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Sample records for characteristics brine chemistry

  1. On the physico-chemical characteristics of brines

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Rao, P.V.S.S.D.P.; Singbal, S.Y.S.

    Analyses of the natural brines form the salt lakes, salt pans and the artificial brines obtained after the solar desalination of seawater respectively, showed wide differences in their physico-chemical characteristics. The natural brines are markEd...

  2. Chemistry of glass corrosion in high saline brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion data obtained in laboratory tests can be used for the performance assessment of nuclear waste glasses in a repository if the data are quantitatively described in the frame of a geochemical model. Experimental data were obtained for conventional pH values corrected for liquid junction, amorphous silica solubility and glass corrosion in concentrated salt brines. The data were interpreted with a geochemical model. The brine chemistry was described with the Pitzer formalism using a data base which allows calculation of brine compositions in equilibrium with salt minerals at temperatures up to 200C. In MgCl2 dominated brines Mg silicates form and due to the consumption of Mg the pH decreases with proceeding reaction. A constant pH (about 4) and composition of alteration products is achieved, when the alkali release from the glass balances the Mg consumption. The low pH results in high release of rare earth elements REE (rare earth elements) and U from the glass. In the NaCl dominated brine MgCl2 becomes exhausted by Mg silicate formation. As long as there is still Mg left in solution the pH decreases. After exhaustion of Mg the pH rises with the alkali release from the glass and analcime is formed

  3. Influence of radiolytic products on the chemistry of uranium VI in brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the near field of a salt repository of nuclear waste, ionizing radiations can strongly affect the chemistry of concentrated saline solutions. Radiolysis can locally modify the redox conditions, speciation, solubility and mobility of the actinide compounds. In the case of uranium VI, radiolytic products can not only reduce U(VI), but also react with uranium species. The net effect on the speciation of uranyl depends on the relative kinetics of the reactions and the buildup of molecular products in brine solutions. The most important molecular products in brines are expected to be hypochlorite ion, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide. Although U(VI) is expected not to be significantly affected by radiolysis, the combined effects of the major molecular radiolytic products on the chemistry of U(VI) in brines have not been experimentally established previously. (authors)

  4. Particle measurement and brine chemistry at the Salton Sea Deep Well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertus, R.J.; Kindle, C.H.; Sullivan, R.G.; Shannon, D.W.

    1991-09-01

    The Advanced Brine Chemistry Project, a part of the US Department of Energy's Geothermal Energy Program, is addressing operating problems associated with scaling and corrosion at geothermal power plants. Under this project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a series of tests at the Salton Sea Deep Well, which has one of the highest solids contents in the world. The purpose of the tests was to evaluate monitoring instrumentation under field conditions and relate particulate formation to the brine chemistry. The instrumentation, was evaluated under scaling geothermal conditions using two different principles: ultrasonic reflection and laser light scattering. The following conclusions were drawn from the instrumentation testing and brine chemistry and particulate analyses. (1) Using reflected ultrasonic impulses to detect suspended particles has been demonstrate for on-line application in a geothermal brine with strong scaling tendencies. Advantages over laser light scattering include improved high-temperature durability for the transducer and longer operation with less maintenance. (2) Counting and sizing particles using laser light scattering requires constant maintenance in geothermal applications. (3) Silica is the dominant scale species and appears in amounts orders of magnitude greater than other minor species such as barium sulfate. (4) The silica that formed at high temperatures and short residence times is very gelatinous and difficult to filter out of the brine. (5) Correlation of instrument readings with particle collection data was difficult because conditions on the filter (i.e., temperature, flowrate, and pressure) could not be maintained constant for long enough intervals to obtain comparable information. 5 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Radiation chemistry of salt-mine brines and hydrates. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenks, G.H.; Walton, J.R.; Bronstein, H.R.; Baes, C.F. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Certain aspects of the radiation chemistry of NaCl-saturated MgCl/sub 2/ solutions and MgCl/sub 2/ hydrates at temperatures in the range of 30 to 180/sup 0/C were investigated through experiments. A principal objective was to establish the values for the yields of H/sub 2/ (G(H/sub 2/)) and accompanying oxidants in the gamma-ray radiolysis of concentrated brines that might occur in waste repositories in salt. We concluded that G(H/sub 2/) from gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated, deaerated atmosphere above the solution is between 0.48 and 0.49 over most of the range 30 to 143/sup 0/C. The yield is probably somewhat lower at the lower end of this range, averaging 0.44 at 30 to 45/sup 0/C. Changes in the relative amounts of MgCl/sub 2/ and NaCl in the NaCl-saturated solutions have negligible effects on the yield. The yield of O/sub 2/ into the same atmosphere averages 0.13, independent of the temperature and brine composition, showing that only about 50% of the radiolytic oxidant that was formed along with the H/sub 2/ was present as O/sub 2/. We did not identify the species that compose the remainder of the oxidant. We concluded that the yield of H/sub 2/ from a gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated atmosphere containing 5 to 8% air in He may be greater than the yield in deaerated systems by amounts ranging from 0% for temperatures of 73 to 85/sup 0/C, to about 30 and 40% for temperatures in the ranges 100 to 143/sup 0/C and 30 to 45/sup 0/C, respectively. We did not establish the mechanism whereby the air affected the yields of H/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/. The values found in this work for G(H/sub 2/) in deaerated systems are in approximate agreement with the value of 0.44 for the gamma-irradiation yield of H/sub 2/ in pure H/sub 2/O at room temperature. They are also in agreement with the values predicted by extrapolation from the findings of previous researchers for the value for G(H/sub 2/) in 2 M NaCl solutions

  6. Origin and evolution of oilfield brines from Tertiary strata in western Qaidam Basin: Constraints from 87Sr/86Sr, δD, δ18O, δ34S and water chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Qishun; MA Haizhou; LAI Zhongping; TAN Hongbing; LI Tingwei

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry of major and minor elements, 87Sr/86Sr, δD, δ18O and δ34S of brines were measured from Tertiary strata and Quaternary salt lakes in the western Qaidam Basin. The water chemistry data show that all oilfield brines are CaCl2 type. They were enriched in Ca2+, B3+, Li+, Sr2+, Br-, and were depleted in Mg2+, SO42-, which indicated that these brines had the characteristics of deeply circulated water. The relationship between δD and δ18O shows that all data of these brines decline towards the Global Meteoric Water Line (GWL) and Qaidam Meteoric Water Line (QWL), and that the intersection between oilfield brines and Meteoric Water Lines was close to the local spring and fresh water in the piedmont in the western Qaidam Basin. The results suggest that oilfield brines has initially originated from meteoric water, and then might be affected by water-rock metamorphose, because most oilfield brines distribute in the range of metamorphosing water. The 87Sr/86Sr values of most oilfield brines range from 0.71121 to 0.71194, and was less than that in salt lake water (>0.712), but close to that of halite in the study area. These imply that salt dissolution occurred in the process of migration. In addition, all oilfield brines have obviously much positive δ34S values (ranging from 26.46‰ to 54.57‰) than that of salt lake brines, which was caused by bacterial sulfate reduction resulting in positive shift of δ34S value and depleteed SO42- in oilfield brines. Combined with water chemical data and δD, δ18O, 87Sr/86Sr, δ34S values, we concluded that oilfield brines mainly originate from the deeply circulated meteoric waters, and then are affected by salt dissolution, water-rock metamorphose, sulfate reduction and dolomitization during the process of migration. These processes alter the chemical compositions of oilfield brines and accumulate rich elements (such as B, Li, Sr, Br, K and so on) for sustainable utilization of salt lake resources in the Qaidam Basin.

  7. Brine chemistry: scaling and corrosion. Geothermal research study in the Salton Sea region of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, M.R.

    1975-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to recommend a reasonable program of brine chemistry research that will result in the development of methods for predicting and controlling scale deposition, and in guidelines for the selection of corrosion-resistant construction materials. First, background information, which is necessary for the understanding of the problems of scaling and corrosion in the Salton Sea KGRA, is presented through a review of the history of geothermal exploration and development in the Salton Sea. Second, literature relevant to the geochemistry of the Salton Sea field is reviewed and important results are emphasized. Third, current research efforts directed toward actual power plant construction are summarized and evaluated. Fourth, research which has been proposed but is not currently funded is discussed. Fifth, because silica scaling has been the most troublesome problem in the past, the basic chemistry of silica and its relationship to scaling is discussed. Sixth, recommendations for future research are made in which a fundamental engineering approach is emphasized. In this approach, experiments would be conducted on actual process equipment and detailed chemical analyses would be performed on site in well-equipped field laboratories. 88 references.

  8. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1990 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during 1990. When excavations began in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. These brine occurrences were initially described as part of the Site Validation Program. Brine studies were formalized in 1985. The BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. The brine chemistry is important because it assists in understanding the origin of the brine and because it may affect possible chemical reactions in the buried waste after sealing the repository. The volume of brine and the hydrologic system that drives the brine seepage also need to be understood to assess the long-term performance of the repository. After more than eight years of observations (1982--1990), no credible evidence exists to indicate that enough naturally occurring brine will seep into the WIPP excavations to be of practical concern. The detailed observations and analyses summarized herein and in previous BSEP reports confirm the evidence apparent during casual visits to the underground workings -- that the excavations are remarkably dry

  9. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1990 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Case, J.B.; Martin, M.L.; Roggenthen, W.M. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

    1991-08-01

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during 1990. When excavations began in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. These brine occurrences were initially described as part of the Site Validation Program. Brine studies were formalized in 1985. The BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. The brine chemistry is important because it assists in understanding the origin of the brine and because it may affect possible chemical reactions in the buried waste after sealing the repository. The volume of brine and the hydrologic system that drives the brine seepage also need to be understood to assess the long-term performance of the repository. After more than eight years of observations (1982--1990), no credible evidence exists to indicate that enough naturally occurring brine will seep into the WIPP excavations to be of practical concern. The detailed observations and analyses summarized herein and in previous BSEP reports confirm the evidence apparent during casual visits to the underground workings -- that the excavations are remarkably dry.

  10. Brine chemistry effects on the durability of a simulated nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of various solution chemistry parameters on the alteration and leaching characteristics of a copper borosilicate simulated waste glass have been determined under hydrothermal conditions. Results are presented which demonstrate that leachant salinity, volume/glass surface area ratio, pH, cation content, and dissolved SiO2 concentration effects are important. A brief explanation of these results is given which is based on ion exchange and solution saturation equilibria

  11. Chemistry of brines in salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico: a preliminary investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present here analyses of macro- and microscopic (intracrystalline) brines observed within the WIPP facility and in the surrounding halite, with interpretations regarding the origin and history of these fluids and their potential effect(s) on long-term waste storage. During excavation, several large fluid inclusions were recovered from an area of highly recrystallized halite in a thick salt bed at the repository horizon (2150 ft below ground level). In addition, 52 samples of brine ''weeps'' were collected from walls of recently excavated drifts at the same stratigraphic horizon from which the fluid inclusion samples are assumed to have been taken. Analyses of these fluids show that they differ substantially in composition from the inclusion fluids and cannot be explained by mixing of the fluid inclusion populations. Finally, holes in the facility floor that filled with brine were sampled but with no stratographic control; therefore it is not possible to interpret the compositions of these brines with any accuracy, except insofar as they resemble the weep compositions but with greater variation in both K/Mg and Na/Cl ratios. However, the Ca and SO4 values for the floor holes are relatively close to the gypsum saturation curve, suggesting that brines filling floor holes have been modified by the presence of gypsum or anhydrite, possibly even originating in one or more of the laterally continuous anhydrite units referred to in the WIPP literature as marker beds. In conclusion, the wide compositional variety of fluids found in the WIPP workings suggest that (1) an interconnected hydrologic system which could effectively transport radonuclides away from the repository does not exist; (2) brine migration studies and experiments must consider the mobility of intergranular fluids as well as those in inclusions; and (3) near- and far-field radionuclide migration testing programs need to consider a wide range of brine compositions rather than a few reference brines

  12. Water quality in the vicinity of Mosquito Creek Lake, Trumbull County, Ohio, in relation of the chemistry of locally occurring oil, natural gas, and brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to describe current water quality and the chemistry of oil, natural gas, and brine in the Mosquito Creek Lake area. Additionally, these data are used to characterize water quality in the Mosquito Creek Lake area in relation to past oil and natural gas well drilling and production. To meet the overall objective, several goals for this investigation were established. These include (1) collect water-quality and subsurface-gas data from shallow sediments and rock that can be used for future evaluation of possible effects of oil and natural gas well drilling and production on water supplies, (2) characterize current surface-water and ground-water quality as it relates to the natural occurrence and (or) release of oil, gas, and brine (3) sample and chemically characterize the oil in the shallow Mecca Oil Pool, gas from the Berea and Cussewago Sandstone aquifers, and the oil, gas, and brine from the Clinton sandstone, and (4) identify areas where aquifers are vulnerable to contamination from surface spills at oil and natural gas drilling and production sites

  13. Water quality in the vicinity of Mosquito Creek Lake, Trumbull County, Ohio, in relation of the chemistry of locally occurring oil, natural gas, and brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, G.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Ryder, R.T.

    1998-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to describe current water quality and the chemistry of oil, natural gas, and brine in the Mosquito Creek Lake area. Additionally, these data are used to characterize water quality in the Mosquito Creek Lake area in relation to past oil and natural gas well drilling and production. To meet the overall objective, several goals for this investigation were established. These include (1) collect water-quality and subsurface-gas data from shallow sediments and rock that can be used for future evaluation of possible effects of oil and natural gas well drilling and production on water supplies, (2) characterize current surface-water and ground-water quality as it relates to the natural occurrence and (or) release of oil, gas, and brine (3) sample and chemically characterize the oil in the shallow Mecca Oil Pool, gas from the Berea and Cussewago Sandstone aquifers, and the oil, gas, and brine from the Clinton sandstone, and (4) identify areas where aquifers are vulnerable to contamination from surface spills at oil and natural gas drilling and production sites.

  14. Characteristics of meaningful chemistry education - The case of water quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westbroek, Hanna Barbara

    2005-01-01

    This thesis addresses the question of how to involve students in meaningful chemistry education by a proper implementation of three characteristics of meaningful: a context, a need-to-know approach and attention for student input. The characteristics were adopted as solution strategies for problemat

  15. Characteristics of Trivalent Lanthanides in Coordination Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Dongfeng(薛冬峰); Zuo Sen(左森); Henryk Ratajczak

    2004-01-01

    Some basic characteristics of lanthanide-oxygen bonds in various trivalent lanthanide metal-organic complexes are quantitatively studied by the bond valence model. Some important relationships among the electronegativity, bond valence parameter, bond length and lanthanide coordination number in these complexes are generally found , which show that for each trivalent lanthanide cation all calculated parameters may well be correlated with its coordination number in their coordination complexes. Specifically,32 new data for the bond valence parameter are first calculated in this work.An approximate linear relationship between the Ln-O bond valence parameter and the coordination number of Ln3+ is obtained.The Ln-O bond length increases with the increase in the lanthanide coordination number.The difference of electronegative values decreases with the increase in the lanthanide coordination number.

  16. Relative permeability hysteresis and capillary trapping characteristics of supercritical CO2/brine systems: An experimental study at reservoir conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarabadi, Morteza; Piri, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    We present the results of an experimental study on the effects of hysteresis on capillary trapping and relative permeability of CO2/brine systems at reservoir conditions. We performed thirty unsteady- and steady-state drainage and imbibition full-recirculation flow experiments in three different sandstone rock samples, low- and high-permeability Berea and Nugget sandstones. The experiments were carried out at various flow rates with both supercritical CO2 (scCO2)/brine and gaseous CO2 (gCO2)/brine fluid systems. The unsteady-state experiments were carried out with a wide range of flow rates to establish a broad range of initial brine saturations (Swi). This allowed investigation of the sensitivity of residual trapped CO2 saturation (S) to changes in Swi. The values were successfully compared with those available in the literature. For a given Swi, the trapped scCO2 saturation was less than that of gCO2 in the same sample. This was attributed to brine being less wetting in the presence of scCO2 than in the presence of gCO2. Post-imbibition dissolution of trapped CO2 and formation of dissolution front was also investigated. During the steady-state experiments, scCO2 and brine were co-injected with monotonically increasing or decreasing fractional flows to perform drainage and imbibition processes. We carried out seven sets of steady-state flow tests with various trajectories generating a comprehensive group of relative permeability hysteresis curves. The scanning curves revealed distinct features with potentially important implications for storage of scCO2 in geological formations. For both series of experiments, the ratio of S to initial CO2 saturation (1- Swi) was found to be much higher for low initial CO2 saturations. The results indicate that very promising fractions (about 49 to 83%) of the initial CO2 saturation can be stored through capillary trapping.

  17. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1991 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Martin, M.L.; Milligan, D.J.; Sobocinski, R.W.; Lipponer, P.P.J. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

    1993-09-01

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) during 1991. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. When excavations began at the WIPP in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. Brine studies began as part of the Site Validation Program and were formalized as a program in its own right in 1985. During nine years of observations (1982--1991), evidence has mounted that the amount of brine seeping into the WIPP excavations is limited, local, and only a small fraction of that required to produce hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. The data through 1990 is discussed in detail and summarized by Deal and others (1991). The data presented in this report describes progress made during the calendar year 1991 and focuses on four major areas: (1) quantification of the amount of brine seeping across vertical surfaces in the WIPP excavations (brine ``weeps); (2) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes; (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) preliminary quantification of the amount of brine that might be released by squeezing the underconsolidated clays present in the Salado Formation.

  18. Reactive transport modeling to study changes in water chemistry induced by CO2 injection at the Frio-I brine pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharaka, Y.K; Doughty, C.; Freifeld, B.M.; Daley, T.M.; Xu, T.

    2009-11-01

    To demonstrate the potential for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers, the Frio-I Brine Pilot was conducted, during which 1600 tons of CO{sub 2} were injected into a high-permeability sandstone and the resulting subsurface plume of CO{sub 2} was monitored using a variety of hydrogeological, geophysical, and geochemical techniques. Fluid samples were obtained before CO{sub 2} injection for baseline geochemical characterization, during the CO{sub 2} injection to track its breakthrough at a nearby observation well, and after injection to investigate changes in fluid composition and potential leakage into an overlying zone. Following CO{sub 2} breakthrough at the observation well, brine samples showed sharp drops in pH, pronounced increases in HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and aqueous Fe, and significant shifts in the isotopic compositions of H{sub 2}O and dissolved inorganic carbon. Based on a calibrated 1-D radial flow model, reactive transport modeling was performed for the Frio-I Brine Pilot. A simple kinetic model of Fe release from the solid to aqueous phase was developed, which can reproduce the observed increases in aqueous Fe concentration. Brine samples collected after half a year had lower Fe concentrations due to carbonate precipitation, and this trend can be also captured by our modeling. The paper provides a method for estimating potential mobile Fe inventory, and its bounding concentration in the storage formation from limited observation data. Long-term simulations show that the CO{sub 2} plume gradually spreads outward due to capillary forces, and the gas saturation gradually decreases due to its dissolution and precipitation of carbonates. The gas phase is predicted to disappear after 500 years. Elevated aqueous CO{sub 2} concentrations remain for a longer time, but eventually decrease due to carbonate precipitation. For the Frio-I Brine Pilot, all injected CO{sub 2} could ultimately be sequestered as carbonate minerals.

  19. Applying the Multilevel Framework of Discourse Comprehension to Evaluate the Text Characteristics of General Chemistry Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyburn, Daniel T.; Pazicni, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Prior chemistry education research has demonstrated a relationship between student reading skill and general chemistry course performance. In addition to student characteristics, however, the qualities of the learning materials with which students interact also impact student learning. For example, low-knowledge students benefit from texts that…

  20. Some observations on the growth and cyst production characteristics of the brine shrimp Artemia sp. (Gujarat strain) in pond culture and its potential for import substitution

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalakrishnan, P.; Krishna Raju, V.; Thaker, S R

    1989-01-01

    Experimental culture of the brine shrimp Artemia sp. (Gujarat strain) and production of cyst is discussed. The qualitative and quantitative aspects of the cyst and its economic potential for import substitution are highlighted.

  1. Exposure and effects of oilfield brine discharges on western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) in Nueces Bay, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J. [National Biological Survey, Laurel, MD (United States); Capizzi, J.L. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); King, K.A. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Phoenix, AZ (United States); LeCaptain, L.J. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Spokane, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Discharge of oilfield brines into fresh and estuarine waters is a common disposal practice in Texas. Petroleum crude oil (PCO) extraction from underground stores includes the removal of a significant amount of water along with the oil. Several methods may be used to separate the oil and water fractions, including tank batteries, heat separation, and skimming ponds. Disposal of the resultant produced water (oilfield brine) may be accomplished by deep-well injection or discharge to surface waters. In Texas, an estimated 766,000 barrels of oilfield brine were discharged daily into tidal waters in 1979. The maximum concentration for oil and grease in these discharges permitted by the Texas Railroad Commission is 25 ppm. Several studies have shown that oilfield brines are toxic to a wide range of marine life, yet little is known about their effects on birds and mammals. Exposure to petroleum in oilfield wastes could evoke toxicological effects in some waterbird species. Avian responses to PCO exposure are highly variable, including cessation of growth, osmoregulatory impairment, endocrine dysfunction, hemolytic anemia, altered blood chemistry, cytochrome P450 induction, reduced reproductive success, and mortality. Oilfield brine discharges may soon be the largest and most pervasive source of contaminants entering Texas estuaries. Migratory and resident birds feeding in the vicinity of discharge sites may be ingesting food items contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals and salts in sufficient quantities to evoke toxicity. The present study of wintering western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) that feed and roost near discharge sites sought to examine oilfield brine exposure and effects through quantification of contaminant burdens, morphological characteristics, and cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenase activities. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. An experimental study of relative permeability hysteresis, capillary trapping characteristics, and capillary pressure of CO2/brine systems at reservoir conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Suthanthiraraj, Pearlson Prashanth

    We present the results of an extensive experimental study on the effects of hysteresis on permanent capillary trapping and relative permeability of CO2/brine and supercritical (sc)CO2+SO2/brine systems. We performed numerous unsteady- and steady-state drainage and imbibition full-recirculation flow experiments in three different sandstone rock samples, i.e., low and high-permeability Berea, Nugget sandstones, and Madison limestone carbonate rock sample. A state-of-the-art reservoir conditions core-flooding system was used to perform the tests. The core-flooding apparatus included a medical CT scanner to measure in-situ saturations. The scanner was rotated to the horizontal orientation allowing flow tests through vertically-placed core samples with about 3.8 cm diameter and 15 cm length. Both scCO2 /brine and gaseous CO2 (gCO2)/brine fluid systems were studied. The gaseous and supercritical CO2/brine experiments were carried out at 3.46 and 11 MPa back pressures and 20 and 55°C temperatures, respectively. Under the above-mentioned conditions, the gCO2 and scCO2 have 0.081 and 0.393 gr/cm3 densities, respectively. During unsteady-state tests, the samples were first saturated with brine and then flooded with CO2 (drainage) at different maximum flow rates. The drainage process was then followed by a low flow rate (0.375 cm 3/min) imbibition until residual CO2 saturation was achieved. Wide flow rate ranges of 0.25 to 20 cm3/min for scCO2 and 0.125 to 120 cm3min for gCO2 were used to investigate the variation of initial brine saturation (Swi) with maximum CO2 flow rate and variation of trapped CO2 saturation (SCO2r) with Swi. For a given Swi, the trapped scCO2 saturation was less than that of gCO2 in the same sample. This was attributed to brine being less wetting in the presence of scCO2 than in the presence of gCO 2. During the steady-state experiments, after providing of fully-brine saturated core, scCO2 was injected along with brine to find the drainage curve and as

  3. The Learner Characteristics, Features of Desktop 3D Virtual Reality Environments, and College Chemistry Instruction: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Zahira; Goetz, Ernest T.; Keeney-Kennicutt, Wendy; Kwok, Oi-man; Cifuentes, Lauren; Davis, Trina J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined a model of the impact of a 3D desktop virtual reality environment on the learner characteristics (i.e. perceptual and psychological variables) that can enhance chemistry-related learning achievements in an introductory college chemistry class. The relationships between the 3D virtual reality features and the chemistry learning test as…

  4. Evolution of hydrologic systems and brine geochemistry in a deforming salt medium: Data from WIPP brine seeps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, D.E. (I. T. Corp., Carlsbad, NM (USA)); Roggenthen, W.M. (South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (USA). Dept. of Geology and Geological Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    The Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) is a formalized continuation of studies that began in 1982 as part of the Site Validation Program. The program was established in 1985. The mission was to document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and the seepage of that brine into the WIPP excavations. This document focuses on the cumulative data obtained from the BSEP. The overall activities of the BSEP described and quantified the brine. It includes documentation and study of brine inflow into boreholes in the facility. The BSEP investigated the occurrence and development of brine weeps, crusts, and brine geochemistry. The presence of salt-tolerant bacteria in the workings was recorded and their possible interactions with experiments and operations, was assessed. The formation properties associated with the occurrence of brine was characterized. The determination of formation properties included the water content of various geologic units, direct examination of these units in boreholes using a video camera system, and measurement of electrical properties relatable to the brine contents. Modeling examined the interaction of salt deformation near the workings and the flow of brine through the deforming rocks. 34 refs.

  5. Evolution of hydrologic systems and brine geochemistry in a deforming salt medium: Data from WIPP brine seeps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) is a formalized continuation of studies that began in 1982 as part of the Site Validation Program. The program was established in 1985. The mission was to document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and the seepage of that brine into the WIPP excavations. This document focuses on the cumulative data obtained from the BSEP. The overall activities of the BSEP described and quantified the brine. It includes documentation and study of brine inflow into boreholes in the facility. The BSEP investigated the occurrence and development of brine weeps, crusts, and brine geochemistry. The presence of salt-tolerant bacteria in the workings was recorded and their possible interactions with experiments and operations, was assessed. The formation properties associated with the occurrence of brine was characterized. The determination of formation properties included the water content of various geologic units, direct examination of these units in boreholes using a video camera system, and measurement of electrical properties relatable to the brine contents. Modeling examined the interaction of salt deformation near the workings and the flow of brine through the deforming rocks. 34 refs

  6. Preparation and Characteristics of Polyaluminium Chloride by Utilizing Fluorine-Containing Waste Acidic Mother Liquid from Clay-Brine Synthetic Cryolite Process

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Clay-brine process employing activated clay, NaCl, HCl, and HF as raw materials is the primarily advanced technology to synthesize cryolite in the present industrial grade. However, plenty of byproducts of fluorine-containing waste HCl at the concentration of about 10%~12% could not be utilized comprehensively and are even hazardous to the environment. This work proposed a new two-step technology to prepare inorganic polymer flocculants polyaluminium chloride (PAC) from synthetic cryolite mot...

  7. Brine Distribution after Vacuum Saturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Kathrine; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann

    1999-01-01

    Experiments with the vacuum saturation method for brine in plugs of chalk showed that a homogeneous distribution of brine cannot be ensured at saturations below 20% volume. Instead of a homogeneous volume distribution the brine becomes concentrated close to the surfaces of the plugs......Experiments with the vacuum saturation method for brine in plugs of chalk showed that a homogeneous distribution of brine cannot be ensured at saturations below 20% volume. Instead of a homogeneous volume distribution the brine becomes concentrated close to the surfaces of the plugs...

  8. Incorporating landscape characteristics in a distance metric for interpolating between observations of stream water chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. Lyon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Spatial patterns of water chemistry along stream networks can be quantified using synoptic or "snapshot" sampling. The basic idea is to sample stream water at many points over a relatively short period of time. Even for intense sampling campaigns, the number of sample points is limited and interpolation methods, like kriging, are commonly used to produce continuous maps of water chemistry based on the point observations from the synoptic sampling. Interpolated concentrations are influenced heavily by how distance between points along the stream network is defined. In this study, we investigate different ways to define distance and test these based on data from a snapshot sampling campaign in a 37-km2 watershed in the Catskill Mountains region (New York State. Three distance definitions (or metrics were compared: Euclidean or straight-line distance, in-stream distance, and in-stream distance adjusted according characteristics of the local contributing area, i.e., an adjusted in-stream distance. Using the adjusted distance metric resulted in a lower cross-validation error of the interpolated concentrations, i.e., a better agreement of kriging results with measurements, than the other distance definitions. The adjusted distance metric can also be used in an exploratory manner to test which landscape characteristics are most influential for the spatial patterns of stream water chemistry and, thus, to target future investigations to gain process-based understanding of in-stream chemistry dynamics.

  9. Incorporating landscape characteristics in a distance metric for interpolating between observations of stream water chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. Lyon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Spatial patterns of water chemistry along stream networks can be quantified using synoptic or "snapshot" sampling. The basic idea is to sample stream water at many points over a relatively short period of time. Even for intense sampling campaigns, the number of sample points is limited and interpolation methods, like kriging, are commonly used to produce continuous maps of water chemistry based on the point observations from the synoptic sampling. Interpolated concentrations are influenced heavily by how distance between points along the stream network is defined. In this study, we investigate different ways to define distance and test these based on data from a snapshot sampling campaign in a 37-km2 watershed in the Catskill Mountains region (New York State. Three distance definitions (or metrics were compared: Euclidean or straight-line distance, in-stream distance, and in-stream distance adjusted according characteristics of the local contributing area, i.e., an adjusted in-stream distance. Using the adjusted distance metric resulted in a lower cross-validation error of the interpolated concentrations, i.e., a better agreement of kriging results with measurements, than the other distance definitions. The adjusted distance metric can also be used in an exploratory manner to test which landscape characteristics are most influential for the spatial patterns of stream water chemistry and, thus, to target future investigations to gain process-based understanding of in-stream chemistry dynamics.

  10. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF3 and dissolved UF4, and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC2. Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U4+/U3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  11. Silica in alkaline brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.F.; Rettig, S.L.; Eugster, H.P.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate brines from closed basins in volcanic terranes of Oregon and Kenya reveals silica contents of up to 2700 parts per million at pH's higher than 10. These high concentrations of SiO 2 can be attributed to reaction of waters with silicates, and subsequent evaporative concentration accompanied by a rise in pH. Supersaturation with respect to amorphous silica may occur and persist for brines that are out of contact with silicate muds and undersaturated with respect to trona; correlation of SiO2 with concentration of Na and total CO2 support this interpretation. Addition of moredilute waters to alkaline brines may lower the pH and cause inorganic precipitation of substantial amounts of silica.

  12. Mineral chemistry and alteration characteristics of spinel in serpentinised peridotites from the northern central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Ray, Dwijesh; Ishii, T.

    Version: J. Geol. Soc. India, vol.86(1); 2015; 41-51 Mineral chemistry and alteration characteristics of spinel in serpentinised peridotites from the Northern Central Indian Ridge RANADIP BANERJEE1 , DWIJESH RAY2 and TERUAKI ISHII3 1 National... Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403004, India 2 PLANEX, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009, India 3 Fukada Geological Institute, Honkomagome, Tokyo 113-0021, Japan Email: ocean1@rediffmail.com; dwijesh...

  13. An Investigation of the Effects of Reader Characteristics on Reading Comprehension Of a General Chemistry Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiles, Kelly Y.

    There is great concern in the scientific community that students in the United States, when compared with other countries, are falling behind in their scientific achievement. Increasing students' reading comprehension of scientific text may be one of the components involved in students' science achievement. To investigate students' reading comprehension this quantitative study examined the effects of different reader characteristics, namely, students' logical reasoning ability, factual chemistry knowledge, working memory capacity, and schema of the chemistry concepts, on reading comprehension of a chemistry text. Students' reading comprehension was measured through their ability to encode the text, access the meanings of words (lexical access), make bridging and elaborative inferences, and integrate the text with their existing schemas to make a lasting mental representation of the text (situational model). Students completed a series of tasks that measured the reader characteristic and reading comprehension variables. Some of the variables were measured using new technologies and software to investigate different cognitive processes. These technologies and software included eye tracking to investigate students' lexical accessing and a Pathfinder program to investigate students' schema of the chemistry concepts. The results from this study were analyzed using canonical correlation and regression analysis. The canonical correlation analysis allows for the ten variables described previously to be included in one multivariate analysis. Results indicate that the relationship between the reader characteristic variables and the reading comprehension variables is significant. The resulting canonical function accounts for a greater amount of variance in students' responses then any individual variable. Regression analysis was used to further investigate which reader characteristic variables accounted for the differences in students' responses for each reading comprehension

  14. Investigating Brine Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Lena Ballone

    2003-01-01

    Presents a brine shrimp activity designed for students in grades 5-12 to foster authentic scientific inquiry in addition to providing an engaging and exciting avenue for student exploration. Emphasizes that inquiry should be a critical component in the science classroom. (KHR)

  15. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research progress is reported in programs on fuel-salt chemistry, properties of compounds in the Li--Te system, Te spectroscopy UF4--H equilibria, porous electrode studies of molten salts, fuel salt-coolant salt reactions, thermodynamic properties of transition-metal fluorides, and properties of sodium fluoroborate. Developmental work on analytical methods is summarized including in-line analysis of molten MSBR fuel, analysis of coolant-salts for tritium, analysis of molten LiF--BeF2--ThF4 for Fe and analysis of LiF--BeF--ThF4 for Te

  16. Soil washing for brine removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the exploration for oil and thereafter, brine transfer lines get ruptured releasing the brine which contaminates the surrounding soil. The salinity level in brine is very high, sometimes approaching or exceeding that of sea water. Soils contaminated with brine are unproductive and unsuitable for plant growth. Several investigators have documented the pollution of surface water and groundwater due to brine disposal from oil and needed to clean up such sites. The objective of this study is to develop a soil washing technique that can be used to remove brine sites were collected and used in the study. This paper reports on results which indicate that soil washing using various surface active agents is effective in removing the brine

  17. Brine migration in salt and its implications in the geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report respresents a comprehensive review and analysis of available information relating to brine migration in salt surrounding radioactive waste in a salt repository. The topics covered relate to (1) the characteristics of salt formations and waste packages pertinent to considerations of rates, amounts, and effects of brine migration, (2) experimental and theoretical information on brine migration, and (3) means of designing to minimize any adverse effects of brine migration. Flooding, brine pockets, and other topics were not considered, since these features will presumably be eliminated by appropriate site selection and repository design. 115 references

  18. Brine migration in salt and its implications in the geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenks, G.H.; Claiborne, H.C.

    1981-12-01

    This report respresents a comprehensive review and analysis of available information relating to brine migration in salt surrounding radioactive waste in a salt repository. The topics covered relate to (1) the characteristics of salt formations and waste packages pertinent to considerations of rates, amounts, and effects of brine migration, (2) experimental and theoretical information on brine migration, and (3) means of designing to minimize any adverse effects of brine migration. Flooding, brine pockets, and other topics were not considered, since these features will presumably be eliminated by appropriate site selection and repository design. 115 references.

  19. Diverse methane concentrations in anoxic brines and underlying sediments, eastern Mediterranean Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Karisiddaiah, S.M.

    of the brines are extremely high, 2692]103 nM at 3493m, and are 20 times higher than the Bannock Basin values. Thus, based on available physical pro"les (oxygen, temperature and salinity) of water masses in these brines, the approximate boundary of the brine... Atlantis II (mer Rouge). Oceanologica Acta 13, 187}197. Boldrin, A., Rabitti, S., 1990. Hydrography of the brines in the Bannock and Tyro anoxic basins (Eastern Mediterranean). Marine Chemistry 31, 21}33. Camerlenghi, A., Cita, M.B., Hieke, W., Ricchuito, T...

  20. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities dealing with the chemical problems related to design and ultimate operation of molten-salt reactor systems are described. An experimental test stand was constructed to expose metallurgical test specimens to Te2 vapor at defined temperatures and deposition rates. To better define the chemistry of fluoroborate coolant, several aspects are being investigated. The behavior of hydroxy and oxy compounds in molten NaBF4 is being investigated to define reactions and compounds that may be involved in corrosion and/or could be involved in methods for trapping tritium. Two corrosion products of Hastelloy N, Na3CrF6 and Na5Cr3F14, were identified from fluoroborate systems. The evaluation of fluoroborate and alternate coolants continued. Research on the behavior of hydrogen and its isotopes is summarized. The solubilities of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium in Li2BeF4 are very low. The sorption of tritium on graphite was found to be significant (a few milligrams of tritium per kilogram of graphite), possibly providing a means of sequestering a portion of the tritium produced. Development of analytical methods continued with emphasis on voltammetric and spectrophotometric techniques for the in-line analysis of corrosion products such as Fe2+ and Cr3+ and the determination of the U3+/U4+ ratio in MSBR fuel salt. Similar studies were conducted with the NaBF4--NaF coolant salt. Information developed during the previous operation of the CSTF has been assessed and used to formulate plans for evaluation of in-line analytical methods in future CSTF operations. Electroanalytical and spectrophotometric research suggests that an electroactive protonic species is present in molten NaBF4--NaF, and that this species rapidly equilibrates with a volatile proton-containing species. Data obtained from the CSTF indicated that tritium was concentrated in the volatile species. (JGB)

  1. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) Phase II Report is an interim report which updates the data released in the BSEP Phase I Report. Direct measurements and observations of the brine that seeps into the WIPP repository excavations were continued through the period between August 1986 and July 1987. That data is included in Appendix A, which extends the observation period for some locations to approximately 900 days. Brine observations at 87 locations are presented in this report. Although WIPP underground workings are considered ''dry,'' small amounts of brine are present. Part of that brine migrates into the repository in response to pressure gradients at essentially isothermal conditions. The data presented in this report is a continuation of moisture content studies of the WIPP facility horizon that were initiated in 1982, as soon as underground drifts began to be excavated. Brine seepages are manifested by salt efflorescences, moist areas, and fluid accumulations in drillholes. 35 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs

  2. Preparation and Characteristics of Polyaluminium Chloride by Utilizing Fluorine-Containing Waste Acidic Mother Liquid from Clay-Brine Synthetic Cryolite Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-shan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clay-brine process employing activated clay, NaCl, HCl, and HF as raw materials is the primarily advanced technology to synthesize cryolite in the present industrial grade. However, plenty of byproducts of fluorine-containing waste HCl at the concentration of about 10%~12% could not be utilized comprehensively and are even hazardous to the environment. This work proposed a new two-step technology to prepare inorganic polymer flocculants polyaluminium chloride (PAC from synthetic cryolite mother liquor. Many specific factors such as the variety of aluminide source, reaction temperature and time, reagent ratio, and manner of alkaline addition were taken into consideration and their influences on the performances of produced PAC were discussed. It was found that synthetic cryolite mother liquor could react with bauxite and calcium aluminate directly to prepare cheap PAC, with plenty amount of water insoluble CaF2 and CaSiF6 produced as well. However, once HCl was introduced into synthetic cryolite mother liquor as well as by utilizing bauxite as aluminide source and sodium aluminate as adjusting basicity agent, the resultant PAC would dissolve out higher amount of aluminum while producing little amount of water insoluble materials. The coagulation behavior of the specially produced PAC could even match the industrial grade PAC conforming to national standard.

  3. Influence of the earthworms on the characteristic chemistries of compost, vermicompost and soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edinete Maria de Oliveira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present work to evaluate it influences of the earthworms on the characteristics chemistries of the compost, vermicompost and fertilized soil. In that research the following treatments were used: T1 - compost of garbage homemade (50 kg; T2 – compost of garbage homemade and culture rest (25 + 25 kg; T3 - compost of garbage homemade, culture rest and manure (35 + 10 + 5 kg; T4 - compost of garbage homemade with manure biodigested (35 + 10 + 5 kg; T5 - compost of garbage homemade, culture rest and manure biodigested (35 + 10 + 5kg; T6 - humus of bovine manure (50kg; T7 - soil (test. The results showed that the compost and vermicompost presented satisfactory value of pH, S and CTC, constitute alternative sources of organic matter for the soil and of nutrients for the plants.

  4. Prospects of the complex development of highly parameter geothermal brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhasov, A. B.; Alkhasova, D. A.; Ramazanov, A. Sh.; Kasparova, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    The high efficiency of complex processing of high-temperature hydrothermal brines with utilization of heat energy in a binary geothermal power plant and subsequent extraction of solved chemical compounds is shown. Promising technological schemes are given, where electric power, which is generated in the binary geothermal power plant, is used in a block to recover chemistry components. The technology for integrated processing of geothermal brines of the chloride-sodium-calcium type is developed, which provides the manufacture not only of marketable products but also of practically overall reagents of processed water that are necessary to realize the technology. Priority areas for development are indicated, and the preliminary estimates for a Berikey geothermal deposit are given. It is shown that only established resources of thermal brines of the Berikey deposit make it possible to produce more than 2000 t of lithium carbonate and, thereby, to completely provide Russian industry requirements for it.

  5. Enhanced Brine Dewatering System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of the Enhanced Brine Dewatering System (EBDS) is to provide an easily scalable means of completely recovering usable water from byproducts created by...

  6. Enhanced Brine Dewatering System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of the Enhanced Brine Dewatering System (EBDS) is to provide a scalable means of completely recovering usable water from byproducts created by reverse...

  7. SURFACE CONTAINMENT FOR GEOTHERMAL BRINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report examines the probability of significant releases of geothermal brine to the surface environment through unplanned or accidental events. It then evaluates the containment measures that may be used to prevent environmental damage. The results indicate that major spills ...

  8. Characteristics and Levels of Sophistication: An Analysis of Chemistry Students' Ability to Think with Mental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2011-08-01

    This study employed a case-study approach to reveal how an ability to think with mental models contributes to differences in students' understanding of molecular geometry and polarity. We were interested in characterizing features and levels of sophistication regarding first-year university chemistry learners' mental modeling behaviors while the learners were solving problems associated with spatial information. To serve this purpose, we conducted case studies on nine students who were sampled from high-scoring, moderate-scoring, and low-scoring students. Our findings point to five characteristics of mental modeling ability that distinguish students in the high-, moderate-, and low-ability groups from one another. Although the levels of mental modeling abilities have been described in categories (high, moderate, and low), they can be thought of as a continuum with the low-ability group reflecting students who have very limited ability to generate and use mental models whereas students in the high-ability group not only construct and use mental models as a thinking tool, but also analyze the problems to be solved, evaluate their mental models, and oversee entire mental modeling processes. Cross-case comparisons for students with different levels of mental modeling ability indicate that experiences of generating and manipulating a mental model based on imposed propositions are crucial for a learner's efforts to incorporate content knowledge with visual-spatial thinking skills. This paper summarizes potential factors that undermine learners' comprehension of molecular geometry and polarity and that influence mastery of this mental modeling ability.

  9. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 20 November 1980 - 16 March 1981 (NODC Accession 8100530)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico from November 20, 1980 to March 16, 1981. Data...

  10. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 27 June 1980 - 31 October 1980 (NODC Accession 8100401)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico from June 27, 1980 to October 31, 1980. Data were...

  11. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 04 December 1979 - 11 June 1980 (NODC Accession 8000476)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico from December 4, 1979 to June 11, 1980. Data were...

  12. Bisphenol A removal from water by activated carbon. Effects of carbon characteristics and solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Toledo, I; Ferro-García, M A; Rivera-Utrilla, J; Moreno-Castilla, C; Vegas Fernández, F J

    2005-08-15

    The present study aimed to analyze the behavior of different activated carbons in the adsorption and removal of bisphenol A (2-2-bis-4-hydroxypheniyl propane) from aqueous solutions in order to identify the parameters that determine this process. Two commercial activated carbons and one prepared in our laboratory from almond shells were used; they were texturally and chemically characterized, obtaining the surface area, pore size distribution, mineral matter content, elemental analysis, oxygen surface groups, and pH of the point of zero charge (pH(PZC)), among other parameters. Adsorption isotherms of bisphenol A and adsorption capacities were obtained. The capacity of the carbons to remove bisphenol A was related to their characteristics. Thus, the adsorption of bisphenol A on activated carbon fundamentally depends on the chemical nature of the carbon surface and the pH of the solution. The most favorable experimental conditions for this process are those in which the net charge density of the carbon is zero and the bisphenol A is in molecular form. Under these conditions, the adsorbent-adsorbate interactions that govern the adsorption mechanism are enhanced. Influences of the mineral matter present in the carbon samples and the solution chemistry (pH and ionic strength) were also analyzed. The presence of mineral matter in carbons reduces their adsorption capacity because of the hydrophilic nature of the matter. The presence of electrolytes in the solution favor the adsorption process because of the screening effect produced between the positively charged carbon surface and the bisphenol A molecules, with a resulting increase in adsorbent-adsorbate interactions. PMID:16173588

  13. Physical-chemistry characteristic of 99mTc-human serum albumin (HSA)-nanospheres radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymphoscintigraphy is one of diagnostic method which is conducted by injecting a colloidal radiopharmaceutical labeled technetium-99m which have ideally size of 100-200 nm in diameters by intradermal, subcutaneous or peritumoral route. The radiopharmaceutical movement in the lymphatic vessel can be detected from external side using gamma camera or a special probe for lymphoscintigraphy parallelly with surgery of tumor or cancer especially breast cancer. In the year of 2006 and 2007 have succeeded to be carried out designed and formulated of 99mTc-HSA-nanospheres is representing one of the nanocolloid radiopharmaceutical which is having the biodegradable and bioavailable characters. In the year of 2008, the study was continued to study of physical-chemistry characteristic of 99mTc-HSA-nanospheres, including radiochemical purity, pH, lipophilicity, plasma protein binding, electricity charge, stability after storage at certain temperature and in the plasmatic media. The results shows that 99mTc-HSA-nanospheres radiopharmaceutical have radiochemical purity of 92,1 ± 2,6%, pH = 6,5 - 7, its number of lipophilicity was 0,127 ± 0,03, plasma protein binding 89,6 ± 1,2% and neutral electricity charge. After 30 minutes, it was kept at room temperature, its radiochemical purity slow down became 71%, while if it was kept at temperature of 4°C (refrigerator) after one hour the radiochemical purity still more than 90%. In vitro plasmatic stability indicated that radiochemical purity was go down drastically, started from 30 minutes later, then one hour that was 61,8% and 55,9%, and at 2, 3 and until four hours storage this value did not change significantly that was 57,8%, 51,2%, 52% and after 24 hours became 8,2%. (author)

  14. Energy storage in evaporated brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, R. Ian

    2010-09-15

    We propose storage of electrical energy in brine solutions by using the energy to enhance natural evaporation. Using properties of existing industrial evaporation technologies and estimates of power regeneration from brine by pressure retarded osmosis, efficiency near 100% is calculated. Modelling indicates that systems ranging from 50kW to 50MW output may be practical, with storage capacities of hours to days. The method appears to have potential to be economically competitive with other technologies over a wide range of capacity. It may present a large new application area that could aid the development of salinity-based power generation technology.

  15. Corrosion and hydrogen permeation of A216 Grade WCA steel in hydrothermal magnesium-containing brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion rates determined at 1 month in 150/degree/C brine increased with magnesium concentration. The structure of the corrosion product, as determined by x-ray diffraction, depended upon the magnesium concentration. In brines with less than 10,000 ppM magnesium, the primary corrosion product had a spinel structure characteristic of magnetite or magnesioferrite. In brines containing magnesium concentrations greater than 20,000 ppM, the primary corrosion product had the amakinite structure characteristic of a complex iron-magnesium hydroxide. The high corrosion rates observed in brines containing high magnesium concentrations suggest that the corrosion products having the amakinite structure is less protective than corrosion products having the spinel structure. Corrosion rates in high-magnesium (inclusion) brine determined over a 6-month test duration were essentially constant. Hydrogen permeation rates observed in exposing mild steel to high-Mg/sup 2/plus// brine at 150/degree/C could be potentially damaging to a mild steel waste package container. The rate of hydrogen permeation was proportional to the brine flow rate in the autoclave. Thiourea additions to the brine increased the hydrogen permeation rate; sulfate and bromide ion additions did not. The maximum gaseous hydrogen pressure attainable is not known (based on 3Fe /plus/ 4H2O /plus/ Fe(sub 3)O /plus/ 4H2, would be /approximately/900 atmospheres), and the dependence of permeation rate on temperature is not known. 8 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Regional characteristics of spring Asian dust and its impact on aerosol chemistry over northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Sun

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available TSP and PM2.5 aerosol samples were synchronously collected at six sites along the transport pathway of dust storm from desert regions to coastal areas in the spring of 2004. The aerosol concentration and composition were measured to investigate the regional characteristics of spring Asian dust and its impact on aerosol chemistry over northern China. Based on the daily PM10 concentrations in 13 cities, the northern China could be divided into five regions, i.e., Northern Dust Region, Northeastern Dust Region, Western Dust Region, Inland Passing Region, and Coastal Region. Northern Dust Region was characterized by high content of Ca and Northeastern Dust Region was characterized by low one instead. Northeastern Dust Region was a relatively clean area with the lowest concentrations of pollutants and secondary ions among all sites. Inland Passing Region and Coastal Region showed high concentrations of pollutants, of which As and Pb in Inland Passing Region, and Na+, SO42− and NO3 in Coastal Region were the highest, respectively. The impact of dust on air quality was the greatest in the cities near source regions, and this impact decreased in the order of Yulin/Duolun > Beijing > Qingdao/Shanghai as the increase of transport distance. The spring Asian dust was inclined to affect the chemical components in coarse particles near source regions and those in fine particles in the cities far from source regions. Dust storm could mix significant quantities of pollutants on the pathway and carry them to the downwind cities or dilute the pollutants in the cities over northern China. Each dust episode corresponded to a low ratio of NO3/SO42− with the lowest value appearing after the peak of dust storm. Asian dust played an important role in buffering and neutralizing the acidity of atmosphere in the cities over northern China

  17. Knowledge, beliefs, and performance of new high school chemistry teachers: A study of teachers' characteristics and teacher preparation program influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshannag, Qasim Mohammad

    This study investigated the influence of teachers' characteristics and secondary science teacher preparation programs on new high school chemistry teachers' knowledge, beliefs, and performance. "New high school chemistry teacher" refers to any teacher who during their first three years of teaching, has a major/minor in chemistry and/or any teacher who teaches chemistry for high school students. This research focused on four new high school chemistry teachers in their second year of teaching who were part of the Salish I Research Project. These four teachers graduated from two different teacher preparation programs, at major research universities. The focus of this study was on teachers who demonstrated one or more of the following teaching styles: teacher-centered, conceptual, and student-centered. A cross case analysis was done among these four teachers to explore the linkages among teachers' characteristics, secondary science teacher preparation program features, and new high school chemistry teachers' knowledge, beliefs, and performance. Data included interviews with university faculty in education and in science, analysis of course syllabi and program descriptions, interviews with the new teachers, analysis video portfolios of the classroom teaching, and other data collected as part of the Salish I Project. The key findings of the in-depth study included: (1) The course objectives in the teacher education courses at both institutions were more diverse and more comprehensive than science disciplinary course objectives. (2) All four of the new teachers and most of the faculty interviewed confirmed that the connections between prospective science teachers' learning and real world applications were not clearly addressed as a major goal in science courses at either institution. (3) Prospective science teachers did not experience cooperative learning in their science courses, but did so in education courses. (4) All new secondary science teachers reported that they

  18. The isotopic composition of strontium in brines from petroleum fields of southeastern Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    87Sr/86Sr ratios were determined for one oil and fourteen brines collected from three petroleum reservoirs in southeastern Ohio: the North Logan and Triadelphia fields, both of which are contained within the Clinton sandstone; and the Macksburg field which is contained within the Berea and Macksburg sandstones. Only the Clinton sandstone yields brines that could reasonably be assumed to be uncontaminated with other fluids. The data suggest that in the North Logan field this brine has a characteristic value of 0.7103 +- 0.0005 which persists for distances of at least several kilometers. This persistence, however, does not extend to the Triadelphia field 125 km away where the brine from the Clinton sandstone has a somewhat lower ratio of 0.7092. The 87Sr/86Sr ratio in one sample of oil from the Clinton sandstone in the North Logan field is identical to that in the associated brine. The data from the brines collected from the Macksburg and Berea sandstones in the Macksburg field indicate that these brines are severely contaminated with other fluids. The ratios in all the brines are generally similar to those in the local ground and stream waters, so that the ratios in all the fluids may be governed by the same factors. In southeastern Ohio, the presence of carbonate minerals in the enclosing rocks seems to be the dominant factor in controlling the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the fluids. (Auth.)

