW 2-DG probe (NIR 2-DG; Li-Cor during mild and severe biliary AP.Wistar rats (300 g; 8-12/group were administered NIR 2-DG (10 nM; I.V.. Mild and severe biliary AP were respectively induced by biliopancreatic duct ligation (DL alone or along with infusing glyceryl trilinoleate (GTL; 50 μL/100 g within 10 minutes of giving NIR 2-DG. Controls (CON only received NIR 2-DG. Imaging was done every 5-10 minutes over 3 hrs. Average Radiant Efficiency [p/s/cm²/sr]/[μW/cm²] was measured over the pancreas using the IVIS 200 in-vivo imaging system (PerkinElmer using the Living Image® software and verified in ex vivo pancreata. Blood amylase, lipase and pancreatic edema, necrosis were measured over the course of AP.NIR 2-DG uptake over the first hour was not influenced by AP induction. However, while the signal declined in controls and rats with mild AP, there was significantly higher retention of NIR 2-DG in the pancreas after 1 hour in those with GTL pancreatitis. The increase was > 3 fold over controls in the GTL group and was verified to be in the pancreas ex vivo. In vitro, pancreatic acini exposed to GTL had a similar increase in NIR 2-DG uptake which was followed by progressively worse acinar necrosis. Greater retention of NIR 2-DG in vivo was associated with worse pancreatic necrosis, reduced ATP concentrations and mortality

  9. Acoustic Characterization and Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging of Long-Circulating Lipid-Coated Microbubbles.

    Li, Hongbo; Yang, Yanye; Zhang, Meimei; Yin, Liping; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong

    2018-05-01

    A long-circulating lipid-coated ultrasound (US) contrast agent was fabricated to achieve a longer wash-out time and gain more resistance against higher-mechanical index sonication. Systemic physical, acoustic, and in vivo imaging experiments were performed to better understand the underlying mechanism enabling the improvement of contrast agent performance by adjusting the physical and acoustic properties of contrast agent microbubbles. By simply altering the gas core, a kind of US contrast agent microbubble was synthesized with a similar lipid-coating shell as SonoVue microbubbles (Bracco SpA, Milan, Italy) to achieve a longer wash-out time and higher inertial cavitation threshold. To bridge the structure-performance relationship of the synthesized microbubbles, the imaging performance of the microbubbles was assessed in vivo with SonoVue as a control group. The size distribution and inertial cavitation threshold of the synthesized microbubbles were characterized, and the shell parameters of the microbubbles were determined by acoustic attenuation measurements. All of the measurements were compared with SonoVue microbubbles. The synthesized microbubbles had a spherical shape, a smooth, consistent membrane, and a uniform distribution, with an average diameter of 1.484 μm. According to the measured attenuation curve, the synthesized microbubbles resonated at around 2.8 MHz. Although the bubble's shell elasticity (0.2 ± 0.09 N/m) was comparable with SonoVue, it had relatively greater viscosity and inertial cavitation because of the different gas core. Imaging studies showed that the synthesized microbubbles had a longer circulation time and a better chance of fighting against rapid collapse than SonoVue. Nano/micrometer long-circulating lipid-coated microbubbles could be fabricated by simply altering the core composition of SonoVue microbubbles with a higher-molecular weight gas. The smaller diameter and higher inertial cavitation threshold of the

  10. A complete characterization of the (m,n-cubes and combinatorial applications in imaging, vision and discrete geometry

    Daniel Khoshnoudirad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to provide a complete characterization of a (m,n-cube. The latter are the pieces of discrete planes appearing in Theoretical Computer Science, Discrete Geometry and Combinatorics. This characterization in three dimensions is the exact equivalent of the preimage for a discrete segment as it has been introduced by McIlroy. Further this characterization, which avoids the redundancies, reduces the combinatorial problem of determining the cardinality of the (m,n-cubes to a new combinatorial problem consisting of determining the volumic regions formed by the crossing of planes. This work can find applications in Imaging, Vision, and pattern recognition for instance.

  11. Characterization and simulation of noise in PET images reconstructed with OSEM: Development of a method for the generation of synthetic images.

    Castro, P; Huerga, C; Chamorro, P; Garayoa, J; Roch, M; Pérez, L

    2018-04-17

    The goals of the study are to characterize imaging properties in 2D PET images reconstructed with the iterative algorithm ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) and to propose a new method for the generation of synthetic images. The noise is analyzed in terms of its magnitude, spatial correlation, and spectral distribution through standard deviation, autocorrelation function, and noise power spectrum (NPS), respectively. Their variations with position and activity level are also analyzed. This noise analysis is based on phantom images acquired from 18 F uniform distributions. Experimental recovery coefficients of hot spheres in different backgrounds are employed to study the spatial resolution of the system through point spread function (PSF). The NPS and PSF functions provide the baseline for the proposed simulation method: convolution with PSF as kernel and noise addition from NPS. The noise spectral analysis shows that the main contribution is of random nature. It is also proven that attenuation correction does not alter noise texture but it modifies its magnitude. Finally, synthetic images of 2 phantoms, one of them an anatomical brain, are quantitatively compared with experimental images showing a good agreement in terms of pixel values and pixel correlations. Thus, the contrast to noise ratio for the biggest sphere in the NEMA IEC phantom is 10.7 for the synthetic image and 8.8 for the experimental image. The properties of the analyzed OSEM-PET images can be described by NPS and PSF functions. Synthetic images, even anatomical ones, are successfully generated by the proposed method based on the NPS and PSF. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Medicina Nuclear e Imagen Molecular. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  13. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing

    Sharma, Rakesh, E-mail: rs05h@fsu.ed [Departments of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2010-07-21

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  14. In vivo characterization of a new abdominal aortic aneurysm mouse model with conventional and molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    Klink, Ahmed; Heynens, Joeri; Herranz, Beatriz; Lobatto, Mark E.; Arias, Teresa; Sanders, Honorius M. H. F.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Merkx, Maarten; Nicolay, Klaas; Fuster, Valentin; Tedgui, Alain; Mallat, Ziad; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to use noninvasive conventional and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect and characterize abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in vivo. Collagen is an essential constituent of aneurysms. Noninvasive MRI of collagen may represent an opportunity to help detect

  15. Multiparametric PET imaging in thyroid malignancy characterizing tumour heterogeneity: somatostatin receptors and glucose metabolism

    Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Putzer, Daniel; Bale, Reto [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Dobrozemsky, Georg; Nilica, Bernhard; Kendler, Dorota; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    Radiolabelled somatostatin (SST) analogues have proven useful in diagnosing tumours positive for SST receptor (SSTR). As different subtypes of SSTR are expressed on the tumour cell surface, the choice of appropriate therapeutic SST analogue is crucial. We evaluated the SSTR status of thyroid cancer patients who had signs of progressive disease comparing different SSTR ligands for PET imaging to evaluate possible further therapeutic options. PET with {sup 68}Ga-radiolabelled SSTR ligands DOTA lanreotide (DOTA-LAN), DOTA-Tyr{sup 3} octreotide (DOTA-TOC) and {sup 18}F-FDG was performed in 31 patients with thyroid cancer (TC). These 31 patients comprised 18 with radioiodine non-avid differentiated TC (DTC) including 6 papillary TC (PTC), 8 follicular TC (FTC) and 4 oxyphilic TC (oxyTC), 5 with anaplastic TC (ATC), and 8 with medullary TC (MTC). The PET results were compared in a region-based evaluation. All patients underwent a PET study with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN, 28 patients with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC and 28 patients with {sup 18}F-FDG. A lack of SSTR expression was found in 13 of the 31 patients (42 %) with negative results with both SSTR tracers in 12 patients. Ambiguous results with both SSTR tracers were observed in one patient. High tracer uptake in SSTR PET images was seen in seven DTC patients (39 %; two PTC, three FTC, two oxyTC), in four ATC patients (80 %) and in six MTC patients (75 %). Lesions showing aerobic glycolysis on {sup 18}F-FDG PET were found in 24 of 28 patients (86 %) with corresponding positive results with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN in 35 % and with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC in 29 %. The heterogeneous SSTR profile of TC tumour lesions needs to be evaluated using different SSTR PET tracers to characterize more closely the SSTR subtype affinities in patients with progressive TC in order to further stratify therapy with SSTR therapeutics. (orig.)

  16. Accurate means of detecting and characterizing abnormal patterns of ventricular activation by phase image analysis

    Botvinick, E.H.; Frais, M.A.; Shosa, D.W.; O' Connell, J.W.; Pacheco-Alvarez, J.A.; Scheinman, M.; Hattner, R.S.; Morady, F.; Faulkner, D.B.

    1982-08-01

    The ability of scintigraphic phase image analysis to characterize patterns of abnormal ventricular activation was investigated. The pattern of phase distribution and sequential phase changes over both right and left ventricular regions of interest were evaluated in 16 patients with normal electrical activation and wall motion and compared with those in 8 patients with an artificial pacemaker and 4 patients with sinus rhythm with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and delta waves. Normally, the site of earliest phase angle was seen at the base of the interventricular septum, with sequential change affecting the body of the septum and the cardiac apex and then spreading laterally to involve the body of both ventricles. The site of earliest phase angle was located at the apex of the right ventricle in seven patients with a right ventricular endocardial pacemaker and on the lateral left ventricular wall in one patient with a left ventricular epicardial pacemaker. In each case the site corresponded exactly to the position of the pacing electrode as seen on posteroanterior and left lateral chest X-ray films, and sequential phase changes spread from the initial focus to affect both ventricles. In each of the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the site of earliest ventricular phase angle was located, and it corresponded exactly to the site of the bypass tract as determined by endocardial mapping. In this way, four bypass pathways, two posterior left paraseptal, one left lateral and one right lateral, were correctly localized scintigraphically. On the basis of the sequence of mechanical contraction, phase image analysis provides an accurate noninvasive method of detecting abnormal foci of ventricular activation.

  17. Accurate means of detecting and characterizing abnormal patterns of ventricular activation by phase image analysis

    Botvinick, E.H.; Frais, M.A.; Shosa, D.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Pacheco-Alvarez, J.A.; Scheinman, M.; Hattner, R.S.; Morady, F.; Faulkner, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    The ability of scintigraphic phase image analysis to characterize patterns of abnormal ventricular activation was investigated. The pattern of phase distribution and sequential phase changes over both right and left ventricular regions of interest were evaluated in 16 patients with normal electrical activation and wall motion and compared with those in 8 patients with an artificial pacemaker and 4 patients with sinus rhythm with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and delta waves. Normally, the site of earliest phase angle was seen at the base of the interventricular septum, with sequential change affecting the body of the septum and the cardiac apex and then spreading laterally to involve the body of both ventricles. The site of earliest phase angle was located at the apex of the right ventricle in seven patients with a right ventricular endocardial pacemaker and on the lateral left ventricular wall in one patient with a left ventricular epicardial pacemaker. In each case the site corresponded exactly to the position of the pacing electrode as seen on posteroanterior and left lateral chest X-ray films, and sequential phase changes spread from the initial focus to affect both ventricles. In each of the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the site of earliest ventricular phase angle was located, and it corresponded exactly to the site of the bypass tract as determined by endocardial mapping. In this way, four bypass pathways, two posterior left paraseptal, one left lateral and one right lateral, were correctly localized scintigraphically. On the basis of the sequence of mechanical contraction, phase image analysis provides an accurate noninvasive method of detecting abnormal foci of ventricular activation

  18. Pattern classification approach to characterizing solitary pulmonary nodules imaged on high-resolution computed tomography

    McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Hart, Eric M.; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Yao, Chih-Wei; Aberle, Denise R.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to characterize solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) as benign or malignant based on pattern classification techniques using size, shape, density and texture features extracted from HRCT images. HRCT images of patients with a SPN are acquired, routed through a PACS and displayed on a thoracic radiology workstation. Using the original data, the SPN is semiautomatically contoured using a nodule/background threshold. The contour is used to calculate size and several shape parameters, including compactness and bending energy. Pixels within the interior of the contour are used to calculate several features including: (1) nodule density-related features, such as representative Hounsfield number and moment of inertia, and (2) texture measures based on the spatial gray level dependence matrix and fractal dimension. The true diagnosis of the SPN is established by histology from biopsy or, in the case of some benign nodules, extended follow-up. Multi-dimensional analyses of the features are then performed to determine which features can discriminate between benign and malignant nodules. When a sufficient number of cases are obtained two pattern classifiers, a linear discriminator and a neural network, are trained and tested using a select subset of features. Preliminary data from nine (9) nodule cases have been obtained and several features extracted. While the representative CT number is a reasonably good indicator, it is an inconclusive predictor of SPN diagnosis when considered by itself. Separation between benign and malignant nodules improves when other features, such as the distribution of density as measured by moment of inertia, are included in the analysis. Software has been developed and preliminary results have been obtained which show that individual features may not be sufficient to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules. However, combinations of these features may be able to discriminate between these two classes. With

  19. Characterizing the Evolution of Circumstellar Systems with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Gemini Planet Imager

    Wolff, Schuyler; Schuyler G. Wolff

    2018-01-01

    The study of circumstellar disks at a variety of evolutionary stages is essential to understand the physical processes leading to planet formation. The recent development of high contrast instruments designed to directly image the structures surrounding nearby stars, such as the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) and coronagraphic data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have made detailed studies of circumstellar systems possible. In my thesis work I detail the observation and characterization of three systems. GPI polarization data for the transition disk, PDS 66 shows a double ring and gap structure with a temporally variable azimuthal asymmetry. This evolved morphology could indicate shadowing from some feature in the innermost regions of the disk, a gap-clearing planet, or a localized change in the dust properties of the disk. Millimeter continuum data of the DH Tau system places limits on the dust mass that is contributing to the strong accretion signature on the wide-separation planetary mass companion, DH Tau b. The lower than expected dust mass constrains the possible formation mechanism, with core accretion followed by dynamical scattering being the most likely. Finally, I present HST scattered light observations of the flared, edge-on protoplanetary disk ESO H$\\alpha$ 569. I combine these data with a spectral energy distribution to model the key structural parameters such as the geometry (disk outer radius, vertical scale height, radial flaring profile), total mass, and dust grain properties in the disk using the radiative transfer code MCFOST. In order to conduct this work, I developed a new tool set to optimize the fitting of disk parameters using the MCMC code \\texttt{emcee} to efficiently explore the high dimensional parameter space. This approach allows us to self-consistently and simultaneously fit a wide variety of observables in order to place constraints on the physical properties of a given disk, while also rigorously assessing the uncertainties in

