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Sample records for channels 30s 31cl

  1. Characterization of the human pH- and PKA-activated ClC-2G(2 alpha) Cl- channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, A M; Stroffekova, K; Knapp, L M; Kupert, E Y; Cuppoletti, J; Malinowska, D H

    1997-08-01

    A ClC-2G(2 alpha) Cl- channel was identified to be present in human lung and stomach, and a partial cDNA for this Cl- channel was cloned from a human fetal lung library. A full-length expressible human ClC-2G(2 alpha) cDNA was constructed by ligation of mutagenized expressible rabbit ClC-2G(2 alpha) cDNA with the human lung ClC-2G(2 alpha) cDNA, expressed in oocytes, and characterized at the single-channel level. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinase (PKA) treatment increased the probability of opening of the channel (Po). After PKA activation, the channel exhibited a linear (r = 0.99) current-voltage curve with a slope conductance of 22.1 +/- 0.8 pS in symmetric 800 mM tetraethylammonium chloride (TEACl; pH 7.4). Under fivefold gradient conditions of TEACl, a reversal potential of +21.5 +/- 2.8 mV was measured demonstrating anion-to-cation discrimination. As previously demonstrated for the rabbit ClC-2G(2 alpha) Cl- channel, the human analog, hClC-2G(2 alpha), was active at pH 7.4 as well as when the pH of the extracellular face of the channel (trans side of the bilayer; pHtrans) was asymmetrically reduced to pH 3.0. The extent of PKA activation was dependent on pHtrans. With PKA treatment, Po increased fourfold with a pHtrans of 7.4 and eightfold with a pHtrans of 3.0. Effects of sequential PKA addition followed by pHtrans reduction on the same channel suggested that the PKA- and pH-dependent increases in channel Po were separable and cumulative. Northern analysis showed ClC-2G(2 alpha) mRNA to be present in human adult and fetal lung and adult stomach, and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction showed this channel to be present in the adult human lung and stomach at about one-half the level found in fetal lung. The findings of the present study suggest that the ClC-2G(2 alpha) Cl- channel may play an important role in Cl- transport in the fetal and adult human lung.

  2. Cloning, functional expression, and characterization of a PKA-activated gastric Cl- channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowska, D H; Kupert, E Y; Bahinski, A; Sherry, A M; Cuppoletti, J

    1995-01-01

    cDNA encoding a Cl- channel was isolated from a rabbit gastric library, sequenced, and expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The predicted protein (898 amino acids, relative molecular mass 98,433 Da) was overall 93% similar to the rat brain ClC-2 Cl- channel. However, a 151-amino acid stretch toward the COOH-terminus was 74% similar to ClC-2 with six amino acids deleted. Two new potential protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation sites (also protein kinase C phosphorylation sites) were introduced. cRNA-injected Xenopus oocytes expressed a Cl- channel that was active at pHtrans 3 and had a linear current-voltage (I-V) curve and a slope conductance of 29 +/- 1 pS at 800 mM CsCl. A fivefold Cl- gradient caused a rightward shift in the I-V curve with a reversal potential of +30 +/- 3 mV, indicating anion selectivity. The selectivity was I- > Cl- > NO3-. The native and recombinant Cl- channel were both activated in vitro by PKA catalytic subunit and ATP. The electrophysiological and regulatory properties of the cloned and the native channel were similar. The cloned protein may be the Cl- channel involved in gastric HCl secretion.

  3. Cl- channels in apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Sirianant, Lalida

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable feature of apoptosis is the initial massive cell shrinkage, which requires opening of ion channels to allow release of K(+), Cl(-), and organic osmolytes to drive osmotic water movement and cell shrinkage. This article focuses on the role of the Cl(-) channels LRRC8, TMEM16/anoctamin......, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in cellular apoptosis. LRRC8A-E has been identified as a volume-regulated anion channel expressed in many cell types. It was shown to be required for regulatory and apoptotic volume decrease (RVD, AVD) in cultured cell lines. Its presence also......(-) channels or as regulators of other apoptotic Cl(-) channels, such as LRRC8. CFTR has been known for its proapoptotic effects for some time, and this effect may be based on glutathione release from the cell and increase in cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although we find that CFTR is activated...

  4. 31S(p,γ)32Cl reaction in explosive hydrogen burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, A.; Vouzoukas, S.; Aguer, P.; Bogaert, G.; Coc, A.; Denker, A.; De Oliveira, F.; Fortier, S.; Goerres, J.; Kiener, J.; Maison, J.M.; Porquet, M.G.; Rosier, L.; Tatischeff, V.; Thibaud, J.P.; Wiescher, M.

    1997-01-01

    In the present work we attempted to determine excitation energies and widths of proton unbound states in 32 Cl. These states may contribute as resonances to the 31 S(p,γ) reaction and will determine the reaction rate. Results were used to evaluate the reaction flow in the Si to Ar region obtained by nova outbursts in the case of an ONeMg white dwarf of 1.35 M odot . (orig.)

  5. Physiology and pathophysiology of ClC-K/barttin channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlke, Christoph; Fischer, Martin

    2010-01-01

    ClC-K channels form a subgroup of anion channels within the ClC family of anion transport proteins. They are expressed predominantly in the kidney and in the inner ear, and are necessary for NaCl resorption in the loop of Henle and for K+ secretion by the stria vascularis. Subcellular distribution as well as the function of these channels are tightly regulated by an accessory subunit, barttin. Barttin improves the stability of ClC-K channel protein, stimulates the exit from the endoplasmic reticulum and insertion into the plasma membrane and changes its function by modifying voltage-dependent gating processes. The importance of ClC-K/barttin channels is highlighted by several genetic diseases. Dysfunctions of ClC-K channels result in Bartter syndrome, an inherited human condition characterized by impaired urinary concentration. Mutations in the gene encoding barttin, BSND, affect the urinary concentration as well as the sensory function of the inner ear. Surprisingly, there is one BSND mutation that causes deafness without affecting renal function, indicating that kidney function tolerates a reduction of anion channel activity that is not sufficient to support normal signal transduction in inner hair cells. This review summarizes recent work on molecular mechanisms, physiology, and pathophysiology of ClC-K/barttin channels.

  6. Physiology and pathophysiology of ClC-K/barttin channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eFahlke

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available ClC-K channels form a subgroup of anion channels within the ClC family of anion transport proteins. They are expressed predominantly in the kidney and in the inner ear, and are necessary for NaCl resorption in the loop of Henle and for K+ secretion by the stria vascularis. Subcellular distribution as well as the function of these channels are tightly regulated by an accessory subunit, barttin. Barttin improves the stability of ClC-K channel protein, stimulates the exit from the endoplasmic reticulum and insertion into the plasma membrane and changes its function by modifying voltage-dependent gating processes. The importance of ClC-K/barttin channels is highlighted by several genetic diseases. Dysfunctions of ClC-K channels result in Bartter syndrome, an inherited human condition characterized by impaired urinary concentration. Mutations in the gene encoding barttin, BSND, affect the urinary concentration as well as the sensory function of the inner ear. Surprisingly, there is one BSND mutation that causes deafness without affecting renal function, indicating that kidney function tolerates a reduction of anion channel activity that is not sufficient to support normal signal transduction in inner hair cells. This review summarizes recent work on molecular mechanisms, physiology and pathophysiology of ClC-K/barttin channels.

  7. Cl- channels of the gastric parietal cell that are active at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuppoletti, J; Baker, A M; Malinowska, D H

    1993-06-01

    HCl secretion across mammalian gastric parietal cell apical membrane may involve Cl- channels. H(+)-K(+)-ATPase-containing membranes isolated from gastric mucosa of histamine-stimulated rabbits were fused to planar lipid bilayers. Channels were recorded with symmetric 800 mM CsCl solutions, pH 7.4. A linear current-voltage (I-V) relationship was obtained, and conductance was 28 +/- 1 pS at 800 mM CsCl. Conductance was 6.9 +/- 2 pS at 150 mM CsCl. Reversal potential was +22 mV with a fivefold cis-trans CsCl concentration gradient, indicating that the channel was anion selective with a discrimination ratio of 6:1 for Cl- over Cs+. Anion selectivity of the channel was I- > Cl- > or = Br- > NO3-, and gluconate was impermeant. Channels obtained at pH 7.4 persisted when pH of medium bathing the trans side of the bilayer (pHtrans) was reduced to pH 3, without a change in conductance, linearity of I-V relationship, or ion selectivity. In contrast, asymmetric reduction of pH of medium bathing the cis side of the bilayer from 7.4 to 3 always resulted in loss of channel activity. At pH 7.4, open probability (Po) of the channel was voltage dependent, i.e., predominantly open at +80 mV but mainly closed at -80 mV. In contrast, with low pHtrans, channel Po at -80 mV was increased 3.5-fold. The Cl- channel was Ca2+ indifferent. In absence of ionophores, ion selectivity for support of H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and H+ transport was consistent with that exhibited by the channel and could be limited by substitution with NO3-, whereas maximal H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity was indifferent to anion present, demonstrating that anion transport can be rate limiting. Cl- channels with similar characteristics (conductance, linear I-V relationship, and ion selectivity) were also present in H(+)-K(+)-ATPase-containing vesicles isolated from resting (cimetidine-treated) gastric mucosa, exhibiting at -80 mV a pH-independent approximately 3.5-fold lower Po than stimulated vesicle channels. At -80 m

  8. Identification of the pH sensor and activation by chemical modification of the ClC-2G Cl- channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroffekova, K; Kupert, E Y; Malinowska, D H; Cuppoletti, J

    1998-10-01

    Rabbit and human ClC-2G Cl- channels are voltage sensitive and activated by protein kinase A and low extracellular pH. The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism involved in acid activation of the ClC-2G Cl- channel and to determine which amino acid residues play a role in this acid activation. Channel open probability (Po) at +/-80 mV holding potentials increased fourfold in a concentration-dependent manner with extracellular H+ concentration (that is, extracellular pH, pHtrans), with an apparent acidic dissociation constant of pH 4.95 +/- 0.27. 1-Ethyl-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide-catalyzed amidation of the channel with glycine methyl ester increased Po threefold at pHtrans 7.4, at which the channel normally exhibits low Po. With extracellular pH reduction (protonation) or amidation, increased Po was due to a significant increase in open time constants and a significant decrease in closed time constants of the channel gating, and this effect was insensitive to applied voltage. With the use of site-directed mutagenesis, the extracellular region EELE (amino acids 416-419) was identified as the pH sensor and amino acid Glu-419 was found to play the key or predominant role in activation of the ClC-2G Cl- channel by extracellular acid.

  9. Chloride channels in the plasma membrane of a foetal Drosophila cell line, S2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Margit; Willumsen, Niels J.

    2000-01-01

    S2 cells, Cl- Channels, Expression system, Drosophila, Inward rectifier, Outward rectifier, Patch clamp......S2 cells, Cl- Channels, Expression system, Drosophila, Inward rectifier, Outward rectifier, Patch clamp...

  10. FPGA based, DSP integrated, 8-channel SIMCON, ver. 3.0. Initial results for 8-channel algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giergusiewicz, W.; Koprek, W.; Jalmuzna, W.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Electronic Systems

    2005-07-01

    The paper describes design, construction and initial measurements of an eight channel electronic LLRF device predicted for building of the control system for the VUV-FEL accelerator at DESY (Hamburg). The device, referred in the paper to as the SIMCON 3.0 (from the SC cavity simulator and controller) consists of a 16 layer, VME size, PCB, a large FPGA chip (VirtexII-4000 by Xilinx), eight fast ADCs and four DACs (by Analog Devices). To our knowledge, the proposed device is the first of this kind for the accelerator technology in which there was achieved (the FPGA based) DSP latency below 200 ns. With the optimized data transmission system, the overall LLRF system latency can be as low as 500 ns. The SIMCON 3.0 sub-system was applied for initial tests with the ACC1 module of the VUV FEL accelerator (eight channels) and with the CHECHIA test stand (single channel), both at the DESY. The promising results with the SIMCON 3.0. encouraged us to enter the design of SIMCON 3.1. possessing 10 measurement and control channels and some additional features to be reported in the next technical note. SIMCON 3.0. is a modular solution, while SIMCON 3.1. will be an integrated board of the all-in-one type. Two design approaches - modular and all-in-one, after branching off in this version of the Simcon, will be continued. (orig.)

  11. Gating of human ClC-2 chloride channels and regulation by carboxy-terminal domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Olivares, Jennie; Alekov, Alexi; Boroumand, Mohammad Reza; Begemann, Birgit; Hidalgo, Patricia; Fahlke, Christoph

    2008-11-15

    Eukaryotic ClC channels are dimeric proteins with each subunit forming an individual protopore. Single protopores are gated by a fast gate, whereas the slow gate is assumed to control both protopores through a cooperative movement of the two carboxy-terminal domains. We here study the role of the carboxy-terminal domain in modulating fast and slow gating of human ClC-2 channels, a ubiquitously expressed ClC-type chloride channel involved in transepithelial solute transport and in neuronal chloride homeostasis. Partial truncation of the carboxy-terminus abolishes function of ClC-2 by locking the channel in a closed position. However, unlike other isoforms, its complete removal preserves function of ClC-2. ClC-2 channels without the carboxy-terminus exhibit fast and slow gates that activate and deactivate significantly faster than in WT channels. In contrast to the prevalent view, a single carboxy-terminus suffices for normal slow gating, whereas both domains regulate fast gating of individual protopores. Our findings demonstrate that the carboxy-terminus is not strictly required for slow gating and that the cooperative gating resides in other regions of the channel protein. ClC-2 is expressed in neurons and believed to open at negative potentials and increased internal chloride concentrations after intense synaptic activity. We propose that the function of the ClC-2 carboxy-terminus is to slow down the time course of channel activation in order to stabilize neuronal excitability.

  12. Dual regulation of the native ClC-K2 chloride channel in the distal nephron by voltage and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Laurent; Nissant, Antoine; Edwards, Aurélie; Lourdel, Stéphane; Teulon, Jacques; Paulais, Marc

    2016-09-01

    ClC-K2, a member of the ClC family of Cl(-) channels and transporters, forms the major basolateral Cl(-) conductance in distal nephron epithelial cells and therefore plays a central role in renal Cl(-) absorption. However, its regulation remains largely unknown because of the fact that recombinant ClC-K2 has not yet been studied at the single-channel level. In the present study, we investigate the effects of voltage, pH, Cl(-), and Ca(2+) on native ClC-K2 in the basolateral membrane of intercalated cells from the mouse connecting tubule. The ∼10-pS channel shows a steep voltage dependence such that channel activity increases with membrane depolarization. Intracellular pH (pHi) and extracellular pH (pHo) differentially modulate the voltage dependence curve: alkaline pHi flattens the curve by causing an increase in activity at negative voltages, whereas alkaline pHo shifts the curve toward negative voltages. In addition, pHi, pHo, and extracellular Ca(2+) strongly increase activity, mainly because of an increase in the number of active channels with a comparatively minor effect on channel open probability. Furthermore, voltage alters both the number of active channels and their open probability, whereas intracellular Cl(-) has little influence. We propose that changes in the number of active channels correspond to them entering or leaving an inactivated state, whereas modulation of open probability corresponds to common gating by these channels. We suggest that pH, through the combined effects of pHi and pHo on ClC-K2, might be a key regulator of NaCl absorption and Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange in type B intercalated cells. © 2016 Pinelli et al.

  13. Basolateral K+ channels in airway epithelia. II. Role in Cl- secretion and evidence for two types of K+ channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, J.D.; Welsh, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    We previously described a Ca2(+)-activated K+ channel (KCLIC) in airway epithelial cells. To determine whether the KCLIC channel is a basolateral membrane channel and to understand its role in Cl- secretion, we studied airway epithelial cells grown on permeable supports. When cells were stimulated with A23187, charybdotoxin (ChTX) inhibited Cl- secretion and 86Rb efflux at the same concentrations, indicating that the KCLIC channel is required for Ca2(+)-stimulated Cl- secretion. We also investigated the function of K+ channels in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate-stimulated secretion. Addition of isoproterenol caused a biphasic increase in Cl- secretion; the time course of the transient component correlated with the time course of the isoproterenol-induced increase in Ca2+ concentration [( Ca2+]c). ChTX inhibited the transient component, but not the prolonged component of secretion; Ba2+ inhibited the sustained component. These results suggest that when cells are grown on permeable supports isoproterenol-induced secretion depends on activation of two types of K+ channel: the KCLIC channel that is stimulated initially and a ChTX-insensitive K+ channel that is stimulated during sustained secretion. This conclusion was supported by measurement of 86Rb efflux from cell monolayers

  14. ClC-K chloride channels: emerging pathophysiology of Bartter syndrome type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrini, Olga; Keck, Mathilde; Briones, Rodolfo; Lourdel, Stéphane; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Teulon, Jacques

    2015-06-15

    The mutations in the CLCNKB gene encoding the ClC-Kb chloride channel are responsible for Bartter syndrome type 3, one of the four variants of Bartter syndrome in the genetically based nomenclature. All forms of Bartter syndrome are characterized by hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and secondary hyperaldosteronism, but Bartter syndrome type 3 has the most heterogeneous presentation, extending from severe to very mild. A relatively large number of CLCNKB mutations have been reported, including gene deletions and nonsense or missense mutations. However, only 20 CLCNKB mutations have been functionally analyzed, due to technical difficulties regarding ClC-Kb functional expression in heterologous systems. This review provides an overview of recent progress in the functional consequences of CLCNKB mutations on ClC-Kb chloride channel activity. It has been observed that 1) all ClC-Kb mutants have an impaired expression at the membrane; and 2) a minority of the mutants combines reduced membrane expression with altered pH-dependent channel gating. Although further investigation is needed to fully characterize disease pathogenesis, Bartter syndrome type 3 probably belongs to the large family of conformational diseases, in which the mutations destabilize channel structure, inducing ClC-Kb retention in the endoplasmic reticulum and accelerated channel degradation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Microglial KCa3.1 Channels as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Maezawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There exists an urgent need for new target discovery to treat Alzheimer’s disease (AD; however, recent clinical trials based on anti-Aβ and anti-inflammatory strategies have yielded disappointing results. To expedite new drug discovery, we propose reposition targets which have been previously pursued by both industry and academia for indications other than AD. One such target is the calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 (KCNN4, which in the brain is primarily expressed in microglia and is significantly upregulated when microglia are activated. We here review the existing evidence supporting that KCa3.1 inhibition could block microglial neurotoxicity without affecting their neuroprotective phagocytosis activity and without being broadly immunosuppressive. The anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of KCa3.1 blockade would be suitable for treating AD as well as cerebrovascular and traumatic brain injuries, two well-known risk factors contributing to the dementia in AD patients presenting with mixed pathologies. Importantly, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of several KCa3.1 blockers are well known, and a KCa3.1 blocker has been proven safe in clinical trials. It is therefore promising to reposition old or new KCa3.1 blockers for AD preclinical and clinical trials.

  16. Recommendations for processing atmospheric attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotthaus, Simone; O'Connor, Ewan; Münkel, Christoph; Charlton-Perez, Cristina; Haeffelin, Martial; Gabey, Andrew M.; Grimmond, C. Sue B.

    2016-08-01

    Ceilometer lidars are used for cloud base height detection, to probe aerosol layers in the atmosphere (e.g. detection of elevated layers of Saharan dust or volcanic ash), and to examine boundary layer dynamics. Sensor optics and acquisition algorithms can strongly influence the observed attenuated backscatter profiles; therefore, physical interpretation of the profiles requires careful application of corrections. This study addresses the widely deployed Vaisala CL31 ceilometer. Attenuated backscatter profiles are studied to evaluate the impact of both the hardware generation and firmware version. In response to this work and discussion within the CL31/TOPROF user community (TOPROF, European COST Action aiming to harmonise ground-based remote sensing networks across Europe), Vaisala released new firmware (versions 1.72 and 2.03) for the CL31 sensors. These firmware versions are tested against previous versions, showing that several artificial features introduced by the data processing have been removed. Hence, it is recommended to use this recent firmware for analysing attenuated backscatter profiles. To allow for consistent processing of historic data, correction procedures have been developed that account for artefacts detected in data collected with older firmware. Furthermore, a procedure is proposed to determine and account for the instrument-related background signal from electronic and optical components. This is necessary for using attenuated backscatter observations from any CL31 ceilometer. Recommendations are made for the processing of attenuated backscatter observed with Vaisala CL31 sensors, including the estimation of noise which is not provided in the standard CL31 output. After taking these aspects into account, attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers are considered capable of providing valuable information for a range of applications including atmospheric boundary layer studies, detection of elevated aerosol layers, and model

  17. A Novel Mechanism of pH Buffering in C. elegans Glia: Bicarbonate Transport via the Voltage-Gated ClC Cl- Channel CLH-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jeff; Matthewman, Cristina; Bianchi, Laura

    2015-12-16

    An important function of glia is the maintenance of the ionic composition and pH of the synaptic microenvironment. In terms of pH regulation, HCO3 (-) buffering has been shown to be important in both glia and neurons. Here, we used in vivo fluorescent pH imaging and RNA sequencing of the amphid sheath glia of Caenorhabditis elegans to reveal a novel mechanism of cellular HCO3 (-) uptake. While the classical mechanism of HCO3 (-) uptake involves Na(+)/HCO3 (-) cotransporters, here we demonstrate that the C. elegans ClC Cl(-) channel CLH-1 is highly permeable to HCO3 (-) and mediates HCO3 (-) uptake into amphid sheath glia. CLH-1 has homology and electrophysiological properties similar to the mammalian ClC-2 Cl(-) channel. Our data suggest that, in addition to maintaining synaptic Cl(-) concentration, these channels may also be involved in maintenance of synaptic pH via HCO3 (-) flux. These findings provide an exciting new facet of study regarding how pH is regulated in the brain. Maintenance of pH is essential for the physiological function of the nervous system. HCO3 (-) is crucial for pH regulation and is transported into the cell via ion transporters, including ion channels, the molecular identity of which remains unclear. In this manuscript, we describe our discovery that the C. elegans amphid sheath glia regulate intracellular pH via HCO3 (-) flux through the voltage-gated ClC channel CLH-1. This represents a novel function for ClC channels, which has implications for their possible role in mammalian glial pH regulation. This discovery may also provide a novel therapeutic target for pathologic conditions, such as ischemic stroke where acidosis leads to widespread death of glia and subsequently neurons. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3516377-21$15.00/0.

  18. cap alpha. -transfer reactions /sup 27/Al(/sup 6/Li, d)/sup 31/P, /sup 29/Si(/sup 6/Li, d)/sup 33/S and /sup 31/P(/sup 6/Li, d)/sup 35/Cl at 36 MeV. [Angular distributions, EFR DWBA, spectroscopic strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eswaran, M A; Gove, H E; Cook, R; Sikora, B [Rochester Univ., NY (USA). Nuclear Structure Research Lab.

    1979-08-13

    The ..cap alpha..-transfer reactions /sup 27/Al(/sup 6/Li,d)/sup 31/P,/sup 29/Si(/sup 6/Li,d) /sup 33/S and /sup 31/P(Li,d)/sup 35/Cl have been studied at a /sup 6/Li energy of 36 MeV. Absolute cross sections and angular distributions have been measured and an exact finite-range distorted-wave Born approximation analysis assuming a direct cluster transfer has been used to extract from the data ..cap alpha..-particle spectroscopic strengths for levels populated in /sup 31/P, /sup 33/S and /sup 35/Cl in three reactions respectively. The results show that in the case of most of the low-lying excited states of /sup 31/P a single value of L of the transferred ..cap alpha..-particle contributes, though a multiplicity of L-values are allowed by angular momentum selection rules. It is also found that the ..cap alpha..-particle spectroscopic strength of the ground state of /sup 31/P is a factor of 2 more than the strengths of the ground states of /sup 33/S and /sup 35/Cl. The ..cap alpha..-spectroscopic strengths of ground states of these, as well as other odd-A s-d shell nuclei, are compared with the presently available shell model calculations.

  19. Observation and spectroscopy of new proton-unbound isotopes {sup 30}Ar and {sup 29}Cl - an interplay of prompt two-proton and sequential decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukha, Ivan [Helmholzzentrum GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Previously unknown isotopes {sup 30}Ar and {sup 29}Cl have been identified by measurement of the trajectories of their in-flight decay products {sup 28}S+p+p and {sup 28}S+p, respectively. The analysis of angular correlations of the fragments provided information on decay energies and structure of the parent states. The lowest states in {sup 30}Ar, {sup 29}Cl point to a violation of isobaric symmetry in structure of these unbound nuclei. The two-proton decay has been identified in a transition region between simultaneous two-proton and sequential proton emissions from the {sup 30}Ar ground state, which is characterized by an interplay of three-body and two-body decay mechanisms. Such a phenomenon, never observed before, may be common in 2p-unbound nuclei, and could be of interest for other disciplines dealing with few-body systems. In addition, the dramatic change of odd-even mass staggering in 2p-unbound nuclei and the fine structure in the 2p decay of the {sup 30}Ar*(2.9 MeV) state were indicated. An Optical Time-Projection Chamber was used in the same experiment to observe beta decays of stopped {sup 31}Ar ions, which passed the secondary target intact. With this detector, β-delayed 3p emission from {sup 31}Ar was observed.

  20. FPGA based, DSP board for LLRF 8-Channel SIMCON 3.0 Part I: Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giergusiewicz, Wojciech; Koprek, Waldemar; Jalmuzna, Wojciech; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2005-09-01

    The paper describes design, construction and initial measurements of an eight channel electronic LLRF device predicted for building of the control system for the VUV-FEL accelerator at DESY (Hamburg). The device, referred in the paper to as the SIMCON 3.0 (from the SC cavity simulator and controller) consists of a 16 layers, VME size, PCB, a large FPGA chip (VirtexII-4000 by Xilinx), eight fast ADCs and four DACs (by Analog Devices). To our knowledge, the proposed device is the first of this kind for the accelerator technology in which there was achieved (the FPGA based) DSP latency below 200 ns. With the optimized data transmission system, the overall LLRF system latency can be as low as 500 ns. The SIMCON 3.0 sub-system was applied for initial tests with the ACC1 module of the VUV FEL accelerator (eight channels) and with the CHECHIA test stand (single channel), both at the DESY. The promising results with the SIMCON 3.0 encouraged us to enter the design of SIMCON 3.1 possessing 10 measurement and control channels and some additional features to be reported in the next technical note. SIMCON 3.0 is a modular solution, while SIMCON 3.1 will be an integrated board of the all-in-one type. Two design approaches - modular and all-in-one, after branching off in this version of the SIMCON, will be continued.

  1. The ClC-K2 Chloride Channel Is Critical for Salt Handling in the Distal Nephron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, J Christopher; Andrini, Olga; Picard, Nicolas; Paulais, Marc; Huebner, Antje K; Cayuqueo, Irma Karen Lopez; Bignon, Yohan; Keck, Mathilde; Cornière, Nicolas; Böhm, David; Jentsch, Thomas J; Chambrey, Régine; Teulon, Jacques; Hübner, Christian A; Eladari, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Chloride transport by the renal tubule is critical for blood pressure (BP), acid-base, and potassium homeostasis. Chloride uptake from the urinary fluid is mediated by various apical transporters, whereas basolateral chloride exit is thought to be mediated by ClC-Ka/K1 and ClC-Kb/K2, two chloride channels from the ClC family, or by KCl cotransporters from the SLC12 gene family. Nevertheless, the localization and role of ClC-K channels is not fully resolved. Because inactivating mutations in ClC-Kb/K2 cause Bartter syndrome, a disease that mimics the effects of the loop diuretic furosemide, ClC-Kb/K2 is assumed to have a critical role in salt handling by the thick ascending limb. To dissect the role of this channel in detail, we generated a mouse model with a targeted disruption of the murine ortholog ClC-K2. Mutant mice developed a Bartter syndrome phenotype, characterized by renal salt loss, marked hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis. Patch-clamp analysis of tubules isolated from knockout (KO) mice suggested that ClC-K2 is the main basolateral chloride channel in the thick ascending limb and in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron. Accordingly, ClC-K2 KO mice did not exhibit the natriuretic response to furosemide and exhibited a severely blunted response to thiazide. We conclude that ClC-Kb/K2 is critical for salt absorption not only by the thick ascending limb, but also by the distal convoluted tubule. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. Calcium-Activated Cl- Channel: Insights on the Molecular Identity in Epithelial Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottgen, Trey S; Nickerson, Andrew J; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M

    2018-05-10

    Calcium-activated chloride secretion in epithelial tissues has been described for many years. However, the molecular identity of the channel responsible for the Ca 2+ -activated Cl − secretion in epithelial tissues has remained a mystery. More recently, TMEM16A has been identified as a new putative Ca 2+ -activated Clchannel (CaCC). The primary goal of this article will be to review the characterization of TMEM16A, as it relates to the physical structure of the channel, as well as important residues that confer voltage and Ca 2+ -sensitivity of the channel. This review will also discuss the role of TMEM16A in epithelial physiology and potential associated-pathophysiology. This will include discussion of developed knockout models that have provided much needed insight on the functional localization of TMEM16A in several epithelial tissues. Finally, this review will examine the implications of the identification of TMEM16A as it pertains to potential novel therapies in several pathologies.