  19. The Brine Shrimp's Butterfly Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Brennan; Garrity, Deborah; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the fluid dynamics of brine shrimp larvae swimming in this gallery of fluid motion video. Time resolved particle image velocimetry was performed using nano-particles as seeding material to measure the time dependent velocity and vorticity fields. The Reynolds number of the flow was roughly 8 and the Womerseley number (ratio of periodic forcing to viscous forcing) was about 5. Vorticity dynamics reveals the formation of a vortex ring structure at the tip of each arm at the begin...

  20. Capillarity and wetting of carbon dioxide and brine during drainage in Berea sandstone at reservoir conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Menhali, Ali; Niu, Ben; Krevor, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    The wettability of CO2-brine-rock systems will have a major impact on the management of carbon sequestration in subsurface geological formations. Recent contact angle measurement studies have reported sensitivity in wetting behavior of this system to pressure, temperature, and brine salinity. We report observations of the impact of reservoir conditions on the capillary pressure characteristic curve and relative permeability of a single Berea sandstone during drainage—CO2 displacing brine—through effects on the wetting state. Eight reservoir condition drainage capillary pressure characteristic curves were measured using CO2 and brine in a single fired Berea sandstone at pressures (5-20 MPa), temperatures (25-50°C), and ionic strengths (0-5 mol kg-1 NaCl). A ninth measurement using a N2-water system provided a benchmark for capillarity with a strongly water wet system. The capillary pressure curves from each of the tests were found to be similar to the N2-water curve when scaled by the interfacial tension. Reservoir conditions were not found to have a significant impact on the capillary strength of the CO2-brine system during drainage through a variation in the wetting state. Two steady-state relative permeability measurements with CO2 and brine and one with N2 and brine similarly show little variation between conditions, consistent with the observation that the CO2-brine-sandstone system is water wetting and multiphase flow properties invariant across a wide range of reservoir conditions.

  1. Performance Characteristics of Lithium-ion Batteries of Various Chemistries for Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Andrew; Miller, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the testing and evaluation of various battery chemistries for use in PHEVs. Test data are presented for lithium-ion cells and modules utilizing nickel cobalt, iron phosphate, and lithium titanate oxide in the electrodes. The energy density of cells using NiCo (nickelate) in the positive electrode have the highest energy density being in the range of 100-170 Wh/kg. Cells using iron phosphate in the positive have energy density between 80-110 Wh/kg and those using l...

  2. Denitrification of Spent Regenerated Brine Using Molasses

    OpenAIRE

    Tepuš, Brigita; Simonič, Marjana; Petrovič, Aleksandra; Filipič, Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    Spent BRINE from the regeneration of exhausted resins has to be properly treated before its disposal. The heterotrophic denitrification of regenerated brine was studied in present work. Molasses which served as a carbon source has until now not been applied during brine denitrification. The nitrate and nitrite consumptions were observed according to different ratios between total organic carbon and nitrate (TOC / NO3 ratios) and the influence of NaCl was studied during batch experiments. ...

  3. Distillation Brine Purification for Resource Recovery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater processing systems for space generate residual brine that contains water and salts that could be recovered to life support consumables. The project assessed the use of ion-exchange resins to selectively remove salts from wastewater treatment brines. The resins were then regenerated for additional use. The intention would be to generate a Na/K and CI rich or purified brine that would then be processed into high value chemicals, such as acids, bases, and/or bleach.

  4. Simulation of radionuclide chemistry and sorption characteristics in the geosphere by artificial intelligence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An expert system operated in a personal computer is employed to simulate chemistry and sorption phenomena of radionuclides in the geosphere. The system handles both qualitative and quantitative analyses primarily for the actinides and fission products. The system also incorporates data bases of several groundwater and rock types with mineral and chemical compositions, the distribution coefficients of nuclides for minerals, etc. The decision rule base facilitates this system to carry out the reasoning procedures to predict the solubility-limiting phase, solute species, oxidation states and possible complex formations of radionuclides, as well as to calculate the distribution coefficients and retardation factors in a geological formation, provided that the essential groundwater and host rock information are available. It is concluded that this device of artificial intelligence provides a vehicle to accumulate developed human knowledge and serves as a tool not only for simulating the complicated radionuclide behaviour in the geosphere, but also for instructional or educational purpose in this field. (orig.)

  5. Brine disposal process for Morcinek coal mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tait, J.H. [Aquatech Services, Inc., Citrus Heights, CA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes the work to develop a commercial brine disposal process for the Morcinek mine, located 45 km south of the city of Katowice in Poland. Currently, brine is discharged into the Odra river and methane from the mine is released into the atmosphere. The process would use the released methane and convert a large percentage of the brine into potable water for commercial use. Thus, the proposed process has two environmental benefits. The brine salinity is about 31,100 ppm. Major brine components are Na (10,300 ppm), Ca (1,170 ppm), Mg (460 ppm), Cl (18,500 ppm) and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (252 ppm). Present in smaller amounts are K, S, Sr, B, Ba and NO{sub 3}. The process integrates a reverse osmosis (RO) unit and a submerged combustion evaporator. Extensive studies made at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory established the pretreatment method of the brine before it enters the RO unit. Without adequate pretreatment, mineral phases in the brine would become super-saturated and would precipitate in the RO unit. The pretreatment consists of first adding sodium carbonate to increase both the pH and the carbonate concentration of the brine. This addition causes precipitation of carbonate solids containing Ca, Mg, Sr, and Ba. After filtration of these precipitates, the fluid is acidified with HCl to prevent precipitation in the RO unit as the brine increases in salinity.

  6. Origin of the yellow brine and the black brine in Sichuan Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spring water, geothermal water and Cretaceous brine in the outer zone of the Sichuan Basin has the Craig relationship, and they are cycling waters. The brine in the inner zone is mainly metasedimentary water. A basic feature of them is poor in 2H, but rich in 18O. The δD-values of the yellow brine in Jurassic and Upper Triassic aquifer of continental facies varies from -62.25 to -22.4, and the δ18O-values are -6.72 - +6.02. The δD-values of the black brine in marine aquifer (T2,T1,P,C,O and so on) varies from -49 to -25.1, and the 18O values are +3.89 - +6.14. The δD of yellow brine is similar to that of meteoric water, and the δD of the black brine is around that of crystallization water expelled from gypsum by anhydritization. Increases of salinity in Jurassic yellow brine result primarily from the evapotranspiration process. The salinity in Upper Triassic yellow brine in Aa sub-area originated from underlying rock salt which was leached by paleometeoric water. Triassic black brine derived from the mixing of the crystallization water leached from rock salt with the residual sea water after salt crystallization. In Zhigong, the composition of yellow brine has mainly been changed by the mixing of the yellow brine with the black brine. (author). 2 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  7. Wettability from Capillarity of CO2-Brine-Rock Systems at Reservoir Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Menhali, Ali; Niu, Ben; Krevor, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    The wettability of CO2-brine-rock systems will have a major impact on the management of carbon sequestration in subsurface geological formations. Recent contact angle measurement studies have reported sensitivity in wetting behaviour of this system to pressure, temperature and brine salinity. We report results of an investigation into the impact of reservoir conditions on wetting through direct observations of their impact on the capillary strength of the system. Eight capillary pressure characteristic curves were measured using CO2 and brine in a single fired Berea sandstone at pressures (5 to 20 MPa), temperatures (25 to 50 °C) and ionic strengths (0 to 5 M kg-1 NaCl) representative of subsurface reservoirs. A ninth measurement using an N2-water system provided a benchmark for capillarity with a strongly water wet system. The semi-dynamic capillary pressure core flooding technique was used with in situ saturation monitoring. In all cases, the capillarity of the system, scaled by the interfacial tension, were equivalent to the N2-water system within measurement uncertainty. Thus reservoir conditions did not have a significant impact on the capillary strength of the CO2-brine system through a variation in wetting. Two steady-state relative permeability measurements with CO2 and brine and one with N2 and brine similarly show little variation between conditions, consistent with the observation that the CO2-brine-sandstone system is strongly water wetting and invariant across a wide range of reservoir conditions.

  8. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent

  9. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent

  10. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnenthal Eric

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Results Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150°C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. Conclusion The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual

  11. REFUSE OF FERMENTATION BRINES IN THE CUCUMBER PICKLING INDUSTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The project evaluated on a commercial scale the technological and economic feasibility of recycling spent cucumber fermentation brine. Two brine treatment procedures, heat treatment and chemical treatment, were used. The results showed that brine recycling was practical on a comm...

  12. Characteristics and Educational Advantages of Laboratory Automation in High School Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid B. Revzin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of automation in the high school chemical inquiry based laboratory. Simple computer-controlled devices for automation of basic manual operations were constructed and applied in students' laboratory experiments together with the Fourier-Systems Inc. data collection and management systems. We examined characteristics of learning in the new automated laboratory environment and discussed educational outcomes.

  13. Characteristics and Educational Advantages of Laboratory Automation in High School Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Leonid B. Revzin; Igor M. Verner

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a study of automation in the high school chemical inquiry based laboratory. Simple computer-controlled devices for automation of basic manual operations were constructed and applied in students' laboratory experiments together with the Fourier-Systems Inc. data collection and management systems. We examined characteristics of learning in the new automated laboratory environment and discussed educational outcomes.

  14. Sensory and Flavor Chemistry Characteristics of Australian Beef: Influence of Intramuscular Fat, Feed, and Breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Damian; Ball, Alex; Hughes, Joanne; Krishnamurthy, Raju; Piyasiri, Udayasika; Stark, Janet; Watkins, Peter; Warner, Robyn

    2016-06-01

    The sensory attributes and flavor chemistry of grilled beef striploins (M. longissimus lumborum, n = 42) varying widely in marbling from commercial production types typical for Southern Australia were extensively characterized. Striploins from Angus grass-fed yearlings (5.2-9.9% intramuscular fat), Angus grain-finished steers (10.2-14.9%), and Wagyu grass-fed heifers (7.8-17.5%) were evaluated. Inherent differences between samples from grass- and grain-fed Angus cattle were minimal when the intramuscular fat content was above ∼5%. After adjusting for intramuscular fat, Wagyu samples had more intense flavor and higher tenderness and juiciness compared to Angus grass-fed samples. Grilled beef flavor, dairy fat, and sweetness increased with the marbling level, and sourness and astringency decreased. Tenderness and juiciness increased with the marbling level and were correlated with Warner-Bratzler peak force measurements. Trained panel sensory differences in flavor corresponded with increases in aroma volatiles and changes in nonvolatile flavor compounds. Unsaturated fatty acids with potential health benefits (vaccenic, oleic, and rumenic acids) increased with the level of marbling. PMID:27118482

  15. Stabilization of high mercury contaminated brine purification sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, J Ming; Lo, Tony; Walsh, Tony; Lam, Tak

    2004-09-10

    The highly leachable mercury contaminants of brine purification sludge (BPS) generated from the Hg-cell electrolysis process in chlorine production can be stabilized in the treatment procedure employing ferric-lignin derivatives (FLD) (Ligmet binder) and Portland cement (PC). The stabilization effectiveness has been examined by time-based multiple toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests and sequential TCLP tests. In a period of 50 days, the multiple TCLP tests showed a variation of less than 90 microg l(-1) for the leachable mercury level, and the sequential TCLP tests for the same sample displayed a declining TCLP mercury level. Based on this study, the stabilization of approximately 2000 t of brine purification sludge has been successfully processed with the ferric-lignin derivatives treatment. PMID:15363526

  16. Soft chemistry routes for synthesis of rare earth oxide nanoparticles with well defined morphological and structural characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphors of (Y0.75Gd0.25)2O3:Eu3+ (5 at.%) have been prepared through soft chemistry routes. Conversion of the starting nitrates mixture into oxide is performed through two approaches: (a) hydrothermal treatment (HT) at 200 °C/3 h of an ammonium hydrogen carbonate precipitated mixture and (b) by thermally decomposition of pure nitrate precursor solution at 900 °C in dispersed phase (aerosol) within a tubular flow reactor by spray pyrolysis process (SP). The powders are additionally thermally treated at different temperatures: 600, 1000, and 1100 °C for either 3 or 12 h. HT—derived particles present exclusively one-dimensional morphology (nanorods) up to the temperatures of 600 °C, while the leaf-like particles start to grow afterward. SP—derived particles maintain their spherical shape up to the temperatures of 1100 °C. These submicron sized spheres were actually composed of randomly aggregated nanoparticles. All powders exhibits cubic Ia-3 structure (Y0.75Gd0.25)2O3:Eu and have improved optical characteristics due to their nanocrystalline nature. The detailed study of the influence of structural and morphological powder characteristics on their emission properties is performed based on the results of X-ray powder diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence measurements.

  17. Effect of Brine Solution Containing Ginger Extracts on the Properties of Egyptian White Brined Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abd El-Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the physico-chemicals properties of white cheese pickled in brine solution containing ginger extracts. After cows milk coagulation and whey drained, fresh white cheese block was cut and divided into 3 equal portions. The first portion covered with 16.0% brine aqueous ginger extract and the second portion was covered with 16.0% brine ethanol ginger extract. The later was covered with 16.0% plain brine serves as a control. All white brined cheese treatments were stored at 5±2°C for the ripening period of 60 days. The results revealed that brine solution containing aqueous ginger extract or ethanol ginger extract enhances the growth of starter culture, protein proteolysis (WSN/TN, total volatile fatty acids (TVFAs, oxidative stability (reduced TBA and sensory properties of white brined cheese compared with control cheese. In addition, brine solution containing aqueous ginger extract or ethanol ginger extract caused an increase in reddish and yellowish color degree and decrease in hardness of white cheese. However, most of these observations were more pronounced in white cheese pickled in brine aqueous ginger extract compared with that pickled in brine ethanol ginger extract; the differences were not significant.

  18. The Brine Shrimp's Butterfly Stroke

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Brennan; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the fluid dynamics of brine shrimp larvae swimming in this gallery of fluid motion video. Time resolved particle image velocimetry was performed using nano-particles as seeding material to measure the time dependent velocity and vorticity fields. The Reynolds number of the flow was roughly 8 and the Womerseley number (ratio of periodic forcing to viscous forcing) was about 5. Vorticity dynamics reveals the formation of a vortex ring structure at the tip of each arm at the beginning of the power stroke. This two vortex system evolves dramatically with time as the stroke progresses. The outer circulation is noted to weaken while the inner circulation strengthens over the power stroke. The gaining strength of the inner vortex correlates with the acceleration and forward movement of the larvae.

  19. Haematology, Blood Chemistry and Carcass Characteristics of Growing Rabbits Fed Grasshopper Meal as a Substitute for Fish Meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Njidda* and C. E. Isidahomen1

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of replacing fish meal with grasshopper meal on haematology, blood chemistry and carcass characteristics of growing rabbits. Forty rabbits of mixed breeds, aged 6-10 weeks, were randomly assigned to the dietary treatments in a complete randomized design with eight rabbits per treatment. The rabbits were fed with diets containing 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75 and 5% grasshopper meal in diets designated as T1 (control, T2, T3, T4 and T5, respectively. The experimental diets and clean drinking water were supplied ad libitum throughout the experimental period of nine weeks. At the end of the feeding trial, three rabbits per treatment were slaughtered for carcass evaluation, while blood samples were collected for analysis. The result of the experiment showed significant differences (P0.05 on haemoglobin and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC. The results also revealed significant differences (P0.05 on serum albumin and total protein. The results of carcass characteristics showed significant differences among treatments (P<0.05 for slaughter weight, carcass weight, dressing percentage, skin pelt, tail, feet and abdominal fat. The slaughter weight and carcass weight were better in groups receiving 2.5% grass hopper meal (50% fish meal replacement. From the results, it can be concluded that inclusion of 2.50% grasshopper meal as a replacement for fish meal (50% replacement has no adverse effects on the haematological parameters, serum biochemistry and carcass characteristics of rabbits.

  20. STURCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS AND QUANTUM CHEMISTRY CALCULATION OF Al-DOPED BORON CARBIDES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Structural characteristics, chemical bonds and thermoelectric properties of Al-doped boron carbides are studied through calculations of various structural unit models by using a self-consistent-field discrete variation Xα method. The calculations show that Al atom doped in boron carbide is in preference to substituting B or C atoms on the end of boron carbide chain, and then may occupy interstitial sites, but it is difficult for Al to substitute B or C atom in the centers of the chain or in the icosahedra. A representative structural unit containing an Al atom is [C-B-Al]ε+-[B11C]ε-, while the structural unit without Al is [C-B-B(C)]ε--[B11C]ε+, and the coexistence of these two different structural units makes the electrical conductivity increased. As the covalent bond of Al-B or Al-C is weaker than that of B-B or B-C, the thermal conductivity decreases when Al is added into boron carbides. With the electrical conductivity increasing and the thermal conductivity decreases, Al doping has significant effect on thermoelectric properties of boron carbides.

  1. Environmental mobility of cobalt-Influence of solid phase characteristics and groundwater chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption of cobalt on samples from a potential waste repository site in an arid region was investigated in batch experiments, as a function of various solution phase parameters including the pH and ionic strength. The samples were characterized using a range of techniques, including BET surface area measurements, total clay content and quantitative X-ray diffraction. The statistical relationships between the measured cobalt distribution coefficients (Kd values) and the solid and liquid phase characteristics were assessed. The sorption of cobalt increased with the pH of the aqueous phase. In experiments with a fixed pH value, the measured Kd values were strongly correlated to the BET surface area, but not to the amount of individual clay minerals (illite, kaolinite or smectite). A further set of sorption experiments was undertaken with two samples of distinctive mineralogy and surface area, and consequently different sorption properties. A simple surface complexation model (SCM) that conceptualized the surface sites as having equivalent sorption properties to amorphous Fe-oxide was moderately successful in explaining the pH dependence of the sorption data on these samples. Two different methods of quantifying the input parameters for the SCM were assessed. While a full SCM for cobalt sorption on these complex environmental substrates is not yet possible, the basic applicability and predictive capability of this type of modeling is demonstrated. A principal requirement to further develop the modeling approach is adequate models for cobalt sorption on component mineral phases of complex environmental sorbents.

  2. Environmental Characteristics of Groundwater: an Application of PCA to Water Chemistry Analysis in Yulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Dong-lin; HUANG Song-lin; WU Qiang; ZHANG Rui; SONG Ying-xia; CHEN Shu-ke; LI Pei; LIU Shou-qiang; BI Cen-cen; LV Zhen-qi

    2007-01-01

    For our investigation into the water quality in Yulin city, we collected 76 typical water samples to be tested for particle quality. By applying a Romani type classification method the groundwater of Yulin city was classified into nine categories by type, i.e., Ca-HCO3, Na-HCO3, Na-HCO3-SO4-Cl, Na-HCO3-SO4, Na-Cl, Na-Cl-HCO3, Na-CaHCO3, Ca-Cl-HCO3 and Ca-HCO3-SO4-Cl. A principal component analysis was carried out in order to analyze the groundwater environment. From this analysis we considered that the information collected could be represented by 21 indices from which we extracted seven principal components, which, respectively, accounted for 37.4%, 13.0%, 8.1%,7.2%, 6.3%, 5.9% and 4.6% of the total variation. The results show that the groundwater environment of this region is largely determined by characteristic components of the natural groundwater background. One part of the water was polluted by leaching/eluviation of solid waste generated from coal mining. Another part of the ground water was contaminated by acid mine water from the coal layer and from improper irrigation. In addition, geological and hydrogeological conditions also cause changes in the water environment.

  3. Structural characteristics and quantum chemistry calculation of Si-doped boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural characteristics, chemical bonds and thermoelectric properties of Si-doped boron carbides are studied through calculations of various structural unit models by using a self-consistent-field discrete variation Xα method. The calculations show that Si atom doped in boron carbide is in preference to substituting B or C atoms on the end of boron carbide chain, and then may occupy interstitial sites, but it is difficult for Si to substitute B or C atom in the centers of chain or in the icosahedra. A representative structural unit containing a Si atom is [C-B-Si]ε+-[B11C]ε-, while the structural unit without Si is [C-B-B(C)]δ'-[B11C]δ+, and the coexistence of these two different structural units makes the electrical conductivity increases. As the covalent bond of Si-B or Si-C is weaker than that of B-B or B-C, the thermal conductivity decreases when Si is added into boron carbides. With the electrical conductivity increases and the thermal conductivity decreases, Si doping has significant effect on thermoelectric properties of boron carbides

  4. Evaporative Evolution of Carbonate-Rich Brines from Synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff Pore Water, Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M; Alai, M; Carroll, S A

    2004-04-14

    The evaporation of a range of synthetic pore water solutions representative of the potential high-level-nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV is being investigated. The motivation of this work is to understand and predict the range of brine compositions that may contact the waste containers from evaporation of pore waters, because these brines could form corrosive thin films on the containers and impact their long-term integrity. A relatively complex synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff pore water was progressively concentrated by evaporation in a closed vessel, heated to 95 C in a series of sequential experiments. Periodic samples of the evaporating solution were taken to determine the evolving water chemistry. According to chemical divide theory at 25 C and 95 C our starting solution should evolve towards a high pH carbonate brine. Results at 95 C show that this solution evolves towards a complex brine that contains about 99 mol% Na{sup +} for the cations, and 71 mol% Cl{sup -}, 18 mol% {Sigma}CO{sub 2}(aq), 9 mol%SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for the anions. Initial modeling of the evaporating solution indicates precipitation of aragonite, halite, silica, sulfate and fluoride phases. The experiments have been used to benchmark the use of the EQ3/6 geochemical code in predicting the evolution of carbonate-rich brines during evaporation.

  5. Zooplankton at deep Red Sea brine pools

    KAUST Repository

    Kaartvedt, Stein

    2016-03-02

    The deep-sea anoxic brines of the Red Sea comprise unique, complex and extreme habitats. These environments are too harsh for metazoans, while the brine–seawater interface harbors dense microbial populations. We investigated the adjacent pelagic fauna at two brine pools using net tows, video records from a remotely operated vehicle and submerged echosounders. Waters just above the brine pool of Atlantis II Deep (2000 m depth) appeared depleted of macrofauna. In contrast, the fauna appeared to be enriched at the Kebrit Deep brine–seawater interface (1466 m).

  6. Ice Control with Brine on Highways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolet, Lars

    of interpreting this information. The improvements gained by the county of Funen were mainly due to the use of technologies (brine spreading with nozzles) giving a more precise spread pattern than the traditional gritting of pre-wetted salt. Major challenges in the process have been to verify the higher quality...... of the nozzles spread pattern, to ensure maximum utilization of volume of brine carried by the spreading vehicles and to control the mixing of brine without getting stratification in the mixture. Moreover, of course, to ensure political approval of abandoning a well-served technology and to organize...

  7. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program 1992--1993 report and summary of BSEP data since 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the last one that is currently scheduled in the sequence of reports of new data, and therefore, also includes summary comments referencing important data obtained by BSEP since 1983. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the (WIPP) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. A project concern is that enough brine might be present after sealing and closure to generate large quantities of hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. This report describes progress made during the calendar years 1992 and 1993 and focuses on four major areas: (1) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes from the underground drifts; (2) observations of weeps in the Air Intake Shaft (AIS); (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) additional characterization of the hydrologic conditions in the fractured zone beneath the excavations

  8. Comparison of the Wear Behavior of UHMWPE Lubricated by Human Plasma and Brine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shi-bo; GE Shi-rong; NORM Gitis; MICHAEL Vinogradov; XIAO Jun

    2007-01-01

    The effect of plasma and brine lubricants on the friction and wear behavior of UHMWPE were studied by using the geometry of a Si3N4 ball sliding on a UHMWPE disc under patterns of uni-directional reciprocation and bi-directional sliding motions. The worn surface and wear particles produced in these two lubricants were analyzed. Sliding motion pattern affected the friction coefficients lubricated with plasma, while seldom affected that lubricated with brine. UHMWPE lubricated with plasma showed about half of the wear rate of that lubricated with brine. The two rates were 0.75 pg/m and 2.19 pg/m for the two motion patterns, respectively. However, wear particles generated in plasma included a greater amount of small particles, compared to that in brine. In uni-directional reciprocation, the main wear mechanism is ploughing both in plasma and in brine. In bi-directional sliding modes, the significant characteristic is ripples on the worn surface in plasma, while there are oriented fibers on the worn surface in brine.

  9. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program 1992--1993 report and summary of BSEP data since 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J. [I. T. Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project Office

    1995-04-01

    This report is the last one that is currently scheduled in the sequence of reports of new data, and therefore, also includes summary comments referencing important data obtained by BSEP since 1983. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the (WIPP) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. A project concern is that enough brine might be present after sealing and closure to generate large quantities of hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. This report describes progress made during the calendar years 1992 and 1993 and focuses on four major areas: (1) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes from the underground drifts; (2) observations of weeps in the Air Intake Shaft (AIS); (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) additional characterization of the hydrologic conditions in the fractured zone beneath the excavations.

  10. Coiled Brine Recovery Assembly (CoBRA): A New Approach to Recovering Water from Wastewater Brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensinger, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Brine water recovery represents a current technology gap in water recycling for human spaceflight. The role of a brine processor is to take the concentrated discharge from a primary wastewater processor, called brine, and recover most of the remaining water from it. The current state-of-the-art primary processor is the ISS Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) that currently achieves 70% water recovery. Recent advancements in chemical pretreatments are expected to increase this to 85% in the near future. This is a welcome improvement, yet is still not high enough for deep space transit. Mission architecture studies indicate that at least 95% is necessary for a Mars mission, as an example. Brine water recovery is the technology that bridges the gap between 85% and 95%, and moves life support systems one step closer to full closure of the water loop. Several brine water recovery systems have been proposed for human spaceflight, most of them focused on solving two major problems: operation in a weightless environment, and management and containment of brine residual. Brine residual is the leftover byproduct of the brine recovery process, and is often a viscous, sticky paste, laden with crystallized solid particles. Due to the chemical pretreatments added to wastewater prior to distillation in a primary processor, these residuals are typically toxic, which further complicates matters. Isolation of crewmembers from these hazardous materials is paramount. The Coiled Brine Recovery Assembly (CoBRA) is a recently developed concept from the Johnson Space Center that offers solutions to these challenges. CoBRA is centered on a softgoods evaporator that enables a passive fill with brine, and regeneration by discharging liquid brine residual to a collection bag. This evaporator is meant to be lightweight, which allows it to be discarded along with the accumulated brine solids contained within it. This paper discusses design and development of a first CoBRA prototype, and reports

  11. The influences of iron characteristics, operating conditions and solution chemistry on contaminants removal by zero-valent iron: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuankui; Li, Jinxiang; Huang, Tinglin; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    For successful application of a zero-valent iron (ZVI) system, of particular interest is the performance of ZVI under various conditions. The current review comprehensively summarizes the potential effects of the major influencing factors, such as iron intrinsic characteristics (e.g., surface area, iron impurities and oxide films), operating conditions (e.g., pH, dissolved oxygen, iron dosage, iron pretreatment, mixing conditions and temperature) and solution chemistry (e.g., anions, cations and natural organic matter) on the performance of ZVI reported in literature. It was demonstrated that all of the factors could exert significant effects on the ZVI performance toward contaminants removal, negatively or positively. Depending on the removal mechanisms of the respective contaminants and other environmental conditions, an individual variable may exhibit different effects. On the other hand, many of these influences have not been well understood or cannot be individually isolated in experimental or natural systems. Thus, more research is required in order to elucidate the exact roles and mechanisms of each factor in affecting the performance of ZVI. Furthermore, based on these understandings, future research may attempt to establish some feasible strategies to minimize the deteriorating effects and utilize the positive effects so as to improve the performance of ZVI. PMID:27206056

  12. Brine Dewatering Using Ultrasonic Nebulization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recovery of water from brine is critically important for future manned space exploration. Resupply of water is prohibitively costly for such extended missions....

  13. Brine Dewatering Using Ultrasonic Nebulization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recovery of water from brine is critically important for manned space exploration. Resupply of water is prohibitively costly for extended missions. It is...

  14. Echinoderms as indicators of brine discharge impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Torquemada, Yolanda; González-Correa, José Miguel; Sánchez-Lizaso, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Echinoderms are osmoconformer organisms and are expected to be very sensitive to brine discharges. The objective of this study is to examine the use of echinoderms as early warning indicators of the impact of brine discharges and its application in the management of desalination discharges. We sampled using visual census along transect lines, for nine consecutive years and in three different stations, i.e. before the seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant began operating and thereafter. ...

  15. Engineering Review Group (ERG) and Geologic Review Group (GRG) report on brine migration at the Deaf Smith County site salt repository horizon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    In April 1986, ONWI requested the ERG and GRG to jointly address the status of current knowledge of, and ONWI approach to further characterization of, the geohydrology of the candidate repository horizon of the potential site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Specifically, the ERG-GRG was asked to evaluate the status of understanding of the hydrogeology of the Lower San Andres Unit 4 (LSA-4) evaporite section and identify any major gaps in the data; evaluate the current understanding of the chemistry and movement of brines in the LSA-4 salt and associated interbeds; develop recommendations for estimating the upper limit quantity of brines, and modeling the brine movement, with respect to the emplaced HLW packages; and identify questions concerning the chemistry of the brines and recommend a technical approach to addressing these questions. 19 refs.

  16. Engineering Review Group (ERG) and Geologic Review Group (GRG) report on brine migration at the Deaf Smith County site salt repository horizon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In April 1986, ONWI requested the ERG and GRG to jointly address the status of current knowledge of, and ONWI approach to further characterization of, the geohydrology of the candidate repository horizon of the potential site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Specifically, the ERG-GRG was asked to evaluate the status of understanding of the hydrogeology of the Lower San Andres Unit 4 (LSA-4) evaporite section and identify any major gaps in the data; evaluate the current understanding of the chemistry and movement of brines in the LSA-4 salt and associated interbeds; develop recommendations for estimating the upper limit quantity of brines, and modeling the brine movement, with respect to the emplaced HLW packages; and identify questions concerning the chemistry of the brines and recommend a technical approach to addressing these questions. 19 refs

  17. Environmental impact of geopressure - geothermal cogeneration facility on wetland resources and socioeconomic characteristics in Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Final report, October 10, 1983-September 31, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalley, A.M.; Saleh, F.M.S.; Fontenot, M.

    1984-08-01

    Baseline data relevant to air quality are presented. The following are also included: geology and resource assessment, design well prospects in southwestern Louisiana, water quality monitoring, chemical analysis subsidence, microseismicity, geopressure-geothermal subsidence modeling, models of compaction and subsidence, sampling handling and preparation, brine chemistry, wetland resources, socioeconomic characteristics, impacts on wetlands, salinity, toxic metals, non-metal toxicants, temperature, subsidence, and socioeconomic impacts. (MHR)

  18. Comparison of brines relevant to nuclear waste experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionic compositions of 18 brines used in nuclear waste-related laboratory tests or obtained from field tests are described and compared. Also described are the origin of each brine, its predominant use for laboratory testing, and its relavancy for future testing. The brines include Brines A and B (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)/generic), Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) Composite Permian Brine P and Equilibrated Permian P No. 2, Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)-Sandia High-Level Waste (HLW) package interactions test brines (flow and downhole), ERDA-6 brines (flow and downhole), WIPP Inclusions No. 1 and No. 2, Materials Characterization Center (MCC) brine, German quinare Brine Q, US Geological Survey bittern NBT-6a, saturated NaCl (200 and 1000C), and standard seawater

  19. Organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the mycotoxin research group are discussed. This includes the isolation and structure determination of mycotoxins, plant products, the biosyntheris of mycotoxins, the synthesis and characteristics of steroids, the synthesis and mechanistic aspects of heterocyclic chemistry and the functionality of steroids over long distances. Nmr spectra and mass spectroscopy are some of the techniques used

  20. Modeling brine and nutrient dynamics in Antarctic sea ice: The case of dissolved silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancoppenolle, Martin; Goosse, Hugues; de Montety, Anne; Fichefet, Thierry; Tremblay, Bruno; Tison, Jean-Louis

    2010-02-01

    Sea ice ecosystems are characterized by microalgae living in brine inclusions. The growth rate of ice algae depends on light and nutrient supply. Here, the interactions between nutrients and brine dynamics under the influence of algae are investigated using a one-dimensional model. The model includes snow and ice thermodynamics with brine physics and an idealized sea ice biological component, characterized by one nutrient, namely, dissolved silica (DSi). In the model, DSi follows brine motion and is consumed by ice algae. Depending on physical ice characteristics, the brine flow is either advective, diffusive, or turbulent. The vertical profiles of ice salinity and DSi concentration are solutions of advection-diffusion equations. The model is configured to simulate the typical thermodynamic regimes of first-year Antarctic pack ice. The simulated vertical profiles of salinity and DSi qualitatively reproduce observations. Analysis of results highlights the role of convection in the lowermost 5-10 cm of ice. Convection mixes saline, nutrient-poor brine with comparatively fresh, nutrient-rich seawater. This implies a rejection of salt to the ocean and a flux of DSi to the ice. In the presence of growing algae, the simulated ocean-to-ice DSi flux increases by 0-115% compared to an abiotic situation. In turn, primary production and brine convection act in synergy to form a nutrient pump. The other important processes are the flooding of the surface by seawater and the percolation of meltwater. The former refills nutrients near the ice surface in spring. The latter, if present, tends to expell nutrients from the ice in summer.

  1. Carbonation of brine impacted fractionated coal fly ash: implications for CO2 sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyambura, Muriithi Grace; Mugera, Gitari Wilson; Felicia, Petrik Leslie; Gathura, Ndungu Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Coal combustion by-products such as fly ash (FA), brine and CO(2) from coal fired power plants have the potential to impact negatively on the environment. FA and brine can contaminate the soil, surface and ground water through leaching of toxic elements present in their matrices while CO(2) has been identified as a green house gas that contributes significantly towards the global warming effect. Reaction of CO(2) with FA/brine slurry can potentially provide a viable route for CO(2) sequestration via formation of mineral carbonates. Fractionated FA has varying amounts of CaO which not only increases the brine pH but can also be converted into an environmentally benign calcite. Carbonation efficiency of fractionated and brine impacted FA was investigated in this study. Controlled carbonation reactions were carried out in a reactor set-up to evaluate the effect of fractionation on the carbonation efficiency of FA. Chemical and mineralogical characteristics of fresh and carbonated ash were evaluated using XRF, SEM, and XRD. Brine effluents were characterized using ICP-MS and IC. A factorial experimental approach was employed in testing the variables. The 20-150 μm size fraction was observed to have the highest CO(2) sequestration potential of 71.84 kg of CO(2) per ton of FA while the >150 μm particles had the lowest potential of 36.47 kg of CO(2) per ton of FA. Carbonation using brine resulted in higher degree of calcite formation compared to the ultra-pure water carbonated residues. PMID:20970918

  2. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  3. Displacement propagators of brine flowing within different types of sedimentary rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verganelakis, Dimitris A; Crawshaw, John; Johns, Michael L; Mantle, Michael D; Scheven, Ulrich; Sederman, Andrew J; Gladden, Lynn F

    2005-02-01

    This paper explores the correlation between different microstructural characteristics of porous sedimentary rocks and the flow properties of a Newtonian infiltrating fluid. Preliminary results of displacement propagator measurements of brine solution flowing through two types of sedimentary rock cores are reported. The two types of rocks, Bentheimer and Portland, are characterized by different porosities, pore-size distributions and permeabilities. Propagators have been measured for brine flow rates of 1 and 5 ml/min. Significant differences are seen between the propagators recorded for the two rocks, and these are related to the spatial distribution of porosity within these porous media. PMID:15833644

  4. Effects of Water or Brine Immersion Thawing Combined with Ultrasound on Quality Attributes of Frozen Pork Loin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Geun-Pyo; Chun, Ji-Yeon; Jo, Yeon-Ji

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the effects of water or brine (2% NaCl, w/v) immersion thawing combined with ultrasound treatment (40 kHz, 150 W) on the quality characteristics of pork. Ultrasound treatment of pork was conducted in two cold media (at 4℃), water and 2% (w/v) brine, respectively. Because the ultrasound treatment caused temperature increase in the media from 4℃ to 16℃, the qualities of pork thawed by ultrasound were compared with those thawed by immersion either in water or brine where the temperature was being maintained at either 4℃ (low temperature control) or 17℃ (high temperature control). The ultrasound treatment resulted in rapid thawing of pork where the thawing rate was similar to those thawed in the 17℃ media. For quality characteristics, ultrasound-treated pork in brine had an advantage of less cooking losses when comparing to the control. In particular, ultrasound treatment in brine exhibited the lowest shear force (or highest tenderness) among the freezing/thawing treatments. Although the ultrasound processing in brine caused discoloration of the pork, this thawing technique had potential to be applied as a commercial thawing technology for frozen foods. PMID:26760753

  5. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR GEOTHERMAL BRINE TREATMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PREMUZIC,E.T.; LIN,M.S.; BOHENEK,M.; JOSHI-TOPE,G.; ZHOU,W.; SHELENKOVA,L.; WILKE,R.

    1998-09-20

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL's Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  6. Biochemical processes for geothermal brine treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Zhou, W.; Shelenkova, L.; Wilke, R.

    1998-08-01

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL`s Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines, (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  7. Calcite solubility in simulated geothermal brines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, K.H.; Raney, P.J.; Shannon, D.W.

    1987-02-01

    The deposition of scale on geothermal piping surfaces has been recognized as a cause of increased pressure drop and diminished fluid flow. The two most common scales encountered in the geothermal energy field are silica and calcite. The main purpose of this study was to obtain accurate, reliable calcite solubility data in brines similar to natural geothermal brines over the temperature range of most known exploitable geothermal resources. In addition, geothermal fluid equilibrium modeling efforts and data bases can be refined and fine-turned with respect to the commercially important calcite-geothermal fluid stability problem with these data. The effect of sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate on the solubility of CaCO/sub 3/ (calcite) in high temperature solutions was measured over the 100 to 300/sup 0/C temperature range. The brines studied contained 0 to 5 wt % NaCl, 0 to 5 mM NaHCO/sub 3/, and 0.003 to 0.1 M CO/sub 2/. The data detailing calcite solubility at various temperatures are presented in tabular, graphical, and regression-equation form for each brine composition tested.

  8. Development of a Rapid, Nondestructive Method to Measure Aqueous Carbonate in High Salinity Brines Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, L.; Phillips-Lander, C. M.; Elwood Madden, A. S.; Parnell, S.; Elwood Madden, M.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional methods of quantitative analysis are often ill-suited to determining the bulk chemistry of high salinity brines due to their corrosive and clogging properties. Such methods are also often difficult to apply remotely in planetary environments. However, Raman spectroscopy can be used remotely without physical contact with the fluid and is not affected by many ionic brines. Developing methods to study aqueous carbonates is vital to future study of brines on Mars and other planetary bodies, as they can reveal important information about modern and ancient near-surface aqueous processes. Both sodium carbonate standards and unknown samples from carbonate mineral dissolution experiments in high salinity brines were analyzed using a 532 nm laser coupled to an inVia Renishaw spectrometer to collect carbonate spectra from near-saturated sodium chloride and sodium sulfate brines. A calibration curve was determined by collecting spectra from solutions of known carbonate concentrations mixed with a pH 13 buffer and a near-saturated NaCl or Na2SO4 brine matrix. The spectra were processed and curve fitted to determine the height ratio of the carbonate peak at 1066 cm-1 to the 1640 cm-1 water peak. The calibration curve determined using the standards was then applied to the experimental data after accounting for dilutions. Concentrations determined based on Raman spectra were compared against traditional acid titration measurements. We found that the two techniques vary by less than one order of magnitude. Further work is ongoing to verify the method and apply similar techniques to measure aqueous carbonate concentrations in other high salinity brines.Traditional methods of quantitative analysis are often ill-suited to determining the bulk chemistry of high salinity brines due to their corrosive and clogging properties. Such methods are also often difficult to apply remotely in planetary environments. However, Raman spectroscopy can be used remotely without physical

  9. Rheological Properties of Silica Nanoparticles in Brine and Brine-Surfactant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pales, Ashley; Kinsey, Erin; Li, Chunyan; Mu, Linlin; Bai, Lingyun; Clifford, Heather; Darnault, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Rheological Properties of Silica Nanoparticles in Brine and Brine-Surfactant Systems Ashley R. Pales, Erin Kinsey, Chunyan Li, Linlin Mu, Lingyun Bai, Heather Clifford, and Christophe J. G. Darnault Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Laboratory of Hydrogeoscience and Biological Engineering, L.G. Rich Environmental Laboratory, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA Nanofluids are suspensions of nanometer sized particles in any fluid base, where the nanoparticles effect the properties of the fluid base. Commonly, nanofluids are water based, however, other bases such as ethylene-glycol, glycerol, and propylene-glycol, have been researched to understand the rheological properties of the nanofluids. This work aims to understand the fundamental rheological properties of silica nanoparticles in brine based and brine-surfactant based nanofluids with temperature variations. This was done by using variable weight percent of silica nanoparticles from 0.001% to 0.1%. Five percent brine was used to create the brine based nanofluids; and 5% brine with 2CMC of Tween 20 nonionic surfactant (Sigma-Aldrich) was used to create the brine-surfactant nanofluid. Rheological behaviors, such as shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity, were compared between these nanofluids at 20C and at 60C across the varied nanoparticle wt%. The goal of this work is to provide a fundamental basis for future applied testing for enhanced oil recovery. It is hypothesized that the addition of surfactant will have a positive impact on nanofluid properties that will be useful for enhance oil recovery. Differences have been observed in preliminary data analysis of the rheological properties between these two nanofluids indicating that the surfactant is having the hypothesized effect.

  10. Mirabilite solubility in equilibrium sea ice brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Benjamin Miles; Papadimitriou, Stathys; Santoro, Anna; Kennedy, Hilary

    2016-06-01

    The sea ice microstructure is permeated by brine channels and pockets that contain concentrated seawater-derived brine. Cooling the sea ice results in further formation of pure ice within these pockets as thermal equilibrium is attained, resulting in a smaller volume of increasingly concentrated residual brine. The coupled changes in temperature and ionic composition result in supersaturation of the brine with respect to mirabilite (Na2SO4·10H2O) at temperatures below -6.38 °C, which consequently precipitates within the sea ice microstructure. Here, mirabilite solubility in natural and synthetic seawater derived brines, representative of sea ice at thermal equilibrium, has been measured in laboratory experiments between 0.2 and -20.6 °C, and hence we present a detailed examination of mirabilite dynamics within the sea ice system. Below -6.38 °C mirabilite displays particularly large changes in solubility as the temperature decreases, and by -20.6 °C its precipitation results in 12.90% and 91.97% reductions in the total dissolved Na+ and SO42- concentrations respectively, compared to that of conservative seawater concentration. Such large non-conservative changes in brine composition could potentially impact upon the measurement of sea ice brine salinity and pH, whilst the altered osmotic conditions may create additional challenges for the sympagic organisms that inhabit the sea ice system. At temperatures above -6.38 °C, mirabilite again displays large changes in solubility that likely aid in impeding its identification in field samples of sea ice. Our solubility measurements display excellent agreement with that of the FREZCHEM model, which was therefore used to supplement our measurements to colder temperatures. Measured and modelled solubility data were incorporated into a 1D model for the growth of first-year Arctic sea ice. Model results ultimately suggest that mirabilite has a near ubiquitous presence in much of the sea ice on Earth, and illustrate the

  11. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: geochemistry of brine in rock salt in temperature gradients and gamma-radiation fields - a selective annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the extensive research concerning brine geochemistry and transport is critically important to successful exploitation of a salt formation for isolating high-level radioactive waste. This annotated bibliography has been compiled from documents considered to provide classic background material on the interactions between brine and rock salt, as well as the most important results from more recent research. Each summary elucidates the information or data most pertinent to situations encountered in siting, constructing, and operating a mined repository in salt for high-level radioactive waste. The research topics covered include the basic geology, depositional environment, mineralogy, and structure of evaporite and domal salts, as well as fluid inclusions, brine chemistry, thermal and gamma-radiation effects, radionuclide migration, and thermodynamic properties of salts and brines. 4 figs., 6 tabs

  12. Expected brine movement at potential nuclear waste repository salt sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCauley, V.S.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-08-01

    The BRINEMIG brine migration code predicts rates and quantities of brine migration to a waste package emplaced in a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The BRINEMIG code is an explicit time-marching finite-difference code that solves a mass balance equation and uses the Jenks equation to predict velocities of brine migration. Predictions were made for the seven potentially acceptable salt sites under consideration as locations for the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Predicted total quantities of accumulated brine were on the order of 1 m/sup 3/ brine per waste package or less. Less brine accumulation is expected at domal salt sites because of the lower initial moisture contents relative to bedded salt sites. Less total accumulation of brine is predicted for spent fuel than for commercial high-level waste because of the lower temperatures generated by spent fuel. 11 refs., 36 figs., 29 tabs.

  13. Co-Sequestration Geochemical Modeling: Simple Brine Solution + CO2-O2-SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verba, C.; Kutchko, B. G.; Reed, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    Class H well cement (LaFarge) was exposed to supercritical CO2 to evaluate the impact of brine chemistry on the well cement. Simulated experimental downhole conditions include a pressure of 28.6 MPa and a temperature of 50oC. Brine composition was formulated from the NETL NATCARB database, resulting in a simple solution of 1 M (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2). It was determined that the brine chemistry plays a vital role in determining the degree and type of alteration of cement in carbon sequestration conditions. The implications of co-sequestration (CO2/O2/SO2 mixtures) from of oxy-fueled combustion, coal gasification and sour gas have been considered. Geochemical modeling was conducted to understand the interaction between formation brine, cement and co-contaminant gases, using a gas composition of 95.5% CO2, 4% O2, and 1.5% SO2. The modeling results are significant in determining the validity of co-sequestering coal flue gas containing SOx gases or sour hydrocarbon gas which could potentially produce pyrite or other sulfur-bearing species in the cement via mineralization trapping. Thermodynamic components of aqueous species, gases, and minerals were used to calculate the pH and mineral saturation indices using CHIM-XPT. The computed pH of the solution is 4.34. The total sulfate molality within the brine is 0.0095 M. In experimental conditions of 600 mL of brine, 0.0057 moles of sulfate will be converted into 5.7 mL of sulfuric acid. The modeling shows that an excess of 31% O2 forms, indicating that H2S from SO2 disporportionation is oxidized to sulfate, thus no gaseous H2S will form. Remaining SO2 in the experimental headspace has a predicted mole fraction is 10-46. Additional SO2 gas added to the system produces the reaction to precipitate gypsum. Additional gas reactions precipitate gypsum, anhydrite, calcite, and dolomite.

  14. Geophysical and geochemical signatures of Gulf of Mexico seafloor brines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Joye

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical, temperature, and discrete depth-stratified geochemical data illustrate differences between an actively venting mud volcano and a relatively quiescent brine pool in the Gulf of Mexico along the continental slope. Geophysical data, including laser-line scan mosaics and sub-bottom profiles, document the dynamic nature of both environments. Temperature profiles, obtained by lowering a CTD into the brine fluid, show that the venting brine was at least 10°C warmer than the bottom water. At the brine pool, two thermoclines were observed, one directly below the brine-seawater interface and a second about one meter below the first. At the mud volcano, substantial temperature variability was observed, with the core brine temperature being either slightly (~2°C in 1997 or substantially (19°C in 1998 elevated above bottom water temperature. Geochemical samples were obtained using a device called the "brine trapper" and concentrations of dissolved gases, major ions and nutrients were determined using standard techniques. Both brines contained about four times as much salt as seawater and steep concentration gradients of dissolved ions and nutrients versus brine depth were apparent. Differences in the concentrations of calcium, magnesium and potassium between the two brine fluids suggests that the fluids are derived from different sources or that brine-sediment reactions are more important at the mud volcano than the brine pool. Substantial concentrations of methane and ammonium were observed in both brines, suggesting that fluids expelled from deep ocean brines are important sources of methane and dissolved inorganic nitrogen to the surrounding environment.

  15. Performance evaluation of a once-through multi-stage flash distillation system: Impact of brine heater fouling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-stage flash distillation (MSF) system modeling involves a number of process variables. An estimation of all these process variables requires both analytical solutions and experimental/field analysis. However, the accurate estimate of variables related to the brine heater operation in a MSF system is very important for a reliable operation of the system. For example, steam operating conditions as well as the brine properties including fouling of the brine heater tubes have a significant effect on the heat transfer characteristics of the brine heater, which in turn influence the distillate output from the system. In this study, the effect of various design as well as operating conditions on the performance ratio (PR), brine temperature and salinity as it leaves the last flash stage are investigated in a once-through system. Increasing the number of stages from 24 to 32 has a significant effect on the PR, it ranges between 79% (for ΔT = 1.5) and 327% (for ΔT = 2.3) for a top-brine temperature of 106 oC. This value increase as the top-brine temperature increases. Increasing the stage-to-stage temperature difference increases the water salinity as it leaves the final stage and reduces its temperature that would imply better energy utilization within the plant. Results show that brine side heat exchanger fouling has a significant effect in decreasing the overall heat transfer coefficient, which reduces the production rate as the fouling increases with time. A sensitivity analysis to identify the key parameters, which can have a significant influence on the desalination plant performance, is carried out in an attempt to contribute a better understanding and operation of MSF desalination processes.

  16. CO2-Brine Rheology Could Suppress Leakage From Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Clarens, A. F.

    2011-12-01

    actually increase the viscosity of CO2-brine suspensions by 4-5 times over brine alone. For a range of ionic strength, temperature, and pressures conditions, the apparent viscosity of the heterogeneous CO2-brine mixture was found to be higher than that of homogeneous CO2-brine mixture because of the viscoelastic nature of CO2 bubbles in the brine. The microstructure of these bubbly suspensions was easily deformed and degraded under shear however. A series of experiments revealed that the bubbly suspensions exhibited strong hysteresis and that the viscoelastic behavior of the mixtures was not easily regained after removing the shear force. At higher temperature and ionic strengths, the viscoeslatic behavior was less pronounced, in part because of the indirect effect of these factors on CO2 solubility and surface tension. The presence of CO2(g) bubbles on the flow of the bulk fluid could have important impacts on impeding (via increasing shear drag force) leakage depending on the geochemical and geophysical characteristics of a storage site. Understanding this behavior is crucial for developing an accurate constitutive relationship regarding CO2 transport through porous media, which will lead to better capacity to select and monitor GCS sites.