  20. Natural and Synthetic Biohydrogels Design, Characterization, Network Structure Imaging and Modeling

    Marmorat, Clement

    Biocompatible hydrogels can be derived from materials that are naturally obtained, such as proteins or polysaccharides, or synthetic, such as poloxamers. In order to be classified as biocompatible, these water-swollen networks can not trigger a toxic response once introduced into a biological or physiological environment and, therefore, must be immunoneutral. Hyaluronic acid hydrogels can be great candidates for tissue engineering applications as long as the cross-linking chemistry and process does not affect the biocompatibility of the natural protein matrix. Thermoreversible hydrogels have the advantage of undergoing a sol/gel phase transition at specific temperatures. Thus, they are excellent candidates for biomedical applications such as drug delivery systems, wound healing coatings or cellular scaffolds. Although these hydrogels can be used in their natural form without further modification or chemical alteration, the original protein or polymer matrix is often strengthened by the use of a crosslinking agent to achieve a specific set of properties. In the case of gelatin fibril formation at low temperatures or the micellization of triblock copolymers in solution with temperature increase, the natural phase transition is modified when crosslinkers are introduced to alter the biohydrogels properties and, ultimately, disturb the system's equilibrium. By using spectroscopy techniques, rheology and cryo-imaging we investigated several biocompatible polymeric networks in their natural form as well as their engineered structures to better understand the mechanisms of gelation and artificial internal re-organization of the networks. Natural and synthetic biohydrogels were designed and their mechanical properties were characterized before imaging. Models that better describe the relationship between network configuration and resulting mechanical properties showed great agreement with experimental mesh size observations. Finally, a novel set of hybrid gels was developed

  1. Registration of whole immunohistochemical slide images: an efficient way to characterize biomarker colocalization.

    Moles Lopez, Xavier; Barbot, Paul; Van Eycke, Yves-Rémi; Verset, Laurine; Trépant, Anne-Laure; Larbanoix, Lionel; Salmon, Isabelle; Decaestecker, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Extracting accurate information from complex biological processes involved in diseases, such as cancers, requires the simultaneous targeting of multiple proteins and locating their respective expression in tissue samples. This information can be collected by imaging and registering adjacent sections from the same tissue sample and stained by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Registration accuracy should be on the scale of a few cells to enable protein colocalization to be assessed. We propose a simple and efficient method based on the open-source elastix framework to register virtual slides of adjacent sections from the same tissue sample. We characterize registration accuracies for different types of tissue and IHC staining. Our results indicate that this technique is suitable for the evaluation of the colocalization of biomarkers on the scale of a few cells. We also show that using this technique in conjunction with a sequential IHC labeling and erasing technique offers improved registration accuracies. Brightfield IHC enables to address the problem of large series of tissue samples, which are usually required in clinical research. However, this approach, which is simple at the tissue processing level, requires challenging image analysis processes, such as accurate registration, to view and extract the protein colocalization information. The method proposed in this work enables accurate registration (on the scale of a few cells) of virtual slides of adjacent tissue sections on which the expression of different proteins is evidenced by standard IHC. Furthermore, combining our method with a sequential labeling and erasing technique enables cell-scale colocalization. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comFor numbered affiliations see end of article.

  2. Characterization biometric and morphophysiological of Peach rootstock seeds using images of their seedling vigor.

    Souza, Aline Das Graças; Smiderle, Oscar Jose; Bianchi, Valmor Joao

    2018-04-26

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of using the computerized imaging seed analysis system (SAS) in the biometric and morphophysiological characterization of seeds and the initial growth of seedlings from peach rootstocks. The experimental design was completely randomized with five replicates of 20 seeds. The variables analyzed were degree of seed humidity, length and width of seeds measured by SAS technology and manual measurements, mean germination time, germination percentage, radicle length and width, taproot length, length of the aerial part and taproot/aerial part ratio. The highest seed length, germination percentage (100%) and lower germination time (11.3), were obtained with the cv. Capdeboscq while, 'Tsukuba 1', 2' and 3' had intermediate seedlings length, varying from 1.55 to 1.65 cm with mean germination times between 14.5 and 18.0 days and average germination percentage of 96%. The computerized analysis of images is fast and efficient for biometric evaluations such as seed width and length, as well as initial growth of peach tree seedlings. The cvs Capdeboscq, Flordaguard and Tsukuba 2 presented greater radicle width, length and a mean taproot/aerial part ratio equal to 2, as well as higher number of adventitious roots, which indicated a strong positive correlation between radicle length, taproot length and initial seedling growth. The continuity of the research will certainly allow the development of reliable procedures for other species, besides allowing the identification of wider alternatives for the use of this system for the expansion of knowledge in the areas of physiology and evaluation of the physiological potential of seeds. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Multi-scale Multi-dimensional Imaging and Characterization of Oil Shale Pyrolysis

    Gao, Y.; Saif, T.; Lin, Q.; Al-Khulaifi, Y.; Blunt, M. J.; Bijeljic, B.

    2017-12-01

    The microstructural evaluation of fine grained rocks is challenging which demands the use of several complementary methods. Oil shale, a fine-grained organic-rich sedimentary rock, represents a large and mostly untapped unconventional hydrocarbon resource with global reserves estimated at 4.8 trillion barrels. The largest known deposit is the Eocene Green River Formation in Western Colorado, Eastern Utah, and Southern Wyoming. An improved insight into the mineralogy, organic matter distribution and pore network structure before, during and after oil shale pyrolysis is critical to understanding hydrocarbon flow behaviour and improving recovery. In this study, we image Mahogany zone oil shale samples in two dimensions (2-D) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and in three dimensions (3-D) using focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), laboratory-based X-ray micro-tomography (µCT) and synchrotron X-ray µCT to reveal a complex and variable fine grained microstructure dominated by organic-rich parallel laminations which are tightly bound in a highly calcareous and heterogeneous mineral matrix. We report the results of a detailed µCT study of the Mahogany oil shale with increasing pyrolysis temperature. The physical transformation of the internal microstructure and evolution of pore space during the thermal conversion of kerogen in oil shale to produce hydrocarbon products was characterized. The 3-D volumes of pyrolyzed oil shale were reconstructed and image processed to visualize and quantify the volume and connectivity of the pore space. The results show a significant increase in anisotropic porosity associated with pyrolysis between 300-500°C with the formation of micron-scale connected pore channels developing principally along the kerogen-rich lamellar structures.

  4. Multiscale imaging and characterization of the effect of mixing temperature on asphalt concrete containing recycled components.

    Cavalli, M C; Griffa, M; Bressi, S; Partl, M N; Tebaldi, G; Poulikakos, L D

    2016-10-01

    When producing asphalt concrete mixture with high amounts of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP), the mixing temperature plays a significant role in the resulting spatial distribution of the components as well as on the quality of the resulting mixture, in terms of workability during mixing and compaction as well as in service mechanical properties. Asphalt concrete containing 50% RAP was investigated at mixing temperatures of 140, 160 and 180°C, using a multiscale approach. At the microscale, using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy the RAP binder film thickness was visualized and measured. It was shown that at higher mixing temperatures this film thickness was reduced. The reduction in film thickness can be attributed to the loss of volatiles as well as the mixing of RAP binder with virgin binder at higher temperatures. X-ray computer tomography was used to characterize statistically the distribution of the RAP and virgin aggregates geometric features: volume, width and shape anisotropy. In addition using X-ray computer tomography, the packing and spatial distribution of the RAP and virgin aggregates was characterized using the nearest neighbour metric. It was shown that mixing temperature may have a positive effect on the spatial distribution of the aggregates but did not affect the packing. The study shows a tendency for the RAP aggregates to be more likely distributed in clusters at lower mixing temperatures. At higher temperatures, they were more homogeneously distributed. This indicates a higher degree of blending both at microscale (binder film) and macroscale (spatial distribution) between RAP and virgin aggregates as a result of increasing mixing temperatures and the ability to quantify this using various imaging techniques. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. A fractal derivative model for the characterization of anomalous diffusion in magnetic resonance imaging

    Liang, Yingjie; Ye, Allen Q.; Chen, Wen; Gatto, Rodolfo G.; Colon-Perez, Luis; Mareci, Thomas H.; Magin, Richard L.

    2016-10-01

    Non-Gaussian (anomalous) diffusion is wide spread in biological tissues where its effects modulate chemical reactions and membrane transport. When viewed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), anomalous diffusion is characterized by a persistent or 'long tail' behavior in the decay of the diffusion signal. Recent MRI studies have used the fractional derivative to describe diffusion dynamics in normal and post-mortem tissue by connecting the order of the derivative with changes in tissue composition, structure and complexity. In this study we consider an alternative approach by introducing fractal time and space derivatives into Fick's second law of diffusion. This provides a more natural way to link sub-voxel tissue composition with the observed MRI diffusion signal decay following the application of a diffusion-sensitive pulse sequence. Unlike previous studies using fractional order derivatives, here the fractal derivative order is directly connected to the Hausdorff fractal dimension of the diffusion trajectory. The result is a simpler, computationally faster, and more direct way to incorporate tissue complexity and microstructure into the diffusional dynamics. Furthermore, the results are readily expressed in terms of spectral entropy, which provides a quantitative measure of the overall complexity of the heterogeneous and multi-scale structure of biological tissues. As an example, we apply this new model for the characterization of diffusion in fixed samples of the mouse brain. These results are compared with those obtained using the mono-exponential, the stretched exponential, the fractional derivative, and the diffusion kurtosis models. Overall, we find that the order of the fractal time derivative, the diffusion coefficient, and the spectral entropy are potential biomarkers to differentiate between the microstructure of white and gray matter. In addition, we note that the fractal derivative model has practical advantages over the existing models from the

  6. Methodology for cork plank characterization (Quercus suber L.) by near-infrared spectroscopy and image analysis

    Prades, Cristina; García-Olmo, Juan; Romero-Prieto, Tomás; García de Ceca, José L.; López-Luque, Rafael

    2010-06-01

    The procedures used today to characterize cork plank for the manufacture of cork bottle stoppers continue to be based on a traditional, manual method that is highly subjective. Furthermore, there is no specific legislation regarding cork classification. The objective of this viability study is to assess the potential of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology for characterizing cork plank according to the following variables: aspect or visual quality, porosity, moisture and geographical origin. In order to calculate the porosity coefficient, an image analysis program was specifically developed in Visual Basic language for a desktop scanner. A set comprising 170 samples from two geographical areas of Andalusia (Spain) was classified into eight quality classes by visual inspection. Spectra were obtained in the transverse and tangential sections of the cork planks using an NIRSystems 6500 SY II reflectance spectrophotometer. The quantitative calibrations showed cross-validation coefficients of determination of 0.47 for visual quality, 0.69 for porosity and 0.66 for moisture. The results obtained using NIRS technology are promising considering the heterogeneity and variability of a natural product such as cork in spite of the fact that the standard error of cross validation (SECV) in the quantitative analysis is greater than the standard error of laboratory (SEL) for the three variables. The qualitative analysis regarding geographical origin achieved very satisfactory results. Applying these methods in industry will permit quality control procedures to be automated, as well as establishing correlations between the different classification systems currently used in the sector. These methods can be implemented in the cork chain of custody certification and will also provide a certainly more objective tool for assessing the economic value of the product.

  7. Study of adolescents’ multifactorial self-image components based on their own self-characterizations

    Horvath, Zsofia Iren

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The most important questions of human existence and development – Who am I? What am I like? – concerned every thinking human in all cultural-historical ages. These questions remain timely even in our rapidly changing postmodern society.The goal of our research is the examination of adolescents’ self-characterization, the outlining of the self-image components age characteristics, the establishment of differences resulting from their environment. Our examination is part of the 2005/2006 school year evaluation (Pletl, 2011 regarding Transylvanian students’ composition skills. In the present research we have analyzed a total of 1602 self-characterization of Transylvanian Hungarian students. Results show that fifth grade students have dichotomous thinking that becomes more sophisticated by the time they get into the eighth grade. Eighth grade students referred significantly more often to the categories Emotions, Satisfaction, Social attitudes, School achievement, Special interests and mentioned more personality traits. In the comparison by location, more similarities and fewer differences were outlined. However, urban students referred significantly more often to emotions and satisfaction, while rural students mentioned more frequently characteristics like good-hearted and diligent. The study also outlined two major deficiencies. No significant difference was found between the two grades in naming abilities, and referring to Science and Language. We strongly believe that school should be more than simply a place for traditional teaching; effective education and personal development should spread to new areas like the development of self-reflective thinking, the shaping of personal competence and the operation of Career and Vocational Counseling.

  8. Form and function in hillslope hydrology: in situ imaging and characterization of flow-relevant structures

    C. Jackisch

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with the identification and characterization of rapid subsurface flow structures through pedo- and geo-physical measurements and irrigation experiments at the point, plot and hillslope scale. Our investigation of flow-relevant structures and hydrological responses refers to the general interplay of form and function, respectively. To obtain a holistic picture of the subsurface, a large set of different laboratory, exploratory and experimental methods was used at the different scales. For exploration these methods included drilled soil core profiles, in situ measurements of infiltration capacity and saturated hydraulic conductivity, and laboratory analyses of soil water retention and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The irrigation experiments at the plot scale were monitored through a combination of dye tracer, salt tracer, soil moisture dynamics, and 3-D time-lapse ground penetrating radar (GPR methods. At the hillslope scale the subsurface was explored by a 3-D GPR survey. A natural storm event and an irrigation experiment were monitored by a dense network of soil moisture observations and a cascade of 2-D time-lapse GPR trenches. We show that the shift between activated and non-activated state of the flow paths is needed to distinguish structures from overall heterogeneity. Pedo-physical analyses of point-scale samples are the basis for sub-scale structure inference. At the plot and hillslope scale 3-D and 2-D time-lapse GPR applications are successfully employed as non-invasive means to image subsurface response patterns and to identify flow-relevant paths. Tracer recovery and soil water responses from irrigation experiments deliver a consistent estimate of response velocities. The combined observation of form and function under active conditions provides the means to localize and characterize the structures (this study and the hydrological processes (companion study Angermann et al., 2017, this issue.