  3. β-delayed p-decay of proton-rich nuclei ^23Al and ^31Cl and explosive H-burning in novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Hardy, J. C.; McCleskey, M.; Simmons, E.; Tabacaru, G.; Tribble, R. E.; Aysto, J.; Jokinen, A.; Saastamoinen, A.; Davinson, T.; Woods, P. J.; Achouri, L.; Roeder, B.

    2008-10-01

    We developed a technique to measure β-delayed proton-decay of proton-rich nuclei produced and separated with MARS at TAMU. In particular, we studied the decay of ^23Al and ^31Cl, both important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. We have pulsed the beam, implanting the source nuclei moving at about 40 MeV/u in a thin Si strip detector, and then measured β-p and β-γ coincidences simultaneously. The states populated above the proton threshold in ^23Mg and ^31S, respectively, may proton decay. They are resonances in the reaction ^22Na(p,γ)^23Mg (crucial for the depletion of ^22Na in ONe novae) and in ^30P(p,γ)^31S (critical point in explosive H-burning in novae), but the protons emitted have very low energies, starting at about 200 keV, an experimental challenge. The setup and the results are described. The β-decay schemes were established for both nuclei, and IAS identified. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to β-delayed charged particle emission and shown to work even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps, for rare isotopes with lifetimes as low as 10s msec.

  4. Endocochlear potential depends on Cl- channels: Mechanism underlying deafness in Bartter syndrome IV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Rickheit (Gesa); H. Maier (Hannes); N. Strenzke (Nicola); C.E. Andreescu (Corina); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); A. Muenscher (Adrian); A.A. Zdebik (Anselm); T.J. Jentsch (Thomas)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHuman Bartter syndrome IV is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital deafness and severe renal salt and fluid loss. It is caused by mutations in BSND, which encodes barttin, a β-subunit of ClC-Ka and ClC-Kb chloride channels. Inner-ear-specific disruption of Bsnd in

  5. Investigating CFTR and KCa3.1 Protein/Protein Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Klein

    Full Text Available In epithelia, Cl- channels play a prominent role in fluid and electrolyte transport. Of particular importance is the cAMP-dependent cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel (CFTR with mutations of the CFTR encoding gene causing cystic fibrosis. The bulk transepithelial transport of Cl- ions and electrolytes needs however to be coupled to an increase in K+ conductance in order to recycle K+ and maintain an electrical driving force for anion exit across the apical membrane. In several epithelia, this K+ efflux is ensured by K+ channels, including KCa3.1, which is expressed at both the apical and basolateral membranes. We show here for the first time that CFTR and KCa3.1 can physically interact. We first performed a two-hybrid screen to identify which KCa3.1 cytosolic domains might mediate an interaction with CFTR. Our results showed that both the N-terminal fragment M1-M40 of KCa3.1 and part of the KCa3.1 calmodulin binding domain (residues L345-A400 interact with the NBD2 segment (G1237-Y1420 and C- region of CFTR (residues T1387-L1480, respectively. An association of CFTR and F508del-CFTR with KCa3.1 was further confirmed in co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrating the formation of immunoprecipitable CFTR/KCa3.1 complexes in CFBE cells. Co-expression of KCa3.1 and CFTR in HEK cells did not impact CFTR expression at the cell surface, and KCa3.1 trafficking appeared independent of CFTR stimulation. Finally, evidence is presented through cross-correlation spectroscopy measurements that KCa3.1 and CFTR colocalize at the plasma membrane and that KCa3.1 channels tend to aggregate consequent to an enhanced interaction with CFTR channels at the plasma membrane following an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Altogether, these results suggest 1 that the physical interaction KCa3.1/CFTR can occur early during the biogenesis of both proteins and 2 that KCa3.1 and CFTR form a dynamic complex, the formation of which

  6. Carboxyl-terminal Truncations of ClC-Kb Abolish Channel Activation by Barttin Via Modified Common Gating and Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stölting, Gabriel; Bungert-Plümke, Stefanie; Franzen, Arne; Fahlke, Christoph

    2015-12-18

    ClC-K chloride channels are crucial for auditory transduction and urine concentration. Mutations in CLCNKB, the gene encoding the renal chloride channel hClC-Kb, cause Bartter syndrome type III, a human genetic condition characterized by polyuria, hypokalemia, and alkalosis. In recent years, several Bartter syndrome-associated mutations have been described that result in truncations of the intracellular carboxyl terminus of hClC-Kb. We here used a combination of whole-cell patch clamp, confocal imaging, co-immunoprecipitation, and surface biotinylation to study the functional consequences of a frequent CLCNKB mutation that creates a premature stop codon at Trp-610. We found that W610X leaves the association of hClC-Kb and the accessory subunit barttin unaffected, but impairs its regulation by barttin. W610X attenuates hClC-Kb surface membrane insertion. Moreover, W610X results in hClC-Kb channel opening in the absence of barttin and prevents further barttin-mediated activation. To describe how the carboxyl terminus modifies the regulation by barttin we used V166E rClC-K1. V166E rClC-K1 is active without barttin and exhibits prominent, barttin-regulated voltage-dependent gating. Electrophysiological characterization of truncated V166E rClC-K1 demonstrated that the distal carboxyl terminus is necessary for slow cooperative gating. Since barttin modifies this particular gating process, channels lacking the distal carboxyl-terminal domain are no longer regulated by the accessory subunit. Our results demonstrate that the carboxyl terminus of hClC-Kb is not part of the binding site for barttin, but functionally modifies the interplay with barttin. The loss-of-activation of truncated hClC-Kb channels in heterologous expression systems fully explains the reduced basolateral chloride conductance in affected kidneys and the clinical symptoms of Bartter syndrome patients. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Carboxyl-terminal Truncations of ClC-Kb Abolish Channel Activation by Barttin Via Modified Common Gating and Trafficking*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stölting, Gabriel; Bungert-Plümke, Stefanie; Franzen, Arne; Fahlke, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ClC-K chloride channels are crucial for auditory transduction and urine concentration. Mutations in CLCNKB, the gene encoding the renal chloride channel hClC-Kb, cause Bartter syndrome type III, a human genetic condition characterized by polyuria, hypokalemia, and alkalosis. In recent years, several Bartter syndrome-associated mutations have been described that result in truncations of the intracellular carboxyl terminus of hClC-Kb. We here used a combination of whole-cell patch clamp, confocal imaging, co-immunoprecipitation, and surface biotinylation to study the functional consequences of a frequent CLCNKB mutation that creates a premature stop codon at Trp-610. We found that W610X leaves the association of hClC-Kb and the accessory subunit barttin unaffected, but impairs its regulation by barttin. W610X attenuates hClC-Kb surface membrane insertion. Moreover, W610X results in hClC-Kb channel opening in the absence of barttin and prevents further barttin-mediated activation. To describe how the carboxyl terminus modifies the regulation by barttin we used V166E rClC-K1. V166E rClC-K1 is active without barttin and exhibits prominent, barttin-regulated voltage-dependent gating. Electrophysiological characterization of truncated V166E rClC-K1 demonstrated that the distal carboxyl terminus is necessary for slow cooperative gating. Since barttin modifies this particular gating process, channels lacking the distal carboxyl-terminal domain are no longer regulated by the accessory subunit. Our results demonstrate that the carboxyl terminus of hClC-Kb is not part of the binding site for barttin, but functionally modifies the interplay with barttin. The loss-of-activation of truncated hClC-Kb channels in heterologous expression systems fully explains the reduced basolateral chloride conductance in affected kidneys and the clinical symptoms of Bartter syndrome patients. PMID:26453302

  8. Exterior Site Occupancy Infers Chloride-Induced Proton Gating in a Prokaryotic Homolog of the ClC Chloride Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, David L.; Berkowitz, Max L.

    2004-01-01

    The ClC family of anion channels mediates the efficient, selective permeation of Cl− across the biological membranes of living cells under the driving force of an electrochemical gradient. In some eukaryotes, these channels are known to exhibit a unique gating mechanism, which appears to be triggered by the permeant Cl− anion. We infer details of this gating mechanism by studying the free energetics of Cl− occupancy in the pore of a prokaryotic ClC homolog. These free energetics were gleaned from 30 ns of molecular dynamics simulation on an ∼133,000-atom system consisting of a hydrated membrane embedded StClC transporter. The binding sites for Cl− in the transporter were determined for the cases where the putative gating residue, Glu148, was protonated and unprotonated. When the glutamate gate is protonated, Cl− favorably occupies an exterior site, Sext, to form a queue of anions in the pore. However, when the glutamate gate is unprotonated, Cl− cannot occupy this site nor, consequently, pass through the pore. An additional, previously undetected, site was found in the pore near the outer membrane that exists regardless of the protonation state of Glu148. Although this suggests that, for the prokaryotic homolog, protonation of Glu148 may be the first step in transporting Cl− at the expense of H+ transport in the opposite direction, an evolutionary argument might suggest that Cl− opens the ClC gate in eukaryotic channels by inducing the conserved glutamate's protonation. During an additional 20 ns free dynamics simulation, the newly discovered outermost site, Sout, and the innermost site, Sint, were seen to allow spontaneous exchange of Cl− ions with the bulk electrolyte while under depolarization conditions. PMID:15345547

  9. A 31-channel MR brain array coil compatible with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Christin Y; Keil, Boris; Chonde, Daniel B; Rosen, Bruce R; Catana, Ciprian; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-06-01

    Simultaneous acquisition of MR and positron emission tomography (PET) images requires the placement of the MR detection coil inside the PET detector ring where it absorbs and scatters photons. This constraint is the principal barrier to achieving optimum sensitivity on each modality. Here, we present a 31-channel PET-compatible brain array coil with reduced attenuation but improved MR sensitivity. A series of component tests were performed to identify tradeoffs between PET and MR performance. Aspects studied include the remote positioning of preamplifiers, coax size, coil trace size/material, and plastic housing. We then maximized PET performance at minimal cost to MR sensitivity. The coil was evaluated for MR performance (signal to noise ratio [SNR], g-factor) and PET attenuation. The coil design showed an improvement in attenuation by 190% (average) compared with conventional 32-channel arrays, and no loss in MR SNR. Moreover, the 31-channel coil displayed an SNR improvement of 230% (cortical region of interest) compared with a PET-optimized 8-channel array with similar attenuation properties. Implementing attenuation correction of the 31-channel array successfully removed PET artifacts, which were comparable to those of the 8-channel array. The design of the 31-channel PET-compatible coil enables higher sensitivity for PET/MR imaging, paving the way for novel applications in this hybrid-imaging domain. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. 7 CFR 30.31 - Classification of leaf tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classification of leaf tobacco. 30.31 Section 30.31... REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.31 Classification of leaf tobacco. For the purpose of this classification leaf tobacco shall...

  11. 30 CFR 281.31 - Overriding royalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overriding royalties. 281.31 Section 281.31 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Financial Considerations § 281.31...

  12. 30 CFR 27.31 - Testing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Testing methods. 27.31 Section 27.31 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Test Requirements § 27.31 Testing methods. A methane...

  13. Evidence for s-channel single top quark production at D0

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    We present the measurements of the cross sections for the two main production modes of single top quarks at the Tevatron with 9.7/fb of data collected by the D0 detector. The analysis employs three different multivariate techniques which are combined to extract the small signal from the large backgrounds in the W+jets final state. We measure independently the t-channel (tqb) and the s-channel (tb), and obtain a lower limit on the CKM matrix element |Vtb|>0.92 at 95% CL. The results are compared with physics beyond the SM. The presence of the s-channel production is established in the D0 data with a significance of more than 3 standard deviations for the first time.

  14. Vasoconstriction triggered by hydrogen sulfide: Evidence for Na+,K+,2Cl-cotransport and L-type Ca2+ channel-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Sergei N; Gusakova, Svetlana V; Smaglii, Liudmila V; Koltsova, Svetlana V; Sidorenko, Svetalana V

    2017-12-01

    This study examined the dose-dependent actions of hydrogen sulfide donor sodium hydrosulphide (NaHS) on isometric contractions and ion transport in rat aorta smooth muscle cells (SMC). Isometric contraction was measured in ring aortas segments from male Wistar rats. Activity of Na + /K + -pump and Na + ,K + ,2Cl - cotransport was measured in cultured endothelial and smooth muscle cells from the rat aorta as ouabain-sensitive and ouabain-resistant, bumetanide-sensitive components of the 86 Rb influx, respectively. NaHS exhibited the bimodal action on contractions triggered by modest depolarization ([K + ] o =30 mM). At 10 -4 M, NaHS augmented contractions of intact and endothelium-denuded strips by ~ 15% and 25%, respectively, whereas at concentration of 10 -3  M it decreased contractile responses by more than two-fold. Contractions evoked by 10 -4  M NaHS were completely abolished by bumetanide, a potent inhibitor of Na + ,K + ,2Cl - cotransport, whereas the inhibition seen at 10 -3  M NaHS was suppressed in the presence of K + channel blocker TEA. In cultured SMC, 5×10 -5  M NaHS increased Na + ,K + ,2Cl - - cotransport without any effect on the activity of this carrier in endothelial cells. In depolarized SMC, 45 Ca influx was enhanced in the presence of 10 -4  M NaHS and suppressed under elevation of [NaHS] up to 10 -3  M. 45 Ca influx triggered by 10 -4  M NaHS was abolished by bumetanide and L-type Ca 2+ channel blocker nicardipine. Our results strongly suggest that contractions of rat aortic rings triggered by low doses of NaHS are mediated by activation of Na + ,K + ,2Cl - cotransport and Ca 2+ influx via L-type channels.

  15. 30 CFR 33.31 - Test space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test space. 33.31 Section 33.31 Mineral... § 33.31 Test space. (a) Drilling tests shall be conducted in a test space formed by two curtains suspended across a mine opening in such a manner that the volume of the test space shall be approximately 2...

  16. Pharmacovigilance database search discloses ClC-K channels as a novel target of the AT1 receptor blockers valsartan and olmesartan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbrici, Paola; Tricarico, Domenico; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe Felice; Nicolotti, Orazio; Lograno, Marcello Diego; Conte, Diana; Liantonio, Antonella

    2017-07-01

    Human ClC-K chloride channels are highly attractive targets for drug discovery as they have a variety of important physiological functions and are associated with genetic disorders. These channels are crucial in the kidney as they control chloride reabsorption and water diuresis. In addition, loss-of-function mutations of CLCNKB and BSND genes cause Bartter's syndrome (BS), whereas CLCNKA and CLCNKB gain-of-function polymorphisms predispose to a rare form of salt sensitive hypertension. Both disorders lack a personalized therapy that is in most cases only symptomatic. The aim of this study was to identify novel ClC-K ligands from drugs already on the market, by exploiting the pharmacological side activity of drug molecules available from the FDA Adverse Effects Reporting System database. We searched for drugs having a Bartter-like syndrome as a reported side effect, with the assumption that BS could be causatively related to the block of ClC-K channels. The ability of the selected BS-causing drugs to bind and block ClC-K channels was then validated through an integrated experimental and computational approach based on patch clamp electrophysiology in HEK293 cells and molecular docking simulations. Valsartan and olmesartan were able to block ClC-Ka channels and the molecular requirements for effective inhibition of these channels have been identified. These results suggest additional mechanisms of action for these sartans further to their primary AT 1 receptor antagonism and propose these compounds as leads for designing new potent ClC-K ligands. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Apparent intermediate K conductance channel hyposmotic activation in human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauf, Peter K; Misri, Sandeep; Chimote, Ameet A; Adragna, Norma C

    2008-03-01

    This study explores the nature of K fluxes in human lens epithelial cells (LECs) in hyposmotic solutions. Total ion fluxes, Na-K pump, Cl-dependent Na-K-2Cl (NKCC), K-Cl (KCC) cotransport, and K channels were determined by 85Rb uptake and cell K (Kc) by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and cell water gravimetrically after exposure to ouabain +/- bumetanide (Na-K pump and NKCC inhibitors), and ion channel inhibitors in varying osmolalities with Na, K, or methyl-d-glucamine and Cl, sulfamate, or nitrate. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot analyses, and immunochemistry were also performed. In isosmotic (300 mosM) media approximately 90% of the total Rb influx occurred through the Na-K pump and NKCC and approximately 10% through KCC and a residual leak. Hyposmotic media (150 mosM) decreased K(c) by a 16-fold higher K permeability and cell water, but failed to inactivate NKCC and activate KCC. Sucrose replacement or extracellular K to >57 mM, but not Rb or Cs, in hyposmotic media prevented Kc and water loss. Rb influx equaled Kc loss, both blocked by clotrimazole (IC50 approximately 25 microM) and partially by 1-[(2-chlorophenyl) diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34) inhibitors of the IK channel KCa3.1 but not by other K channel or connexin hemichannel blockers. Of several anion channel blockers (dihydro-indenyl)oxy]alkanoic acid (DIOA), 4-2(butyl-6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentylindan-1-on-5-yl)oxybutyric acid (DCPIB), and phloretin totally or partially inhibited Kc loss and Rb influx, respectively. RT-PCR and immunochemistry confirmed the presence of KCa3.1 channels, aside of the KCC1, KCC2, KCC3 and KCC4 isoforms. Apparently, IK channels, possibly in parallel with volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying Cl channels, effect regulatory volume decrease in LECs.

  18. Modulation of electronic and optical properties in mixed halide perovskites CsPbCl3xBr3(1-x) and CsPbBr3xI3(1-x)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ziqi; Cui, Yu; Deng, Hui-Xiong; Huang, Le; Wei, Zhongming; Li, Jingbo

    2017-03-01

    The recent discovery of lead halide perovskites with band gaps in the visible presents important potential in the design of high efficient solar cells. CsPbCl3, CsPbBr3 and CsPbI3 are stable compounds within this new family of semiconductors. By performing the first-principles calculation, we explore the structural, electronic and optical properties of CsPbCl3xBr3(1-x) and CsPbBr3xI3(1-x) with various compositions of halide atoms. Structural stability is demonstrated with halide atoms distributing randomly at the halide atomic sites. CsPbCl3xBr3(1-x) and CsPbBr3xI3(1-x) exhibit the modulation of their band gaps by varying the halide composition. Our results also indicate that CsPbCl3xBr3(1-x) and CsPbBr3xI3(1-x) with different halide compositions are suitable to application to solar cells for the general features are well preserved. Good absorption to lights of different wavelengths has been obtained in these mixed halide perovskites.

  19. λ-Selection Strategy in C+L Band 1-Pbit/s (448 WDM/19-Core/128 Gbit/s/channel) Flex-Grid Space Division Multiplexed Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Rameez; Ye, Feihong; Morioka, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an inter-core crosstalk based wavelength selection scheme has been proposed for flex-grid superchannels in space division multiplexed transmission. The two λ-selection strategies are categorized as: (a) aligned wavelength super-channels (Aλ-SCs), where all super-channels are placed...... at same λ in all the cores and (b) interleaved wavelength super-channels (Iλ-SCs), where all super-channels are placed at different λ in all the neighboring cores. It is depicted that system performance is improved for DP-16QAM channels in 1-Pbit/s (448 WDM/19 Core/128 Gbit/s/channel) 60 km fiber link...

  20. 30 CFR 7.31 - New technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New technology. 7.31 Section 7.31 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF... technology. MSHA may approve brattice cloth and ventilation tubing that incorporates technology for which the...

  1. Additional results from the β-delayed proton decays of 27P and 31Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ognibene, T.J.; Powell, J.; Moltz, D.M.; Rowe, M.W.; Cerny, J.

    1996-01-01

    β-delayed proton decays of the nuclides 27 P and 31 Cl were measured using the helium-jet recoil collection technique and low-energy particle identification detector telescopes. In 27 P, two new proton groups at 466±3 keV and 612±2 keV, with intensities of 9±2% and 97±3% relative to the main (100%) group at 731±2 keV, were discovered. Additionally, during the 27 P experiments, a new proton transition was identified following the β decay of 28 P. This group, at a proton energy of 1452±4 keV, had a 2±1% intensity relative to the 100% group at 679±1 keV. A total 27 P β-delayed proton branch of 0.07% was estimated. The experimental Gamow-Teller β-decay strengths of the observed transitions from 27 P were compared to results from shell model calculations. A search for new proton transitions in 31 Cl, the next member of this A=4n+3, T z =-3/2 series, was unsuccessful. However, several proton peaks that had been previously assigned to 31 Cl decay were shown to be from the decay of 25 Si. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  2. The K+ channel KCa3.1 as a novel target for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy M Roach

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a common, progressive and invariably lethal interstitial lung disease with no effective therapy. We hypothesised that K(Ca3.1 K(+ channel-dependent cell processes contribute to IPF pathophysiology.K(Ca3.1 expression in primary human lung myofibroblasts was examined using RT-PCR, western blot, immunofluorescence and patch-clamp electrophysiology. The role of K(Ca3.1 channels in myofibroblast proliferation, wound healing, collagen secretion and contraction was examined using two specific and distinct K(Ca3.1 blockers (TRAM-34 and ICA-17043 [Senicapoc].Both healthy non fibrotic control and IPF-derived human lung myofibroblasts expressed K(Ca3.1 channel mRNA and protein. K(Ca3.1 ion currents were elicited more frequently and were larger in IPF-derived myofibroblasts compared to controls. K(Ca3.1 currents were increased in myofibroblasts by TGFβ1 and basic FGF. K(Ca3.1 was expressed strongly in IPF tissue. K(Ca3.1 pharmacological blockade attenuated human myofibroblast proliferation, wound healing, collagen secretion and contractility in vitro, and this was associated with inhibition of TGFβ1-dependent increases in intracellular free Ca(2+.K(Ca3.1 activity promotes pro-fibrotic human lung myofibroblast function. Blocking K(Ca3.1 may offer a novel approach to treating IPF with the potential for rapid translation to the clinic.

  3. Complementary roles of KCa3.1 channels and β1-integrin during alveolar epithelial repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Alban; Chebli, Jasmine; Privé, Anik; Trinh, Nguyen Thu Ngan; Maillé, Emilie; Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Brochiero, Emmanuelle

    2015-09-04

    Extensive alveolar epithelial injury and remodelling is a common feature of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and it has been established that epithelial regeneration, and secondary lung oedema resorption, is crucial for ARDS resolution. Much evidence indicates that K(+) channels are regulating epithelial repair processes; however, involvement of the KCa3.1 channels in alveolar repair has never been investigated before. Wound-healing assays demonstrated that the repair rates were increased in primary rat alveolar cell monolayers grown on a fibronectin matrix compared to non-coated supports, whereas an anti-β1-integrin antibody reduced it. KCa3.1 inhibition/silencing impaired the fibronectin-stimulated wound-healing rates, as well as cell migration and proliferation, but had no effect in the absence of coating. We then evaluated a putative relationship between KCa3.1 channel and the migratory machinery protein β1-integrin, which is activated by fibronectin. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence experiments indicated a link between the two proteins and revealed their cellular co-distribution. In addition, we demonstrated that KCa3.1 channel and β1-integrin membrane expressions were increased on a fibronectin matrix. We also showed increased intracellular calcium concentrations as well as enhanced expression of TRPC4, a voltage-independent calcium channel belonging to the large TRP channel family, on a fibronectin matrix. Finally, wound-healing assays showed additive effects of KCa3.1 and TRPC4 inhibitors on alveolar epithelial repair. Taken together, our data demonstrate for the first time complementary roles of KCa3.1 and TRPC4 channels with extracellular matrix and β1-integrin in the regulation of alveolar repair processes.

  4. Results of the 37Cl experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R. Jr.

    Present results of the 37 Cl experiment to measure the flux of 8 B neutrinos from the sun are presented. The results are plotted, and the technical details are discussed. From a 37 Ar production rate above the background of 0.30, the possible solar neutrino rate was deduced to be 5.31 x (0.30 +- 0.08) = 1.6 +- 0.4 SNU

  5. Direct modulation of tracheal Cl--channel activity by 5,6- and 11,12-EET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvail, D; Dumoulin, M; Rousseau, E

    1998-09-01

    Using microelectrode potential measurements, we tested the involvement of Cl- conductances in the hyperpolarization induced by 5,6- and 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. 5,6-EET and 11,12-EET (0.75 microM) caused -5.4 +/- 1.1- and -3.34 +/- 0.95-mV hyperpolarizations, respectively, of rabbit tracheal cells (from a resting membrane potential of -53.25 +/- 0.44 mV), with significant residual repolarizations remaining after the Ca2+-activated K+ channels had been blocked by 10 nM iberiotoxin. In bilayer reconstitution experiments, we demonstrated that the EETs directly inhibit a Ca2+-insensitive Cl- channel from bovine ASM; 1 microM 5,6-EET and 1.5 microM 11,12-EET lowered the unitary current amplitude by 40 (n = 6 experiments) and 44.7% (n = 4 experiments), respectively. Concentration-dependent decreases in channel open probability were observed, with estimated IC50 values of 0.26 microM for 5,6- and 1.15 microM for 11,12-EET. Furthermore, pharmacomechanical tension measurements showed that both regioisomers induced significant bronchorelaxations in epithelium-denuded ASM strips. These results suggest that 5,6- and 11,12-EET can act in ASM as epithelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors.

  6. [Computation of the K+, Na+ and Cl- fluxes through plasma membrane of animal cell with Na+/K+ pump, NKCC, NC cotransporters, and ionic channels with and without non-Goldman rectification in K+ channels. Norma and apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubashkin, A A; Iurinskaia, V E; Vereninov, A A

    2010-01-01

    The balance of K+, Na+ and Cl- fluxes through cell membrane with the Na+/K+ pump, ion channels and NKCC and NC cotransporters is considered. It is shown that all unidirectional K+, Na+ and Cl- fluxes through cell membrane, permeability coefficients of ion channels and membrane potential can be computed for balanced ion distribution between cell and the medium if K+, Na+ and Cl- concentration in cell water and three fluxes are known: total Cl- flux, total K+ influx and ouabain-inhibitable "pump" component of the K+ influx. Changes in the mortovalent ion balance in lymphoid cells U937 induced to apoptosis by 1 microM staurosporine are analyzed as an example. It is found that the apoptotic shift in ion and water balance in studied cells is caused by a decrease in the pump activity which is accompanied by a decrease in the integral permeability of Na+ channels without significant increase in K+ and Cl- channel permeabilities. Computation shows that only a small part of the total fluxes of K+, Na+ and Cl- accounts for the fluxes via NKCC and NC cotransporters. Therefore, cotransport fluxes can not be studied using inhibitors.

  7. Adesão de profissionais de enfermagem ao seguimento clínico após exposição ocupacional com material biológico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Agy Loureiro

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a adesão dos profissionais de enfermagem ao seguimento clínico, após aexposição ocupacional a material biológico, no ambulatório especializado (AOPS. Os dados se referem aacidentes ocorridos com profissionais de enfermagem no período julho a dezembro de 2006 e foram obtidos pormeio de consulta ao prontuário. O estudo foi desenvolvido nas duas unidades (campus e emergência de umhospital universitário de grande porte na cidade de Ribeirão Preto. Observou-se que em 30,4% foi indicado ouso de anti-retrovirais para quimioprofilaxia; dos que fizeram o uso, 31,3% apresentaram efeitos adversos.Destaca-se que 69,6% dos profissionais completaram o seguimento clínico indicado. É premente a necessidadede implementação de um programa de educação permanente junto aos trabalhadores de saúde para prevençãode exposições ocupacionais e adesão ao seguimento clínico após exposição.