  17. Multiphase flow of carbon dioxide and brine in dual porosity carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentland, Christopher; Oedai, Sjaam; Ott, Holger

    2014-05-01

    The storage of carbon dioxide in subsurface formations presents a challenge in terms of multiphase flow characterisation. Project planning requires an understanding of multiphase flow characteristics such as the relationship between relative permeability and saturation. At present there are only a limited number of relative permeability relations for carbon dioxide-brine fluid systems, most of which are measured on sandstone rocks. In this study coreflood experiments are performed to investigate the relative permeability of carbon dioxide and brine in two dual porosity carbonate systems. Carbon dioxide is injected into the brine saturated rocks in a primary drainage process. The rock fluid system is pre-equilibrated to avoid chemical reactions and physical mass transfer between phases. The pressure drop across the samples, the amount of brine displaced and the saturation distribution within the rocks are measured. The experiments are repeated on the same rocks for the decane-brine fluid system. The experimental data is interpreted by simulating the experiments with a continuum scale Darcy solver. Selected functional representations of relative permeability are investigated, the parameters of which are chosen such that a least squares objective function is minimised (i.e. the difference between experimental observations and simulated response). The match between simulation and measurement is dependent upon the form of the functional representations. The best agreement is achieved with the Corey [Brooks and Corey, 1964] or modified Corey [Masalmeh et al., 2007] functions which best represent the relative permeability of brine at low brine saturations. The relative permeability of carbon dioxide is shown to be lower than the relative permeability of decane over the saturation ranges investigated. The relative permeability of the brine phase is comparable for the two fluid systems. These observations are consistent with the rocks being water-wet. During the experiment

  18. Effect of electroosmotic flow on brine imbibition in porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui WANG; Xiang-an YUE; Xu WEI; Wei ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Based on Darcy's Law and the Helmholta-Smoluchowski equation, an imbibition velocity formula for the water phase with an electric field was deduced, showing that the imbibition velocity with an electric field is to various extents not only-related to the rock permeability and characteristic length, the fluid viscosity, the oil-water interface tension and the gravity of the imbibing brine, but also to the fluid dielectric permittivity, zeta potential, applied electric field direction, and strength. Imbibition experiments with electric fields that are different in direction and strength were conducted, showing that application of a positive electric field enhances the imbibition velocity and increases the imbibition recovery ratio, while application of a negative electric field reduces the imbibition velocity and decreases the imbibition recovery ratio. The imbibition recovery ratio with a positive electric field increases with the strength of the electric field, and the imbibition recovery ratio with a negative electric field is lower than that without an electric field.

  19. Hydrochemical Characteristics and Boron Isotope Geochemistry of Brine in Hoh Xil, Qinghai Province%青海可可西里盐湖水化学及硼同位素地球化学特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马茹莹; 韩耀宗; 郭坚峰; 韩凤清; 马海州; 肖应凯; 马云麒; 张燕霞; 王腾; 何蕾; 韩继龙

    2015-01-01

    本文主要依据2009—2010年间的考察对可可西里地区盐湖进行了水化学及硼同位素分布特征研究。结果表明,除前人发现的5个盐湖外,可可西里东部新发现的多秀湖、茶错、布查湖和果木错玛德日4个湖泊也属于盐湖;勒斜武担湖为氯化物型盐湖,其余8个盐湖均为硫酸盐型盐湖;盐湖及周围水体皆富集 B、Li 元素,形成以盐湖为中心的含量高值区,且 B-Li 元素对显示出协同消长关系,表明在该地区这两种元素的物质来源、搬运条件及富集环境具有相似性;正热电离质谱法测量结果显示,本区盐湖δ11B 值的变化范围在+4.77‰~+12.52‰之间,远低于海水δ11B值,证明这些盐湖均属陆相成因,与前人对青藏高原地区盐湖成因的研究结果相一致;勒斜武担湖和布查盐湖北部均出露有大量泉水,水化学分析和硼同位素分析数据表明,勒斜武担湖和布查盐湖分别与各自周围的泉水具有同源性,认为这些泉水是这两个盐湖的主要物质来源;根据区域地质构造特征和硼同位素地球化学数据,可判断出新青峰喷泉中的硼主要来自于深部火山岩溶滤。%A study of the hydrochemical characteristics and boron isotope distribution of salt lakes in Hoh Xil region was conducted on the basis of the survey in 2009 and 2010. Besides the Mingjing Lake, Xijinwulan Lake, Lexiewudan Lake, Salt Lake and Cangcuo Lake discovered earlier, the Duoxiu Lake, Chacuo Lake, Bucha Lake and Guomucuomaderi Lake are all salt lakes discovered recently, whose salinities are equal to or higher than 50 g/L. These discoveries have brought the total number of salt lakes in this region to 9. Except for the Lexiewudan salt lake, which is of the chloride type, the remaining 8 salt lakes are of the sulfate type; the boron and lithium are both abundant in the lake water and surrounding waters, and B-Li elements indicate a collaborative

  20. An Experimental Study of CO2-Brine Relative Permeability in Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    by Change in Pressure, Temperature, and Phase in Saline Aquifer, 2010 Energy Sources, Part A, 32: 83-99 Zuo, L., Krevor, S. and Falta, R. W. et al. An experimental study of CO2 exsolution and relative permeability measurements during CO2 saturated water depressurization. Transport in Porous Media, 2012, 91: 459-478 Akbarabadi, M. and Piri, M. Relative permeability hysteresis and capillary trapping characteristics of supercritical CO2/brine systems: an experimental study at reservoir conditions. Advances in Water Resources, 2013 52: 190-206

  1. OUT Success Stories: Chemical Treatments for Geothermal Brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE research helped develop the large, untapped geothermal resource beneath the Salton Sea in California's Imperial Valley. The very hot brines under high pressure make them excellent for electric power production. The brines are very corrosive and contain high concentrations of dissolved silica. DOE worked with San Diego Gas and Electric Company to find a solution to the silica-scaling problem. This innovative brine treatment eliminated scaling and made possible the development of the Salton Sea geothermal resource

  2. Geophysical and geochemical signatures of Gulf of Mexico seafloor brines

    OpenAIRE

    Joye, S. B.; Macdonald, I. R.; Montoya, J. P.; Peccini, M.

    2005-01-01

    Geophysical, temperature, and discrete depth-stratified geochemical data illustrate differences between an actively venting mud volcano and a relatively quiescent brine pool in the Gulf of Mexico along the continental slope. Geophysical data, including laser-line scan mosaics and sub-bottom profiles, document the dynamic nature of both environments. Temperature profiles, obtained by lowering a CTD into the brine fluid, show that the venting brine was at least 10°C warmer than the bottom w...

  3. Geophysical and geochemical signatures of Gulf of Mexico seafloor brines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Joye

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical, temperature, and discrete depth-stratified geochemical data illustrate differences between an actively venting mud volcano and a relatively quiescent brine pool in the Gulf of Mexico along the continental slope. Geophysical data, including laser-line scan mosaics and sub-bottom profiles, document the dynamic nature of both environments. Temperature profiles, obtained by lowering a CTD into the brine fluid, show that the venting brine was at least 10°C warmer than the bottom water. At the brine pool, thermal stratification was observed and only small differences in stratification were documented between three sampling times (1991, 1997 and 1998. In contrast, at the mud volcano, substantial temperature variability was observed, with the core brine temperature being slightly higher than bottom water (by 2°C in 1997 but substantially higher than bottom water (by 19°C in 1998. Detailed geochemical samples were obtained in 2002 using a device called the 'brine trapper' and concentrations of dissolved gases, major ions and nutrients were determined. Both brines contained about four times as much salt as seawater and steep concentration gradients of dissolved ions and nutrients versus brine depth were apparent. Differences in the concentrations of calcium, magnesium and potassium between the two brine fluids suggest that the fluids are derived from different sources, have different dilution/mixing histories, or that brine-sediment reactions are more important at the mud volcano. Substantial concentrations of methane, ammonium, and silicate were observed in both brines, suggesting that fluids expelled from deep ocean brines are important sources of these constituents to the surrounding environment.

  4. Evaluation of Brine Processing Technologies for Spacecraft Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Hali L.; Flynn, Michael; Wisniewski, Richard; Lee, Jeffery; Jones, Harry; Delzeit, Lance; Shull, Sarah; Sargusingh, Miriam; Beeler, David; Howard, Jeanie; Howard, Kevin; Harris, Linden; Parodi, Jurek; Kawashima, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Brine drying systems may be used in spaceflight. There are several advantages to using brine processing technologies for long-duration human missions including a reduction in resupply requirements and achieving high water recovery ratios. The objective of this project was to evaluate four technologies for the drying of spacecraft water recycling system brine byproducts. The technologies tested were NASA's Forward Osmosis Brine Drying (FOBD), Paragon's Ionomer Water Processor (IWP), NASA's Brine Evaporation Bag (BEB) System, and UMPQUA's Ultrasonic Brine Dewatering System (UBDS). The purpose of this work was to evaluate the hardware using feed streams composed of brines similar to those generated on board the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration missions. The brine formulations used for testing were the ISS Alternate Pretreatment and Solution 2 (Alt Pretreat). The brines were generated using the Wiped-film Rotating-disk (WFRD) evaporator, which is a vapor compression distillation system that is used to simulate the function of the ISS Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). Each system was evaluated based on the results from testing and Equivalent System Mass (ESM) calculations. A Quality Function Deployment (QFD) matrix was also developed as a method to compare the different technologies based on customer and engineering requirements.

  5. Modeling of brine migration in halite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four different models of the migration process have been reviewed to determine their suitability as a working model. While there are several common factors in the models additional factors are included to account for several possible effects. The detail of each model leads to a certain degree of difficulty in applying the model to the problem at hand. One model predicts that inclusions smaller than 0.1 mm dimension probably will not migrate. The other models do not consider size as a factor. Thermal diffusion (Soret effect) is considered insignificant in three models, while in the fourth model it is added to the concentration diffusion term. The following conclusions are made: (1) Temperature is the most significant parameter in all models and must be known as a function of time, and distance from the canister. (2) All four models predict about the same migration velocity for a given set of conditions. For 1000C and 10C/cm thermal gradient, the individual values are 3.0, 4.8, 5.6 and 6.4 mm/y. (3) The diffusion of ions through the brine inclusions is the rate controlling mechanism. (4) The difference between the thermal gradients in the liquid and in the solid should always be considered, and is a function of droplet shape. (5) The model based upon work by Nernst is easiest to use since all necessary parameters are readily available in the literature. However, of the four models is predicts the lowest migration rate. (6) The maximum volume of pure brine accumulated at the canister surface would be less than 20-40 liters in 50 years, for a canister initial thermal power of 3.5 kW. Bitterns would migrate proportionately less volume. A compuber code, BRINE, was developed to make these calculations by means of any of the four models

  6. Power production via North Sea Hot Brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditionally the power demand of offshore oil platforms is delivered by on-platform gas turbines. Natural gas to fuel these turbines is usually separated from the produced oil. However, in ageing fields as oil production declines so does the associated gas. Ultimately gas supply becomes insufficient; in order to continue producing fuel is imported at great expense. This study proposes the power demand of a platform could be met or supplemented by an on-platform ORC (organic Rankine cycle ) fuelled by coproduced hot brines. This could extend the operating life of oil platforms and reduce both cost and emissions. The potential power output of an ORC is modelled for fields in the North Sea's Brent Province. Results show 6 fields have the potential to generate more than 10 MW via an organic Rankine cycle fuelled by hot brines, with a maximum of 31 MW predicted for the Ninian field. Analysis of simulations for the Eider field shows that ORC plants can scale to size constraints. The cost of a 10 MW ORC is compared to cost of continued use of gas turbines. Payback times of between 3.09 and 4.53 years are predicted for an ORC, without accounting for greenhouse gas emissions levies. - Highlights: • We model organic Rankine cycles fuelled by hot brines produced in the North Sea. • Organic Rankine cycles could provide all an off-shore platform's power demand. • 6 fields in the Brent province have the potential to produce >10 MW via an ORC system. • Payback time calculated for a 10 MW organic Rankine cycle is 3.09–4.53 years

  7. Consolidation and permeability of salt in brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shor, A.J.; Baes, C.F. Jr.; Canonico, C.M.

    1981-07-01

    The consolidation and loss of permeability of salt crystal aggregates, important in assessing the effects of water in salt repositories, has been studied as a function of several variables. The kinetic behavior was similar to that often observed in sintering and suggested the following expression for the time dependence of the void fraction: phi(t) = phi(0) - (A/B)ln(1 + Bt/z(0)/sup 3/), where A and B are rate constants and z(0) is initial average particle size. With brine present, A and phi(0) varied linearly with stress. The initial void fraction was also dependent to some extent on the particle size distribution. The rate of consolidation was most rapid in brine and least rapid in the presence of only air as the fluid. A brine containing 5 m MgCl/sub 2/ showed an intermediate rate, presumably because of the greatly reduced solubility of NaCl. A substantial wall effect was indicated by an observed increase in the void fraction of consolidated columns with distance from the top where the stress was applied and by a dependence of consolidation rate on the column height and radius. The distance through which the stress fell by a factor of phi was estimated to change inversely as the fourth power of the column diameter. With increasing temperature (to 85/sup 0/C), consolidation proceeded somewhat more rapidly and the wall effect was reduced. The permeability of the columns dropped rapidly with consolidation, decreasing with about the sixth power of the void fraction. In general, extrapolation of the results to repository conditions confirms the self-sealing properties of bedded salt as a storage medium for radioactive waste.

  8. Assessment of brine migration along vertical pathways due to CO2 injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Alexander; Class, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Global climate change, shortage of resources and the growing usage of renewable energy sources has lead to a growing demand for the utilization of subsurface systems which may create conflicts with essential public interests such as water supply from aquifers. For example, brine migration into potential drinking water aquifers due to the injection of CO2 into deep saline aquifers is perceived as a potential threat resulting from the Carbon Capture and Storage Technology (CCS). In this work, we focus on the large scale impacts of CO2 storage on brine migration but the methodology and the obtained results may also apply to other fields like waste water disposal, where large amounts of fluid are injected into the subsurface. We consider a realistic (but not real) on-shore site in the North German Basin with characteristic geological features. In contrast to modeling on the reservoir scale, the spatial scale in this work is much larger in both vertical and lateral direction, since the regional hydrogeology is considered as well. Structures such as fault zones, hydrogeological windows in the Rupelian clay or salt wall flanks are considered as potential pathways for displaced fluids into shallow systems and their influence needs to be taken into account. Simulations on this scale always require a compromise between the accuracy of the description of the relevant physical processes, data availability and computational resources. Therefore, we test different model simplifications and discuss them with respect to the relevant physical processes and the expected data availability. The simplifications in the models are concerned with the role of salt-induced density differences on the flow, with injection of brine (into brine) instead of CO2 into brine, and with simplifying the geometry of the site.

  9. Brine Transport Experiments in Granular Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Amy B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-06

    To gain confidence in the predictive capability of numerical models, experimental validation must be performed to ensure that parameters and processes are correctly simulated. The laboratory investigations presented herein aim to address knowledge gaps for heat-generating nuclear waste (HGNW) disposal in bedded salt that remain after examination of prior field and laboratory test data. Primarily, we are interested in better constraining the thermal, hydrological, and physicochemical behavior of brine, water vapor, and salt when moist salt is heated. The target of this work is to use run-of-mine (RoM) salt; however during FY2015 progress was made using high-purity, granular sodium chloride.

  10. Pressure-driven brine migration in a salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The traditional view is that salt is the ideal rock for isolation of nuclear waste because it is ''dry'' and probably ''impermeable.'' The existence of salt through geologic time is prima facie evidence of such properties. Experiments and experience at potential salt sites for geologic repositories have indicated that while porosity and permeability of salt are low, the salt may be saturated with brine. If this hypothesis is correct, then it is possible to have brine flow due to pressure differences within the salt. If there is pressure-driven brine migration in salt repositories then it is paramount to know the magnitude of such flow because inward brine flow would affect the corrosion rate of nuclear waste containers and outward brine flow might affect radionuclide transport rates. Brine exists in natural salt as inclusions in salt crystals and in grain boundaries. Brine inclusions in crystals move to nearby grain boundaries when subjected to a temperature gradient, because of temperature-dependent solubility of salt. Brine in grain boundaries moves under the influence of a pressure gradient. When salt is mined to create a waste repository, brine from grain boundaries will migrate into the rooms, tunnels and boreholes because these cavities are at atmospheric pressure. After a heat-emitting waste package is emplaced and backfilled, the heat will impose a temperature gradient in the surrounding salt that will cause inclusions in the nearby salt to migrate to grain boundaries within a few years, adding to the brine that was already present in the grain boundaries. The formulation of brine movement with salt as a thermoelastic porous medium, in the context of the continuum theory of mixtures, has been described. In this report we show the mathematical details and discuss the results predicted by this analysis

  11. Trends in adsorption characteristics of benzene on transition metal surfaces: Role of surface chemistry and van der Waals interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, Handan; Greber, Thomas; Kara, Abdelkader

    2013-01-01

    The accurate description of interface characteristics between organic molecules and metal surfaces has long been debated in theoretical studies. A well-founded description of interface geometry and adsorption energy is highly desirable for these hybrid inorganic/organic interfaces. Using first principles calculations with the inclusion of five van der Waals functionals (vdW-DF family), benzene (C6H6) adsorption on seven transition metal surfaces is studied to explore the performance of these ...

  12. Bad chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    General chemistry courses haven't changed significantly in forty years. Because most basic chemistry students are premedical students, medical schools have enormous influence and could help us start all over again to create undergraduate chemistry education that works.

  13. Photocatalytic reduction of nitrate using titanium dioxide for regeneration of ion exchange brine

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ting; Doudrick, Kyle; Westerhoff, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate is often removed from groundwater by ion exchange (IX) before its use as drinking water. Accumulation of nitrate in IX brine reduces the efficiency of IX regeneration and the useful life of the regeneration brine. For the first time, we present a strategy to photocatalytically reduce nitrate in IX brine, thereby extending the use of the brine. Titanium dioxide (Evonik P90), acting as photocatalyst, reduced nitrate effectively in both synthetic brines and sulfate-removed IX brine when ...

  14. Intracrystalline brine inclusion motion for Palo Duro Unit 5 salt from the Mansfield No. 1 borehole in Oldham County, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microscope equipped with a hot stage was used to monitor intracrystalline migration of natural fluid inclusions in Palo Duro Basin Unit 5 salt from the Mansfield No. 1 borehole in Oldham County, Texas. Steady-state velocities are determined for 65 inclusions between 0.04 mm and 0.82 mm in size subjected to temperature gradients between 200 K/m and 1440 K/m at temperatures of 3180K to 4750K. Inclusion velocity increases with increasing inclusion size, mean salt temperature, and temperature gradient. Two models that predict brine inclusion velocity as a function of temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion size are used to analyze the data. The models are simplified due to uncertainties in properties that depend on brine chemistry and temperature, such as the equilibrium salt concentration of the brine. These simplified models are then fitted to the data and the fitted parameters are used to estimate the threshold temperature gradient below which inclusions do not migrate. The threshold temperature gradients determined in this study are in reasonable agreement with other values reported in the literature. Since values of the fitted parameters depend on the chemical composition of the brine, it is necessary to determine the model parameters and threshold temperature gradient for each repository site. 14 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  15. Hydrological and Chemical Assessment of Groundwater Flow and Quality in Costal Brine Aquifers of Laizhou Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Hu, Bill X.; Miao, Jinjie

    2016-04-01

    In geological time, seawater had been intruded groundwater several times since Late Pleistocene in the coastal area of Laizhou Bay, china. This unique phenomenon caused freshwater and brine water interbedded each other in the aquifers and forged Laizhou Bay became a multiple sources dynamic coastal area. In the last two decades, massive exploitation of fresh groundwater and brine water has significantly increased seawater intrusion and strengthened mixture of brine water and freshwater in the coastal area, which threatens local groundwater resources and severely impacts local ecological geo-environment. In this study, the hydrological and chemical (HC) process was studied according to the monitoring wells and chemical ionic constituents. The groundwater level continuously decreasing rather than showing a typical seasonal variation in areas close to the depression cone. A groundwater divide was formed along Yingli-Houzhen-Yangzi accounted for the exploitation of fresh water in the south and brine extraction in the north. This divide prevented the saltwater intrusion to fresh groundwater further south in study area. The results also showed that during concentration process, a series of complex reactions including water chemistry metamorphic role and evolution took place, such as mineral precipitation, cation ion exchange, dedolomitization and silicate alteration, etc. This work highlighted hydrological-chemical coupling process and provided a better insight into hydrogeological system.

  16. Groundwater contaminant transport with adsorption and ion exchange chemistry: method of characteristics for the case without dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contaminant transport in the groundwater environment with adsorption and ion exchange reactions is considered. For the case where the influence of dispersion is negligible, the method of characteristics is used to formulate the solution for any adsorption isotherm and an arbitrary number of exchanging cations. The approach applies equally well to linear flow systems and to nonlinear systems along streamlines in a nonuniform flow field. Transport problems related to the emerging technologies of in situ gasification of lignite and in situ leach mining of uranium are discussed. 12 refs

  17. Moisture variations in brine-salted pasta filata cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindstedt, P S

    2001-01-01

    A study was made of the moisture distribution in brine-salted pasta filata cheese. Brine-salted cheeses usually develop reasonably smooth and predictable gradients of decreasing moisture from center to surface, resulting from outward diffusion of moisture in response to inward diffusion of salt. However, patterns of moisture variation within brine-salted pasta filata cheeses, notably pizza cheese, are more variable and less predictable because of the peculiar conditions that occur when warm cheese is immersed in cold brine. In this study, cold brining resulted in less moisture loss from the cheese surface to the brine. Also it created substantial temperature gradients within the cheese, which persisted after brining and influenced the movement of moisture within the cheese independently of that caused by the inward diffusion of salt. Depending on brining conditions and age, pizza cheese may contain decreasing, increasing, or irregular gradients of moisture from center to surface, which may vary considerably at different locations within a single block. This complicates efforts to obtain representative samples for moisture and composition testing. Dicing the entire block into small (e.g., 1.5 cm) cubes and collecting a composite sample after thorough mixing may serve as a practical sampling approach for manufacturers and users of pizza cheese that have ready access to dicing equipment. PMID:11324629

  18. Microbial succession and the functional potential during the fermentation of Chinese soy sauce brine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanita eSulaiman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The quality of traditional Chinese soy sauce is determined by microbial communities and their inter-related metabolic roles in the fermentation tank. In this study, traditional Chinese soy sauce brine samples were obtained periodically to monitor the transitions of the microbial population and functional properties during the six months of fermentation process. Whole genome shotgun (WGS method revealed that the fermentation brine was dominated by the bacterial genus Weissella and later dominated by the fungal genus Candida. Metabolic reconstruction of the metagenome sequences demonstrated a characteristic profile of heterotrophic fermentation of proteins and carbohydrates. This was supported by the detection of ethanol with stable decrease of pH values. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that explores the temporal changes in microbial successions over a period of six months, through metagenome shotgun sequencing in traditional Chinese soy sauce fermentation and the biological processes therein.

  19. Microbial succession and the functional potential during the fermentation of Chinese soy sauce brine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Joanita; Gan, Han Ming; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    The quality of traditional Chinese soy sauce is determined by microbial communities and their inter-related metabolic roles in the fermentation tank. In this study, traditional Chinese soy sauce brine samples were obtained periodically to monitor the transitions of the microbial population and functional properties during the 6 months of fermentation process. Whole genome shotgun method revealed that the fermentation brine was dominated by the bacterial genus Weissella and later dominated by the fungal genus Candida. Metabolic reconstruction of the metagenome sequences demonstrated a characteristic profile of heterotrophic fermentation of proteins and carbohydrates. This was supported by the detection of ethanol with stable decrease of pH values. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that explores the temporal changes in microbial successions over a period of 6 months, through metagenome shotgun sequencing in traditional Chinese soy sauce fermentation and the biological processes therein. PMID:25400624

  20. Chemistry variations of the secondary circuit aqueous environment reflected in the characteristics of the superficial films formed on the carbon steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to establish correlations between the characteristics of the superficial films formed on the carbon steel components in operation conditions of the secondary circuit of the Cernavoda Nuclear Power Station (NPS) and the specific parameters of the aqueous environment in which these films were formed. The main parameters studied in this paper, specific to a secondary circuit environment, are: the value of pH and the substances used to control it and the oxygen concentration dissolved in the aqueous environment, respectively. These filmed samples by autoclaving were studied by: 1. X rays diffraction method; 2. metallographic microscopy and 3. electrochemical methods such as: potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (E.I.S). to establish the correlations between the characteristics of the superficial films and the chemistry of the aqueous environment from the secondary circuit. To create films on the carbon steel samples similarly with those formed on the components during the operation of the NPS secondary circuit, some samples of three types of carbon steel - SA106, SA508 and SA516 - were filmed by autoclaving at 260 deg. C (51 atm) in aqueous environments with given physical and chemical characteristics. Using descaling and gravimetric method, there were established the corrosion kinetics of the carbon steel samples, which include: 1. the global corrosion rate (mg/dm2/day); 2. the global corrosion products formed (mg/dm2); 3. the adherent corrosion film (mg/dm2); 4. the non-adherent corrosion products (mg/dm2), etc. (authors)

  1. Complex chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-15

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  2. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  3. Mathematical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Trinajstić, Nenad; Gutman, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    A brief description is given of the historical development of mathematics and chemistry. A path leading to the meeting of these two sciences is described. An attempt is made to define mathematical chemistry, and journals containing the term mathematical chemistry in their titles are noted. In conclusion, the statement is made that although chemistry is an experimental science aimed at preparing new compounds and materials, mathematics is very useful in chemistry, among other things, to produc...

  4. Radionuclide transport in sandstones with WIPP brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retardation factors (R) have been measured for the transport of 3H, /sup 95m/Tc, and 85Sr in WIPP brine using St. Peter, Berea, Kayenta, and San Felipe sandstone cores. If tritium is assumed to have R=1, /sup 95m/Tc has R=1.0 to 1.3 and therefore is essentially not retarded. Strontium-85 has R = 1.0 to 1.3 on St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta, but R=3 on San Felipe. This is attributed to sorption on the matrix material of San Felipe, which has 45 volume % matrix compared with 1 to 10 volume % for the others. Retardation factors (R/sub s/) for 85Sr calculated from static sorption measurements are unity for all the sandstones. Therefore, the static and transport results for 85Sr disagree in the case of San Felipe, but agree for St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta

  5. Improved brine recycling during nitrate removal using ion exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Byung-Uk; Jung, Yoo-Hoon; Han, Woon-Woo; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2002-07-01

    Ion exchange technology is currently the best for removing nitrate from drinking water. However, problems related to the disposal of spent brine from regeneration of exhausted resins must be overcome so that ion exchange can be applied more widely and economically, especially in small communities. For this purpose, a novel spent brine recycling system using combined biological denitrification and sulfate reduction processes was developed for more efficient reuse of brine. A granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption column was introduced as an additional step to prevent contamination of resins by bio-polymers and dissolved organics present in the bio-reactor effluent. Two upflow sludge blanket reactors (USBRs) were operated in series for 166 days to provide denitrification and sulfate reduction. The denitrification reactor provided a nitrate removal efficiency of 96% at a nitrate-N loading rate of 5.4 g NO3(-)-N/l d. The sulfate reduction efficiency of the sulfate reduction reactor remained approximately 62% at a sulfate loading rate of 1.8 g SO4(2-)/l d. Five ion exchange columns containing A520E resins were repeatedly operated in up to 25 cycles of service and regeneration using five kinds of brine: one virgin 3% NaCl and four differently recycled spent brines. Throughput decreased remarkably when the biologically recycled brine was not treated with the GAC column, probably due to the presence of bio-polymers and dissolved organic compounds. The sulfate reduction reactor placed after the denitrification step increased the bicarbonate concentration, which could be used as a co-regenerant with chloride. The inclusion of the sulfate reduction reactor into the conventional brine recycling system allowed more efficient reuse of brine, resulting in both reduced salt consumption and brine discharge. PMID:12188132

  6. Brine migration in hot-pressed polycrystalline sodium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes experiments designed to provide data on brine migration in polycrystalline salt. Polycrystalling samples of various grain sizes, density, and purity were prepared from several commercial-grade salts by hot-pressing. Three distinct experimental set-ups were used to place salt billets in an induced thermal gradient in contact with brine source. The test designs varied primarily in the way in which the thermal gradient was applied and monitored and the way in which brine migration was determined. All migration was in enclosed vessels which precluded visual observation of brine movement through the microstructure. Migration velocities were estimated either by the timed appearance of brine at the hot face of the sample, or by determination of the penetration distance of migration artifacts in the microstructure after tests of fixed duration. For various reasons both of these methods were subject to a large degree of error. Our results suggest, however, that the migration velocity in dense polycrystalline salt may be at least an order of magnitude greater than that suggested by single-crystal experiments. Microstructural analysis shows that brine prefers to migrate along paths of high crystalline activity such as grain and subgrain boundaries and is dispersed rather quickly in the microstructure. A series of tests were performed using various types of tracers in brine in order to flag migration paths and locate brine in the microstructure more decisively. These attempts failed and it appears that only the aqueous portion of the brine moves through the microstructure with the dissolved ions being lost and replaced rather quickly. This suggests the use of deuterium as a tracer in future work

  7. Empirical formula for the refractive index of freezing brine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2009-01-01

    The refractive index of freezing brine is important for example in order to estimate oceanic scattering as sea ice develops. Previously, no simple continuous expression was available for estimating the refractive index of brine at subzero temperatures. I show that extrapolation of the empirical f...... formula for the refractive index of seawater by Quan and Fry [Appl. Opt. 34(18), 3477-3480 (1995)] provides a good fit to the refractive index of freezing brine for temperatures above -24 degrees celsius and salinities below 180 parts per thousand....

  8. Electromagnetic mapping of brine contamination in petroleum producing areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geophysical electromagnetic devices are well suited to mapping soil and groundwater contamination by oilfield brines. Frequency domain devices such as ground conductivity meters are used for quick assessment of the lateral extent of contamination in the near surface. Time domain devices can accurately define the depth and thickness of the contaminated horizons. Three cases are reviewed which involve the use of geophysical electromagnetic mapping to evaluate brine contamination around a disused drilling pit and an evaporation pond, and to investigate the occurrence of brine relative to local geology in the Michigan Basin. 11 refs., 8 figs

  9. Variação das características físico-químicas e microbiológicas das salmouras empregadas na salga de queijos tipo mussarela durante o período de sua utilização Variation of physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of brines applied in the salting of mozzarella cheese during the period of utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Augusto do Amaral

    1992-02-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisadas 40 amostras de salmouras empregadas na salga por submersão de queijos tipo mussarela, em uma indústria de laticínios do Estado de São Paulo, Brasil, com o objetivo de se conhecer a variação das características físico-químicas e microbiológicas durante o período de sua utilização. Os valores médios do pH, concentração de cloreto de sódio e de proteínas solúveis, desde o preparo da salmoura até o 21° dia de utilização, variaram de 7,21 a 5,76, 27,1 a 24,5 e de zero a 0,126 mg/ml, respectivamente. Por outro lado, os valores médios das contagens de microrganismos mesófilos e do número mais provável de coliformes totais e de origem fecal variaram de 5,8 x 10 UFC/ml a 6,9 x 10(4 UFC/ml, zero a 1,6 x 10(5/100ml e zero a 1,1 x 10(5/100ml, respectivamente. Além disso, os valores médios das contagens de bolores e leveduras e de Staphylococcus coagulase positiva, variaram de 0,4 x 10 UFC/ml a 2,0 x 10³ UFC/ml e de zero a 1,3 x 10 UFC/ml, respectivamente. Os resultados encontrados sugerem a existência de condições higiênicas inadequadas durante o preparo e utilização das salmouras, de modo a representar uma importante fonte de contaminação para os queijos. Em decorrência deste fato, existe a possibilidade do comprometimento da qualidade dos queijos, de modo a representar risco potencial à população consumidora.Variation of the physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of brines during their utilization for salting mozzarella cheese. Forty brine samples used for submersion salting of mozzarella cheese in a dairy industry in the State of S. Paulo, Brazil, were analysed for the purpose of discovering the variation in the physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics observed over their period of utilization. The mean values preparation up to the 21st day of utilization of pH, sodium chloride and protein concentration varied from 7.21 to 5.76, from 27.1 to 24.5 and from zero to 0

  10. Occurrence of aspartyl proteases in brine after herring marinating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak, Mariusz; Lepczyński, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Herrings are marinated in a brine consisting of salt and acetic acid. During marinating, various nitrogen fractions diffuse from fish flesh to the brine, causing significant nutritional quality losses of the raw material. In this study, it has been demonstrated for the first time that proteases diffuse from the fish to the marinating brine. Using ammonium sulphate precipitation and affinity chromatography on pepstatin-A agarose bed the aspartyl proteases were purified and concentrated over 2600-fold from a marinating brine. Pepstatin-A completely inhibited the activity of the purified preparation. The preparation was active against fluorogenic substrates specific for cathepsin D and E and inactive against substrates specific for cysteine cathepsins. Depending on incubation time, the preparation showed pH-optimum at 2.0 or 4.5. The 2D SDS-PAGE separation demonstrated the presence of a few proteins with molecular weights and pI values typical of cathepsin D, E and pepsin. PMID:26471581

  11. Migration of brine and nitrogen in creeping salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the excavations in bedded salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are, for all practical purposes, dry, small amounts of brine have been observed to weep from exposed surfaces in the repository horizon and seep into drill holes in the underground excavations. As part of the Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) at the WIPP, this study has been made to formulate the complex problem of brine and nitrogen flow through deforming salt as completely as possible. The derived equations are coupled where appropriate in order to closely describe the natural phenomena. The main objective of this paper is to suggest a method by which the formulation might be solved in order to estimate the brine inflow rate into the excavated rooms at the WIPP repository level. The suggested solution method requires the modification and combination of two finite element codes which may necessitate a large amount of computer memory for data storage

  12. Coiled Brine Recovery Assembly (CoBRA) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Coiled Brine Recovery Assembly (CoBRA) project will result in a proof-of-concept demonstration for a lightweight, compact, affordable, regenerable and...

  13. Development of the brine shrimp Artemia is accelerated during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, B. S.; Metcalf, J.; DeBell, L.; Paulsen, A.; Noren, W.; Guikema, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Developmentally arrested brine shrimp cysts have been reactivated during orbital spaceflight on two different Space Shuttle missions (STS-50 and STS-54), and their subsequent development has been compared with that of simultaneously reactivated ground controls. Flight and control brine shrimp do not significantly differ with respect to hatching rates or larval morphology at the scanning and transmission EM levels. A small percentage of the flight larvae had defective nauplier eye development, but the observation was not statistically significant. However, in three different experiments on two different flights, involving a total of 232 larvae that developed in space, a highly significant difference in degree of flight to control development was found. By as early as 2.25 days after reactivation of development, spaceflight brine shrimp were accelerated, by a full instar, over ground control brine shrimp. Although developing more rapidly, flight shrimp grew as long as control shrimp at each developmental instar or stage.

  14. Self-oscillations in large storages of highly mineralized brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimova, Tatyana; Lepikhin, Anatoly; Tsiberkin, Kirill; Parshakova, Yanina

    2014-05-01

    One of the stages of the production process at large enrichment plants is settling of aqueous solutions in large technological storages. The present work is devoted to the modeling of hydrodynamic regimes of large storage of highly mineralized brines. The density of brines in these objects depends not only on the content of dissolved macrocomponents, but also on the concentration of fine particulate matter. This leads to the need to consider the dynamics of the suspended sediment under significant density stratification, which greatly complicates the problem. Because of that it is important to develop hydrodynamical models of these objects. A peculiarity of these systems is the possibility of self-oscillatory regimes the mechanism of which is as follows. In warm sunny days, with high solar insolation, the heating of the sediments and bottom water takes place. The bottom water warming and the decrease of its density give rise to flow. The slurry particles composing the sediments are involved in the flow. The heated particles entrained by the flow transfer the heat to the surrounding liquid and increase the absorption of the solar radiation in the volume, which leads to equalization of temperature and convective flow damping. After the particle settling on the bottom the process is repeated. We study the stability of equilibrium of the horizontal liquid layer containing heavy insoluble particles in the presence of evaporation from the free surface and solar radiation absorption by insoluble particles. The time-dependent solution of heat transfer problem is obtained and used for estimate of time of instability onset. It is found that for the layer of saturated brines of potassium chloride of the thickness about 10 m the time for instability onset is about one hour. By using analytical estimates based on the empirical model of turbulence by Prandtl we confirmed the time for the onset of instability and obtained the estimates for the period of self

  15. Dense, viscous brine behavior in heterogeneous porous medium systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D Johnson; Pedit, J A; Gasda, S E; Farthing, M W; Murphy, L L; Knight, S R; Brubaker, G R; Miller, C T

    2010-06-25

    The behavior of dense, viscous calcium bromide brine solutions used to remediate systems contaminated with dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) is considered in laboratory and field porous medium systems. The density and viscosity of brine solutions are experimentally investigated and functional forms fit over a wide range of mass fractions. A density of 1.7 times, and a corresponding viscosity of 6.3 times, that of water is obtained at a calcium bromide mass fraction of 0.53. A three-dimensional laboratory cell is used to investigate the establishment, persistence, and rate of removal of a stratified dense brine layer in a controlled system. Results from a field-scale experiment performed at the Dover National Test Site are used to investigate the ability to establish and maintain a dense brine layer as a component of a DNAPL recovery strategy, and to recover the brine at sufficiently high mass fractions to support the economical reuse of the brine. The results of both laboratory and field experiments show that a dense brine layer can be established, maintained, and recovered to a significant extent. Regions of unstable density profiles are shown to develop and persist in the field-scale experiment, which we attribute to regions of low hydraulic conductivity. The saturated-unsaturated, variable-density groundwater flow simulation code SUTRA is modified to describe the system of interest, and used to compare simulations to experimental observations and to investigate certain unobserved aspects of these complex systems. The model results show that the standard model formulation is not appropriate for capturing the behavior of sharp density gradients observed during the dense brine experiments. PMID:20444520

  16. Brine shrimp cytotoxic activities of Hippophae rhamnoides Linn leaves extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Javid Ali; Bashir Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate brine shrimp lethality assay of solvent extracts (aqueous, methanol, ethanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, chloroform and n-hexane) of Hippophae rhamnoides (H. rhamnoides) leaves. Methods: Brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay was used to assess the cytotoxic potential of H. rhamnoides leaves extracts. Three vials for concentration of each extract were made and 10 shrimps per vial (30 shrimps per dilution) were transferred to specific concentration of each extrac...

  17. Brine Shrimp Ecology In The Great Salt Lake, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Wurtsbaugh, Wayne A.

    1995-01-01

    Hypersaline lakes are noted for their simple communities which facilitate understanding ecological interactions (Williams et al. 1990; Wurtsbaugh 1992; Jellison and Melack 1988). Nevertheless, we still cannot easily predict how environmental changes will effect the population dynamics in these lakes, at least in part because even these simple ecosystems may be more complex than we .realize. Many hypersaline lakes are dominated by the brine shrimp Artemia spp. The production of brine shrimp is...

  18. Combinatorial chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John

    1994-01-01

    An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds.......An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds....

  19. Positronium chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James

    1964-01-01

    Positronium Chemistry focuses on the methodologies, reactions, processes, and transformations involved in positronium chemistry. The publication first offers information on positrons and positronium and experimental methods, including mesonic atoms, angular correlation measurements, annihilation spectra, and statistical errors in delayed coincidence measurements. The text then ponders on positrons in gases and solids. The manuscript takes a look at the theoretical chemistry of positronium and positronium chemistry in gases. Topics include quenching, annihilation spectrum, delayed coincidence

  20. Characterization of brines and evaporites of Lake Katwe, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasedde, Hillary; Kirabira, John Baptist; Bäbler, Matthäus U.; Tilliander, Anders; Jonsson, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Lake Katwe brines and evaporites were investigated to determine their chemical, mineralogical and morphological composition. 30 brine samples and 3 solid salt samples (evaporites) were collected from different locations of the lake deposit. Several analytical techniques were used to determine the chemical composition of the samples including Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES), Inductively Coupled Plasma-Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP-SFMS), ion chromatography, and potentiometric titration. The mineralogical composition and morphology of the evaporites was determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Physical parameters of the lake brines such as density, electrical conductivity, pH, and salinity were also studied. The results show that the lake brines are highly alkaline and rich in Na+, Cl-, CO32-, SO42-, and HCO3- with lesser amounts of K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Br-, and F- ions. The brines show an intermediate transition between Na-Cl and Na-HCO3 water types. Among the trace metals, the lake brines were found to be enriched in B, I, Sr, Fe, Mo, Ba, and Mn. The solid salts are composed of halite mixed with other salts such as hanksite, burkeite and trona. It was also observed that the composition of the salts varies considerably even within the same grades.

  1. Brine: a computer program to compute brine migration adjacent to a nuclear waste canister in a salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a mathematical model used to predict brine migration toward a nuclear waste canister in a bedded salt repository. The mathematical model is implemented in a computer program called BRINE. The program is written in FORTRAN and executes in the batch mode on a CDC 7600. A description of the program input requirements and output available is included. Samples of input and output are given

  2. A microfluidic flow focusing platform to screen the evolution of crude oil-brine interfacial elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Brendon; Liu, Yafei; Alvarado, Vladimir; Oakey, John

    2016-08-01

    Multiphase fluid flow dynamics dominate processes used to recover the majority of hydrocarbon resources produced by global energy industries. Micromodels have long been used to recapitulate geometric features of these processes, allowing for the phenomenological validation of multiphase porous media transport models. Notably, these platform surrogates typically preserve the complexity of reservoir conditions, preventing the elucidation of underlying physical mechanisms that govern bulk phenomena. Here, we introduce a microfluidic flow focusing platform that allows crude oil to be aged against brines of distinct composition in order to evaluate the pore-level effects of chemically-mediated interfacial properties upon snap-off. Snap-off is a fundamental multiphase flow process that has been shown to be a function of aqueous phase chemistry, which in turn establishes the limits of crude oil recovery during enhanced oil recovery operations. Specifically, this platform was used to evaluate the hypothesis that low salinity brines suppress crude oil snap-off, thus enhancing recovery. This hypothesis was validated and conditions that promote the effect were shown to, unexpectedly, develop over a matter of minutes on the pore scale. Microfluidic snap-off experiments were complemented by finite element fluid dynamics modeling, and further validated against a classical instability framework. PMID:27241440

  3. Evaporative evolution of a Na–Cl–NO3–K–Ca–SO4–Mg–Si brine at 95°C: Experiments and modeling relevant to Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll Susan; Sutton Mark; Alai Maureen

    2005-01-01

    A synthetic Topopah Spring Tuff water representative of one type of pore water at Yucca Mountain, NV was evaporated at 95°C in a series of experiments to determine the geochemical controls for brines that may form on, and possibly impact upon the long-term integrity of waste containers and drip shields at the designated high-level, nuclear-waste repository. Solution chemistry, condensed vapor chemistry, and precipitate mineralogy were used to identify important chemical divides and to valida...

  4. Brine migration test for Asse Mine, Federal Republic of Germany: final test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-07-01

    The United States and the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) will conduct a brine migration test in the Asse Salt Mine in the FRG as part of the US/FRG Cooperative Radioactive Waste Management Agreement. Two sets of two tests each will be conducted to study both liquid inclusion migration and vapor migration in the two salt types chosen for the experiments: (1) pure salt, for its characteristics similar to the salt that might occur in potential US repositories, and (2) transitional salt, for its similarity to the salt that might occur in potential repositories in Germany.

  5. Brine migration test for Asse Mine, Federal Republic of Germany: final test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States and the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) will conduct a brine migration test in the Asse Salt Mine in the FRG as part of the US/FRG Cooperative Radioactive Waste Management Agreement. Two sets of two tests each will be conducted to study both liquid inclusion migration and vapor migration in the two salt types chosen for the experiments: (1) pure salt, for its characteristics similar to the salt that might occur in potential US repositories, and (2) transitional salt, for its similarity to the salt that might occur in potential repositories in Germany

  6. Effects of brine migration on waste storage systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processes which can lead to mobilization of brine adjacent to spent fuel or nuclear waste canisters and some of the thermomechanical consequences have been investigated. Velocities as high as 4 x 10-7 m s-1 (13 m y-1) are calculated at the salt/canister boundary. As much as 40 liters of pure NaCl brine could accumulate around each canister during a 10-year storage period. Accumulations of bittern brines would probably be less, in the range of 2 to 5 liters. With 0.5% water, NaCl brine accumulation over a 10-year storage cycle around a spent fuel canister producing 0.6 kW of heat is expected to be less than 1 liter for centimeter-size inclusions and less than 0.5 liter for millimeter-size inclusions. For bittern brines, about 25 years would be required to accumulate 0.4 liter. The most serious mechanical consequence of brine migration would be the increased mobility of the waste canister due to pressure solution. In pressure solution enhanced deformation, the existence of a thin film of fluid either between grains or between media (such as between a canister and the salt) provides a pathway by which the salt can be redistributed leading to a marked increase in strain rates in wet rock relative to dry rock. In salt, intergranular water will probably form discontinuous layers rather than films so that they would dominate pressure solution. A mathematical model of pressure solution indicates that pressure solution will not lead to appreciable canister motions except possibly in fine grained rocks (less than 10-4 m). In fine grained salts, details of the contact surface between the canister and the salt bed may lead to large pressure solution motions. A numerical model indicates that heat transfer in the brine layer surrounding a spent fuel canister is not conduction dominated but has a significant convective component

  7. Migration chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration chemistry, the influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour of pollutants in the environment, is an interplay between the actual natur of the pollutant and the characteristics of the environment, such as pH, redox conditions and organic matter content. The wide selection of possible pollutants in combination with varying geological media, as well as the operation of different chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions compleactes the prediction of the influence of these processes on the mobility of pollutants. The report summarizes a wide range of potential pollutants in the terrestrial environment as well as a variety of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions, which can be expected to influence the migration behaviour, comprising diffusion, dispersion, convection, sorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, transformations/degradations, biochemical reactions and complex formation. The latter comprises the complexation of metal ions as well as non-polar organics to naturally occurring organic macromolecules. The influence of the single types of processes on the migration process is elucidated based on theoretical studies. The influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour is unambiguous, as the processes apparently control the transport of pollutants in the terrestrial environment. As the simple, conventional KD concept breaks down, it is suggested that the migration process should be described in terms of the alternative concepts chemical dispersion, average-elution-time and effective retention. (AB) (134 refs.)

  8. Social Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtfouse, Eric; Schwarzbauer, Jan; Robert, Didier

    2012-01-01

    International audience This article is both an essay to propose social chemistry as a new scientific discipline, and a preface of the book Environmental Chemistry for a Sustainable World. Environmental chemistry is a fast emerging discipline aiming at the understanding the fate of pollutants in ecosystems and at designing novel processes that are safe for ecosystems. Past pollution should be cleaned, future pollution should be predicted and avoided (Lichtfouse et al., 2005a). Such advices ...

  9. Computational chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Truhlar, Donald G.; McKoy, Vincent

    2000-01-01

    Computational chemistry has come of age. With significant strides in computer hardware and software over the last few decades, computational chemistry has achieved full partnership with theory and experiment as a tool for understanding and predicting the behavior of a broad range of chemical, physical, and biological phenomena. The Nobel Prize award to John Pople and Walter Kohn in 1998 highlighted the importance of these advances in computational chemistry. With massively parallel computers ...

  10. Bioinorganic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bertini, Ivano; Gray, Harry B.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone

    1994-01-01

    This book covers material that could be included in a one-quarter or one-semester course in bioinorganic chemistry for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students in chemistry or biochemistry. We believe that such a course should provide students with the background required to follow the research literature in the field. The topics were chosen to represent those areas of bioinorganic chemistry that are mature enough for textbook presentation. Although each chapter presents material...

  11. Effects of a brine discharge over soft bottom Polychaeta assemblage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilar-Ruso, Yoana del [Dpto. de Ciencias del Mar y Biologia Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, Campus de San Vicente del Raspeig, Ap. 99, E-03080, Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: yoana.delpilar@ua.es; Ossa-Carretero, Jose Antonio de la; Gimenez-Casalduero, Francisca; Sanchez-Lizaso, Jose Luis [Dpto. de Ciencias del Mar y Biologia Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, Campus de San Vicente del Raspeig, Ap. 99, E-03080, Alicante (Spain)

    2008-11-15

    Desalination is a growing activity that has introduced a new impact, brine discharge, which may affect benthic communities. Although the role of polychaetes as indicators to assess organic pollution is well known, their tolerance to salinity changes has not been examined to such a great extent. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of brine discharge over soft bottom polychaete assemblage along the Alicante coast (Southeast Spain) over a two year period. Changes in the polychaete assemblage was analysed using univariate and multivariate techniques. We compared a transect in front of the discharge with two controls. At each transect we sampled at three depths (4, 10 and 15 m) during winter and summer. We have observed different sensitivity of polychaete families to brine discharges, Ampharetidae being the most sensitive, followed by Nephtyidae and Spionidae. Syllidae and Capitellidae showed some resistance initially, while Paraonidae proved to be a tolerant family. - The Polychaete assemblage is affected by the brine discharge of the Alicante desalination plant and we detect different sensitivity levels in polychaete families to brine impact.

  12. Technetium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  13. Dispersive Tidal Plume Modeling of Brine Discharge from Reverse Osmosis (RO) Desalination System, Coral Bay, St. John, USVI using Finite Segment Steady-state Response Matrix (SSRM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J.; Shahvari, A.

    2011-12-01

    This characterization and modeling study of dispersive tidal plume of brine discharge from reverse osmosis (RO) desalination system is a part of the Environmental Assessment (EA) for a new reverse osmosis system in the Coral Bay, St. John, USVI (US Virgin Island). Main foci are on developing the tidal longitudinal (perpendicular to the shoreline) and lateral (parallel to the shoreline) dispersion coefficients and subsequently characterize dispersion and mixing characterization of the negatively buoyant brine discharge plume from the proposed reverse osmosis plant to evaluate the level of salinity variations in the nearshore mixing plume in regard to existing coral reef ecosystem. An in situ dye study was conducted by a marine biologist for this purpose to estimate brine discharge plume dispersion coefficients under oscillatory tidal transport and fate flux for current and proposed plant configuration. Additional tidal and surface runoff hydrologic data, bathymetric data and brine discharge characteristics in the vicinity of the brine discharge location are reflected in this study. With estimated dispersion coefficients, eighteen brine discharge scenarios were evaluated to model anticipated dispersive characteristics under varying operational conditions and ambient tidal current conditions for average measured salinity of 33.27 PSU in loco as well as a standard 35 PSU for typical nearshore water salinity variations. Modeling results indicated that the dispersive tidal plume of design brine discharge from reverse osmosis (RO) desalination system at a discharge of 150,000 gpd would raise salinity no higher than 0.0123 PSU in receiving nearshore estuarine water (Maximum concentration at the segment 3 = 33.2822 PSU at Δt = 12 hrs and 24 hrs in diurnal tidal cycle under when the brine discharge with Base+25% concentration, 81.25 PSU at brine discharge rate of 0.0066 m3/sec, and with a minimum direct overland flow efflux at 0.003 m3/sec - this is a "worst-case" operating

  14. Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

    2009-09-01

    The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

  15. Effect of sodium bicarbonate and varying concentrations of sodium chloride in brine on the liquid retention of fish (Pollachius virensL.) muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åsli, Magnus; Ofstad, Ragni; Böcker, Ulrike;

    2016-01-01

    brined with a combination of salt (NaCl) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). RESULTS Water characteristics and microstructure of saithe (Pollachius virens L.) muscle brined in solutions of NaCl and NaHCO3 or NaCl alone were compared using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) T2 relaxometry...... in greater intracellular space at 30 and 60 g kg−1 NaCl. CONCLUSION Sodium bicarbonate addition to low-salt solutions can improve yield and flesh quality of fish muscle owing to altered water mobility and wider space between the muscle cells...