  9. Form and function in hillslope hydrology: in situ imaging and characterization of flow-relevant structures

    Jackisch, Conrad; Angermann, Lisa; Allroggen, Niklas; Sprenger, Matthias; Blume, Theresa; Tronicke, Jens; Zehe, Erwin

    2017-07-01

    The study deals with the identification and characterization of rapid subsurface flow structures through pedo- and geo-physical measurements and irrigation experiments at the point, plot and hillslope scale. Our investigation of flow-relevant structures and hydrological responses refers to the general interplay of form and function, respectively. To obtain a holistic picture of the subsurface, a large set of different laboratory, exploratory and experimental methods was used at the different scales. For exploration these methods included drilled soil core profiles, in situ measurements of infiltration capacity and saturated hydraulic conductivity, and laboratory analyses of soil water retention and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The irrigation experiments at the plot scale were monitored through a combination of dye tracer, salt tracer, soil moisture dynamics, and 3-D time-lapse ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods. At the hillslope scale the subsurface was explored by a 3-D GPR survey. A natural storm event and an irrigation experiment were monitored by a dense network of soil moisture observations and a cascade of 2-D time-lapse GPR trenches. We show that the shift between activated and non-activated state of the flow paths is needed to distinguish structures from overall heterogeneity. Pedo-physical analyses of point-scale samples are the basis for sub-scale structure inference. At the plot and hillslope scale 3-D and 2-D time-lapse GPR applications are successfully employed as non-invasive means to image subsurface response patterns and to identify flow-relevant paths. Tracer recovery and soil water responses from irrigation experiments deliver a consistent estimate of response velocities. The combined observation of form and function under active conditions provides the means to localize and characterize the structures (this study) and the hydrological processes (companion study Angermann et al., 2017, this issue).

  10. Methodology for cork plank characterization (Quercus suber L.) by near-infrared spectroscopy and image analysis

    Prades, Cristina; López-Luque, Rafael; García-Olmo, Juan; Romero-Prieto, Tomás; García de Ceca, José L

    2010-01-01

    The procedures used today to characterize cork plank for the manufacture of cork bottle stoppers continue to be based on a traditional, manual method that is highly subjective. Furthermore, there is no specific legislation regarding cork classification. The objective of this viability study is to assess the potential of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology for characterizing cork plank according to the following variables: aspect or visual quality, porosity, moisture and geographical origin. In order to calculate the porosity coefficient, an image analysis program was specifically developed in Visual Basic language for a desktop scanner. A set comprising 170 samples from two geographical areas of Andalusia (Spain) was classified into eight quality classes by visual inspection. Spectra were obtained in the transverse and tangential sections of the cork planks using an NIRSystems 6500 SY II reflectance spectrophotometer. The quantitative calibrations showed cross-validation coefficients of determination of 0.47 for visual quality, 0.69 for porosity and 0.66 for moisture. The results obtained using NIRS technology are promising considering the heterogeneity and variability of a natural product such as cork in spite of the fact that the standard error of cross validation (SECV) in the quantitative analysis is greater than the standard error of laboratory (SEL) for the three variables. The qualitative analysis regarding geographical origin achieved very satisfactory results. Applying these methods in industry will permit quality control procedures to be automated, as well as establishing correlations between the different classification systems currently used in the sector. These methods can be implemented in the cork chain of custody certification and will also provide a certainly more objective tool for assessing the economic value of the product

  11. A combined use of multispectral and SAR images for ship detection and characterization through object based image analysis

    Aiello, Martina; Gianinetto, Marco

    2017-10-01

    Marine routes represent a huge portion of commercial and human trades, therefore surveillance, security and environmental protection themes are gaining increasing importance. Being able to overcome the limits imposed by terrestrial means of monitoring, ship detection from satellite has recently prompted a renewed interest for a continuous monitoring of illegal activities. This paper describes an automatic Object Based Image Analysis (OBIA) approach to detect vessels made of different materials in various sea environments. The combined use of multispectral and SAR images allows for a regular observation unrestricted by lighting and atmospheric conditions and complementarity in terms of geographic coverage and geometric detail. The method developed adopts a region growing algorithm to segment the image in homogeneous objects, which are then classified through a decision tree algorithm based on spectral and geometrical properties. Then, a spatial analysis retrieves the vessels' position, length and heading parameters and a speed range is associated. Optimization of the image processing chain is performed by selecting image tiles through a statistical index. Vessel candidates are detected over amplitude SAR images using an adaptive threshold Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) algorithm prior the object based analysis. Validation is carried out by comparing the retrieved parameters with the information provided by the Automatic Identification System (AIS), when available, or with manual measurement when AIS data are not available. The estimation of length shows R2=0.85 and estimation of heading R2=0.92, computed as the average of R2 values obtained for both optical and radar images.

  12. WE-E-17A-01: Characterization of An Imaging-Based Model of Tumor Angiogenesis

    Adhikarla, V; Jeraj, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the transient dynamics of tumor oxygenation is important when evaluating tumor-vasculature response to anti-angiogenic therapies. An imaging-based tumor-vasculature model was used to elucidate factors that affect these dynamics. Methods: Tumor growth depends on its doubling time (Td). Hypoxia increases pro-angiogenic factor (VEGF) concentration which is modeled to reduce vessel perfusion, attributing to its effect of increasing vascular permeability. Perfused vessel recruitment depends on the existing perfused vasculature, VEGF concentration and maximum VEGF concentration (VEGFmax) for vessel dysfunction. A convolution-based algorithm couples the tumor to the normal tissue vessel density (VD-nt). The parameters are benchmarked to published pre-clinical data and a sensitivity study evaluating the changes in the peak and time to peak tumor oxygenation characterizes them. The model is used to simulate changes in hypoxia and proliferation PET imaging data obtained using [Cu- 61]Cu-ATSM and [F-18]FLT respectively. Results: Td and VD-nt were found to be the most influential on peak tumor pO2 while VEGFmax was marginally influential. A +20 % change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax resulted in +50%, +25% and +5% increase in peak pO2. In contrast, Td was the most influential on the time to peak oxygenation with VD-nt and VEGFmax playing marginal roles. A +20% change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax increased the time to peak pO2 by +50%, +5% and +0%. A −20% change in the above parameters resulted in comparable decreases in the peak and time to peak pO2. Model application to the PET data was able to demonstrate the voxel-specific changes in hypoxia of the imaged tumor. Conclusion: Tumor-specific doubling time and vessel density are important parameters to be considered when evaluating hypoxia transients. While the current model simulates the oxygen dynamics of an untreated tumor, incorporation of therapeutic effects can make the model a potent tool for analyzing

  13. Micro-structural characterization of materials using synchrotron hard X-ray imaging techniques

    Agrawal, Ashish; Singh, Balwant; Kashyap, Yogesh; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging has been an important tool to study the materials microstructure with the laboratory based sources however the advent of third generation synchrotron sources has introduced new concepts in X-ray imaging such as phase contrast imaging, micro-tomography, fluorescence imaging and diffraction enhance imaging. These techniques are being used to provide information of materials about their density distribution, porosity, geometrical and morphological characteristics at sub-micron scalewith improved contrast. This paper discusses the development of various imaging techniques at synchrotron based imaging beamline Indus-2 and few recent experiments carried out at this facility

  14. A method to obtain reference images for evaluation of ultrasonic tissue characterization techniques

    Jensen, M.S.; Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Sahl, B.

    2002-01-01

    of the macroscopic photograph, due to the histological preparation process. The histological information was "mapped back" into the format of the ultrasound images the following way: On the macroscopic images, outlines were drawn manually which defined the border of the tissue. These outlines were superimposed...... of the various tissue types. Specifically, the macroscopic image revealed the borders between the different tissues, while the histological image identified the four tissue types. A set of 12 reference images based on modified macroscopic outlines was created. The overlap between the ultrasound images...... and the macroscopic images-which are the geometrical basis for the final reference images-was between 77% and 93%. A set of 12 reference images spaced 2.5 mm, identifying spatial location of four different tissue types in porcine muscle has been created. With the reference images, it is possible to quantitatively...

  15. RootAnalyzer: A Cross-Section Image Analysis Tool for Automated Characterization of Root Cells and Tissues.

    Joshua Chopin

    Full Text Available The morphology of plant root anatomical features is a key factor in effective water and nutrient uptake. Existing techniques for phenotyping root anatomical traits are often based on manual or semi-automatic segmentation and annotation of microscopic images of root cross sections. In this article, we propose a fully automated tool, hereinafter referred to as RootAnalyzer, for efficiently extracting and analyzing anatomical traits from root-cross section images. Using a range of image processing techniques such as local thresholding and nearest neighbor identification, RootAnalyzer segments the plant root from the image's background, classifies and characterizes the cortex, stele, endodermis and epidermis, and subsequently produces statistics about the morphological properties of the root cells and tissues. We use RootAnalyzer to analyze 15 images of wheat plants and one maize plant image and evaluate its performance against manually-obtained ground truth data. The comparison shows that RootAnalyzer can fully characterize most root tissue regions with over 90% accuracy.

  16. Characterization of UV-enhanced SiPMs for Imaging in High Pressure Xenon Electroluminescent TPC

    Yahlali, Nadia; Lorca, David; Fernandes, L.M.P.

    2013-06-01

    The possibility of recording charged particle tracks in an electro-luminescent xenon gas TPC is investigated using a SiPM-based tracking system, operated in the demonstrator prototype of the NEXT-100 ββ decay experiment. The tracks of the ββ0ν events from the decay of the 136 Xe isotope have a distinctive topology, which allows their discrimination against single-electron events from the natural radioactivity that populates the region of interest of the neutrinoless decay in the ββ energy spectrum. Combined to the near-intrinsic energy resolution of the gaseous detector, this tracking capability provides a powerful background rejection tool for the search of the neutrinoless ββ decay aimed by the experiment. The NEXT-100 detector concepts and sensitivity and the first results of its demonstrator prototype are presented. The characterization studies relevant for the operation of UV-enhanced SiPMs used for imaging in an electro-luminescent TPC are reviewed. (authors)

  17. Characterization of a new fertilizer during field trials by hyperspectral imaging

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia; Trella, Agata; Garcia Izquierdo, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    This work was carried out in the framework of the LIFE RESAFE Project (LIFE12 ENV/IT/000356) "Innovative fertilizer from urban waste, bio-char and farm residues as substitute of chemical fertilizers". The aim of RESAFE project is the production of a new fertilizer from waste for agricultural practices. The new fertilizer was tested on 5 different crops during field trials carried out in Spain: barley, corn, tomato, potato and melon. For each crop six different treatments were applied and compared to verify the quality of RESAFE fertilizer. Soil samples were collected at the beginning and at the end of the experiment. The possibility to apply hyperspectral imaging (HSI) to perform soil evolution monitoring and characterization in respect to the fertilizer utilization and quality of the resulting crops was investigated. Soil samples were acquired by HSI in the near infrared field (1000-1700 nm) and on the same samples classical chemical analyses were carried out with reference to total nitrogen, total organic carbon, C/N ratio, total organic matter. Hyperspectral data were analyzed adopting a chemometric approach through application of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for exploratory purposes and Partial Least Squares Analysis (PLS) for estimation of chemical parameters. The results showed as the proposed hardware and software integrated architecture allows to implement low cost and easy to use analytical procedures able to quantitatively assess soil chemical-physical attributes according to different fertilization strategies, in respect of different environmental conditions and selected crops.

  18. Characterization of lipidic markers of chondrogenic differentiation using mass spectrometry imaging.

    Rocha, Beatriz; Cillero-Pastor, Berta; Eijkel, Gert; Bruinen, Anne L; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Heeren, Ron M A; Blanco, Francisco J

    2015-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are an interesting alternative for cell-based therapy of cartilage defects attributable to their capacity to differentiate toward chondrocytes in the process termed chondrogenesis. The metabolism of lipids has recently been associated with the modulation of chondrogenesis and also with the development of pathologies related to cartilage degeneration. Information about the distribution and modulation of lipids during chondrogenesis could provide a panel of putative chondrogenic markers. Thus, the discovery of new lipid chondrogenic markers could be highly valuable for improving MSC-based cartilage therapies. In this work, MS imaging was used to characterize the spatial distribution of lipids in human bone marrow MSCs during the first steps of chondrogenic differentiation. The analysis of MSC micromasses at days 2 and 14 of chondrogenesis by MALDI-MSI led to the identification of 20 different lipid species, including fatty acids, sphingolipids, and phospholipids. Phosphocholine, several sphingomyelins, and phosphatidylcholines were found to increase during the undifferentiated chondrogenic stage. A particularly detected lipid profile was verified by TOF secondary ion MS. Using this technology, a higher intensity of phosphocholine-related ions was observed in the peripheral region of the micromasses collected at day 14. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Characterization of lipid films by an angle-interrogation surface plasmon resonance imaging device.

    Liu, Linlin; Wang, Qiong; Yang, Zhong; Wang, Wangang; Hu, Ning; Luo, Hongyan; Liao, Yanjian; Zheng, Xiaolin; Yang, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Surface topographies of lipid films have an important significance in the analysis of the preparation of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). In order to achieve accurately high-throughput and rapidly analysis of surface topographies of lipid films, a homemade SPR imaging device is constructed based on the classical Kretschmann configuration and an angle interrogation manner. A mathematical model is developed to accurately describe the shift including the light path in different conditions and the change of the illumination point on the CCD camera, and thus a SPR curve for each sampling point can also be achieved, based on this calculation method. The experiment results show that the topographies of lipid films formed in distinct experimental conditions can be accurately characterized, and the measuring resolution of the thickness lipid film may reach 0.05 nm. Compared with existing SPRi devices, which realize detection by monitoring the change of the reflective-light intensity, this new SPRi system can achieve the change of the resonance angle on the entire sensing surface. Thus, it has higher detection accuracy as the traditional angle-interrogation SPR sensor, with much wider detectable range of refractive index. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A thematic content analysis of #cheatmeal images on social media: Characterizing an emerging dietary trend.