  8. The role and mechanism of KCa3.1 channels in human monocyte migration induced by palmitic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Zhen; Pang, Zheng-Da; Wang, Jun-Hong; Song, Zheng; Zhao, Li-Mei; Du, Xiao-Jun; Deng, Xiu-Ling

    2018-05-21

    Monocyte migration into diseased tissues contributes to the pathogenesis of diseases. Intermediate-conductance Ca 2+ -activated K + (K Ca 3.1) channels play an important role in cell migration. However, the role of K Ca 3.1 channels in mediating monocyte migration induced by palmitic acid (PA) is still unclear. Using cultured THP-1 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy subjects, we investigated the role and signaling mechanisms of K Ca 3.1 channels in mediating the migration induced by PA. Using methods of Western blotting analysis, RNA interference, cell migration assay and ELISA, we found that PA-treated monocytes exhibited increment of the protein levels of K Ca 3.1 channel and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and the effects were reversed by co-incubation of PA with anti-TLR2/4 antibodies or by specific inhibitors of p38-MAPK, or NF-κB. In addition, PA increased monocyte migration, which was abolished by a specific K Ca 3.1 channel blocker, TRAM-34, or K Ca 3.1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). The expression and secretion of MCP-1 induced by PA was also similarly prevented by TRAM-34 and K Ca 3.1 siRNA. These results demonstrate for the first time that PA upregulates K Ca 3.1 channels through TLR2/4, p38-MAPK and NF-κB pathway to promote the expression of MCP-1, and then induce the trans-endothelial migration of monocytes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Recurrent Mutation in CACNA1G Alters Cav3.1 T-Type Calcium-Channel Conduction and Causes Autosomal-Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutelier, Marie; Blesneac, Iulia; Monteil, Arnaud; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Ando, Kunie; Mundwiller, Emeline; Brusco, Alfredo; Le Ber, Isabelle; Anheim, Mathieu; Castrioto, Anna; Duyckaerts, Charles; Brice, Alexis; Durr, Alexandra; Lory, Philippe; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary cerebellar ataxias (CAs) are neurodegenerative disorders clinically characterized by a cerebellar syndrome, often accompanied by other neurological or non-neurological signs. All transmission modes have been described. In autosomal-dominant CA (ADCA), mutations in more than 30 genes are implicated, but the molecular diagnosis remains unknown in about 40% of cases. Implication of ion channels has long been an ongoing topic in the genetics of CA, and mutations in several channel genes have been recently connected to ADCA. In a large family affected by ADCA and mild pyramidal signs, we searched for the causative variant by combining linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing. In CACNA1G, we identified a c.5144G>A mutation, causing an arginine-to-histidine (p.Arg1715His) change in the voltage sensor S4 segment of the T-type channel protein Cav3.1. Two out of 479 index subjects screened subsequently harbored the same mutation. We performed electrophysiological experiments in HEK293T cells to compare the properties of the p.Arg1715His and wild-type Cav3.1 channels. The current-voltage and the steady-state activation curves of the p.Arg1715His channel were shifted positively, whereas the inactivation curve had a higher slope factor. Computer modeling in deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) neurons suggested that the mutation results in decreased neuronal excitability. Taken together, these data establish CACNA1G, which is highly expressed in the cerebellum, as a gene whose mutations can cause ADCA. This is consistent with the neuropathological examination, which showed severe Purkinje cell loss. Our study further extends our knowledge of the link between calcium channelopathies and CAs. PMID:26456284

  10. 48 CFR 31.205-30 - Patent costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Patent costs. 31.205-30....205-30 Patent costs. (a) The following patent costs are allowable to the extent that they are incurred... patent application where title or royalty-free license is to be conveyed to the Government. (b) General...

  11. Volume Regulated Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    of volume perturbations evolution have developed system of channels and transporters to tightly control volume homeostasis. In the past decades evidence has been mounting, that the importance of these volume regulated channels and transporters are not restricted to the defense of cellular volume...... but are also essential for a number of physiological processes such as proliferation, controlled cell death, migration and endocrinology. The thesis have been focusing on two Channels, namely the swelling activated Cl- channel (ICl, swell) and the transient receptor potential Vanilloid (TRPV4) channel. I: Cl......- serves a multitude of functions in the mammalian cell, regulating the membrane potential (Em), cell volume, protein activity and the driving force for facilitated transporters giving Cl- and Cl- channels a major potential of regulating cellular function. These functions include control of the cell cycle...

  12. Single-Crystal Growth of Cl-Doped n-Type SnS Using SnCl2 Self-Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Yuki; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Sugiyama, Taiki; Yanagi, Hiroshi

    2018-06-05

    SnS is a promising photovoltaic semiconductor owing to its suitable band gap energy and high optical absorption coefficient for highly efficient thin film solar cells. The most significant carnage is demonstration of n-type SnS. In this study, Cl-doped n-type single crystals were grown using SnCl 2 self-flux method. The obtained crystal was lamellar, with length and width of a few millimeters and thickness ranging between 28 and 39 μm. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed the single crystals had an orthorhombic unit cell. Since the ionic radii of S 2- and Cl - are similar, Cl doping did not result in substantial change in lattice parameter. All the elements were homogeneously distributed on a cleaved surface; the Sn/(S + Cl) ratio was 1.00. The crystal was an n-type degenerate semiconductor with a carrier concentration of ∼3 × 10 17 cm -3 . Hall mobility at 300 K was 252 cm 2 V -1 s -1 and reached 363 cm 2 V -1 s -1 at 142 K.

  13. FInal Technical Repot of the Project: Design and Implementation of Low-Power 10Gb/s/channel Laser/Silicon Photonics Modulator Drivers with SEU Tolerance for HL-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gui, Ping [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-08-09

    During the funding period of this award from May 1, 2014 through March 30, 2016, we have accomplished the design, implementation and measurement results of two laser driver chips: LpGBLD10+ which is a low-power single-channel 10Gb/s laser driver IC, and LDQ10P, which is a 4x10Gb/s driver array chip for High Energy Physics (HEP) applications. With new circuit techniques, the driver consumes a record-low power consumption, 31 mW @10Gb/s/channel and occupies a small area of 400 µm × 1750 µm for the single-channel driver IC and 1900umx1700um for the LDQ10P chip. These characteristics allow for both the LpGBLD10+ ICs and LDQ10P suitable candidate for the Versatile Link PLUS (VL+) project, offering flexibility in configuring multiple Transmitters and receivers.

  14. Physical, meteorological, and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS from the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) as part of the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) project from 01 January 1988 to 31 December 1988 (NODC Accession 8900241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 01 January 1988 to 31 December 1988. Data...

  15. Dynamic [Cl-]i measurement with chloride sensing quantum dots nanosensor in epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuchi; Mao Hua; Wong, Lid B

    2010-01-01

    We have synthesized a chloride sensing quantum dots (QD) nanosensor, Cl-QD, for the dynamic measurements of chloride ion concentration in the millimolar range, a sensitivity that is applicable to most physiological intracellular chloride ion concentration ([Cl - ] i ) measurements in epithelial cells. The Cl-QD is synthesized by conjugating an anion receptor, 1-(2-mercapto-ethyl)-3-phenyl-thiourea (MEPTU) to a water soluble CdSe/ZnS QD at an emission wavelength of 620 nm. Upon binding of chloride ions to the Cl-QD, a photo-induced electron transfer mechanism caused the fluorescence of the QD to quench. This resulted in an inversely proportional relationship between the chloride ion concentration and the fluorescence intensity of the Cl-QD. We have utilized this Cl-QD to measure [Cl - ] i in T84 and CF-PAC cultured cells, with either the C1C-2 or CFTR chloride channels being manipulated by pharmacological chloride channel activators and inhibitors. Activations of C1C-2 and CFTR chloride channels in T84 by the respective lubiprostone and genistein caused predictive increases in the fluorescence of the Cl-QD, i.e., a decrease of [Cl - ] i . Conversely, glibenclamide, a chloride channel inhibitor, applied to the CF-PAC cells caused a predictable decrease in the fluorescence of Cl-QD due to the increase of [Cl - ] i . These are the first data in using QD-based chloride ion sensors for dynamic measurements of intracellular chloride ion concentrations in epithelial cells.

  16. First measurement of 30S+α resonant elastic scattering for the 30S(α ,p ) reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kubono, S.; Chen, A. A.; Parikh, A.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, J.; Cherubini, S.; Duy, N. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Iwasa, N.; Jung, H. S.; Kato, S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Ota, S.; Setoodehnia, K.; Teranishi, T.; Tokieda, H.; Yamada, T.; Yun, C. C.; Zhang, L. Y.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Type I x-ray bursts are the most frequently observed thermonuclear explosions in the galaxy, resulting from thermonuclear runaway on the surface of an accreting neutron star. The 30S(α ,p ) reaction plays a critical role in burst models, yet insufficient experimental information is available to calculate a reliable, precise rate for this reaction. Purpose: Our measurement was conducted to search for states in 34Ar and determine their quantum properties. In particular, natural-parity states with large α -decay partial widths should dominate the stellar reaction rate. Method: We performed the first measurement of 30S+α resonant elastic scattering up to a center-of-mass energy of 5.5 MeV using a radioactive ion beam. The experiment utilized a thick gaseous active target system and silicon detector array in inverse kinematics. Results: We obtained an excitation function for 30S(α ,α ) near 150∘ in the center-of-mass frame. The experimental data were analyzed with R -matrix calculations, and we observed three new resonant patterns between 11.1 and 12.1 MeV, extracting their properties of resonance energy, widths, spin, and parity. Conclusions: We calculated the resonant thermonuclear reaction rate of 30S(α ,p ) based on all available experimental data of 34Ar and found an upper limit about one order of magnitude larger than a rate determined using a statistical model. The astrophysical impact of these two rates has been investigated through one-zone postprocessing type I x-ray burst calculations. We find that our new upper limit for the 30S(α ,p )33Cl rate significantly affects the predicted nuclear energy generation rate during the burst.

  17. A close association of RyRs with highly dense clusters of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels underlies the activation of STICs by Ca2+ sparks in mouse airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Rongfeng; Lifshitz, Lawrence M; Tuft, Richard A; Bellvé, Karl; Fogarty, Kevin E; ZhuGe, Ronghua

    2008-07-01

    Ca(2+) sparks are highly localized, transient releases of Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticulum through ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In smooth muscle, Ca(2+) sparks trigger spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) by opening nearby clusters of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, and also gate Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) (Cl((Ca))) channels to induce spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs). While the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of STOCs by Ca(2+) sparks is well understood, little information is available on how Ca(2+) sparks activate STICs. In the present study, we investigated the spatial organization of RyRs and Cl((Ca)) channels in spark sites in airway myocytes from mouse. Ca(2+) sparks and STICs were simultaneously recorded, respectively, with high-speed, widefield digital microscopy and whole-cell patch-clamp. An image-based approach was applied to measure the Ca(2+) current underlying a Ca(2+) spark (I(Ca(spark))), with an appropriate correction for endogenous fixed Ca(2+) buffer, which was characterized by flash photolysis of NPEGTA. We found that I(Ca(spark)) rises to a peak in 9 ms and decays with a single exponential with a time constant of 12 ms, suggesting that Ca(2+) sparks result from the nonsimultaneous opening and closure of multiple RyRs. The onset of the STIC lags the onset of the I(Ca(spark)) by less than 3 ms, and its rising phase matches the duration of the I(Ca(spark)). We further determined that Cl((Ca)) channels on average are exposed to a [Ca(2+)] of 2.4 microM or greater during Ca(2+) sparks. The area of the plasma membrane reaching this level is <600 nm in radius, as revealed by the spatiotemporal profile of [Ca(2+)] produced by a reaction-diffusion simulation with measured I(Ca(spark)). Finally we estimated that the number of Cl((Ca)) channels localized in Ca(2+) spark sites could account for all the Cl((Ca)) channels in the entire cell. Taken together these results lead us to propose a model in which

  18. A Novel Mechanism of pH Buffering in C. elegans Glia: Bicarbonate Transport via the Voltage-Gated ClC Cl− Channel CLH-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jeff; Matthewman, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    An important function of glia is the maintenance of the ionic composition and pH of the synaptic microenvironment. In terms of pH regulation, HCO3− buffering has been shown to be important in both glia and neurons. Here, we used in vivo fluorescent pH imaging and RNA sequencing of the amphid sheath glia of Caenorhabditis elegans to reveal a novel mechanism of cellular HCO3− uptake. While the classical mechanism of HCO3− uptake involves Na+/HCO3− cotransporters, here we demonstrate that the C. elegans ClC Cl− channel CLH-1 is highly permeable to HCO3− and mediates HCO3− uptake into amphid sheath glia. CLH-1 has homology and electrophysiological properties similar to the mammalian ClC-2 Cl− channel. Our data suggest that, in addition to maintaining synaptic Cl− concentration, these channels may also be involved in maintenance of synaptic pH via HCO3− flux. These findings provide an exciting new facet of study regarding how pH is regulated in the brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Maintenance of pH is essential for the physiological function of the nervous system. HCO3− is crucial for pH regulation and is transported into the cell via ion transporters, including ion channels, the molecular identity of which remains unclear. In this manuscript, we describe our discovery that the C. elegans amphid sheath glia regulate intracellular pH via HCO3− flux through the voltage-gated ClC channel CLH-1. This represents a novel function for ClC channels, which has implications for their possible role in mammalian glial pH regulation. This discovery may also provide a novel therapeutic target for pathologic conditions, such as ischemic stroke where acidosis leads to widespread death of glia and subsequently neurons. PMID:26674864

  19. 31 CFR 30.0 - Executive compensation and corporate governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Executive compensation and corporate governance. 30.0 Section 30.0 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.0 Executive compensation and corporate governance...

  20. Agonist of inward rectifier K+ channels enhances the protection of ischemic postconditioning in isolated rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z; Feng, Z; Long, C

    2014-07-01

    Selective inhibition of inward rectifier K + channels could abolish the protection mediated by ischemic preconditioning, but the roles of these channels in ischemic postconditioning have not been well characterized. Our study aims to evaluate the effect of inward rectifier K + channels on the protection induced by ischemic postconditioning. Langendorff-perfused rat hearts (n=8 per group) were split into four groups: postconditioning hearts (IPO group); ischemic postconditioning with BaCl 2 hearts (PB group); ischemic postconditioning with zacopride hearts (PZ group); and without ischemic postconditioning (CON group). After suffering 30 minutes of global ischemia, groups IPO, PB and PZ went through 10 seconds of ischemic postconditioning with three different perfusates: respectively, Krebs-Henseleit buffer (IPO group); 20 μmol/L BaCl 2 (antagonist of the channel, PB group); 1 μmol/L zacopride (agonist of the channel, PZ group). At the end of reperfusion, the myocardial performance was better preserved in the PZ group than the other three groups. The PB group showed no significant differences from the CON group. Our study has shown that the I K1 channel agonist zacopride is associated with the enhancement of ischemic postconditioning. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Pulmonary hypertension in wild type mice and animals with genetic deficit in KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Wandall-Frostholm

    Full Text Available In vascular biology, endothelial KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 channels contribute to arterial blood pressure regulation by producing membrane hyperpolarization and smooth muscle relaxation. The role of KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 channels in the pulmonary circulation is not fully established. Using mice with genetically encoded deficit of KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 channels, this study investigated the effect of loss of the channels in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.Male wild type and KCa3.1-/-/KCa2.3T/T(+DOX mice were exposed to chronic hypoxia for four weeks to induce pulmonary hypertension. The degree of pulmonary hypertension was evaluated by right ventricular pressure and assessment of right ventricular hypertrophy. Segments of pulmonary arteries were mounted in a wire myograph for functional studies and morphometric studies were performed on lung sections. Chronic hypoxia induced pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, increased lung weight, and increased hematocrit levels in either genotype. The KCa3.1-/-/KCa2.3T/T(+DOX mice developed structural alterations in the heart with increased right ventricular wall thickness as well as in pulmonary vessels with increased lumen size in partially- and fully-muscularized vessels and decreased wall area, not seen in wild type mice. Exposure to chronic hypoxia up-regulated the gene expression of the KCa2.3 channel by twofold in wild type mice and increased by 2.5-fold the relaxation evoked by the KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 channel activator NS309, whereas the acetylcholine-induced relaxation - sensitive to the combination of KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 channel blockers, apamin and charybdotoxin - was reduced by 2.5-fold in chronic hypoxic mice of either genotype.Despite the deficits of the KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 channels failed to change hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension, the up-regulation of KCa2.3-gene expression and increased NS309-induced relaxation in wild-type mice point to a novel mechanism to counteract pulmonary

  2. Channel-forming activities in the glycosomal fraction from the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Gualdron-López

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glycosomes are a specialized form of peroxisomes (microbodies present in unicellular eukaryotes that belong to the Kinetoplastea order, such as Trypanosoma and Leishmania species, parasitic protists causing severe diseases of livestock and humans in subtropical and tropical countries. The organelles harbour most enzymes of the glycolytic pathway that is responsible for substrate-level ATP production in the cell. Glycolysis is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei and enzymes comprising this pathway have been validated as drug targets. Glycosomes are surrounded by a single membrane. How glycolytic metabolites are transported across the glycosomal membrane is unclear. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesized that glycosomal membrane, similarly to membranes of yeast and mammalian peroxisomes, contains channel-forming proteins involved in the selective transfer of metabolites. To verify this prediction, we isolated a glycosomal fraction from bloodstream-form T. brucei and reconstituted solubilized membrane proteins into planar lipid bilayers. The electrophysiological characteristics of the channels were studied using multiple channel recording and single channel analysis. Three main channel-forming activities were detected with current amplitudes 70-80 pA, 20-25 pA, and 8-11 pA, respectively (holding potential +10 mV and 3.0 M KCl as an electrolyte. All channels were in fully open state in a range of voltages ±150 mV and showed no sub-conductance transitions. The channel with current amplitude 20-25 pA is anion-selective (P(K+/P(Cl-∼0.31, while the other two types of channels are slightly selective for cations (P(K+/P(Cl- ratios ∼1.15 and ∼1.27 for the high- and low-conductance channels, respectively. The anion-selective channel showed an intrinsic current rectification that may suggest a functional asymmetry of the channel's pore. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that the membrane of glycosomes

  3. Observation and investigation of the new proton-unbound nuclei {sup 30}Ar and {sup 29}Cl with in-flight decay spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-06-30

    Two-proton (2p) radioactivity is an exotic nuclear decay mode resulting in the simultaneous emission of two protons. The ground-state 2p radioactivity was discovered in the decay of {sup 45}Fe in 2002. Later, this novel decay mode was also found in the decays of {sup 48}Ni, {sup 54}Zn, and {sup 19}Mg. In order to study a promising 2p radioactivity candidate {sup 30}Ar, an experiment was performed at the Fragment Separator of GSI in Darmstadt (Germany). The in-flight decay technique, which is based on the tracking of the in-flight decay products by using the silicon strip detectors, was employed. Several calibration and alignment procedures were performed to achieve the best-possible accuracy of position and angle measurements. In order to determine the angular and half-life resolutions as well as the detection efficiency, the decays of the previously-known 2p emitter {sup 19}Mg were remeasured. The 2p radioactivity of {sup 19}Mg ground state and sequential emission of protons from several known excited states in {sup 19}Mg were confirmed. The deduced 2p decay energies are consistent with previous data. The evidence on a new excited state in {sup 19}Mg at 8.9{sup +0.8}{sub -0.7} MeV above the 2p threshold was found. It was tentatively suggested that this new {sup 19}Mg state decays by sequential emission of protons via two unknown 18Na resonances at 2.5{sup +0.7}{sub -0.3} MeV and 4.0{sup +1.5}{sub -0.6} MeV above the 1p threshold, respectively. Two previously-unknown proton-unbound nuclei {sup 30}Ar and {sup 29}Cl were identified by measuring the trajectories of their in-flight decay products {sup 28}S+p+p and {sup 28}S+p, respectively. The analysis of {sup 28}S-proton angular correlations provided information on the decay energies and structure of the observed states in {sup 30}Ar and {sup 29}Cl. The assigned ground state and first excited state of {sup 29}Cl were found at 1.8{sup +0.1}{sub -0.1} MeV and 2.3{sup +0.1}{sub 0.1} MeV above the one-proton threshold

  4. Transformation of AgCl nanoparticles in a sewer system — A field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaegi, Ralf, E-mail: ralf.kaegi@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 133, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Voegelin, Andreas; Sinnet, Brian [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 133, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Zuleeg, Steffen [KUSTER + HAGER Group, Oberstrasse 222, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Siegrist, Hansruedi [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 133, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Burkhardt, Michael [HSR University of Applied Sciences, Institute of Environmental and Process Engineering (UMTEC), Oberseestrasse 10, 8640 Rapperswil (Switzerland)

    2015-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are increasingly used in consumer products and their release during the use phase may negatively affect aquatic ecosystems. Research efforts, so far, have mainly addressed the application and use of metallic Ag(0)-NP. However, as shown by recent studies on the release of Ag from textiles, other forms of Ag, especially silver chloride (AgCl), are released in much larger quantities than metallic Ag(0). In this field study, we report the release of AgCl-NP from a point source (industrial laundry that applied AgCl-NP during a piloting phase over a period of several months to protect textiles from bacterial regrowth) to the public sewer system and investigate the transformation of Ag during its transport in the sewer system and in the municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). During the study period, the laundry discharged ~ 85 g of Ag per day, which dominated the Ag loads in the sewer system from the respective catchment (72–95%) and the Ag in the digested WWTP sludge (67%). Combined results from electron microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the Ag discharged from the laundry to the sewer consisted of about one third AgCl and two thirds Ag{sub 2}S, both forms primarily occurring as nanoparticles with diameters < 100 nm. During the 800 m transport in the sewer channel to the nearby WWTP, corresponding to a travel time of ~ 30 min, the remaining AgCl was transformed into nanoparticulate Ag{sub 2}S. Ag{sub 2}S-NP also dominated the Ag speciation in the digested sludge. In line with results from earlier studies, the very low Ag concentrations measured in the effluent of the WWTP (< 0.5 μg L{sup −1}) confirmed the very high removal efficiency of Ag from the wastewater stream (> 95%). - Highlights: • First field study on the transformation of AgCl nanoparticles released from a point source into the municipal sewer system. • Transformation of AgCl-NP into Ag{sub 2}S already occurred during 30-min transport in the

  5. Zuotai and HgS differ from HgCl2 and methyl mercury in Hg accumulation and toxicity in weanling and aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Li, Wen-Kai; Hou, Wei-Yu; Luo, Ya; Shi, Jing-Zhen; Li, Cen; Wei, Li-Xin; Liu, Jie

    2017-09-15

    Mercury sulfides are used in Ayurvedic medicines, Tibetan medicines, and Chinese medicines for thousands of years and are still used today. Cinnabar (α-HgS) and metacinnabar (β-HgS) are different from mercury chloride (HgCl 2 ) and methylmercury (MeHg) in their disposition and toxicity. Whether such scenario applies to weanling and aged animals is not known. To address this question, weanling (21d) and aged (450d) rats were orally given Zuotai (54% β-HgS, 30mg/kg), HgS (α-HgS, 30mg/kg), HgCl 2 (34.6mg/kg), or MeHg (MeHgCl, 3.2mg/kg) for 7days. Accumulation of Hg in kidney and liver, and the toxicity-sensitive gene expressions were examined. Animal body weight gain was decreased by HgCl 2 and to a lesser extent by MeHg, but unaltered after Zuotai and HgS. HgCl 2 and MeHg produced dramatic tissue Hg accumulation, increased kidney (kim-1 and Ngal) and liver (Ho-1) injury-sensitive gene expressions, but such changes are absent or mild after Zuotai and HgS. Aged rats were more susceptible than weanling rats to Hg toxicity. To examine roles of transporters in Hg accumulation, transporter gene expressions were examined. The expression of renal uptake transporters Oat1, Oct2, and Oatp4c1 and hepatic Oatp2 was decreased, while the expression of renal efflux transporter Mrp2, Mrp4 and Mdr1b was increased following HgCl 2 and MeHg, but unaffected by Zuotai and HgS. Thus, Zuotai and HgS differ from HgCl 2 and MeHg in producing tissue Hg accumulation and toxicity, and aged rats are more susceptible than weanling rats. Transporter expression could be adaptive means to reduce tissue Hg burden. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Altered thalamocortical rhythmicity and connectivity in mice lacking CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channels in unconsciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Lee, Seongwon; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2015-01-01

    In unconscious status (e.g., deep sleep and anesthetic unconsciousness) where cognitive functions are not generated there is still a significant level of brain activity present. Indeed, the electrophysiology of the unconscious brain is characterized by well-defined thalamocortical rhythmicity. Here we address the ionic basis for such thalamocortical rhythms during unconsciousness. In particular, we address the role of CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channels, which are richly expressed in thalamic neurons. Toward this aim, we examined the electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes of mice lacking CaV3.1 channels (CaV3.1 knockout) during unconsciousness induced by ketamine or ethanol administration. Our findings indicate that CaV3.1 KO mice displayed attenuated low-frequency oscillations in thalamocortical loops, especially in the 1- to 4-Hz delta band, compared with control mice (CaV3.1 WT). Intriguingly, we also found that CaV3.1 KO mice exhibited augmented high-frequency oscillations during unconsciousness. In a behavioral measure of unconsciousness dynamics, CaV3.1 KO mice took longer to fall into the unconscious state than controls. In addition, such unconscious events had a shorter duration than those of control mice. The thalamocortical interaction level between mediodorsal thalamus and frontal cortex in CaV3.1 KO mice was significantly lower, especially for delta band oscillations, compared with that of CaV3.1 WT mice, during unconsciousness. These results suggest that the CaV3.1 channel is required for the generation of a given set of thalamocortical rhythms during unconsciousness. Further, that thalamocortical resonant neuronal activity supported by this channel is important for the control of vigilance states. PMID:26056284

  7. CaV3.1 isoform of T-type calcium channels supports excitability of rat and mouse ventral tegmental area neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Matthew E; Tesic, Vesna; Stamenic, Tamara Timic; Joksimovic, Srdjan M; Busquet, Nicolas; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2018-03-23

    Recent data have implicated voltage-gated calcium channels in the regulation of the excitability of neurons within the mesolimbic reward system. While the attention of most research has centered on high voltage L-type calcium channel activity, the presence and role of the low voltage-gated T-type calcium channel (T-channels) has not been well explored. Hence, we investigated T-channel properties in the neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) utilizing wild-type (WT) rats and mice, Ca V 3.1 knock-out (KO) mice, and TH-eGFP knock-in (KI) rats in acute horizontal brain slices of adolescent animals. In voltage-clamp experiments, we first assessed T-channel activity in WT rats with characteristic properties of voltage-dependent activation and inactivation, as well as characteristic crisscrossing patterns of macroscopic current kinetics. T-current kinetics were similar in WT mice and WT rats but T-currents were abolished in Ca V 3.1 KO mice. In ensuing current-clamp experiments, we observed the presence of hyperpolarization-induced rebound burst firing in a subset of neurons in WT rats, as well as dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic neurons in TH-eGFP KI rats. Following the application of a pan-selective T-channel blocker TTA-P2, rebound bursting was significantly inhibited in all tested cells. In a behavioral assessment, the acute locomotor increase induced by a MK-801 (Dizocilpine) injection in WT mice was abolished in Ca V 3.1 KO mice, suggesting a tangible role for 3.1 T-type channels in drug response. We conclude that pharmacological targeting of Ca V 3.1 isoform of T-channels may be a novel approach for the treatment of disorders of mesolimbic reward system. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. An electron back-scattered diffraction study on the microstructure evolution of AZ31 Mg alloy during equal channel angular extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Li; Lin Dongliang; Mao Dali; Zeng Xiaoqin; Ding Wenjiang

    2006-01-01

    Microstructure evolution of AZ31 Mg alloy during equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) was investigated by electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD). The grains of AZ31 Mg alloy were refined significantly after ECAE 1-8 passes at 498 K and the distributions of grain size tended to be more uniform with pass number increasing. Frequency of sub-boundaries and low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) increased at initial stage of deformation, and sub-boundaries and LAGBs evolved into high angle grain boundaries (HAGBs) with further deformation, which resulted in the high frequency of HAGBs in the alloy after ECAE 8 passes. Preferred misorientation angle with frequency peak near 30 deg. and 90 deg. were observed. The frequency peaks were weak after ECAE 1 pass but became stronger with the increase of pass numbers. Micro-textures were formed in AZ31 microstructure during ECAE and were stronger with the pass number increasing

  9. CLCNKB mutations causing mild Bartter syndrome profoundly alter the pH and Ca2+ dependence of ClC-Kb channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrini, Olga; Keck, Mathilde; L'Hoste, Sébastien; Briones, Rodolfo; Mansour-Hendili, Lamisse; Grand, Teddy; Sepúlveda, Francisco V; Blanchard, Anne; Lourdel, Stéphane; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Teulon, Jacques

    2014-09-01

    ClC-Kb, a member of the ClC family of Cl(-) channels/transporters, plays a major role in the absorption of NaCl in the distal nephron. CLCNKB mutations cause Bartter syndrome type 3, a hereditary renal salt-wasting tubulopathy. Here, we investigate the functional consequences of a Val to Met substitution at position 170 (V170M, α helix F), which was detected in eight patients displaying a mild phenotype. Conductance and surface expression were reduced by ~40-50 %. The regulation of channel activity by external H(+) and Ca(2+) is a characteristic property of ClC-Kb. Inhibition by external H(+) was dramatically altered, with pKH shifting from 7.6 to 6.0. Stimulation by external Ca(2+) on the other hand was no longer detectable at pH 7.4, but was still present at acidic pH values. Functionally, these regulatory modifications partly counterbalance the reduced surface expression by rendering V170M hyperactive. Pathogenic Met170 seems to interact with another methionine on α helix H (Met227) since diverse mutations at this site partly removed pH sensitivity alterations of V170M ClC-Kb. Exploring other disease-associated mutations, we found that a Pro to Leu substitution at position 124 (α helix D, Simon et al., Nat Genet 1997, 17:171-178) had functional consequences similar to those of V170M. In conclusion, we report here for the first time that ClC-Kb disease-causing mutations located around the selectivity filter can result in both reduced surface expression and hyperactivity in heterologous expression systems. This interplay must be considered when analyzing the mild phenotype of patients with type 3 Bartter syndrome.