  16. Good chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    The subject matter in chemistry courses reflects almost nothing of the issues that chemists are interested in. It is important to formulate a set of topics - and a Medical College Admissions Test reflecting them - that would leave chemistry departments no choice but to change their teaching.

  17. EVALUATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OF URANIUM, THORIUM, AND RADIUM ASSOCIATED WITH PRODUCED FLUIDS, PRECIPITATES, AND SLUDGES FROM OIL, GAS, AND OILFIELD BRINE INJECTION WELLS IN MISSISSIPPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Swann; John Matthews; Rick Ericksen; Joel Kuszmaul

    2004-03-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are known to be produced as a byproduct of hydrocarbon production in Mississippi. The presence of NORM has resulted in financial losses to the industry and continues to be a liability as the NORM-enriched scales and scale encrusted equipment is typically stored rather than disposed of. Although the NORM problem is well known, there is little publically available data characterizing the hazard. This investigation has produced base line data to fill this informational gap. A total of 329 NORM-related samples were collected with 275 of these samples consisting of brine samples. The samples were derived from 37 oil and gas reservoirs from all major producing areas of the state. The analyses of these data indicate that two isotopes of radium ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) are the ultimate source of the radiation. The radium contained in these co-produced brines is low and so the radiation hazard posed by the brines is also low. Existing regulations dictate the manner in which these salt-enriched brines may be disposed of and proper implementation of the rules will also protect the environment from the brine radiation hazard. Geostatistical analyses of the brine components suggest relationships between the concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra, between the Cl concentration and {sup 226}Ra content, and relationships exist between total dissolved solids, BaSO{sub 4} saturation and concentration of the Cl ion. Principal component analysis points to geological controls on brine chemistry, but the nature of the geologic controls could not be determined. The NORM-enriched barite (BaSO{sub 4}) scales are significantly more radioactive than the brines. Leaching studies suggest that the barite scales, which were thought to be nearly insoluble in the natural environment, can be acted on by soil microorganisms and the enclosed radium can become bioavailable. This result suggests that the landspreading means of scale disposal

  18. Heat gradient induced migration of brine inclusions in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model for the brine migration in rock salt around an infinite line heat source is set up. The temperature field around the time dependent heat source is calculated by use of Green functions. Numerical solutions are obtained by the computer PSAMA and results are compared with hand calculations for certain simple cases. By general considerations of the migration field approximate values of the brine inflow, which are independent of the source shape, is obtained and these results are used to estimate the agreement with the experimental results from Project Salt Vault. (author)

  19. Assessing Radium Activity in Shale Gas Produced Brine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, W.; Hayes, K. F.; Ellis, B. R.

    2015-12-01

    The high volumes and salinity associated with shale gas produced water can make finding suitable storage or disposal options a challenge, especially when deep well brine disposal or recycling for additional well completions is not an option. In such cases, recovery of commodity salts from the high total dissolved solids (TDS) of the brine wastewater may be desirable, yet the elevated concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides such as Ra-226 and Ra-228 in produced waters (sometimes substantially greater than the EPA limit of 5 pCi/L) may concentrate during these steps and limit salt recovery options. Therefore, assessing the potential presence of these Ra radionuclides in produced water from shale gas reservoir properties is desirable. In this study, we seek to link U and Th content within a given shale reservoir to the expected Ra content of produced brine by accounting for secular equilibrium within the rock and subsequent release to Ra to native brines. Produced brine from a series of Antrim shale wells and flowback from a single Utica-Collingwood shale well in Michigan were sampled and analyzed via ICP-MS to measure Ra content. Gamma spectroscopy was used to verify the robustness of this new Ra analytical method. Ra concentrations were observed to be up to an order of magnitude higher in the Antrim flowback water samples compared to those collected from the Utica-Collingwood well. The higher Ra content in Antrim produced brines correlates well with higher U content in the Antrim (19 ppm) relative to the Utica-Collingwood (3.5 ppm). We also observed an increase in Ra activity with increasing TDS in the Antrim samples. This Ra-TDS relationship demonstrates the influence of competing divalent cations in controlling Ra mobility in these clay-rich reservoirs. In addition, we will present a survey of geochemical data from other shale gas plays in the U.S. correlating shale U, Th content with produced brine Ra content. A goal of this study is to develop a

  20. Pressure-induced brine migration into an open borehole in a salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides some solutions to models that predict the brine accumulation in an open borehole. In this model, brine flow rates are controlled by pressure differences between the salt and the borehole

  1. Review of information on the radiation chemistry of materials around waste canisters in salt and assessment of the need for additional experimental information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenks, G.H.; Baes, C.F. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    The brines, vapors, and salts precipitated from the brines will be exposed to gamma rays and to elevated temperatures in the regions close to a waste package in the salt. Accordingly, they will be subject to changes in composition brought about by reactions induced by the radiations and heat. This report reviews the status of information on the radiation chemistry of brines, gases, and solids which might be present around a waste package in salt and to assess the need for additional laboratory investigations on the radiation chemistry of these materials. The basic aspects of the radiation chemistry of water and aqueous solutions, including concentrated salt solutions, were reviewed briefly and found to be substantially unchanged from those presented in Jenks's 1972 review of radiolysis and hydrolysis in salt-mine brines. Some additional information pertaining to the radiolytic yields and reactions in brine solutions has become available since the previous review, and this information will be useful in the eventual, complete elucidation of the radiation chemistry of the salt-mine brines. 53 references.

  2. Liquid-like layers on ice in the environment: bridging the quasi-liquid and brine layer paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Kuo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Liquid-like layers on ice significantly influence atmospheric chemistry in polar regions. In the absence of impurities a nanoscale region of surface disorder known as the "quasi-liquid layer" (QLL may exist below the bulk melting point (down to ~−30 °C. Surface and bulk impurities are known to modulate the QLL thickness. In aqueous systems containing ionic solutes, a liquid brine layer (BL may form upon freezing due to the exclusion of impurities from the ice crystal lattice coupled with freezing point depression in the concentrated surface layer. Brine layers are conceptually distinct from the QLL, which can exist in the absence of impurities.

    We have developed a unified model for liquid-like layers in environmental ice systems that is valid over a wide range of temperatures and solute concentrations, spanning the QLL and BL regimes. The model consists of two coupled modules describing the thickness of the BL and the QLL. The BL module is derived from fundamental equlibrium thermodynamics, whereas the QLL formulation is derived semi-empirically based on statistical mechanical principles and previously published QLL thickness data. The resulting unified model has been tested against experimental data from literature and applied to several environmentally important systems, such as HCl(g-ice, HNO3(g-ice, and frozen sea ice. This model can be used to improve the representation of air-ice chemical interactions in polar atmospheric chemistry models.

  3. Guidelines for using HEC polymers for increasing viscosity of solids-free completion and workover brines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuerman, R.F.

    1983-02-01

    Solids-free brines are used increasingly in well completion and workover operations. One technique to minimize downhole losses of expensive, high-density brine is to spot a pill of thickened brine across the thief zone. Hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) is the polymer used most frequently for this purpose. This report discusses the properties of HEC-thickened brines and presents guidelines for their use for completion and workover fluid-loss control.

  4. Guidelines for using HEC polymers for viscosifying solids free completion and workover brines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuerman, R.F.

    1982-01-01

    Solids free brines are increasingly used in well completion and workover operations. One technique to minimize downhole losses of expensive, high density brine is to spot a pill of viscosified brine across the thief zone. Hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) is the polymer most frequently used for this purpose. This report discusses the properties of HEC thickened brines and presents guidelines for their use for completion and workover fluid loss control. 2 refs.

  5. The Effect of adjusting PH on Stretchability and Meltability to White Brined Nabulsi Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman S. Mazahreh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Boiled white brined (Nabulsi cheese is the mostly consumed in Jordan; this cheese should show meltability and high stretchability in order to fit in the production of high quality Kunafa and other popular local sweets and pastries.The most outstanding characteristic of Nabulsi cheese is the long keeping ability (more than one year without cooling, since it is preserved in concentrated brine (up to 25%. Approach: This work was based on the hypothesis that it would be possible to imply meltability and stretchability to the cheese by adjusting pH to the original brine that may specifically act on cross linking bonds of casein. A new apparatus for measuring the actual stretchability was designed and constructed; measurements on different cheeses proved its validity and reliability to measurement stretchability up to 80cm. Detailed treatments revealed the success of the proposed assumption in inducing meltability and stretchability to cheese processed and preserved according to the traditional methods. Results: The following results were obtained: It is possible to imply a low but acceptable level of stretchability and meltability through adjustment of the pH in the range of 5.4-5.8 by adding calculated amount of citric acid considering the buffering capacity of the cheese and storing it for few weeks to reach equilibrium. Conclusion: Conformational experiments proved the applicability of the new method on commercial Nabulsi cheese samples. Sensory evaluation revealed the superiority of pH adjusting treatment specifically at pH 5.4 and 5.8 as well as commercial Mashmouleh cheese that has high meltability and stretchability when used in Kunafa making.

  6. First results of an integrated monitoring concept to detect brine migration processes in freshwater aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, M.; Schmidt-Hattenberger, C.; Wagner, F.; Schröder, S.

    2012-04-01

    The reduction of new carbon dioxide emissions is an important contribution to realise climate change mitigation solutions. One possibility consists in the long-term storage of industrial produced greenhouse gas in deep saline aquifers. The most important research focus of the multidisciplinary integrated project BRINE is to ensure the safe storage operation. This research work refers to an area in eastern Brandenburg (Germany). However, the analysis can be applied to regions with comparable geological characteristics. The relevant reservoir horizon is located within a classic anticlinal structure, generated by salt tectonic processes. Due to the local geological site specifics, the CO2 injection could cause a pressure build-up and thus a brine migration in the reservoir layer. For this reason, an adequate monitoring system for the observation of possible brine displacement into upper freshwater aquifers is essential. For both the qualitatively and quantitatively investigation a combination of several geophysical methods is needed. The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a measurement method with a comparatively high spatial resolution on small scales. Therefore it will be generally used for borehole and near subsurface investigations. The presented monitoring concept focusses on three potential pathways. Beside regional fault-zones, also formation defects in the upper aquitards and leakages around the wellbore could promote a saltwater migration. The main objective is to find an optimal combination of several electrode arrays like surface, surface-downhole and cross-borehole configurations to detect time-lapse effects of the resistivity distribution in the subsurface. By means of numerical modelling studies of different salinisation scenarios, we have tested several standard and several adapted electrode arrays. In order to further improve the results, an inversion code based on the measured resistance ratios is used. Parallel to the large-scale modelling

  7. UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING RISKS POSED BY BRINES CONTAINING DISSOLVED CARBON DIOXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geologic disposal of supercritical carbon dioxide in saline aquifers and depleted oil and gas fields will cause large volumes of brine to become saturated with dissolved CO2 at concentrations of 50 g/l or more.  As CO2 dissolves in brine, the brine de...

  8. Microbial changes and growth of Listeria monocytogenes during chilled storage of brined shrimp ( Pandalus borealis )

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlholm, Ole; Kjeldgaard, J.; Modberg, A.;

    2008-01-01

    Thirteen storage trials and ten challenge tests were carried out to examine microbial changes, spoilage and the potential growth of Listeria monocytogenes in brined shrimp (Pandalus borealis). Shrimp in brine as well as brined and drained shrimp in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) were produce...

  9. Isolation and characterization of a heavy metal-resistant, thermophilic esterase from a Red Sea Brine Pool

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Yasmine M.

    2013-11-28

    The Red Sea Atlantis II brine pool is an extreme environment that displays multiple harsh conditions such as high temperature, high salinity and high concentrations of multiple, toxic heavy metals. The survival of microbes in such an environment by utilizing resistant enzymes makes them an excellent source of extremophilic enzymes. We constructed a fosmid metagenomic library using DNA isolated from the deepest and most secluded layer of this pool. We report the isolation and biochemical characterization of an unusual esterase: EstATII. EstATII is thermophilic (optimum temperature, 65 C), halotolerant (maintains its activity in up to 4.5â€...M NaCl) and maintains at least 60% of its activity in the presence of a wide spectrum of heavy metals. The combination of biochemical characteristics of the Red Sea Atlantis II brine pool esterase, i.e., halotolerance, thermophilicity and resistance to heavy metals, makes it a potentially useful biocatalyst.

  10. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    1993-01-01

    Praised for its appealing writing style and clear pedagogy, Lowe's Quantum Chemistry is now available in its Second Edition as a text for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level chemistry students. The book assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry, thus enabling students to comprehend much of the current chemical literature in which quantum chemical methods or concepts are used as tools. The book begins with a six-chapter introduction of standard one-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom,

  11. Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The year 2009 celebrates 10 years of safe operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the only nuclear waste repository designated to dispose defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste in the United States. Many elements contributed to the success of this one-of-the-kind facility. One of the most important of these is the chemistry of the actinides under WIPP repository conditions. A reliable understanding of the potential release of actinides from the site to the accessible environment is important to the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The environmental chemistry of the major actinides disposed at the WIPP continues to be investigated as part of the ongoing recertification efforts of the WIPP project. This presentation provides an overview of the actinide chemistry for the WIPP repository conditions. The WIPP is a salt-based repository; therefore, the inflow of brine into the repository is minimized, due to the natural tendency of excavated salt to re-seal. Reducing anoxic conditions are expected in WIPP because of microbial activity and metal corrosion processes that consume the oxygen initially present. Should brine be introduced through an intrusion scenario, these same processes will re-establish reducing conditions. In the case of an intrusion scenario involving brine, the solubilization of actinides in brine is considered as a potential source of release to the accessible environment. The following key factors establish the concentrations of dissolved actinides under subsurface conditions: (1) Redox chemistry - The solubility of reduced actinides (III and IV oxidation states) is known to be significantly lower than the oxidized forms (V and/or VI oxidation states). In this context, the reducing conditions in the WIPP and the strong coupling of the chemistry for reduced metals and microbiological processes with actinides are important. (2) Complexation - For the anoxic, reducing and mildly basic brine systems in the WIPP, the most important

  12. Selective oxidation of bromide in wastewater brines from hydraulic fracturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mei; Lowry, Gregory V; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2013-07-01

    Brines generated from oil and natural gas production, including flowback water and produced water from hydraulic fracturing of shale gas, may contain elevated concentrations of bromide (~1 g/L). Bromide is a broad concern due to the potential for forming brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment. Conventional treatment processes for bromide removal is costly and not specific. Selective bromide removal is technically challenging due to the presence of other ions in the brine, especially chloride as high as 30-200 g/L. This study evaluates the ability of solid graphite electrodes to selectively oxidize bromide to bromine in flowback water and produced water from a shale gas operation in Southwestern PA. The bromine can then be outgassed from the solution and recovered, as a process well understood in the bromine industry. This study revealed that bromide may be selectively and rapidly removed from oil and gas brines (~10 h(-1) m(-2) for produced water and ~60 h(-1) m(-2) for flowback water). The electrolysis occurs with a current efficiency between 60 and 90%, and the estimated energy cost is ~6 kJ/g Br. These data are similar to those for the chlor-alkali process that is commonly used for chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide production. The results demonstrate that bromide may be selectively removed from oil and gas brines to create an opportunity for environmental protection and resource recovery. PMID:23726709

  13. Solar desalination, brine and fine chemicals - a preliminary report

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Nagarajan, R.

    Solar stills put into operation by taking known quantities of sea water of different salinities varying from 27. 75 - 36.27 x 103 during April-May 1990, indicated fresh water yield of 55-68% (av. 64) The volumes of brine as well as those of bitterns...

  14. Solar desalination, brine and fine chemicals - a preliminary report

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Nagarajan, R.

    Solar stills put into operation by taking known quantities of sea water of different salinities varying from 27.75-36.27 x 10 super(3) during April-May 1990, indicated fresh water yield of 55-68% (av. 64). The volumes of brine as well as those...

  15. THE BRINE SHRIMP (ARTMA SALINA) LETHALITY OF SOME FERULAGO SPECIES

    OpenAIRE

    F. HIRLAK, S. DOĞANCA, E. GÜRKAN, O.T. TÜZÜN,

    2015-01-01

    In this work the bio-activities of the extracts obtained from F. asparagifoliaBoiss., F. humilis Boiss., F. aucheri Boiss. (Umbelliferae) are investigatedusing the Brine shrimp method.Key words: Ferulago aucheri, F. humilis, F. asparagifolia, Brineshrimp (Artemia salina).

  16. Treatment of RO brine-towards sustainable water reclamation practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, H Y; Lee, L Y; Ong, S L; Tao, G; Viawanath, B; Kekre, K; Lay, W; Seah, H

    2008-01-01

    Treatment and disposal of RO brine is an important part in sustaining the water reclamation practice. RO brine generated from water reclamation contains high concentration of organic and inorganic compounds. Cost-effective technologies for treatment of RO brine are still relatively unexplored. Thus, this study aim to determine a feasible treatment process for removal of both organic and inorganic compounds in RO brine generated from NEWater production. The proposed treatment consists of biological activated carbon (BAC) column followed by capacitive deionization (CDI) process for organic and inorganic removals, respectively. Preliminary bench-scale study demonstrated about 20% TOC removal efficiency was achieved using BAC at 40 mins empty bed contact time (EBCT) while the CDI process was able to remove more than 90% conductivity reducing it from 2.19 mS/cm to only about 164 microS/cm. More than 90% cations and anions in the BAC effluent were removed using CDI process. In addition, TOC and TN removals of 78% and 91%, respectively were also attained through this process. About 90% water recovery was achieved. This process shows the potential of increased water recovery in the reclamation process while volume for disposal can be further minimized. Further studies on the sustainable operation and process optimization are ongoing. PMID:18776632

  17. Durability of concrete materials in high-magnesium brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cement pastes and mortars representing 11 combinations of candidate concrete materials were cast in the laboratory and monitored for susceptibility to chemical deterioration in high-magnesium brine. Mixtures were selected to include materials included in the current leading candidate concrete for seals at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Some materials were included in the experimental matrix to answer questions that had arisen during study of the concrete used for construction of the liner of the WIPP waste-handling shaft. Mixture combinations compared Class C and Class F fly ashes, presence or absence of an expansive component, and presence or absence of salt as a mixture component. Experimental conditions exposed the pastes and mortars to extreme conditions, those being very high levels of Mg ion and an effectively unlimited supply of brine. All pastes and mortars showed deterioration with brine exposure. In general, mortars deteriorated more extensively than the corresponding pastes. Two-inch cube specimens of mortar were not uniformly deteriorated, but showed obvious zoning even after a year in the brine, with a relatively unreacted zone remaining at the center of each cube. Loss of calcium from the calcium hydroxide of paste/aggregate interfaces caused measurable strength loss in the reacted zone comprising the outer portion of every mortar specimen. The current candidate mass concrete for WIPP seals includes salt as an initial component, and has a relatively closed initial microstructure. Both of these features contribute to its suitability for use in large placements within the Salado Formation

  18. Talking about Brine Shrimps: Three Ways of Analysing Pupil Conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale; Reiss, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Applies three distinct analyses to recorded and transcribed student conversations (n=240) about brine shrimps. The complementary analytic methods provide information on the content of pupils' conversations in terms of the observations made, the ways in which pupils make sense of their observations, and the ways in which students use conversation…

  19. Brine Shrimp and Their Habitat, An Environmental Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This environmental unit is one of a series designed for integration within the existing curriculum. The unit is self-contained and students are encouraged to work at their own speed. The philosophy of the unit is based on an experience-oriented process that encourages independent student work. This unit explores the life cycle of brine shrimp and…

  20. Durability of concrete materials in high-magnesium brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakeley, L.D.; Poole, T.S.; Burkes, J.P. [Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Structures Lab.

    1994-03-01

    Cement pastes and mortars representing 11 combinations of candidate concrete materials were cast in the laboratory and monitored for susceptibility to chemical deterioration in high-magnesium brine. Mixtures were selected to include materials included in the current leading candidate concrete for seals at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Some materials were included in the experimental matrix to answer questions that had arisen during study of the concrete used for construction of the liner of the WIPP waste-handling shaft. Mixture combinations compared Class C and Class F fly ashes, presence or absence of an expansive component, and presence or absence of salt as a mixture component. Experimental conditions exposed the pastes and mortars to extreme conditions, those being very high levels of Mg ion and an effectively unlimited supply of brine. All pastes and mortars showed deterioration with brine exposure. In general, mortars deteriorated more extensively than the corresponding pastes. Two-inch cube specimens of mortar were not uniformly deteriorated, but showed obvious zoning even after a year in the brine, with a relatively unreacted zone remaining at the center of each cube. Loss of calcium from the calcium hydroxide of paste/aggregate interfaces caused measurable strength loss in the reacted zone comprising the outer portion of every mortar specimen. The current candidate mass concrete for WIPP seals includes salt as an initial component, and has a relatively closed initial microstructure. Both of these features contribute to its suitability for use in large placements within the Salado Formation.

  1. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  2. Introductory Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Mark; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Jose; Stevens, Gary; Gray, Nathan; Atherton, Thomas; Winn, Joss

    2010-01-01

    Teaching and Learning resources for the 1st Year Introductory Chemistry course (Forensic Science). 30 credits. These are Open Educational Resources (OER), made available for re-use under a Creative Commons license.

  3. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is comprised of nineteen chapters, which describes introduction of analytical chemistry, experimental error and statistics, chemistry equilibrium and solubility, gravimetric analysis with mechanism of precipitation, range and calculation of the result, volume analysis on general principle, sedimentation method on types and titration curve, acid base balance, acid base titration curve, complex and firing reaction, introduction of chemical electro analysis, acid-base titration curve, electrode and potentiometry, electrolysis and conductometry, voltammetry and polarographic spectrophotometry, atomic spectrometry, solvent extraction, chromatograph and experiments.

  4. Cluster Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cansisting of eight scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Xiamen University, this creative research group is devoted to the research of cluster chemistry and creation of nanomaterials.After three-year hard work, the group scored a series of encouraging progresses in synthesis of clusters with special structures, including novel fullerenes, fullerene-like metal cluster compounds as well as other related nanomaterials, and their properties study.

  5. Green Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collison, Melanie

    2011-05-15

    Green chemistry is the science of chemistry used in a way that will not use or create hazardous substances. Dr. Rui Resendes is working in this field at GreenCentre Canada, an offshoot of PARTEQ Innovations in Kingston, Ontario. GreenCentre's preliminary findings suggest their licensed product {sup S}witchable Solutions{sup ,} featuring 3 classes of solvents and a surfactant, may be useful in bitumen oil sands extraction.

  6. Characterization of dissolved organic material in the interstitial brine of Lake Vida, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, Kaelin M.; Murray, Alison E.; Doran, Peter T.; Kenig, Fabien; Stubbins, Aron; Chen, Hongmei; Hatcher, Patrick G.; McKnight, Diane M.

    2016-06-01

    of LVBr DOM by abiotic oxidants including perchlorate and chlorate may explain the low portion in the XAD8 fraction and the lack of aromatic carbon, as measured by 13C NMR spectroscopy, found for all but the most hydrophobic fraction, LV-XAD8. Overall, the chemical characteristics of Lake Vida brine DOM suggest that legacy DOM sealed and concentrated within the brine has been altered due to a combination of both biological and abiotic chemical reactions.

  7. Investigation of Controlling Factors Impacting Water Quality in Shale Gas Produced Brine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, W.; Hayes, K. F.; Ellis, B. R.

    2014-12-01

    The recent boom in production of natural gas from unconventional reservoirs has generated a substantial increase in the volume of produced brine that must be properly managed to prevent contamination of fresh water resources. Produced brine, which includes both flowback and formation water, is often highly saline and may contain elevated concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive material and other toxic elements. These characteristics present many challenges with regard to designing effective treatment and disposal strategies for shale gas produced brine. We will present results from a series of batch experiments where crushed samples from two shale formations in the Michigan Basin, the Antrim and Utica-Collingwood shales, were brought into contact with synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluids under in situ temperature and pressure conditions. The Antrim has been an active shale gas play for over three decades, while the Utica-Collingwood formation (a grouped reservoir consisting of the Utica shale and Collingwood limestone) is an emerging shale gas play. The goal of this study is to investigate the influence of water-rock interactions in controlling produced water quality. We evaluate toxic element leaching from shale samples in contact with model hydraulic fracturing fluids under system conditions corresponding to reservoir depths up to 1.5 km. Experimental results have begun to elucidate the relative importance of shale mineralogy, system conditions, and chemical additives in driving changes in produced water quality. Initial results indicate that hydraulic fracturing chemical additives have a strong influence on the extent of leaching of toxic elements from the shale. In particular, pH was a key factor in the release of uranium (U) and divalent metals, highlighting the importance of the mineral buffering capacity of the shale. Low pH values persisted in the Antrim and Utica shale experiments and resulted in higher U extraction efficiencies than that

  8. Characteristics and use of grey literature in scientific journals articles of Algerian researchers: Case study of University of Science and Technology Houari Boumediene (Physics, Chemistry and computer sciences)

    OpenAIRE

    Chalabi, Lydia (CERIST); GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines grey literature in research articles of Algerian teachers-researchers across the STM(Physics, Chemistry & Computer science) sciences at Algerian University of Science and Technology "USTHB". Each of these disciplines is respectively high ranked according to the report of Algerian general directorate of scientific research and technological development about Top emerged disciplines in Algeria. The purpose of the study is to reports the important and use of electronic resour...

  9. Progress on radiometric dating of Wolfcamp brines using 4He and 40Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground water samples (brines) from deep wells in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas are being analyzed for noble gases in an attempt to obtain radiometric ages for these brines. The brines contain radiogenic 4He and 40Ar produced from the radioactive decay of U, Th, and K. Consideration of hydrochemical data for the brines, various isotopic, chemical, and mineralogical data for the aquifer rocks and noble gas production rates allow estimating the age of the brines to be about 130 million years at two wells. At a third well interaquifer mixing has occurred and the age is presently indeterminate. 9 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  10. [Determination of Iodine and Iodate in Brine and Seafood Simultaneously by Ultraviolet Absorption Spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jun; Zhu, Xia-ping; Liu, Miao-miao; Wei, Zhi-cheng; Sang, Shi-hua

    2015-06-01

    The iodide in samples was oxidized to iodate by bromine water, which could be removed by formic acid, and iodate could be transformed to I3- with excess of I- in phosphoric acid, the iodate in samples could be transformed directly to I3- with excess of I- in phosphoric acid. The I3- solution had strong absorption at 350 and 288 nm, and the absorbance had a linear relationship to the concentration of I3- in a certain range. Total content of iodide and iodate had been detected after samples were oxidized by bromine water and the content of iodate had been detected directly, and the content of iodide was obtained by difference of the two results. Based on this, the method had been established to detect iodide and iodate in brine and seafood simultaneously by ultraviolet absorption spectrometry. The volumes of bromine water, formic acid, phosphoric acid and potassium iodide had been optimized. The effect of illumination, temperature and time also had been discussed. The optional reagents condition for iodide was: 2 drops of 3% bromine water, 0.5 mL of 10% formic acid, 4 mL of 20% phosphoric acid and 1 mL of 100 g x L(-1 KI. The optional reagents condition for iodate was: 0. 2 mL of 20% phosphoric acid and 1 mL of 100 g x L(-1) KI. The absorbance were determined after reacting for 30 min at room temperature and natural light conditions. Under the optimized conditions, the concentration of iodide and iodate in the range of 0 - 1.2 and 0 -1.5 mg x L(-1) were well agreed with Lambert Beer law. The sample blank was detected for twelve times and the detection limit of iodide and iodate were 1.54 and 14.8 μg x L(-1) respectively. The RSD of twelve times determination of 0.8 mg x L(-1) of iodide and iodate were 0.097% and 0.067%, respectively. The iodide and iodate in Zhabuye brine, Hong Feng underground brine, kelp, seaweed and sea cabbage had been detected, the recovery experiments also had been conducted at the same time, the recovery of iodide and iodate were between 80

  11. Radiation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  12. Unique prokaryotic consortia in geochemically distinct sediments from Red Sea Atlantis II and discovery deep brine pools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Siam

    Full Text Available The seafloor is a unique environment, which allows insights into how geochemical processes affect the diversity of biological life. Among its diverse ecosystems are deep-sea brine pools - water bodies characterized by a unique combination of extreme conditions. The 'polyextremophiles' that constitute the microbial assemblage of these deep hot brines have not been comprehensively studied. We report a comparative taxonomic analysis of the prokaryotic communities of the sediments directly below the Red Sea brine pools, namely, Atlantis II, Discovery, Chain Deep, and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Analyses of sediment samples and high-throughput pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified environmental 16S ribosomal RNA genes (16S rDNA revealed that one sulfur (S-rich Atlantis II and one nitrogen (N-rich Discovery Deep section contained distinct microbial populations that differed from those found in the other sediment samples examined. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Deferribacteres, and Euryarchaeota were the most abundant bacterial and archaeal phyla in both the S- and N-rich sections. Relative abundance-based hierarchical clustering of the 16S rDNA pyrotags assigned to major taxonomic groups allowed us to categorize the archaeal and bacterial communities into three major and distinct groups; group I was unique to the S-rich Atlantis II section (ATII-1, group II was characteristic for the N-rich Discovery sample (DD-1, and group III reflected the composition of the remaining sediments. Many of the groups detected in the S-rich Atlantis II section are likely to play a dominant role in the cycling of methane and sulfur due to their phylogenetic affiliations with bacteria and archaea involved in anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction.

  13. Unique prokaryotic consortia in geochemically distinct sediments from Red Sea Atlantis II and discovery deep brine pools.

    KAUST Repository

    Siam, Rania

    2012-08-20

    The seafloor is a unique environment, which allows insights into how geochemical processes affect the diversity of biological life. Among its diverse ecosystems are deep-sea brine pools - water bodies characterized by a unique combination of extreme conditions. The \\'polyextremophiles\\' that constitute the microbial assemblage of these deep hot brines have not been comprehensively studied. We report a comparative taxonomic analysis of the prokaryotic communities of the sediments directly below the Red Sea brine pools, namely, Atlantis II, Discovery, Chain Deep, and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Analyses of sediment samples and high-throughput pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified environmental 16S ribosomal RNA genes (16S rDNA) revealed that one sulfur (S)-rich Atlantis II and one nitrogen (N)-rich Discovery Deep section contained distinct microbial populations that differed from those found in the other sediment samples examined. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Deferribacteres, and Euryarchaeota were the most abundant bacterial and archaeal phyla in both the S- and N-rich sections. Relative abundance-based hierarchical clustering of the 16S rDNA pyrotags assigned to major taxonomic groups allowed us to categorize the archaeal and bacterial communities into three major and distinct groups; group I was unique to the S-rich Atlantis II section (ATII-1), group II was characteristic for the N-rich Discovery sample (DD-1), and group III reflected the composition of the remaining sediments. Many of the groups detected in the S-rich Atlantis II section are likely to play a dominant role in the cycling of methane and sulfur due to their phylogenetic affiliations with bacteria and archaea involved in anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction.

  14. Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

    1984-09-01

    The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

  15. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    2006-01-01

    Lowe's new edition assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry. It can serve as a primary text in quantum chemistry courses, and enables students and researchers to comprehend the current literature. This third edition has been thoroughly updated and includes numerous new exercises to facilitate self-study and solutions to selected exercises.* Assumes little initial mathematical or physical sophistication, developing insights and abilities in the context of actual problems* Provides thorough treatment

  16. Polymer Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  17. Changes in optical properties, chemistry, and micropore and mesopore characteristics of bituminous coal at the contact with dikes in the Illinois Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalerz, Maria; Drobniak, A.; Schimmelmann, A.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in high-volatile bituminous coal (Pennsylvanian) near contacts with two volcanic intrusions in Illinois were investigated with respect to optical properties, coal chemistry, and coal pore structure. Vitrinite reflectance (Ro) increases from 0.62% to 5.03% within a distance of 5.5??m from the larger dike, and from 0.63% to 3.71% within 3.3??m from the small dike. Elemental chemistry of the coal shows distinct reductions in hydrogen and nitrogen content close to the intrusions. No trend was observed for total sulfur content, but decreases in sulfate content towards the dikes indicate thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR). Contact-metamorphism has a dramatic effect on coal porosity, and microporosity in particular. Around the large dike, the micropore volume, after a slight initial increase, progressively decreases from 0.0417??cm3/g in coal situated 4.7??m from the intrusive contact to 0.0126??cm3/g at the contact. Strongly decreasing mesopore and micropore volumes in the altered zone, together with frequent cleat and fracture filling by calcite, indicate deteriorating conditions for both coalbed gas sorption and gas transmissibility. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Brine crude oil interactions at the oil-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    mechanisms. The ion specific interaction between fines and polar fractions of crude oil at the oil-water interface has been less explored. In this study the relative affinity between different ions and the oil surface was determined. The experiments prove the importance of Ca2+, SO42-, and HPO42- ions......-, HPO42-, and HCO3- (anions), were studied through gas chromatographic analysis. Crude oil from the North Sea was doped with various fractions of organic acids to mimic different polar behavior. Increased brine concentration showed up to 15% upsurge of polar fractions on the oil-water emulsion formation......The impact of brine salinity and its ionic composition on oil displacement efficiency has been investigated extensively in recent years due to the potential of enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Wettability alterations through relative interactions at the mineral surface have been the basis of proposed...

  19. Linear polarization measurements at high temperatures in hypersaline geothermal brines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, S.D.; Needham, P.B. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines conducted a series of in situ linear polarization measurements in high-temperature, high-pressure hypersaline geothermal brines at the Bureau of Mines Geothermal Test Facility in the Imperial Valley of California. The measurements represented an evaluation of the linear polarization technique for obtaining instantaneous corrosion rates of materials of construction in flowing hypersaline hydrothermal fluids that rapidly form scales on exposed surfaces. A special method was devised for use with the linear polarization technique that resulted in obtaining corrosion rates for 1020 carbon steel, 316 and 430 stainless steel, titanium, various nickel-based alloys, and aluminum 6061 under strong scale-forming conditions. The measurements also provided information on scale-deposition rates in various geothermal environments. Exploratory in situ potentiostatic polarization measurements were made in the flowing brines to qualitatively determine scale-deposition effects on the electrochemical measurements.

  20. Ice Control with Brine Spread with Nozzles on Highways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolet, Lars; Fonnesbech, Jens Kristian

    2010-01-01

    During the years 1996-2006, the former county of Funen, Denmark, gradually replaced pre-wetted salt with brine spread with nozzles as anti-icing agent in all her ice control activities. The replacement related to 1000 kilometres of highways. Jeopardizing neither road safety nor traffic flow...... the spread rate of pure sodium chloride (and thus the environmental impact) compared to neighbouring counties was less than fifty percent per square meter. Successful pre-salting is, of course, dependent on reliable weather forecasts and on staff well trained in the art of interpreting this information....... The improvements gained by the county of Funen were mainly due to the use of technologies (brine spreading with nozzles) giving a more precise spread pattern than the traditional gritting of pre-wetted salt. The spread pattern for every spreader, tested in The County of Funen, has been meassured 3 hours after...

  1. Dispersion of brine discharge from seawater reverse osmosis desalination plants

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Torquemada, Yolanda; González-Correa, José Miguel; Loya-Fernández, Angel; Ferrero-Vicente, Luis Miguel; Díaz Valdés, Marta; Sánchez-Lizaso, José Luis

    2008-01-01

    Desalination of seawater has been considered as a potential solution for the water shortage problem in coastal areas and the number of projected and constructed desalination plants has significantly increased in recent years. The challenge of the desalination industry is to produce new water resources without increasing the pressure on the marine environment. Environmental impact of SWRO desalination plants is mainly associated with the discharge into the sea of the brine produced. To estimat...

  2. Modelling of lactic fermentation of carrot slices in salted brines

    OpenAIRE

    Nabais, R.M.; Malcata, F. X.

    1997-01-01

    Increases in suspended biomass and variation in the concentrations of reducing sugars, salt, and lactic acid in brine containing sliced carrots were followed for a period of several days. A tentative unstructured, unsegregated model for the metabolism of suspended Lactobacillus plan tarum coupled with Fick's second law of diffusion for the transport of solutes within the carrot material was postulated. This general model was fitted by non-linear multiresponse regression analysis to an extensi...

  3. Brine shrimp lethality bioassay of selected Centaurea L. species (Asteraceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Janaćković P.; Tešević V.; Marin P.D.; Milosavljević S.; Duletić-Laušević Sonja; Janaćković Slavica; Veljić M.

    2008-01-01

    Ether extracts of 15 Centaurea L. species (Asteraceae) methanol extracts of 12species, and cnicin isolated from C. derventana were tested for general bioactivity using the brine shrimp lethality test. Cnicin showed the most potent activity with LC50 0.2. Also, ether extract of C. splendens showed significant activity with LC50 7.3, as did methanol extract of C. arenaria with LC50 12.4.

  4. Cyanobacterial cytotoxicity versus toxicity to brine shrimp Artemia salina

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hisem, D.; Hrouzek, Pavel; Tomek, P.; Tomšíčková, J.; Zapomělová, Eliška; Skácelová, K.; Lukešová, Alena; Kopecký, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2011), s. 76-83. ISSN 0041-0101 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/1501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z60170517; CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : Secondary metabolites * Brine shrimp bioassay * Health risk assessment Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.508, year: 2011

  5. Inhibition of Weld Corrosion in Flowing Brines Containing Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Alawadhi, Khaled

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of a typical oilfield corrosion inhibitor, which is considered to be a green inhibitor (non toxic to the environment) in controlling internal corrosion of welded X65 pipeline steel in brines saturated with carbon dioxide at one bar pressure, under dynamic flowing conditions, over a range of temperatures. Several experimental configurations were used ranging from a simple flat plate design to a novel rotating cylinder electrode, to all...

  6. Long term corrosion of glasses in salt brines

    OpenAIRE

    Roggendorf, Hans; Schmidt, Helmut K.

    1989-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses are supposed to be a suitable matrix for the fixation of calcined radioactive wastes. For the safety assessment of the disposal of these glasses in geological formations like carnallite or rock salt, their chemical durability in saturated salt brines has been investigated. Temperatures up to 200° C, pressures up to 130 bar, and corrosion times up to 5 years were applied. Special attention was given to the long term corrosion which is mainly characterized by the saturation...

  7. Reinventing Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Whitesides, George McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is in a period of change, from an era focused on molecules and reactions, to one in which manipulations of systems of molecules and reactions will be essential parts of controlling larger systems. This Essay traces paths from the past to possible futures.

  8. Chemistry Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  9. Photocatalytic reduction of nitrate using titanium dioxide for regeneration of ion exchange brine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Doudrick, Kyle; Westerhoff, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Nitrate is often removed from groundwater by ion exchange (IX) before its use as drinking water. Accumulation of nitrate in IX brine reduces the efficiency of IX regeneration and the useful life of the regeneration brine. For the first time, we present a strategy to photocatalytically reduce nitrate in IX brine, thereby extending the use of the brine. Titanium dioxide (Evonik P90), acting as photocatalyst, reduced nitrate effectively in both synthetic brines and sulfate-removed IX brine when formic acid (FA) was used as the hole scavenger (i.e., electron donor) and the initial FA to nitrate molar ratio (IFNR) was 5.6. Increasing the NaCl level in the synthetic brine slowed the nitrate reduction rate without affecting by-product selectivity of ammonium and gaseous N species (e.g., N(2), N(2)O). In a non-modified IX brine, nitrate removal was greatly inhibited owing to the presence of sulfate, which competed with nitrate for active surface sites on P90 and induced aggregation of P90 nanoparticles. After removing sulfate through barium sulfate precipitation, nitrate was effectively reduced; approximately 3.6 × 10(24) photons were required to reduce each mole of nitrate to 83% N Gases and 17% NH(4)(+). To make optimum use of FA and control the residual FA level in treated brine, the IFNR was varied. High IFNRs (e.g., 4, 5.6) were found to be more efficient for nitrate reduction but left higher residual FA in brine. IX column tests were performed to investigate the impact of residual FA for brine reuse. The residual FA in the brine did not significantly affect the nitrate removal capacity of IX resins, and formate contamination of treated water could be eliminated by rinsing with one bed volume of fresh brine. PMID:23276425

  10. Survival of foodborne pathogens in natural cracked olive brines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Eduardo; Romero-Gil, Verónica; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio; Arroyo-López, Francisco Noé

    2016-10-01

    This work reports the survival (challenge tests) of foodborne pathogen species (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica) in Aloreña de Málaga table olive brines. The inhibitions were fit using a log-linear model with tail implemented in GInaFIT excel software. The olive brine had a considerable inhibitory effect on the pathogens. The residual (final) populations (Fp) after 24 h was below detection limit (monocytogenes and S. enterica, respectively. Brine dilutions increased Fp and 4Dr, while decreased kmax. A cluster analysis showed that E. coli had an overall quite different behaviour being the most resistant species, but the others bacteria behaved similarly, especially S. aureus and S. enterica. Partial Least Squares regression showed that the most influential phenols on microbial survival were EDA (dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl elenolic acid), HyEDA (EDA linked to hydroxytyrosol), hydroxytyrosol 4-glucoside, tyrosol, and oleoside 11-methyl ester. Results confirm the adverse habitats of table olives for foodborne pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:27375250

  11. Brine migration test - Asse salt mine, Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the final report on the Cooperative German-American 'Brine Migration Tests' that were performed at the Asse Salt Mine in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), Columbus, Ohio, and the Institut fuer Tieflagerung (IfT), Braunschweig, of the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen (GSF). Final test and equipment design as well as manufacturing and installation was carried out by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. The tests were designed to simulate a nuclear waste repository to measure the effects of heat and gamma radiation on brine migration, salt decrepitation, disassociation of brine, and gases collected. The thermal mechanical behavior of salt, such as room closure, stresses and changes of the properties of salt are measured and compared with predicted behavior. The performance of an array of candidate waste package materials, test equipment and procedures under repository conditions will be evaluated with a view towards future in-depth testing of potential repository sites. (orig./RB)

  12. Brine shrimp cytotoxic activities of Hippophae rhamnoides Linn leaves extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JavidAli; BashirAhmad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate brine shrimp lethality assay of solvent extracts (aqueous, methanol, ethanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, chloroform and n-hexane) of Hippophae rhamnoides (H. rhamnoides) leaves. Methods: Brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay was used to assess the cytotoxic potential of H. rhamnoides leaves extracts. Three vials for concentration of each extract were made and 10 shrimps per vial (30 shrimps per dilution) were transferred to specific concentration of each extract. Results: The mortality of aqueous extract was 46.7%, methanol extract was 46.7%, ethanolic extract was 50.0%, ethyl acetate was 26.7%, acetone extract was 33.3%, chloroform extract was 40.0% and n-hexane extract was 33.3%. The lowest LD50 was found in methanol extracts (1199.97 µg/mL). Brine shrimp cytotoxicity of tested extracts of H. rhamnoides showed that mortality rate was concentration dependent. Conclusions: It is concluded that bioactive components are present in all leaves extracts of H. rhamnoides, which could be accounted for its pharmacological effects. Thus, the results support the uses of this plant species in traditional medicine.

  13. Large eddy simulation of spray and combustion characteristics with realistic chemistry and high-order numerical scheme under diesel engine-like conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • MUSCL differencing scheme in LES method is used to investigate liquid fuel spray and combustion process. • Using MUSCL can accurately capture the gas phase velocity distribution and liquid spray features. • Detailed chemistry mechanism with a parallel algorithm was used to calculate combustion process. • Increasing oxygen concentration can decrease ignition delay time and flame LOL. - Abstract: The accuracy of large eddy simulation (LES) for turbulent combustion depends on suitably implemented numerical schemes and chemical mechanisms. In the original KIVA3V code, finite difference schemes such as QSOU (Quasi-second-order upwind) and PDC (Partial Donor Cell Differencing) cannot achieve good results or even computational stability when using coarse grids due to large numerical diffusion. In this paper, the MUSCL (Monotone Upstream-centered Schemes for Conservation Laws) differencing scheme is implemented into KIVA3V-LES code to calculate the convective term. In the meantime, Lu’s n-heptane reduced 58-species mechanisms (Lu, 2011) is used to calculate chemistry with a parallel algorithm. Finally, improved models for spray injection are also employed. With these improvements, the KIVA3V-LES code is renamed as KIVALES-CP (Chemistry with Parallel algorithm) in this study. The resulting code was used to study the gas–liquid two phase jet and combustion under various diesel engine-like conditions in a constant volume vessel. The results show that using the MUSCL scheme can accurately capture the spray shape and fuel vapor penetration using even a coarse grid, in comparison with the Sandia experimental data. Similarly good results are obtained for three single-component fuels, i-Octane (C8H18), n-Dodecanese (C12H26), and n-Hexadecane (C16H34) with very different physical properties. Meanwhile the improved methodology is able to accurately predict ignition delay and flame lift-off length (LOL) under different oxygen concentrations from 10% to 21

  14. Larval brine shrimp (Nauplii): a potentially useful model to study cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargman, G J

    1976-01-01

    One of the most consistent characteristics of cystic fibrosis is the abnormal handling of electrolytes by exocrine glands. The present study has examined the possibility that diminished respiratory energy formation is a primary biochemical error responsible for this abnormality. Using oxygen consumption of intact larval brine shrimp, quantitative differences have been observed from reaction of mixed mouth saliva between CF heterozygotes and CF homozygotes. In addition, information demonstrating a correlation between a biochemical abnormality and disease severity was observed. The differences observed in inhibition by saliva from both CF homozygotes and obligate heterozygotes may occur as the result of 1) interference with electron transfer from organic fuel molecules to molecular oxygen or 2) interference with the mechanism responsible for generating the biochemical reducing power necessary for multiple biosynthetic reactions. PMID:996791

  15. Structural Characteristics and Reactivity Relationships of Nitroaromatic and Nitramine Explosives – A Review of Our Computational Chemistry and Spectroscopic Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Honea

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Although much has been discovered, discussed and written as to problems ofcontamination by various military unique compounds, particularly by the nitrogen basedenergetics (NOCs, remaining problems dictate further evaluation of actual and potentialrisk to the environment by these energetics and their derivatives and metabolites throughdetermination of their environmental impact—transport, fate and toxicity. This workcomprises an effort to understand structural relationships and degradation mechanisms ofcurrent and emerging explosives, including nitroaromatic; cyclic and cage cyclic nitramine;and a nitrocubane. This review of our computational chemistry and spectroscopic researchdescribes and compares competitive degradation mechanisms by free radical oxidative,reductive and alkali hydrolysis, relating them, when possible, to environmental risk.

  16. Ice Control with Brine Spread with Nozzles on Highways:Implementation of Brine Spreading Technologies in Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Bolet, Lars; Fonnesbech, Jens Kristian

    2010-01-01

    During the years 1996-2006, the former county of Funen, Denmark, gradually replaced pre-wetted salt with brine spread with nozzles as anti-icing agent in all her ice control activities. The replacement related to 1000 kilometres of highways. Jeopardizing neither road safety nor traffic flow the spread rate of pure sodium chloride (and thus the environmental impact) compared to neighbouring counties was less than fifty percent per square meter.Successful pre-salting is, of course, dependent on...

  17. The Effect Of Picking Period And Brining Applications On Fungicide Residue Levels In Brined Vine Leaves Production

    OpenAIRE

    CANGİ, Rüstem; YANAR, Yusuf; YAĞCI, Adem; TOPÇU, Neval; SUCU, Seda; DÜLGEROĞLU, Yağmur

    2014-01-01

    Especially at the time then the leaves are harvested contact and systemic fungicides are applied frequently to protect the grapevine agaist downy mildew and powdery mildew. Intensive pesticide use in vineyard resulted in residue problem on brined vine leaves that are used as food. This study was aimed at development of a proper chemical control program to reduce the pesticide residue problem on vine (Vitis vinifera) leaves in vineyards during the growing period. In this study two fungicides ...

  18. Parameterization of and Brine Storage in MOR Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, J.; Lowell, R. P.; Cummings, K. B.

    2009-12-01

    Single-pass parameterized models of high-temperature hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers use observational constraints such as vent temperature, heat output, vent field area, and the area of heat extraction from the sub-axial magma chamber to deduce fundamental hydrothermal parameters such as total mass flux Q, bulk permeability k, and the thickness of the conductive boundary layer at the base of the system, δ. Of the more than 300 known systems, constraining data are available for less than 10%. Here we use the single pass model to estimate Q, k, and δ for all the seafloor hydrothermal systems for which the constraining data are available. Mean values of Q, k, and δ are 170 kg/s, 5.0x10-13 m2, and 20 m, respectively; which is similar to results obtained from the generic model. There is no apparent correlation with spreading rate. Using observed vent field lifetimes, the rate of magma replenishment can also be calculated. Essentially all high-temperature hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers undergo phase separation, yielding a low chlorinity vapor and a high salinity brine. Some systems such as the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the 9°50’N sites on the East Pacific Rise vent low chlorinity vapor for many years, while the high density brine remains sequestered beneath the seafloor. In an attempt to further understand the brine storage at the EPR, we used the mass flux Q determined above, time series of vent salinity and temperature, and the depth of the magma chamber to determine the rate of brine production at depth. We found thicknesses ranging from 0.32 meters to ~57 meters over a 1 km2 area from 1994-2002. These calculations suggest that brine maybe being stored within the conductive boundary layer without a need for lateral transport or removal by other means. We plan to use the numerical code FISHES to further test this idea.

  19. The Impact of Fluid Properties and Flow Conditions on the Measurement of Relative Permeability and Residual CO2 Trapping Saturation for CO2-Brine Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, B.; Al-Menhali, A.; Krevor, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Successful industrial scale carbon dioxide injection into deep saline aquifers will be dependent on the ability to model the flow of the fluid and to quantify the impact of various trapping mechanisms. The effectiveness of the models is in turn dependent on high quality laboratory measurements of basic multiphase flow properties such as relative permeability and residual trapping at reservoir conditions. Compared with typical oil-brine systems, however, a unique defining characteristic of the CO2-brine system is its combination of high viscosity ratio and low density ratio. This combination of properties results in unique complications for experiments with CO2 and brine and unique flow conditions must be used to achieve the combined goals of observations across a large saturation range and the avoidance of the effects of heterogeneity as well as capillary forces and gravity segregation. We have simulated the corefloods experiments at various conditions and calculated with different interpretation techniques: Steady state method, JBN-type method and history matching. As one of the essential mechanisms for CO2 storage underground, residual trapping refers to the trapping of CO2 through capillary forces within the pore space of a permeable aquifer. There are few studies that have observed the trapping characteristics for CO2-brine systems in permeable rocks, including the impact of reservoir conditions, and this remains a major uncertainty for geologic CO2 storage. This work presents results from a core-flooding laboratory that has been recently developed at Imperial College dedicated to observations of CO2-brine systems. The apparatus includes high precision pumps, accurate temperature control and a rotating X-ray CT scanner that allows experiments to be performed in both vertical and horizontal directions. The proper approach to measuring relative permeability for CO2-brine system is proposed and demonstrated. The changes in residual trapping correlated to pressure

  20. Fine chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 progress report of the Fine Chemistry laboratory (Polytechnic School, France) is presented. The research programs are centered on the renewal of the organic chemistry most important reactions and on the invention of new, highly efficient and highly selective reactions, by applying low cost reagents and solvents. An important research domain concerns the study and fabrication of new catalysts. They are obtained by means of the reactive sputtering of the metals and metal oxydes thin films. The Monte Carlo simulations of the long-range electrostatic interaction in a clay and the obtention of acrylamides from anhydrous or acrylic ester are summarized. Moreover, the results obtained in the field of catalysis are also given. The published papers and the congress communications are included

  1. Organometallic chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bashkin, James K.; M.L.H. Green; Dr. M. L. H. Green

    1982-01-01

    Transition metal organometallic chemistry is a rapidly expanding field, which has an important relationship to industrial problems of petrochemical catalysis. This thesis describes studies of fundamental organometallic reaction processes, such as C-H and C-C bond formation and cleavage, and investigations of the structure and bonding of organometallic compounds. A number of techniques were used to pursue these studies, including synthesis, X-ray crystallography, and semi-em...