    Pila, Eva; Mond, Jonathan M; Griffiths, Scott; Mitchison, Deborah; Murray, Stuart B

    2017-06-01

    Despite the pervasive social endorsement of "cheat meals" within pro-muscularity online communities, there is an absence of empirical work examining this dietary phenomenon. The present study aimed to characterize cheat meals, and explore the meaning ascribed to engagement in this practice. Thematic content analysis was employed to code the photographic and textual elements of a sample (n = 600) that was extracted from over 1.6 million images marked with the #cheatmeal tag on the social networking site, Instagram. Analysis of the volume and type of food revealed the presence of very large quantities (54.5%) of calorie-dense foods (71.3%) that was rated to qualify as an objective binge episode. Photographic content of people commonly portrayed highly-muscular bodies (60.7%) in the act of intentional body exposure (40.0%). Meanwhile, textual content exemplified the idealization of overconsumption, a strict commitment to fitness, and a reward-based framework around diet and fitness. Collectively, these findings position cheat meals as goal-oriented dietary practices in the pursuit of physique-ideals, thus underscoring the potential clinical repercussions of this socially-endorsed dietary phenomenon. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Experimental characterization of solid particle transport by slug flow using Particle Image Velocimetry

    Goharzadeh, A; Rodgers, P

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of gas-liquid slug flow on solid particle transport inside a horizontal pipe with two types of experiments conducted. The influence of slug length on solid particle transportation is characterized using high speed photography. Using combined Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) with Refractive Index Matching (RIM) and fluorescent tracers (two-phase oil-air loop) the velocity distribution inside the slug body is measured. Combining these experimental analyses, an insight is provided into the physical mechanism of solid particle transportation due to slug flow. It was observed that the slug body significantly influences solid particle mobility. The physical mechanism of solid particle transportation was found to be discontinuous. The inactive region (in terms of solid particle transport) upstream of the slug nose was quantified as a function of gas-liquid composition and solid particle size. Measured velocity distributions showed a significant drop in velocity magnitude immediately upstream of the slug nose and therefore the critical velocity for solid particle lifting is reached further upstream.

  2. Characterization and recognition of mixed emotional expressions in thermal face image

    Saha, Priya; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; De, Barin K.; Nasipuri, Mita

    2016-05-01

    Facial expressions in infrared imaging have been introduced to solve the problem of illumination, which is an integral constituent of visual imagery. The paper investigates facial skin temperature distribution on mixed thermal facial expressions of our created face database where six are basic expressions and rest 12 are a mixture of those basic expressions. Temperature analysis has been performed on three facial regions of interest (ROIs); periorbital, supraorbital and mouth. Temperature variability of the ROIs in different expressions has been measured using statistical parameters. The temperature variation measurement in ROIs of a particular expression corresponds to a vector, which is later used in recognition of mixed facial expressions. Investigations show that facial features in mixed facial expressions can be characterized by positive emotion induced facial features and negative emotion induced facial features. Supraorbital is a useful facial region that can differentiate basic expressions from mixed expressions. Analysis and interpretation of mixed expressions have been conducted with the help of box and whisker plot. Facial region containing mixture of two expressions is generally less temperature inducing than corresponding facial region containing basic expressions.

  3. Quantitative phase imaging characterization of tumor-associated blood vessel formation on a chip

    Guo, Peng; Huang, Jing; Moses, Marsha A.

    2018-02-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from existing ones, is a biological process that has an essential role in solid tumor growth, development, and progression. Recent advances in Lab-on-a-Chip technology has created an opportunity for scientists to observe endothelial cell (EC) behaviors during the dynamic process of angiogenesis using a simple and economical in vitro platform that recapitulates in vivo blood vessel formation. Here, we use quantitative phase imaging (QPI) microscopy to continuously and non-invasively characterize the dynamic process of tumor cell-induced angiogenic sprout formation on a microfluidic chip. The live tumor cell-induced angiogenic sprouts are generated by multicellular endothelial sprouting into 3 dimensional (3D) Matrigel using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By using QPI, we quantitatively measure a panel of cellular morphological and behavioral parameters of each individual EC participating in this sprouting. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate that QPI is a powerful tool that can provide real-time quantitative analysis of biological processes in in vitro 3D biomimetic devices, which, in turn, can improve our understanding of the biology underlying functional tissue engineering.

  4. Murine liver implantation of radiation-induced fibrosarcoma: characterization with MR imaging, microangiography and histopathology

    Wang, Huaijun; Keyzer, Frederik de; Jin, Lixin; Yu, Jie; Marchal, Guy; Ni, Yicheng [Catholic University of Leuven, Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Putte, Marie van de; Witte, Peter de [K.U. Leuven, Laboratory for Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Leuven (Belgium); Chen, Feng [Catholic University of Leuven, Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Southeast University, Department of Radiology, Zhong Da Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2008-07-15

    We sought to establish and characterize a mouse liver tumor model as a platform for preclinical assessment of new diagnostics and therapeutics. Radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) was intrahepatically implanted in 27 C3H/Km mice. Serial in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a clinical 1.5-T-magnet was performed using T1- (T1WI), T2- (T2WI), and diffusion-weighted sequences (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), and contrast-enhanced T1WI, and validated with postmortem microangiography and histopathology. Implantation procedure succeeded in 25 mice with 2 deaths from overdosed anesthesia or hypothermia. RIF-1 grew in 21 mice with volume doubling time of 2.55{+-}0.88 days and final size of 216.2{+-}150.4 mm{sup 3} at day 14. Three mice were found without tumor growth and one only with abdominal seeding. The intrahepatic RIF-1 was hypervascularized with negligible necrosis as shown on MRI, microangiography and histology. On DCE-MRI, maximal initial slope of contrast-time curve and volume transfer constant per unit volume of tissue, K, differed between the tumor and liver with only the former significantly lower in the tumor than in the liver (P<0.05). Liver implantation of RIF-1 in mice proves a feasible and reproducible model and appears promising for use to screen new diagnostics and therapeutics under noninvasive monitoring even with a clinical MRI system. (orig.)

  5. Multi-Scale Characterization of the PEPCK-Cmus Mouse through 3D Cryo-Imaging

    Debashish Roy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed, for the Case 3D Cryo-imaging system, a specialized, multiscale visualization scheme which provides color-rich volume rendering and multiplanar reformatting enabling one to visualize an entire mouse and zoom in to organ, tissue, and microscopic scales. With this system, we have anatomically characterized, in 3D, from whole animal to tissue level, a transgenic mouse and compared it with its control. The transgenic mouse overexpresses the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C in its skeletal muscle and is capable of greatly enhanced physical endurance and has a longer life-span and reproductive life as compared to control animals. We semiautomatically analyzed selected organs such as kidney, heart, adrenal gland, spleen, and ovaries and found comparatively enlarged heart, much less visceral, subcutaneous, and pericardial adipose tissue, and higher tibia-to-femur ratio in the transgenic animal. Microscopically, individual skeletal muscle fibers, fine mesenteric blood vessels, and intestinal villi, among others, were clearly seen.

  6. Murine liver implantation of radiation-induced fibrosarcoma: characterization with MR imaging, microangiography and histopathology

    Wang, Huaijun; Keyzer, Frederik de; Jin, Lixin; Yu, Jie; Marchal, Guy; Ni, Yicheng; Putte, Marie van de; Witte, Peter de; Chen, Feng

    2008-01-01

    We sought to establish and characterize a mouse liver tumor model as a platform for preclinical assessment of new diagnostics and therapeutics. Radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) was intrahepatically implanted in 27 C3H/Km mice. Serial in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a clinical 1.5-T-magnet was performed using T1- (T1WI), T2- (T2WI), and diffusion-weighted sequences (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), and contrast-enhanced T1WI, and validated with postmortem microangiography and histopathology. Implantation procedure succeeded in 25 mice with 2 deaths from overdosed anesthesia or hypothermia. RIF-1 grew in 21 mice with volume doubling time of 2.55±0.88 days and final size of 216.2±150.4 mm 3 at day 14. Three mice were found without tumor growth and one only with abdominal seeding. The intrahepatic RIF-1 was hypervascularized with negligible necrosis as shown on MRI, microangiography and histology. On DCE-MRI, maximal initial slope of contrast-time curve and volume transfer constant per unit volume of tissue, K, differed between the tumor and liver with only the former significantly lower in the tumor than in the liver (P<0.05). Liver implantation of RIF-1 in mice proves a feasible and reproducible model and appears promising for use to screen new diagnostics and therapeutics under noninvasive monitoring even with a clinical MRI system. (orig.)

  7. Characterizing shock waves in hydrogel using high speed imaging and a fiber-optic probe hydrophone

    Anderson, Phillip A.; Betney, M. R.; Doyle, H. W.; Tully, B.; Ventikos, Y.; Hawker, N. A.; Roy, Ronald A.

    2017-05-01

    The impact of a stainless steel disk-shaped projectile launched by a single-stage light gas gun is used to generate planar shock waves with amplitudes on the order of 102MPa in a hydrogel target material. These shock waves are characterized using ultra-high-speed imaging as well as a fiber-optic probe hydrophone. Although the hydrogel equation of state (EOS) is unknown, the combination of these measurements with conservation of mass and momentum allows us to calculate pressure. It is also shown that although the hydrogel behaves similarly to water, the use of a water EOS underpredicts pressure amplitudes in the hydrogel by ˜10 % at the shock front. Further, the water EOS predicts pressures approximately 2% higher than those determined by conservation laws for a given value of the shock velocity. Shot to shot repeatability is controlled to within 10%, with the shock speed and pressure increasing as a function of the velocity of the projectile at impact. Thus the projectile velocity may be used as an adequate predictor of shock conditions in future work with a restricted suite of diagnostics.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of bioresorbable calcium phosphosilicate nanocomposite particles for fluorescence imaging and biomedical applications

    Morgan, Thomas T.

    Organically doped calcium phosphosilicate nanoparticles (CPSNPs) were developed and characterized, driven by the need for non-toxic vectors for drug delivery and fluorescence biological imaging applications. In particular, advancement in drug delivery for the chemotherapeutic treatment of cancers is required to increase drug efficacy and improve patient quality of life. Additionally, brighter and more photostable fluorophores are needed to meet demands for improved sensitivity and experimental diversity, which may lead to improvements in early detection of solid tumors and advancement in understanding of biological processes. A literature survey on the state of the field for nanoparticle based biological fluorescence imaging and drug delivery is presented in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 focuses on the characterization techniques used in this work. The development and optical characterization of 20-40 nm diameter, citrate functionalized Cy3 amidite doped calcium phosphosilicate nanoparticles (Cy3 CPSNPs) for in vitro fluorescence imaging is outlined in Chapters 3 and 4, respectively. In particular, sodium citrate was used to functionalize the surface and provide electrosteric dispersion of these particles. CPSNPs stabilized with sodium citrate routinely exhibited highly negative zeta potentials greater than -25 mV in magnitude. Furthermore, the fluorescence quantum yield of the encapsulated fluorophore was improved by more than 4.5-fold when compared to the unencapsulated dye. The bioimaging and drug delivery capability of CPSNPs was explored. Cy3 CPSNPs dissolved quickly in the acidic environment experienced during endocytosis, releasing the encapsulated fluorophore. This is consistent with solution phase experiments that show the particles are dissolved at pH 5. CPSNPs loaded with fluorescein and a hydrophobic growth inhibitor, ceramide C6, proved the ability to simultaneously image and delivery of the hydrophobic drug to cells in vitro. Chapter 5 examined the colloidal

  9. Preparation and characterization of alginate based-fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for fluorescence/magnetic resonance multimodal imaging applications

    Kwon, Yong-Su; Choi, Kee-Bong; Lim, Hyungjun; Lee, Sunghwi; Lee, Jae-Jong

    2018-06-01

    Simple and versatile methodologies have been reported that customize the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles and impart additional fluorescence capabilities to these contrast agents. Herein, we present the rational design, synthesis, characterization, and biological applications of a new magnetic-based fluorescent probe. The dual modality imaging protocol was developed by labeling fluorophore with alginate natural polymers that have excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability, and using gelification method to form nanocomposites containing SPIO. The formation of alginate-based fluorescent magnetic (AFM) nanoparticles was observed in spherical and elliptical forms with a diameter of less than 500 nm by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The fluorescent wavelength band in the range of 560 nm was also confirmed in the UV–visible spectrophotometer. In this study, we demonstrate that the multi-tasking design of AFM nanoparticles provides an ideal platform for building balanced dual-image probes of magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging.

  10. Characterization of Fluorescent Proteins for Three- and Four-Color Live-Cell Imaging in S. cerevisiae.

    Higuchi-Sanabria, Ryo; Garcia, Enrique J; Tomoiaga, Delia; Munteanu, Emilia L; Feinstein, Paul; Pon, Liza A

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae are widely used for imaging fluorescently tagged protein fusions. Fluorescent proteins can easily be inserted into yeast genes at their chromosomal locus, by homologous recombination, for expression of tagged proteins at endogenous levels. This is especially useful for incorporation of multiple fluorescent protein fusions into a single strain, which can be challenging in organisms where genetic manipulation is more complex. However, the availability of optimal fluorescent protein combinations for 3-color imaging is limited. Here, we have characterized a combination of fluorescent proteins, mTFP1/mCitrine/mCherry for multicolor live cell imaging in S. cerevisiae. This combination can be used with conventional blue dyes, such as DAPI, for potential four-color live cell imaging.

  11. Characterization of conductive nanobiomaterials derived from viral assemblies by low-voltage STEM imaging and Raman scattering

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Bahena, Daniel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Carreño-Fuentes, Liliana; Palomares, Laura A; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2014-01-01

    New technologies require the development of novel nanomaterials that need to be fully characterized to achieve their potential. High-resolution low-voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has proven to be a very powerful technique in nanotechnology, but its use for the characterization of nanobiomaterials has been limited. Rotavirus VP6 self-assembles into nanotubular assemblies that possess an intrinsic affinity for Au ions. This property was exploited to produce hybrid nanobiomaterials by the in situ functionalization of recombinant VP6 nanotubes with gold nanoparticles. In this work, Raman spectroscopy and advanced analytical electron microscopy imaging with spherical aberration-corrected (Cs) STEM and nanodiffraction at low-voltage doses were employed to characterize nanobiomaterials. STEM imaging revealed the precise structure and arrangement of the protein templates, as well as the nanostructure and atomic arrangement of gold nanoparticles with high spatial sub-Angstrom resolution and avoided radiation damage. The imaging was coupled with backscattered electron imaging, ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy. The hybrid nanobiomaterials that were obtained showed unique properties as bioelectronic conductive devices and showed enhanced Raman scattering by their precise arrangement into superlattices, displaying the utility of viral assemblies as functional integrative self-assembled nanomaterials for novel applications. (paper)

  12. A high-speed scintillation-based electronic portal imaging device to quantitatively characterize IMRT delivery.

    Ranade, Manisha K; Lynch, Bart D; Li, Jonathan G; Dempsey, James F

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) employing a fast scintillator and a high-speed camera. The device is designed to accurately and independently characterize the fluence delivered by a linear accelerator during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with either step-and-shoot or dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) delivery. Our aim is to accurately obtain the beam shape and fluence of all segments delivered during IMRT, in order to study the nature of discrepancies between the plan and the delivered doses. A commercial high-speed camera was combined with a terbium-doped gadolinium-oxy-sulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillator to form an EPID for the unaliased capture of two-dimensional fluence distributions of each beam in an IMRT delivery. The high speed EPID was synchronized to the accelerator pulse-forming network and gated to capture every possible pulse emitted from the accelerator, with an approximate frame rate of 360 frames-per-second (fps). A 62-segment beam from a head-and-neck IMRT treatment plan requiring 68 s to deliver was recorded with our high speed EPID producing approximately 6 Gbytes of imaging data. The EPID data were compared with the MLC instruction files and the MLC controller log files. The frames were binned to provide a frame rate of 72 fps with a signal-to-noise ratio that was sufficient to resolve leaf positions and segment fluence. The fractional fluence from the log files and EPID data agreed well. An ambiguity in the motion of the MLC during beam on was resolved. The log files reported leaf motions at the end of 33 of the 42 segments, while the EPID observed leaf motions in only 7 of the 42 segments. The static IMRT segment shapes observed by the high speed EPID were in good agreement with the shapes reported in the log files. The leaf motions observed during beam-on for step-and-shoot delivery were not temporally resolved by the log files.