  10. The reaction 32S(d,alpha)30P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrie, J.J.

    1979-03-01

    Cross sections for the reaction 32 S(d,alpha) 30 P were measured at an average deuteron energy of about 6 MeV over deuteron energy ranges of about 200 - 400 KeV with steps of 15 KeV and at laboratory angles of 90 degrees, 112 degrees, 125 degrees, 133 degrees, 137 degrees, 141 degrees, 148 degrees, 155 degrees and 175,5 degrees. The range of excitation pertaining to the study, extended to the 23rd excited state at 4,73 MeV in 30 P. The observed cross section fluctuations in the excitation functions are indicative of the statistical nature of the reaction. A coherence width of 43 plus minus 4 keV was obtained for the compound nucleus 34 Cl at 17,2 MeV excitation from fluctuation analyses for states up to the 7th excited level at 2,84 MeV in 30 P. By contrast the coherence width for the isospin forbidden transition to the T = 1 excited state at 2,94 MeV in 30 P was found to be 34 plus minus 6 keV. This difference can be accounted for in terms of isospin mixing in the compound nucleus. Spins of excited states in 30 P were determined by comparing experimental cross sections with Hauser-Feshbach predictions. The most probable spin values obtained from this study are: 1 + for the 10th (3,73 MeV),2 + for the 11th (3,83 MeV),3 + for the 12th (3,93 MeV),0 + for the 16th (4,235 MeV) and 1 + for the 23rd excited state at 4,73 MeV in 30 P. From the assumption that the spin of the 17th excited state (4,30 MeV) is 2 - , spin possibilities of 2 + , 3 - and 4 + could be deduced for the 18th excited state (4,34 MeV). An inhibition factor of 0,41 plus minus 0,06 for the isospin forbidden reaction 32 S(d,alpha) 30 P has been obtained and corresponds to a value of = 18 keV for the compound nucleus 34 Cl at 17,2 MeV excitation

  11. Subunit Stoichiometry of Human Muscle Chloride Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Fahlke, Christoph; Knittle, Timothy; Gurnett, Christina A.; Campbell, Kevin P.; George, Alfred L.

    1997-01-01

    Voltage-gated Cl? channels belonging to the ClC family appear to function as homomultimers, but the number of subunits needed to form a functional channel is controversial. To determine subunit stoichiometry, we constructed dimeric human skeletal muscle Cl? channels in which one subunit was tagged by a mutation (D136G) that causes profound changes in voltage-dependent gating. Sucrose-density gradient centrifugation experiments indicate that both monomeric and dimeric hClC-1 channels in their ...

  12. Dark matter annihilation with s-channel internal Higgsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Jason; Liao, Jiajun, E-mail: liaoj@hawaii.edu; Marfatia, Danny

    2016-08-10

    We study the scenario of fermionic dark matter that annihilates to standard model fermions through an s-channel axial vector mediator. We point out that the well-known chirality suppression of the annihilation cross section can be alleviated by s-channel internal Higgsstrahlung. The shapes of the cosmic ray spectra are identical to that of t-channel internal Higgsstrahlung in the limit of a heavy mediating particle. Unlike the general case of t-channel bremsstrahlung, s-channel Higgsstrahlung can be the dominant annihilation process even for Dirac dark matter. Since the s-channel mediator can be a standard model singlet, collider searches for the mediator are easily circumvented.

  13. Dark matter annihilation with s-channel internal Higgsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Jason; Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, Danny

    2016-01-01

    We study the scenario of fermionic dark matter that annihilates to standard model fermions through an s-channel axial vector mediator. We point out that the well-known chirality suppression of the annihilation cross section can be alleviated by s-channel internal Higgsstrahlung. The shapes of the cosmic ray spectra are identical to that of t-channel internal Higgsstrahlung in the limit of a heavy mediating particle. Unlike the general case of t-channel bremsstrahlung, s-channel Higgsstrahlung can be the dominant annihilation process even for Dirac dark matter. Since the s-channel mediator can be a standard model singlet, collider searches for the mediator are easily circumvented.

  14. QUANTUM @ Théâtre Forum Meyrin | 30-31 October

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The Gilles Jobin Company has the pleasure of welcoming you to QUANTUM @ Théâtre Forum Meyrin.   QUANTUM @ Théâtre Forum Meyrin Friday, 30 October - 8.30 p.m.  Saturday, 31 October - 7.00 p.m. SPECIAL PRICE FOR CERN PERSONNEL: 15 CHF upon presentation of your CERN card (regular price: 25 CHF/20 CHF). QUANTUM is a "creative collision" between 2012 Arts@CERN resident artists Gilles Jobin, choreographer, and Julius Von Bismarck, visual artist. Von Bismarck's lumino-kinetic installation lights up the stage while Carla Scaletti's music score uses real LHC "sonified" data! Physicists Michael Doser and Nicholas Chanon participated in the creation as scientific advisors to the choreographer. Created at the CMS ex...

  15. Low latency control board for LLRF system: SIMCON 3.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giergusiewicz, Wojciech; Jalmuzna, Wojciech; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Ignashin, Nikolay; Grecki, Mariusz; Makowski, Dariusz; Jezynski, Tomasz; Perkuszewski, Karol; Czuba, Krzysztof; Simrock, Stefan; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2005-09-01

    A new version of the SIMCON system is presented in this paper. The SIMCON stands for the microwave, resonant, superconductive accelerator cavity simulator and controller (embracing the hardware and software layers). The current version of the SIMCON is 3.1. which is a considerable step forward from the previous 8-channel version 3.0. which was released at the beginning of 2005 and was made operable in April. Many important upgrades were implemented in SIMCON 3.1. It is a stand-alone VME board (whereas SIMCON 3.0 was modular) based on the Virtex II Pro 30 chip with two embedded Power PCs and DSP blocks. It has Ethernet and multiple gigabit optical I/Os. The Simcon 3.1 board provides 10 ADC channels. The architecture idea and block diagrams of the PCB for SIMCON 3.1. are presented. Some of the applied novel technical solutions, Protel"R" views and schemes are shown. A number of initial conclusions were drawn from a few month experience with the development of this new board. The tables of predicted system parameters are quoted.

  16. An S-type anion channel SLAC1 is involved in cryptogein-induced ion fluxes and modulates hypersensitive responses in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurusu, Takamitsu; Saito, Katsunori; Horikoshi, Sonoko; Hanamata, Shigeru; Negi, Juntaro; Yagi, Chikako; Kitahata, Nobutaka; Iba, Koh; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological evidence suggests that anion channel-mediated plasma membrane anion effluxes are crucial in early defense signaling to induce immune responses and hypersensitive cell death in plants. However, their molecular bases and regulation remain largely unknown. We overexpressed Arabidopsis SLAC1, an S-type anion channel involved in stomatal closure, in cultured tobacco BY-2 cells and analyzed the effect on cryptogein-induced defense responses including fluxes of Cl(-) and other ions, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), gene expression and hypersensitive responses. The SLAC1-GFP fusion protein was localized at the plasma membrane in BY-2 cells. Overexpression of SLAC1 enhanced cryptogein-induced Cl(-) efflux and extracellular alkalinization as well as rapid/transient and slow/prolonged phases of NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production, which was suppressed by an anion channel inhibitor, DIDS. The overexpressor also showed enhanced sensitivity to cryptogein to induce downstream immune responses, including the induction of defense marker genes and the hypersensitive cell death. These results suggest that SLAC1 expressed in BY-2 cells mediates cryptogein-induced plasma membrane Cl(-) efflux to positively modulate the elicitor-triggered activation of other ion fluxes, ROS as well as a wide range of defense signaling pathways. These findings shed light on the possible involvement of the SLAC/SLAH family anion channels in cryptogein signaling to trigger the plasma membrane ion channel cascade in the plant defense signal transduction network.

  17. Pharmacological activation of KCa3.1/KCa2.3 channels produces endothelial hyperpolarization and lowers blood pressure in conscious dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjaer, Mads; Nielsen, Gorm; Bodendiek, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose.  In rodents, the endothelial KCa-channels, KCa3.1 and KCa2.3, have been shown to play a crucial role in initiating endothelium-derived hyperpolarising factor(EDHF) vasodilator responses. However, it is not known to which extent these channels are involved in blood pressure...... regulation in large mammals which also allow addressing safety issues. We therefore characterized canine endothelial KCa3.1 and KCa2.3 functions and evaluated the effect on blood pressure and heart rate of the KCa3.1/KCa2.3-activator SKA-31 in dogs. Experimental approach.  Canine endothelial KCa3.1/KCa2.......3 functions were studied by patch-clamp electrophysiology and wire-myography in mesenteric arteries. The systemic cardiovascular actions of acute SKA-31 administration were monitored in conscious, unstressed beagle dogs. Key results.  Mesenteric endothelial cells expressed functional KCa3.1 and KCa2...

  18. The potassium channel KCa3.1 as new therapeutic target for the prevention of obliterative airway disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hua, Xiaoqin; Deuse, Tobias; Chen, Yi-Je

    2013-01-01

    The calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 is critically involved in T-cell activation as well as in the proliferation of smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. We sought to investigate whether KCa3.1 contributes to the pathogenesis of obliterative airway disease (OAD) and whether knockout or p...

  19. Observation of s-Channel Single Top Quark Production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, Matteo [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    Testing the Standard Model (SM) and looking for new phenomena have been the focus of generations of particle physicists in the last decades. Following this spirit, this thesis presents two searches. The first is the search for single top quark production from the exchange of an s-channel virtual W boson using events with an imbalance in the total transverse energy, b-tagged jets, and no identified leptons. Assuming the electroweak production of top quarks of mass 172.5 GeV/c2 in the s-channel, a cross section of 1.12+0.61 -0.57 (stat+syst) pb, with a significance of 1.9 standard deviations, is measured. This measurement is combined with the result obtained from events with an imbalance in total transverse momentum, b-tagged jets, and exactly one identified lepton, yielding a cross section of 1.36+0.37 -0.322 (stat+syst) pb, with a significance of 4.2 standard deviations. The first observation of single-top-quark production in the s channel through the combination of the CDF and D0 measurements is also reported. The measured cross section is σs = 1.29+0.26 -0.244 pb. The probability of observing a statistical fluctuation of the background to a cross section of the observed size or larger is 1.8 10-10, corresponding to a significance of 6.3 standard deviation. The second is the search for W'-like resonances decaying to tb. No significant excess above the SM prediction is found. Using a benchmark W' → tb left-right symmetric model, 95% C.L. mass-dependent upper limits are placed on the W0 boson production cross section times branching ratio to tb. Assuming a W' boson with SM-like couplings and allowed (forbidden) decay to leptons, W' → tb is excluded with 95% C.L. for W' boson masses below 860 (880) GeV/c2. Relaxing the hypothesis on SM-like couplings, we exclude W' boson coupling strength values as a function of the W' boson mass

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Antiamoebin Ion Channel: Linking Structure and Conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Wei, Chenyu; Bjelkmar, Paer; Wallace, B. A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to ascertain which of the potential multimeric forms of the transmembrane peptaibol channel, antiamoebin, is consistant with its measured conductance. Estimates of the conductance obtained through counting ions that cross the channel and by solving the Nernst-Planck equation yield consistent results, indicating that the motion of ions inside the channel can be satisfactorily described as diffusive.The calculated conductance of octameric channels is markedly higher than the conductance measured in single channel recordings, whereas the tetramer appears to be non-conducting. The conductance of the hexamer was estimated to be 115+/-34 pS and 74+/-20 pS, at 150 mV and 75 mV, respectively, in satisfactory agreement with the value of 90 pS measured at 75 mV. On this basis we propose that the antiamoebin channel consists of six monomers. Its pore is large enough to accommodate K(+) and Cl(-) with their first solvation shells intact. The free energy barrier encountered by K(+) is only 2.2 kcal/mol whereas Cl(-) encounters a substantially higher barrier of nearly 5 kcal/mol. This difference makes the channel selective for cations. Ion crossing events are shown to be uncorrelated and follow Poisson statistics. keywords: ion channels, peptaibols, channel conductance, molecular dynamics

  1. Multi-particle Emission from $^{31}$Ar at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Marroquin, I; Ciemny, A A; de Witte, H; Fraile, L M; Fynbo, H O U; Garzón-Camacho, A; Howard, A; Johansson, H; Jonson, B; Kirsebom, O S; Koldste, G T; Lica, R; Lund, M V; Madurga, M; Mazzocchi, C; Mihai, C; Munch, M; Nae, S A; Nacher, E; Negret, A; Nilsson, T; Perea, A; Refsgaard, J; Riisager, K; Rapisarda, E; Sotty, C; Stanoiu, M; Tengblad, O; Turturica, A E; Vedia, M V

    2016-01-01

    A multi-particle decay experiment was successfully performed at the ISOLDE Decay Station. In this new permanent station, devoted to\\break $\\beta$-decay studies, the novel MAGISOL Si-Plugin Chamber was installed to study the exotic decay modes of the proton drip-line nucleus ${^{31}}$Ar. The motivation was to search for $\\beta3p$ and $\\beta3p\\gamma$ channels, as well as to provide information on resonances in ${^{30}}$S and ${^{29}}$P relevant for the astrophysical\\break rp-process. Description of the experimental set-up and preliminary results are presented.

  2. Chemical aspects of the radioactive decay 38S to 38Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leurs, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    The cyclotron-production of 38 S with the reaction 40 Ar(p,3p) 38 S is described. An excitation curve for this nuclear reaction is given and the chemistry used to produce sulfates labeled with 38 S and H 2 38 S is described. The probability distribution of the recoil energy of 38 Cl, produced by beta-decay of 38 S, is given. The probability for rupture of the original bonds due to the radioactive decay process, is estimated for gaseous H 2 38 S and for crystalline sulfates- 38 S. The results are given for the β,γ-decay of 38 S to 38 Cl under different circumstances in inorganic solid sulfates (with and without water of crystallization) and in the mixed crystal K 2 SO 4 .K 2 BeF 4 (1 : 2500). Finally, the reactions of 38 Cl, produced by radioactive decay of 38 S (as H 2 38 S) with gaseous 1,2-dichloroethylene are discussed

  3. 31 CFR 357.30 - Cases of delay or suspension of payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cases of delay or suspension of payment. 357.30 Section 357.30 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... Securities System (Legacy Treasury Direct) § 357.30 Cases of delay or suspension of payment. If evidence...

  4. On S-mixing entropy of quantum channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamedov, Farrukh; Watanabe, Noboru

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, an S-mixing entropy of quantum channels is introduced as a generalization of Ohya's S-mixing entropy. We investigate several properties of the introduced entropy. Moreover, certain relations between the S-mixing entropy and the existing map and output entropies of quantum channels are investigated as well. These relations allowed us to find certain connections between separable states and the introduced entropy. Hence, there is a sufficient condition to detect entangled states. Moreover, several properties of the introduced entropy are investigated. Besides, entropies of qubit and phase-damping channels are calculated.

  5. Contribution of S4 segments and S4-S5 linkers to the low-voltage activation properties of T-type CaV3.3 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Sanchez-Sandoval

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium channels contain four highly conserved transmembrane helices known as S4 segments that exhibit a positively charged residue every third position, and play the role of voltage sensing. Nonetheless, the activation range between high-voltage (HVA and low-voltage (LVA activated calcium channels is around 30-40 mV apart, despite the high level of amino acid similarity within their S4 segments. To investigate the contribution of S4 voltage sensors for the low-voltage activation characteristics of CaV3.3 channels we constructed chimeras by swapping S4 segments between this LVA channel and the HVA CaV1.2 channel. The substitution of S4 segment of Domain II in CaV3.3 by that of CaV1.2 (chimera IIS4C induced a ~35 mV shift in the voltage-dependence of activation towards positive potentials, showing an I-V curve that almost overlaps with that of CaV1.2 channel. This HVA behavior induced by IIS4C chimera was accompanied by a 2-fold decrease in the voltage-dependence of channel gating. The IVS4 segment had also a strong effect in the voltage sensing of activation, while substitution of segments IS4 and IIIS4 moved the activation curve of CaV3.3 to more negative potentials. Swapping of IIS4 voltage sensor influenced additional properties of this channel such as steady-state inactivation, current decay, and deactivation. Notably, Domain I voltage sensor played a major role in preventing CaV3.3 channels to inactivate from closed states at extreme hyperpolarized potentials. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis in the CaV3.3 channel revealed a partial contribution of the S4-S5 linker of Domain II to LVA behavior, with synergic effects observed in double and triple mutations. These findings indicate that IIS4 and, to a lesser degree IVS4, voltage sensors are crucial in determining the LVA properties of CaV3.3 channels, although the accomplishment of this function involves the participation of other structural elements like S4-S5 linkers.

  6. Contribution of S4 segments and S4-S5 linkers to the low-voltage activation properties of T-type CaV3.3 channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Sandoval, Ana Laura; Herrera Carrillo, Zazil; Díaz Velásquez, Clara Estela; Delgadillo, Dulce María; Rivera, Heriberto Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels contain four highly conserved transmembrane helices known as S4 segments that exhibit a positively charged residue every third position, and play the role of voltage sensing. Nonetheless, the activation range between high-voltage (HVA) and low-voltage (LVA) activated calcium channels is around 30–40 mV apart, despite the high level of amino acid similarity within their S4 segments. To investigate the contribution of S4 voltage sensors for the low-voltage activation characteristics of CaV3.3 channels we constructed chimeras by swapping S4 segments between this LVA channel and the HVA CaV1.2 channel. The substitution of S4 segment of Domain II in CaV3.3 by that of CaV1.2 (chimera IIS4C) induced a ~35 mV shift in the voltage-dependence of activation towards positive potentials, showing an I-V curve that almost overlaps with that of CaV1.2 channel. This HVA behavior induced by IIS4C chimera was accompanied by a 2-fold decrease in the voltage-dependence of channel gating. The IVS4 segment had also a strong effect in the voltage sensing of activation, while substitution of segments IS4 and IIIS4 moved the activation curve of CaV3.3 to more negative potentials. Swapping of IIS4 voltage sensor influenced additional properties of this channel such as steady-state inactivation, current decay, and deactivation. Notably, Domain I voltage sensor played a major role in preventing CaV3.3 channels to inactivate from closed states at extreme hyperpolarized potentials. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis in the CaV3.3 channel revealed a partial contribution of the S4-S5 linker of Domain II to LVA behavior, with synergic effects observed in double and triple mutations. These findings indicate that IIS4 and, to a lesser degree IVS4, voltage sensors are crucial in determining the LVA properties of CaV3.3 channels, although the accomplishment of this function involves the participation of other structural elements like S4-S5 linkers. PMID:29474447

  7. Contribution of S4 segments and S4-S5 linkers to the low-voltage activation properties of T-type CaV3.3 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Sandoval, Ana Laura; Herrera Carrillo, Zazil; Díaz Velásquez, Clara Estela; Delgadillo, Dulce María; Rivera, Heriberto Manuel; Gomora, Juan Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels contain four highly conserved transmembrane helices known as S4 segments that exhibit a positively charged residue every third position, and play the role of voltage sensing. Nonetheless, the activation range between high-voltage (HVA) and low-voltage (LVA) activated calcium channels is around 30-40 mV apart, despite the high level of amino acid similarity within their S4 segments. To investigate the contribution of S4 voltage sensors for the low-voltage activation characteristics of CaV3.3 channels we constructed chimeras by swapping S4 segments between this LVA channel and the HVA CaV1.2 channel. The substitution of S4 segment of Domain II in CaV3.3 by that of CaV1.2 (chimera IIS4C) induced a ~35 mV shift in the voltage-dependence of activation towards positive potentials, showing an I-V curve that almost overlaps with that of CaV1.2 channel. This HVA behavior induced by IIS4C chimera was accompanied by a 2-fold decrease in the voltage-dependence of channel gating. The IVS4 segment had also a strong effect in the voltage sensing of activation, while substitution of segments IS4 and IIIS4 moved the activation curve of CaV3.3 to more negative potentials. Swapping of IIS4 voltage sensor influenced additional properties of this channel such as steady-state inactivation, current decay, and deactivation. Notably, Domain I voltage sensor played a major role in preventing CaV3.3 channels to inactivate from closed states at extreme hyperpolarized potentials. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis in the CaV3.3 channel revealed a partial contribution of the S4-S5 linker of Domain II to LVA behavior, with synergic effects observed in double and triple mutations. These findings indicate that IIS4 and, to a lesser degree IVS4, voltage sensors are crucial in determining the LVA properties of CaV3.3 channels, although the accomplishment of this function involves the participation of other structural elements like S4-S5 linkers.

  8. Novel phenolic inhibitors of small/intermediate-conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channels, KCa3.1 and KCa2.3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Oliván-Viguera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: KCa3.1 channels are calcium/calmodulin-regulated voltage-independent K(+ channels that produce membrane hyperpolarization and shape Ca(2+-signaling and thereby physiological functions in epithelia, blood vessels, and white and red blood cells. Up-regulation of KCa3.1 is evident in fibrotic and inflamed tissues and some tumors rendering the channel a potential drug target. In the present study, we searched for novel potent small molecule inhibitors of KCa3.1 by testing a series of 20 selected natural and synthetic (polyphenols, synthetic benzoic acids, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, with known cytoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and/or cytostatic activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In electrophysiological experiments, we identified the natural phenols, caffeic acid (EC50 1.3 µM and resveratrol (EC50 10 µM as KCa3.1 inhibitors with moderate potency. The phenols, vanillic acid, gallic acid, and hydroxytyrosol had weak or no blocking effects. Out of the NSAIDs, flufenamic acid was moderately potent (EC50 1.6 µM, followed by mesalamine (EC50≥10 µM. The synthetic fluoro-trivanillic ester, 13b ([3,5-bis[(3-fluoro-4-hydroxy-benzoyloxymethyl]phenyl]methyl 3-fluoro-4-hydroxy-benzoate, was identified as a potent mixed KCa2/3 channel inhibitor with an EC50 of 19 nM for KCa3.1 and 360 pM for KCa2.3, which affected KCa1.1 and Kv channels only at micromolar concentrations. The KCa3.1/KCa2-activator SKA-31 antagonized the 13b-blockade. In proliferation assays, 13b was not cytotoxic and reduced proliferation of 3T3 fibroblasts as well as caffeic acid. In isometric vessel myography, 13b increased contractions of porcine coronary arteries to serotonin and antagonized endothelium-derived hyperpolarization-mediated vasorelaxation to pharmacological KCa3.1/KCa2.3 activation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified the natural phenols, caffeic acid and resveratrol, the NSAID, flufenamic acid, and the polyphenol 13b as novel

  9. CLC channel function and dysfunction in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel eStölting

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available CLC channels and transporters are expressed in most tissues and fulfill diverse functions. There are four human CLC channels, ClC-1, ClC-2, ClC-Ka and ClC-Kb, and five CLC transporters, ClC-3 through -7. Some of the CLC channels additionally associate with accessory subunits. Whereas barttin is mandatory for the functional expression of CLC-K, GlialCam is a facultative subunit of ClC-2 which modifies gating and thus increases the functional variability within the CLC family. Isoform-specific ion conduction and gating properties optimize distinct CLC channels for their cellular tasks. ClC-1 preferentially conducts at negative voltages, and the resulting inward rectification provides a large resting chloride conductance without interference with the muscle action potential. Exclusive opening at voltages negative to the chloride reversal potential allows for ClC-2 to regulate intracellular chloride concentrations. ClC-Ka and ClC-Kb are equally suited for inward and outward currents to support transcellular chloride fluxes. Every human CLC channel gene has been linked to a genetic disease, and studying these mutations has provided much information about the physiological roles and the molecular basis of CLC channel function. Mutations in the gene encoding ClC-1 cause myotonia congenita, a disease characterized by sarcolemmal hyperexcitability and muscle stiffness. Loss-of-function of ClC-Kb/barttin channels in patients suffering from Bartter syndrome identified the determinants of chloride conductances in the limb of Henle. Mutations in CLCN2 were found in patients with CNS disorders but the functional role of this isoform is still not understood. Recent links between ClC-1 and epilepsy and ClC-Ka and heart failure suggested novel cellular functions of these proteins. This review aims to survey the knowledge about physiological and pathophysiological functions of human CLC channels in the light of recent discoveries from biophysical, physiological

  10. Novel CLCNKB mutations causing Bartter syndrome affect channel surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Mathilde; Andrini, Olga; Lahuna, Olivier; Burgos, Johanna; Cid, L Pablo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V; L'hoste, Sébastien; Blanchard, Anne; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Lourdel, Stéphane; Teulon, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    Mutations in the CLCNKB gene encoding the ClC-Kb Cl(-) channel cause Bartter syndrome, which is a salt-losing renal tubulopathy. Here, we investigate the functional consequences of seven mutations. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, four mutants carried no current (c.736G>C, p.Gly246Arg; c.1271G>A, p.Gly424Glu; c.1313G>A, p.Arg438His; c.1316T>C, p.Leu439Pro), whereas others displayed a 30%-60% reduction in conductance as compared with wild-type ClC-Kb (c.242T>C, p.Leu81Pro; c.274C>T, p.Arg92Trp; c.1052G>C, p.Arg351Pro). Anion selectivity and sensitivity to external Ca(2+) and H(+), typical of the ClC-Kb channel, were not modified in the partially active mutants. In oocytes, we found that all the mutations reduced surface expression with a profile similar to that observed for currents. In HEK293 cells, the currents in the mutants had similar profiles to those obtained in oocytes, except for p.Leu81Pro, which produced no current. Furthermore, p.Arg92Trp and p.Arg351Pro mutations did not modify the unit-conductance of closely related ClC-K1. Western blot analysis in HEK293 cells showed that ClC-Kb protein abundance was lower for the nonconducting mutants but similar to wild-type for other mutants. Overall, two classes of mutants can be distinguished: nonconducting mutants associated with low total protein expression, and partially conducting mutants with unaltered channel properties and ClC-Kb protein abundance. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  11. Opposite effects of the S4-S5 linker and PIP2 on voltage-gated channel function: KCNQ1/KCNE1 and other channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S Choveau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels are tetramers, each subunit presenting six transmembrane segments (S1-S6, with each S1-S4 segments forming a voltage-sensing domain (VSD and the four S5-S6 forming both the conduction pathway and its gate. S4 segments control the opening of the intracellular activation gate in response to changes in membrane potential. Crystal structures of several voltage-gated ion channels in combination with biophysical and mutagenesis studies highlighted the critical role of the S4-S5 linker (S4S5L and of the S6 C-terminal part (S6T in the coupling between the VSD and the activation gate. Several mechanisms have been proposed to describe the coupling at a molecular scale. This review summarizes the mechanisms suggested for various voltage-gated ion channels, including a mechanism that we described for KCNQ1, in which S4S5L is acting like a ligand binding to S6T to stabilize the channel in a closed state. As discussed in this review, this mechanism may explain the reverse response to depolarization in HCN-like channels. As opposed to S4S5L, the phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2, stabilizes KCNQ1 channel in an open state. Many other ion channels (not only voltage-gated require PIP2 to function properly, confirming its crucial importance as an ion channel co-factor. This is highlighted in cases in which an altered regulation of ion channels by PIP2 leads to channelopathies, as observed for KCNQ1. This review summarizes the state of the art on the two regulatory mechanisms that are critical for KCNQ1 and other voltage-gated channels function (PIP2 and S4-S5L, and assesses their potential physiological and pathophysiological roles.