  2. Disk Chemistry*

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Wing-Fai

    2015-01-01

    The chemical species in protoplanetary disks react with each other. The chemical species control part of the thermal balance in those disks. How the chemistry proceeds in the varied conditions encountered in disks relies on detailed microscopic understanding of the reactions through experiments or theoretical studies. This chapter strives to summarize and explain in simple terms the different types of chemical reactions that can lead to complex species. The first part of the chapter deals wit...

  3. Interstellar chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Klemperer, William

    2006-01-01

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species o...

  4. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The division for Analytical Chemistry continued to try and develope an accurate method for the separation of trace amounts from mixtures which, contain various other elements. Ion exchange chromatography is of special importance in this regard. New separation techniques were tried on certain trace amounts in South African standard rock materials and special ceramics. Methods were also tested for the separation of carrier-free radioisotopes from irradiated cyclotron discs

  5. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, and Lactic acid bacteria species in chill brine

    OpenAIRE

    Meadows, Bridget Archibald

    2004-01-01

    SURVIVAL OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES, LISTERIA INNOCUA, AND LACTIC ACID BACTERIA SPECIES IN CHILL BRINES Bridget Archibald Meadows (ABSTRACT) Listeria monocytogenes is the major pathogen in ready-to-eat meat products such as deli meats and frankfurters. Contamination can occur via the salt brines that are used to cool thermally processed meats. Both L. monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria can grow and thrive under these brine conditions, and may become competitive with each ot...

  6. The American brine shrimp as an exotic invasive species in the western Mediterranean

    OpenAIRE

    Amat, Francisco; Hontoria, Francisco; Ruiz, Olga; Green, Andy J.; Sánchez, Marta I.; Figuerola, Jordi; Hortas, F.

    2005-01-01

    The hypersaline environments and salterns present in the western Mediterranean region (including Italy, southern France, the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco) contain autochthonous forms of the brine shrimp Artemia, with parthenogenetic diploid and tetraploid strains coexisting with the bisexual species A. sal- ina. Introduced populations of the American brine shrimp A. franciscana have also been recorded in these Mediterranean environments since the 1980s. Based on brine shrimp cyst samples...

  7. Potentials of converting microalgae into brine shrimp Artemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sorgeloos, P

    1985-01-01

    High densities of brine shrimp Artemia can be cultured in flow-through systems using the effluent of microalgae cultures as a combined source of culture medium and food. It has been proven at the "St. Croix Artificial Upwelling Mariculture Project" that in comparison with the fast growing clam Tapes japonica, brine shrimp assure a much more efficient conversion of plant into animal biomass. It appears from the given examples that microalgae conversion into brine shrimp Artemia offers efficien...

  8. Computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  9. Green chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A grand challenge facing government, industry, and academia in the relationship of our technological society to the environment is reinventing the use of materials. To address this challenge, collaboration from an interdisciplinary group of stakeholders will be necessary. Traditionally, the approach to risk management of materials and chemicals has been through inerventions intended to reduce exposure to materials that are hazardous to health and the environment. In 1990, the Pollution Prevention Act encouraged a new tact-elimination of hazards at the source. An emerging approach to this grand challenge seeks to embed the diverse set of environmental perspectives and interests in the everyday practice of the people most responsible for using and creating new materials--chemists. The approach, which has come to be known as Green Chemistry, intends to eliminate intrinsic hazard itself, rather than focusing on reducing risk by minimizing exposure. This chapter addresses the representation of downstream environmental stakeholder interests in the upstream everyday practice that is reinventing chemistry and its material inputs, products, and waste as described in the '12 Principles of Green Chemistry'

  10. Green chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depletion of world fossil fuel reserves and the involvement of greenhouse gases in the global warming has led to change the industrial and energy policies of most developed countries. The goal is now to reserve petroleum to the uses where it cannot be substituted, to implement renewable raw materials obtained from plants cultivation, and to consider the biodegradability of molecules and of manufactured objects by integrating the lifetime concept in their expected cycle of use. The green chemistry includes the design, development and elaboration of chemical products and processes with the aim of reducing or eliminating the use and generation of harmful compounds for the health and the environment, by adapting the present day operation modes of the chemical industry to the larger framework of the sustainable development. In addition to biofuels, this book reviews the applications of green chemistry in the different industrial processes in concern. Part 1 presents the diversity of the molecules coming from renewable carbon, in particular lignocellulose and the biotechnological processes. Part 2 is devoted to materials and treats of the overall available technological solutions. Part 3 focusses on functional molecules and chemical intermediates, in particular in sugar- and fats-chemistry. Part 4 treats of biofuels under the aspects of their production and use in today's technologies. The last part deals with the global approaches at the environmental and agricultural levels. (J.S.)

  11. Physico-chemistry characteristics of compost from urban solid wastes in Valencia (Spain); Caracteristicas fisico-quimicas de los composts de residuos solidos urbanos de la Comunidad Valenciana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiach, M. R.; Canet, R.; Pomares, F.; Tarazona, F.; Chaves, C.; Ferrer, E.

    2004-07-01

    For nearly twenty years samples of MSW compost produced in the Valencia region. have been analysed in our laboratories. Their main characteristics are summarised and discussed in this article, which reveals their compliance with current regulations, but also the problems which may arise if stricter requirements are eventually applied by the European Commission. (Author)

  12. Modeling the interaction of mine brines with chloride minerals of potassium-magnesium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetisov, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The article is devoted to study of dynamics of saturation degree of suprasalt brines with respect to major chloride minerals of salt strata in the initial phase of an accident related to discontinuity of waterproof stratum in the mine of the Verkhnekamskoe salt deposit (Berezniki-3 mine, 1986). Physicochemical modeling has showed that the brines discharged into mine are in equilibrium with halite during all period of observation. At the same time, their degree of saturation with respect to sylvite and carnallite regularly decreases with the increase in inflow of the suprasalt Cl-Na brines. The initial stage of suprasalt brine penetration into mine is characterized by an increase in the saturation degree with respect to the considered chloride minerals, which is showed on the chart presented in the article. However, there are brines oversaturated with respect to halite, which occurs over a brief period. In contrast to the mine brines of different genesis being in equilibrium or close to equilibrium with sylvite, saturation index (SI) for this mineral decreases in the suprasalt brine. This allows one to recommend the use of this parameter in the study of the mine brines to timely detect suprasalt brines entering the mine.

  13. Pressure-induced brine migration in consolidated salt in a repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a mathematical model for brine migration through intact salt near a radioactive waste package emplaced in salt. Solutions indicate limited movement following ten years emplacement

  14. Strontium isotope evidence on the history of oilfield brines, Mediterranean Coastal Plain, Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starinsky, A.; Bielski, M.; Lazar, B. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Geology); Steinitz, G.; Raab, M. (Geological Survey of Israel, Jerusalem)

    1983-04-01

    The isotopic composition of Sr in oil field brines from the Mediterranean Coastal Plain was determined in 18 drillholes. The brines are characterized by salinities ranging from 35 to 93 g/l (TDS), Sr from 28 to 350 mg/l, Sr/Ca molar ratios from 0.011 to 0.053 and /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios from 0.7075 to 0.7090. E and A = 0.7081 +- 0.0004 (2sigma). The brines are classified into two groups: (a) Mavqi'im group - brines with relatively high /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios, sampled from clastics, dolomites and anhydrites of Upper Miocene age. (b) Heletz group - brines with relatively low /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios, sampled from sandstones and dolomites of Lower Cretaceous age. Equations were derived to show the relations between /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratio of the brines and the processes through which they evolved. It is suggested that both groups of brines originated from Mediterranean evaporated seawater during the Messinian desiccation. The strontium isotope composition of the seawater is reflected in that of both groups of brines, the Mavqi'im group containing the original /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratio. The Heletz group evolved later on, through exchange reactions of those primary brines with a carbonate sequence of Cretaceous age and consequently new /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios could have been developed.

  15. Atlantis II Deep geothermal brine system. Hydrographic situation in 1977 and changes since 1965

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, M.

    1980-02-01

    The geothermal brine system of the Atlantis II Deep in the Red Sea was reinvestigated hydrographically and chemically in November 1977. A comparison with results from earlier investigations confirms an increase of the hot brine volume, as suggested by the 1972 measurements ( SCHOELL, Bundesanstalt für Bodenforschung, Hannover, 1063 pp. 1974). The rate of increase is evidently parallel to the rate of temperature increase. The salinity of the lower brine was nearly constant during this period. The nearby Discovery Deep brine is evidently unaffected by the changes in the Atlantis II Deep as its temperature was constant within ±0.1°C during this time.

  16. The Chemical Core of Chemistry I: A Conceptual Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim Schummer

    1998-01-01

    Given the rich diversity of research fields usually ascribed to chemistry in a broad sense, the present paper tries to dig our characteristic parts of chemistry that can be conceptually distinguished from interdisciplinary, applied, and specialized subfields of chemistry, and that may be called chemistry in a very narrow sense, or 'the chemical core of chemistry'. Unlike historical, ontological, and 'anti-reductive' approaches, I use a conceptual approach together with some methodological imp...

  17. Uranium-thorium series radionuclides in brines and reservoir rocks from two deep geothermal boreholes in the Salton Sea geothermal field, southeastern California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally occurring U and Th series radionuclides have been analyzed in high temperature brines (∼ 300 degree C, 25 wt% dissolved solids) and associated rocks from two deep geothermal wells located on the northeastern margin of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). These data are part of a study of the SSGF as a natural analog of possible radionuclide behavior near a nuclear waste repository constructed in salt beds, and permit evaluation of some characteristics of water-rock interaction in the SSGF

  18. Brine migration resulting from CO2 injection into saline aquifers – An approach to risk estimation including various levels of uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Lena; Binning, Philip John; Oladyshkin, Sergey;

    2012-01-01

    features such as caprock properties, faults, and distinct geological layers. This is considered in this work by 6 different scenarios having different characteristic geological features. On the other hand, Monte Carlo methods are a classical approach to address statistical uncertainty. This is not feasible...... study provides estimates of the risk of brine discharge into freshwater aquifers due to CO2 injection into geological formations and resultant salt concentrations in the overlying drinking water aquifers....

  19. TOUGHREACT Testing in High Ionic Strength Brine Sandstone Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep saline formations and oil and gas reservoirs often contain concentrated brine solutions of ionic strength greater than 1 (I > 1 M). Geochemical modeling, involving high ionic strength brines, is a challenge. In the original TOUGHREACT code (Xu et al., 2004; Xu et al., 2006), activity coefficients of charged aqueous species are computed using an extended Debye-Huckel (DH) equation and parameters derived by Helgeson et al. (1981). The DH model can deal with ionic strengths from dilute to moderately saline water (up to 6 molal for an NaCl-dominant solution). The equations implemented for the DH model are presented in Appendix A. During the course of the Yucca Mountain project, a Pitzer ion-interaction model was implemented into TOUGHREACT. This allows the application of this simulator to problems involving much more concentrated aqueous solutions, such as those involving geochemical processes in and around high-level nuclear waste repositories where fluid evaporation and/or boiling is expected to occur (Zhang et al., 2007). The Pitzer ion-interaction model, which we refer to as the Pitzer virial approach, and associated ion-interaction parameters have been applied successfully to study non-ideal concentrated aqueous solutions. The formulation of the Pitzer model is presented in Appendix B; detailed information can be founded in Zhang et al. (2007). For CO2 geological sequestration, the Pitzer ion-interaction model for highly concentrated brines was incorporated into TOUGHREACT/ECO2N, then was tested and compared with a previously implemented extended Debye-Hueckel (DH) ion activity model. The comparison was made through a batch geochemical system using a Gulf Coast sandstone saline formation

  20. Transition and separation process in brine channels formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, Alessia, E-mail: alessia.berti@unibs.it [Facoltà di Ingegneria, Università e-Campus, Via Isimbardi 10, 22060 Novedrate, CO (Italy); Bochicchio, Ivana, E-mail: ibochicchio@unisa.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universitá degli Studi di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy); Fabrizio, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.fabrizio@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Università di Bologna, Piazza di Porta S. Donato, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, we discuss the formation of brine channels in sea ice. The model includes a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation for the solid-liquid phase change, a diffusion equation of the Cahn-Hilliard kind for the solute dynamics, and the heat equation for the temperature change. The macroscopic motion of the fluid is also considered, so the resulting differential system couples with the Navier-Stokes equation. The compatibility of this system with the thermodynamic laws and a maximum theorem is proved.

  1. Surface chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Desai, KR

    2008-01-01

    The surface Chemistry of a material as a whole is crucially dependent upon the Nature and type of surfaces exposed on crystallites. It is therefore vitally important to independently Study different, well - defined surfaces through surface analytical techniques. In addition to composition and structure of surface, the subject also provides information on dynamic light scattering, micro emulsions, colloid Stability control and nanostructures. The present book endeavour to bring before the reader that the understanding and exploitation of Solid state phenomena depended largely on the ability to

  2. Hypercarbon chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This text points out the emerging significance of higher-valent carbon compounds. It describes the compounds of carbon with coordination numbers greater than four and explores the delocalized bonds of π aromatic molecules as a basis for rational description of orbitals; localized multicentered orbitals; the interactions of metallic ions with other atoms and molecules; the skeletal electron counts as a guide for synthesis; and the isolobal concept. Illustrated are the ways in which these subjects bring together structure and reactivity in the great diversity of novel carbon chemistry and its relationship to that of boron, lithium, hydrogen, the metals, and others

  3. Theoretical chemistry periodicities in chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical Chemistry: Periodicities in Chemistry and Biology, Volume 4 covers the aspects of theoretical chemistry. The book discusses the stably rotating patterns of reaction and diffusion; the chemistry of inorganic systems exhibiting nonmonotonic behavior; and population cycles. The text also describes the mathematical modeling of excitable media in neurobiology and chemistry; oscillating enzyme reactions; and oscillatory properties and excitability of the heart cell membrane. Selected topics from the theory of physico-chemical instabilities are also encompassed. Chemists, mechanical engin

  4. Ice Control with Brine on Highways:Implementation of Brine Spreading Technologies in County of Funen, Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Bolet, Lars

    2008-01-01

    During the years 1996-2006, the Division of Highways and Transportation in the former county of Funen gradually replaced pre-wetted salt with brine as de-icing agent in all her ice control activities. The replacement related to 1000 kilometres of highways. Jeopardizing neither road safety nor traffic flow the spread rate of pure sodium chloride (and thus the environmental impact) in the pre-salting operations was cut back by more than one third. Compared to neighbouring counties the use of sa...

  5. Analysis of radiolabelled thiocyanate tracer in oil field brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiocyanate (SCN-) labelled with 14C or 35S is applicable for the tracing of the water flow in water-driven oil production. This work describes two improved methods for increasing the concentration of S14CN- with sample sizes up to 1000 ml of sampled brine. The radioactivity detection is carried out by low-background liquid scintillation counting using standard-size counting vials of 20 ml. The first method is based on solvent extraction: two extraction/strip steps reduce the volume by the required factor of 100 down to 10 ml. The extraction agent is 0.5M tri-isooctylamine (TiOA) in Solvesso-150 and the stripping agent is 5M NH3. A chemical yield of 70-75%, a somewhat unfavourable quenching factor and a moderate reproducibility lead to a detection limit LD of 0.04 Bq/1. The second method is based on anion exchange. 1000 ml tracer-containing brine may be loaded onto 6.1 ml of the anion-exchange resin AG1-x8 before significant breakthrough of the tracer. More than 98.4% is absorbed. By elution with 2.8M sodiumperchlorate, more than 99.5% of the absorbed tracer is concentrated in a sharp elution peak of 10 ml. With a total chemical yield of 98%, a lower quenching factor and higher reproducibility than for the solvent extraction method, an LD-value of 0.005 Bq/1 is obtained. (orig.)

  6. Selection of a Brine Processor Technology for NASA Manned Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Donald L.; Gleich, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    The current ISS Water Recovery System (WRS) reclaims water from crew urine, humidity condensate, and Sabatier product water. Urine is initially processed by the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) which recovers 75% of the urine as distillate. The remainder of the water is present in the waste brine which is currently disposed of as trash on ISS. For future missions this additional water must be reclaimed due to the significant resupply penalty for missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). NASA has pursued various technology development programs for a brine processor in the past several years. This effort has culminated in a technology down-select to identify the optimum technology for future manned missions. The technology selection is based on various criteria, including mass, power, reliability, maintainability, and safety. Beginning in 2016 the selected technology will be transitioned to a flight hardware program for demonstration on ISS. This paper summarizes the technology selection process, the competing technologies, and the rationale for the technology selected for future manned missions.

  7. Geochemistry of Salado Formation brines recovered from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intergranular brines recovered from the repository horizon of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) have major- and trace-element compositions that reflect seawater evaporation and diagenetic processes. Brines obtained from repository drill holes are heterogenous with respect to composition, but their compositional fields are distinct from those obtained from fluid inclusions in WIPP halite. The heterogeneity of brine compositions within the drill-hole population indicates a lack of mixing and fluid homogenization within the salt at the repository level. Compositional differences between intergranular (drill hole) and intragranular (fluid inclusions) brines is attributed to isolation of the latter from diagenetic fluids that were produced from dehydration reactions involving gypsum and clay minerals. Modeling of brine-rock equilibria indicates that equilibration with evaporite minerals controls the concentrations of major elements in the brine. Drill-hole brines are in equilibrium with the observed repository minerals halite, anhydrite, magnesite, polyhalite and quartz. The equilibrium model supports the derivation of drill-hole brines from near-field fluid, rather than large-scale vertical migration of fluids from the overlying Rustler or underlying Castile Formations. 13 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  8. Water Recovery from Brine in the Short and Long Term: A KSC Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Griffin; Melendez, Orlando; Anthony, Steve

    2014-01-01

    KSC has spent many years researching Hollow Fiber Membrane Bioreactors as well as research encompassing: Alternate ammonia removal, Advanced oxidation, Brine purification technologies. KSC-ISRU has built an electrolysis cell for the removal of acids in ISRU mining brines. Our goal is to combine all such technologies.

  9. Bag-in-box technology: Membrane filtration of cucumber fermentation brine

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major goal in producing process-ready, brined cucumbers is the reclaiming of the brine obtained from the fermentation for use in other products. This article summarizes research results obtained from the use of membrane filtration technology to remove microbial cells and other sediments from cucu...

  10. Analytical Chemistry Division's sample transaction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analytical Chemistry Division uses the DECsystem-10 computer for a wide range of tasks: sample management, timekeeping, quality assurance, and data calculation. This document describes the features and operating characteristics of many of the computer programs used by the Division. The descriptions are divided into chapters which cover all of the information about one aspect of the Analytical Chemistry Division's computer processing

  11. Plasma chemistry and organic synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, M.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristic features of chemical reactions using low temperature plasmas are described and differentiated from those seen in other reaction systems. A number of examples of applications of plasma chemistry to synthetic reactions are mentioned. The production of amino acids by discharge reactions in hydrocarbon-ammonia-water systems is discussed, and its implications for the origins of life are mentioned.

  12. Indoor tests to investigate the effect of brine depth on the performance of solar still

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwah AW. Ali, Abdul Jabbar N. Khalifa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many experimental and numerical studies have been done on different configurations of solar stills to optimize the design by examining the effect of climatic, operational and design parameters on its performance. One of the most important of the operational parameters that has received a considerable attention in the literature is the brine depth. This paper reports indoor experimental investigations on the effect of brine depth on the productivity and efficiency of the solar stills at four different brine depths of 1.5, 2, 4 and 5.5 cm. Indoor tests were used by simulating the solar input by proper electric heaters located at the bottom of the still for heating the water contained in the basin of the still. The present study validated the decreasing trend in productivity with the increase of brine depth and showed that the still productivity could be influenced by the brine depth by up to 24%.

  13. Indoor tests to investigate the effect of brine depth on the performance of solar still

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Marwah A.W.; Jabbar N. Khalifa, Abdul [Nahrain University, College of Engineering, Jadiriya, P.O. Box 64040, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2013-07-01

    Many experimental and numerical studies have been done on different configurations of solar stills to optimize the design by examining the effect of climatic, operational and design parameters on its performance. One of the most important of the operational parameters that has received a considerable attention in the literature is the brine depth. This paper reports indoor experimental investigations on the effect of brine depth on the productivity and efficiency of the solar stills at four different brine depths of 1.5, 2, 4 and 5.5 cm. Indoor tests were used by simulating the solar input by proper electric heaters located at the bottom of the still for heating the water contained in the basin of the still. The present study validated the decreasing trend in productivity with the increase of brine depth and showed that the still productivity could be influenced by the brine depth by up to 24%.

  14. Scanning electron microscope observations of brine shrimp larvae from space shuttle experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBell, L.; Paulsen, A.; Spooner, B.

    1992-01-01

    Brine shrimp are encysted as gastrula stage embryos, and may remain dehydrated and encysted for years without compromising their viability. This aspect of brine shrimp biology is desirable for studying development of animals during space shuttle flight, as cysts placed aboard a spacecraft may be rehydrated at the convenience of an astronaut, guaranteeing that subsequent brine shrimp development occurs only on orbit and not on the pad during launch delays. Brine shrimp cysts placed in 5 ml syringes were rehydrated with salt water and hatched during a 9 day space shuttle mission. Subsequent larvae developed to the 8th larval stage in the sealed syringes. We studied the morphogenesis of the brine shrimp larvae and found the larvae from the space shuttle experiments similar in rate of growth and extent of development, to larvae grown in sealed syringes on the ground. Extensive differentiation and development of embryos and larvae can occur in a microgravity environment.

  15. Measurement and modeling of CO2 solubility in NaCl brine and CO2–saturated NaCl brine density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Huang, Shengli; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    over climate change and energy security. This work is an experimental and modeling study of two fundamental properties in high pressure CO2–NaCl brine equilibrium, i.e., CO2 solubility in NaCl brine and CO2–saturated NaCl brine density. A literature review of the available data was presented first to......Phase equilibrium for CO2–NaCl brine is of general interest to many scientific disciplines and technical areas. The system is particularly important to CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers and CO2 enhanced oil recovery, two techniques discussed intensively in recent years due to the concerns...... illustrate the necessity of experimental measurements of the two properties at high pressures. An experimental method for measuring high pressure CO2 solubility in NaCl brine was then developed. With the method, CO2 solubilities in 0, 1, and 5m NaCl brines were measured at 323, 373, and 413K from 5 to 40MPa...

  16. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  17. Cyclodextrin chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of cyclodextrins was studied. This study included synthesising some cyclodextrin derivatives, preparing selected inclusion complexes with cyclodextrin and investigating the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins and certain linear oligosaccharides. This report presents a brief review of the structure and properties of cyclodextrins, the synthesis of cyclodextrin derivatives, their complexation and applications. This is followed by a description of the synthesis of some cyclodextrin derivatives and the preparation of inclusion complexes of cyclodextrin with some organic compounds. Finally, the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins, some of their derivatives and certain structurally related carbohydrates are discussed. The gamma irradiation studies were carried out for two reasons: to study the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins and their derivatives; and to investigate selectivity during the gamma irradiation of cyclodextrin derivatives

  18. Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 during manufacture and storage of white brined cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaili, Tareq M; Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Olaimat, Amin N; Shaker, Reyad R; Taha, Mohammad; Holley, Richard A

    2014-09-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a major foodborne pathogen that causes severe disease in humans. Survival of E. coli O157:H7 during processing and storage of white brined cheese was investigated. Cheeses were prepared using pasteurized milk inoculated with a 4 strain E. coli O157:H7 cocktail (7 log(10) CFU/g) with or without yogurt starter culture (Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus salivarius ssp. thermophilus) and stored in 10% or 15% NaCl brine at 10 and 21 ºC for 28 d. NaCl concentration, water activity (a(w)), pH, and numbers of E. coli O157:H7 and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were determined in cheese and brine. E. coli O157:H7 was able to survive in cheese stored in both brines at 10 and 21 ºC regardless of the presence of starter LAB, although the latter significantly enhanced E. coli O157:H7 reduction in cheese or its brine at 10 ºC. E. coli O157:H7 numbers were reduced by 2.6 and 3.4 log(10) CFU/g in cheese stored in 10% and 15% NaCl brine, respectively, in the presence of starter LAB and by 1.4 and 2.3 log(10) CFU/g, respectively, in the absence of starter LAB at 10 ºC. The pathogen survived, but at lower numbers in the brines. The salt concentration of cheese stored in 10% brine remained about 5% during ripening, but in 15% brine, the NaCl level increased 1.6% to 8.1% (w/w) by 28 d. Values of pH and a(w) slightly decreased 1 d after exposure to brine and reached 5.5 to 6.6 and 0.88 to 0.94, respectively, in all treatments. PMID:25134419

  19. The role of watershed characteristics, permafrost thaw, and wildfire on dissolved organic carbon biodegradability and water chemistry in Arctic headwater streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larouche, J. R.; Abbott, B. W.; Bowden, W. B.; Jones, J. B.

    2015-07-01

    In the Alaskan Arctic, rapid climate change is increasing the frequency of disturbance including wildfire and permafrost collapse. These pulse disturbances may influence the delivery of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to aquatic ecosystems, however the magnitude of these effects compared to the natural background variability of DOC at the watershed scale is not well known. We measured DOC quantity, composition, and biodegradability from 14 river and stream reaches (watershed sizes ranging from 1.5-167 km2) some of which were impacted by permafrost collapse (thermokarst) and fire. We found that region had a significant impact on quantity and biodegradability of DOC, likely driven by landscape and watershed characteristics such as lithology, soil and vegetation type, elevation, and glacial age. However, contrary to our hypothesis, we found that streams disturbed by thermokarst and fire did not contain significantly altered labile DOC fractions compared to adjacent reference waters, potentially due to rapid ecosystem recovery after fire and thermokarst as well as the limited spatial extent of thermokarst. Overall, biodegradable DOC ranged from 4 to 46 % and contrary to patterns of DOC biodegradability in large Arctic rivers, seasonal variation in DOC biodegradability showed no clear pattern between sites, potentially related to stream geomorphology and position along the river network. While thermokarst and fire can alter DOC quantity and biodegradability at the scale of the feature, we conclude that tundra ecosystems are resilient to these types of disturbance.

  20. The role of watershed characteristics, permafrost thaw, and wildfire on dissolved organic carbon biodegradability and water chemistry in Arctic headwater streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Larouche

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Alaskan Arctic, rapid climate change is increasing the frequency of disturbance including wildfire and permafrost collapse. These pulse disturbances may influence the delivery of dissolved organic carbon (DOC to aquatic ecosystems, however the magnitude of these effects compared to the natural background variability of DOC at the watershed scale is not well known. We measured DOC quantity, composition, and biodegradability from 14 river and stream reaches (watershed sizes ranging from 1.5–167 km2 some of which were impacted by permafrost collapse (thermokarst and fire. We found that region had a significant impact on quantity and biodegradability of DOC, likely driven by landscape and watershed characteristics such as lithology, soil and vegetation type, elevation, and glacial age. However, contrary to our hypothesis, we found that streams disturbed by thermokarst and fire did not contain significantly altered labile DOC fractions compared to adjacent reference waters, potentially due to rapid ecosystem recovery after fire and thermokarst as well as the limited spatial extent of thermokarst. Overall, biodegradable DOC ranged from 4 to 46% and contrary to patterns of DOC biodegradability in large Arctic rivers, seasonal variation in DOC biodegradability showed no clear pattern between sites, potentially related to stream geomorphology and position along the river network. While thermokarst and fire can alter DOC quantity and biodegradability at the scale of the feature, we conclude that tundra ecosystems are resilient to these types of disturbance.

  1. Seawater chemistry and the advent of biocalcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sean T.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Horita, Juske

    2004-06-01

    Major ion compositions of primary fluid inclusions from terminal Proterozoic (ca. 544 Ma) and Early Cambrian (ca. 515 Ma) marine halites indicate that seawater Ca2+ concentrations increased approximately threefold during the Early Cambrian. The timing of this shift in seawater chemistry broadly coincides with the “Cambrian explosion,” a brief drop in marine 87Sr/86Sr values, and an increase in tectonic activity, suggesting a link between the advent of biocalcification, hydrothermal mid-ocean-ridge brine production, and the composition of seawater. The Early Cambrian surge in oceanic [Ca2+] was likely the first such increase following the rise of metazoans and may have spurred evolutionary changes in marine biota.

  2. Seawater Chemistry and the Advent of Biocalcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, S. T. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA; Lowenstein, T K. [State University of New York, Binghamton; Horita, Juske [ORNL

    2004-01-01

    Major ion compositions of primary fluid inclusions from terminal Proterozoic (ca. 544 Ma) and Early Cambrian (ca. 515 Ma) marine halites indicate that seawater Ca{sup 2+} concentrations increased approximately threefold during the Early Cambrian. The timing of this shift in seawater chemistry broadly coincides with the 'Cambrian explosion,' a brief drop in marine {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr values, and an increase in tectonic activity, suggesting a link between the advent of biocalcification, hydrothermal mid-ocean-ridge brine production, and the composition of seawater. The Early Cambrian surge in oceanic [Ca{sup 2+}] was likely the first such increase following the rise of metazoans and may have spurred evolutionary changes in marine biota.

  3. ESTUDIO COMPARATIVO DE CARACTERÍSTICAS FÍSICOQUÍMICAS DE CEREALES KELLOGG'S COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS CHARACTERISTICS OF KELLOGG'S CEREALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Prieto M

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio comparativo de las características físicoquímicas de tres variedades de cereales Kellogg's para desayuno, hojuelas de arroz (Special K, hojuelas de maíz (Zucaritas y hojuelas de trigo (All Brand, y se compararon con las especificaciones dadas por el fabricante. Se constató que existen pequeñas diferencias que pueden ser debidas al tiempo transcurrido desde su elaboración. Se estudió por técnicas de difracción de rayos Lasser la distribución y tamaños de las partículas en suspención de estos cereales, correspondientes a los gránulos de almidón y partículas de grasas, denotándose una diferencia entre las variedades. Esto puede resultar efectivo para estudios posteriores por técnicas de análisis térmico, que permitan predecir de forma rápida y dinámica, tiempos de vida de estos productos y fechas de caducidadA comparative study of physic and chemical characteristics of three varieties of Kellogg's cereals for breakfast, of rice (Special K, maize (Zucaritas and wheat (All Brand was made, and compared with the specifications given by the manufacturer. It was stated that small differences exist that can be due to the time passed from their elaboration. It was possible to be studied by techniques of diffraction Lasser ray the distribution and sizes of particles in suspension of these cereals, corresponding to grains of starch and fat particles, denoting itself a difference between the varieties. These, can be effective for later studies by techniques of thermal analysis, that allow to predict of fast and dynamic form, times of life of these products and dates of lapsing

  4. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  5. Why Teach Environmental Chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Marjorie H.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching environmental chemistry in secondary school science classes, and outlines five examples of environmental chemistry problems that focus on major concepts of chemistry and have critical implications for human survival and well-being. (JR)

  6. Impacts of harvesting on brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sura, Shayna A; Belovsky, Gary E

    2016-03-01

    Selective harvesting can cause evolutionary responses in populations via shifts in phenotypic characteristics, especially those affecting life history. Brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) cysts in Great Salt Lake (GSL), Utah, USA are commercially harvested with techniques that select against floating cysts. This selective pressure could cause evolutionary changes over time. Our objectives are to (1) determine if there is a genetic basis to cyst buoyancy, (2) determine if cyst buoyancy and nauplii mortality have changed over time, and (3) to examine GSL environmental conditions over time to distinguish whether selective harvesting pressure or a trend in environmental conditions caused changes in cyst buoyancy and nauplii mortality. Mating crosses between floating and sinking parental phenotypes with two food concentrations (low and high) indicated there is a genetic basis to cyst buoyancy. Using cysts harvested from 1991-2011, we found cyst buoyancy decreased and nauplii mortality increased over time. Data on water temperature, salinity, and chlorophyll a concentration in GSL from 1994 to 2011 indicated that although water temperature has increased over time and chlorophyll a concentration has decreased over time, the selective harvesting pressure against floating cysts is a better predictor of changes in cyst buoyancy and nauplii mortality over time than trends in environmental conditions. Harvesting of GSL A. franciscana cysts is causing evolutionary changes, which has implications for the sustainable management and harvesting of these cysts. Monitoring phenotypic characteristics and life-history traits of the population should be implemented and appropriate responses taken to reduce the impacts of the selective harvesting. PMID:27209783

  7. Public perception of chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Stražar, Alenka

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with the perception of chemistry among the public, which reflects the stereotypes that people have about chemistry. It presents the existing classification of stereotypes about chemistry and their upgrade. An analysis of movies that reflect the existing perception of chemistry in the public is written. Literature on selected aspects of the application of chemistry in movies is collected and analyzed. A qualification of perception of chemistry in the movies is presented based ...

  8. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  9. Microprobe analysis of brine shrimp grown on meteorite extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear microprobe methods have been used to investigate the uptake and distribution of various elements by brine shrimps and their unhatched eggs when grown in extracts of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous meteorites, which were selected as model space resources. Measurements were carried out using a focussed 2 MeV proton beam raster scanned over the samples in order to obtain the average elemental concentrations. Line scans across the egg and shrimp samples show uptake of elements such as Mg, Ni, S and P which are present in the meteorites. The results confirmed that carbonaceous chondrite materials can provide nutrients, including high levels of the essential nutrient phosphate. The concentrations of these elements varied significantly between shrimp and eggs grown in extracts of the two meteorite types, which can help in identifying optimal growth media. Our results illustrate that nuclear microprobe techniques can determine elemental concentrations in organisms exposed to meteorite derived media and thus help in identifying useful future resources

  10. Study of photon attenuation coefficient in brine using MCNP code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Caroline M.; Salgado, Cesar M.; Brandao, Luis E.B., E-mail: carolmattosb@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br, E-mail: brandao@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In petroleum industry, multiphase flows are common and the relative salt content of the water component depends on the location of oil extraction. The salt present in the water component causes incrustations in the pipeline and may interfere in the flow measurement. This paper presents an elaborate model using MCNP code to simulate a narrow beam gamma ray source, a brine sample and a NaI(Tl) detector, with beam energies ranging from 59,54 keV to 662 keV. Through this model, we can relate the photon attenuation coefficient to the salinity of water. This model can be experimentally reproduced, and used to measure the salinity in situ without affecting the medium. (author)

  11. Microprobe analysis of brine shrimp grown on meteorite extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, J. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)]. E-mail: j.kennedy@gns.cri.nz; Mautner, M.N. [Soil, Plant and Ecological Sciences Division, Lincoln University (New Zealand) and Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8001 (New Zealand)]. E-mail: m.mautner@solis1.com; Barry, B. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Markwitz, A. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2007-07-15

    Nuclear microprobe methods have been used to investigate the uptake and distribution of various elements by brine shrimps and their unhatched eggs when grown in extracts of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous meteorites, which were selected as model space resources. Measurements were carried out using a focussed 2 MeV proton beam raster scanned over the samples in order to obtain the average elemental concentrations. Line scans across the egg and shrimp samples show uptake of elements such as Mg, Ni, S and P which are present in the meteorites. The results confirmed that carbonaceous chondrite materials can provide nutrients, including high levels of the essential nutrient phosphate. The concentrations of these elements varied significantly between shrimp and eggs grown in extracts of the two meteorite types, which can help in identifying optimal growth media. Our results illustrate that nuclear microprobe techniques can determine elemental concentrations in organisms exposed to meteorite derived media and thus help in identifying useful future resources.

  12. Microprobe analysis of brine shrimp grown on meteorite extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J.; Mautner, M. N.; Barry, B.; Markwitz, A.

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear microprobe methods have been used to investigate the uptake and distribution of various elements by brine shrimps and their unhatched eggs when grown in extracts of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous meteorites, which were selected as model space resources. Measurements were carried out using a focussed 2 MeV proton beam raster scanned over the samples in order to obtain the average elemental concentrations. Line scans across the egg and shrimp samples show uptake of elements such as Mg, Ni, S and P which are present in the meteorites. The results confirmed that carbonaceous chondrite materials can provide nutrients, including high levels of the essential nutrient phosphate. The concentrations of these elements varied significantly between shrimp and eggs grown in extracts of the two meteorite types, which can help in identifying optimal growth media. Our results illustrate that nuclear microprobe techniques can determine elemental concentrations in organisms exposed to meteorite derived media and thus help in identifying useful future resources.

  13. Guiding brine shrimp through mazes by solving reaction diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Krishma; Fenton, Flavio

    Excitable systems driven by reaction diffusion equations have been shown to not only find solutions to mazes but to also to find the shortest path between the beginning and the end of the maze. In this talk we describe how we can use the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model, a generic model for excitable media, to solve a maze by varying the basin of attraction of its two fixed points. We demonstrate how two dimensional mazes are solved numerically using a Java Applet and then accelerated to run in real time by using graphic processors (GPUs). An application of this work is shown by guiding phototactic brine shrimp through a maze solved by the algorithm. Once the path is obtained, an Arduino directs the shrimp through the maze using lights from LEDs placed at the floor of the Maze. This method running in real time could be eventually used for guiding robots and cars through traffic.

  14. Trace Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  15. Experimental and simulation studies of pore scale flow and reactive transport associated with supercritical CO2 injection into brine-filled reservoir rocks (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePaolo, D. J.; Steefel, C. I.; Bourg, I. C.

    2013-12-01

    This talk will review recent research relating to pore scale reactive transport effects done in the context of the Department of Energy-sponsored Energy Frontier Research Center led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with several other laboratory and University partners. This Center, called the Center for Nanoscale Controls on Geologic CO2 (NCGC) has focused effort on the behavior of supercritical CO2 being injected into and/or residing as capillary trapped-bubbles in sandstone and shale, with particular emphasis on the description of nanoscale to pore scale processes that could provide the basis for advanced simulations. In general, simulation of reservoir-scale behavior of CO2 sequestration assumes a number of mostly qualitative relationships that are defensible as nominal first-order descriptions of single-fluid systems, but neglect the many complications that are associated with a two-phase or three-phase reactive system. The contrasts in properties, and the mixing behavior of scCO2 and brine provide unusual conditions for water-rock interaction, and the NCGC has investigated the underlying issues by a combination of approaches including theoretical and experimental studies of mineral nucleation and growth, experimental studies of brine films, mineral wetting properties, dissolution-precipitation rates and infiltration patterns, molecular dynamic simulations and neutron scattering experiments of fluid properties for fluid confined in nanopores, and various approaches to numerical simulation of reactive transport processes. The work to date has placed new constraints on the thickness of brine films, and also on the wetting properties of CO2 versus brine, a property that varies between minerals and with salinity, and may also change with time as a result of the reactivity of CO2-saturated brine. Mineral dissolution is dependent on reactive surface area, which can be shown to vary by a large factor for various minerals, especially when correlated with

  16. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established

  17. CO2/ brine substitution experiments at simulated reservoir conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerow, Juliane; Spangenberg, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Capillary properties of rocks affect the mobility of fluids in a reservoir. Therefore, the understanding of the capillary pressure behaviour is essential to assess the long-term behaviour of CO2 reservoirs. Beyond this, a calibration of the petrophysical properties on water saturation of reservoir rocks at simulated in situ conditions is crucial for a proper interpretation of field monitoring data. We present a set-up, which allows for the combined measurements of capillary pressure, electric resistivity, and elastic wave velocities under controlled reservoir conditions (pconf = 400 bar, ppore = 180 bar, T = 65 ° C) at different brine-CO2 saturations. The capillary properties of the samples are measured using the micropore membrane technique. The sample is jacketed with a Viton tube (thickness = 4 mm) and placed between two current electrode endcaps, which as well contain pore fluid ports and ultrasonic P and S wave transducers. Between the sample and the lower endcap the hydrophilic semi-permeable micro-pore membrane (pore size = 100 nm) is integrated. It is embedded into filter papers to establish a good capillary contact and to protect the highly sensitive membrane against mechanical damage under load. Two high-precision syringe pumps are used to displace a quantified volume of brine by CO2 and determine the corresponding sample saturation. The fluid displacement induces a pressure gradient along the sample, which corresponds to the capillary pressure at a particular sample saturation. It is measured with a differential pressure sensor in the range between 0 - 0.2 MPa. Drainage and imbibition cycles are performed to provide information on the efficiency of capillary trapping and to get a calibration of the petrophysical parameters of the sample.

  18. Brine Organisms and the Question of Habitat Specific Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, B. Z.; Siegel, S. M.; Speitel, Thomas; Waber, Jack; Stoecker, Roy

    1984-12-01

    Among the well-known ultrasaline terrestrial habitats, the Dead Sea in the Jordan Rift Valley and Don Juan Pond in the Upper Wright Valley represent two of the most extreme. The former is a saturated sodium chloride-magnesium sulfate brine in a hot desert, the latter a saturated calcium chloride brine in an Antarctic desert. Both Dead Sea and Don Juan water bodies themselves are limited in microflora, but the saline Don Juan algal mat and muds contain abundant nutrients and a rich and varied microbiota, including Oscillatoria, Gleocapsa, Chlorella, diatoms, Penicillium and bacteria. In such environments, the existence of an array of specific adaptations is a common, and highly reasonable, presumption, at least with respect to habitat-obligate forms. Nevertheless, many years of ongoing study in our laboratory have demonstrated that lichens (e.g. Cladonia), algae (e.g. Nostoc) and fungi (e.g. Penicillium, Aspergillus) from the humid tropics can sustain metabolism down to -40°C and growth down to -10°C in simulated Dead Sea or Don Juan (or similar) media without benefit of selection or gradual acclimation. Non-selection is suggested in fungi by higher growth rates from vegetative inocula than spores. The importance of nutrient parameters was also evident in responses to potassium and reduced nitrogen compounds. In view of the saline performance of tropical Nostoc, and its presence in the Antarctic dry valley soils, its complete absence in our Don Juan mat samples was and remains a puzzle. We suggest that adaptive capability is already resident in many terrestrial life forms not currently in extreme habitats, a possible reflection of evolutionary selection for wide spectrum environmental adaptability.

  19. Composition of brine discharge from tunisian desalination plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of unconventional water resources such as desalination is becoming inevitable sources to alleviate water scarcity in the world. Desalination of brackish water is one of the non conventional water resources that the Tunisian government developed in order to enhance the quality of water distributed in the south. Despite the many benefits desalination technology has to offer a list of potential environmental like the emissions of air pollutant, the energy demand, land use but the main impact of desalination plant is caused by the discharge of an effluent of very high salinity. The constant discharge of reject streams with high salinity and temperature can be fatal for marine life. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the chemical composition of reject brine from Gabes desalination plant and Jerba desalination plant. Both desalination plants are planted to securing the fresh water supply for consumer consumption to the respectively government Gabes and Jerba when the level of salinity is exceeded 3g /l. The average capacity of these plants varied between 25000m3/d and 30 000m3/d. Water samples were collected from several locations at reject site of both desalination plant Jerba and Gabes. All samples have been analysed for major, nutritive and minor constituents The analyses reveal a difference between the compositions of brine of the both stations, The comparison between quality of the effluent discharged and Tunisian norms of reject in hydraulic areas (NT 106 002) showed that the concentration of calcium, chlorides sodium sulphates are higher than the allowable limits the norms.

  20. Buoyancy-driven CO2/brine flow at reservoir conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J.; Kim, K.; Han, W.; Kim, T.; Kim, J.; Park, E.

    2013-12-01

    Suitable geological formations should guarantee a long-term safe and reliable storage of the injected supercritical CO2. In this study we targeted the cases of gravity-driven CO2 plume migration in a storage formation and the resulting CO2 leakage to overlying formation through a possible fractures or abandoned wells. A laboratory experiment and numerical model for two-phase core-flooding tests were designed to understand the buoyancy effect on supercritical CO2 migration under reservoir conditions. A series of core flooding tests were performed with Berea sandstone cores which have 20 % porosity and 1.7×10-13 m2 permeability. Unlike the normal core-flooding tests, the core was set up in a vertical direction and the CO2 was released at the bottom of the core to investigate the gravity effect on CO2 migration. During the test, the downstream pressure was maintained at 10 MPa, and the confining pressure was kept at 20 MPa. The temperature was set to be 40 °C to reflect the 1 km subsurface environment. The CO2-flooding (drainage) tests with brine-saturated core were performed with various CO2-release periods. The CO2 saturation was measured with a linear X-ray scanner. In addition to laboratory experiments, numerical simulations were performed to provide further insight into the CO2 migration behavior. TOUGH2 with ECO2N module was used to simulate CO2/brine core-flooding tests. Dimensionless numbers (Capillary number and Bond number) were calculated with the simulation results at various time points covering both the release and monitoring period.

  1. Multimeric hemoglobin of the Australian brine shrimp Parartemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M; Matthews, C M; Trotman, C N

    2001-04-01

    The hemoglobin molecule of the commercially important brine shrimp Artemia sp. has been used extensively as a model for the study of molecular evolution. It consists of nine globin domains joined by short linker sequences, and these domains are believed to have originated through a series of duplications from an original globin gene. In addition, in Artemia, two different polymers of hemoglobin, called C and T, are found which differ by 11.7% at the amino acid level and are believed to have diverged about 60 MYA. This provides a set of data of 18 globin domain sequences that have evolved in the same organism. The pattern of amino acid substitution between these two polymers is unusual, with pairs of equivalent domains displaying differences of up to 2.7-fold in total amino acid substitution. Such differences would reflect a similar range of molecular-clock rates in what appear to be duplicate, structurally equivalent domains. In order to provide a reference outgroup, we sequenced the cDNA for a nine-domain hemoglobin (P) from another genus of brine shrimp, Parartemia zietziana, which differs morphologically and ecologically from Artemia and is endemic to Australia. Parartemia produces only one hundredth the amount of hemoglobin that Artemia produces and does not upregulate production in response to low oxygen partial pressure. Comparison of the globin domains at the amino acid and DNA levels suggests that the Artemia globin T gene has accumulated substitutions differently from the Parartemia P and Artemia C globin genes. We discuss the questions of accelerated evolution after duplication and possible functions for the Parartemia globin. PMID:11264409

  2. On the viscosity of natural hyper-saline solutions and its importance: The Dead Sea brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph; Shandalov, Semion; Lensky, Nadav

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the density, temperature and viscosity of hypersaline solutions, both natural and synthetic, is explored. An empirical equation of the density-viscosity relationship as a function of temperature was developed for the Dead Sea brine and its dilutions. The viscosity levels of the Dead Sea brine (density of 1.24 ṡ 103 kg/m3; viscosity of 3.6 mPa s at 20 °C) and of the more extremely saline natural brine (density of 1.37 ṡ 103 kg/m3) were found to be ∼3 and ∼10 times greater than that of fresh water, respectively. The combined effect of the above changes in viscosity and density on the hydraulic conductivity is reduction by a factor of 3-7. The chemical composition significantly affects the viscosity of brines with similar densities, whereby solutions with a higher Mg/Na ratio have higher viscosity. This explains the extremely high viscosity of the Dead Sea and related Mg-rich brines in comparison with the much lower values of NaCl and KCl brines with similar density. Possible impacts of the results include reduced settling velocity of grains in hypersaline viscous brines and changing hydraulic dynamics at the freshwater-saltwater and the vicinity of sinkholes.

  3. Purification of High Salinity Brine by Multi-Stage Ion Concentration Polarization Desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bumjoo; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kwon, Hyukjin J; Pham, Van Sang; Kim, Minseok; Al-Anzi, Bader; Lim, Geunbae; Han, Jongyoon

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for the desalination of high concentration brine (>TDS 35,000 ppm) efficiently and economically, either for the treatment of produced water from shale gas/oil development, or minimizing the environmental impact of brine from existing desalination plants. Yet, reverse osmosis (RO), which is the most widely used for desalination currently, is not practical for brine desalination. This paper demonstrates technical and economic feasibility of ICP (Ion Concentration Polarization) electrical desalination for the high saline water treatment, by adopting multi-stage operation with better energy efficiency. Optimized multi-staging configurations, dependent on the brine salinity values, can be designed based on experimental and numerical analysis. Such an optimization aims at achieving not just the energy efficiency but also (membrane) area efficiency, lowering the true cost of brine treatment. ICP electrical desalination is shown here to treat brine salinity up to 100,000 ppm of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) with flexible salt rejection rate up to 70% which is promising in a various application treating brine waste. We also demonstrate that ICP desalination has advantage of removing both salts and diverse suspended solids simultaneously, and less susceptibility to membrane fouling/scaling, which is a significant challenge in the membrane processes. PMID:27545955

  4. One potential superlarge Pb-Zn ore occurrence with Himalayan thermal brine genesis--Wuqia Region, Xinjiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘继顺; 高珍权; 邓功全; 李明; 刘全德

    2002-01-01

    The paper focuses on geological and geochemical evidence of thermal brine genesis of Pb-Zn deposits in Wuqia district, Xinjiang. The results suggest that the known Pb-Zn deposits, such as Wulagen, are thermal brine genesis, which is supported by the features of tectonic setting, magma and regional metamorphism, and the characteristics of trace element distribution in strata and redistribution in the ore-forming process, the REE patterns and their main parameters of main type ores, the composition features and the source indicators of Pb, S isotopes. Ore-forming conditions of superlarge Pb-Zn deposits studies show that there exists tectonic and sources setting of Jinding-type superlarge Pb-Zn deposits in this area. Five Pb-Zn ore belts and central uplift belts discovered lately have not only confirmed that the genesis of Wulagen Pb-Zn deposits is thermal genesis, but also further proved that there exists tectonic and source setting of Jinding-type superlarge Pb-Zn deposit in the study area. Mineral deposit model was described and prospecting potentiality of superlarge Pb-Zn deposit and their significance were discussed.