  13. A high-speed scintillation-based electronic portal imaging device to quantitatively characterize IMRT delivery

    Ranade, Manisha K.; Lynch, Bart D.; Li, Jonathan G.; Dempsey, James F.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) employing a fast scintillator and a high-speed camera. The device is designed to accurately and independently characterize the fluence delivered by a linear accelerator during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with either step-and-shoot or dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) delivery. Our aim is to accurately obtain the beam shape and fluence of all segments delivered during IMRT, in order to study the nature of discrepancies between the plan and the delivered doses. A commercial high-speed camera was combined with a terbium-doped gadolinium-oxy-sulfide (Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb) scintillator to form an EPID for the unaliased capture of two-dimensional fluence distributions of each beam in an IMRT delivery. The high speed EPID was synchronized to the accelerator pulse-forming network and gated to capture every possible pulse emitted from the accelerator, with an approximate frame rate of 360 frames-per-second (fps). A 62-segment beam from a head-and-neck IMRT treatment plan requiring 68 s to deliver was recorded with our high speed EPID producing approximately 6 Gbytes of imaging data. The EPID data were compared with the MLC instruction files and the MLC controller log files. The frames were binned to provide a frame rate of 72 fps with a signal-to-noise ratio that was sufficient to resolve leaf positions and segment fluence. The fractional fluence from the log files and EPID data agreed well. An ambiguity in the motion of the MLC during beam on was resolved. The log files reported leaf motions at the end of 33 of the 42 segments, while the EPID observed leaf motions in only 7 of the 42 segments. The static IMRT segment shapes observed by the high speed EPID were in good agreement with the shapes reported in the log files. The leaf motions observed during beam-on for step-and-shoot delivery were not temporally resolved by the log files

  14. Effects of spatial and spectral frequencies on wide-field functional imaging (wifi) characterization of preclinical breast cancer models

    Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Choi, Bernard

    2010-02-01

    A common strategy to study breast cancer is the use of the preclinical model. These models provide a physiologically relevant and controlled environment in which to study both response to novel treatments and the biology of the cancer. Preclinical models, including the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model, are very amenable to optical imaging and to this end, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument that is perfectly suited to studying tumor metabolism in preclinical models. WiFI combines two optical imaging modalities, spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm x 5 cm) field of view. Using SFDI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are determined, which are then used to extract tissue chromophore concentrations in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. In the current study, we employ Monte Carlo simulations of SFDI light propagation in order to characterize the penetration depth of light in both the spontaneous tumor model and mammary window chamber model. Preliminary results suggest that different spatial frequency and wavelength combinations have different penetration depths, suggesting the potential depth sectioning capability of the SFDI component of WiFI.

  15. Characterization of oily mature skin by biophysical and skin imaging techniques.

    de Melo, M O; Maia Campos, P M B G

    2018-02-13

    The skin is a complex biological system and may suffer change according to the environmental factors, as higher temperatures can increase sebum excretion, presenting oiliness and acne. These alterations can persist during the aging and provoke more changes in aged skin. In this study we evaluated the mature oily skin characteristics using biophysical and skin imaging techniques. Sixty healthy female subjects, aged between 39 and 55 years old were recruited and separated into 2 groups according to their skin type: normal/dry and oily skin. The skin was evaluated in terms of stratum corneum water content, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) sebum content, dermis thickness and echogenicity, skin microrelief, and pores content. The mature oily skin presented no significant differences when compared to the normal/dry skin on the stratum corneum water content and TEWL parameters. The sebum content was significantly higher on the oily skin group. The microrelief analysis showed an increase of skin roughness values in the oily skin and increase of scaliness in the normal/dry skin. The oily skin showed lower dermis echogenicity mainly in the frontal region and higher dermis thickness when compared to normal/dry skin. The mature oily skin showed different characteristics from normal/dry skin in terms of sebum content, microrelief parameters, and dermis thickness. This way, the characterization of mature oily skin in an objective way is very important to development of dermocosmetic products for more effective treatments focused specially on this type of skin. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. X-ray imaging characterization of femoral bones in aging mice with osteopetrotic disorder.

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Huang, Hong-Wen; Chang, Wei-Jeng

    2015-04-01

    Aging mice with a rare osteopetrotic disorder in which the entire space of femoral bones are filled with trabecular bones are used as our research platform. A complete study is conducted with a micro computed tomography (CT) system to characterize the bone abnormality. Technical assessment of femoral bones includes geometric structure, biomechanical strength, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone mineral content (BMC). Normal aging mice of similar ages are included for comparisons. In our imaging work, we model the trabecular bone as a cylindrical rod and new quantitative which are not previously discussed are developed for advanced analysis, including trabecular segment length, trabecular segment radius, connecting node number, and distribution of trabecular segment radius. We then identified a geometric characteristic in which there are local maximums (0.0049, 0.0119, and 0.0147 mm) in the structure of trabecular segment radius. Our calculations show 343% higher in percent trabecular bone volume at distal-metaphysis; 38% higher in cortical thickness at mid-diaphysis; 11% higher in cortical cross-sectional moment of inertia at mid-diaphysis; 42% higher in cortical thickness at femur neck; 26% higher in cortical cross-sectional moment of inertia at femur neck; 31% and 395% higher in trabecular BMD and BMC at distal-metaphysis; 17% and 27% higher in cortical BMD and BMC at distal-metaphysis; 9% and 53% higher in cortical BMD and BMC at mid-diaphysis; 25% and 64% higher in cortical BMD and BMC at femur neck. Our new quantitative parameters and findings may be extended to evaluate the treatment response for other similar bone disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative CT characterization of pediatric lung development using routine clinical imaging

    Stein, Jill M.; Brody, Alan S.; Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Walkup, Laura L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Center for Pulmonary Imaging Research, Pulmonary Medicine and Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Woods, Jason C. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Center for Pulmonary Imaging Research, Pulmonary Medicine and Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The use of quantitative CT analysis in children is limited by lack of normal values of lung parenchymal attenuation. These characteristics are important because normal lung development yields significant parenchymal attenuation changes as children age. To perform quantitative characterization of normal pediatric lung parenchymal X-ray CT attenuation under routine clinical conditions in order to establish a baseline comparison to that seen in pathological lung conditions. We conducted a retrospective query of normal CT chest examinations in children ages 0-7 years from 2004 to 2014 using standard clinical protocol. During these examinations semi-automated lung parenchymal segmentation was performed to measure lung volume and mean lung attenuation. We analyzed 42 CT examinations in 39 children, ages 3 days to 83 months (mean ± standard deviation [SD] = 42 ± 27 months). Lung volume ranged 0.10-1.72 liters (L). Mean lung attenuation was much higher in children younger than 12 months, with values as high as -380 Hounsfield units (HU) in neonates (lung volume 0.10 L). Lung volume decreased to approximately -650 HU by age 2 years (lung volume 0.47 L), with subsequently slower exponential decrease toward a relatively constant value of -860 HU as age and lung volume increased. Normal lung parenchymal X-ray CT attenuation decreases with increasing lung volume and age; lung attenuation decreases rapidly in the first 2 years of age and more slowly thereafter. This change in normal lung attenuation should be taken into account as quantitative CT methods are translated to pediatric pulmonary imaging. (orig.)

  18. High-Energy X-Ray Imaging Applied to Nondestructive Characterization of Large Nuclear Waste Drums

    Estre, Nicolas; Eck, Daniel; Pettier, Jean-Luc; Payan, Emmanuel; Roure, Christophe; Simon, Eric

    2015-12-01

    As part of its R&D programs on non-destructive testing of nuclear waste drums, CEA is commissioning an irradiation cell named CINPHONIE, at Cadarache. This cell allows high-energy imaging (radiography and tomography) on large volumes (up to 5 m3) and heavy weights (up to 5 tons). A demonstrator has been finalized, based on existing components. The X-ray source is a 9 MeV LINAC which produces Bremsstrahlung X-rays (up to 23 Gy/min at 1 meter in the beam axis). The mechanical bench is digitally controlled on three axes (translation, rotation, elevation) and can handle objects up to 2 t. This bench performs trajectories necessary for acquisition of projections (sinograms) according to different geometries: Translation-Rotation, Fan-Beam and Cone-Beam. Two detection systems both developed by CEA-Leti are available. The first one is a large GADOX scintillating screen ( 800 ×600 mm2) coupled to a low-noise pixelated camera. The second one is a multi-CdTe semiconductor detector, offering measurements up to 5 decades of attenuation (equivalent to 25 cm of lead or 180 cm of standard concrete). At the end of the acquisition, a Filtered Back Projection-based algorithm is performed. Then, a density slice (fan-beam tomography) or a density volume (cone-beam tomography or helical tomography) is produced and used to examine the waste. Characterization of LINAC, associated detectors as well as the full acquisition chain, are presented. Experimental performances on phantoms and real drum are discussed and expected limits on defect detectability are evaluated by simulation. The final system, designed to handle objects up to 5 tons is then presented.

  19. Characterization of a dielectric phantom for high-field magnetic resonance imaging applications

    Duan, Qi, E-mail: Qi.Duan@nih.gov; Duyn, Jeff H.; Gudino, Natalia; Zwart, Jacco A. de; Gelderen, Peter van [Advanced MRI Section, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Sodickson, Daniel K.; Brown, Ryan [The Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: In this work, a generic recipe for an inexpensive and nontoxic phantom was developed within a range of biologically relevant dielectric properties from 150 MHz to 4.5 GHz. Methods: The recipe includes deionized water as the solvent, NaCl to primarily control conductivity, sucrose to primarily control permittivity, agar–agar to gel the solution and reduce heat diffusivity, and benzoic acid to preserve the gel. Two hundred and seventeen samples were prepared to cover the feasible range of NaCl and sucrose concentrations. Their dielectric properties were measured using a commercial dielectric probe and were fitted to a 3D polynomial to generate a recipe describing the properties as a function of NaCl concentration, sucrose concentration, and frequency. Results: Results indicated that the intuitive linear and independent relationships between NaCl and conductivity and between sucrose and permittivity are not valid. A generic polynomial recipe was developed to characterize the complex relationship between the solutes and the resulting dielectric values and has been made publicly available as a web application. In representative mixtures developed to mimic brain and muscle tissue, less than 2% difference was observed between the predicted and measured conductivity and permittivity values. Conclusions: It is expected that the recipe will be useful for generating dielectric phantoms for general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil development at high magnetic field strength, including coil safety evaluation as well as pulse sequence evaluation (including B{sub 1}{sup +} mapping, B{sub 1}{sup +} shimming, and selective excitation pulse design), and other non-MRI applications which require biologically equivalent dielectric properties.

  20. Quantitative CT characterization of pediatric lung development using routine clinical imaging

    Stein, Jill M.; Brody, Alan S.; Fleck, Robert J.; Walkup, Laura L.; Woods, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    The use of quantitative CT analysis in children is limited by lack of normal values of lung parenchymal attenuation. These characteristics are important because normal lung development yields significant parenchymal attenuation changes as children age. To perform quantitative characterization of normal pediatric lung parenchymal X-ray CT attenuation under routine clinical conditions in order to establish a baseline comparison to that seen in pathological lung conditions. We conducted a retrospective query of normal CT chest examinations in children ages 0-7 years from 2004 to 2014 using standard clinical protocol. During these examinations semi-automated lung parenchymal segmentation was performed to measure lung volume and mean lung attenuation. We analyzed 42 CT examinations in 39 children, ages 3 days to 83 months (mean ± standard deviation [SD] = 42 ± 27 months). Lung volume ranged 0.10-1.72 liters (L). Mean lung attenuation was much higher in children younger than 12 months, with values as high as -380 Hounsfield units (HU) in neonates (lung volume 0.10 L). Lung volume decreased to approximately -650 HU by age 2 years (lung volume 0.47 L), with subsequently slower exponential decrease toward a relatively constant value of -860 HU as age and lung volume increased. Normal lung parenchymal X-ray CT attenuation decreases with increasing lung volume and age; lung attenuation decreases rapidly in the first 2 years of age and more slowly thereafter. This change in normal lung attenuation should be taken into account as quantitative CT methods are translated to pediatric pulmonary imaging. (orig.)

  1. Characterization of the anatomy of the anterolateral ligament of the knee using magnetic resonance imaging

    Kosy, Jonathan D.; Mandalia, Vipul I.; Anaspure, Rahul [Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Princess Elizabeth Orthopaedic Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    The anterolateral ligament (ALL) may limit tibial internal rotation and pivot-shift following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Previous studies, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify this structure, have been inconsistent. We aimed to further characterize the anatomy of this ligament with reference to previous work. Institutional Review Board approval was gained and a retrospective study of 154 consecutive 1.5-T MRI studies was performed by a consultant musculoskeletal radiologist. Cases with a lateral compartment or cruciate injury and patients under 16 years were excluded. A total of 100 MRIs (98 patients; 63 males: 35 females; mean age, 45.3 years, range, 16-85 years) were included in the study. The ALL was visualized partially in 94 (94.0 %) of the cases and fully with distinct femoral and tibial fibers in 57 (57.0 %) of the cases. Although the femoral origin was discreet in only 57 (57.0 %) of cases, the tibial insertion (7.64 ± 1.26 mm below the joint-line) and meniscal attachment were demonstrated in all cases where the ligament was seen. Where the femoral origin was not seen, a broad expansion of the ligament was noted. We identified four types of meniscal attachment (complete, central, bipolar, and inferior-only). The thickness of the ALL, at the level of the joint-line, was 1.75 ± 0.57 mm. The ALL is a consistent structure with meniscal and tibial portions identifiable in the majority of MRI studies of the uninjured knee. There is an attachment to the lateral meniscus with anatomical variation described by our subclassification. (orig.)