  12. Combustible and incombustible speciation of Cl and S in various components of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Yamamoto, Osamu; Sakai, Mamoru; Fukuyama, Johji

    2004-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl) and sulfur (S) in municipal solid waste (MSW) are important reactive elements during combustion. They generate the acidic pollutants HCl and SOx, and, furthermore, produce and suppress organic chlorinated compounds. Nevertheless, few practical reports about Cl and S content in MSW have been published. In combustion and recycling processes, both combustible Cl and S, and incombustible Cl and S species are equally important. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive study about combustible and incombustible Cl and S in MSW components, including kitchen garbage, paper, textiles, wood and leaves, plastics and small chips. By integrating this collected data with data about MSW composition, not only the overall content of Cl and S in MSW, but also the origins of both combustible and incombustible Cl and S were estimated. The average Cl content in bulk MSW was 3.7 g/kg of raw MSW, of which 2.7 and 1.0 g/kg were combustible and incombustible, respectively. The Cl contribution from plastics was 76% and 27% with respect to combustible and incombustible states. The average S content in bulk MSW was 0.81 g/kg of raw MSW, of which 0.46 g/kg was combustible and 0.35 g/kg was incombustible. Combustible S was mainly due to synthetic textiles, while incombustible S was primarily from paper.

  13. Flow behaviour of magnesium alloy AZ31B processed by equal-channel angular pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arun, M S; Chakkingal, U

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are characterised by their low density, high specific strength and stiffness. But, the potential application of Mg is limited by its low room-temperature ductility and formability. Formability can be improved by developing an ultrafine grained (UFG) structure. Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) is a well known process that can be used to develop an ultrafine grained microstructure. The aim of this study was to investigate the flow behaviour of AZ31B magnesium alloy after ECAP. The specimen was subjected to three passes of ECAP with a die angle of 120° using processing route Bc. The processing temperature was 523 K for the first pass and 423 K for the subsequent two passes. The microstructure characterisation was done. Compression tests of ECAPed and annealed specimens were carried out at strain rates of 0.01 – 1s −1 and deformation temperatures of 200 – 300°C using computer servo-controlled Gleeble-3800 system. The value of activation energy Q and the empirical materials constants of A and n were determined. The equations relating flow stress and Zener-Hollomon parameter were proposed. In the case annealed AZ31, the activation energy was determined to be 154 kJ/mol, which was slightly higher than the activation energy of 144 kJ/mol for ECAPed AZ31

  14. Flow behaviour of magnesium alloy AZ31B processed by equal-channel angular pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, M. S.; Chakkingal, U.

    2014-08-01

    Magnesium alloys are characterised by their low density, high specific strength and stiffness. But, the potential application of Mg is limited by its low room-temperature ductility & formability. Formability can be improved by developing an ultrafine grained (UFG) structure. Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) is a well known process that can be used to develop an ultrafine grained microstructure. The aim of this study was to investigate the flow behaviour of AZ31B magnesium alloy after ECAP. The specimen was subjected to three passes of ECAP with a die angle of 120° using processing route Bc. The processing temperature was 523 K for the first pass and 423 K for the subsequent two passes. The microstructure characterisation was done. Compression tests of ECAPed and annealed specimens were carried out at strain rates of 0.01 - 1s-1 and deformation temperatures of 200 - 300°C using computer servo-controlled Gleeble-3800 system. The value of activation energy Q and the empirical materials constants of A and n were determined. The equations relating flow stress and Zener-Hollomon parameter were proposed. In the case annealed AZ31, the activation energy was determined to be 154 kJ/mol, which was slightly higher than the activation energy of 144 kJ/mol for ECAPed AZ31.

  15. Criterios para el diagnóstico clínico de algunos síndromes genéticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Taboada Lugo

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Hasta mediados del pasado siglo se conocía muy poco acerca de las enfermedades genéticas, aparte de su mera existencia. Si bien a título aislado muchas de ellas son entidades clínicas poco frecuentes, al sumar unos 30 000 síndromes, constituyen una afección pediátrica no desdeñable, y a pesar de su complejidad, el pediatra puede abordar con facilidad el reto de su diagnóstico, como base para solicitar los exámenes complementarios pertinentes o bien la interconsulta con otras especialidades, a la que no debería recurrir "de entrada" ante la presencia de un niño con un posible síndrome "raro". Fue el propósito de este trabajo propiciar a pediatras y personal médico en general los criterios clínicos para llegar al diagnóstico de algunos síndromes genéticos, los que han sido elaborados luego de una exhaustiva delineación clínica de éstos. Fueron reflejados los criterios establecidos para el diagnóstico clínico de 9 síndromes genéticos.Very little was known up to the middle of the last century about genetic diseases, but just its mere existance. Considered isolatedly, many of them are uncommon clinical entities, but as there are 30 000 syndromes at present, they are a pediatric affection that cannot be disdained. In spite of their complexity, the pediatrician can easily face the challenge of making the diagnosis as a basis to order the complementary tests, or to have an interconsultation with other specialists, which should not be done when he sees a child with a "rare" syndrome for the first time. This paper was aimed at giving pediatricians and medical personnel in general the clinical criteria resulting from an exhaustive clinical analysis that allow to diagnose some genetic syndromes. The criteria established for the clinical diagnosis of 9 genetic syndromes were included.

  16. Probing the conformation of a conserved glutamic acid within the Cl- pathway of a CLC H+/Cl- exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vien, Malvin; Basilio, Daniel; Leisle, Lilia; Accardi, Alessio

    2017-04-03

    The CLC proteins form a broad family of anion-selective transport proteins that includes both channels and exchangers. Despite extensive structural, functional, and computational studies, the transport mechanism of the CLC exchangers remains poorly understood. Several transport models have been proposed but have failed to capture all the key features of these transporters. Multiple CLC crystal structures have suggested that a conserved glutamic acid, Glu ex , can adopt three conformations and that the interconversion of its side chain between these states underlies H + /Cl - exchange. One of these states, in which Glu ex occupies the central binding site (S cen ) while Cl - ions fill the internal and external sites (S int and S ext ), has only been observed in one homologue, the eukaryotic cmCLC. The existence of such a state in other CLCs has not been demonstrated. In this study, we find that during transport, the prototypical prokaryotic CLC exchanger, CLC-ec1, adopts a conformation with functional characteristics that match those predicted for a cmCLC-like state, with Glu ex trapped in S cen between two Cl - ions. Transport by CLC-ec1 is reduced when [Cl - ] is symmetrically increased on both sides of the membrane and mutations that disrupt the hydrogen bonds stabilizing Glu ex in S cen destabilize this trapped state. Furthermore, inhibition of transport by high [Cl - ] is abolished in the E148A mutant, in which the Glu ex side chain is removed. Collectively, our results suggest that, during the CLC transport cycle, Glu ex can occupy S cen as well as the S ext position in which it has been captured crystallographically and that hydrogen bonds with the side chains of residues that coordinate ion binding to S cen play a role in determining the equilibrium between these two conformations. © 2017 Vien et al.

  17. The First Extracellular Linker Is Important for Several Aspects of the Gating Mechanism of Human TRPA1 Channel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršáková, Lenka; Barvík, I.; Zíma, V.; Zímová, Lucie; Vlachová, Viktorie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, Jan 31 (2017), č. článku 16. ISSN 1662-5099 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-15839S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : TRP channel * S1-S2 linker * allyl isothiocynate * sensor module Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neuroscience s (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 5.076, year: 2016

  18. Development of a Chemically Defined Medium for Better Yield and Purification of Enterocin Y31 from Enterococcus faecium Y31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenli Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The macro- and micronutrients in traditional medium, such as MRS, used for cultivating lactic acid bacteria, especially for bacteriocin production, have not been defined, preventing the quantitative monitoring of metabolic flux during bacteriocin biosynthesis. To enhance Enterocin Y31 production and simplify steps of separation and purification, we developed a simplified chemically defined medium (SDM for the growth of Enterococcus faecium Y31 and production of its bacteriocin, Enterocin Y31. We found that the bacterial growth was unrelated to Enterocin Y31 production in MRS; therefore, both the growth rate and the Enterocin Y31 production were set as the index for investigation. Single omission experiments revealed that 5 g/L NaCl, five vitamins, two nucleic acid bases, MgSO4·7H2O, MnSO4·4H2O, KH2PO4, K2HPO4, CH3COONa, fourteen amino acids, and glucose were essential for the strain’s growth and Enterocin Y31 production. Thus, a novel simplified and defined medium (SDM was formulated with 30 components in total. Consequently, Enterocin Y31 production yield was higher in SDM as compared to either MRS or CDM. SDM improved the Enterocin Y31 production and simplified the steps of purification (only two steps, which has broad potential applications.

  19. Utilization of the residual water resource from the Kozloduy NPP's hot channel for building a small hydropower plant (TK1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolev, T.

    2004-01-01

    A hydropower plant built on the hot channel of the NPP should be capable to utilise the whole changing water flow from the NPP cooling system. Tree factors - level of the hot channel, level of the Danube river and the water flow - determine the power potential of the HPP. The water level in the hot channel varies between 31.20 and 32.50 m with an optimum at 31.50 m. The Danube river level varies in a wide range. The head at 85% of the river level and at a level of the channel 31.50 m is 7.2 m. The water flow depends on the NPP operation and it is between 45 m 3 /s and 140 m 3 /s. Thus the nominal power of the HPP is 5 740 kW. The construction of the HPP is justified in case of at least 30 years of operation. The calculations are made for the operation of units 5 and 6 which are expected to work during this period. A significant role for the maximal utilisation of the resource of the hot channel plays the choice of the hydro-turbines. The horizontal PIT-Kaplan turbines are considered as the most appropriate. The integrating of the plant into the electric network and possible impact on the environment are also considered

  20. Negative ion–gas reaction studies using ion guides and accelerator mass spectrometry II: S{sup −}, SO{sup −} and Cl{sup −} with NO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliades, J.A., E-mail: j.eliades@alum.utoronto.ca [Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Zhao, X.-L. [University of Ottawa, Department of Physics and Lalonde AMS Laboratory, 25 Templeton St., Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Litherland, A.E. [University of Toronto, Department of Physics, 60 Saint George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada); Kieser, W.E. [University of Ottawa, Department of Physics and Lalonde AMS Laboratory, 25 Templeton St., Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Currently analysis of {sup 36}Cl by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) requires large facilities for separation of the isobar {sup 36}S. Previously, it has been shown possible to suppress S{sup −} by >6 orders of magnitude at low energies in a prototype radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) instrument by ion reactions in NO{sub 2} gas in the injection line of an AMS system. Reaction products for the negative ions S{sup −}, SO{sup −} and Cl{sup −} with NO{sub 2}, and S{sup −} with N{sub 2}O, have been surveyed in order to understand isobar attenuation plateaus and the losses of analyte ions. Ion energies were at eV levels, but had a large initial energy spread of at least several eV. Under these conditions, the aggregate total S{sup −} and SO{sup −} cross sections in NO{sub 2} were estimated to be 6.6 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2} and 7.1 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2} respectively and the major reaction channel observed was electron transfer producing NO{sub 2}{sup −}. Other reaction products observed for S{sup −} were SO{sup −}, SO{sub 2}{sup −}, NS{sup −}, and NSO{sub 2}{sup −}. On the other hand, S{sup −}, SO{sup −} and NS{sup −} were found to be largely unreactive with N{sub 2}O despite the existence of some highly exothermic reaction channels. When Cl{sup −} was injected into NO{sub 2}, reaction products such as ClO{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −} were observed only at low levels suggesting that larger Cl{sup −} transmissions should be possible with some RFQ design modifications. The ClO{sup −} reaction product had only a small attenuation under the experimental conditions, despite having near resonant electron affinity with NO{sub 2}.

  1. The antiparasitic isoxazoline A1443 is a potent blocker of insect ligand-gated chloride channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Asahi, Miho; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Nakahira, Kunimitsu; Mita, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    A structurally unique isoxazoline class compound, A1443, exhibits antiparasitic activity against cat fleas and dog ticks comparable to that of the commercial ectoparasiticide fipronil. This isoxazoline compound inhibits specific binding of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor channel blocker [(3)H]4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate (EBOB) to housefly-head membranes, with an IC(50) value of 455pM. In contrast, the IC(50) value in rat-brain membranes is>10muM. To study the mode of action of this isoxazoline, we utilized MdGBCl and MdGluCl cDNAs, which encode the subunits of housefly GABA- and glutamate-gated chloride channels, respectively. Two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology was used to confirm that A1443 blocks GABA- and glutamate-induced chloride currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing MdGBCl or MdGluCl channels, with IC(50) values of 5.32 and 79.9 nM, respectively. Blockade by A1443 was observed in A2'S-MdGBCl and S2'A-MdGluCl mutant channels at levels similar to those of the respective wild-types, and houseflies expressing A2'S-MdGBCl channels were as susceptible to A1443 as standard houseflies. These findings indicate that A1443 is a novel and specific blocker of insect ligand-gated chloride channels. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell swelling activates K+ and Cl- channels as well as nonselective, stretch-activated cation channels in ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ove; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    1992-01-01

    Cell-attached patch-clamp recordings from Ehrlich ascites tumor cells reveal nonselective cation channels which are activated by mechanical deformation of the membrane. These channels are seen when suction is applied to the patch pipette or after osmotic cell swelling. The channel activation does...... system. In isolated insideout patches a Ca2+-dependent, inwardly rectifying K+ channel is demonstrated. The single-channel conductance recorded with symmetrical 150 mm K+ solutions is for inward current estimated at 40 pS and for outward current at 15 pS. Activation of the K+ channel takes place after...... by membrane stretch (suction). The time-averaged number of open K+ channels during regulatory volume decrease (RVD) can be estimated at 40 per cell. The number of open K+ channels following addition of Ca2+ plus ionophore A23187 was estimated at 250 per cell. Concurrent activation in cell-attached patches...

  3. Advances in fuel channel technology for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheadle, B.A.; Coleman, C.E.

    1994-05-01

    The components of the CANDU fuel channels are being developed to have service lives of over 30 years with large margins of safety. Information from research programs and the examination of components removed from reactors has enable improvements to be made to pressure tubes, spacers, calandria tubes and end fittings. Improvements have also been made to the channel design to facilitate planned retubing. (author). 22 refs., 5 tabs., 31 figs

  4. Formation of new halogenothiocarbonylsulfenyl halides, XC(S)SY, through photochemical matrix reactions starting from CS2 and a dihalogen molecule XY (XY=Cl2, Br2, or BrCl).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobón, Yeny A; Romano, Rosana M; Védova, Carlos O Della; Downs, Anthony J

    2007-05-28

    Isolation of a dihalogen molecule XY (XY=Cl2, Br2, or BrCl) with CS2 in a solid Ar matrix at about 15 K leads, by broad-band UV-vis photolysis (200ClCS*, Cl*...SCS, CCl4, *CCl3, :CCl2, SCl2, SCBr2, CBr4, *CBr3, BrC(S)Cl, BrCCl3, and :CBrCl, the following new molecules have also been identified as products of the various photoreactions: syn-ClC(S)SCl, anti-ClC(S)SCl, syn-BrC(S)SBr, anti-BrC(S)SBr, syn-ClC(S)SBr, anti-ClC(S)SBr, syn-BrC(S)SCl, anti-BrC(S)SCl, ClC(S)S*, BrCS*, and Br*...SCS. The IR spectra of these hitherto unknown species have been interpreted with reference to the predictions of ab initio (HF and MP2) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results are analyzed in relation to the reaction pathways accessed by matrix photolysis.

  5. IGF-1 and insulin exert opposite actions on ClC-K2 activity in the cortical collecting ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Boukelmoune, Nabila; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2015-01-01

    Despite similar stimulatory actions on the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)-mediated sodium reabsorption in the distal tubule, insulin promotes kaliuresis, whereas insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) causes a reduction in urinary potassium levels. The factors contributing to this phenomenon remain elusive. Electrogenic distal nephron ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport establishes driving force for Cl(-) reabsorption and K(+) secretion. Using patch-clamp electrophysiology, we document that a Cl(-) channel is highly abundant on the basolateral plasma membrane of intercalated cells in freshly isolated mouse cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells. The channel has characteristics attributable to the ClC-K2: slow gating kinetics, conductance ∼10 pS, voltage independence, Cl(-)>NO3 (-) anion selectivity, and inhibition/activation by low/high pH, respectively. IGF-1 (100 and 500 nM) acutely stimulates ClC-K2 activity in a reversible manner. Inhibition of PI3-kinase (PI3-K) with LY294002 (20 μM) abrogates activation of ClC-K2 by IGF-1. Interestingly, insulin (100 nM) reversibly decreases ClC-K2 activity in CCD cells. This inhibitory action is independent of PI3-K and is mediated by stimulation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent cascade. We propose that IGF-1, by stimulating ClC-K2 channels, promotes net Na(+) and Cl(-) reabsorption, thus reducing driving force for potassium secretion by the CCD. In contrast, inhibition of ClC-K2 by insulin favors coupling of Na(+) reabsorption with K(+) secretion at the apical membrane contributing to kaliuresis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. NaCl responsive taste cells in the mouse fungiform taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, R; Horio, N; Murata, Y; Yasumatsu, K; Shigemura, N; Ninomiya, Y

    2009-03-17

    Previous studies have demonstrated that rodents' chorda tympani (CT) nerve fibers responding to NaCl can be classified according to their sensitivities to the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) blocker amiloride into two groups: amiloride-sensitive (AS) and -insensitive (AI). The AS fibers were shown to respond specifically to NaCl, whereas AI fibers broadly respond to various electrolytes, including NaCl. These data suggest that salt taste transduction in taste cells may be composed of at least two different systems; AS and AI ones. To further address this issue, we investigated the responses to NaCl, KCl and HCl and the amiloride sensitivity of mouse fungiform papilla taste bud cells which are innervated by the CT nerve. Comparable with the CT data, the results indicated that 56 NaCl-responsive cells tested were classified into two groups; 25 cells ( approximately 44%) narrowly responded to NaCl and their NaCl response were inhibited by amiloride (AS cells), whereas the remaining 31 cells ( approximately 56%) responded not only to NaCl, but to KCl and/or HCl and showed no amiloride inhibition of NaCl responses (AI cells). Amiloride applied to the basolateral side of taste cells had no effect on NaCl responses in the AS and AI cells. Single cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments indicated that ENaC subunit mRNA was expressed in a subset of AS cells. These findings suggest that the mouse fungiform taste bud is composed of AS and AI cells that can transmit taste information differently to their corresponding types of CT fibers, and apical ENaCs may be involved in the NaCl responses of AS cells.

  7. 31 CFR 30.1 - Q-1: What definitions apply in this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-1: What definitions apply in this part? 30.1 Section 30.1 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.1 Q-1: What definitions apply in this part...

  8. Evaluation report on CCTF core-I reflood tests Cl-17(Run 36) and Cl-20(Run 39)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Yoshio; Iguchi, Tadashi

    1983-02-01

    In the safety analysis of the reflood phase of a PWR LOCA, the core thermo-hydrodynamic behavior is analyzed as a phenomena in a single channel core. In other words, the core thermo-hydrodynamic behavior is treated one-dimensionally. In order to confirm the validity of the one-dimensional treatment, tests named Asymmetric power test Cl-17(Run 36) and Asymmetric temperature test Cl-20(Run 39) were performed, whose test conditions were similar to the base case test Cl-5(Run 14) (the reference test for the parametric effect tests) except for the power distribution and the initial temperature distribution in core, respectively. First the results of the base case test were investigated. And the results of Asymmetric power test and Asymmetric temperature test were compared with the results of the base case test. The main conclusions are as follows: (1) The water accumulation was observed along the whole core even above quench front almost simultaneously just after reflood initiation and almost terminated within 20 to 30 seconds. The flow pattern was recognized as a slug flow. (2) In the lower two-thirds of the core, bottom quench was observed and the core water accumulation was one-dimensional even under the thermally asymmetric conditions. (3) In the upper portion of the core, the multi-dimensional effect was observed, i.e. the top quench occurred locally. (4) The water accumulation behavior or void fraction in the lower two-thirds of the core, i.e. our concerning region for the peak clad temperature analysis, and the core behavior for system analysis can be one-dimensionally analyzed with a representing single channel core. (author)

  9. Positive Feedback Regulation of Agonist-Stimulated Endothelial Ca2+ Dynamics by KCa3.1 Channels in Mouse Mesenteric Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Xun; Francis, Michael; Köhler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Intermediate and small conductance KCa channels IK1 (KCa3.1) and SK3 (KCa2.3) are primary targets of endothelial Ca(2+) signals in the arterial vasculature, and their ablation results in increased arterial tone and hypertension. Activation of IK1 channels by local Ca(2+) transients from internal ...... stores or plasma membrane channels promotes arterial hyperpolarization and vasodilation. Here, we assess arteries from genetically altered IK1 knockout mice (IK1(-/-)) to determine whether IK1 channels exert a positive feedback influence on endothelial Ca(2+) dynamics....

  10. Polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities for the atoms Al, Si, P, S, Cl, and Ar: Coupled cluster calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupinetti, Concetta; Thakkar, Ajit J

    2005-01-22

    Accurate static dipole polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities are calculated for the ground states of the Al, Si, P, S, Cl, and Ar atoms. The finite-field computations use energies obtained with various ab initio methods including Moller-Plesset perturbation theory and the coupled cluster approach. Excellent agreement with experiment is found for argon. The experimental alpha for Al is likely to be in error. Only limited comparisons are possible for the other atoms because hyperpolarizabilities have not been reported previously for most of these atoms. Our recommended values of the mean dipole polarizability (in the order Al-Ar) are alpha/e(2)a(0) (2)E(h) (-1)=57.74, 37.17, 24.93, 19.37, 14.57, and 11.085 with an error estimate of +/-0.5%. The recommended values of the mean second dipole hyperpolarizability (in the order Al-Ar) are gamma/e(4)a(0) (4)E(h) (-3)=2.02 x 10(5), 4.31 x 10(4), 1.14 x 10(4), 6.51 x 10(3), 2.73 x 10(3), and 1.18 x 10(3) with an error estimate of +/-2%. Our recommended polarizability anisotropy values are Deltaalpha/e(2)a(0) (2)E(h) (-1)=-25.60, 8.41, -3.63, and 1.71 for Al, Si, S, and Cl respectively, with an error estimate of +/-1%. The recommended hyperpolarizability anisotropies are Deltagamma/e(4)a(0) (4)E(h) (-3)=-3.88 x 10(5), 4.16 x 10(4), -7.00 x 10(3), and 1.65 x 10(3) for Al, Si, S, and Cl, respectively, with an error estimate of +/-4%. (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  11. A defect in KCa3.1 channel activity limits the ability of CD8+ T cells from cancer patients to infiltrate an adenosine-rich microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimote, Ameet A; Balajthy, Andras; Arnold, Michael J; Newton, Hannah S; Hajdu, Peter; Qualtieri, Julianne; Wise-Draper, Trisha; Conforti, Laura

    2018-04-24

    The limited ability of cytotoxic T cells to infiltrate solid tumors hampers immune surveillance and the efficacy of immunotherapies in cancer. Adenosine accumulates in solid tumors and inhibits tumor-specific T cells. Adenosine inhibits T cell motility through the A 2A receptor (A 2A R) and suppression of KCa3.1 channels. We conducted three-dimensional chemotaxis experiments to elucidate the effect of adenosine on the migration of peripheral blood CD8 + T cells from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. The chemotaxis of HNSCC CD8 + T cells was reduced in the presence of adenosine, and the effect was greater on HNSCC CD8 + T cells than on healthy donor (HD) CD8 + T cells. This response correlated with the inability of CD8 + T cells to infiltrate tumors. The effect of adenosine was mimicked by an A 2A R agonist and prevented by an A 2A R antagonist. We found no differences in A 2A R expression, 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate abundance, or protein kinase A type 1 activity between HNSCC and HD CD8 + T cells. We instead detected a decrease in KCa3.1 channel activity, but not expression, in HNSCC CD8 + T cells. Activation of KCa3.1 channels by 1-EBIO restored the ability of HNSCC CD8 + T cells to chemotax in the presence of adenosine. Our data highlight the mechanism underlying the increased sensitivity of HNSCC CD8 + T cells to adenosine and the potential therapeutic benefit of KCa3.1 channel activators, which could increase infiltration of these T cells into tumors. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  12. Q value for the 34Cl superallowed beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, S.; Brindhaban, S.A.; Barker, P.H.

    1994-01-01

    The proton separation energy of 34 Cl has been measured to be 5143.30(5) keV in a series of overlapping and self-consistent experiments involving the study of three resonances in the 33 S(p,γ) reaction, using a variety of techniques in laboratories in Auckland and Florence. This figure is in disagreement with the only other published value. By combining the proton separation energy with the only measured value for the 34 S neutron separation energy, the Q ec for the 34 Cl superallowed decay becomes 5491.48(12) keV. Some comments are offered on the associated 34 S(p,n) 34 Cl threshold energy measurement

  13. Two stage S-N curve in corrosion fatigue of extruded magnesium alloy AZ31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiharu Mutoh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Tension-compression fatigue tests of extruded AZ31 magnesium alloys were carried out under corrosive environments:(a high humidity environment (80 %RH and (b 5 wt. %NaCl environment. It was found that the reduction rate of fatiguestrength due to corrosive environment was 0.12 under a high humidity and 0.53 under a NaCl environment. It was alsoobserved that under corrosive environments, the S-N curve was not a single curve but a two-stage curve. Above the fatiguelimit under low humidity, the crack nucleation mechanism was due to a localized slip band formation mechanism. Below thefatigue limit under low humidity, the reduction in fatigue strength was attributed to the corrosion pit formation and growth to the critical size for fatigue crack nucleation under the combined effect of cyclic load and the corrosive environment. The critical size was attained when the stress intensity factor range reached the threshold value for crack growth.

  14. Deletion of T-type calcium channels Cav3.1 or Cav3.2 attenuates endothelial dysfunction in aging mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Anne D; Andersen, Kenneth; Lyngsø, Kristina S

    2018-01-01

    Impairment of endothelial function with aging is accompanied by reduced nitric oxide (NO) production. T-type Cav3.1 channels augment nitric oxide and co-localize with eNOS. Therefore, the hypothesis was that T-type channels contribute to the endothelial dysfunction of aging. Endothelial function...... was determined in mesenteric arteries (perfusion) and aortae (isometric contraction) of young and old wild-type (WT), Cav3.1, and Cav3.2 knockout mice. NO production was measured by fluorescence imaging in mesenteric arteries. With age, endothelium-dependent subsequent dilatation (following depolarization...... significantly reduced in mesenteric arteries of old compared to young WT mice. In Cav3.1(-/-) and Cav3.2(-/-) preparations, NO levels increased significantly with age. Relaxations to acetylcholine were significantly smaller in the aortae of old compared to young WT mice, while such responses were comparable...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10083 - Copper, [29H, 31H-phthalocyaninato (2-)-N29, N30, N31, N32]-, 4-[(17-substituted-3,6,9,12,15...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copper, [29H, 31H-phthalocyaninato (2... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10083 Copper, [29H, 31H-phthalocyaninato (2-)-N29... substance identified generically as copper, [29H, 31H-phthalocyaninato (2-)-N29, N30, N31, N32]-, 4-[(17...

  16. Mycoplasma orale infection affects K+ and Cl- currents in the HSG salivary gland cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izutsu, K T; Fatherazi, S; Belton, C M; Oda, D; Cartwright, F D; Kenny, G E

    1996-06-01

    The relations between K+ channel and Cl- channel currents and mycoplasma infection status were studied longitudinally in HSG cells, a human submandibular gland cell line. The K+ channel currents were disrupted by the occurrence of mycoplasma infection: muscarinic activation of K+ channels and K+ channel expression as estimated by ionomycin- or hypotonically induced K+ current responses were all decreased. Similar decreases in ionomycin- and hypotonically induced responses were observed for Cl- channels, but only the latter decrease was statistically significant. Also, Cl- currents could be elicited more frequently than K+ currents (63% of cases versus 0%) in infected cells when tested by exposure to hypotonic media, indicating that mycoplasma infection affects K+ channels relatively more than Cl- channels. These changes occurred in the originally infected cells, were ameliorated when the infection was cleared with sparfloxacin, and recurred when the cells were reinfected. Such changes would be expected to result in hyposecretion of salivary fluid if they occurred in vivo.