  5. Deep well injection of brine from Paradox Valley, Colorado: Potential major precipitation problems remediated by nanofiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Ambats, G.; Thordsen, J.J.; Davis, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    Groundwater brine seepage into the Dolores River in Paradox Valley, Colorado, increases the dissolved solids load of the Colorado River annually by ~2.0 x 108 kg. To abate this natural contamination, the Bureau of Reclamation plans to pump ~3540 m3/d of brine from 12 shallow wells located along the Dolores River. The brine, with a salinity of 250,000 mg/L, will be piped to the deepest (4.9 km) disposal well in the world and injected mainly into the Mississippian Leadville Limestone. Geochemical modeling indicates, and water-rock experiments confirm, that a huge mass of anhydrite (~1.0 x 104 kg/d) likely will precipitate from the injected brine at downhole conditions of 120??C and 500 bars. Anhydrite precipitation could increase by up to 3 times if the injected brine is allowed to mix with the highly incompatible formation water of the Leadville Limestone and if the Mg in this brine dolomitizes the calcite of the aquifer. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that nanofiltration membranes, which are selective to divalent anions, provide a new technology that remediates the precipitation problem by removing ~98% of dissolved SO4 from the hypersaline brine. The fluid pressure used (50 bars) is much lower than would be required for traditional reverse osmosis membranes because nanofiltration membranes have a low rejection efficiency (5-10%) for monovalent anions. Our results indicate that the proportion of treatable brine increases from ~60% to >85% with the addition of trace concentrations of a precipitation inhibitor and by blending the raw brine with the effluent stream.

  6. Weeks Island brine diffuser site study: baseline conditions and environmental assessment technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-12

    This technical report presents the results of a study conducted at two alternative brine diffuser sites (A and B) proposed for the Weeks Island salt dome, together with an analysis of the potential physical, chemical, and biological effects of brine disposal for this area of the Gulf of Mexico. Brine would result from either the leaching of salt domes to form or enlarge oil storage caverns, or the subsequent use of these caverns for crude oil storage in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program. Brine leached from the Weeks Island salt dome would be transported through a pipeline which would extend from the salt dome either 27 nautical miles (32 statute miles) for Site A, or 41 nautical miles (47 statute miles) for Site B, into Gulf waters. The brine would be discharged at these sites through an offshore diffuser at a sustained peak rate of 39 ft/sup 3//sec. The disposal of large quantities of brine in the Gulf could have a significant impact on the biology and water quality of the area. Physical and chemical measurements of the marine environment at Sites A and B were taken between September 1977 and July 1978 to correlate the existing environmental conditions with the estimated physical extent of tthe brine discharge as predicted by the MIT model (US Dept. of Commerce, 1977a). Measurements of wind, tide, waves, currents, and stratification (water column structure) were also obtained since the diffusion and dispersion of the brine plume are a function of the local circulation regime. These data were used to calculate both near- and far-field concentrations of brine, and may also be used in the design criteria for diffuser port configuration and verification of the plume model. Biological samples were taken to characterize the sites and to predict potential areas of impact with regard to the discharge. This sampling focused on benthic organisms and demersal fish. (DMC)

  7. Hydrological and geochemical monitoring for a CO2 sequestration pilot in a brine formation

    OpenAIRE

    Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten; Benson, Sally M.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Gunter, William D.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrological and geochemical monitoring are key components of site characterization and CO2 plume monitoring for a pilot test to inject CO2 into a brine-bearing sand of the fluvial-deltaic Frio formation in the upper Texas Gulf Coast. In situ, injected CO2 forms a supercritical phase that has gas-like properties (low density and viscosity) compared to the surrounding brine, while some CO2 dissolves in the brine. The pilot test employs one injection well and one monitor well, with contin...

  8. Examination of brine contamination risk to aquatic resources from petroleum development in the Williston Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Robert A.; Thamke, Joanna N.; Smith, Bruce D.; Tangen, Brian A.; Chesley-Preston, Tara; Preston, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey scientists and cooperating partners are examining the potential risk to aquatic resources (for example, wetlands, streams) by contamination from saline waters (brine) produced by petroleum development in the Williston Basin of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota. The primary goals of this study are to provide a science-based approach to assess potential risk of brine contamination to aquatic systems and to help focus limited monitoring and mitigation resources on the areas of greatest need. These goals will be accomplished through field investigations that quantify brine movement and risk assessments using remotely-sensed and other spatial datasets.

  9. Synthesis of hydroxy sodalite from coal fly ash using waste industrial brine solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M; Petrik, Leslie F; Balfour, Gillian; Gitari, Wilson M; Hums, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The effect of using industrial waste brine solution instead of ultra pure water was investigated during the synthesis of zeolites using three South African coal fly ashes as Si feedstock. The high halide brine was obtained from the retentate effluent of a reverse osmosis mine water treatment plant. Synthesis conditions applied were; ageing of fly ash was at 47 ° C for 48 hours, and while the hydrothermal treatment temperature was set at 140 ° C for 48 hours. The use of brine as a solvent resulted in the formation of hydroxy sodalite zeolite although unconverted mullite and hematite from the fly ash feedstock was also found in the synthesis product. PMID:22175873

  10. Buoyancy effects on upward brine displacement caused by CO2 injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Rinaldi, A.

    2010-01-15

    Upward displacement of brine from deep reservoirs driven by pressure increases resulting from CO{sub 2} injection for geologic carbon sequestration may occur through improperly sealed abandoned wells, through permeable faults, or through permeable channels between pinch-outs of shale formations. The concern about upward brine flow is that, upon intrusion into aquifers containing groundwater resources, the brine may degrade groundwater. Because both salinity and temperature increase with depth in sedimentary basins, upward displacement of brine involves lifting fluid that is saline but also warm into shallower regions that contain fresher, cooler water. We have carried out dynamic simulations using TOUGH2/EOS7 of upward displacement of warm, salty water into cooler, fresher aquifers in a highly idealized two-dimensional model consisting of a vertical conduit (representing a well or permeable fault) connecting a deep and a shallow reservoir. Our simulations show that for small pressure increases and/or high-salinity-gradient cases, brine is pushed up the conduit to a new static steady-state equilibrium. On the other hand, if the pressure rise is large enough that brine is pushed up the conduit and into the overlying upper aquifer, flow may be sustained if the dense brine is allowed to spread laterally. In this scenario, dense brine only contacts the lower-most region of the upper aquifer. In a hypothetical case in which strong cooling of the dense brine occurs in the upper reservoir, the brine becomes sufficiently dense that it flows back down into the deeper reservoir from where it came. The brine then heats again in the lower aquifer and moves back up the conduit to repeat the cycle. Parameter studies delineate steady-state (static) and oscillatory solutions and reveal the character and period of oscillatory solutions. Such oscillatory solutions are mostly a curiosity rather than an expected natural phenomenon because in nature the geothermal gradient prevents the

  11. Deep brine recognition upstream the EBE syndicate. Geochemical and isotopic investigations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report and discuss the results obtained after performing a drilling upstream the drinkable water harnessing field of a water supply syndicate in Alsace (Ensisheim, Bollwiller and surroundings), in order to confirm the existence of a deep brine source. This brine is diluted by recent waters. The first isotopic investigations do not allow the origin of this brine to be identified, but fractures due to some seismic events are suspected. The report presents the drilling and the various aspects of the chemical and isotopic studies (sampling, physico-chemical analysis, dating, identification of various isotopes)

  12. Evaluation of the bioactivities of some Myanmar medicinal plants using brine shrimp (Artemia salina) toxicity test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a variety of toxic substances, brine shrimp larvae (Artemia salina) are usually used as a simple bioassay method and it is also applied for natural product research. The brine shrimp larvae (nauplii) are obtained by natural hatching method from Artemia cysts. By using the larvae, the results from these experiments lead to the lethal dose, LD50 values of extracts of selected medicinal plants. Activities of a broad range of plant extracts are manifested as toxicity to the brine shrimp. Screening results with six plant extracts are compared with pure caffeine. This method is rapid, reliable, inexpensive and convenient. (author)

  13. A Brine Shrimp Bioassay for Measuring Toxicity and Remediation of Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Marya

    1999-12-01

    A bioassay using Artemia franciscana (brine shrimp) was adapted to measure the toxicity of household chemicals. One project is described in which students collect dose-response curves for seven commercial flea-killing products. Next, groups of students researched the insecticidal ingredients of the flea products. On the basis of the structures of the active ingredients, they chose remediation methods to make the flea product less toxic to brine shrimp; procedures included copper-catalyzed hydrolysis, adsorption onto activated charcoal, bleach treatment, and photodegradation. No special equipment or supplies are necessary for the bioassay other than the brine shrimp eggs, which can be obtained at any aquarium store.

  14. Wettability measurement under high P-T conditions using X-ray imaging with application to the brine-supercritical CO2 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Kuldeep; Guiltinan, Eric J.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Maisano, Jessica A.; Ketcham, Richard A.; Bennett, Philip C.

    2015-09-01

    We present a new method for measuring wettability or contact angle of minerals at reservoir pressure-temperature conditions using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) and radiography. In this method, a capillary or a narrow slot is constructed from a mineral or a rock sample of interest wherein two fluids are allowed to form an interface that is imaged using X-rays. After some validation measurements at room pressure-temperature conditions, we illustrate this method by measuring the contact angle of CO2-brine on quartz, muscovite, shale, borosilicate glass, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon), and polyether ether ketone (PEEK) surfaces at 60-71°C and 13.8-22.8 MPa. At reservoir conditions, PTFE and PEEK surfaces were found to be CO2-wet with contact angles of 140° and 127°, respectively. Quartz and muscovite were found to be water-wet with contact angles of 26° and 58°, respectively, under similar conditions. Borosilicate glass-air-brine at room conditions showed strong water-wet characteristics with a contact angle of 9°, whereas borosilicate glass-CO2-brine at 13.8 MPa and 60°C showed a decrease in its water-wetness with contact angle of 54°. This method provides a new application for X-ray imaging and an alternative to other methods.

  15. Industrial Chemistry and School Chemistry: Making Chemistry Studies More Relevant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstein, Avi; Kesner, Miri

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the development and implementation over the period of more than 15 years of learning materials focusing on industrial chemistry as the main theme. The work was conducted in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. The project's general goal was to teach chemistry concepts in the…

  16. Does stream water chemistry reflect watershed characteristics?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chuman, Tomáš; Hruška, Jakub; Oulehle, Filip; Gürtlerová, P.; Majer, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 185, č. 7 (2013), s. 5683-5701. ISSN 0167-6369 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Anions * Cations * Land cover * Water quality * Geochemical reactivity * Czech Republic Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.679, year: 2013

  17. Interim report for defining brine and oil threats in the Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge [2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following interim report is a list of activities being performed in conjunction with the study of oil brine effects on crayfish in the Patoka River National...

  18. Corrosion studies of A216 grade WCA steel in hydrothermal magnesium-containing brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project (SRP) is investigating the general corrosion resistance of cast mild steel as a candidate material for waste package containers. Evaluation of this material is being performed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in environments simulating expected repository conditions. General corrosion studies of mild steel (ASTM A216 grade WCA) in the as-cast and normalized conditions were conducted in hydrothermal halite-saturated (saturated at ambient temperature) brine environments simulating a ''dissolution'' and an ''inclusion'' brine. Corrosion tests were also performed in brines similar to the inclusion brine but containing magnesium concentrations ranging from 1000 to 30,000 ppM to investigate the effect of magnesium on the corrosion behavior. Corrosion rates of the cast mild steel were found to increase with increasing temperature and with increasing magnesium concentration. Some possible mechanisms that explain the observed behavior are presented. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Antioxidative low molecular weight compounds in marinated herring (Clupea harengus) salt brine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gringer, Nina; Safafar, Hamed; du Mesnildot, Axelle;

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at unravelling the antioxidative capacity of low molecular weight compounds (LMWC) (peptides, amino acids and phenolic acids) present in salt brines from the marinated herring production. Brines were fractionated into <10 kDa fractions using dialysis and further into 94 fractions...... salt brines contain LMWC holding ABTS-radical scavenging activity, reducing power and iron chelating activity. Generally, a strong correlation between TPC and ABTSradical scavenging was found. In contrast, reducing power and iron chelating activity seemed to be caused by peptides. Protein....../peptide sequencing revealed 1 kDa peptides with the presence of HDFmotif which could be responsible for some of the antioxidant capacity observed in marinated herring salt brine....

  20. Interim report for defining brine and oil threats in the Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge [2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following interim report is a list of activities being performed in conjunction with the study of oil brine effects on crayfish in the Patoka River National...

  1. THE BRINE SHRIMP (ARTEMIA SALINA) LETHALITY OF Brassica oleracea var. capitata

    OpenAIRE

    O. T. TÜZÜN, E. GÜRKAN, S. DOĞANCA, F. HIRLAK,

    2015-01-01

    This work covers up the bio-activities of the five fractions obtained from the ethanolic extract of Brassica oleracea var. capitata (Cruciferae).Key Words: Brassica oleracea var. capitata, Brine shrimp (Artemia salina)

  2. Use of a Brine Shrimp Assay to Study Herbal Teas in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opler, Annette; Mizell, Rebecca; Robert, Alexander; Cervantes-Cervantes, Miguel; Kincaid, Dwight; Kennelly, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a brine shrimp assay to demonstrate the effects of the biological activity of herbal remedies. Describes two protocols, one using aqueous extracts and the other using methanol extracts. (Contains 21 references.) (YDS)

  3. Brine shrimp lethality and antibacterial activity of extracts from the bark of Schleichera oleosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laxman Pokhrel; Bigyan Sharma; Gan B Bajracharya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the antibacterial efficacy and brine shrimp toxicity of extracts (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water) obtained from the bark of Schleichera oleosa. Methods: The powdered bark sample was Soxhlet extracted sequentially in hexanes, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. Antibacterial evaluation was carried out by following the agar diffusion method and amoxicillin disc was used as a reference. Slightly modified Meyer’s method was used to determine the toxicity of the extracts in brine shrimps. Results: Among the nine bacterial strains tested, the methanolic and aqueous extracts showed promising antibacterial efficacy against Serratia marcescens, Escherarichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus. None of the extracts were found significantly toxic to brine shrimps. Conclusions: Strong antibacterial activity and low brine shrimp toxicity of methanolic and aqueous extracts can provide new antibacterial compounds.

  4. Brine shrimp lethality and antibacterial activity of extracts from the bark of Schleichera oleosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxman Pokhrel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the antibacterial efficacy and brine shrimp toxicity of extracts (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water obtained from the bark of Schleichera oleosa. Methods: The powdered bark sample was Soxhlet extracted sequentially in hexanes, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. Antibacterial evaluation was carried out by following the agar diffusion method and amoxicillin disc was used as a reference. Slightly modified Meyer’s method was used to determine the toxicity of the extracts in brine shrimps. Results: Among the nine bacterial strains tested, the methanolic and aqueous extracts showed promising antibacterial efficacy against Serratia marcescens, Escherarichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus. None of the extracts were found significantly toxic to brine shrimps. Conclusions: Strong antibacterial activity and low brine shrimp toxicity of methanolic and aqueous extracts can provide new antibacterial compounds.

  5. Production dynamics of Brine Shrimp (Artemia franciscana) in the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Abundance, stage structure and population dynamics of brine shrimp Artemia franciscana in pond M4 of the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge were documented...

  6. Bead Evaporator for Complete Water and Salt Recovery from Brine Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A microgravity-compatible Brine Evaporation and Mineralization System (BEMS) is proposed for 100% water recovery from highly contaminated wastewater as well as...

  7. An experimental study of diopside- CO2 -brine interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bing; Liu, Li; Ming, Xiaoran; Guo, Yanjun

    2014-05-01

    Diopside is one of the main minerals that consist igneous rock. It is characterized by high content of divalent cations like Ca, Mg, and Fe and relatively fast dissolution rate. These features make it an expected mineral of releasing metal ions for mineral carbonation during the research of mineral trapping of CO2. This study focus on the dissolution amount and micro-scale observing of diopside after the reaction with CO2 and brine under 100, 150, and 200°C. Each of the three experiments are carried out with 2 pieces of diopside (10mm*10mm*4mm) and 500ml Nacl (1mol/L) for 72h, and the pressure inside is 7Mp after injecting of CO2. SEM analysis of the surface of diopside before and after the experiments shows that the degree of corrosion increase with the rising of temperature. The slices of diopside lose 0.8% of its weight at the end of the experiments of 100°C, about 1.8% at 150°C, and about 3.92% at 200°C. Silicon concentrations after reaction are 14.55 mg/L (100°C), 47.02 mg/L (150°C), and 65.32 mg/L (200°C), which also prove the elevated temperature has a positive influence on dissolution of solid. Concentration of calcium and bicarbonate increase with temperature, while magnesium and iron are not. This may due to the heterogeneity of the composition in each piece of solid, or the precipitation of some compounds during the experiments. There are some amorphous compounds are found under SEM, which are mostly consisted of C, O, Na, Mg, Si, and Ca. A simple numerical simulation of CO2-diopside-brine interaction is carried out by TOUGHREACT. The setting of parameters are based on the experiments. Diopside reacts with 1mol/L Nacl under the CO2 partial pressure of 10Mp and the temperature keeps 100°C. The results present that the volume percent of precipitated carbonates (calcite and magnesite) reaches 1.23% after 100 years, which means 1m3 diopside could capture 16.76kg CO2 after 100 years by the means of mineral carbonation. This study reveals the

  8. Field evaluation of membrane distillation technologies for desalination of highly saline brines

    OpenAIRE

    Minier-Matar, J.; Hussain, A; Janson, A; Benyahia, F.; Adham, S.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) is a hybrid thermal-membrane desalination process that uses low-grade waste heat and hydrophobic membrane to produce high quality distillate. The MD process can treat highly saline brines that other conventional desalination processes cannot treat. These unique features of the MD process make it an ideal candidate to desalinate concentrated brines from thermal desalination plants to augment fresh water production from existing facilities. A consortium consisting of ...

  9. Study of thermal-gradient-induced migration of brine inclusions in salt. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural salt deposits, which are being considered for high-level waste disposal, contain a small volume fraction of water in the form of brine inclusions distributed throughout the salt. Radioactive decay heating of the nuclear wastes will impose a temperature gradient on the surrounding salt which mobilizes the brine inclusions. Inclusions filled completely with brine (the all-liquid inclusions) migrate up the temperature gradient and eventually accumulate brine near the buried waste forms. The brine may slowly corrode or degrade the waste forms, which is undesirable. Therefore it is important to consider the migration of brine inclusions in salt under imposed temperature gradients to properly evaluate the performance of a future salt repository for nuclear wastes. The migration velocities of the inclusions were found to be dependent on temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion shape and size. The velocities were also dictated by the interfacial mass transfer resistance at brine/solid interface. This interfacial resistance depends on the dislocation density in the crystal, which in turn, depends on the axial compressive loading of the crystal. At low axial loads, the dependence between the velocity and temperature gradient is nonlinear. At high axial loads, the interfacial resistance is reduced and the migration velocity depends linearly on the temperature gradient. All-liquid inclusions filled with mixed brines were also studied. For gas-liquid inclusions, helium, air and argon were compared. Migration studies were also conducted on single crystallites of natural salt as well as in polycrystalline natural salt samples. The behavior of the inclusions at large-ange grain boundaries was observed

  10. BRINE SHRIM LETHALITY BIOASSAY OF METHANOLIC CRUDE EXTRACTS OF TERMINALIA ARJUNA

    OpenAIRE

    Maruf Anayet and Mohammad Musarraf Hussain

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the cytotoxic activities of Terminalia arjuna (Family: Combretaceae) by brine shrimp lethality bioassay. The leaves of Terminalia arjuna were extracted with methanol and the methanolic extract was fractionated into three fractions by using organic solvents like n-hexane, ethyl acetate and chloroform. The n-hexane, ethyl acetate and chloroform soluble fractions of methanolic crude extract were screened for antitumor properties using brine shrimp lethality b...

  11. Brine shrimp lethality and acute oral toxicity studies on Swietenia mahagoni (Linn.) Jacq. seed methanolic extract

    OpenAIRE

    Geethaa Sahgal; Surash Ramanathan; Sreenivasan Sasidharan; Mohd. Nizam Mordi; Sabariah Ismail; Sharif Mahsufi Mansor

    2010-01-01

    Background: The seeds of Swietenia mahagoni have been applied in folk medicine for the treatment of hypertension, diabetes, malaria, amoebiasis, cough, chest pain, and intestinal parasitism. Here we are the first to report on the toxicity of the Swietenia mahagoni crude methanolic (SMCM) seed extract. Methods: SMCM seed extract has been studied for its brine shrimp lethality and acute oral toxicity, in mice. Results: The brine shrimp lethality bioassay shows a moderate cytotoxicity at high co...

  12. Comparing the potential for dispersal via waterbirds of a native and an invasive brine shrimp

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Marta I.; Hortas, F.; Figuerola, Jordi; Green, Andy J.

    2012-01-01

    Migratory waterbirds are likely to have a major role in the spread of many exotic aquatic invertebrates by passive dispersal. However, in the field, this has so far only been confirmed in the case of the American brine shrimp Artemia franciscana, which is spreading quickly around the Mediterranean region. We compared experimentally the capacity of A. franciscana and the native brine shrimp Artemia parthenogenetica to disperse via migratory shorebirds. After Artemia resting eggs (cysts) were f...

  13. A comparison between two brine shrimp assays to detect in vitro cytotoxicity in marine natural products

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Pilar; Hernández-Inda Zaira L; Carballo José; García-Grávalos María D

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background The brine shrimp lethality assay is considered a useful tool for preliminary assessment of toxicity. It has also been suggested for screening pharmacological activities in plant extracts. However, we think that it is necessary to evaluate the suitability of the brine shrimp methods before they are used as a general bio-assay to test natural marine products for pharmacological activity. Material and Methods The bioactivity of the isopropanolic (2-PrOH) extracts of 14 specie...

  14. Acute toxicity, brine shrimp cytotoxicity, anthelmintic and relaxant potentials of fruits of Rubus fruticosus Agg

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Niaz; Aleem, Umer; Ali Shah, Syed Wadood; Shah, Ismail; Junaid, Muhammad; Ahmed, Ghayour; Ali, Waqar; Ghias, Mehreen

    2013-01-01

    Background Rubus fruticosus is used in tribal medicine as anthelmintic and an antispasmodic. In the current work, we investigated the anthelmintic and antispasmodic activities of crude methanol extract of fruits of R. fruticosus on scientific grounds. Acute toxicity and brine shrimp cytotoxicity activity of the extract were also performed. Methods Acute toxicity study of crude methanol extract of R. fruticosus was performed on mice. In vitro Brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay was performed on sh...

  15. Study of thermal-gradient-induced migration of brine inclusions in salt. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    Natural salt deposits, which are being considered for high-level waste disposal, contain a small volume fraction of water in the form of brine inclusions distributed throughout the salt. Radioactive decay heating of the nuclear wastes will impose a temperature gradient on the surrounding salt which mobilizes the brine inclusions. Inclusions filled completely with brine (the all-liquid inclusions) migrate up the temperature gradient and eventually accumulate brine near the buried waste forms. The brine may slowly corrode or degrade the waste forms, which is undesirable. Therefore it is important to consider the migration of brine inclusions in salt under imposed temperature gradients to properly evaluate the performance of a future salt repository for nuclear wastes. The migration velocities of the inclusions were found to be dependent on temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion shape and size. The velocities were also dictated by the interfacial mass transfer resistance at brine/solid interface. This interfacial resistance depends on the dislocation density in the crystal, which in turn, depends on the axial compressive loading of the crystal. At low axial loads, the dependence between the velocity and temperature gradient is nonlinear. At high axial loads, the interfacial resistance is reduced and the migration velocity depends linearly on the temperature gradient. All-liquid inclusions filled with mixed brines were also studied. For gas-liquid inclusions, helium, air and argon were compared. Migration studies were also conducted on single crystallites of natural salt as well as in polycrystalline natural salt samples. The behavior of the inclusions at large-ange grain boundaries was observed.

  16. New aspects of the use of inert diets for high density culturing of brine shrimp

    OpenAIRE

    Dobbeleir, J.; Adam, N.(Princeton University, Princeton, U.S.A); Bossuyt, E.; Bruggeman, E.; Sorgeloos, P

    1980-01-01

    Brine shrimp being non-selective filter-feeders, cheap agricultural waste products should be evaluated as potential food sources for their controlled mass culturing. Preliminary results of screening tests performed with wheat bran, soybean meal , rice bran and whey powder in culturing systems of various size are reported. Wheat bran appears to be unsuitable as monodiet for brine shrimp. The other products tested support good growth although specific precautions have to be taken with some food...

  17. Effects of brine addition on effluent toxicity and marine toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) manipulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.T.; Burgess, R.M. (Environmental Protection Agency, Narragansett, RI (United States)); Mitchell, K. (Xavier Univ. of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States). Biology Dept.); Zappala, M. (Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States))

    1995-02-01

    Little information is available concerning the effect of salinity adjustment on effluent storage and toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) performance. These factors are important for accurate assessments of potential toxicity to marine organisms. The objective of this study was to determine (a) the effect of salinity adjustment using hypersaline brine on the toxicity of effluents stored up to 40 d, and (b) to determine the effect of salinity adjustment on TIE manipulations. Changes in effluent toxicity over time were examined by using a municipal and an industrial effluent. A toxicity time series was performed for 16 d for the industrial effluent and 40 d for the municipal effluent. Toxicity was measured with modified 48-h acute Mysidopsis bahia and Menidia beryllina tests. Results indicate that, compared to day 0 test results, effluent stored with brine had fewer significant changes in toxicity than did effluent stored without brine. To determine the effects of brine addition on TIE manipulations, the authors conducted a series of manipulations in which one aliquot of an effluent had brine added prior to the TIE manipulations and the other aliquot had brine added after the TIE manipulation. The manipulations conducted were EDTA addition, sodium thiosulfate addition, C[sub 18] extraction, aeration, filtration, and graduated pH manipulations. Toxicity was measured with the modified 48-h acute mysid test. Addition of brine had no effect on the outcome of TIE manipulations. They have concluded that it is operationally easier to add brine as soon as possible after sampling and that effluent tests should be conducted as soon as practical.

  18. Antagonism Between Osmophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria and Yeasts in Brine Fermentation of Soy Sauce

    OpenAIRE

    Noda, Fumio; HAYASHI, Kazuya; Mizunuma, Takeji

    1980-01-01

    Brine fermentation by osmophilic lactic acid bacteria and yeasts for long periods of time is essential to produce a good quality of shoyu (Japanese fermented soy sauce). It is well known that lactic acid fermentation by osmophilic lactic acid bacteria results in the depression of alcoholic fermentation by osmophilic yeasts, but the nature of the interaction between osmophilic lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in brine fermentation of shoyu has not been revealed. The inhibitory effect of osmophi...

  19. Fermentation of table olives by oleuropeinolytic starter culture in reduced salt brines and inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataridou, M; Kotzekidou, P

    2015-09-01

    The effect of an autochthonous starter culture developed by oleuropeinolytic strains belonging to the Lactobacillus plantarum group on the physicochemical and microbiological characteristics and the biophenol content of table olives fermented under reduced salt conditions was studied. Black (cv. Kalamata) and green (cv. Chalkidikis) olives were fermented in two different kinds of brine (Brine A containing 2.3% NaCl, 32.3mM Ca-acetate and 33.9mM Ca-lactate and Brine B containing 4% NaCl, pH5.0 in both brines). The sensory attributes of olives fermented by oleuropeinolytic starter culture assessed by a trained panel did not differ significantly compared with industrial processing. It is possible to carry out significant changes in table olive processing applying a completely microbiological procedure using oleuropeinolytic strains of the L. plantarum group as both the debittering and the fermentation agent in order to achieve improved sensorial and nutritional characteristics of the final product. Table olives processed by the suggested methodology may constitute a good source of biophenols in the diet, especially hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol. The inactivation potential of Escherichia coli O157 EDL-932 and Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in olives fermented by oleuropeinolytic starter culture was evaluated. The population of each pathogen in olive homogenates of both cultivars is inactivated by more than 6logCFU/ml in less than 24h. When whole fermented olives were submerged in peptone/saline (containing 6.7logCFU/ml of the relevant bacterial pathogen) for 30min followed by rinsing in distilled water, the population of viable foodborne pathogens dropped more than 4 logs in olive pulp. During subsequent storage at 22 or 4°C the population of L. monocytogenes Scott A was further eliminated under the detection limit in both olive cultivars whereas the population of E. coli O157 EDL-932 could be detected in olives stored in peptone/saline at 22°C for 7days. The inhibitory

  20. From Matter to Life:Chemistry?Chemistry!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Marie; LEHN

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Animate as well as inanimate matter,living organisms as well as materials,are formed of molecules and of the organized entities resulting from the interaction of molecules with each other.Chemistry provides the bridge between the molecules of inanimate matter and the highly complex molecular architectures and systems which make up living organisms. Synthetic chemistry has developed a very powerful set of methods for constructing ever more complex molecules.Supramolecular chemistry seeks to con...

  1. Green chemistry: A tool in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Smita Talaviya; Falguni Majumdar

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceut...

  2. Advances in analytical chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendale, W. F.; Congo, Richard T.; Nielsen, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of computer programs based on multivariate statistical algorithms makes possible obtaining reliable information from long data vectors that contain large amounts of extraneous information, for example, noise and/or analytes that we do not wish to control. Three examples are described. Each of these applications requires the use of techniques characteristic of modern analytical chemistry. The first example, using a quantitative or analytical model, describes the determination of the acid dissociation constant for 2,2'-pyridyl thiophene using archived data. The second example describes an investigation to determine the active biocidal species of iodine in aqueous solutions. The third example is taken from a research program directed toward advanced fiber-optic chemical sensors. The second and third examples require heuristic or empirical models.

  3. Nuclear waste repository simulation experiments (brine migration), Asse Mine of the Federal Republic of Germany: Quarterly brine migration data report, October--December 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tenth brine migration data report describes experiments simulating a nuclear waste repository at the 800-m (2624-ft) level of the Asse Salt Mine in the Federal Republic of Germany from May 1983 through December 1985. This report describes the test equipment, the Asse Salt Mine, and the pretest properties of the salt in the test gallery. This report includes test data for 31 months of operations on brine migration rates, borehole pressure, salt temperatures and thermomechanical behavior of the salt. 3 refs., 118 figs., 93 tabs

  4. Quarterly brine migration data report, May-September 1983: Nuclear Waste Repository simulation experiments (brine migration), Asse Mine of the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first quarterly brine migration data report describes experiments simulating a nuclear waste repository at the 800-m (2624-ft) level of the Asse Salt Mine in the Federal Republic of Germany from May 1983 through September 1983. This report describes the test equipment, the Asse Salt Mine, and the pretest properties of the salt in the test gallery. This report also includes test data for the first 4 months of operations on brine migration rates, borehole pressure, salt temperatures, and thermomechanical behavior of the salt. The duration of the experiments will be approximately 2 years, ending in December 1985. 83 figs., 55 tabs

  5. A review of degradation modes of low carbon steel in brine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature search was conducted to review information on degradation modes of low carbon steel in brine solutions. A computer search was used to obtain articles from 1970 to present while a manual search was conducted for articles published prior to 1970. The published articles and reports indicated that uniform corrosion occurred in sea water, geothermal brines and simulated repository brines. The uniform corrosion rate increased with decreasing pH, increasing oxygen contest of brine and increasing temperature. Pitting of low carbon steel in brine solutions was related to scale formation due to presences of sulfur and heavy metal ions or mill scale present prior to exposure. Low carbon steel did not appear to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, but data was limited. The presence of anaerobic bacteria greatly increased the rate of corrosion of low carbon steel as compared to sterile conditions. If sufficient hydrogen is present, low carbon steel could fail due to hydrogen embrittlement in brine solutions. However, this is an area where experimental work needs to be done under more specific conditions related to salt repositories. Corrosion fatigue and stray current corrosion require specific conditions to occur which can be avoided during waste storage and were there fore not addressed. Also, galvanic effects were not addressed as it will be possible to minimize galvanic effects by design. 226 refs., 4 tabs

  6. About effect of magnesium chloride and some ions in brines on boron coprecipitation by iron hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were made of conditions of precipitation of boron with iron hydroxide from the brines of the mixing zone of the Kara-Bogaz Gol, the mother liquor after the precipitation of potassium salts and artificial manganese chloride solutions at a temperature of 7-45 dee C. The maximum extraction of boron from the brines investigated is observed both in a weakly acid and a weakly alkaline medium. The extraction intensity increases drastically in the range of the maximum with an increase in brine concentration. The anions Cl-, SO42-, and HCO3- present in the brines produce the maximum effect on boron precipitation at a definite pH. This effect depends on the nature of the anions and their ratio in the brine. With a rise in temperature the degree of boron precipitations from the magnesium chloride brine and the precipitate capacity increase as a result of the release of active magnesium hydroxide. When the ratio of Fe2O3 to 100 ml initial solution changes towards increase in precipitating agent at a constant temperature, the precipitate capacity for B2O3 decreases

  7. Chemical Analyses of Geothermal Waters and Strategic Petroleum Reserve Brines for Strategic and Precious Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrar, Jackson E.; Raber, Ellen

    1983-06-01

    Water form seven hydrothermal-geothermal, one geopressured-geothermal, and six Strategic Petroleum Reserve wells have been surveyed for twelve metals of special strategic and economic importance using trace chemical analysis techniques. The elements sought were Cr, Co, Mn, Ta, Sn, V, Nb, Li, Sr, Pt, Au, and Ag. Platinum was found at a concentration of ~50 ppb in a brine from the Salton Sea geothermal area. Brine from this region, as has been known from previous studies, is also rich in Li, Sr, and Mn. Higher concentrations (~900) of Sr are found in the high-salinity geopressured brines. None of the fluids contained interesting concentrations of the other metals. Good recovery of precious metals at sub-ppm concentrations from synthetic high salinity brines was achieved using Amborane resin, but similar recovery in the laboratory using real brines could not be demonstrated. Several analytical techniques were compared in sensitivity for the determination of the precious metals; neutron activation analysis with carrier separation is the best for gold and platinum in geothermal brines. (DJE-2005)

  8. Evolution of Hydrate Dissociation by Warm Brine Stimulation Combined Depressurization in the South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Yang Chen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the gas production performance of the hydrate accumulations in the South China Sea, a numerical simulation with warm brine stimulation combined depressurization has been conducted. A dual horizontal well system is considered as the well configuration in this work. In order to reduce energy input and improve energy utilization, warm brine (50 °C is injected into the reservoir for hydrate dissociation. The effect of the intrinsic permeability of the hydrate reservoir, the salinity and the temperature of the injected brine to gas hydrate exploitation have been investigated. The numerical simulation results indicate that the average gas production rate Qavg is about 1.23 ´ 105 ST m3/day for the entire hydrate deposit, which has the same order of magnitude compared with the commercially viable production rate. The injected brine can be pumped out from the upper production well directly after the hydrate between the two wells is dissociated completely. Thus, the effective region of heat and inhibitor stimulation is limited. The sensitivity analyses indicate that the dissociation rate of hydrate can be enhanced by increasing the temperature of the injected brine and raising the salinity of the injected brine. The parametric study of permeability shows that the hydrate of the reservoir with the larger permeability has a higher dissociation rate.

  9. Actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): FY94 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains six reports on actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These reports, completed in FY94, are relevant to the estimation of the potential dissolved actinide concentrations in WIPP brines under repository breach scenarios. Estimates of potential dissolved actinide concentrations are necessary for WIPP performance assessment calculations. The specific topics covered within this document are: the complexation of oxalate with Th(IV) and U(VI); the stability of Pu(VI) in one WIPP-specific brine environment both with and without carbonate present; the solubility of Nd(III) in a WIPP Salado brine surrogate as a function of hydrogen ion concentration; the steady-state dissolved plutonium concentrations in a synthetic WIPP Culebra brine surrogate; the development of a model for Nd(III) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate solutions; and the development of a model for Np(V) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium Perchlorate, sodium carbonate, and sodium chloride media

  10. Actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): FY94 results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, C.F. [ed.

    1995-08-01

    This document contains six reports on actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These reports, completed in FY94, are relevant to the estimation of the potential dissolved actinide concentrations in WIPP brines under repository breach scenarios. Estimates of potential dissolved actinide concentrations are necessary for WIPP performance assessment calculations. The specific topics covered within this document are: the complexation of oxalate with Th(IV) and U(VI); the stability of Pu(VI) in one WIPP-specific brine environment both with and without carbonate present; the solubility of Nd(III) in a WIPP Salado brine surrogate as a function of hydrogen ion concentration; the steady-state dissolved plutonium concentrations in a synthetic WIPP Culebra brine surrogate; the development of a model for Nd(III) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate solutions; and the development of a model for Np(V) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium Perchlorate, sodium carbonate, and sodium chloride media.

  11. Actinide Biocolloid Formation in Brine by Halophilic Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the ability of a halophilic bacterium (WFP 1A) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to accumulate uranium in order to determine the potential for biocolloid facilitated actinide transport. The bacterial cell Surface functional groups involved in the complexation of the actinide were determined by titration. Uranium, added as uranyl nitrate, was removed from solution at pH 5 by cells but at pH 7 and 9 very little uranium was removed due to its limited volubility. Although present as soluble species, uranyl citrate at pH 5, 7, and 9, and uranyl carbonate at pH 9 were not removed by the bacterium because they were not bioavailable due to their neutral or negative charge. Addition of uranyl EDTA to brine at pH 5, 7, and 9 resulted in the immediate precipitation of U. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that uranium was not only associated with the cell surface but also accumulated intracellulary as uranium-enriched granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, of the bacterial cells indicated the bulk sample contained more than one uranium phase. Nevertheless these results show the potential for the formation of actinide bearing bacterial biocolloids that are strictly regulated by the speciation and bioavailability of the actinide

  12. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  13. Micro-polymer Chemistry Experiment Teaching Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李青山

    2009-01-01

    For nearly thirty years,there has been made great progress in micro-polymer chemistry experiment teaching which has these characteristics that using less reagents,less pollution and more portable in comparison with the conventional experiment.In China,Zhou Ninghuai and others began to go on micro-scale experiment research firstly and Professor Li Qingshan who brought this innovation to polymer organic synthesis experiment has done a lot of works in micro-polymer chemistry experiment teaching.To carry out the study ofmicro-polymer chemistry experiments not only accords with teaching methods and reform,but also conforms to the trend of the times of green chemistry.So the research and application of micro-polymer chemistry experiment have broad prospects.

  14. Crevice chemistry estimation from bulk water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the first PWR plant in Japan started commercial operation in 1970, 22 plants are running in Japan as of the end of 1994. The main purpose of secondary water chemistry control is to minimize the corrosion possibility of the secondary system equipment, especially steam generators (SG). To achieve this objective, much effort has been concentrated on improving secondary water chemistry control. As a result of this effort, the recent secondary water chemistry in Japanese plants is well maintained in every stage of operation. However, to ensure and improve the reliability of SG, it is necessary to control crevice environments, which are located at tube/tube support plate intersections and under the sludge pile on the tube sheet. According to recent crevice monitoring examination results, the concentration behavior impurities in SG bulk water at the crevice is different for each species, and SG bulk water and crevice chemical compositions are not always equal. From these results, to control the crevice chemistry, improving bulk water chemistry control methods and a new type of molar ratio control index is needed. This paper introduces a brief summary of a recent crevice chemistry evaluation technique and bulk water chemistry control method, which is employed for crevice chemistry control, based on crevice monitoring examination results

  15. Green chemistry: A tool in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Talaviya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceuticals is to utilize eco-friendly, non-hazardous, reproducible and efficient solvents and catalysts in synthesis of drug molecules, drug intermediates and in researches involving synthetic chemistry. Microwave synthesis is also an important tool of green chemistry by being an energy efficient process.

  16. An overview of peat related chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Peat is a type of renewable resource that has usually been ignored. Nowadays, people mainly apply peat as the heating energy resource instead of other purposes. This thesis elaborates many studies such as peat used in chemistry, which were utilized by researchers, and the product has been made according to special characteristics of peat. The aim of thesis is to give a summary of the achievement of research, which had been studied of peat that applied in chemistry. Eight studies of peat- r...

  17. Advances in high temperature chemistry 1

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Leroy

    2013-01-01

    Advances in High Temperature Chemistry, Volume 1 describes the complexities and special and changing characteristics of high temperature chemistry. After providing a brief definition of high temperature chemistry, this nine-chapter book goes on describing the experiments and calculations of diatomic transition metal molecules, as well as the advances in applied wave mechanics that may contribute to an understanding of the bonding, structure, and spectra of the molecules of high temperature interest. The next chapter provides a summary of gaseous ternary compounds of the alkali metals used in

  18. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  19. CHINESE JOURNAL OF CHEMISTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Chinese Journal of Chemistry is an international journal published in English by the Chinese Chemical Society with its editorial office hosted by Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  1. Long-term monitoring of arsenic, copper, selenium, and other elements in Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA) surface water, brine shrimp, and brine flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, William J; DeForest, David K; Tear, Lucinda M; Payne, Kelly; Brix, Kevin V

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents long-term monitoring data for 19 elements with a focus on arsenic (As), copper (Cu), and selenium (Se), in surface water (2002-2011), brine shrimp (2001-2011), and brine flies (1995-1996) collected from Great Salt Lake (GSL, Utah, USA). In open surface waters, mean (±standard deviation [SD]; range; n) As concentrations were 112 (±22.1; 54.0-169; 47) and 112 μg/L (±35.6; 5.1-175; 68) in filtered and unfiltered surface water samples, respectively, and 16.3 μg/g (±5.6; 5.1-35.2; 62) dry weight (dw) in brine shrimp. Mean (±SD; range; n) Cu concentrations were 4.2 (±2.1; 1.3-12.5; 47) and 6.9 μg/L (±6.6; 1.9-38.1; 68) in filtered and unfiltered surface water samples, respectively, and 20.6 μg/g (±18.4; 5.4-126; 62) dw in brine shrimp. Finally, mean (±SD; range; n) dissolved and total recoverable Se concentrations were 0.6 (±0.1; 0.4-1.2; 61) and 0.9 μg/L (±0.7; 0.5-3.6; 89), respectively, and 3.6 μg/g (±2.2; 1.1-14.9; 98) dw in brine shrimp. Thus, Se in open lake surface waters was most often in the range of 0.5-1 μg/L, and concentrations in both surface water and brine shrimp were comparable to concentrations measured in other monitoring programs for the GSL. Temporally, the statistical significance of differences in mean dissolved or total recoverable As, Cu, and Se concentrations between years was highly variable depending which test statistic was used, and there was no clear evidence of increasing or decreasing trends. In brine shrimp, significant differences in annual mean concentrations of As, Cu, and Se were observed using both parametric and nonparametric statistical approaches, but, as for water, there did not appear to be a consistent increase or decrease in concentrations of these elements over time. PMID:25690606

  2. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume III. Biological oceanography. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began discharging brine into the Gulf of Mexico from its West Hackberry site near Cameron, Louisiana in May 1981. The brine originates from underground salt domes being leached with water from the Intracoastal Waterway, making available vast underground storage caverns for crude oil. The effects of brine discharge on aquatic organisms are presented in this volume. The topics covered are: benthos; nekton; phytoplankton; zooplankton; and data management.

  3. Bioencapsulation of the antibacterial drug sarafloxacin in nauplii of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana

    OpenAIRE

    Dixon, B.A.; Van Poucke, S; Chair, M; Dehasque, M.; Nelis, H J; Sorgeloos, P.; De Leenheer, A P

    1995-01-01

    Nauplii of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana were enriched with the antibacterial drug sarafloxacin hydrochloride to determine if levels effective against four pathogenetic strains of Vibrio spp. would accumulate in brine shrimp. Three vibrio strains were Vibrio anguillarum; the fourth was V. vulnificus. Concentrations of sarafloxacin ranging from 1 to 40% (weight: volume) were incorporated into the oil phase of Super Selco brine shrimp diets. Enriched nauplii and controls were sampled at ...

  4. Frontiers in Gold Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Basic chemistry of gold tells us that it can bond to sulfur, phosphorous, nitrogen, and oxygen donor ligands. The Frontiers in Gold Chemistry Special Issue covers gold complexes bonded to the different donors and their fascinating applications. This issue covers both basic chemistry studies of gold complexes and their contemporary applications in medicine, materials chemistry, and optical sensors. There is a strong belief that aurophilicity plays a major role in the unending applications of g...

  5. Sorption of cesium and strontium from concentrated brines by backfill barrier materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption of radionuclides from potentially intruding groundwater at a nuclear waste repository is a major chemical function of backfill barriers. In this study, various materials (including clays, zeolites and an inorganic ion exchanger) were screened for the sorption of the fission products cesium and strontium in concentrated brines. Representative brines A and B for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a proposed radioactive waste repository and test facility in bedded salt were used. Sorption properties were quantified using empirical distribution coefficients, k/sub d/. Of the materials examined, sodium titanate had the highest k/sub d/ for the sorption of Sr(II) in both brine A (k/sub d/ = 125 ml/g) and brine B(k/sub d/ = 500 to 600 ml/g). A mordenite-type zeolite was the most effective getter for Cs(I) in brine A (k/sub d = 27 ml/g), while illite yielded the highest k/sub d/ for Cs(I) in brine B (k/sub d/ = 115 ml/g). The relative merit of these k/sub d/ values is evaluated in terms of calculated estimates of breakthrough times for a backfill barrier containing the getter. Results show that a backfill mixture containing these getters is potentially an effective barrier to the migration of Sr(II) and Cs(I), although further study (especially for the sorption of cesium from brine A) is recommended. Initial mechanistic studies revealed competing ion effects which would support an ion exchange mechanism. K/sub d/'s were constant over a Sr(II) concentration range of 10-11 to 10-5 M and a Cs(I) concentration range of 10-8 to 10-5 M, supporting the choice of a linear sorption isotherm as a model for the results. Constant batch composition was shown to be attained within one week

  6. Sorption of cesium and strontium from concentrated brines by backfill barrier materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winslow, C D

    1981-03-01

    The sorption of radionuclides from potentially intruding groundwater at a nuclear waste repository is a major chemical function of backfill barriers. In this study, various materials (including clays, zeolites and an inorganic ion exchanger) were screened for the sorption of the fission products cesium and strontium in concentrated brines. Representative brines A and B for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a proposed radioactive waste repository and test facility in bedded salt were used. Sorption properties were quantified using empirical distribution coefficients, k/sub d/. Of the materials examined, sodium titanate had the highest k/sub d/ for the sorption of Sr(II) in both brine A (k/sub d/ = 125 ml/g) and brine B(k/sub d/ = 500 to 600 ml/g). A mordenite-type zeolite was the most effective getter for Cs(I) in brine A (k/sub d = 27 ml/g), while illite yielded the highest k/sub d/ for Cs(I) in brine B (k/sub d/ = 115 ml/g). The relative merit of these k/sub d/ values is evaluated in terms of calculated estimates of breakthrough times for a backfill barrier containing the getter. Results show that a backfill mixture containing these getters is potentially an effective barrier to the migration of Sr(II) and Cs(I), although further study (especially for the sorption of cesium from brine A) is recommended. Initial mechanistic studies revealed competing ion effects which would support an ion exchange mechanism. K/sub d/'s were constant over a Sr(II) concentration range of 10/sup -11/ to 10/sup -5/ M and a Cs(I) concentration range of 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/ M, supporting the choice of a linear sorption isotherm as a model for the results. Constant batch composition was shown to be attained within one week.

  7. Corrosion and hydrogen permeation of A216 grade WCA steel in hydrothermal magnesium-containing brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project (SRP) is investigating the general corrosion resistance of cast mild steel as a candidate material for waste package containers. Evaluation of this material is being performed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in environments simulating expected repository conditions. The present work addresses two potential failure modes of the reference waste package container: failure by general corrosion processes, and failure by internal hydrogen pressurization by permeation of corrosion product hydrogen. General corrosion studies of mild steel (ASTM A216 grade WCA) in the as-cast and normalized conditions were conducted in hydrothermal halite-saturated (saturated at ambient temperature) brine environments simulating a dissolution and an inclusion brine. Corrosion tests were also performed in brines similar to the inclusion brine but containing magnesium concentrations ranging from 1,000 to 30,000 ppm to investigate the effect of magnesium on the corrosion behavior. In addition, long-term (to 18 months) corrosion tests have been carried out using two-phase salt/brine environments (excess salt tests). Corrosion rates of the cast mild steel in brine were found to increase with increasing temperature and with increasing magnesium concentration. Some possible mechanisms that explain the observed behavior are presented. The corrosion rates observed in the excess-salt tests tend to decrease with time, at 200 degree and 150 degree C; and as-cast material corrodes more slowly than does normalized material. Corrosion-product hydrogen rapidly permeated a mild steel tubing corrosion/permeation specimen immersed in brine. The rate of permeation at 150 degree C was high enough to cause concern regarding potential container overpressurization

  8. Design Status of the Capillary Brine Residual in Containment Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargusingh, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    One of the goals of the AES Life Support System (LSS) Project is to achieve 98% water loop closure for long duration human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. To meet this objective, the AES LSS Project is developing technologies to recover water from wastewater brine; highly concentrated waste products generated from a primary water recovery system. The state of the art system used aboard the International Space Station (ISS) has the potential to recover up to 85% water from unine wastewater, leaving a significant amounts of water in the waste brine, the recovery of which is a critical technology gap that must be filled in order to enable long duration human exploration. Recovering water from the urine wastewater brine is complicated by the concentration of solids as water is removed from the brine, and the concentration of the corrosive, toxic chemicals used to stabilize the urine which fouls and degrades water processing hardware, and poses a hazard to operators and crew. Brine Residual in Containment (BRIC) is focused on solids management through a process of "in-place" drying - the drying of brines within the container used for final disposal. Application of in-place drying has the potential to improve the safety and reliability of the system by reducing the exposure to crew and hardware to the problematic brine residual. Through a collaboration between the NASA Johnson Space Center and Portland Status University, a novel water recovery system was developed that utilizes containment geometry to support passive capillary flow and static phase separation allowing free surface evaporation to take place in a microgravity environment. A notional design for an ISS demonstration system was developed. This paper describes the concept for the system level design.

  9. Aerobic methanotrophic communities at the Red Sea brine-seawater interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehab Z. Abdallah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The central rift of the Red Sea contains 25 brine pools with different physicochemical conditions, dictating the diversity and abundance of the microbial community. Three of these pools, the Atlantis II, Kebrit and Discovery Deeps, are uniquely characterized by a high concentration of hydrocarbons. The brine-seawater interface, described as an anoxic-oxic (brine-seawater boundary, is characterized by a high methane concentration, thus favoring aerobic methane oxidation. The current study analyzed the aerobic free–living methane-oxidizing bacterial communities that potentially contribute to methane oxidation at the brine-seawater interfaces of the three aforementioned brine pools, using metagenomic pyrosequencing, 16S rRNA pyrotags and pmoA library constructs. The sequencing of 16S rRNA pyrotags revealed that these interfaces are characterized by high microbial community diversity. Signatures of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria were detected in the Atlantis II Interface (ATII-I and the Kebrit Deep Upper (KB-U and Lower (KB-L brine-seawater interfaces. Through phylogenetic analysis of pmoA, we further demonstrated that the ATII-I aerobic methanotroph community is highly diverse. We propose four ATII-I pmoA clusters. Most importantly, cluster 2 groups with marine methane seep methanotrophs, and cluster 4 represent a unique lineage of an uncultured bacterium with divergent alkane monooxygenases. Moreover, non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS based on the ordination of putative enzymes involved in methane metabolism showed that the Kebrit interface layers were distinct from the ATII-I and DD-I brine-seawater interfaces.

  10. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume V. Supporting data for estuarine hydrology, discharge plume analysis, chemical oceanography, biological oceanography, and data management. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume V contains appendices for the following: supporting data for estuarine hydrology and hydrography; supporting data analysis of discharge plume; supporting data for water and sediment chemistry; CTD/DO and pH profiles during biological monitoring; supporting data for nekton; and supporting data for data management.