  2. Reliability of MEG source imaging of anterior temporal spikes: analysis of an intracranially characterized spike focus.

    Wennberg, Richard; Cheyne, Douglas

    2014-05-01

    To assess the reliability of MEG source imaging (MSI) of anterior temporal spikes through detailed analysis of the localization and orientation of source solutions obtained for a large number of spikes that were separately confirmed by intracranial EEG to be focally generated within a single, well-characterized spike focus. MSI was performed on 64 identical right anterior temporal spikes from an anterolateral temporal neocortical spike focus. The effects of different volume conductors (sphere and realistic head model), removal of noise with low frequency filters (LFFs) and averaging multiple spikes were assessed in terms of the reliability of the source solutions. MSI of single spikes resulted in scattered dipole source solutions that showed reasonable reliability for localization at the lobar level, but only for solutions with a goodness-of-fit exceeding 80% using a LFF of 3 Hz. Reliability at a finer level of intralobar localization was limited. Spike averaging significantly improved the reliability of source solutions and averaging 8 or more spikes reduced dependency on goodness-of-fit and data filtering. MSI performed on topographically identical individual spikes from an intracranially defined classical anterior temporal lobe spike focus was limited by low reliability (i.e., scattered source solutions) in terms of fine, sublobar localization within the ipsilateral temporal lobe. Spike averaging significantly improved reliability. MSI performed on individual anterior temporal spikes is limited by low reliability. Reduction of background noise through spike averaging significantly improves the reliability of MSI solutions. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a multi-scale and multi-modality imaging system to characterize tumours and their microenvironment in vivo

    Rouffiac, Valérie; Ser-Leroux, Karine; Dugon, Emilie; Leguerney, Ingrid; Polrot, Mélanie; Robin, Sandra; Salomé-Desnoulez, Sophie; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Sebrié, Catherine; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne

    2015-03-01

    In vivo high-resolution imaging of tumor development is possible through dorsal skinfold chamber implantable on mice model. However, current intravital imaging systems are weakly tolerated along time by mice and do not allow multimodality imaging. Our project aims to develop a new chamber for: 1- long-term micro/macroscopic visualization of tumor (vascular and cellular compartments) and tissue microenvironment; and 2- multimodality imaging (photonic, MRI and sonography). Our new experimental device was patented in March 2014 and was primarily assessed on 75 mouse engrafted with 4T1-Luc tumor cell line, and validated in confocal and multiphoton imaging after staining the mice vasculature using Dextran 155KDa-TRITC or Dextran 2000kDa-FITC. Simultaneously, a universal stage was designed for optimal removal of respiratory and cardiac artifacts during microscopy assays. Experimental results from optical, ultrasound (Bmode and pulse subtraction mode) and MRI imaging (anatomic sequences) showed that our patented design, unlike commercial devices, improves longitudinal monitoring over several weeks (35 days on average against 12 for the commercial chamber) and allows for a better characterization of the early and late tissue alterations due to tumour development. We also demonstrated the compatibility for multimodality imaging and the increase of mice survival was by a factor of 2.9, with our new skinfold chamber. Current developments include: 1- defining new procedures for multi-labelling of cells and tissue (screening of fluorescent molecules and imaging protocols); 2- developing ultrasound and MRI imaging procedures with specific probes; 3- correlating optical/ultrasound/MRI data for a complete mapping of tumour development and microenvironment.

  4. Research on imaging, sensing, and characterization of cells at Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS), Academia Sinica

    Tsai, Hui-Chen; Chang, Chun-Fang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Chu, Chih-Wei; Han, Hsieh-Cheng; Hatanaka, Koji; Hsieh, Tung-Han; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Chung; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Yang, Fu-Liang; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-12-01

    Development of imaging, sensing, and characterization of cells at Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS) of Academia Sinica in Taiwan is progressing rapidly. The research on advanced lattice light sheet microscopy for temporal visualization of cells in three dimensions at sub-cellular resolution shows novel imaging results. Label-free observation on filopodial dynamics provides a convenient assay on cancer cell motility. The newly-developed software enables us to track the movement of two types of particles through different channels and reconstruct the co-localized tracks. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for detecting urinary microRNA for diagnosis of acute kidney injury demonstrates excellent sensitivity. A fully automated and integrated portable reader was constructed as a home-based surveillance system for post-operation hepatocellular carcinoma. New microfluidic cell culture devices for fast and accurate characterizations prove various diagnosis capabilities.

  5. SPICES: Spectro-Polarimetric Imaging and Characterization of Exoplanetary Systems - From Planetary Disks To Nearby Super Earths

    Boccaletti, Anthony; Schneider, Jean; Traub, Wes; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Stam, Daphne; Gratton, Raffaele; Trauger, John; Cahoy, Kerri; Snik, Frans; Baudoz, Pierre; hide

    2012-01-01

    SPICES (Spectro-Polarimetric Imaging and Characterization of Exoplanetary Systems) is a five-year M-class mission proposed to ESA Cosmic Vision. Its purpose is to image and characterize long-period extrasolar planets and circumstellar disks in the visible (450-900 nm) at a spectral resolution of about 40 using both spectroscopy and polarimetry. By 2020/2022, present and near-term instruments will have found several tens of planets that SPICES will be able to observe and study in detail. Equipped with a 1.5 m telescope, SPICES can preferentially access exoplanets located at several AUs (0.5-10 AU) from nearby stars (less than 25 pc) with masses ranging from a few Jupiter masses to Super Earths (approximately 2 Earth radii, approximately 10 mass compared to Earth) as well as circumstellar disks as faint as a few times the zodiacal light in the Solar System.

  6. Use of focus measure operators for characterization of flood illumination adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy image quality.

    Alonso-Caneiro, David; Sampson, Danuta M; Chew, Avenell L; Collins, Michael J; Chen, Fred K

    2018-02-01

    Adaptive optics flood illumination ophthalmoscopy (AO-FIO) allows imaging of the cone photoreceptor in the living human retina. However, clinical interpretation of the AO-FIO image remains challenging due to suboptimal quality arising from residual uncorrected wavefront aberrations and rapid eye motion. An objective method of assessing image quality is necessary to determine whether an AO-FIO image is suitable for grading and diagnostic purpose. In this work, we explore the use of focus measure operators as a surrogate measure of AO-FIO image quality. A set of operators are tested on data sets acquired at different focal depths and different retinal locations from healthy volunteers. Our results demonstrate differences in focus measure operator performance in quantifying AO-FIO image quality. Further, we discuss the potential application of the selected focus operators in (i) selection of the best quality AO-FIO image from a series of images collected at the same retinal location and (ii) assessment of longitudinal changes in the diseased retina. Focus function could be incorporated into real-time AO-FIO image processing and provide an initial automated quality assessment during image acquisition or reading center grading.

  7. Objective image characterization of a spectral CT scanner with dual-layer detector

    Ozguner, Orhan; Dhanantwari, Amar; Halliburton, Sandra; Wen, Gezheng; Utrup, Steven; Jordan, David

    2018-01-01

    This work evaluated the performance of a detector-based spectral CT system by obtaining objective reference data, evaluating attenuation response of iodine and accuracy of iodine quantification, and comparing conventional CT and virtual monoenergetic images in three common phantoms. Scanning was performed using the hospital’s clinical adult body protocol. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated for a tungsten wire and visual line pair targets were evaluated. Image noise power spectrum (NPS) and pixel standard deviation were calculated. MTF for monoenergetic images agreed with conventional images within 0.05 lp cm-1. NPS curves indicated that noise texture of 70 keV monoenergetic images is similar to conventional images. Standard deviation measurements showed monoenergetic images have lower noise except at 40 keV. Mean CT number and CNR agreed with conventional images at 75 keV. Measured iodine concentration agreed with true concentration within 6% for inserts at the center of the phantom. Performance of monoenergetic images at detector based spectral CT is the same as, or better than, that of conventional images. Spectral acquisition and reconstruction with a detector based platform represents the physical behaviour of iodine as expected and accurately quantifies the material concentration.

  8. Comparison of Three Non-Imaging Angle-Diversity Receivers as Input Sensors of Nodes for Indoor Infrared Wireless Sensor Networks: Theory and Simulation

    Beatriz R. Mendoza

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In general, the use of angle-diversity receivers makes it possible to reduce the impact of ambient light noise, path loss and multipath distortion, in part by exploiting the fact that they often receive the desired signal from different directions. Angle-diversity detection can be performed using a composite receiver with multiple detector elements looking in different directions. These are called non-imaging angle-diversity receivers. In this paper, a comparison of three non-imaging angle-diversity receivers as input sensors of nodes for an indoor infrared (IR wireless sensor network is presented. The receivers considered are the conventional angle-diversity receiver (CDR, the sectored angle-diversity receiver (SDR, and the self-orienting receiver (SOR, which have been proposed or studied by research groups in Spain. To this end, the effective signal-collection area of the three receivers is modelled and a Monte-Carlo-based ray-tracing algorithm is implemented which allows us to investigate the effect on the signal to noise ratio and main IR channel parameters, such as path loss and rms delay spread, of using the three receivers in conjunction with different combination techniques in IR links operating at low bit rates. Based on the results of the simulations, we show that the use of a conventional angle-diversity receiver in conjunction with the equal-gain combining technique provides the solution with the best signal to noise ratio, the lowest computational capacity and the lowest transmitted power requirements, which comprise the main limitations for sensor nodes in an indoor infrared wireless sensor network.

  9. Traceable working standards with SI units of radiance for characterizing the measurement performance of investigational clinical NIRF imaging devices

    Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Litorja, Maritoni; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2017-03-01

    All medical devices for Food and Drug market approval require specifications of performance based upon International System of Units (SI) or units derived from SI for reasons of traceability. Recently, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging devices of a variety of designs have emerged on the market and in investigational clinical studies. Yet the design of devices used in the clinical studies vary widely, suggesting variable device performance. Device performance depends upon optimal excitation of NIRF imaging agents, rejection of backscattered excitation and ambient light, and selective collection of fluorescence emanating from the fluorophore. There remains no traceable working standards with SI units of radiance to enable prediction that a given molecular imaging agent can be detected in humans by a given NIRF imaging device. Furthermore, as technologies evolve and as NIRF imaging device components change, there remains no standardized means to track device improvements over time and establish clinical performance without involving clinical trials, often costly. In this study, we deployed a methodology to calibrate luminescent radiance of a stable, solid phantom in SI units of mW/cm2/sr for characterizing the measurement performance of ICCD and IsCMOS camera based NIRF imaging devices, such as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast. The methodology allowed determination of superior SNR of the ICCD over the IsCMOS system; comparable contrast of ICCD and IsCMOS depending upon binning strategies.

  10. 3D modeling to characterize lamina cribrosa surface and pore geometries using in vivo images from normal and glaucomatous eyes

    Sredar, Nripun; Ivers, Kevin M.; Queener, Hope M.; Zouridakis, George; Porter, Jason

    2013-01-01

    En face adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images of the anterior lamina cribrosa surface (ALCS) represent a 2D projected view of a 3D laminar surface. Using spectral domain optical coherence tomography images acquired in living monkey eyes, a thin plate spline was used to model the ALCS in 3D. The 2D AOSLO images were registered and projected onto the 3D surface that was then tessellated into a triangular mesh to characterize differences in pore geometry between 2D and 3D images. Following 3D transformation of the anterior laminar surface in 11 normal eyes, mean pore area increased by 5.1 ± 2.0% with a minimal change in pore elongation (mean change = 0.0 ± 0.2%). These small changes were due to the relatively flat laminar surfaces inherent in normal eyes (mean radius of curvature = 3.0 ± 0.5 mm). The mean increase in pore area was larger following 3D transformation in 4 glaucomatous eyes (16.2 ± 6.0%) due to their more steeply curved laminar surfaces (mean radius of curvature = 1.3 ± 0.1 mm), while the change in pore elongation was comparable to that in normal eyes (−0.2 ± 2.0%). This 3D transformation and tessellation method can be used to better characterize and track 3D changes in laminar pore and surface geometries in glaucoma. PMID:23847739

  11. Technical characterization by image analysis: an automatic method of mineralogical studies

    Oliveira, J.F. de

    1988-01-01

    The application of a modern method of image analysis fully automated for the study of grain size distribution modal assays, degree of liberation and mineralogical associations is discussed. The image analyser is interfaced with a scanning electron microscope and an energy dispersive X-rays analyser. The image generated by backscattered electrons is analysed automatically and the system has been used in accessment studies of applied mineralogy as well as in process control in the mining industry. (author) [pt

  12. Characterization of controlled bone defects using 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging techniques

    Parmar, Biren J; Longsine, Whitney; Han, Arum; Righetti, Raffaella [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Dwight Look College of Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Sabonghy, Eric P [OneOrtho Orthopedic Surgery Clinic, Houston, TX (United States); Tasciotti, Ennio; Ferrari, Mauro [Department of Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Weiner, Bradley K, E-mail: righetti@ece.tamu.ed [Division of Spinal Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-08-21

    Ultrasound is emerging as an attractive alternative modality to standard x-ray and CT methods for bone assessment applications. As of today, however, there is a lack of systematic studies that investigate the performance of diagnostic ultrasound techniques in bone imaging applications. This study aims at understanding the performance limitations of new ultrasound techniques for imaging bones in controlled experiments in vitro. Experiments are performed on samples of mammalian and non-mammalian bones with controlled defects with size ranging from 400 {mu}m to 5 mm. Ultrasound findings are statistically compared with those obtained from the same samples using standard x-ray imaging modalities and optical microscopy. The results of this study demonstrate that it is feasible to use diagnostic ultrasound imaging techniques to assess sub-millimeter bone defects in real time and with high accuracy and precision. These results also demonstrate that ultrasound imaging techniques perform comparably better than x-ray imaging and optical imaging methods, in the assessment of a wide range of controlled defects both in mammalian and non-mammalian bones. In the future, ultrasound imaging techniques might provide a cost-effective, real-time, safe and portable diagnostic tool for bone imaging applications.