  17. 36Cl AMS measurement with 3 MV tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huijuan; Guan Yongjing; Zhang Wei; Jiang Shan; He Ming

    2012-01-01

    Developing the 36 Cl and other medium heavy isotopes measurement at 3 MV AMS facilities is one of the vital trends in AMS measurement. To further increase suppression factor of 36 S, the energy loss straggling and angular straggling of 36 C1 and 36 S ions in various counter gases (Pl0, isobutane and propane) were investigated. Some water samples were measured with the energy of 32 MeV, the results are in good agreement with the result by ion energy of 72 MeV. The results indicate that the detection limit of 36 C1 with 3 MV AMS facility is approximately 36 Cl/Cl ≈ l0 -14 , and the uncertainty is 30% for the sample with isotopic ration 36 Cl/Cl ≈ lO -13 . (authors)

  18. Partitioning of K, Cl, S and P during combustion of poplar and brassica energy crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Díaz-Ramírez, Maryori; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Glarborg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    K-, Cl-, S- and P-release from a herbaceous (brassica) and a short rotation coppice (poplar) cultivated in the Mediterranean region, have been investigated under combustion conditions [500-1100 °C]. Contrary to brassica, Cl- and S-release from poplar were substantial for all temperatures tested....... Low-temperature [500-700 °C] Cl-release from the high-Cl brassica appeared to be primarily limited by the fuel chemical composition and secondarily by interactions of the ash-forming elements with the fuel organic matrix. Below 700 °C, Cl-release was nearly 50%, whereas complete dechlorination...... resulted around 800 °C. S-release from brassica was up to 40% at low temperature. Above 1000 °C, additional S-release was observed presumably by sulfate dissociation. K-release was linked to Cl-release around 700 °C and, gradually increased afterwards. At 1100 °C, nearly 60% of K in poplar was retained...

  19. Role of protein kinase A and class II phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase C2β in the downregulation of KCa3.1 channel synthesis and membrane surface expression by lyso-globotriaosylceramide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ju Yeon; Park, Seonghee, E-mail: sp@ewha.ac.kr

    2016-02-19

    The intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa3.1) mediates proliferation of many cell types including fibroblasts, and is a molecular target for intervention in various cell proliferative diseases. Our previous study showed that reduction of KCa3.1 channel expression by lyso-globotriaosylceramide (lyso-Gb3) inhibits differentiation into myofibroblasts and collagen synthesis, which might lead to development of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm secondary to Fabry disease. However, how lyso-Gb3 downregulates KCa3.1 channel expression is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of lyso-Gb3-mediated KCa3.1 channel downregulation, focusing on the cAMP signaling pathway. We found that lyso-Gb3 increased the intracellular cAMP concentration by upregulation of adenylyl cyclase 6 and inhibited ERK 1/2 phosphorylation through the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, leading to the inhibition of KCa3.1 channel synthesis, not the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) pathway. Moreover, lyso-Gb3 suppressed expression of class II phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase C2β (PI3KC2β) by PKA activation, which reduces the production of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P], and the reduced membrane surface expression of KCa3.1 channel was recovered by increasing the intracellular levels of PI(3)P. Consequently, our findings that lyso-Gb3 inhibited both KCa3.1 channel synthesis and surface expression by increasing intracellular cAMP, and controlled surface expression through changes in PI3KC2β-mediated PI(3)P production, suggest that modulation of PKA and PI3KC2β activity to control of KCa3.1 channel expression can be an alternative important target to attenuate ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms in Fabry disease. - Highlights: • Lyso-Gb3 causes elevation of intracellular cAMP. • Lyso-Gb3 inhibits the ERK 1/2 phosphorylation through PKA, thereby reducing KCa3.1 channel synthesis. • Lyso-Gb3 reduces PI3KC2

  20. Na+ -K+ -2Cl- Cotransporter (NKCC) Physiological Function in Nonpolarized Cells and Transporting Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpire, Eric; Gagnon, Kenneth B

    2018-03-25

    Two genes encode the Na + -K + -2Cl - cotransporters, NKCC1 and NKCC2, that mediate the tightly coupled movement of 1Na + , 1K + , and 2Cl - across the plasma membrane of cells. Na + -K + -2Cl - cotransport is driven by the chemical gradient of the three ionic species across the membrane, two of them maintained by the action of the Na + /K + pump. In many cells, NKCC1 accumulates Cl - above its electrochemical potential equilibrium, thereby facilitating Cl - channel-mediated membrane depolarization. In smooth muscle cells, this depolarization facilitates the opening of voltage-sensitive Ca 2+ channels, leading to Ca 2+ influx, and cell contraction. In immature neurons, the depolarization due to a GABA-mediated Cl - conductance produces an excitatory rather than inhibitory response. In many cell types that have lost water, NKCC is activated to help the cells recover their volume. This is specially the case if the cells have also lost Cl - . In combination with the Na + /K + pump, the NKCC's move ions across various specialized epithelia. NKCC1 is involved in Cl - -driven fluid secretion in many exocrine glands, such as sweat, lacrimal, salivary, stomach, pancreas, and intestine. NKCC1 is also involved in K + -driven fluid secretion in inner ear, and possibly in Na + -driven fluid secretion in choroid plexus. In the thick ascending limb of Henle, NKCC2 activity in combination with the Na + /K + pump participates in reabsorbing 30% of the glomerular-filtered Na + . Overall, many critical physiological functions are maintained by the activity of the two Na + -K + -2Cl - cotransporters. In this overview article, we focus on the functional roles of the cotransporters in nonpolarized cells and in epithelia. © 2018 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 8:871-901, 2018. Copyright © 2018 American Physiological Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Preliminary study of 3.0 T contrast-enhanced whole heart coronary MR angiography using 32-channel coils with high acceleration factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qi; Li Kuncheng; Du Xiangying; Ma Heng; An Jing; Li Han; Xu Dong; Bi Xiaoming; Li Debiao

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 3.0 T contrast enhanced (CE) whole-heart coronary MRA (CE MRA) using 32-channel coils with high acceleration factor. Methods: Sixty patients with suspected coronary artery disease who were scheduled for coronary angiography (CAG) underwent CE CMRA at 3.0 T MRI scanner. A 32-channel receiver coil was used for data acquisition. For image acquisition, an ECG triggered,navigator-gated, inversion-recovery prepared, segmented gradient-echo sequence was used with an acceleration factor of three in the phase-encoding direction using GRAPPA reconstruction. Gd-BOPTA (0.15 mmol/kg body weight) was intravenously administered at a rate of 0.3 ml/s. The diagnostic accuracy in detecting significant stenoses (≥50% of vessel lumen) was evaluated using χ 2 test with X-ray angiography as the reference. Results: Whole-heart CE CMRA was successfully completed in 56 patients who were scheduled for CAG. The averaged imaging time was (6.0±1.3) min. 3.0 T CE CMRA using 32 channel coils correctly identified significant CAD in 28 patients and correctly ruled out CAD in 23 patients. The sensitivity and specificity were 93.3% and 88.5% respectively. Conclusion: Combined with dedicated 32-channel coils, 3.0 T CE CMRA allows significant reduction in imaging speed and reduced dose of the contrast agent. These improvements resulted in substantially improved overall accuracy of CE CMRA in detecting coronary artery disease. (authors)

  2. Semi-annual technical report, September 30, 1999 - March 31, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Dorin

    2000-04-01

    The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, Inc. (CPBR) continues to operate according to objectives outlined in the proposal funded through the cooperative agreement. The italicized objectives below are addressed in this report, which covers the period September 30,1999 through March 31, 2000. (1) Update the research agenda using information obtained from member companies. (2) Identify and implement research projects that are deemed by industrial, scientific, and sponsoring agency evaluation to address significantly the problems and future of U.S. energy resources and that are relevant to the Department of Energy's mission. Specifically: (1) Announce research grants competition through a Request for Preproposals. (2) Conduct a dual-stage review process: Stage one--industrial and DOE review of preproposals; and Stage two--peer review, scientific consultants' review, DOE review of full proposals and Project Recommendation Committee evaluation and recommendation for funding. (3) Board of Directors approval of recommended awards. (4) Conduct ongoing project management. (5) Obtain semiannual, annual and final reports for evaluation of research goals and technology transfer. (6) Present reports to DOE.

  3. 31 CFR 1.30 - Application to system of records maintained by Government contractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Application to system of records maintained by Government contractors. 1.30 Section 1.30 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS Privacy Act § 1.30 Application to system of records maintained...

  4. Structure of the CLC-1 chloride channel from Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunyong; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2018-05-29

    CLC channels mediate passive Cl - conduction, while CLC transporters mediate active Cl - transport coupled to H + transport in the opposite direction. The distinction between CLC-0/1/2 channels and CLC transporters seems undetectable by amino acid sequence. To understand why they are different functionally we determined the structure of the human CLC-1 channel. Its 'glutamate gate' residue, known to mediate proton transfer in CLC transporters, adopts a location in the structure that appears to preclude it from its transport function. Furthermore, smaller side chains produce a wider pore near the intracellular surface, potentially reducing a kinetic barrier for Cl - conduction. When the corresponding residues are mutated in a transporter, it is converted to a channel. Finally, Cl - at key sites in the pore appear to interact with reduced affinity compared to transporters. Thus, subtle differences in glutamate gate conformation, internal pore diameter and Cl - affinity distinguish CLC channels and transporters. © 2018, Park & MacKinnon.

  5. The chloride channel inhibitor NS3736 [corrected] prevents bone resorption in ovariectomized rats without changing bone formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaller, Sophie; Henriksen, Kim; Sveigaard, Christina

    2004-01-01

    , appearing mainly in osteoclasts, ovaries, appendix, and Purkinje cells. This highly selective distribution predicts that inhibition of ClC-7 should specifically target osteoclasts in vivo. We suggest that NS3736 is inhibiting ClC-7, leading to a bone-specific effect in vivo. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION......Chloride channel activity is essential for osteoclast function. Consequently, inhibition of the osteoclastic chloride channel should prevent bone resorption. Accordingly, we tested a chloride channel inhibitor on bone turnover and found that it inhibits bone resorption without affecting bone...... for osteoporosis, daily treatment with 30 mg/kg orally protected bone strength and BMD by approximately 50% 6 weeks after surgery. Most interestingly, bone formation assessed by osteocalcin, mineral apposition rate, and mineralized surface index was not inhibited. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Analysis of chloride...

  6. 31 CFR 30.2 - Q-2: To what entities does this part apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-2: To what entities does this part apply? 30.2 Section 30.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.2 Q-2: To what entities does this part apply? This...

  7. Measurements of (p,γ) resonance strengths in the s-d shell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbertink, G.A.P.; Endt, P.M.

    1966-01-01

    Resonace strengths of selected resonances in the Ep=0.3−2.1 MeV region in the (p, γ) reactions on 23Na, 24–24Mg, 27Al, 28–30Si, 31P, 32, 34S, 35, 37Cl, 39, 41K and 40Ca are compared through relative yield measurements, using targets of many different chemical compounds, each containing at least two

  8. The search for the Higgs boson through its channel with pair of photons in the ATLAS experiment at the LHC: an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escalier, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In the context of particle physics, within the ATLAS experiment at LHC, this document presents the discovery of a particle compatible with the Higgs boson by the combination of several decay channels, with a mass of the order of 126 GeV. With an increased statistics, that is the full set of data collected by the ATLAS experiment at LHC during the years 2011 (L=4.5 fb -1 at √s=7 TeV) and 2012 (L=20.3 fb -1 at √s=8 TeV), the particle is also discovered individually in the channel H→γγ with an observed significance (respectively expected) of 5.2 σ (respectively 4.7 σ). The analysis dedicated to the measurement of the mass (m H ) and signal strength (μ) in the channel H→γγ gives the measurement: m H = 125.98 ± 0.42 (stat) ± 0.28 (syst) GeV; μ = 1.29 ± 0.30 and the constraint on the width Γ H of the Higgs decay of 5.0 GeV at 95 % CL. The mass combination of 2011 and 2012 campaigns for the H→γγ and H→4l channels gives the measurement: m H =125.36 ± 0.37 (stat) ± 0.18 (syst) GeV. The analysis dedicated to the measurement of the production modes in the channel H → γγ is given in this work.The spin study rejects the hypothesis of spin 2 at 99 % CL. The odd parity (spin-parity 0 - state) is excluded at more than 98 % CL. Within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties accessible at the time of the analysis, all results: channels showing the excess with respect to the background only hypothesis, measured mass and signal strength, couplings, quantum numbers (J PC ), production modes, fiducial and differential cross-sections, are compatible with the Standard Model Higgs boson. (author)

  9. Preliminary stage and streamflow data at selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in Maine and New Hampshire for the flood of October 3031, 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiah, Richard G.; Stasulis, Nicholas W.

    2018-03-08

    Rainfall from a storm on October 24–27, 2017, and Tropical Storm Philippe on October 29–30, created conditions that led to flooding across portions of New Hampshire and western Maine. On the basis of streamflow data collected at 30 selected U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgages in the Androscoggin River, Connecticut River, Merrimack River, and Saco River Basins, the storms caused minor to moderate flooding in those basins on October 3031, 2017. During the storms, the USGS deployed hydrographers to take discrete measurements of streamflow. The measurements were used to confirm the stage-to-streamflow relation (rating curve) at the selected USGS streamgages. Following the storms, hydrographers documented high-water marks in support of indirect measurements of streamflow. Seven streamgages with greater than 50 years of streamflow data recorded preliminary streamflow peaks within the top five for the periods of record. Twelve streamgages recorded preliminary peak streamflows greater than an estimate of the 100-year streamflow based on drainage area.

  10. Effect of microwave treatment on the luminescence properties of CdS and CdTe:Cl Single Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Red’ko, R. A.; Budzulyak, S. I.; Korbutyak, D. V.; Lotsko, A. P.; Vakhnyak, N. D.; Demchyna, L. A.; Kalytchuk, S. M.; Konakova, R. V.; Milenin, V. V.; Bykov, Yu. V.; Egorov, S. V.; Eremeev, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of microwave radiation on the luminescence properties of CdS and CdTe:Cl single crystals is studied. It is established that the exposure of these semiconductors to short-term (≤30 s) microwave radiation substantially modifies their impurity and defect structure. The mechanisms of transformation of the defect subsystem of II–VI single crystals upon microwave treatment are discussed. It is shown that the experimentally observed changes are defined by the nonthermal effects of microwave radiation at a power density of 7.5 W cm –2 ; at 90 W cm –2 , nonthermal effects are prevailing

  11. T-type channels: release a brake, engage a gear

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiss, Norbert; Lacinová, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2016), s. 78-80 ISSN 1933-6950 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : gating brake * pore opening * Ca(V)3.3 * channel gating * Ca(V)3.1 * low-voltage activated calcium channels Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.042, year: 2016

  12. Tb3O2Cl[SeO3]2 and Tb5O4Cl3[SeO3]2: Oxide Chloride Oxoselenates(IV) of Trivalent Terbium with ''Lone-Pair'' Channel or Layer Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wontcheu, Joseph; Schleid, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Orthorhombic Tb 3 O 2 Cl[SeO 3 ] 2 (Pnma; a = 535.16(4), b = 1530.51(9), c = 1081.72(7) pm; Z = 4) is formed by reacting a stoichiometric mixture of Tb 4 O 7 , Tb, TbCl 3 , and SeO 2 in a suitable molar ratio (12: 8: 7: 42) within seven days in an evacuated sealed silica tube at 850 C. The needle-shaped, colourless single crystals (light, water and air stable) exhibit one-dimensional strands [(Tb1) 3/3 (Tb2) 2/1 O 4/2 ] 5+ [O 2 Tb 3 ] 5+ along [100] formed by two parallel chains [OTb 4/2 ] 4+ of trans-edge connected [OTb 4 ] 10+ tetrahedra (d(O-Tb) = 220 - 231 pm) which share an extra edge per chain link. The crystal structure contains two crystallographically different Tb 3+ cations: Tb1 is coordinated as bicapped trigonal prism, while Tb2 resides in square antiprismatic coordination. The Se 4+ coordination is best described as Ψ 1 tetrahedral ([SeO 3 E] 2- ; E: non-binding electron pair). The non-binding ''lone-pair'' electrons of four [SeO 3 ] 2- groups and two Cl - anions form pseudo-hexagonal empty channels along [100] between four cationic double chains. Tb 5 O 4 Cl 3 [SeO 3 ] 2 was prepared likewise as plate-like, colourless single crystals by solid-state reaction of an admixture of Tb 4 O 7 , Tb, TbOCl, TbCl 3 , and SeO 2 (molar ratio: 9: 6: 21: 7: 28) in an evacuated sealed silica tube during seven days at 850 C. This compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system (C2/m; a = 1229.13(9), b = 546.17(4), c = 978.79(7) pm, β = 90.485(6) ; Z = 2) and contains three crystallographically different Tb 3+ cations in seven- and eightfold coordination of O 2- and Cl - anions, respectively. The crystal structure of Tb 5 O 4 Cl 3 [SeO 3 ] 2 is layered and built up of corrugated terbium-oxygen sheets [O 4 Tb 5 ] 7+ formed by edge- and vertex-shared [OTb 4 ] 10+ tetrahedra (d(O-Tb) = 226-232 pm) spreading parallel (001). The structure is strongly related to the ''lone-pair'' channel structures of Tb 2 O[SeO 3 ] 2 and Tb 3 O 2 Cl[SeO 3 ] 2 , where single ([OTb 2 ] 4

  13. Rational synthesis of high nuclearity Mo/Fe/S clusters: the reductive coupling approach in the convenient synthesis of (Cl(4)-cat)(2)Mo(2)Fe(6)S(8)(PR(3))(6) [R = Et, (n)Pr, (n)Bu] and the new [(Cl(4)-cat)(2)Mo(2)Fe(2)S(3)O(PEt(3))(3)Cl]-1/2(Fe(PEt(3))(2)(MeCN)(4)) and (Cl(4)-cat)(2)Mo(2)Fe(3)S(5)(PEt(3))(5) clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J; Koutmos, M; Ahmad, S A; Coucouvanis, D

    2001-11-05

    A general method for the synthesis of high nuclearity Mo/Fe/S clusters is presented and involves the reductive coupling of the (Et(4)N)(2)[(Cl(4)-cat)MoOFeS(2)Cl(2)] (I) and (Et(4)N)(2)[Fe(2)S(2)Cl(4)] (II) clusters. The reaction of I and II with Fe(PR(3))(2)Cl(2) or sodium salts of noncoordinating anions such as NaPF(6) or NaBPh(4) in the presence of PR(3) (R = Et, (n)Pr, or (n)Bu) affords (Cl(4)-cat)(2)Mo(2)Fe(6)S(8)(PR(3))(6) [R = Et (IIIa), (n)Pr (IIIb), (n)Bu (IIIc)], Fe(6)S(6)(PEt(3))(4)Cl(2) (IV) and (PF(6))[Fe(6)S(8)(P(n)Pr(3))(6)] (V) as byproducts. The isolation of (Et(4)N)[Fe(PEt(3))Cl(3)] (VI), NaCl, and SPEt(3) supports a reductive coupling mechanism. Cluster IV and V also have been synthesized by the reductive self-coupling of compound II. The reductive coupling reaction between I and II by PEt(3) and NaPF(6) in a 1:1 ratio produces the (Et(4)N)(2)[(Cl(4)-cat)Mo(L)Fe(3)S(4)Cl(3)] clusters [L = MeCN (VIIa), THF (VIIb)]. The hitherto unknown [(Cl(4)-cat)(2)Mo(2)Fe(2)S(3)O(PEt(3))(3)Cl](+) cluster (VIII) has been isolated as the 2:1 salt of the (Fe(PEt(3))(2)(MeCN)(4))(2+) cation after the reductive self-coupling reaction of I in the presence of Fe(PEt(3))(2)Cl(2). Cluster VIII crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with a = 11.098(3) A, b = 22.827(6) A, c = 25.855(6) A, beta = 91.680(4) degrees, and Z = 4. The formal oxidation states of metal atoms in VIII have been assigned as Mo(III), Mo(IV), Fe(II), and Fe(III) on the basis of zero-field Mössbauer spectra. The Fe(PEt(3))(2)(MeCN)(4) cation of VIII is also synthesized independently, isolated as the BPh(4)(-) salt (IX), and has been structurally characterized. The reductive coupling of compound I also affords in low yield the new (Cl(4)-cat)(2)Mo(2)Fe(3)S(5)(PEt(3))(5) cluster (X) as a byproduct. Cluster X crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n with a = 14.811(3) A, b = 22.188(4) A, c = 21.864(4) A, beta = 100.124(3) degrees, and Z = 4 and the structure shows very short Mo

  14. Functional role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in heart automaticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eMesirca

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pacemaker activity of automatic cardiac myocytes controls the heartbeat in everyday life. Cardiac automaticity is under the control of several neurotransmitters and hormones and is constantly regulated by the autonomic nervous system to match the physiological needs of the organism. Several classes of ion channels and proteins involved in intracellular Ca2+ dynamics contribute to pacemaker activity. The functional role of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs in heart automaticity and impulse conduction has been matter of debate for 30 years. However, growing evidence shows that VGCCs are important regulators of the pacemaker mechanisms and play also a major role in atrio-ventricular impulse conduction. Incidentally, studies performed in genetically modified mice lacking L-type Cav1.3 (Cav1.3-/- or T-type Cav3.1 (Cav3.1-/- channels show that genetic inactivation of these channels strongly impacts pacemaking. In cardiac pacemaker cells, VGCCs activate at negative voltages at the beginning of the diastolic depolarization and importantly contribute to this phase by supplying inward current. Loss-of-function of these channels also impairs atrio-ventricular conduction. Furthermore, inactivation of Cav1.3 channels promotes also atrial fibrillation and flutter in knockout mice suggesting that these channels can play a role in stabilizing atrial rhythm. Genomic analysis demonstrated that Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels are widely expressed in pacemaker tissue of mice, rabbits and humans. Importantly, human diseases of pacemaker activity such as congenital bradycardia and heart block have been attributed to loss-of-function of Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on the role of VGCCs in the generation and regulation of heart rate and rhythm. We will discuss also how loss of Ca2+ entry through VGCCs could influence intracellular Ca2+ handling and promote atrial arrhythmias.

  15. Assembly of the 30S subunit from Escherichia coli ribosomes occurs via two assembly domains which are initiated by S4 and S7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowotny, V.; Nierhaus, K.H.

    1988-01-01

    A protein which initiates assembly of ribosomes is defined as a protein which binds to the respective rRNA without cooperativity (i.e., without the help of other proteins) during the onset of assembly and is essential for the formation of active ribosomal subunits. The number of proteins binding without cooperativity was determined by monitoring the reconstitution output of active particles at various inputs of 16S rRNA, in the present of constant amounts of 30S-derived proteins (TP30): This showed that only two of the proteins of the 30S subunit are assembly-initiator proteins. These two proteins are still present on a LiCl core particle comprising 16S rRNA and 12 proteins (including minor proteins). The 12 proteins were isolated, and a series of reconstitution experiments at various levels of rRNA excess demonstrated that S4 and S7 are the initiator proteins. Pulse-chase experiments performed during the early assembly with 14 C- and 3 H-labeled TP30 and the determination of the 14 C/ 3 H ratio of the individual proteins within the assembled particles revealed a bilobal structure of the 30S assembly: A group of six proteins headed by S4 (namely, S4, S20, S16, S15, S6, and S18) resisted the chasing most efficiently (S4 assembly domain). None of the proteins depending on S7 during assembly were found in this group but rather in a second group with intermediate chasing stability [S7 assembly domain; consisting of S7, S9, (S8), S19, and S3]. A number of proteins could be fully chased during the early assembly and therefore represent late assembly proteins (S10, S5, S13, S2, S21, S1). These findings fit well with the 30S assembly map. These data, together with the assembly map, imply that S8 and S5 play an important role in the interconnection of the two assembly domains

  16. 36Cl-AMS measurements with 3-MV tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huijuan; Guan Yongjing; Zhang Wei; Jiang Shan; Ming He

    2013-01-01

    36 C- is one of the most interesting nuclides in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements. The application of 36 Cl has been widely applied in various fields. All most all of 36 Cl AMS measurements at natural isotopic concentrations have yet been performed at tandem accelerator with 5 MV or higher terminal voltage. The measure improvement of 36 Cl and other medium heavy isotopes performed at 3 MV in AMS facilities is one of the hottest topics in AMS measurements. In order to increase the suppression factor of 36 S, the energy loss straggling and angular straggling of 36 Cl and 36 S ions in various counter gases (P10, isobutane and propane) were investigated. Some groundwater samples were measured with energy of 32 MeV, and the results were in good agreement with the result obtained with ion energy of 72 MeV. The results indicate that the approximate detection limit of 36 Cl in 3 MV AMS facility is 36 Cl/Cl=1 × 10 -14 , and the uncertainty is 30% when the sample with isotopic ration 36 Cl/Cl≈10 -13 . (authors)

  17. Using isotope 36Cl to study utilization of Cl by crops and distribution and movement of Cl in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jiarong; Wen Xianfang; Tang Nianxin

    1991-06-01

    Results from using isotope 36 Cl show that a large quantity of Cl is absorbed and utilized by spring wheat, cotton and tobacco from the chloride fertilizers. The utilization coefficient of Cl increases with the growing time of plants and reaches peak at mature stage. The utilization coefficient of above plants are 26.72%, 3317% and 26.19% respectively. The absorption and utilization of residual Cl in soil is much smaller than that in fertilizers, and the utilization coefficient is decreasing with the increasing of growth season. For spring wheat, utilization coefficient is 12.7% in second season and 9.3% in third season. The ability of absorbing and utilizing Cl from organic materials by crops is very low and the utilization coefficient is 10% or less, that depends on circumstances. For rice the utilization coefficient is 3.1% in dry land and 24.3% in flooded land. The distribution of absorbed Cl is mainly in stalk, a little in husk and a few in seeds and roots. After irrigating water it is equivalent to 9.1 mm of rainfall in soil, the Cl moves rapidly to depth 10∼12 cm. Cl moves faster in porous soil than in clay soil, and faster in horizontal direction than in vertical direction

  18. Reaction between ethylenediamine and acetone on a platinum(II) complex. Crystal structure of [PtCl(en)(PBu3)][PtCl(ien)(PBu3)]Cl2 x CH3COCH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozelka, J.; Bois, C.

    1988-01-01

    The synthesis of [PtCl(en)(PBu 3 )][PtCl(ien)(PBu 3 )]Cl 2 CH 3 COCH 3 (en = ethylenediamine and ien = N-iso-propylideneethylenediamine) is reported herein. The crystal structure of the compound determined by x-ray absorption analysis and 1 H and 31 P NMR spectral data of the compound are reported. 11 references, 2 figures, 3 tables

  19. The Sarcoglycan complex is expressed in the cerebrovascular system and is specifically regulated by astroglial Cx30 channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Cécile eBoulay

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, the most prominent glial cell type in the brain, send specialized processes called endfeet, around blood vessels and express a large molecular repertoire regulating the cerebrovascular system physiology. One of the most striking properties of astrocyte endfeet is their enrichment in gap junction protein Connexin 43 and 30 (Cx43 and Cx30 allowing in particular for direct intercellular trafficking of ions and small signaling molecules through perivascular astroglial networks. In this study, we addressed the specific role of Cx30 at the gliovascular interface. Using an inactivation mouse model for Cx30 (Cx30Δ/Δ, we showed that absence of Cx30 does not affect blood-brain barrier (BBB organization and permeability. However, it results in the cerebrovascular fraction, in a strong upregulation of Sgcg encoding γ-Sarcoglycan (SG, a member of the Dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC connecting cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The same molecular event occurs in Cx30T5M/T5M mutated mice, where Cx30 channels are closed, demonstrating that Sgcg regulation relied on Cx30 channel functions. We further characterized the expression of other Sarcoglycan complex (SGC molecules in the cerebrovascular system and showed the presence of α-, β-, δ-, γ-, ε- and ζ- SG, as well as Sarcospan. Their expression was however not modified in Cx30Δ/Δ. These results suggest that a full SGC might be present in the cerebrovascular system, and that expression of one of its member, γ-Sarcoglycan, depends on Cx30 channels. As described in skeletal muscles, the SGC may contribute to membrane stabilization and signal transduction in the cerebrovascular system, which may therefore be regulated by Cx30 channel-mediated functions.