  11. Marine fragrance chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hügel, Helmut M; Drevermann, Britta; Lingham, Anthony R; Marriott, Philip J

    2008-06-01

    The main marine message in perfumery is projected by Calone 1951 (7-methyl-2H-1,5-benzodioxepin-3(4H)-one). Kraft (Givaudan) and Gaudin (Firmenich) further maximized the marine fragrance molecular membership by extending the carbon chain of the 7-Me group. Our research targeted the polar group of the benzodioxepinone parent compound to investigate how this region of molecular makeup resonates with the dominant marine fragrance of the Calone 1951 structure. The olfactory evaluation of analogues prepared by chemical modification or removal of the CO group resulted in the introduction of aldehydic, sweet and floral-fruity notes with a diluted/diminished potency of the marine odor. To further analyze the olfactory properties of benzodioxepinones containing a diverse range of aromatic ring substituents, a novel synthesis route was developed. We found that a 7-alkyl group in Calone 1951 was essential for the maintenance of the significant marine odor characteristic, and our studies support the concept that the odorant structure occupying the hydrophobic binding pocket adjacent to the aromatic ring-binding site of the olfactory receptor is pivotal in the design and discovery of more potent and characteristic marine fragrances. How the structure of benzodioxepinones connects to marine sea-breeze fragrances is our continuing challenging research focus at the chemistry-biology interface. PMID:18618392

  12. Green Chemistry and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  13. Environmental Chemistry Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackland, Thomas; And Others

    The authors of this curriculum supplement believe in a laboratory approach to chemistry and express the feeling that environmental chemistry provides the students an opportunity to apply theoretical chemistry to important practical problems. There are eighteen activities presented, each accompanied with behavioral objectives, one or more suggested…

  14. Facets of coordination chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwala, BV

    1993-01-01

    A concise account of coordination chemistry since its inception is given here together with some of the newer significant facets. This book covers a broad spectrum of various topics on Environment, Cyclic Voltammetry, Chromatography, Metal Complexes of biological interest, Alkoxides, NMR spectroscopy and others. These are useful to the scientific community engaged in the field of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry.

  15. The solubility of UO22+ in dilute sodium chloride solutions and in high-ionic strength sodium sulfate and chlorine brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is a major component of high-level nuclear waste. In an oxidizing environment, UO22+ would be expected to be the dominant dissolved species in solution. In addition to dilute solutions, because high-level nuclear waste may be stored in repositories containing salt, it is important to characterize the aqueous chemistry of UO22+ and the solubility-controlling U(VI) solids in high-ionic strength brines as a function of pH. We have studied the solubility of UO22+ by precipitation of solid phase in 0.001 molal NaCl, 5.2 molal NaCl, and saturated Na2SO4 at pH values ranging from 5 to 12. The solution concentrations were measured by alpha particle liquid scintillation counting. The precipitated solids were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

  16. The Brine Shrimp Artemia: Adapted to Critical Life Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajardo, Gonzalo M.; Beardmore, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The brine shrimp Artemia is a micro-crustacean, well adapted to the harsh conditions that severely hypersaline environments impose on survival and reproduction. Adaptation to these conditions has taken place at different functional levels or domains, from the individual (molecular-cellular-physiological) to the population level. Such conditions are experienced by very few equivalent macro-planktonic organisms; thus, Artemia can be considered a model animal extremophile offering a unique suite of adaptations that are the focus of this review. The most obvious is a highly efficient osmoregulation system to withstand up to 10 times the salt concentration of ordinary seawater. Under extremely critical environmental conditions, for example when seasonal lakes dry-out, Artemia takes refuge by producing a highly resistant encysted gastrula embryo (cyst) capable of severe dehydration enabling an escape from population extinction. Cysts can be viewed as gene banks that store a genetic memory of historical population conditions. Their occurrence is due to the evolved ability of females to “perceive” forthcoming unstable environmental conditions expressed by their ability to switch reproductive mode, producing either cysts (oviparity) when environmental conditions become deleterious or free-swimming nauplii (ovoviviparity) that are able to maintain the population under suitable conditions. At the population level the trend is for conspecific populations to be fragmented into locally adapted populations, whereas species are restricted to salty lakes in particular regions (regional endemism). The Artemia model depicts adaptation as a complex response to critical life conditions, integrating and refining past and present experiences at all levels of organization. Although we consider an invertebrate restricted to a unique environment, the processes to be discussed are of general biological interest. Finally, we highlight the benefits of understanding the stress response of

  17. The brine shrimp Artemia: adapted to critical life conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo M Gajardo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The brine shrimp Artemia is a micro-crustacean, well adapted to the harsh conditions that severely hypersaline environments impose on survival and reproduction. Adaptation to these conditions has taken place at different functional levels or domains, from the individual (molecular-cellular-physiological to the population level. Such conditions are experienced by very few equivalent macro-planktonic organisms; thus, Artemia can be considered a model animal extremophile offering a unique suite of adaptations that are the focus of this review. The most obvious is a highly efficient osmoregulation system to withstand up to 10 times the salt concentration of ordinary seawater. Under extremely critical environmental conditions, for example when seasonal lakes dry out, Artemia takes refuge by producing a highly resistant encysted gastrula embryo (cyst capable of severe dehydration enabling an escape from population extinction. Cysts can be viewed as gene banks that store a genetic memory of historical population conditions. Their occurrence is due to the evolved ability of females to perceive forthcoming unstable environmental conditions expressed by their ability to switch reproductive mode, producing either cysts (oviparity when environmental conditions become deleterious or free-swimming nauplii (ovoviviparity that are able to maintain the population under suitable conditions.At the population level the trend is for conspecific populations to be fragmented into locally adapted populations, whereas species are restricted to salty lakes in particular regions (regional endemism. The Artemia model depicts adaptation as a complex response to critical life conditions, integrating and refining past and present experiences at all levels of organization. Although we consider an invertebrate restricted to a unique environment, the processes to be discussed are of general biological interest. Finally, we highlight the benefits of understanding the stress

  18. Changes of washing water during debittering and the brine during storage of irradiated olive fruits (Olea europea. L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive fruits (Olea europea. var. Surrany) treated with 0, 1, 2 and 3 kGy of gamma irradiation were debittered in distilled water for 8 days and stored in brine for 12 months at room temperature. Total dissolved and inorganic dissolved solids, Na, K, Ca, electric conductivity (EC) and pH values were evaluated in washing wastewater (daily), and in brine (after 6 and 12 months). The results showed that gamma irradiation increased the total and inorganic dissolved solids, Na and K in washing wastewater, and in brine throughout debittering and storage periods. Also, gamma irradiation had an effect on EC and pH values of washing wastewater and brine

  19. Effects of a Pre-Filter and Electrolysis Systems on the Reuse of Brine in the Chinese Cabbage Salting Process

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong-Ho; Yoo, Jae Yeol; Jang, Keum-Il

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effects of a pre-filter system and electrolysis system on the safe and efficient reuse of brine in the cabbage salting process were investigated. First, sediment filter-electrolyzed brine (SF-EB) was selected as brine for reuse. Then, we evaluated the quality and microbiological properties of SF-EB and Chinese cabbage salted with SF-EB. The salinity (9.4%) and pH (4.63) of SF-EB were similar to those of control brine (CB). SF-EB turbidity was decreased (from 0.112 to 0.062)...

  20. Behavior of natural uranium, thorium, and radium isotopes in the Wolfcamp brine aquifers, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously reported results for Palo Duro deep brines show that Ra is highly soluble and not retarded. Relative to Ra, U and Th are highly sorbed. Uranium, like thorium, is in the +4 valence state, indicating a reducing environment. Additional data reported here support these results. However, one Wolfcamp brine sample gives somewhat different results. Radium appears to be somewhat sorbed. Uranium is largely in the +6 valence state, indicating a less reducing condition. In all brines, kinetics for sorption (228Th) and desorption (224Ra) are rapid. This Wolfcamp brine was tested for the effects of colloids for Ra, U, and Th concentrations. No effects were found

  1. An Assessment of Thermodynamic Database Effects on Reactive Transport Models' Predictions of Permeability Fields: Insights from CO2/Brine Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutolo, B. M.; Seyfried, W. E.; Saar, M. O.

    2011-12-01

    Numerical modeling software such as TOUGHREACT, ECLIPSE, and Geochemist's Workbench provide modules that couple mineral reactive chemistry with porosity and permeability modifications to predict the behavior of energy byproducts, such as carbon dioxide, in the subsurface. Modern coders have already included increasingly complex equations that describe natural systems (i.e. mineral dissolution/precipitation kinetic parameters and porosity/permeability functions) into these and other software applications. Generally, these computer models use the bulk volumetric changes predicted by geochemical calculations to infer porosity changes, and subsequently use highly simplified porosity/permeability correlation functions, such as the Carman-Kozeny equation, to modify permeability fields. In spite of the computational complexity provided in these models, they require, as a foundation, fundamental information on the thermodynamic stability of minerals and aqueous species at a wide range of temperatures and pressures to produce accurate predictions of the geochemistry of long-term energy byproduct storage in the subsurface, even in the simplest cases. With improvements in geochemical thermodynamic databases, researchers may begin to produce more realistic simulations of the complex interactions between fluid and heat flow and geological systems. Unfortunately, the requisite thermodynamic data is often lacking, or inaccurate. In this study, therefore, we provide a discussion of geochemical thermodynamic databases, discuss the synthesis and reconciliation of the databases used in this study, and compare predictions from reactive transport software with single phase CO2/brine experiments performed at temperatures and pressures applicable to geologic storage conditions.

  2. American Association for Clinical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indispensable patient care tool. Learn more IN CLINICAL CHEMISTRY ddPCR Quantification of Lymphoma Mutations Researchers have developed ... Online Harmonization.net Commission on Accreditation in Clinical Chemistry American Board of Clinical Chemistry Clinical Chemistry Trainee ...

  3. The New Color of Chemistry: Green Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal GERÇEK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry which is the new application of chemistry rules provides solutions to problems that mankind is faced with climate changes, sustainable agriculture, energy, toxics, depletion of natural sources e.g. designing new chemicals and processes that production and utilization of hazardous matters. So, it is the indispensible tool for sustainable development. Current and future chemists should consider the human health and ecological issues in their professional life. In order to provide a solution for this requirement, green chemistry rules and under standings should be primarily taken in the university curriculum and at all educational levels.

  4. Experimental Work Conducted on MgO Inundated Hydration in WIPP-Relevant Brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, H.; Xiong, Y.; Nemer, M. B.; Johnsen, S.

    2009-12-01

    Magnesium oxide (MgO) is being emplaced in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as an engineered barrier to mitigate the effect of microbial CO2 generation on actinide mobility in a postclosure repository environment. MgO will sequester CO2 and consume water in brine or water vapor in the gaseous phase. Martin Marietta (MM) MgO is currently being emplaced in the WIPP. A fractional-factorial experiment has been performed to study the inundated-hydration of MM MgO as a function of its particle size, solid-to-liquid ratio, and brine type. MgO hydration experiments have been carried out with three MgO particle sizes and two solid-to-liquid ratios in three WIPP-related brines: ERDA-6, GWB and simplified GWB. ERDA-6 is a synthetic NaCl-rich brine typical of a Castile brine reservoir below the repository. GWB is a synthetic MgCl2- and NaCl-rich brine representative of intergranular brines from the Salado Formation at or near the stratigraphic horizon of the repository. Simplified GWB contains amounts of Mg, Na, and Cl similar to those in GWB without other minor constituents. The hydration products include brucite (Mg(OH)2) and phase 5 (Mg3(OH)5Cl4H2O). In addition to phase 5, MgO hydration in GWB or simplified GWB produces brucite, whereas MgO hydrated in ERDA-6 only produces brucite. The MgO particle size has had a significant effect on the formation of hydration products: small MgO particles have hydrated before the large particles. MgO has hydrated faster in simplified GWB than in the other two brines. In ERDA-6, the solid-to-liquid ratio has affected the brine pH due to the presence of CaO (~1 wt %) as an impurity in MM MgO. GWB has sufficient dissolved Mg to buffer pH despite small amounts of CaO. Both our results and thermodynamic modeling indicate that phase-5 is the stable Mg-OH-Cl phase in Mg-Na-Cl-dominated brines with ionic strengths and chemical compositions similar to that of GWB. In contrast, phase-3 (Mg2(OH)3Cl4H2O) is the stable phase in the MgCl2

  5. Determining Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Systematics in Brines at Elevated p/T Conditions to Enhance Monitoring of CO2 Induced Processes in Carbon Storage Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, V.; Myrttinen, A.; Mayer, B.; Barth, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) are a powerful tool for inferring carbon sources and mixing ratios of injected and baseline CO2 in storage reservoirs. Furthermore, CO2 releasing and consuming processes can be deduced if the isotopic compositions of end-members are known. At low CO2 pressures (pCO2), oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of CO2 usually assume the δ18O of the water plus a temperature-dependent isotope fractionation factor. However, at very high CO2 pressures as they occur in CO2 storage reservoirs, the δ18O of the injected CO2 may in fact change the δ18O of the reservoir brine. Hence, changing δ18O of brine constitutes an additional tracer for reservoir-internal carbon dynamics and allows the determination of the amount of free phase CO2 present in the reservoir (Johnson et al. 2011). Further systematic research to quantify carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation between the involved inorganic carbon species (CO2, H2CO3, HCO3-, CO32-, carbonate minerals) and kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects during gas-water-rock interactions is necessary because p/T conditions and salinities in CO2 storage reservoirs may exceed the boundary conditions of typical environmental isotope applications, thereby limiting the accuracy of stable isotope monitoring approaches in deep saline formations (Becker et al. 2011). In doing so, it is crucial to compare isotopic patterns observed in laboratory experiments with artificial brines to similar experiments with original fluids from representative field sites to account for reactions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with minor brine components. In the CO2ISO-LABEL project, funded by the German Ministry for Education and Research, multiple series of laboratory experiments are conducted to determine the influence of pressure, temperature and brine composition on the δ13C of DIC and the δ18O of brines in water-CO2-rock reactions with special focus placed on kinetics and stable oxygen and carbon isotope fractionation

  6. Extreme alteration by hyperacidic brines at Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia: II: Metasomatic imprint and element fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hinsberg, Vincent; Berlo, Kim; Sumarti, Sri; van Bergen, Manfred; Williams-Jones, Anthony

    2010-10-01

    The hyperacidic brines of the Kawah Ijen crater lake and Banyu Pahit river, East Java, Indonesia, induce an intense alteration on their magmatic host rock. This alteration is a proxy for water-rock interaction in magmatic-hydrothermal systems and associated high-sulphidation mineralizing environments, as well as for how these systems translate changes in the magmatic system to surface emissions, which are used in volcanic hazard monitoring. Detailed bulk chemical study of altered and unaltered samples shows that alteration is characterised by near-complete leaching of all major and trace elements, except for Pb, Sn and Sb, which are progressively enriched (Pb up to 15-fold absolute enrichment). The resulting element release is complementary to the observed changes in composition of the Banyu Pahit water downstream, when corrected for dilution, indicating that alteration progressively increases the element load. The signature of the change in water chemistry is best explained by complete alteration of fresh rock, rather than mature alteration, which might be expected given the advanced altered state of the riverbed. Together with mass balance considerations, this indicates that the dominant element source is material falling into the river from the valley flanks. The chemical signature of the crater lake is inconsistent with the observed alteration in samples from the hydrothermal system, and likewise is best explained by surface input of cations from rocks falling in from the crater walls. This indicates that the lake water cation chemistry is not a direct reflection of the underlying magmatic-hydrothermal system and that its cation content is therefore not an appropriate monitor of changes in volcanic activity.

  7. The origin of brines and salts in Chilean salars: a hydrochemical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risacher, François; Alonso, Hugo; Salazar, Carlos

    2003-11-01

    Northern Chile is characterized by a succession of north-south-trending ranges and basins occupied by numerous saline lakes and salt crusts, collectively called salars. Fossil salt crusts are found to the west in the extremely arid Central Valley, while active salars receiving permanent inflows fill many intravolcanic basins to the east in the semiarid Cordillera. Sea salts and desert dust are blown eastward over the Cordillera, where they constitute an appreciable fraction of the solute load of very dilute waters (salt contentsalars. Saline lakes and subsurface brines are under steady-state regime. The average residence time of conservative components ranges from a few years to some thousands years, which indicates a permanent leakage of the brines through bottom sediments. The infiltrating brines are recycled in the hydrologic system where they mix with dilute meteoric waters. High heat flow is the likely driving force that moves the deep waters in this magmatic arc region. Active Chilean salars cannot be considered as terminal lakes nor, strictly speaking, as closed basin lakes. Almost all incoming salts leave the basin and are transported elsewhere. Moreover, the dissolution of fossil salt crusts in some active salars also carries away important fluxes of components in percolating brines. Evaporative concentration of inflow waters leads to sulfate-rich or calcium-rich, near-neutral brines. Alkaline brines are almost completely lacking. The alkalinity/calcium ratio of inflow waters is lowered by the oxidation of native sulfur (reducing alkalinity) and the deposition of eolian gypsum (increasing Ca concentration). Theoretically, SO 4-rich inflow waters and their derived SO 4-rich brines should be found in the intravolcanic basins of the Cordillera because of the ubiquity of native sulfur, while Ca-rich brines should prevail in sedimentary basins where Ca-rich minerals are abundant. This relation is perfectly observed in the salar de Atacama, the largest in Chile

  8. Surface chemistry essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Birdi, K S

    2013-01-01

    Surface chemistry plays an important role in everyday life, as the basis for many phenomena as well as technological applications. Common examples range from soap bubbles, foam, and raindrops to cosmetics, paint, adhesives, and pharmaceuticals. Additional areas that rely on surface chemistry include modern nanotechnology, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. There is extensive literature on this subject, but most chemistry books only devote one or two chapters to it. Surface Chemistry Essentials fills a need for a reference that brings together the fundamental aspects of surface chemistry w

  9. Fundamentals of reactor chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around the nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also the subject material of chemistry. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry in the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI was considered, and the fundamental part of reactor chemistry was reviewed in this report. Since the students of the Nuclear Engineering School are not chemists, the knowledge necessary in and around the nuclear reactors was emphasized in order to familiarize the students with the reactor chemistry. The teaching experience of the fundamentals of reactor chemistry is also given. (author)

  10. Distinctive Microbial Community Structure in Highly Stratified Deep-Sea Brine Water Columns

    KAUST Repository

    Bougouffa, Salim

    2013-03-29

    Atlantis II and Discovery are two hydrothermal and hypersaline deep-sea pools in the Red Sea rift that are characterized by strong thermohalo-stratification and temperatures steadily peaking near the bottom. We conducted comprehensive vertical profiling of the microbial populations in both pools and highlighted the influential environmental factors. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes revealed shifts in community structures vis-à-vis depth. High diversity and low abundance were features of the deepest convective layers despite the low cell density. Surprisingly, the brine interfaces had significantly higher cell counts than the overlying deep-sea water, yet they were lowest in diversity. Vertical stratification of the bacterial populations was apparent as we moved from the Alphaproteobacteria-dominated deep sea to the Planctomycetaceae- or Deferribacteres-dominated interfaces to the Gammaproteobacteria-dominated brine layers. Archaeal marine group I was dominant in the deep-sea water and interfaces, while several euryarchaeotic groups increased in the brine. Across sites, microbial phylotypes and abundances varied substantially in the brine interface of Discovery compared with Atlantis II, despite the near-identical populations in the overlying deep-sea waters. The lowest convective layers harbored interestingly similar microbial communities, even though temperature and heavy metal concentrations were very different. Multivariate analysis indicated that temperature and salinity were the major influences shaping the communities. The harsh conditions and the low-abundance phylotypes could explain the observed correlation in the brine pools.

  11. Effects of gamma radiation on the survival and growth of brine shrimp, Artemia salina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the effects of gamma radiation on the survival and growth of brine shrimp, nauplii and adults were exposed to different doses of radiation and maintained at different salinities and temperatures. The LD50 determination demonstrated that nauplii were thirty to forty times more sensitive than the adults and had a 25-day LD50 of 450 rads. Radiation and salinity reduced survival of adult female brine shrimp more than the males. The interaction of salinity, 5 and 50 ppt, temperature, 10, 20 and 300C, and radiation, 25 to 100 kilorads, decreased the survival of both male and female brine shrimp, with the males having the greater sensitivity. Brine shrimp nauplii irradiated with doses of 500 and 2,500 rads had accelerated growth and matured earlier than the controls. A test of the effect of crowding on growth showed that volume per individual was important, and a dose of 500 rads accelerated brine shrimp growth in all concentrations, with the greatest increase at 8 ml/nauplius

  12. Geochemical evaluation of flowback brine from Marcellus gas wells in Pennsylvania, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large quantities of highly saline brine flow from gas wells in the Marcellus Formation after hydraulic stimulation (“fracking”). This study assesses the composition of these flowback waters from the Marcellus shale in Pennsylvania, USA. Concentrations of most inorganic components of flowback water (Cl, Br, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Sr, Ba, Ra, Fe, Mn, total dissolved solids, and others) increase with time from a well after hydraulic stimulation. Based on results in several datasets reported here, the greatest concentration of Cl− in flowback water is 151,000 mg/L. For total Ra (combined 226Ra and 228Ra) in flowback, the highest level reported is 6540 pCi/L. Flowback waters from hydraulic fracturing of Marcellus wells resemble brines produced from conventional gas wells that tap into other Paleozoic formations in the region. The Br/Cl ratio and other parameters indicate that both types of brine formed by the evaporation of seawater followed by dolomitization, sulfate reduction and subsurface mixing with seawater and/or freshwater. Trends and relationships in brine composition indicate that (1) increased salt concentration in flowback is not mainly caused by dissolution of salt or other minerals in rock units, (2) the flowback waters represent a mixture of injection waters with highly concentrated in situ brines similar to those in the other formations, and (3) these waters contain concentrations of Ra and Ba that are commonly hundreds of times the US drinking water standards.

  13. Inhibitors of lactic acid fermentation in Spanish-style green olive brines of the Manzanilla variety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Eduardo; Romero, Concepción; de Castro, Antonio; Brenes, Manuel; García, Aranzazu

    2008-10-15

    Frequently, a delay or lack of lactic acid fermentation occurs during the processing of Spanish-style green olives, in particular of the Manzanilla variety. Many variables can affect the progress of fermentation such as temperature, nutrients, salt concentration, antimicrobials in brines, and others. In this study, it was demonstrated that an inappropriate alkaline treatment (low NaOH strength and insufficient alkali penetration) allowed for the presence of several antimicrobial compounds in brines, which inhibited the growth of Lactobacillus pentosus. These substances were the dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl elenolic acid either free or linked to hydroxytyrosol and an isomer of oleoside 11-methyl ester. Olive brines, from olives treated with a NaOH solution of low concentration up to 1/2 the distance to the pit, contained these antimicrobials, and no lactic acid fermentation took place in them. By contrast, a more intense alkaline treatment (2/3 lye depth penetration) gave rise to an abundant growth of lactic acid bacteria without any antimicrobial in brines. Therefore, the precise cause of stuck fermentation in Manzanilla olive brines was demonstrated for the first time and this finding will contribute to better understand the table olive fermentation process. PMID:26047282

  14. Highly selective lithium recovery from brine using a λ-MnO2-Ag battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehan; Yu, Seung-Ho; Kim, Choonsoo; Sung, Yung-Eun; Yoon, Jeyong

    2013-05-28

    The demand for lithium has greatly increased with the rapid development of rechargeable batteries. Currently, the main lithium resource is brine lakes, but the conventional lithium recovery process is time consuming, inefficient, and environmentally harmful. Rechargeable batteries have been recently used for lithium recovery, and consist of lithium iron phosphate as a cathode. These batteries feature promising selectivity between lithium and sodium, but they suffer from severe interference from coexisting magnesium ions, an essential component of brine, which has prompted further study. This study reports on a highly selective and energy-efficient lithium recovery system using a rechargeable battery that consists of a λ-MnO2 positive electrode and a chloride-capturing negative electrode. This system can be used to recover lithium from brine even in the presence of magnesium ions as well as other dissolved cations. In addition, lithium recovery from simulated brine is successfully demonstrated, consuming 1.0 W h per 1 mole of lithium recovered, using water similar to that from the artificial brine, which contains various cations (mole ratio: Na/Li ≈ 15.7, K/Li ≈ 2.2, Mg/Li ≈ 1.9). PMID:23595419

  15. The effect of brine salinity on fill fraction and formation pattern of methane hydrates in sandstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husebo, J.; Ersland, G.; Kvamme, B.; Graue, A. [Bergen Univ., Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics and Technology; Stevens, J. [ConocoPhillips, Bartlesville, OK (United States). Bartlesville Technology Center

    2008-07-01

    Methane hydrates were synthesized in sandstone cores partially saturated with brine at different salinity levels. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of salinity on hydrate filling fractions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to study the in-situ formation pattern of the hydrates. Results of the experimental study showed that salinity levels lower than sea water composition did not have a significant impact on the fill fractions of methane hydrates in porous media. However, when salinity levels higher than sea water were used, a significant drop in the hydrate's fill fraction was noted. Results suggested that methane hydrate fill fraction is dominated by the total brine salinity as opposed to the brine distribution within the sediment core. The MRI analysis showed that hydrate growth patterns are influenced by the initial brine distribution rather than brine salinity levels. It was concluded that the available methane in hydrate reserves can be predicted by identifying the salinity levels of the adjacent aqueous zone. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Measurement and modeling of CO₂ solubility in natural and synthetic formation brines for CO₂ sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haining; Dilmore, Robert; Allen, Douglas E; Hedges, Sheila W; Soong, Yee; Lvov, Serguei N

    2015-02-01

    CO2 solubility data in the natural formation brine, synthetic formation brine, and synthetic NaCl+CaCl2 brine were collected at the pressures from 100 to 200 bar, temperatures from 323 to 423 K. Experimental results demonstrate that the CO2 solubility in the synthetic formation brines can be reliably represented by that in the synthetic NaCl+CaCl2 brines. We extended our previously developed model (PSUCO2) to calculate CO2 solubility in aqueous mixed-salt solution by using the additivity rule of the Setschenow coefficients of the individual ions (Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), Cl(-), and SO4(2-)). Comparisons with previously published models against the experimental data reveal a clear improvement of the proposed PSUCO2 model. Additionally, the path of the maximum gradient of the CO2 solubility contours divides the P-T diagram into two distinct regions: in Region I, the CO2 solubility in the aqueous phase decreases monotonically in response to increased temperature; in region II, the behavior of the CO2 solubility is the opposite of that in Region I as the temperature increases. PMID:25558883

  17. GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF CO₂-BRINE-ROCK INTERACTIONS OF THE KNOX GROUP IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoksoulian, Lois; Berger, Peter; Freiburg, Jared; Butler, Shane; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Increased output of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO₂), into the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources is of great concern. A potential technology to reduce CO₂ emissions is geologic carbon sequestration. This technology is currently being evaluated in the United States and throughout the world. The geology of the Illinois Basin exhibits outstanding potential as a carbon sequestration target, as demonstrated by the ongoing Illinois Basin – Decatur Project that is using the Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir and Eau Claire Shale seal system to store and contain 1 million tonnes of CO₂. The Knox Group-Maquoketa Shale reservoir and seal system, located stratigraphically above the Mt. Simon Sandstone-Eau Claire Shale reservoir and seal system, has little economic value as a resource for fossil fuels or as a potable water source, making it ideal as a potential carbon sequestration target. In order for a reservoir-seal system to be effective, it must be able to contain the injected CO₂ without the potential for the release of harmful contaminants liberated by the reaction between CO₂-formation fluids and reservoir and seal rocks. This study examines portions of the Knox Group (Potosi Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, New Richmond Sandstone) and St. Peter Sandstone, and Maquoketa Shale from various locations around the Illinois Basin. A total of 14 rock and fluid samples were exposed to simulated sequestration conditions (9101–9860 kPa [1320–1430 psi] and 32°–42°C [90°– 108°F]) for varying amounts of time (6 hours to 4 months). Knox Group reservoir rocks exhibited dissolution of dolomite in the presence of CO₂ as indicated by petrographic examination, X-ray diffraction analysis, and fluid chemistry analysis. These reactions equilibrated rapidly, and geochemical modeling confirmed that these reactions reached equilibrium within the time frames of the experiments. Pre-reaction sample mineralogy and postreaction fluid geochemistry from this

  18. Annual report 1985 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All particles and reports published and lectures given in 1985 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  19. Annual report 1984 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1984 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry , environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  20. Annual Report 1984. Chemistry Department

    OpenAIRE

    Funck, Jytte; Nielsen, Ole John

    1985-01-01

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1984 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general.

  1. The New Color of Chemistry: Green Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Zuhal GERÇEK

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry which is the new application of chemistry rules provides solutions to problems that mankind is faced with climate changes, sustainable agriculture, energy, toxics, depletion of natural sources e.g. designing new chemicals and processes that production and utilization of hazardous matters. So, it is the indispensible tool for sustainable development. Current and future chemists should consider the human health and ecological issues in their professional life. In order to provid...

  2. Philosophy of Chemistry or Philosophy with Chemistry?

    OpenAIRE

    Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry deserves more philosophical attention not so much to do justice to a long-neglected science or to enhance its cultural prestige, but to undermine a number of taken-for-granted assumptions about scientific rationality and more importantly to diversify our metaphysical views of nature and reality. In brief, this paper does not make the case for a philosophy of chemistry. It rather urges philosophers of science to listen to chemists and discuss what they learn from them. Because over t...

  3. Chemistry and metallurgy of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium is a strategic element with unique chemistry and metallurgy. It has five valence states with close redox potentials and many of them coexist in solutions. It is a hard Lewis acid and forms strong complexes with hard Lewis bases. Its redox and complexing characteristics are useful in its separation and analytical chemistry. Plutonium metal has several allotropic forms even though its melting point is only 639.5℃. It is a metal with very high density and one of the few metals which shrinks on heating. It holds promise of abundant nuclear energy, but also has potential for being diverted towards nuclear explosive devices. This paper is a brief compilation from available literature. (author)

  4. Modeling gas and brine migration for assessing compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, P. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butcher, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Swift, P. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01

    At the request of the WIPP Project Integration Office (WPIO) of the DOE, the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has completed preliminary uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration away from the undisturbed repository. This paper contains descriptions of the numerical model and simulations, including model geometries and parameter values, and a summary of major conclusions from sensitivity analyses. Because significant transport of contaminants can only occur in a fluid (gas or brine) medium, two-phase flow modeling can provide an estimate of the distance to which contaminants can migrate. Migration of gas or brine beyond the RCRA ``disposal-unit boundary`` or the Standard`s accessible environment constitutes a potential, but not certain, violation and may require additional evaluations of contaminant concentrations.

  5. Brine migration resulting from pressure increases in a layered subsurface system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Nordbeck, Johannes; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Brine originating from the deep subsurface impairs parts of the freshwater resources in the North German Basin. Some of the deep porous formations (esp. Trias and Jurassic) exhibit considerable storage capacities for waste fluids (CO2, brine from oil production or cavern leaching), raising concerns among water providers that this type of deep subsurface utilization might impair drinking water supplies. On the one hand, overpressures induced by fluid injections and the geothermal gradient support brine migration from deep into shallow formations. On the other hand, the rising brine is denser than the surrounding less-saline formation waters and, therefore, tends to settle down. Aim of this work is to investigate the conditions under which pressurized formation brine from deep formations can reach shallow freshwater resources. Especially, the role of intermediate porous formations between the storage formation and the groundwater is studied. For this, complex thermohaline simulations using a coupled numerical process model are necessary and performed in this study, in which fluid density depends on fluid pressure, temperature and salt content and the governing partial differential equations are coupled. The model setup is 2D and contains a hypothetic series of aquifers and barriers, each with a thickness of 200 m. Formation pressure is increased at depths of about 2000 m in proximity to a salt wall and a permeable fault. The domain size reaches up to tens of kilometers horizontally to the salt wall. The fault connects the injection formation and the freshwater aquifer such that conditions can be considered as extremely favorable for induced brine migration (worst case scenarios). Brine, heat, and salt fluxes are quantified with reference to hydraulic permeabilities, storage capacities (in terms of domain size), initial salt and heat distribution, and operation pressures. The simulations reveal the development of a stagnation point in the fault region in each

  6. Modeling gas and brine migration for assessing compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the request of the WIPP Project Integration Office (WPIO) of the DOE, the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has completed preliminary uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration away from the undisturbed repository. This paper contains descriptions of the numerical model and simulations, including model geometries and parameter values, and a summary of major conclusions from sensitivity analyses. Because significant transport of contaminants can only occur in a fluid (gas or brine) medium, two-phase flow modeling can provide an estimate of the distance to which contaminants can migrate. Migration of gas or brine beyond the RCRA ''disposal-unit boundary'' or the Standard's accessible environment constitutes a potential, but not certain, violation and may require additional evaluations of contaminant concentrations

  7. A deep sea community at the Kebrit brine pool in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Vestheim, Hege

    2015-02-26

    Approximately 25 deep sea brine pools occur along the mid axis of the Red Sea. These hypersaline, anoxic, and acidic environments have previously been reported to host diverse microbial communities. We visited the Kebrit brine pool in April 2013 and found macrofauna present just above the brine–seawater interface (~1465 m). In particular, inactive sulfur chimneys had associated epifauna of sea anemones, sabellid type polychaetes, and hydroids, and infauna consisting of capitellid polychaetes, gastropods of the genus Laeviphitus (fam. Elachisinidae), and top snails of the family Cocculinidae. The deep Red Sea generally is regarded as extremely poor in benthos. We hypothesize that the periphery along the Kebrit holds increased biomass and biodiversity that are sustained by prokaryotes associated with the brine pool or co-occurring seeps.

  8. FIELD IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FOR A WILLISTON BASIN BRINE EXTRACTION AND STORAGE TEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamling, John; Klapperich, Ryan; Stepan, Daniel; Sorensen, James; Pekot, Lawrence; Peck, Wesley; Jacobson, Lonny; Bosshart, Nicholas; Hurley, John; Wilson, William; Kurz, Marc; Burnison, Shaughn; Salako, Olarinre; Musich, Mark; Botnen, Barry; Kalenze, Nicholas; Ayash, Scott; Ge, Jun; Jiang, Tao; Dalkhaa, Chantsalmaa; Oster, Benjamin; Peterson, Kyle; Feole, Ian; Gorecki, Charles; Steadman, Edward

    2016-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) successfully completed all technical work of Phase I, including development of a field implementation plan (FIP) for a brine extraction and storage test (BEST) in the North Dakota portion of the Williston Basin. This implementation plan was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as a proxy for managing formation pressure plumes and measuring/monitoring the movement of differential pressure and CO2 plumes in the subsurface for future saline CO2 storage projects. BEST comprises the demonstration and validation of active reservoir management (ARM) strategies and extracted brine treatment technologies. Two prospective commercial brine injection sites were evaluated for BEST to satisfy DOE’s goals. Ultimately, an active saltwater disposal (SWD) site, Johnsons Corner, was selected because it possesses an ideal combination of key factors making it uniquely suited to host BEST. This site is located in western North Dakota and operated by Nuverra Environmental Solutions (Nuverra), a national leader in brine handling, treatment, and injection. An integrated management approach was used to incorporate local and regional geologic characterization activities with geologic and simulation models, inform a monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) plan, and to conduct a risk assessment. This approach was used to design a FIP for an ARM schema and an extracted brine treatment technology test bed facility. The FIP leverages an existing pressure plume generated by two commercial SWD wells. These wells, in conjunction with a new brine extraction well, will be used to conduct the ARM schema. Results of these tests will be quantified based on their impact on the performance of the existing SWD wells and the surrounding reservoir system. Extracted brine will be injected into an underlying deep saline formation through a new injection well. The locations of proposed

  9. Laboratory flow experiments for visualizing carbon dioxide-induced, density-driven brine convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.; Pruess, K.

    2009-09-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers confined by low-permeability cap rock will result in a layer of CO{sub 2} overlying the brine. Dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the brine increases the brine density, resulting in an unstable situation in which more-dense brine overlies less-dense brine. This gravitational instability could give rise to density-driven convection of the fluid, which is a favorable process of practical interest for CO{sub 2} storage security because it accelerates the transfer of buoyant CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase, where it is no longer subject to an upward buoyant drive. Laboratory flow visualization tests in transparent Hele-Shaw cells have been performed to elucidate the processes and rates of this CO{sub 2} solute-driven convection (CSC). Upon introduction of CO{sub 2} into the system, a layer of CO{sub 2}-laden brine forms at the CO{sub 2}-water interface. Subsequently, small convective fingers form, which coalesce, broaden, and penetrate into the test cell. Images and time-series data of finger lengths and wavelengths are presented. Observed CO{sub 2} uptake of the convection system indicates that the CO{sub 2} dissolution rate is approximately constant for each test and is far greater than expected for a diffusion-only scenario. Numerical simulations of our system show good agreement with the experiments for onset time of convection and advancement of convective fingers. There are differences as well, the most prominent being the absence of cell-scale convection in the numerical simulations. This cell-scale convection observed in the experiments is probably initiated by a small temperature gradient induced by the cell illumination.

  10. Biological screening of chitosan derivatives using Artemia spp. (brine shrimp test)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study reported on the screening of six selected chitosan derivatives using the brine shrimp lethality bioassay. In addition, the irradiation effects towards the compounds at 25 kGy were also studied. Chitosan is a natural polysaccharide derived from chitin, extracted from the exoskeletons of crustaceans and insects as well as walls of some bacteria and fungi. Brine shrimp test is employed for the screening of toxicity of chitosan derivatives. Toxicity test was carried out by adding different concentrations of tested samples to approximately 5 to 15 Artemia salina larvae. Biological activity using the brine shrimp bioassay was recorded as LC50 i.e. lethal concentration that kills 50% of the larvae within 24 hours of contact with the samples. Compounds are considered toxic when the LC50 value is lower than 1 mg/ml by brine shrimp bioassay and practically non-toxic when the value is larger. Of the samples tested, none were toxic to the brine shrimp (LC50 > 1 mg/ml). The LC50 values of all chitosan derivatives tested, control and irradiated at 25 kGy were above 1 mg/ml thus all tested samples are considered non-toxic. This study demonstrated that irradiation at 25 kGy showed no significant effects towards the toxicity of the chitosan derivatives. After irradiation, only NO-CMC exhibited marked decrease in LC50 value, reduced by 3-fold from 34.96 mg/ml to 11.07 mg/ml while O-CMC (5.45 mg/ml to 5 mg/ml) showed no clear differences based on rough estimation. This study suggested that brine shrimp bioassay is a simple, reliable and convenient method that could provide useful clues of the relative toxic potential of the sample tested. (Author)

  11. Water chemistry control practices and data of the European BWR fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nineteen BWR plants are in operation in Europe, nine built by ASEA Atom, six by Siemens KWU and four by General Electric. This paper gives an overview of water chemistry operation practices and parameters of the European BWR plants. General design characteristics of the plants are described. Chemistry control strategies and underlying water chemistry guidelines are summarized. Chemistry data are presented and discussed with regard to plant design characteristics. The paper is based on a contract of the European BWR Forum with AREVA on a chemistry sourcebook for member plants. The survey of chemistry data was conducted for the years 2002 to 2008. (author)

  12. Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, we present FY2015 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This is a combined milestone report related to milestone Salt R&D Milestone ''Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures'' (M3FT-15LB0818012) and the Salt Field Testing Milestone (M3FT-15LB0819022) to support the overall objectives of the salt field test planning.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of bacteria in sea ice brine sampled from the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial diversity in sea ice brine samples which collected from four stations located at the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean was analyzed by PCR-DGGE. Twenty-three 16S rDNA sequences of bacteria obtained from DGGE bands were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis clustered these sequences within γ-proteobacteria, Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides (CFB) group, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. The phylotype of Pseudoalteromonas in the γ-proteobacteria was predominant and members of the CFB group and γ-proteobacteria were highly abundant in studied sea ice brine samples.

  14. STUDY ON DECANTATION WAYS OF ROCK SALT BRINES AND THEIR EFFECTIVE USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hodo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Rock salt from Dhrovjani mine (Delvina is characterized by a very high content of insoluble in water matter (around 20%. Nevertheless, it has been used for more than 20 years in some industrial areas, particularly in soda ash production at the Vlora plant. The use of this kind of salt is accompanied by large amount generation of solid waste, and also by limited decantation rate of raw brines prepared, in particular during the wet seasons (when the salt moisture content exceeds 2.5%. The study was undertaken in relation to this rocky salt, as well as to the possibility of decantation rate increasing of the crude brines.

  15. Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Blanco-Martin, Laura [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Molins, Sergi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Trebotich, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we present FY2015 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This is a combined milestone report related to milestone Salt R&D Milestone “Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures” (M3FT-15LB0818012) and the Salt Field Testing Milestone (M3FT-15LB0819022) to support the overall objectives of the salt field test planning.

  16. Processes of lithium chlorides purification from Salar de Atacama concentrated brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of research carried out to obtain lithium chloride, as a suitable electrolyte for the production of high purity lithium metal are presented. Concentrated lithium chloride brines from Salar de Atacama have been used as starting materials. The studied process requires the reduction of the boron content in the brines to levels below 5 ppm, followed by a crystallization process to obtain a crystallized lithium chloride. The elimination of the magnesium chloride co-crystallized with the lithium chloride, is achieved by a complementary washing step and the lixiviation of the impure LiCl crystals with ethanol. (author)

  17. Using brine extraction to isolate the pressure responses from CO2 injection operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandilla, K.; Court, B.; Celia, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Many potential carbon dioxide (CO2) injection sites are in large sedimentary basins, and it seems reasonable to expect that multiple operators will be injecting into the same formation. While the supercritical CO2 plumes are not expected to intersect, the pressure responses will most likely overlap. This will lead to overlapping Areas-of-Review (AoR), leading to complications for both the operators and the regulators. Also, existing injection operations will be impacted by new operations that come online at a later time, and as such existing AoRs will need to be updated to account for the pressure interference. One option to avoid pressure interference is to locate injection operations far from one other. However, this would greatly reduce the overall storage efficiency of the injection formation and increase the regulatory burden by requiring a basin-wide planning process. Active pressure management through brine production is one option to limit the spatial extent of the pressure responses, thereby avoiding pressure interference while also allowing for a greater spatial density of injection operations. For example, each injection operation could be surrounded by a ring of brine production wells, not dissimilar to an enhanced oil recovery operation, thereby limiting the far field impact of the CO2 injection. In this presentation we use a hypothetical model based on a section of the Illinois Basin to show the effectiveness of brine extraction in isolating the pressure responses of multiple injection operations. The model domain contains several injection wells, with the different injection operations brought on-line in a time-staggered fashion. The impact of factors such as brine extraction rates and extraction well spacing on the AoRs is investigated. A vertically integrated approach is used to numerically solve the two-phase flow problem, which greatly reduces the computational cost of the simulations. The results of this study show that brine extraction can be

  18. Determination of the protein content in brine from salted herring using near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, V.T.; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch; Bro, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    Near-infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy in the spectral range of 1000-2500 nm, was measured directly on brine from barrel salted herring, to investigate the potential of NIR as a fast method to determine the protein content. A principal component analysis performed on the NIR spectra shows two...... clearly indicate that NIR spectroscopy has a potential as a fast and noninvasive method for assessing the protein content in brine from barrel salted herring, which again may be used as an indicator for the ripening quality of barrel salted herring....

  19. The brine shrimp ( Artemia parthenogenetica) as encapsulation organism for prophylactic chemotherapy of fish and prawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ji-Xiang; Bian, Bo-Zhong; Li, Ming-Ren

    1996-06-01

    Brine shrimp ( Artemia parthenogenetica) which had ingested three water-insoluble antibacterial drugs i.e. sulfadiazine(SD), oxytetracycline (OTC) and erythromycin estolate (ERY-Es) were fed to Tilapia and Mysis III of Penaeus orientalis K. The drug contents in the predators were then determined. After administration of drugs to Tilapia and Mysis III, through the bio-encapsulation of the brine shrimp, efficacious therapeutical concentration of OTC and ERY-Es (but not SD) in the predators could be reached and maintained for more than 8 hours.

  20. Phylogeography and local endemism of the native Mediterranean brine shrimp Artemia salina (Branchiopoda: Anostraca)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Joaquin; Gómez, Africa; Green, Andy J.;

    2008-01-01

    There has been a recent appreciation of the ecological impacts of zooplanktonic species invasions. The North American brine shrimp Artemia franciscana is one such alien invader in hyper-saline water ecosystems at a global scale. It has been shown to outcompete native Artemia species, leading to...... their local extinction. We used partial sequences of the mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit 1 (COI or cox1) gene to investigate the genetic diversity and phylogeography of A. salina, an extreme halophilic sexual brine shrimp, over its known distribution range (Mediterranean Basin and South...

  1. Mathematical Simulation of Evaporating Brine by Solar Radiation for the Production of Salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Z.Zhang; C.D.Li; 等

    1993-01-01

    A computer simulation model of salt pan is presented.The transient behavior and the effects of various parameters of the salt pans,such as the depth of the brine layer,the absorptance of the soil surface,the thermal properties of the soil beneath the brine layer and the depth of the underground water table,on the evaporation process of salt pans are discussed.The effects of extra insulation layer and the intensity of solar radiation are also examined.

  2. Gas phase chemistry of the transactinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türler, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the past few years the gas phase chemistry of the first three transactinide elements rutherfordium (element 104), dubnium (element 105) and seaborgium (element 106) has been studied experimentally using OLGA, the On-line Gas chemistry Apparatus, developed at Paul Scherrer Institute. In each experiment, the investigated transactinide element was identified by measuring the characteristic decay properties of its isotopes. In the chemistry of rutherfordium and dubnium evidence for relativistic effects were found, as predicted previously in theoretical calculations. For the first time, the volatility of Sg oxychlorides in comparison to its lighter homologues W and Mo was measured. Also, the half-lives and SF-branches of the nuclides 265Sg and 266Sg were determined. Finally, prospects for a chemical separation of bohrium (element 107) and hassium (element 108) using gas phase chemistry will be discussed.

  3. Gas phase chemistry of the transactinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past few years the gas phase chemistry of the first three transactinide elements Rutherfordium (element 104), Dubnium (element 105) and Seaborgium (element 106) has been studied experimentally using OLGA, the On-line Gas chemistry Apparatus, developed at Paul Scherrer Institute. In each experiment, the investigated transactinide element was identified by measuring the characteristic decay properties of its isotopes. In the chemistry of Rutherfordium and Dubnium evidence for relativistic effects were found, as predicted previously in theoretical calculations. For the first time, the volatility of Sg oxychlorides in comparison to its lighter homologues W and Mo was measured. Also, the half-lives and SF-branches of the nuclides 265Sg and 266Sg were determined. Finally, prospects for a chemical separation of Bohrium (element 107) and Hassium (108) using gas phase chemistry will be discussed. (author)

  4. Gas phase chemistry of the transactinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past few years the gas phase chemistry of the first three transactinide elements rutherfordium (element 104), dubnium (element 105) and seaborgium (element 106) has been studied experimentally using OLGA, the On-line Gas chemistry Apparatus, developed at Paul Scherrer Institute. In each experiment, the investigated transactinide element was identified by measuring the characteristic decay properties of its isotopes. In the chemistry of rutherfordium and dubnium evidence for relativistic effects were found, as predicted previously in theoretical calculations. For the first time, the volatility of Sg oxychlorides in comparison to its lighter homologues W and Mo was measured. Also, the half-lives and SF-branches of the nuclides 265Sg and 266Sg were determined. Finally, prospects for a chemical separation of bohrium (element 107) and hassium (element 108) using gas phase chemistry will be discussed. (author)

  5. Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Zhou, Q.; Kraemer, S.; Bandilla, K.W.

    2011-05-01

    Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.

  6. U, Th, and Ra concentrations in brines from four deep wells in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains analyzed samples of ground water (brines) collected from deep brine aquifers, and saline water collected from the uppermost salt at wells in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas. These water samples were analyzed for natural radioactive isotopes in 238uranium and 232thorium decay series. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated

  7. Nuclear waste repository simulation experiments (brine migration), Asse Mine of the Federal of Germany: Quarterly brine migration data report, July-September 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fifth brine migration data status report describes experiments simulating a nuclear waste repository at the 800-m (2624-ft) level of the Asse Salt Mine in the Federal Republic of Germany from May 1983 through September 1984. This report describes the test equipment, the Asse Salt Mine, and the pretest properties of the salt in the test gallery. This report also includes test data for the first 16 months of operations on brine migration rates, borehole pressure, salt temperatures, and thermomechanical behavior of the salt. Annual reports have been prepared for the years 1983 and 1984, describing the test activities on a yearly basis (Rothfuchs et al., 1984, 1986). The duration of the experiments will be approximately 2 years, ending in December 1985. 2 refs., 118 figs., 91 tabs

  8. Lithofacies palaeogeography and forecast of potassium-rich brine of Leikoupo Formation in western Sichuan%川西地区雷口坡组岩相古地理与富钾卤水预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国盛; 陈美玲; 刘为; 孟昱璋; 杨朋; 胡永宏; 彭敬成; 王宪刚; 黄小琼

    2012-01-01

    regression, evaporate platform deposits were produced in several areas. Chengdu gypsum-basin micro-facies include 3 salt-basin micro-facies, which are called Pingluoba, Daxingchang and Yanjinggou salt-basin respectively. The potassium-rich brine in western Sichuan basin is a mixed high-degree metamorphic brine, which suggests that the sea facies primary sedimentary potassium brine from the evaporation and concentration of sea water became mature by inter-crystalline brine, brine from dissolution and infiltration reaction between potassium saline minerals and brine from continental flow. In addition, the distribution characteristics of the potassium-rich brine can be generalized into "gypsum-basin and salt-basin control the area, folds and faults determine the zone, and cracks and pores store the brine". Based on a comprehensive analysis of sedimentary facies, lithofacies palaeogeography and the origin and distribution characteristics of potassium-rich brine in western Sichuan basin, the authors put forward two concepts which are called "brine aggregate-potash center" and "brine reservoir center". According to the single well water chemical analytical data of brine formation and standard industrial production indices of rich potassium brine, one aggregate-potash center and three rich-halogen centers were delineated and predicted in western Sichuan basin, with the aggregate-potash center located in Pingluoba structure area, and the rich-halogen centers located respectively in Jiangyou Zhongba , Danling Daxingchang and Pengshan Yanjinggou structure areas, which indicate the direction for exploring rich potassium brine in the Middle Triassic Leikoupo Formation in western Sichuan basin.

  9. Computational chemistry research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Eugene

    1987-01-01

    Task 41 is composed of two parts: (1) analysis and design studies related to the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Extended Operating Configuration (EOC) and (2) computational chemistry. During the first half of 1987, Dr. Levin served as a member of an advanced system planning team to establish the requirements, goals, and principal technical characteristics of the NAS EOC. A paper entitled 'Scaling of Data Communications for an Advanced Supercomputer Network' is included. The high temperature transport properties (such as viscosity, thermal conductivity, etc.) of the major constituents of air (oxygen and nitrogen) were correctly determined. The results of prior ab initio computer solutions of the Schroedinger equation were combined with the best available experimental data to obtain complete interaction potentials for both neutral and ion-atom collision partners. These potentials were then used in a computer program to evaluate the collision cross-sections from which the transport properties could be determined. A paper entitled 'High Temperature Transport Properties of Air' is included.