  13. Characterization of Polycrystalline Materials Using Synchrotron X-ray Imaging and Diffraction Techniques

    Ludwig, Wolfgang; King, A.; Herbig, M.

    2010-01-01

    The combination of synchrotron radiation x-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offers new possibilities for in-situ observation of deformation and damage mechanisms in the bulk of polycrystalline materials. Minute changes in electron density (i.e., cracks, porosities) can be detected using...... propagation based phase contrast imaging, a 3-D imaging mode exploiting the coherence properties of third generation synchrotron beams. Furthermore, for some classes of polycrystalline materials, one may use a 3-D variant of x-ray diffraction imaging, termed x-ray diffraction contrast tomography. X-ray...

  14. Effects of manual threshold setting on image analysis results of a sandstone sample structural characterization by X-ray microtomography

    Moreira, Anderson C.; Fernandes, Celso P.; Fernandes, Jaquiel S.; Marques, Leonardo C.; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Nagata, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    X-ray microtomography is a nondestructive nuclear technique widely applied for samples structural characterization. This methodology permits the investigation of materials porous phase, without special sample preparation, generating bidimensional images of the irradiated sample. The images are generated by the linear attenuation coefficient mapping of the sample. In order to do a quantitative characterization, the images have to be binarized, separating porous phase from the material matrix. The choice of the correct threshold in the grey level histogram is an important and discerning procedure for the binary images creation. Slight variations of the threshold level led to substantial variations in physical parameters determination, like porosity and pore size distribution values. The aim of this work is to evaluate these variations based on some manual threshold setting. Employing Imago image analysis software, four operators determined the porosity and pore size distribution of a sandstone sample by image analysis. The microtomography measurements were accomplished with the following scan conditions: 60 kV, 165 μA, 1 mm Al filter, 0.45 deg step size and 180.0 deg total rotation angle with and 3.8 μm and 11 μm spatial resolution. The global average porosity values, determined by the operators, range from 27.8 to 32.4 % for 3.8 μm spatial resolution and 12.3 to 28.3 % for 11 μm spatial resolution. Percentage differences among the pore size distributions were also found. For the same pore size range, 5.5 % and 17.1 %, for 3.8 μm and 11 μm spatial resolutions respectively, were noted. (author)

  15. The LEECH Exoplanet Imaging Survey: Characterization of the Coldest Directly Imaged Exoplanet, GJ 504 b, and Evidence for Superstellar Metallicity

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Morley, Caroline V.; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Leisenring, Jarron; Buenzli, Esther; Bonnefoy, Mickael; Bailey, Vanessa; Hinz, Philip; Defrére, Denis; Esposito, Simone; Apai, Dániel; Biller, Beth; Brandner, Wolfgang; Close, Laird; Crepp, Justin R.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Desidera, Silvano; Eisner, Josh; Fortney, Jonathan; Freedman, Richard; Henning, Thomas; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Kopytova, Taisiya; Lupu, Roxana; Maire, Anne-Lise; Males, Jared R.; Marley, Mark; Morzinski, Katie; Oza, Apurva; Patience, Jenny; Rajan, Abhijith; Rieke, George; Schertl, Dieter; Schlieder, Joshua; Stone, Jordan; Su, Kate; Vaz, Amali; Visscher, Channon; Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Weigelt, Gerd; Woodward, Charles E.

    2016-02-01

    As gas giant planets and brown dwarfs radiate away the residual heat from their formation, they cool through a spectral type transition from L to T, which encompasses the dissipation of cloud opacity and the appearance of strong methane absorption. While there are hundreds of known T-type brown dwarfs, the first generation of directly imaged exoplanets were all L type. Recently, Kuzuhara et al. announced the discovery of GJ 504 b, the first T dwarf exoplanet. GJ 504 b provides a unique opportunity to study the atmosphere of a new type of exoplanet with a ˜500 K temperature that bridges the gap between the first directly imaged planets (˜1000 K) and our own solar system's Jupiter (˜130 K). We observed GJ 504 b in three narrow L-band filters (3.71, 3.88, and 4.00 μm), spanning the red end of the broad methane fundamental absorption feature (3.3 μm) as part of the LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt (LEECH) exoplanet imaging survey. By comparing our new photometry and literature photometry with a grid of custom model atmospheres, we were able to fit GJ 504 b's unusual spectral energy distribution for the first time. We find that GJ 504 b is well fit by models with the following parameters: Teff = 544 ± 10 K, g Germany. LBT Corporation partners are the University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrophisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University, and the Research Corporation, on behalf of the University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University of Virginia.

  16. Non-contact respiration monitoring for in-vivo murine micro computed tomography: characterization and imaging applications

    Burk, Laurel M; Lee, Yueh Z; Wait, J Matthew; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto Z

    2012-01-01

    A cone beam micro-CT has previously been utilized along with a pressure-tracking respiration sensor to acquire prospectively gated images of both wild-type mice and various adult murine disease models. While the pressure applied to the abdomen of the subject by this sensor is small and is generally without physiological effect, certain disease models of interest, as well as very young animals, are prone to atelectasis with added pressure, or they generate too weak a respiration signal with this method to achieve optimal prospective gating. In this work we present a new fibre-optic displacement sensor which monitors respiratory motion of a subject without requiring physical contact. The sensor outputs an analogue signal which can be used for prospective respiration gating in micro-CT imaging. The device was characterized and compared against a pneumatic air chamber pressure sensor for the imaging of adult wild-type mice. The resulting images were found to be of similar quality with respect to physiological motion blur; the quality of the respiration signal trace obtained using the non-contact sensor was comparable to that of the pressure sensor and was superior for gating purposes due to its better signal-to-noise ratio. The non-contact sensor was then used to acquire in-vivo micro-CT images of a murine model for congenital diaphragmatic hernia and of 11-day-old mouse pups. In both cases, quality CT images were successfully acquired using this new respiration sensor. Despite the presence of beam hardening artefacts arising from the presence of a fibre-optic cable in the imaging field, we believe this new technique for respiration monitoring and gating presents an opportunity for in-vivo imaging of disease models which were previously considered too delicate for established animal handling methods. (paper)

  17. 3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. 1998 annual progress report

    Lesmes, D.; Morgan, F.D.; Rodi, W.

    1998-01-01

    'The overall objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth''s subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. Three specific objectives towards this end are: (1) understanding IP at the laboratory level through measurements of complex resistivity as a function of frequency in rock and soil samples with varying pore geometries, pore fluid conductivities and saturations, and contaminant chemistries and concentrations; (2) developing effective data acquisition techniques for measuring the critical IP responses (time domain or frequency domain) in the field; (3) developing modeling and inversion algorithms that permit the interpretation of field IP data in terms of subsurface geology and contaminant plume properties. The authors laboratory experiments to date are described in Appendices A and B, which consist of two papers submitted to the annual SAGEEP conference (Frye et al., 1998; Sturrock et al., 1998). The experiments involved measurements of complex resistivity vs. frequency on a suite of brine saturated sandstone samples. In one set of experiments, the fluid chemistry (pH, ionic strength, and cation type) was varied. In a second set of experiments, the microgeometry of the rock matrix was varied. The experiments showed that spectral IP responses are sensitive to subtle variations in both the solution chemistry and rock microgeometry. The results demonstrate that spectral IP responses have the potential of being sensitive indicators of in-situ chemistry and microgeometry, the latter of which may be related to the hydraulic properties. Data Acquisition The authors have been looking in some detail at the effects of electromagnetic coupling and how to practically deal with it. In this area, the results to date are summarized in Vandiver (1998). The progress in the development of modeling and inversion algorithms for IP is described in Appendix C, a paper submitted to the

  18. Characterization of Long Working Distance Optical Coherence Tomography for Imaging of Pediatric Retinal Pathology.

    Qian, Ruobing; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Sarin, Neeru; Vajzovic, Lejla; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2017-10-01

    We determined the feasibility of fovea and optic nerve head imaging with a long working distance (LWD) swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) prototype in adults, teenagers, and young children. A prototype swept source OCT system with a LWD (defined as distance from the last optical element of the imaging system to the eye) of 350 mm with custom fixation targets was developed to facilitate imaging of children. Imaging was performed in 49 participants from three age groups: 26 adults, 16 children 13 to 18 years old (teenagers), and seven children under 6 years old (young children) under an approved institutional review board protocol. The imaging goal was to acquire high quality scans of the fovea and optic nerve in each eye in the shortest time possible. OCT B-scans and volumes of the fovea and optic nerve head of each eligible eye were captured and graded based on four categories (lateral and axial centration, contrast, and resolution) and on ability to determine presence or absence of pathology. LWD-OCT imaging was successful in 88 of 94 eligible eyes, including seven of 10 eyes of young children. Of the successfully acquired OCT images, 83% of B-scan and volumetric images, including 86% from young children, were graded as high-quality scans. Pathology was observed in high-quality OCT images. The prototype LWD-OCT system achieved high quality retinal imaging of adults, teenagers, and some young children with and without pathology with reasonable alignment time. The LWD-OCT system can facilitate imaging in children.

  19. Collaborative Research and Development. Delivery Order 0006: Transmission Electron Microscope Image Modeling and Semiconductor Heterointerface Characterization

    Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy

    2006-01-01

    .... Transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterization studies were performed on a variety of novel III-V semiconductor heterostructures being developed for advanced optoelectronic device applications...

  20. Lipid-based nanoparticles for magnetic resonance molecular imaging : design, characterization, and application

    Mulder, W.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis research is described which was aimed to develop lipidic nanoparticles for the investigation and visualization of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis with both magnetic resonance molecular imaging and optical techniques. The underlying rationale for this is that conventional MR imaging

  1. Image analysis for gene expression based phenotype characterization in yeast cells

    Tleis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Image analysis of objects in the microscope scale requires accuracy so that measurements can be used to differentiate between groups of objects that are being studied. This thesis deals with measurements in yeast biology that are obtained through microscope images. We study the algorithms and

  2. DCT-Based Characterization of Milk Products Using Diffuse Reflectance Images

    Sharifzadeh, Sara; Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2013-01-01

    We propose to use the two-dimensional Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) for decomposition of diffuse reflectance images of laser illumination on milk products in different wavelengths. Based on the prior knowledge about the characteristics of the images, the initial feature vectors are formed at ea...... discriminate milk from yogurt products better....

  3. Characterization of viscous biofuel sprays using digital imaging in the near field region

    Sallevelt, J.L.H.P.; Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Brem, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    The atomization of biodiesel, vegetable oil and glycerin has been studied in an atmospheric spray rig by using digital imaging (PDIA). Images of the spray were captured in the near field, just 18 mm downstream of the atomizer, and processed to automatically determine the size of both ligaments and

  4. H-Metric: Characterizing Image Datasets via Homogenization Based on KNN-Queries

    Welington M da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Precision-Recall is one of the main metrics for evaluating content-based image retrieval techniques. However, it does not provide an ample perception of the properties of an image dataset immersed in a metric space. In this work, we describe an alternative metric named H-Metric, which is determined along a sequence of controlled modifications in the image dataset. The process is named homogenization and works by altering the homogeneity characteristics of the classes of the images. The result is a process that measures how hard it is to deal with a set of images in respect to content-based retrieval, offering support in the task of analyzing configurations of distance functions and of features extractors.

  5. THE LEECH EXOPLANET IMAGING SURVEY: CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COLDEST DIRECTLY IMAGED EXOPLANET, GJ 504 b, AND EVIDENCE FOR SUPERSTELLAR METALLICITY

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Leisenring, Jarron; Bailey, Vanessa; Hinz, Philip; Defrére, Denis; Apai, Dániel; Close, Laird; Eisner, Josh [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Ave. Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan [University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High St. Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Zimmerman, Neil T.; Buenzli, Esther; Bonnefoy, Mickael; Biller, Beth; Brandner, Wolfgang [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Skrutskie, Michael F. [University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Rd., Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Esposito, Simone [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, 50125, Florence (Italy); Crepp, Justin R. [Notre Dame University, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); De Rosa, Robert J. [Arizona State University, 781 South Terrace Rd, Tempe, AZ 85281 (United States); Desidera, Silvano [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Padova Astronomical Observatory, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, 35122 Padova (Italy); and others

    2016-02-01

    As gas giant planets and brown dwarfs radiate away the residual heat from their formation, they cool through a spectral type transition from L to T, which encompasses the dissipation of cloud opacity and the appearance of strong methane absorption. While there are hundreds of known T-type brown dwarfs, the first generation of directly imaged exoplanets were all L type. Recently, Kuzuhara et al. announced the discovery of GJ 504 b, the first T dwarf exoplanet. GJ 504 b provides a unique opportunity to study the atmosphere of a new type of exoplanet with a ∼500 K temperature that bridges the gap between the first directly imaged planets (∼1000 K) and our own solar system's Jupiter (∼130 K). We observed GJ 504 b in three narrow L-band filters (3.71, 3.88, and 4.00 μm), spanning the red end of the broad methane fundamental absorption feature (3.3 μm) as part of the LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt (LEECH) exoplanet imaging survey. By comparing our new photometry and literature photometry with a grid of custom model atmospheres, we were able to fit GJ 504 b's unusual spectral energy distribution for the first time. We find that GJ 504 b is well fit by models with the following parameters: T{sub eff} = 544 ± 10 K, g < 600 m s{sup −2}, [M/H] = 0.60 ± 0.12, cloud opacity parameter of f{sub sed} = 2–5, R = 0.96 ± 0.07 R{sub Jup}, and log(L) = −6.13 ± 0.03 L{sub ⊙}, implying a hot start mass of 3–30 M{sub jup} for a conservative age range of 0.1–6.5 Gyr. Of particular interest, our model fits suggest that GJ 504 b has a superstellar metallicity. Since planet formation can create objects with nonstellar metallicities, while binary star formation cannot, this result suggests that GJ 504 b formed like a planet, not like a binary companion.