  20. The mechanism of fast-gate opening in ClC-0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engh, Anita M; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Maduke, Merritt

    2007-10-01

    ClC-0 is a chloride channel whose gating is sensitive to both voltage and chloride. Based on analysis of gating kinetics using single-channel recordings, a five-state model was proposed to describe the dependence of ClC-0 fast-gate opening on voltage and external chloride (Chen, T.-Y., and C. Miller. 1996. J. Gen. Physiol. 108:237-250). We aimed to use this five-state model as a starting point for understanding the structural changes that occur during gating. Using macroscopic patch recordings, we were able to reproduce the effects of voltage and chloride that were reported by Chen and Miller and to fit our opening rate constant data to the five-state model. Upon further analysis of both our data and those of Chen and Miller, we learned that in contrast to their conclusions, (a) the features in the data are not adequate to rule out a simpler four-state model, and (b) the chloride-binding step is voltage dependent. In order to be able to evaluate the effects of mutants on gating (described in the companion paper, see Engh et al. on p. 351 of this issue), we developed a method for determining the error on gating model parameters, and evaluated the sources of this error. To begin to mesh the kinetic model(s) with the known CLC structures, a model of ClC-0 was generated computationally based on the X-ray crystal structure of the prokaryotic homolog ClC-ec1. Analysis of pore electrostatics in this homology model suggests that at least two of the conclusions derived from the gating kinetics analysis are consistent with the known CLC structures: (1) chloride binding is necessary for channel opening, and (2) chloride binding to any of the three known chloride-binding sites must be voltage dependent.

  1. A comparative corrosion behavior of Mg, AZ31 and AZ91 alloys in 3.5% NaCl solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Singh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of Mg, AZ31 and AZ91 has been evaluated in 3.5% NaCl solution using weight loss, electrochemical polarization and impedance measurements. Corrosion rate derived from the weight losses demonstrated the occurrence of steeply fast corrosion reaction on AZ91 alloy after three hours of immersion, indicating the start of galvanic corrosion. An increase of corrosion rate with immersion time was also observed for AZ31 but with lesser extent than AZ91 alloy. Whereas Mg metals showed a decrease of corrosion rate with immersion time, suggesting the formation of a protective layer on their surfaces. In contrast, the corrosion current density (Icorr derived from the Tafel plots, exhibited their corrosion resistances in order of Mg > AZ91 > AZ31. Electrochemical charge transfer resistance (Rct and double layer capacitance measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, are well in accordance with the measured Icorr. EIS measurements with time and microstructural examination of the corroded and uncorroded samples are helpful in elucidation of results measured by electrochemical polarization.

  2. Interaction of H2S with Calcium Permeable Channels and Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing amount of evidence has suggested that hydrogen sulfide (H2S, as a gasotransmitter, is involved in intensive physiological and pathological processes. More and more research groups have found that H2S mediates diverse cellular biological functions related to regulating intracellular calcium concentration. These groups have demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between H2S and calcium ion channels and transporters, such as L-type calcium channels (LTCC, T-type calcium channels (TTCC, sodium/calcium exchangers (NCX, transient receptor potential (TRP channels, β-adrenergic receptors, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR in different cells. However, the understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms is incomplete. Recently, some research groups demonstrated that H2S modulates the activity of calcium ion channels through protein S-sulfhydration and polysulfide reactions. In this review, we elucidate that H2S controls intracellular calcium homeostasis and the underlying mechanisms.

  3. CARBON DIOXIDE - PARTIAL PRESSURE (pCO2) - SEA and Other Data from MULTIPLE SHIPS From TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 19890101 to 19891231 (NODC Accession 9500075)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea/air gas ratios data was collected in TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 1989 during cruises conducted using ships...

  4. Tevatron Combination of Single-Top-Quark Cross Sections and Determination of the Magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Matrix Element V_{tb}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurisano, A; Avila, C; Azfar, F; Badaud, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartlett, J F; Bartos, P; Bassler, U; Bauce, M; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Bedeschi, F; Begalli, M; Behari, S; Bellantoni, L; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bortoletto, D; Borysova, M; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brigliadori, L; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brucken, E; Bu, X B; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camacho-Pérez, E; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Chokheli, D; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Clutter, J; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corbo, M; Corcoran, M; Cordelli, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cutts, D; Das, A; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; Davies, G; de Barbaro, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; D'Errico, M; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Edmunds, D; Elagin, A; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Farrington, S; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fernández Ramos, J P; Fiedler, F; Field, R; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Fuess, S; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gershtein, Y; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Ginther, G; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gogota, O; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Golovanov, G; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hahn, S R; Haley, J; Han, J Y; Han, L; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Harder, K; Hare, M; Harel, A; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinrich, J; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herndon, M; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hocker, A; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ito, A S; Ivanov, A; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; James, E; Jang, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Jindariani, S; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jonsson, P; Joo, K K; Joshi, J; Jun, S Y; Jung, A W; Junk, T R; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Karmanov, D; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Katsanos, I; Kaur, M; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Kiselevich, I; Knoepfel, K; Kohli, J M; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurata, M; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lammers, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Limosani, A; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipeles, E; Lipton, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Luna-Garcia, R; Lungu, G; Lyon, A L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Mansour, J; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez-Ortega, J; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miao, T; Miconi, F; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondal, N K; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nagy, E; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Nunnemann, T; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Orduna, J; Ortolan, L; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pagliarone, C; Pal, A; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parker, W; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Pondrom, L; Popov, A V; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ripp-Baudot, I; Ristori, L; Rizatdinova, F; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Rominsky, M; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sajot, G; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santi, L; Santos, A S; Sato, K; Savage, G; Saveliev, V; Savitskyi, M; Savoy-Navarro, A; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwanenberger, C; Schwarz, T; Schwienhorst, R; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Sekaric, J; Semenov, A; Severini, H; Sforza, F; Shabalina, E; Shalhout, S Z; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simak, V; Simonenko, A; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, H; Sonnenschein, L; Sorin, V; Soustruznik, K; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stark, J; Stentz, D; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Titov, M; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tokmenin, V V; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Verkheev, A Y; Vernieri, C; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vidal, M; Vilanova, D; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wahl, H D; Wallny, R; Wang, M H L S; Wang, S M; Warchol, J; Waters, D; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wobisch, M; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wood, D R; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, S; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Youn, S W; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, J M; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zucchelli, S

    2015-10-09

    We present the final combination of CDF and D0 measurements of cross sections for single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb^{-1} per experiment. The t-channel cross section is measured to be σ_{t}=2.25_{-0.31}^{+0.29} pb. We also present the combinations of the two-dimensional measurements of the s- vs t-channel cross section. In addition, we give the combination of the s+t channel cross section measurement resulting in σ_{s+t}=3.30_{-0.40}^{+0.52} pb, without assuming the standard model value for the ratio σ_{s}/σ_{t}. The resulting value of the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling is |V_{tb}|=1.02_{-0.05}^{+0.06}, corresponding to |V_{tb}|>0.92 at the 95% C.L.

  5. Molecular determinants of ivermectin sensitivity at the glycine receptor chloride channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy; Webb, Timothy I.; Dixon, Christine L.

    2011-01-01

    Ivermectin is an anthelmintic drug that works by activating glutamate-gated chloride channel receptors (GluClRs) in nematode parasites. GluClRs belong to the Cys-loop receptor family that also includes glycine receptor (GlyR) chloride channels. GluClRs and A288G mutant GlyRs are both activated...

  6. Fundación SERMES para la Investigación Clínica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Berlanga

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available SERMES se constituyó en 1997 como un Centro Especial de Empleo, con una plantilla inicial de siete trabajadores con experiencia en grabación y proceso de datos. Su objetivo principal siempre ha sido la integración laboral de personas con discapacidad. En 2001 cuando se fundó SERMES CRO™ para apoyar el desarrollo y crecimiento de la empresa en todas las actividades relacionadas con Investigación Clínica. Con el objetivo de ampliar la cartera de clientes internacionales y dar servicio clientes locales en proyectos internacionales, SERMES CRO funda PSN con oficinas centrales en EEUU y subsidiarias en España, Francia, Inglaterra, Alemania, Italia, Holanda y Dinamarca además de tener acuerdos de colaboración con otras compañías para cubrir aquellos países en los que no se posee de oficinas propias. PSN es una CRO global que ofrece a empresas farmacéuticas, biotecnológicas e instituciones independientes una alternativa flexible, rápida, de calidad y coste-efectiva. Por otro lado, se ha creado SERMES UK, en Inglaterra, con el fin de ofrecer la representación legal a promotores sin filial ni ubicación física en la Unión Europea (UE y aprovechar las sinergias propias de una localización en Inglaterra. Dicha representación, conocida como "representación legal", es válida para los ensayos clínicos con medicamentos, así como los ensayos clínicos de dispositivos médicos. Para más información sobre Fundación Sermes para la Investigación Clínica, por favor contactar: Tel 91.375.69.30 - Fax 91.375.69.31 info@fundacionsermes.org www.fundacionsermes.org www.sermescro.com www.psnglobal.org.

  7. SEPARATION OF CsCl FROM LiCl-CsCl MOLTEN SALT BY COLD FINGER MELT CRYSTALLIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSHUA R. VERSEY

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study provides a fundamental understanding of a cold finger melt crystallization technique by exploring the heat and mass transfer processes of cold finger separation. A series of experiments were performed using a simplified LiCl-CsCl system by varying initial CsCl concentrations (1, 3, 5, and 7.5 wt%, cold finger cooling rates (7.4, 9.8, 12.3, and 14.9 L/min, and separation times (5, 10, 15, and 30 min. Results showed a potential recycling rate of 0.36 g/min with a purity of 0.33 wt% CsCl in LiCl. A CsCl concentrated drip formation was found to decrease crystal purity especially for smaller crystal formations. Dimensionless heat and mass transfer correlations showed that separation production is primarily influenced by convective transfer controlled by cooling gas flow rate, where correlations are more accurate for slower cooling gas flow rates.

  8. High-resolution orientation and depth of insertion of the voltage-sensing S4 helix of a potassium channel in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Tim; Su, Yongchao; Hong, Mei

    2010-08-27

    The opening and closing of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are controlled by several conserved Arg residues in the S4 helix of the voltage-sensing domain. The interaction of these positively charged Arg residues with the lipid membrane has been of intense interest for understanding how membrane proteins fold to allow charged residues to insert into lipid bilayers against free-energy barriers. Using solid-state NMR, we have now determined the orientation and insertion depth of the S4 peptide of the KvAP channel in lipid bilayers. Two-dimensional (15)N correlation experiments of macroscopically oriented S4 peptide in phospholipid bilayers revealed a tilt angle of 40 degrees and two possible rotation angles differing by 180 degrees around the helix axis. Remarkably, the tilt angle and one of the two rotation angles are identical to those of the S4 helix in the intact voltage-sensing domain, suggesting that interactions between the S4 segment and other helices of the voltage-sensing domain are not essential for the membrane topology of the S4 helix. (13)C-(31)P distances between the S4 backbone and the lipid (31)P indicate a approximately 9 A local thinning and 2 A average thinning of the DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphochloline)/DMPG (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol) bilayer, consistent with neutron diffraction data. Moreover, a short distance of 4.6 A from the guanidinium C(zeta) of the second Arg to (31)P indicates the existence of guanidinium phosphate hydrogen bonding and salt bridges. These data suggest that the structure of the Kv gating helix is mainly determined by protein-lipid interactions instead of interhelical protein-protein interactions, and the S4 amino acid sequence encodes sufficient information for the membrane topology of this crucial gating helix. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Improvement of pre-treatment method for 36Cl/Cl measurement of Cl in natural groundwater by AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Kotaro; Hasegawa, Takuma

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of 36 Cl/Cl by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a useful method to trace hydrological processes in groundwater. For accurate estimation, separation of SO 4 2- from Cl - in groundwater is required because 36 S affects AMS measurement of 36 Cl. Previous studies utilized the difference in solubility between BaSO 4 and BaCl 2 (BaSO 4 method) to chemically separate SO 4 2- from Cl - . However, the accuracy of the BaSO 4 method largely depends on operator skill, and consequently Cl - recovery is typically incomplete (70-80%). In addition, the method is time consuming (>1 week), and cannot be applied directly to dilute solutions. In this study, a method based on ion-exchange column chromatography (column method) was developed for separation of Cl - and SO 4 2- . Optimum conditions were determined for the diameter and height of column, type and amount of resin, type and concentration of eluent, and flow rate. The recovery of Cl - was almost 100%, which allowed complete separation from SO 4 2- . The separation procedure was short ( 4 methods, and then analyzed by AMS to estimate 36 S counts and 36 Cl/Cl values. 36 S counts in samples processed by the column method were stable and lower than those from the BaSO 4 method. The column method has the following advantages over the BaSO 4 method: (1) complete and stable separation of Cl - and SO 4 2- , (2) less operator influence on results, (3) short processing time ( - , and (5) concentration of Cl - and separation from SO 4 2- in the one system for dilute solutions.

  10. Seperation of CsCl from LiCl-CsCl molten salt by cold finger melt cryst allization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versey, Joshua R. [Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Program University of Idaho, Idaho (United States); Phongikaroon, Supathorn [Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (Korea, Republic of); Simpson, Michael F. [Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering University of Utah, Utah (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    This study provides a fundamental understanding of a cold finger melt crystallization technique by exploring the heat and mass transfer processes of cold finger separation. A series of experiments were performed using a simplified LiCl-CsCl system by varying initial CsCl concentrations (1, 3, 5, and 7.5 wt%), cold finger cooling rates (7.4, 9.8, 12.3, and 14.9 L/min), and separation times (5, 10, 15, and 30 min). Results showed a potential recycling rate of 0.36 g/min with a purity of 0.33 wt% CsCl in LiCl. A CsCl concentrated drip formation was found to decrease crystal purity especially for smaller crystal formations. Dimensionless heat and mass transfer correlations showed that separation production is primarily influenced by convective transfer controlled by cooling gas flow rate, where correlations are more accurate for slower cooling gas flow rates.

  11. 30 CFR 280.31 - Whom will MMS notify about environmental issues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Whom will MMS notify about environmental issues... Obligations Under This Part Environmental Issues § 280.31 Whom will MMS notify about environmental issues? (a... submission for approval. (b) In cases where an environmental assessment is to be prepared, the Director will...

  12. CH_3Cl, CH_2Cl_2, CHCl_3, and CCl_4: Infrared spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallington, Timothy J.; Pivesso, Bruno Pasquini; Lira, Alane Moura; Anderson, James E.; Nielsen, Claus Jørgen; Andersen, Niels Højmark; Hodnebrog, Øivind

    2016-01-01

    Infrared spectra for the title compounds were measured experimentally in 700 Torr of air at 295 K and systematically modeled in B3LYP, M06-2X and MP2 calculations employing various basis sets. Calibrated infrared spectra over the wavenumber range 600–3500 cm"−"1 are reported and combined with literature data to provide spectra for use in experimental studies and radiative transfer calculations. Integrated absorption cross sections are (units of cm"−"1 molecule"−"1): CH_3Cl, 660–780 cm"−"1, (3.89±0.19)×10"−"1"8; CH_2Cl_2, 650–800 cm"−"1, (2.16±0.11)×10"−"1"7; CHCl_3, 720–810 cm"−"1, (4.08±0.20)×10"−"1"7; and CCl_4, 730–825 cm"−"1, (6.30±0.31)×10"−"1"7. CH_3Cl, CH_2Cl_2, CHCl_3, and CCl_4 have radiative efficiencies of 0.004, 0.028, 0.070, and 0.174 W m"−"2 ppb"−"1 and global warming potentials (100 year horizon) of 5, 8, 15, and 1775, respectively. Quantum chemistry calculations generally predict larger band intensities than the experimental values. The best agreement with experiments is obtained in MP2(Full) calculations employing basis sets of at least triple-zeta quality augmented by diffuse functions. The B3LYP functional is found ill-suited for calculating vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of halocarbons. - Highlights: • Infrared spectra reported for CH_3Cl, CH_2Cl_2, CHCl_3, and CCl_4. • REs of CH_3Cl, CH_2Cl_2, CHCl_3, and CCl_4 are 0.004, 0.028, 0.070, and 0.174 W m"−"2 ppb"−"1, respectively. • GWPs of CH_3Cl, CH_2Cl_2, CHCl_3, and CCl_4 are 5, 8, 15, and 1775, respectively.

  13. A 16-channel reconfigurable OCDMA/DWDM system using continuous phase-shift SSFBGs

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Tian; Zhang, Zhaowei; Ibsen, M.; Petropoulos, P.; Richardson, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a reconfigurable 16-channel optical code-division multiple access (OCDMA)/dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) system (4 OCDMA times 4 DWDM times 625 Mb/s) based on novel 31-chip, 40 Gchip/s quaternary phase coding gratings operating at a channel spacing of just 50 GHz. The system performance is studied for cases of both fixed and code-reconfigurable decoders. Error-free performance is achieved in both cases and for all 16 channels.

  14. Molecular interaction of connexin 30.3 and connexin 31 suggests a dominant-negative mechanism associated with erythrokeratodermia variabilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plantard, Laure; Huber, Marcel; Macari, Francoise

    2003-01-01

    Connexins are homologous four-transmembrane-domain proteins and major components of gap junctions. We recently identified mutations in either GJB3 or GJB4 genes, encoding respectively connexin 31 (Cx31) or 30.3 (Cx30.3), as causally involved in erythrokeratodermia variabilis (EKV), a mostly autos...

  15. Distribution of {sup 36}Cl/Cl in a river-recharged aquifer: Implications for the fallout rate of bomb-produced {sup 36}Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosaki, Yuki, E-mail: tosaki@tac.tsukuba.ac.j [Sustainable Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Massmann, Gudrun [Institute of Geological Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Malteserstrasse 74-100, 12249 Berlin (Germany); Tase, Norio [Sustainable Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Sasa, Kimikazu; Takahashi, Tsutomu [Tandem Accelerator Complex, Research Facility Center for Science and Technology, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Matsushi, Yuki [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Tamari, Michiko [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Nagashima, Yasuo [Tandem Accelerator Complex, Research Facility Center for Science and Technology, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Bessho, Kotaro; Matsumura, Hiroshi [Radiation Science Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Distribution of {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in a river-recharged aquifer was investigated in the Oderbruch area, northeastern Germany. The aquifer is confined up to 3.5-4 km inland, where it changes to an unconfined condition. The {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in the confined area were in the range between 4.6 x 10{sup -14} and 23.1 x 10{sup -14}, showing a peak at 2-3 km away from the river. A plot of {sup 36}Cl/Cl vs. reciprocal Cl{sup -} concentrations indicated possible effect of the Cl{sup -} concentration variation on the observed {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios. After accounting for this effect, the estimated {sup 36}Cl fallout rates for the last 30 yrs show reasonable agreement with the Dye-3 data and the mid-latitude background value. The results suggest that a local {sup 36}Cl fallout curve can be constructed from groundwater when dispersive mixing is of minor importance.

  16. [The relationship between acute rejection and expression of sCD30 for the patients after kidney transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Lin; Hao, Hong-Jun; Qin, Bin; Bang, Ling-Qing; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Xin, Dian-Qi; Guo, Ying-Lu; Na, Yan-Qun

    2005-03-16

    To study the relationship between the sCD30 and acute rejection. We tested the sCD30 level in serum for 58 cases with kidney transplantation before and the 7th day and 28th day after operation by ELISA. 31 healthy individual for control group, and simultaneously recorded the incidence of rejection after kidney transplantation. The results showed that there is an obviously relation before kidney transplantation between the sCD30 level in serum and the incidence of acute rejection (chi = 4.843, P = 0.028, P kidney transplantation between the sCD30 level in serum and the incidence of acute rejection (chi = 7.201, P = 0.007, P kidney transplantation between the sCD30 level in serum and the incidence of acute rejection (chi = 2.095, P = 0.148, P > 0.05). The results suggested that the expressions of sCD30 are related to acute rejection. We speculated that the expressions of sCD30 could play an important role in acute rejection.

  17. 36Cl accelerator mass spectrometry with a bespoke instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcken, K.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.; Schnabel, C.; Binnie, S.A.; Xu, S.; Phillips, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Cosmogenic 36 Cl analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a valuable environmental and geological sciences research tool. Overcoming the stable nuclide 36 S isobar interfering with measurement is challenging, however. Traditionally this has required large accelerators, but following recent technical advances it is now possible with ∼30 MeV ion energies. Consequently 5 MV or even smaller modern bespoke spectrometers are now 36 Cl-capable, increasing accessibility and promoting wider and more varied 36 Cl use. However, the technical ability to identify 36 Cl ions is quite distinct from demonstrated high-performance AMS. Such is the theme of this paper. We present a systematic analysis of the accurate measurement of sample radioisotope relative to the stable chlorine, the normalisation of the measured ratio and correction for remaining 36 S interference, all combined with the use of stable-isotope dilution to determine sample Cl concentration to begin with. We conclude by showing that repeated analyses support our claims for routine 3% 36 Cl-AMS data. Accordingly, the modest SUERC spectrometer well competes with the performance of larger longer-established instruments, and the results may be quite generic for modern bespoke instruments.

  18. Operation of SOI P-Channel Field Effect Transistors, CHT-PMOS30, under Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Electronic systems are required to operate under extreme temperatures in NASA planetary exploration and deep space missions. Electronics on-board spacecraft must also tolerate thermal cycling between extreme temperatures. Thermal management means are usually included in today s spacecraft systems to provide adequate temperature for proper operation of the electronics. These measures, which may include heating elements, heat pipes, radiators, etc., however add to the complexity in the design of the system, increases its cost and weight, and affects its performance and reliability. Electronic parts and circuits capable of withstanding and operating under extreme temperatures would reflect in improvement in system s efficiency, reducing cost, and improving overall reliability. Semiconductor chips based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology are designed mainly for high temperature applications and find extensive use in terrestrial well-logging fields. Their inherent design offers advantages over silicon devices in terms of reduced leakage currents, less power consumption, faster switching speeds, and good radiation tolerance. Little is known, however, about their performance at cryogenic temperatures and under wide thermal swings. Experimental investigation on the operation of SOI, N-channel field effect transistors under wide temperature range was reported earlier [1]. This work examines the performance of P-channel devices of these SOI transistors. The electronic part investigated in this work comprised of a Cissoid s CHT-PMOS30, high temperature P-channel MOSFET (metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor) device [2]. This high voltage, medium-power transistor is designed for geothermal well logging applications, aerospace and avionics, and automotive industry, and is specified for operation in the temperature range of -55 C to +225 C. Table I shows some specifications of this transistor [2]. The CHT-PMOS30 device was characterized at various temperatures

  19. Geophysical borehole logging of the boreholes KR30, KR31, KR31b, KR32, KR33, KR33b and KR24 Upper Part, at Olkiluoto 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majapuro, J. [Suomen Malmi Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-12-15

    Suomen Malmi Oy conducted geophysical borehole logging of the boreholes KR30, KR31, KR31B, KR32, KR33, KR33B and KR24 upper part at the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki during December 2004, January, February and September 2005. The survey is a part of Posiva Oy's detailed investigation program for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The assignment included the field work and processing of the acoustic data. The report describes the field operation, equipment as well as processing procedures and shows the obtained results and their quality in the appendices. The raw and processed data are delivered digitally in WellCAD and Excel format. (orig.)

  20. Nano grained AZ31 alloy achieved by equal channel angular rolling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassani, F.Z.; Ketabchi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Equal channel angular rolling (ECAR) is a severe plastic deformation process which is carried out on large, thin sheets. The grain size could be significantly decreased by this process. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of grain refinement of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet by this process to nanometer. The effect of the number of ECAR passes on texture evolution of AZ31 magnesium alloy was investigated. ECAR temperature was controlled to maximize the grain refinement efficiency along with preventing cracking. The initial microstructure of as-received AZ31 sheet showed an average grain size of about 21 μm. The amount of grain refinement increased with increasing the pass number. After 10 passes of the process, significant grain refinement occurred and the field emission scanning electron microscopic (FESEM) micrographs showed that the size of grains were decreased significantly to about 14-70 nm. These grains were formed at the grain boundaries and inside some of the previous larger micrometer grains. Observation of optical microstructures and X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) showed the formation of twins after ECAR process. Micro-hardness of material was studied at room temperature. There was a continuous enhancement of hardness by increasing the pass number of ECAR process. At the 8th pass, hardness values increased by 53%. At final passes hardness reduced slightly, which was attributed to saturation of strain in high number of passes.

  1. Presentations at TENCompetence Workshop in Sofia, Bulgaria. March 30th-31st, 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Several

    2006-01-01

    Several (2006). Presentations at International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development. March, 30-31, 2006, Sofia, Bulgaria: TENCompetence Conference. The full proceedings can be downloaded at: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/836.

  2. S1 constrains S4 in the voltage sensor domain of Kv7.1 K+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoni Haitin

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated K(+ channels comprise a central pore enclosed by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs. While movement of the S4 helix is known to couple to channel gate opening and closing, the nature of S4 motion is unclear. Here, we substituted S4 residues of Kv7.1 channels by cysteine and recorded whole-cell mutant channel currents in Xenopus oocytes using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. In the closed state, disulfide and metal bridges constrain residue S225 (S4 nearby C136 (S1 within the same VSD. In the open state, two neighboring I227 (S4 are constrained at proximity while residue R228 (S4 is confined close to C136 (S1 of an adjacent VSD. Structural modeling predicts that in the closed to open transition, an axial rotation (approximately 190 degrees and outward translation of S4 (approximately 12 A is accompanied by VSD rocking. This large sensor motion changes the intra-VSD S1-S4 interaction to an inter-VSD S1-S4 interaction. These constraints provide a ground for cooperative subunit interactions and suggest a key role of the S1 segment in steering S4 motion during Kv7.1 gating.

  3. Sizeable beta-strength in 31Ar (beta 3p) decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Koldste, G.; Blank, B.; J. G. Borge, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present for the first time precise spectroscopic information on the recently discovered decay mode beta-delayed 3p-emission. The detection of the 3p events gives an increased sensitivity to the high energy part of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution from the decay of 31Ar revealing that as ...... that as much as 30% of the strength resides in the beta-3p decay mode. A simplified description of how the main decay modes evolve as the excitation energy increases in 31Cl is provided....

  4. Polithematic Children’s Channel of television: an approach to a definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene MELGAREJO MORENO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The digitalization has created a new way to understand the television channels. There are several authors that have studied this theme –Cebrián (2004, Alcolea (2003, Bustamante (1999, etc. -,however, the approaches that have been made about thematic children’s channels are quite superfluous. This article carries out a revision of the existing theories about television, chilhood and thematic channels that provides a new terminology and formulates an approach to the Polithematic Children´s Channel definition, which shows the XXI Century television reality.

  5. Study of astrophysically important resonant states in 30 S using the 32S(p,t30 S reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrede C.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A small fraction (< 1% of presolar SiC grains is suggested to have been formed in the ejecta of classical novae. The 29P(p,γ30S reaction plays an important role in understanding the Si isotopic abundances in such grains, which in turn provide us with information on the nature of the probable white dwarf progenitor’s core, as well as the peak temperatures achieved during nova outbursts, and thus the nova nucleosynthetic path. The 29P(p,γ30S reaction rate at nova temperatures is determined by two low-lying 3+ and 2+ resonances above the proton threshold at 4399 keV in 30S. Despite several experimental studies in the past, however, only one of these two states has only been observed very recently. We have studied the 30S nuclear structure via the 32S(p,t 30S reaction at 5 laboratory angles between 9° to 62°. We have observed 14 states, eleven of which are above the proton threshold, including two levels at 4692.7 ± 4.5 keV and 4813.8 ± 3.4 keV that are candidates for the 3+ and the previously “issing” 2+ state, respectively.

  6. A multi-channel S-band FMCW radar front-end

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.P.M.; Vliet, F.E. van

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a low-cost synthesized FMCW radar module, operating in S band. The bi-layer PCB contains a frequency-agile low phase-noise synthesizer and three identical coherent receive-channels. The transmit channel has an automatic power control system that

  7. Criterios para el diagnóstico clínico de algunos síndromes genéticos

    OpenAIRE

    Noel Taboada Lugo; Roberto Lardoeyt Ferrer

    2003-01-01

    Hasta mediados del pasado siglo se conocía muy poco acerca de las enfermedades genéticas, aparte de su mera existencia. Si bien a título aislado muchas de ellas son entidades clínicas poco frecuentes, al sumar unos 30 000 síndromes, constituyen una afección pediátrica no desdeñable, y a pesar de su complejidad, el pediatra puede abordar con facilidad el reto de su diagnóstico, como base para solicitar los exámenes complementarios pertinentes o bien la interconsulta con otras especialidades, a...