  10. Journal of Business Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Journal of Business Chemistry examines issues associated with leadership and management for chemists and managers working in chemical research or industry. This journal is devoted to improving and developing the field of Business Chemistry. The Journal of Business Chemistry publishes peer-reviewed papers (including case studies) and essays. Areas for possible publication in include: leadership issues in the chemical and biochemical industry, such as teamwork, team building, mentoring, coa...

  11. Mathematical Thinking in Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    José L. Villaveces; Guillermo Restrepo

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical chemistry is often thought to be a 20th-century subdiscipline of chemistry, but in this paper we discuss several early chemical ideas and some landmarks of chemistry as instances of the mathematical way of thinking; many of them before 1900. By the mathematical way of thinking, we follow Weyl's description of it in terms of functional thinking, i.e. setting up variables, symbolizing them, and seeking for functions relating them. The cases we discuss are Plato's triangles, Geoffro...

  12. Elementary physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Linder, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    This book is designed for a one-semester course, for undergraduates, not necessarily chemistry majors, who need to know something about physical chemistry. The emphasis is not on mathematical rigor, but subtleties and conceptual difficulties are not hidden. It covers the essential topics in physical chemistry, including the state of matter, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, phase and chemical equilibria, introduction to quantum theory, and molecular spectroscopy.

  13. Orbital interactions in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, Thomas A; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Explains the underlying structure that unites all disciplines in chemistry Now in its second edition, this book explores organic, organometallic, inorganic, solid state, and materials chemistry, demonstrating how common molecular orbital situations arise throughout the whole chemical spectrum. The authors explore the relationships that enable readers to grasp the theory that underlies and connects traditional fields of study within chemistry, thereby providing a conceptual framework with which to think about chemical structure and reactivity problems. Orbital Interactions

  14. Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

    2006-12-29

    Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes

  15. Brine release based on structural calculations of damage around an excavation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a large in situ experimntal circular room, brine inflow was measured over 5 years. After correcting for evaporation losses into mine ventilation air, the measurements gave data for a period of nearly 3 years. Predicted brine accumulation based on a mechanical ''snow plow'' model of the volume swept by creep-induced damage as calculated with the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model was found to agree with experiment. Calculation suggests the damage zone at 5 years effectively exends only some 0.7 m into the salt around the room. Also, because the mecahnical model of brine release gives an adequate explanation of the measured data, the hydrological process of brine flow appears to be rapid compared to the mechanical process of brine release

  16. VARIATIONS IN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS OF CHLORINE IN EVAPORATION-CONTROLLED SALT LAKE BRINES OF QAIDAM BASIN,CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic compositions of chlorine in evaporation-controlled saline lake brines were determined by using an improved procedure for precise measurement of chlorine isotopes based on Cs2Cl+ ion by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The results showed that variation in δ37Cl values in these evaporation-controlled brines are attributable to evaporation of brine accompanied by the deposition of saline minerals. The isotopic fractionation of chlorine between the deposited saline mineral and the co-existing brine caused the variation of δ37Cl values in the brine. In general the isotopic fractionation of chlorine in nature indicates enrichment of 37Cl in the solid phase relative to 35Cl. The reverse isotopic fractionation of chlorine in which 35Cl is enriched in the solid phase, was observed to some extent during quick deposition under laboratory conditions as well as in nature. The mechanism of isotopic fractionation of chlorine during evaporation deposition was studied.

  17. Conservação de filés de tilápia-do-nilo (Oreochromis niloticus em salga seca e salga úmida Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus preservation by means of dry salting and saturated brine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Aiura

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Acompanhou-se o desenvolvimento dos processos da salga em salmoura saturada (salga úmida e salga seca de filés de tilápia-do-nilo (Oreochromis niloticus e avaliaram-se algumas características indicativas de qualidade do produto durante a estocagem. Os processos foram acompanhados por 156 horas na salga úmida e por 96 horas na salga seca, e os filés salgados foram estocados, respectivamente, por 60 e 45 dias à temperatura ambiente. Os teores máximos de cloreto nos filés (14% foram atingidos com 72 horas na salga úmida e com 36 horas na salga seca. Os filés de tilápia salgados em salmoura mantiveram as características próprias do produto por um período de 45 dias, e os submetidos à salga seca apresentaram baixo teor de umidade (6% e alta concentração de extrato etéreo (4,6%. Recomenda-se somente o processo de salga em salmoura saturada como forma de conservação dos filés de tilápia-do-nilo.The processes of salting of Nile tilapia fillets (Oreochromis niloticus submitted to saturated brine and dry salting were observed, and some characteristics that indicate the quality of the product during the storage were evaluated. The brine saturated process was followed up to 156 hours and the dry salting was followed up to 96 hours. When the salting finished, fillets were stored for 45 (dry salting and 60 days (saturated brine, respectively. The highest values for chloride in fillets (14% were reached within 72 hours in brine salting and 36 hours in dry salting. The tilapia fillets salted in brine kept the proper characteristics of the product for a period of 45 days and the fillets submitted to dry salting showed low moisture ratios (6% and a high concentration of lipids (4.6%. Thereby, it is only recommended the salting process in saturated brine to be used as a mean of conservation for Nile tilapia fillets.

  18. The Chemistry Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Fontecave, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry at the Collège de France has received particular attention over the last few years. After the departures of Profs Jean-Marie Lehn and Jacques Livage, new ambition for developing this discipline has led to the creation of several Chairs: Prof. Marc Fontecave’s Chair of Chemistry of Biological Processes in 2008, Prof. Clément Sanchez’ Chair of Chemistry of Hybrid Materials in 2011, and the Chair of Chemistry of Materials and Energy, which Prof. Jean-Marie Tarascon has held since 2014....

  19. Advances in quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin, John R

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features detailed reviews written by leading international researchers. This volume focuses on the theory of heavy ion physics in medicine.Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features

  20. DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. This volume contains the following modules: reactor water chemistry (effects of radiation on water chemistry, chemistry parameters), principles of water treatment (purpose; treatment processes [ion exchange]; dissolved gases, suspended solids, and pH control; water purity), and hazards of chemicals and gases (corrosives [acids, alkalies], toxic compounds, compressed gases, flammable/combustible liquids)

  1. Group theory and chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, David M

    1993-01-01

    Group theoretical principles are an integral part of modern chemistry. Not only do they help account for a wide variety of chemical phenomena, they simplify quantum chemical calculations. Indeed, knowledge of their application to chemical problems is essential for students of chemistry. This complete, self-contained study, written for advanced undergraduate-level and graduate-level chemistry students, clearly and concisely introduces the subject of group theory and demonstrates its application to chemical problems.To assist chemistry students with the mathematics involved, Professor Bishop ha

  2. Degradation of concrete-based barriers by Mg-containing brines: From laboratory experiments via reactive transport modelling to overall safety analysis in repository scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Matthias; Wilhelm, Stefan; Hagemann, Sven; Xie, Mingliang; Wollrath, Jürgen; Preuss, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    initial hydraulic permeability and possibly on inhomogeneities like fractures and the hydraulic behaviour of the excavation damage zone (EDZ). Experimentally, the corrosion capacity of the brines to the concrete cannot be directly determined by throughflow experiments because the initial hydraulic permeability of the original building material is far too low. Instead, the decrease of magnesium, the main corroding agent in the brines, has been measured in cascade experiments with grounded cement mortar. The results of these experiments have been reproduced with geochemical modelling. However, those model calculations reveal that the stoichiometry of this reaction strongly depends on the assumptions about the relative stability of the potentially formed mineral phases, especially the various magnesium-silicate-hydrate-phases. As a pragmatic approach, the probability density function of the corrosion capacity has been estimated by stochastic calculations including the variation within a reasonable bandwidth of the chemical composition of each mortar components and the thermodynamic data of the critical mineral phases. Subsequently, the corrosion of the sealed access drifts in repository scale has been simulated by a reactive transport model, combining advective / dispersive transport and variable hydraulic permeability as function of the reaction progress. In the model, the chemistry of the corrosion process has been abstracted to one single equation. This allowed a fine discretisation - more than 10'000 nodes in an auto-adapting 2D-FE-mesh with axial symmetry. The parameter for the reaction rate was chosen on basis of experimental observations and turned out to be non-sensitive. The calculations show that the reaction zone is quite narrow - less than 5 m in a seal of 130 m length - as the reaction rate is much faster than the transport processes. With this model, the influence of a persistent EDZ in the host rock on the degradation of the hydraulic seal was studied

  3. Optimal concentration of local well brine groundwater irrigation for Bamboo willow introduced to the arid areas in northern Xinjiang province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Cao, Ling; Zhang, Ya; Cui, Kaiqiang; Wu, Shengli

    2015-04-01

    The adaptation and survive of introduced plants to local well brine groundwater irrigation is an important issue, while people introduce some plants to improve the local environment in the construction of urban greening oases in arid areas, north China. We measured some of the photosynthetic characteristics of introduced Bamboo willow irrigated by different local well brine groundwater in the wild controlled experiments, in May 2014 in Kelamayi city in north China, which to seek the most appropriate irrigation concentration of underground saline water, and to clarify the physiological ecological adaptation to the local habitat. The parameters, measured by Li-6400XT, a portable photosynthesis system, include the following ones, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), transpiration rate (Tr), the internal CO2 concentration (Ci) and efficiency of water application (WUE) of one-year old introduced Bamboo willow irrigated by set salinity groundwater gradient, as 0 g/L, 5 g/L and 10 g/L. the results showed that (1) In each salt water concentration, the diurnal variation curve of net photosynthetic rate showed as "bimodal curve" style, and obvious "midday depression". (2) The parameter Pn of Bamboo willow irrigated by salt water of 5g/L was highest compared with the other two, and the value Pn irrigated by salt water concentration of 10g/L down. The net photosynthetic rate would increase in the salt concentration of 10g/L. In conclusion, the salt groundwater concentration of 10g/L was the optimal concentration of local well brine groundwater irrigation for Bamboo willow introduced to the arid areas in northern Xinjiang province, China.

  4. Advances in high temperature chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Leroy

    1969-01-01

    Advances in High Temperature Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in the knowledge of the high temperature behavior of materials and the complex and unfamiliar characteristics of matter at high temperature. The book discusses the dissociation energies and free energy functions of gaseous monoxides; the matrix-isolation technique applied to high temperature molecules; and the main features, the techniques for the production, detection, and diagnosis, and the applications of molecular beams in high temperatures. The text also describes the chemical research in streaming thermal plasmas, as w

  5. Induced Seismicity of the Paradox Valley Brine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, C. E.; Foxall, W.; Daley, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Paradox Valley Unit (PVU) is operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and is built to control the water quality of the Dolores River - a feeder of the Colorado River. Brine is extracted along the river from several shallow wells. Before it is injected into a 4.8km deep well for long-term storage, it is filtered at a surface-treatment facility. The target zone of the injection is a subhorizontal formation of a Mississippian-age limestone. The first injection test started in 1991, continuous injections started in 1996 and are still ongoing. The injection of the fluid in the underground induces micro-seismicity that is monitored by the USBR with the 15-station Paradox Valley Seismic Network. This network located more then 5700 events in the 20 years since the injection started. The locations of the seismic events give crucial insights to the pathways of the injected fluid. In this study we analyze the seismicity up to the end of 2011, which does not include the magnitude 3.9 event that caused a temporary shut down of the PVU in January 2013. The largest event included in our study period is an event with M4.3 of May 2000. The majority (75%) of events are micro-seismic events with magnitudes of 1 or smaller; only 74 events have magnitudes larger or equal to 2.5 of which only 4 are larger or equal to 3.5. Most of the seismicity is constrained to the vicinity of the injection well with roughly 80% of the events occurring within a 4km radius. However, there is one active zone more then 10 km away from the injection well that showed first activity in late 2010. More than 500 micro-seismic events occurred within several weeks in this new zone. The goal behind this study is to understand the processes behind a long-term injection of fluid into the underground where no circulation takes place. While other such projects exist, such as different wastewater injections, none of them has been monitored as well as the Paradox Valley seismicity and or has been going on

  6. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2014-10-01

    Alternative transportation fuels, preferably from renewable sources, include alcohols with up to five or even more carbon atoms. They are considered promising because they can be derived from biological matter via established and new processes. In addition, many of their physical-chemical properties are compatible with the requirements of modern engines, which make them attractive either as replacements for fossil fuels or as fuel additives. Indeed, alcohol fuels have been used since the early years of automobile production, particularly in Brazil, where ethanol has a long history of use as an automobile fuel. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the use of non-petroleum-based fuels made from biological sources, including alcohols (predominantly ethanol), as important liquid biofuels. Today, the ethanol fuel that is offered in the market is mainly made from sugar cane or corn. Its production as a first-generation biofuel, especially in North America, has been associated with publicly discussed drawbacks, such as reduction in the food supply, need for fertilization, extensive water usage, and other ecological concerns. More environmentally friendly processes are being considered to produce alcohols from inedible plants or plant parts on wasteland. While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides ethanol, many linear and branched members of the alcohol family, from methanol to hexanols, have been studied, with a particular emphasis on butanols. These fuels and their combustion properties, including their ignition, flame propagation, and extinction characteristics, their pyrolysis and oxidation reactions, and their potential to produce pollutant emissions have been intensively investigated in dedicated experiments on the laboratory and the engine scale

  7. Bentonite porewater chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porewater composition in a compacted bentonite is dependent on the composition of the surrounding groundwater, and on the characteristics of the bentonite itself. Two mechanisms through which bentonite influences the respective porewater composition are distinguished: surface chemical reactions (ion exchange, surface complexation) on smectite and dissolution of minerals and soluble impurities included in bentonite. This report provides the results of different activities related to the definition of porewater chemistry through the use of geochemical models: 1) review of thermodynamic model on ion exchange reaction, 2) modeling of bentonite-water interactions under aerobic conditions, 3) performance of sensitivity analyses of key parameters in the bentonite model, 4) model simulation of bentonite porewater chemistry in the engineered barrier system under repository conditions. Experimental information of bentonite-water interaction allowed the determination of soluble impurities in the bentonite, and the knowledge of these impurities is important for predictive modeling. For the impurities of Kunigel-V1, 0.38% of CaSO4, 0.0011% of NaCl and 0.0044% of KCl were determined. The sensitivity analyses resulted in that the presence of calcite, CaSO4 and pyrite strongly influences the pH in the compacted bentonite, and the pH in compacted bentonite is buffered by the acid/base equilibria at the Na-smectite surface as well. Through the model calculations, some remarks on the expected trends for the long term behavior can be made like that the pH in compacted bentonite is expected to increase with increasing number of water exchange cycles, as long as CaCO3 contributes to the pH buffering capacity, due to slow depletion of the soluble impurities in the bentonite. The pH of the porewater, however, lies in all cases (but in the presence of CaCo3) between 5.6 and 9.5. Based on the findings discussed above, a large number of calculations were carried out to support the definition

  8. Open access and medicinal chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Swain Chris

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Chemistry Central is a new open access website for chemists publishing peer-reviewed research in chemistry from a range of open access journals. A new addition, Chemistry Central Journal, will cover all of chemistry and will be broken down into discipline-specific sections, and Im delighted that Medicinal Chemistry will be a key discipline in this new journal.

  9. Annual report 1988 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. The names and abstracts of all articles and reports published and lectures given in 1988 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, chemical reactivity, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  10. Annual report 1986 chemistry department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1986 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, radical chemistral, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  11. Annual report 1989 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. The names and abstracts of all articles and reports published and lectures given in 1989 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, chemical reactivity, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  12. Barite Crusts From A Brine Pool In The Gulf Of Mexico Entomb Filamentous Sulfur Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, E. W.; Bailey, J. V.; Flood, B. E.; Jones, D. S.; Joye, S. B.; Teske, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Hypersaline environments offer the opportunity to study the preservation of cell material and the role of biology in catalyzing mineral precipitation under conditions where authigenic minerals are forming in the presence of microbial biomass. Mineral crusts collected from a brine pool in the Gulf of Mexico contain filamentous mineral structures of grossly similar morphology to extant Beggiatoa mats that can be found on and around the brine pool crusts. Mineralogical and molecular analyses were preformed in order to characterize the microbial and mineral assemblage associated with the crusts. Initial mineralogical analyses show the bulk composition of the crust to be barite (BaSO4). 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to provide insight into the overall microbial community composition. Sequencing results indicate the presence of phylotypes potentially involved in methane oxidation. Sequence-data produced with Beggiatoa specific primers also indicate Beggiatoa-derived DNA within the barite crusts. Barite precipitation has been linked with sulfide oxidation in non-marine settings, and we hypothesize that it may also be important in brine pool settings where low sulfate brine waters interface with sulfide produced via AOM. Ongoing experiments using several types of bacteria are being used to determine if the metabolic oxidation of sulfide to sulfate can induce the precipitation of barite, thus providing insight into the question of whether Beggiatoa can induce the precipitation of barite within a hypersaline setting.

  13. DISTINCTIVE LOCALIZATION OF GROUP 3 LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT SYNTHESIZING CELLS DURING BRINE SHRIMP DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Yong; Song, Hwa Young; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, Bong Hee; Kim, Kyung Joo; Jo, Kyung Jin; Kim, Suhng Wook; Lee, Seung Gwan; Lee, Boo Hyung

    2015-07-01

    Despite numerous studies on late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, their functions, roles, and localizations during developmental stages in arthropods remain unknown. LEA proteins protect crucial proteins against osmotic stress during the development and growth of various organisms. Thus, in this study, fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to determine the crucial regions protected against osmotic stress as well as the distinctive localization of group 3 (G3) LEA(+) cells during brine shrimp development. Several cell types were found to synthesize G3 LEA RNA, including neurons, muscular cells, APH-1(+) cells, and renal cells. The G3 LEA(+) neuronal cell bodies outside of the mushroom body projected their axonal bundles to the central body, but those inside the mushroom body projected their axonal bundles toward the deutocerebrum without innervating the central body. The cell bodies inside the mushroom body received axons of the G3 LEA(+) sensory cells at the medial ventral cup of the nauplius eye. Several glands were found to synthesize G3 LEA RNA during the nauplius stages of brine shrimp, including the sinus, antennal I and II, salt, and three ectodermal glands. This study provides the first demonstration of the formation of G3 LEA(+) sinus glands at the emergence stages of brine shrimp. These results suggest that G3 LEA protein is synthesized in several cell types. In particular, specific glands play crucial roles during the emergence and nauplius stages of brine shrimp. PMID:25781424

  14. Characterization of phytochemicals and antioxidant activities of red radish brines during lactic acid fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Pu; Song, Li-Hua; Shen, Shan-Qi; Zhao, Shu-Juan; Pang, Jie; Qian, Bing-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Red radish (Raphanus L.) pickles are popular appetizers or spices in Asian-style cuisine. However, tons of radish brines are generated as wastes from industrial radish pickle production. In this study, we evaluated the dynamic changes in colour properties, phenolics, anthocyanin profiles, phenolic acid composition, flavonoids, and antioxidant properties in radish brines during lactic acid fermentation. The results showed that five flavonoids detected were four anthocyanins and one kaempferol derivative, including pelargonidin-3-digluoside-5-glucoside derivatives acylated with p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, p-coumaric and manolic acids, or ferulic and malonic acids. Amounts ranged from 15.5-19.3 µg/mL in total monomeric anthocyanins, and kaempferol-3,7-diglycoside (15-30 µg/mL). 4-Hydroxy-benzoic, gentisic, vanillic, syringic, p-coumaric, ferulic, sinapic and salicylic acids were detected in amounts that varied from 70.2-92.2 µg/mL, whereas the total phenolic content was 206-220 µg/mL. The change in colour of the brine was associated with the accumulation of lactic acid and anthocyanins. The ORAC and Fe2+ chelation capacity of radish brines generally decreased, whereas the reducing power measured as FRAP values was increased during the fermentation from day 5 to day 14. This study provided information on the phytochemicals and the antioxidative activities of red radish fermentation waste that might lead to further utilization as nutraceuticals or natural colorants. PMID:25004074

  15. Construction of a cylindrical brine test room using a tunnel boring machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the construction of a horizontal cylindrical brine test room at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The room was constructed in the bedded salt formation at a depth of 655 meters with a tunnel boring machine. The machine leasing, technical and operational management, parameters involved, and successful completion of this effort are included. 3 figs

  16. Grain Size Data from the Brine Disposal Program, Gulf of Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are part of the Brine Disposal Program funded by NOAA in the US Gulf of Mexico, compiled by NOAA/CEAS and partially conducted by R. W. Hann of Texas A...

  17. 40 CFR 436.120 - Applicability; description of the salines from brine lakes subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability; description of the salines from brine lakes subcategory. 436.120 Section 436.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS MINERAL MINING AND PROCESSING POINT...

  18. Bioencapsulation of Two Different Vibrio Species in Nauplii of the Brine Shrimp (Artemia franciscana)

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Herrera-Vega, Maria A.; Abreu-Grobois, F. Alberto; Roque, Ana

    1998-01-01

    Two groups of nauplii from the brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) were enriched with different bacteria, and the dynamics of bacterial uptake by the nauplii were observed. This study showed that the efficiency of Artemia nauplii in bioencapsulating bacteria strongly depends on the type of bacteria used, time of exposure, and status (live or dead) of the bacteria.

  19. Isolation and identification of oxidation products of guaiacol from brines and heated meat matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölicke, Sarah-Maria; Ternes, Waldemar

    2016-07-01

    In this study we investigated the formation of the oxidation products of guaiacol in brines and heated meat matrix: 6-nitrosoguaiacol, 4-nitroguaiacol and 6-nitroguaiacol. For this purpose we applied a newly developed HPLC-UV and LC-MS method. For the first time, 6-nitrosoguaiacol was determined in brine and meat (containing guaiacol and sodium nitrite), which had been heated to 80°C and subsequently subjected to simulated digestion. Application of 500mg/L ascorbic acid to the brines reduced guaiacol degradation at pH3 and simultaneously inhibited the formation of 6-nitrosoguaiacol compared to brines containing only 100mg/L of ASC. The oxidation products were isolated with a new extraction method from meat samples containing 400mg/kg sodium nitrite at pH3.6 following simulated digestion. When oxygen was added, 6-nitrosoguaiacol was determined even at legally allowed levels (150mg/kg) of the curing agent. Finally, we developed a new LC-MS method for the separation and qualitative determination of the four main smoke methoxyphenols. PMID:26937586

  20. Simulation of the high-pressure phase equilibria of hydrocarbon-water/brine systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuo, You-Xiang; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Guo, Tian-Min

    1996-01-01

    The major objectives of this work are: (1) extend the modified Patel-Teja (MPT) equation of state proposed for aqueous electrolyte systems (Zuo and Guo, 1991) to describe the liquid-liquid and vapor-liquid-liquid equilibria of hydrocarbon-water/brine systems through introducing an unconventional ...

  1. 9 CFR 96.14 - Uncertified casings; disinfection with saturated brine solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... testing vat or a preliminary vat. By following this procedure the temperature will not vary unduly and thus cause unsatisfactory results. After removing the casings from the testing vat, it will be found... heating method. In order to keep the temperature of the brine in the testing vat of a uniform degree,...

  2. Chemical Characterization, Antioxidant and Enzymatic Activity of Brines from Scandinavian Marinated Herring Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gringer, Nina; Osman, Ali; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch; Undeland, Ingrid; Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    Brines generated during the last marination step in the production of marinated herring (Clupea harengus) were chemically characterized and analyzed for antioxidant and enzyme activities. The end-products were vinegar cured, spice cured and traditional barrel-salted herring with either salt or...

  3. Ion sensitive field effect transistors applied to the measurement of the pH of brines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.

    1991-12-31

    The ability to measure the pH (the negative logarithm of the hydrogen ion activity) of harsh fluids such as geothermal oil field brines is important, since pH is a fundamental property; as one chemist stated: ``very often pH is a critical test because its accuracy lays the foundation for other measurements``. In our research, we focus on the analysis of brines similar to those found in underground geothermal reservoirs. Since the brines are deep under the ground, the values of the pressure and the temperature are high (up to 14 Mpa and 150{degrees}C); therefore the usual methods of pH measurement, e.g., glass electrode, are not applicable. The hydrogen ion sensitive ISFET (Ion Selective Field Effect Transistor) was studied as a pH sensor in this research. An ISFET can detect the electrochemical potential difference between the solution and the semiconductor due to the concentration of H{sup +} ions in the solution. Because of its solid state construction, an ISFET should work properly under high pressure and high temperature conditions. Earlier results, have indicated that it is possible to use ISFETs under the harsh conditions presented by geothermal brines.

  4. Ion sensitive field effect transistors applied to the measurement of the pH of brines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J

    1991-07-01

    The ability to measure the pH (the negative logarithm of the hydrogen ion activity) of harsh fluids such as geothermal oil field brines is important, since pH is a fundamental property; as one chemist stated: very often pH is a critical test because its accuracy lays the foundation for other measurements''. In our research, we focus on the analysis of brines similar to those found in underground geothermal reservoirs. Since the brines are deep under the ground, the values of the pressure and the temperature are high (up to 14 Mpa and 150[degrees]C); therefore the usual methods of pH measurement, e.g., glass electrode, are not applicable. The hydrogen ion sensitive ISFET (Ion Selective Field Effect Transistor) was studied as a pH sensor in this research. An ISFET can detect the electrochemical potential difference between the solution and the semiconductor due to the concentration of H[sup +] ions in the solution. Because of its solid state construction, an ISFET should work properly under high pressure and high temperature conditions. Earlier results, have indicated that it is possible to use ISFETs under the harsh conditions presented by geothermal brines.

  5. Characterization of Phytochemicals and Antioxidant Activities of Red Radish Brines during Lactic Acid Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Jing

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Red radish (Raphanus L. pickles are popular appetizers or spices in Asian-style cuisine. However, tons of radish brines are generated as wastes from industrial radish pickle production. In this study, we evaluated the dynamic changes in colour properties, phenolics, anthocyanin profiles, phenolic acid composition, flavonoids, and antioxidant properties in radish brines during lactic acid fermentation. The results showed that five flavonoids detected were four anthocyanins and one kaempferol derivative, including pelargonidin-3-digluoside-5-glucoside derivatives acylated with p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, p-coumaric and manolic acids, or ferulic and malonic acids. Amounts ranged from 15.5–19.3 µg/mL in total monomeric anthocyanins, and kaempferol-3,7-diglycoside (15–30 µg/mL. 4-Hydroxy-benzoic, gentisic, vanillic, syringic, p-coumaric, ferulic, sinapic and salicylic acids were detected in amounts that varied from 70.2–92.2 µg/mL, whereas the total phenolic content was 206–220 µg/mL. The change in colour of the brine was associated with the accumulation of lactic acid and anthocyanins. The ORAC and Fe2+ chelation capacity of radish brines generally decreased, whereas the reducing power measured as FRAP values was increased during the fermentation from day 5 to day 14. This study provided information on the phytochemicals and the antioxidative activities of red radish fermentation waste that might lead to further utilization as nutraceuticals or natural colorants.

  6. Precipitation of halite from supersaline brine from Tønder formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arturi, Kasia; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2014-01-01

    results, there is no precipitation of NaCl as a result of cooling. Neither the heat exchanger nor the system were afflicted by scaling problems, formation of coating or clogging. The were no problems with the flow of brine in the plant whatsoever. The absence of precipitation was confirmed by both...

  7. Aerobic methanotrophic communities at the Red Sea brine-seawater interface

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Rehab Z.

    2014-09-23

    Abdallah RZ, Adel M, Ouf A, Sayed A, Ghazy MA, Alam I, Essack M, Lafi FF, Bajic VB, El-Dorry H and Siam R (2014) Aerobic methanotrophic communities at the Red Sea brine-seawater interface. Front. Microbiol. 5:487. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2014.00487

  8. Characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers in the brine shrimp Artemia (Branchiopoda, Anostraca)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Joaquin; Green, Andy J.; Figuerola, Jordi;

    2009-01-01

    The brine shrimp Artemia is a complex genus containing sexual species and parthenogenetic lineages. Artemia franciscana is native to America and its cysts (diapausing eggs) are used worldwide as a food source in aquaculture. As a consequence, this anostracan has become an invasive species in many...

  9. Depletion of a brine layer at the base of ridge-crest hydrothermal systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoofs, Stan; Hansen, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    The variable salinity of fluid venting from mid-ocean ridges is indicative of mixing between hydrothermal seawater and fluids that have undergone supercritical phase separation. In order to study the stability of a brine-saturated layer that may form in the lowermost part of the hydrothermal system,

  10. Origin of brine in the Kangan gasfield: isotopic and hydrogeochemical approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagheri, R.; Nadri, A.; Raeisi, E.; Kazemi, G.A.; Eggenkamp, H.G.M.; Montaseri, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Kangan Permo-Triassic brine aquifer and the overlying gas reservoir in the southern Iran are located in Kangan and Dalan Formations, consisting dominantly of limestone, dolomite, and to a lesser extent, shale and anhydrite. The gasfield, 2,900 m in depth and is exploited by 36 wells, some of whi

  11. FIBER ROLLS AS A TOOL FOR RE-VEGETATION OF OIL-BRINE CONTAMINATED WATERSHEDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We found that fibrijute burlap cylinders filled with organic matter and inoculated with salt tolerant plants and mycorrhizal fungi promoted remediation of an historic brine scar devoid of vegetation since the 1960's. Soils in plots that received a surface treatment of hay, org...

  12. Brine saturation technique for extracting light filth from ground cinnamon: intralaboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, C C

    1985-01-01

    An intralaboratory study was performed using the new brine saturation technique for isolating light filth from ground cinnamon. Recoveries of light filth averaged greater than or equal to 96.5%. The excellent recovery plus improvements in safety and simplicity give this new technique considerable advantage over the present official method. PMID:4086431

  13. A study of hydrocarbons associated with brines from DOE geopressured wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeley, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    Accomplishments are summarized on the following tasks: distribution coefficients and solubilities, DOE design well sampling, analysis of well samples, review of theoretical models of geopressured reservoir hydrocarbons, monitor for aliphatic hydrocarbons, development of a ph meter probe, DOE design well scrubber analysis, removal and disposition of gas scrubber equipment at Pleasant Bayou Well, and disposition of archived brines.

  14. The Breath of Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josephsen, Jens

    The present preliminary text is a short thematic presentation in biological inorganic chemistry meant to illustrate general and inorganic (especially coordination) chemistry in biochemistry. The emphasis is on molecular models to explain features of the complicated mechanisms essential to breathing...

  15. Movies in Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekdag, Bulent; Le Marechal, Jean-Francois

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews numerous studies on chemistry movies. Movies, or moving pictures, are important elements of multimedia and signify a privileged or motivating means of presenting knowledge. Studies on chemistry movies show that the first movie productions in this field were devoted to university lectures or documentaries. Shorter movies were…

  16. Physical Chemistry of Molecular

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Established in 2009, the group consists of six researchers and more than 70 research assistants and graduate students from the CAS Key Laboratory of Molecular Nanostructures and Nanotechnologies at the CAS Institute of Chemistry.Its research focuses on the physical chemistry involved in molecular assembly, molecular nanostructures, functional nanomaterials and conceptual nano-devices.

  17. Chemistry of americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    Essential features of the descriptive chemistry of americium are reviewed. Chapter titles are: discovery, atomic and nuclear properties, collateral reading, production and uses, chemistry in aqueous solution, metal, alloys, and compounds, and, recovery, separation, purification. Author and subject indexes are included. (JCB)

  18. Exercises in Computational Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16).......A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16)....

  19. Titanocene sulfide chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 314, MAY 2016 (2016), s. 83-102. ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/2368 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titanocene sulfide chemistry * photolysis * titanocene hydrosulfides Ti-(SH)n Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 12.239, year: 2014

  20. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  1. Origin and implications of zoned amphiboles and other hydrous silicates during aqueous brine infiltration in the Bamble mega shearzone, S-Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, B. E.; Larsen, R. B.

    2009-12-01

    This study addresses the metasomatic alteration of ortho-amphibolites, in the Froland area in the Bamble sector, South Norway. Potassic alteration is associated with the introduction of biotite and the formation of conspicuous rims on the amphiboles. Significant color variation from deep blue green to light green in the rims encouraged a chemical study of their evolution. Dark blue-green rims are ferrotschermakite/ferropargasite. Rims gradually becomes richer in Mg and depleted in Fe, K, Na, Al and Cl and, finally, terminates with Cl poor actinolite (XMg ≈ 0.9). Simultaneously biotite experiences metasomatic alteration that is strongly correlated with the coexisting calcic amphibole rims. Fluid inclusions combined with phase diagram calculations documents that high salinity brines with near constant salinities of c. 30 wt% solvents, infiltrated and metasomatised the amphibolites throughout cooling and uplift from 630 to 280°C. The compositional changes reflect the complex interaction between brine fluids and hydrous minerals during cooling and uplift. Accordingly, the brine fluids fully control the composition of Fe-Mg silicates by metasomatosis. Models that argue that the biotite Fe/Mg ratio together with the P, T and the fluid compositin control the Cl content of (Munoz and Swenson 1981), can not explain the Froland amphiboles and biotites. This is because the silicate and whole rock chemistries are changed by interaction with the brine fluids. The compositional zoning reflects interaction with a fluid having constant halogen contents during gradually changing PT-conditions. In intensively altered areas the original amphibolite mineralogy is entirely replaced. Here we observe the large-scale metasomatic processes in a small scale version, for example following this pattern toward the centre of a vein: Amphibolite with small amount of biotite (host rock): Zone1: biotite-plagioclase zone (K-enrichment). Zone2: amphibole-plagioclase (K-depletion). Zone3

  2. Brine production strategy modeling for active and integrated management of water resources in CCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, B.; Celia, M. A.; Nordbotten, J. M.; Buscheck, T. A.; Elliot, T. J.; Bandilla, K.; Dobossy, M.

    2010-12-01

    Our society is at present highly dependent on coal, which will continue to play a major role in baseload electricity production in the coming decades. Most projected climate change mitigation strategies require CO2 Capture and Sequestration (CCS) as a vital element to stabilize CO2 atmospheric emissions. In these strategies, CCS will have to expand in the next two decades by several orders of magnitude compared to current worldwide implementation. At present the interactions among freshwater extraction, CO2 injection, and brine management are being considered too narrowly across CCS operations, and in the case of freshwater almost completely overlooked. Following the authors’ recently published overview of these challenges, an active and integrated management of water resources throughout CCS operations was proposed to avoid overlooking critical challenges that may become major obstacles to CCS implementation. Water resources management is vital for several reasons including that a coal-fired power plant retrofitted for CCS requires twice as much cooling water as the original plant. However this increased demand may be accommodated by brine extraction and treatment, which would concurrently function as large-scale pressure management and a potential source of freshwater. Synergistic advantages of such proactive integration that were identified led the authors to concluded that: Active management of CCS operations through an integrated approach -including brine production, treatment, use for cooling, and partial reinjection- can address challenges simultaneously with several synergistic advantages; and, that freshwater and brine must be linked to CO2 and pressure as key decision making parameters throughout CCS operations while recognizing scalability and potential pore space competition challenges. This work presents a detailed modeling investigation of a potential integration opportunity resulting from brine production. Technical results will focus solely on the

  3. Supercritical CO2/brine transport in a fractured rock under geologic sequestration conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kue-Young; Oh, Junho; Han, Weon Shik

    2013-04-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a promising technology for mitigating CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. In general, densely fractured natural reservoirs are rarely considered as suitable candidates due to issues related to safe and secure long-term storage. Nevertheless, assessment of CO2 storage processes in a storage medium with fractures is critical, as fractures occur in nearly all geological settings and play a major role in hydrocarbon migration as well as entrapment. We evaluated the impact of fractures on CO2/brine transport under geologic sequestration conditions by conducting both experimental and numerical studies. Laboratory experimental results showed a piston-like brine displacement with gravity over-run effects in the homogeneous core regardless of CO2 injection rates. In the fractured core, however, two distinctive types of brine displacements were observed; one showing brine displacement only in the fracture whereas the other shows brine displacement both in the fracture and matrix with different rates, depending on the magnitude of the pressure build-up in the matrix. In the experiments, the injectivity in the fractured core was twice greater than that in the homogeneous core at our experimental condition, while the estimated storage capacity was greater in the homogeneous core than in the fractured core by over 1.5 times. Capillary pressure curves were illustrated for both cores including entry pressures and irreducible brine saturation. The free-phase CO2 transfer in a fracture-matrix system was addressed by numerical simulation, and provided transient flux exchange processes during the brine displacement by CO2. The pressure gradient between the fracture and matrix induced CO2 transfer from fracture into matrix at the front of CO2 plume in fracture. In contrast, at the rear zone of CO2 plume, the reversal of pressure gradient resulted in a reverse CO2 flux. Additionally, the influence of fracture aperture on CO2 transfer between fracture

  4. Mathematical Thinking in Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Villaveces

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical chemistry is often thought to be a 20th-century subdiscipline of chemistry, but in this paper we discuss several early chemical ideas and some landmarks of chemistry as instances of the mathematical way of thinking; many of them before 1900. By the mathematical way of thinking, we follow Weyl's description of it in terms of functional thinking, i.e. setting up variables, symbolizing them, and seeking for functions relating them. The cases we discuss are Plato's triangles, Geoffroy's affinity table, Lavoisier's classification of substances and their relationships, Mendeleev's periodic table, Cayley's enumeration of alkanes, Sylvester's association of algebra and chemistry, and Wiener's relationship between molecular structure and boiling points. These examples show that mathematical chemistry has much more than a century of history.

  5. Accelerators and nuclear reactors as tools in hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of accelerators and of nuclear reactors - the latter to a lesser extent - are discussed in view of their present and future use in hot atom chemistry research and its applications. (author)

  6. Korean Kimchi Chemistry: A Multicultural Chemistry Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murfin, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Connecting science with different cultures is one way to interest students in science, to relate science to their lives, and at the same time to broaden their horizons in a variety of ways. In the lesson described here, students make kimchi, a delicious and popular Korean dish that can be used to explore many important chemistry concepts,…

  7. Data report on gamma radiolysis tests on PBB1 and PBB3 brines: Salt Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tests described in this data report are described in the FY 1986 Technical Program Plan (TPP), WBS Element 0302 - Brine Radiolysis, for the Waste Package Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), conducted for the Salt Repository Project through the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Department of Energy. Two types of tests were outlined in the FY 1986 TPP, one in which PBB1 and PBB3 brines were to be irradiated in closed systems while the buildup of gas pressure was monitored, and the second in which the Eh of PBB1 and PBB3 brines was to be monitored continuously during irradiation. The first type of test was intended to simulate repository conditions by including coupons of mild steel to represent container material. Blank tests, which involved either no radiation or no steel coupons, were added to both of the test matrices to aid in understanding the radiolysis results. Hindsight shows that the tests that included steel coupons provided corrosion-relevant data but generated little useful radiolysis information. The second type of test was intended to use platinum electrodes to measure the effect of radiolysis on the redox potential of the brines. Eh measurements were to be made during irradiation because it was thought that the redox potential might change rapidly after the irradiation was terminated. If that were true, then Eh measurements made only after irradiation would be misleading. However, platinum electrodes were found to be ill-suited for measuring the redox potential of PBB1 and PBB3 brines; therefore, a different method is needed. Some exploratory testing is being conducted, and results obtained to date are reported here along with the more extensive gas pressure and corrosion results. This data report will be followed at a later date by a summary or topical report, which will include analysis of the data. The data in this data report are preliminary; they have been neither analyzed nor evaluated

  8. RO brine treatment and recovery by biological activated carbon and capacitive deionization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Guihe; Viswanath, Bala; Kekre, Kiran; Lee, Lai Yoke; Ng, How Yong; Ong, Say Leong; Seah, Harry

    2011-01-01

    The generation of brine solutions from dense membrane (reverse osmosis, RO or nanofiltration, NF) water reclamation systems has been increasing worldwide, and the lack of cost effective disposal options is becoming a critical water resources management issue. In Singapore, NEWater is the product of a multiple barrier water reclamation process from secondary treated domestic effluent using MF/UF-RO and UV technologies. The RO brine (concentrates) accounts for more than 20% of the total flow treated. To increase the water recovery and treat the RO brine, a CDI based process with BAC as pretreatment was tested. The results show that ion concentrations in CDI product were low except SiO2 when compared with RO feed water. CDI product was passed through a RO and the RO permeate was of better quality including low SiO2 as compared to NEWater quality. It could be beneficial to use a dedicated RO operated at optimum conditions with better performance to recover the water. BAC was able to achieve 15-27% TOC removal of RO brine. CDI had been tested at a water recovery ranging from 71.6 to 92.3%. CDI based RO brine treatment could improve overall water recovery of NEWater production over 90%. It was found that calcium phosphate scaling and organic fouling was the major cause of CDI pressure increase. Ozone disinfection and sodium bisulfite dosing were able to reduce CDI fouling rate. For sustainable operation of CDI organic fouling control and effective organic fouling cleaning should be further studied. PMID:22053461

  9. The Effect of CO2-Saturated Brines on the Hydraulic and Mechanical Behavior of Dunite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisabeth, H. P.; Zhu, W.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is increasingly being used as an industrial chemical, both in enhanced oil and gas recovery and in pilot and proposed carbon capture and storage projects. Due to the high reactivity of carbon dioxide, particularly with mafic and ultramafic minerals, a better understanding of the effects of CO2-rock interaction is necessary for the safe and effective implementation of these technologies. In order to explore the effect of CO2-rock interaction on the hydraulic and mechanical behavior of ultramafic rocks, we performed hydrostatic creep tests on thermally cracked dunites saturated with distilled water and CO2-saturated brines of varying composition to observe the effect of the presence of CO2 in pore fluid on the compaction behavior and permeability evolution of the samples. Pore fluids used in these tests were distilled water, CO2-saturated 0.6 M NaHCO3 brine, and CO2-saturated 1.5 M NaHCO3 brine. Experiments were performed at room temperature and 423 K, with a confining pressure of 15 MPa and a pore fluid pressure of 10 MPa. In-situ permeability measurements were taken throughout the experiment. At the end of three day hydrostatic tests, samples were axially deformed at a constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1 to the point of failure to assess the effects of compaction and reaction on the mechanical behavior of the samples. Samples saturated with distilled water compact with a monotonic decrease in compaction rate throughout the tests, while samples saturated with CO2-brine display an increase in compaction rate toward the end of tests. All samples exhibit a modest reduction in permeability throughout the compaction. Samples saturated with CO2-brine appear to accommodate more axial shortening before the onset of dilatancy in axial deformation tests. Optical microscopy and SEM analyses were performed on the samples and reveal interplay between dissolution, precipitation and mechanical cracking.

  10. Third Chemistry Conference on Recent Trends in Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The third chemistry conference 2011 on recent trends in chemistry was held from October 17-19, 2001 at Islamabad, Pakistan. More than 65 papers and oral presentation. The scope of the conference was wide open and provides and opportunity for participation of broad spectrum of chemists. This forum provided a platform for the dissemination of the latest research followed by discussion pertaining to new trends in chemistry. This con fence covered different aspects of subjects including analytical chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, industrial chemistry, biochemistry and nano chemistry etc. (A.B.)

  11. Shelf life determination of the brined golden mullet Liza aurata during vacuum refrigerated storage using some quality aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariyam Ali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Salted fish products are popular in many countries around the world. Salting is one of the oldest techniques for fish preservation, and is essentially intended to increase the shelf-life of the product depressing water activity by means of dehydration and salt uptake by the fish muscle. However, the current demand for salted fish is driven more by the flavour of the product than for preservation purposes. Vacuum-packaging represents a static form of hypobaric storage. It is widely used in the food industry because of its effectiveness in reducing oxidative reactions in the product at relatively low cost. Low temperature storage is one of the primary methods to maintain fish quality, based on the reduction in the rates of microbiological, chemical and biochemical changes. Material  and methods. Fresh Golden mullets were rapidly beheaded, scaled, gutted and immediately washed with tap water then, samples were taken to the laboratory in ice box for chemical and microbial analysis of fresh fish, other samples were put in the brine (6 liter water and 2160 g salt was used for brine solution. After 14 days of brining, fish were taken out of brine solution and drained, then they were Vacuum Packed and labelled (each pack contained two fish about 1500 g weight. All the packs were stored in a refrigerator 4°C. Some quality aspects including Total Volatile Nitrogen (TVN, Peroxide Value (PV, Thiobarbituric Acid (TBA, Total Viable Count (TVC, Halophilic Bacteria (HB and presence of Clostridium Botulinum were determined in fresh mullets, fresh brined mullets after 14 days of brining, and in (Vacuum Packed VP samples stored at 4°C at intervals of 30, 60 and 90 days. Results.  TVN increased from ten mg/100 g in fresh brined after 14 days to 30.80 mg/100 g in VP brined Golden mullet after 90 days of storage at 4°C, PV increased after brining from 1.50 meq/kg in fresh brined to 28.90 meq/kg in VP brined Golden mullet after 90 days of storage at 4

  12. System approach to chemistry course

    OpenAIRE

    Lorina E. Kruglova; Valentina G. Derendyaeva

    2010-01-01

    The article considers the raise of chemistry profile for engineers and constructors training, discloses the system approach to chemistry course and singles out the most important modules from the course of general chemistry for construction industry.

  13. A review of theories on the origins of saline waters and brines in the Canadian Precambrian Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater at depths greater that 500 m in the Canadian Precambrian Shield is typically saline with a sodium-calcium/chloride chemical composition. Brines with dissolved solid concentrations exceeding 100 g/L have been encountered in several deep mines (>1000 m) on the Shield. Theories on the origins of these deep saline waters and brines can be grouped into two general categories: (1) autochthonous (in situ) origins attributable to silicate mineral hydrolysis over geologic time scales, leaching of fluid inclusions or radiolysis effects, and (2) allochthonous (external) sources caused by the infiltration of brine of modified seawater origins in the geologic past. Although the chemical and isotopic compositions of these waters clearly reflect the effects of reaction between the water and their silicate host rocks, it is unlikely that the high chlorinity of the brines is in an autochthonous attribute. It is proposed that the compositions of these brines are most compatible with the Paleozoic residual brine hypothesis of Spencer (1987). This theory invokes deep infiltration of a high-density residual brine, formed by the evaporation of seawater during Devonian time, into underlying Precambrian basement rocks where subsequent chemical modifications occurred. (author) 39 refs., 2 figs

  14. Liquid-vapor partitioning of NaCl(aq) from concentrated brines at temperatures to 350{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonson, J.M.; Palmer, Donald A.; Carter, R.W.

    1994-01-20

    Compositions of coexisting liquid and vapor phases have been determined at temperatures from 250 to 350°C for brines containing NaCl and either HCI or NaOH by direct sampling of both phases from a static phase-equilibration apparatus. In these experiments, NaCl concentrations in the liquid phase ranged to 6.5 mol-kg{sup -1}, with corresponding vapor-phase NaCl concentrations varying strongly with temperature and brine composition. Acid or base was added to the brines to suppress unknown contributions of NaCl(aq) hydrolysis products to the observed volatilities. Thermodynamic partitioning constants for NaCl have been determined from the observed compositions of the coexisting phases combined with the known activity coefficients of NaCl(aq) in the liquid phase. An apparent dependence of the values of these partitioning constants on brine concentration is explained by considering the effect of decreasing pressure on the density of the vapor phase. Concentrations of HCI and NaCl in steam produced from various natural brines may be calculated as hnctions of temperature and brine composition based on these new results coupled with our previous determinations of the partitioning constants for HCl(aq). Application of these results to The Geysers will be discussed in terms of the composition of postulated brines which could be in equilibrium with observed steam compositions at various temperatures.

  15. Disposal/recovery options for brine waters from oil and gas production in New York State. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, M.R.; Atkinson, J.F.; Bunn, M.D.; Hodge, D.S.

    1996-03-01

    Produced water from oil and gas operations, or brine as it is typically referred, may be characterized as being highly saline, with total dissolved solids greater than 100 g/L. If these bribes are disposed improperly there may be severe adverse environmental effects. Thus, it is important that brine be disposed using environmentally sound methods. Unfortunately, costs for the disposal of brine water are a significant burden to oil and gas producers in New York State. These costs and the relatively low market price of oil and natural gas have contributed to the decline in gas and oil production in New York State during the past 10 years. The objectives of this study were to evaluate new and existing options for brine disposal in New York State, examine the technical and economic merits of these options, and assess environmental impacts associated with each option. Two new disposal options investigated for New York State oil and gas producers included construction of a regional brine treatment facility to treat brine prior to discharge into a receiving water and a salt production facility that utilizes produced water as a feed stock. Both options are technically feasible; however, their economic viability depends on facility size and volume of brine treated.

  16. Disposal/recovery options for brine waters from oil and gas production in New York State. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Produced water from oil and gas operations, or brine as it is typically referred, may be characterized as being highly saline, with total dissolved solids greater than 100 g/L. If these bribes are disposed improperly there may be severe adverse environmental effects. Thus, it is important that brine be disposed using environmentally sound methods. Unfortunately, costs for the disposal of brine water are a significant burden to oil and gas producers in New York State. These costs and the relatively low market price of oil and natural gas have contributed to the decline in gas and oil production in New York State during the past 10 years. The objectives of this study were to evaluate new and existing options for brine disposal in New York State, examine the technical and economic merits of these options, and assess environmental impacts associated with each option. Two new disposal options investigated for New York State oil and gas producers included construction of a regional brine treatment facility to treat brine prior to discharge into a receiving water and a salt production facility that utilizes produced water as a feed stock. Both options are technically feasible; however, their economic viability depends on facility size and volume of brine treated

  17. Rapid changes in surface water carbonate chemistry during Antarctic sea ice melt

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Elizabeth M.; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Venables, Hugh J.; Whitehouse, Michael J.; Korb, Rebecca E.; Watson, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of sea ice melt on the carbonate chemistry of surface waters in the Weddell–Scotia Confluence, Southern Ocean, was investigated during January 2008. Contrasting concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA) and the fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2) were observed in and around the receding sea ice edge. The precipitation of carbonate minerals such as ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) in sea ice brine has the net effect of decreasing DIC and TA and increasing the fCO2 i...

  18. Water chemistry and microbial corrosion in oilfield water handling facilities: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack, T.; Bramhill, B.

    1992-01-01

    This study was carried out in an oilfield waterflood operation in which produced brine is reinjected to displace more oil from the reservoir. Significant corrosion problems are associated with bacterial colonization of the water handling system. This report describes results of an audit of chemical, biological and corrosion parameters measured across the Wainwright waterflood operation over 30 months. Based on the insights obtained and previous observation of shifts in microbial populations with variations in water chemistry, a series of runs was conducted in the field test facility at unit 13 waterplant to investigate the effect of specific chemical additions.

  19. Annual report 1987 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. The names and abstracts of all articles and reports published and lectures given in 1987 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, radical chemistry, mineral processing, and general. 13 ills., (author)

  20. Annual report 1982 chemistry department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work going on in the Risoe National Laboratory, Chemistry Department is briefly surveyed by a presentation of all articles and reports published in 1982. The facilities and equipment are barely mentioned. The papers are divided into eight activities: 1. neutron activation analysis 2. analytical- and organic chemistry 3. environmental chemistry 4. polymer chemistry 5. geochemistry 6. radical chemistry 7. poitron annihilation 8. uranium process chemistry. (author)