  6. Through-the-wall high-resolution imaging of a human and experimental characterization of the transmission of wall materials

    Nilsson, S.; Jänis, A.; Gustafsson, M.; Kjellgren, J.; Sume, Ain

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes the research efforts made at the Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) concerning through-the-wall imaging radar, as well as fundamental characterization of various wall materials. These activities are a part of two FOI-projects concerning security sensors in the aspects of Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT) and Homeland Defence. Through-the-wall high resolution imaging of a human between 28-40 GHz has been performed at FOI. The UWB radar that was used is normally a member of the instrumentation of the FOI outdoor RCS test range Lilla Gåra. The armed test person was standing behind different kinds of walls. The radar images were generated by stepping the turntable in azimuth and elevation. The angular resolution in the near-field was improved by refocusing the parabolic antennas, which in combination with the large bandwidth (12 GHz) gave extremely high resolution radar images. A 3D visualization of the person even exposed the handgun tucked into one hip pocket. A qualitative comparison between the experimental results and simulation results (physical optics-based method) will also be presented. The second part of this paper describes results from activities at FOI concerning material characterization in the 2-110 GHz region. The transmission of building, packing and clothing materials has been experimentally determined. The wide-band measurements in free space were carried out with a scalar network analyzer. In this paper results from these characterizations will be presented. Furthermore, an experimental investigation will be reported of how the transmission properties for some moisted materials change as a function of water content and frequency. We will also show experimental results of how the transmission properties of a pine panel are affected when the surface is coated with a thin surface layer of water.

  7. Recycling-oriented characterization of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from mobile phones by electronic and chemical imaging

    Palmieri, Roberta; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia, E-mail: silvia.serranti@uniroma1.it

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • A recycling oriented characterization of end-of-life mobile phones was carried out. • Characterization was developed in a zero-waste-perspective, aiming to recover all the mobile phone materials. • Plastic frames and printed circuit boards were analyzed by electronic and chemical imaging. • Suitable milling/classification strategies were set up to define specialized-pre-concentrated-streams. • The proposed approach can improve the recovery of polymers, base/precious metals, rare earths and critical raw materials. - Abstract: This study characterizes the composition of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from end-of-life mobile phones. This knowledge may help define an optimal processing strategy for using these items as potential raw materials. Correct handling of such a waste is essential for its further “sustainable” recovery, especially to maximize the extraction of base, rare and precious metals, minimizing the environmental impact of the entire process chain. A combination of electronic and chemical imaging techniques was thus examined, applied and critically evaluated in order to optimize the processing, through the identification and the topological assessment of the materials of interest and their quantitative distribution. To reach this goal, end-of-life mobile phone derived wastes have been systematically characterized adopting both “traditional” (e.g. scanning electronic microscopy combined with microanalysis and Raman spectroscopy) and innovative (e.g. hyperspectral imaging in short wave infrared field) techniques, with reference to frames and printed circuit boards. Results showed as the combination of both the approaches (i.e. traditional and classical) could dramatically improve recycling strategies set up, as well as final products recovery.

  8. Recycling-oriented characterization of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from mobile phones by electronic and chemical imaging

    Palmieri, Roberta; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A recycling oriented characterization of end-of-life mobile phones was carried out. • Characterization was developed in a zero-waste-perspective, aiming to recover all the mobile phone materials. • Plastic frames and printed circuit boards were analyzed by electronic and chemical imaging. • Suitable milling/classification strategies were set up to define specialized-pre-concentrated-streams. • The proposed approach can improve the recovery of polymers, base/precious metals, rare earths and critical raw materials. - Abstract: This study characterizes the composition of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from end-of-life mobile phones. This knowledge may help define an optimal processing strategy for using these items as potential raw materials. Correct handling of such a waste is essential for its further “sustainable” recovery, especially to maximize the extraction of base, rare and precious metals, minimizing the environmental impact of the entire process chain. A combination of electronic and chemical imaging techniques was thus examined, applied and critically evaluated in order to optimize the processing, through the identification and the topological assessment of the materials of interest and their quantitative distribution. To reach this goal, end-of-life mobile phone derived wastes have been systematically characterized adopting both “traditional” (e.g. scanning electronic microscopy combined with microanalysis and Raman spectroscopy) and innovative (e.g. hyperspectral imaging in short wave infrared field) techniques, with reference to frames and printed circuit boards. Results showed as the combination of both the approaches (i.e. traditional and classical) could dramatically improve recycling strategies set up, as well as final products recovery

  9. Major depressive disorder is characterized by greater reward network activation to monetary than pleasant image rewards.

    Smoski, Moria J; Rittenberg, Alison; Dichter, Gabriel S

    2011-12-30

    Anhedonia, the loss of interest or pleasure in normally rewarding activities, is a hallmark feature of unipolar Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). A growing body of literature has identified frontostriatal dysfunction during reward anticipation and outcomes in MDD. However, no study to date has directly compared responses to different types of rewards such as pleasant images and monetary rewards in MDD. To investigate the neural responses to monetary and pleasant image rewards in MDD, a modified Monetary Incentive Delay task was used during functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess neural responses during anticipation and receipt of monetary and pleasant image rewards. Participants included nine adults with MDD and 13 affectively healthy controls. The MDD group showed lower activation than controls when anticipating monetary rewards in right orbitofrontal cortex and subcallosal cortex, and when anticipating pleasant image rewards in paracingulate and supplementary motor cortex. The MDD group had relatively greater activation in right putamen when anticipating monetary versus pleasant image rewards, relative to the control group. Results suggest reduced reward network activation in MDD when anticipating rewards, as well as relatively greater hypoactivation to pleasant image than monetary rewards. 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Novel Murine Model for Localized Radiation Necrosis and its Characterization Using Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Jost, Sarah C.; Hope, Andrew; Kiehl, Erich; Perry, Arie; Travers, Sarah; Garbow, Joel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a murine model of radiation necrosis using fractionated, subtotal cranial irradiation; and to investigate the imaging signature of radiation-induced tissue damage using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four mice each received 60 Gy of hemispheric (left) irradiation in 10 equal fractions. Magnetic resonance images at 4.7 T were subsequently collected using T1-, T2-, and diffusion sequences at selected time points after irradiation. After imaging, animals were killed and their brains fixed for correlative histologic analysis. Results: Contrast-enhanced T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images at months 2, 3, and 4 showed changes consistent with progressive radiation necrosis. Quantitatively, mean diffusivity was significantly higher (mean = 0.86, 1.13, and 1.24 μm 2 /ms at 2, 3, and 4 months, respectively) in radiated brain, compared with contralateral untreated brain tissue (mean = 0.78, 0.82, and 0.83 μm 2 /ms) (p < 0.0001). Histology reflected changes typically seen in radiation necrosis. Conclusions: This murine model of radiation necrosis will facilitate investigation of imaging biomarkers that distinguish between radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence. In addition, this preclinical study supports clinical data suggesting that diffusion-weighted imaging may be helpful in answering this diagnostic question in clinical settings.

  11. Development of an imaging system for single droplet characterization using a droplet generator.

    Minov, S Vulgarakis; Cointault, F; Vangeyte, J; Pieters, J G; Hijazi, B; Nuyttens, D

    2012-01-01

    The spray droplets generated by agricultural nozzles play an important role in the application accuracy and efficiency of plant protection products. The limitations of the non-imaging techniques and the recent improvements in digital image acquisition and processing increased the interest in using high speed imaging techniques in pesticide spray characterisation. The goal of this study was to develop an imaging technique to evaluate the characteristics of a single spray droplet using a piezoelectric single droplet generator and a high speed imaging technique. Tests were done with different camera settings, lenses, diffusers and light sources. The experiments have shown the necessity for having a good image acquisition and processing system. Image analysis results contributed in selecting the optimal set-up for measuring droplet size and velocity which consisted of a high speed camera with a 6 micros exposure time, a microscope lens at a working distance of 43 cm resulting in a field of view of 1.0 cm x 0.8 cm and a Xenon light source without diffuser used as a backlight. For measuring macro-spray characteristics as the droplet trajectory, the spray angle and the spray shape, a Macro Video Zoom lens at a working distance of 14.3 cm with a bigger field of view of 7.5 cm x 9.5 cm in combination with a halogen spotlight with a diffuser and the high speed camera can be used.

  12. Characterization of a computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm by image quality evaluations with an anthropomorphic phantom

    Rampado, O.; Bossi, L.; Garabello, D.; Davini, O.; Ropolo, R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the consequences on dose and image quality of the choices of different combinations of NI and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) percentage, the image quality parameters of GE CT equipment. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate the chest and upper abdomen of a standard weight patient. Images were acquired with tube current modulation and different values of noise index, in the range 10–22 for a slice thickness of 5 mm and a tube voltage of 120 kV. For each selected noise index, several image series were reconstructed using different percentages of ASIR (0, 40, 50, 60, 70, 100). Quantitative noise was assessed at different phantom locations. Computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and dose length products (DLP) were recorded. Three radiologists reviewed the images in a blinded and randomized manner and assessed the subjective image quality by comparing the image series with the one acquired with the reference protocol (noise index 14, ASIR 40%). The perceived noise, contrast, edge sharpness and overall quality were graded on a scale from −2 (much worse) to +2 (much better). Results: A repeatable trend of noise reduction versus the percentage of ASIR was observed for different noise levels and phantom locations. The different combinations of noise index and percentage of ASIR to obtain a desired dose reduction were assessed. The subjective image quality evaluation evidenced a possible dose reduction between 24 and 40% as a consequence of an increment of ASIR percentage to 50 or 70%, respectively. Conclusion: These results highlighted that the same patient dose reduction can be obtained with several combinations of noise index and percentages of ASIR, providing a model with which to choose these acquisition parameters in future optimization studies, with the aim of reducing patient dose by maintaining image quality in diagnostic levels.

  13. Characterization of cervigram image sharpness using multiple self-referenced measurements and random forest classifiers

    Jaiswal, Mayoore; Horning, Matt; Hu, Liming; Ben-Or, Yau; Champlin, Cary; Wilson, Benjamin; Levitz, David

    2018-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women worldwide and is especially prevalent in low resource settings due to lack of screening and treatment options. Visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) is a widespread and cost-effective screening method for cervical pre-cancer lesions, but accuracy depends on the experience level of the health worker. Digital cervicography, capturing images of the cervix, enables review by an off-site expert or potentially a machine learning algorithm. These reviews require images of sufficient quality. However, image quality varies greatly across users. A novel algorithm was developed to evaluate the sharpness of images captured with the MobileODT's digital cervicography device (EVA System), in order to, eventually provide feedback to the health worker. The key challenges are that the algorithm evaluates only a single image of each cervix, it needs to be robust to the variability in cervix images and fast enough to run in real time on a mobile device, and the machine learning model needs to be small enough to fit on a mobile device's memory, train on a small imbalanced dataset and run in real-time. In this paper, the focus scores of a preprocessed image and a Gaussian-blurred version of the image are calculated using established methods and used as features. A feature selection metric is proposed to select the top features which were then used in a random forest classifier to produce the final focus score. The resulting model, based on nine calculated focus scores, achieved significantly better accuracy than any single focus measure when tested on a holdout set of images. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.9459.

  14. Characterization of a computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm by image quality evaluations with an anthropomorphic phantom

    Rampado, O., E-mail: orampado@molinette.piemonte.it [S.C. Fisica Sanitaria, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Bossi, L., E-mail: laura-bossi@hotmail.it [S.C. Fisica Sanitaria, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Garabello, D., E-mail: dgarabello@molinette.piemonte.it [S.C. Radiodiagnostica DEA, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Davini, O., E-mail: odavini@molinette.piemonte.it [S.C. Radiodiagnostica DEA, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Ropolo, R., E-mail: rropolo@molinette.piemonte.it [S.C. Fisica Sanitaria, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the consequences on dose and image quality of the choices of different combinations of NI and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) percentage, the image quality parameters of GE CT equipment. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate the chest and upper abdomen of a standard weight patient. Images were acquired with tube current modulation and different values of noise index, in the range 10-22 for a slice thickness of 5 mm and a tube voltage of 120 kV. For each selected noise index, several image series were reconstructed using different percentages of ASIR (0, 40, 50, 60, 70, 100). Quantitative noise was assessed at different phantom locations. Computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and dose length products (DLP) were recorded. Three radiologists reviewed the images in a blinded and randomized manner and assessed the subjective image quality by comparing the image series with the one acquired with the reference protocol (noise index 14, ASIR 40%). The perceived noise, contrast, edge sharpness and overall quality were graded on a scale from -2 (much worse) to +2 (much better). Results: A repeatable trend of noise reduction versus the percentage of ASIR was observed for different noise levels and phantom locations. The different combinations of noise index and percentage of ASIR to obtain a desired dose reduction were assessed. The subjective image quality evaluation evidenced a possible dose reduction between 24 and 40% as a consequence of an increment of ASIR percentage to 50 or 70%, respectively. Conclusion: These results highlighted that the same patient dose reduction can be obtained with several combinations of noise index and percentages of ASIR, providing a model with which to choose these acquisition parameters in future optimization studies, with the aim of reducing patient dose by maintaining image quality in diagnostic levels.

  15. In-Situ Characterization of Tissue Blood Flow, Blood Content, and Water State Using New Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Conturo, Thomas Edward

    Tissue blood flow, blood content, and water state have been characterized in-situ with new nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The sensitivities of standard techniques to the physiologic tissue parameters spin density (N_{rm r}) and relaxation times (T_1 and T_2 ) are mathematically defined. A new driven inversion method is developed so that tissue T_1 and T_2 changes produce cooperative intensity changes, yielding high contrast, high signal to noise, and sensitivity to a wider range of tissue parameters. The actual tissue parameters were imaged by automated collection of multiple-echo data having multiple T _1 dependence. Data are simultaneously fit by three-parameters to a closed-form expression, producing lower inter-parameter correlation and parameter noise than in separate T_1 or T_2 methods or pre-averaged methods. Accurate parameters are obtained at different field strengths. Parametric images of pathology demonstrate high sensitivity to tissue heterogeneity, and water content is determined in many tissues. Erythrocytes were paramagnetically labeled to study blood content and relaxation mechanisms. Liver and spleen relaxation were enhanced following 10% exchange of animal blood volumes. Rapid water exchange between intracellular and extracellular compartments was validated. Erythrocytes occupied 12.5% of renal cortex volume, and blood content was uniform in the liver, spleen and kidney. The magnitude and direction of flow velocity was then imaged. To eliminate directional artifacts, a bipolar gradient technique sensitized to flow in different directions was developed. Phase angle was reconstructed instead of intensity since the former has a 2pi -fold higher dynamic range. Images of flow through curves demonstrated secondary flow with a centrifugally-biased laminar profile and stationary velocity peaks along the curvature. Portal vein flow velocities were diminished or reversed in cirrhosis. Image artifacts have been characterized and removed. The

  16. High Resolution/High Fidelity Seismic Imaging and Parameter Estimation for Geological Structure and Material Characterization

    Ru-Shan Wu; Xiao-Bi Xie

    20