  8. Searches for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.N.; Nief, J.Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J.M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I.C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J.A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A.O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D.E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S.J.; Halley, A.W.; Knowles, I.G.; Lynch, J.G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R.M.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E.B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A.M.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E.P.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lutjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Richter, Robert, 1; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, Richard Dante; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, Ph.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Lutz, A.M.; Nikolic, Irina; Schune, M.H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Bryant, L.M.; Chambers, J.T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Wright, A.E.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C.A.J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W.M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J.M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-01-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 \\pb\\ at $\\sqrt{s} = 161 ~\\, \\rm GeV$, 1.1 \\pb\\ at 170 \\gev\\ and 9.5 \\pb\\ at 172 GeV. The \\eenunu\\ cross se ction is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 \\gevsq\\ at 95\\% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralin o ($\\tau_{\\chi_{1}^{0}} \\leq $ 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models.

  9. MAIL3.1 : a computer program generating cross section sets for SIMCRI, ANISN-JR, KENO IV, KENO V, MULTI-KENO, MULTI-KENO-2 and MULTI-KENO-3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, Kenya; Komuro, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takada, Tomoyuki; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Ouchi, Keisuke

    1998-02-01

    This report is a user`s manual of the computer program MAIL3.1 which generates various types of cross section sets for neutron transport programs such as SIMCRI, ANISN-JR, KENO IV, KENO V, MULTI-KENO, MULTI-KENO-2 and MULTI-KENO-3.0. MAIL3.1 is a revised version of MAIL3.0 that was opened in 1990. It has all of abilities of MAIL3.0 and has two more functions as shown in following. 1. AMPX-type cross section set generating function for KENO V. 2. Enhanced function for user of 16 group Hansen-Roach library. (author)

  10. 31 CFR 800.226 - U.S. business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. business. 800.226 Section 800... TAKEOVERS BY FOREIGN PERSONS Definitions § 800.226 U.S. business. The term U.S. business means any entity... subsidiary is a U.S. business. Corporation A and its branch or subsidiary is each also a foreign person...

  11. 29 CFR 37.31 - Where must the notice required by §§ 37.29 and 37.30 be published?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Where must the notice required by §§ 37.29 and 37.30 be published? 37.31 Section 37.31 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor IMPLEMENTATION OF THE... required by §§ 37.29 and 37.30 be published? (a) At a minimum, the notice required by §§ 37.29 and 37.30...

  12. Excimer lasers utilizing XeF and XeCl molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bychkov, Yu I; Konovalov, I N; Losev, V F; Mesyats, G A; Ryzhov, V V; Tarasenko, V F; Fedorov, A I; Shemyakina, S B; Yastremskii, A G

    1978-12-01

    The results are given of an experimental and theoretical study of XeF (wavelength approx. 350 nm) and XeCl (wavelength approx. 308 nm) lasers excited by an electron beam, a discharge stabilized by an electron beam, and a rapid discharge. These lasers are representative of ones employing halides of noble gases, which are the most powerful sources of stimulated emission in the uv region. The XeCl laser is shown to have good emission characteristics with various methods of excitation. An analysis of the kinetics of processes in the plasma of lasers utilizing halides of noble gases showed that the main channel for the transfer of the beam's energy to the formation of excimer molecules is the ionic channel. An efficiency of about 2.6 percent and a specific radiant energy of 10 J.l/sup -1/ showed that XeCl* is one of the most effective excimer molecules.

  13. Cáncer de pelvis renal: cuadro clínico-patológico y sobrevida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Diaz Plasencia

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Identificar el cuadro clínico-patológico y determinar la influencia del estadío clínico, tipo histológico y tipo de tratamiento en la sobrevida a 5 años. Material y Métodos: Revisamos las historias clínicas de 16 pacientes con carcinoma de pelvis renal tratados en el Hospital Belén, Trujillo, Perú, entre 1966 y 1995. La edad varió de 45 a 85 años, con una media de 64.7 años. Ocho pacientes fueron varones y 8 fueron mujeres. Resultados: El tiempo medio de enfermedad fue de 30 meses. Los síntomas más comunes fueron hematuria (81.3% y dolor en en el flanco (37.5%. La mayoría de pacientes presentó palidez (43.8% y masa palpable (32.3% al examen clínico. El riñón izquierdo fue el más afectado (56.3%. La citología exfoliativa (PAP detectó células neoplásicas en el 28.8% de los casos. La etapificación final fue: estadíos I-II, 31.2% y estadíos III-IV, 68.8%, con una sobrevida quinquenial de 100% y 0%, respectivamente. El tipo histológico más frecuente fue el carcinoma de células transicionales (75%, seguido por el carcinoma epidermoide (18.7% y adenocarcinoma (6.3%. La sobrevida a 5 años para el carcinoma de células transicionales fue de 36% y para aquellos con otro tipo histológico fue de 0%. Once pacientes recibieron tratamiento quirúrgico, 4 cirugía más radioterapia y uno sólo radioterapia, con una sobrevida a 5 años de 19%, 75% y 0%, respectivamente. En la presente serie la sobrevida a 5 años fue de 32%. Conclusión: El diagnóstico precoz y el uso de la nefroureterectomía con resección en cuña en vejiga deberían ser considerados para obtener una mejor sobrevida en estos pacientes. ( Rev Med Hered 1998; 9:3-9.

  14. Estudo comparativo entre o quadro clínico contemporâneo “fibromialgia” e o quadro clínico “histeria” descrito por Freud no século XIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Krukoski Marques e Silva Slompo

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem como objetivo comparar o quadro clínico contemporâneo Fibromialgia, com o quadro clínico Histeria, tal qual descrito por Sigmund Freud no século XIX. Pretende-se explorar as duas patologias no que se refere à descrição, sintomas, fatos e tratamento. Serão também apresentados casos clínicos para ilustrar os dois quadros e identificar possíveis semelhanças. A fibromialgia será descrita através do discurso médico contemporâneo; já a histeria será abordada através dos escritos de Freud. Por fim, defende-se a hipótese de que a fibromialgia faz parte do quadro clínico da histeria, ou seja, que os sujeitos diagnosticados com fibromialgia são, na verdade, pacientes que apresentam sintomas histéricos.

  15. Crystal Structure of Na3MoCl6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Beran

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The ternary chloride Na3MoCl6 is obtained as red crystals from a disproportionation reaction of molybdenum dichloride, {Mo6}Cl12, in an acidic NaCl/AlCl3 melt at 350 °C. The crystal structure (trigonal, P-31c, a = 687.1(1, c = 1225.3(2 pm, Z = 2, V = 501,0(1 106 pm3 is that of Na3CrCl6: within a hexagonal closest-packing of chloride ions two thirds of the octahedral voids are filled between the AB double layers with Na+/Mo3+, and between the BA layers with Na+.

  16. Role of endolymphatic anion transport in forskolin-induced Cl- activity increase of scala media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, I; Mori, N; Matsunaga, T

    1995-03-01

    To determine the role of anion transport in the forskolin-induced Cl- increase of scala media (SM), effects of forskolin on the EP (endocochlear potential) and Cl- activity (ACl) in SM were examined with double-barrelled Cl(-)-selective microelectrodes. The experiments were carried out on guinea pig cochleae, using a few anion transport inhibitors: IAA-94 for a Cl- channel blocker, bumetanide (BU) for an Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransport blocker, and SITS and DIDS for Cl-/HCO3- exchange blockers. The application of forskolin (200 microM) into scala vestibuli (SV) caused a 20 mEq increase of endolymphatic ACl and a 15 mV elevation of EP, and IAA-94 with forskolin completely abolished these responses. Although each application of BU, SITS or DIDS did not completely suppress EP elevation, the concurrent application of these inhibitors completely suppressed EP with endolymphatic ACl increase. The results indicate the involvement of Cl- channels, Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransport and Cl-/HCO3- exchange in forskolin-induced increase of ACl and EP. The role of adenylate cyclase activation and Cl- transport in endolymph homeostasis was discussed.

  17. Dynamics of 30 large channel bars in the Lower Mississippi River in response to river engineering from 1985 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Xu, Y. Jun

    2018-01-01

    Channel bars are a major depositional feature in alluvial rivers and their morphodynamics has been investigated intensively in the past several decades. However, relatively less is known about how channel bars in alluvial rivers respond to river engineering and regulations. In this study, we assessed 30-yr morphologic changes of 30 large emerged bars located in a 223 km reach of the highly regulated Lower Mississippi River from Vicksburg, Mississippi, to the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River diversion. Landsat imagery and river stage data between 1985 and 2015 were utilized to characterize bar morphologic features and quantify decadal changes. Based on bar surface areas estimated with the satellite images at different river stages, a rating curve was developed for each of the 30 bars to determine their volumes. Results from this study show that the highly regulated river reach favored the growth of mid-channel and attached bars, while more than half of the point bars showed degradation. Currently, the mid-channel and attached bars accounted for 38% and 34% of the total volume of the 30 bars. The average volume of a single mid-channel bar is over two times that of an attached bar and over four times that of a point bar. Overall, in the past three decades, the total volume of the studied 30 bars increased by 110,118,000 m3 (41%). Total dike length in a dike field was found mostly contributing to the bar volume increase. Currently, the emerged volume of the 30 bars was estimated approximately 378,183,000 m3. The total bar volume is equivalent to 530 million metric tons of coarse sand, based on an average measured bulk density of 1.4 t/m3 for the bar sediment. The findings show that these bars are large sediment reservoirs.

  18. Tevatron Combination of Single-Top-Quark Cross Sections and Determination of the Magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Matrix Element Vtb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Borysova, M.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brucken, E.; Bu, X. B.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; D’Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Farrington, S.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gogota, O.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, A. W.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansour, J.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parker, W.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A. S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savitskyi, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stark, J.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vernieri, C.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wallny, R.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wang, S. M.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. -M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J. M.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present the final combination of CDF and D0 measurements of cross sections for single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1 per experiment. The t-channel cross section is measured to be σt=2.25+0.29-0.31 pb. We also present the combinations of the two-dimensional measurements of the s- vs t-channel cross section. In addition, we give the combination of the s+t channel cross section measurement resulting in σs+t=3.30+0.52-0.40 pb , without assuming the standard model value for the ratio σs/σt. Moreover, the resulting value of the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling is |Vtb|=1.02+0.06-0.05, corresponding to |Vtb|>0.92 at the 95% C.L.

  19. {sup 36}Cl exposure dating with a 3-MV tandem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steier, Peter, E-mail: peter.steier@univie.ac.a [VERA Laboratory, Fakultaet fuer Physik - Isotopenforschung, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria); HPK H 31, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstr. 20 CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Forstner, Oliver; Golser, Robin; Kutschera, Walter; Martschini, Martin [VERA Laboratory, Fakultaet fuer Physik - Isotopenforschung, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria); HPK H 31, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstr. 20 CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Merchel, Silke [CEREGE, CNRS-IRD-Universite Aix-Marseille, Europole Mediterraneen de L' Arbois, 13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); HPK H 31, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstr. 20 CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Orlowski, Tobias; Priller, Alfred [VERA Laboratory, Fakultaet fuer Physik - Isotopenforschung, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria); HPK H 31, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstr. 20 CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Vockenhuber, Christof [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); HPK H 31, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstr. 20 CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Wallner, Anton [VERA Laboratory, Fakultaet fuer Physik - Isotopenforschung, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria); HPK H 31, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstr. 20 CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-04-15

    {sup 36}Cl AMS measurements at natural isotopic concentrations have yet been performed only at tandem accelerators with 5 MV terminal voltage or beyond. We have developed a method to detect {sup 36}Cl at natural terrestrial isotopic concentrations with a 3-MV system, operated above specifications at 3.5 MV. An effective separation was obtained with an optimized split-anode ionization chamber design (adopted from the ETH/PSI Zurich AMS group), providing a suppression factor of up to 30,000 for the interfering isobar {sup 36}S. Despite the good separation, a relatively high sulfur output from the ion source ({sup 36}S{sup -}/{sup 35}Cl{sup -} approx 4 x 10{sup -10} for samples prepared from chemically pure reagents), and a possibly cross contamination resulted in a background corresponding to {sup 36}Cl/Cl approx 3 x 10{sup -14}. The method was applied to samples containing between 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} atoms {sup 36}Cl/g rock from sites in Italy and Iran, which were already investigated by other laboratories for surface exposure dating. The {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in the range from 2 x 10{sup -13} to 5 x 10{sup -12} show a generally good agreement with the previous results. These first measurements demonstrate that also 3-MV tandems, constituting the majority of dedicated AMS facilities, are capable of {sup 36}Cl exposure dating, which is presently the domain of larger facilities.

  20. Intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations in molten RbCl-AgCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, S. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI, SPring-8), Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kawakita, Y. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shimakura, H. [Faculty of Pharmacy, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Ohara, K. [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI, SPring-8), Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukami, T. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Takeda, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    A first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) is observed in the X-ray total structure factor of a molten mixture of RbCl-AgCl, while both pure melts of RbCl and AgCl do not exhibit FSDP individually. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the origin of the FSDP with the polarizable ion model (PIM). Coexistence of covalent Ag–Cl and ionic Rb–Cl bonds leads the system to evolve intermediate range ordering, which is simulated by introducing the induced polarization in different ways between Ag–Cl with fully polarizable treatment based on Vashishta-Raman potential and Rb–Cl with suppression over-polarization in the nearest neighbor contribution based on Born-Meyer potential. The partial structure factors for both the Ag–Ag and Rb–Rb correlations, S{sub AgAg}(Q) and S{sub RbRb}(Q), show a positive contribution to the FSDP, while S{sub AgRb}(Q) for the Ag–Rb correlation exhibits a negative contribution, indicating that Ag and Rb ions are distributed in an alternating manner within the intermediate-range length scale. The origin of the intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations can be ascribed to the preferred direction of the dipole moments of anions in the PIM.

  1. Intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations in molten RbCl-AgCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, S.; Kawakita, Y.; Shimakura, H.; Ohara, K.; Fukami, T.; Takeda, S.

    2015-01-01

    A first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) is observed in the X-ray total structure factor of a molten mixture of RbCl-AgCl, while both pure melts of RbCl and AgCl do not exhibit FSDP individually. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the origin of the FSDP with the polarizable ion model (PIM). Coexistence of covalent Ag–Cl and ionic Rb–Cl bonds leads the system to evolve intermediate range ordering, which is simulated by introducing the induced polarization in different ways between Ag–Cl with fully polarizable treatment based on Vashishta-Raman potential and Rb–Cl with suppression over-polarization in the nearest neighbor contribution based on Born-Meyer potential. The partial structure factors for both the Ag–Ag and Rb–Rb correlations, S AgAg (Q) and S RbRb (Q), show a positive contribution to the FSDP, while S AgRb (Q) for the Ag–Rb correlation exhibits a negative contribution, indicating that Ag and Rb ions are distributed in an alternating manner within the intermediate-range length scale. The origin of the intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations can be ascribed to the preferred direction of the dipole moments of anions in the PIM

  2. Biophysical characterization of Vpu from HIV-1 suggests a channel-pore dualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnert, T; Routh, A; Judge, P J; Lam, Y H; Fischer, D; Watts, A; Fischer, W B

    2008-03-01

    Vpu from HIV-1 is an 81 amino acid type I integral membrane protein which consists of a cytoplasmic and a transmembrane (TM) domain. The TM domain is known to alter membrane permeability for ions and substrates when inserted into artificial membranes. Peptides corresponding to the TM domain of Vpu (Vpu(1-32)) and mutant peptides (Vpu(1-32)-W23L, Vpu(1-32)-R31V, Vpu(1-32)-S24L) have been synthesized and reconstituted into artificial lipid bilayers. All peptides show channel activity with a main conductance level of around 20 pS. Vpu(1-32)-W23L has a considerable flickering pattern in the recordings and longer open times than Vpu(1-32). Whilst recordings for Vpu(1-32)-R31V are almost indistinguishable from those of the WT peptide, recordings for Vpu(1-32)-S24L do not exhibit any noticeable channel activity. Recordings of WT peptide and Vpu(1-32)-W23L indicate Michaelis-Menten behavior when the salt concentration is increased. Both peptide channels follow the Eisenman series I, indicative for a weak ion channel with almost pore like characteristics. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. In situ AFM study on barite (0 0 1) surface dissolution in NaCl solutions at 30 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwahara, Yoshihiro; Makio, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We examined barite surface dissolution behavior in NaCl solutions by AFM. • Step retreat and step splitting behavior changed with the NaCl concentration. • Etch pit formation and development differed in each NaCl solution. • Step retreat and etch pit growth rates increased with the NaCl concentration. • We assessed the effects of temperature and NaCl concentration on these rates. - Abstract: This paper reports in situ observations on barite (0 0 1) surface dissolution behavior in 0.1–0.001 M NaCl solutions at 30 °C using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The step retreating on barite (0 0 1) surfaces changed with increasing NaCl solution concentrations. In solutions with a higher NaCl concentration (⩾0.01 M), many steps showed curved or irregular fronts during the later experimental stage, while almost all steps in solutions with a lower NaCl concentration exhibited straight or angular fronts, even during the late stage. The splitting phenomenon of the initial 〈h k 0〉 one-layer steps (7.2 Å) into two half-layer steps (3.6 Å) occurred in all NaCl solutions, while that of the initial [0 1 0] one-layer steps observed only in the 0.1 M NaCl solution. The step retreat rates increased with an increasing NaCl solution concentration. We observed triangular etch pit and deep etch pit formation in all NaCl solutions, which tended to form late in solutions with lower NaCl concentrations. The deep etch pit morphology changed with increasing NaCl solution concentrations. A hexagonal form elongated in the [0 1 0] direction was bounded by the {1 0 0}, {3 1 0}, and (0 0 1) faces in a 0.001 M NaCl solution, and a rhombic form was bounded by the {5 1 0} and (0 0 1) faces in 0.01 M and 0.1 M NaCl solutions. An intermediate form was observed in a 0.005 M NaCl solution, which was defined by {1 0 0}, a curved face tangent to the [0 1 0] direction, {3 1 0}, and (0 0 1) faces: the intermediate form appeared between the hexagonal and rhombic forms in

  4. Genetic KCa3.1-deficiency produces locomotor hyperactivity and alterations in cerebral monoamine levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Lykke Lambertsen

    Full Text Available The calmodulin/calcium-activated K(+ channel KCa3.1 is expressed in red and white blood cells, epithelia and endothelia, and possibly central and peripheral neurons. However, our knowledge about its contribution to neurological functions and behavior is incomplete. Here, we investigated whether genetic deficiency or pharmacological activation of KCa3.1 change behavior and cerebral monoamine levels in mice.In the open field test, KCa3.1-deficiency increased horizontal activity, as KCa3.1(-/- mice travelled longer distances (≈145% of KCa3.1(+/+ and at higher speed (≈1.5-fold of KCa3.1(+/+. Working memory in the Y-maze was reduced by KCa3.1-deficiency. Motor coordination on the rotarod and neuromuscular functions were unchanged. In KCa3.1(-/- mice, HPLC analysis revealed that turn-over rates of serotonin were reduced in frontal cortex, striatum and brain stem, while noradrenalin turn-over rates were increased in the frontal cortex. Dopamine turn-over rates were unaltered. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels were unaltered. Intraperitoneal injections of 10 mg/kg of the KCa3.1/KCa2-activator SKA-31 reduced rearing and turning behavior in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice, while 30 mg/kg SKA-31 caused strong sedation in 50% of the animals of either genotypes. KCa3.1(-/- mice were hyperactive (≈+60% in their home cage and SKA-31-administration reduced nocturnal physical activity in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice.KCa3.1-deficiency causes locomotor hyperactivity and altered monoamine levels in selected brain regions, suggesting a so far unknown functional link of KCa3.1 channels to behavior and monoaminergic neurotransmission in mice. The tranquilizing effects of low-dose SKA-31 raise the possibility to use KCa3.1/KCa2 channels as novel pharmacological targets for the treatment of neuropsychiatric hyperactivity disorders.

  5. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey IV. WR 62-2, a new very massive star in the core of the VVV CL041 cluster

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chene, A.-N.; Alegria, S.R.; Borissova, J.; O'Leary, E.; Martins, F.; Hervé, Anthony; Kuhn, M.; Kurtev, R.; Consuelo Amigo Fuentes, P.; Bonatto, C.; Minniti, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 584, December (2015), A31/1-A31/8 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02385S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : open clusters and associations * VVV CL041 * massive star s Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  6. Efeitos das fontes e níveis de sódio, cloro e potássio e da relação (Na + K/Cl, sobre o desempenho e características do plasma sangüíneo de poedeiras comerciais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqueira Otto Mack

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Dois experimentos foram realizados para estudar os efeitos da relação (Na + K/Cl na dieta de poedeiras comerciais no final do ciclo de postura, pela adição de bicarbonato de sódio (NaHCO3, cloreto de sódio (NaCl, cloreto de potássio (KCl e cloreto de amônia (NH4Cl, avaliando-se os parâmetros produtivos e características do plasma sangüíneo. O primeiro experimento envolveu cinco tratamentos: 0,30% de NaCl; 0,30% de NaCl + 0,95% de NaHCO3; 0,38% de KCl + 0,67% de NaHCO3; 0,38% de KCl + 1,62% de NaHCO3; e 0,38% de KCL + 2,56% de NaHCO3. A relação (Na + K/Cl foi, respectivamente, 3,46; 4,46; 4,46; 5,46; e 6,46. O segundo experimento envolveu quatro tratamentos: 0,30% NaCl; 0,47% de NaHCO3 + 0,19 de NH4Cl; 1,17% NaHCO3 + 0,19% de NH4Cl; e 1,88% de NaHCO3 + 0,19% de NH4Cl. A relação (Na + K/Cl foi 3,46; 4,46; 5,46; e 6,46, respectivamente. No primeiro experimento, o maior consumo alimentar foi observado nas aves alimentadas com dietas contendo 0,30% de NaCl. As aves que consumiram KCl apresentaram melhor conversão alimentar. Foi observado aumento no fósforo e pH do plasma sangüíneo. Aves que receberam dietas em que a relação (Na +K/Cl foi de 5,46 apresentaram maiores níveis de fósforo no plasma sangüíneo. O aumento do pH no plasma sangüíneo foi observado em aves que receberam dietas com relações de (Na + K/Cl de 4,46 e 6,46. No segundo experimento, o peso do ovo diminuiu com o aumento do NaHCO3 da dieta.

  7. Cellular distribution and function of ion channels involved in transport processes in rat tracheal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Anne; Faulhaber, Johannes; Srisawang, Lalita; Stortz, Andreas; Salomon, Johanna J; Mall, Marcus A; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Transport of water and electrolytes in airway epithelia involves chloride-selective ion channels, which are controlled either by cytosolic Ca 2+ or by cAMP The contributions of the two pathways to chloride transport differ among vertebrate species. Because rats are becoming more important as animal model for cystic fibrosis, we have examined how Ca 2+ - dependent and cAMP- dependent Cl - secretion is organized in the rat tracheal epithelium. We examined the expression of the Ca 2+ -gated Cl - channel anoctamin 1 (ANO1), the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl - channel, the epithelial Na + channel ENaC, and the water channel aquaporin 5 (AQP5) in rat tracheal epithelium. The contribution of ANO1 channels to nucleotide-stimulated Cl - secretion was determined using the channel blocker Ani9 in short-circuit current recordings obtained from primary cultures of rat tracheal epithelial cells in Ussing chambers. We found that ANO1, CFTR and AQP5 proteins were expressed in nonciliated cells of the tracheal epithelium, whereas ENaC was expressed in ciliated cells. Among nonciliated cells, ANO1 occurred together with CFTR and Muc5b and, in addition, in a different cell type without CFTR and Muc5b. Bioelectrical studies with the ANO1-blocker Ani9 indicated that ANO1 mediated the secretory response to the nucleotide uridine-5'-triphosphate. Our data demonstrate that, in rat tracheal epithelium, Cl - secretion and Na + absorption are routed through different cell types, and that ANO1 channels form the molecular basis of Ca 2+ -dependent Cl - secretion in this tissue. These characteristic features of Cl - -dependent secretion reveal similarities and distinct differences to secretory processes in human airways. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  8. J/ψ reconstruction in the di-muon decay channel with the CBM experiment for p+Au collisions at 30 GeV laboratory beam energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, V; Kisel, I

    2013-01-01

    The study of p+Au collisions at 30 GeV laboratory beam energy is considered as a part of the CBM research program and will be performed in the first phase of FAIR with a start version of the CBM detector at SIS-100. Results of J/ψ reconstruction feasibility studies in di-muon channel in proton-nuclear collisions at SIS 100 energies are presented. The simulated detector concept includes STS and MuCh detectors. The study was performed for a wide range of MuCh detector inefficiency. Also the influence of MuCh stations misalignment on the charmonium reconstruction efficiency was studied. The algorithm allows to reconstruct J/ψ with an efficiency of 31.3 % and the signal to the background ratio of 24.4.

  9. Cellular mechanism underlying formaldehyde-stimulated Cl- secretion in rat airway epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Li Luo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest that formaldehyde (FA could be synthesized endogeneously and transient receptor potential (TRP channel might be the sensor of FA. However, the physiological significance is still unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present study investigated the FA induced epithelial Cl(- secretion by activation of TRPV-1 channel located in the nerve ending fiber. Exogenously applied FA induced an increase of I(SC in intact rat trachea tissue but not in the primary cultured epithelial cells. Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis identified TRPV-1 expression in rat tracheal nerve ending. Capsazepine (CAZ, a TRPV-1 specific antagonist significantly blocked the I(SC induced by FA. The TRPV-1 agonist capsaicin (Cap induced an increase of I(SC, which was similar to the I(SC induced by FA. L-703606, an NK-1 specific inhibitor and propranolol, an adrenalin β receptor inhibitor significantly abolished the I(SC induced by FA or Cap. In the ion substitute analysis, FA could not induce I(SC in the absence of extracelluar Cl(-. The I(SC induced by FA could be blocked by the non-specific Cl(- channel inhibitor DPC and the CFTR specific inhibitor CFTR(i-172, but not by the Ca(2+-activated Cl(- channel inhibitor DIDS. Furthermore, both forskolin, an agonist of adenylate cyclase (AC and MDL-12330A, an antagonist of AC could block FA-induced I(SC. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that FA-induced epithelial I(SC response is mediated by nerve, involving the activation of TRPV-1 and release of adrenalin as well as substance P.

  10. 31 CFR 30.6 - Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirement under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply... recipient's employees? 30.6 Section 30.6 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.6 Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply...

  11. 31 CFR 30.5 - Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirements under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply... recipient? 30.5 Section 30.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.5 Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply with the...

  12. 36Cl AMS measurement of JCO samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, D.; Seki, R.; Nagashima, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Kume, H.; Mawatari, R.

    2000-01-01

    A critical nuclear accident occurred at the nuclear fuel processing facility, JCO, in Tokaimura, Ibaraki prefecture, Japan on 30 September 1999, and a lot of neutron particle were released in the environment. In order to estimate the total neutron flux, we measured the yield of 36 Cl radioisotopes in the samples being collected from the accident site. The neutron flux can be estimated from the ratio of 36 Cl to 35 Cl because the 36 Cl nuclei are created from 35 Cl through a thermal neutron capture process, 35 Cl(n,γ) 36 Cl. (author)

  13. Bumetanide increases Cl--dependent short-circuit current in late distal colon: Evidence for the presence of active electrogenic Cl- absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lieqi; Fang, Xiefan; Winesett, Steven P; Cheng, Catherine Y; Binder, Henry J; Rivkees, Scott A; Cheng, Sam X

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian colonic epithelia consist of cells that are capable of both absorbing and secreting Cl-. The present studies employing Ussing chamber technique identified two opposing short-circuit current (Isc) responses to basolateral bumetanide in rat distal colon. Apart from the transepithelial Cl--secretory Isc in early distal colon that was inhibited by bumetanide, bumetanide also stimulated Isc in late distal colon that had not previously been identified. Since bumetanide inhibits basolateral Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC) in crypt cells and basolateral K+-Cl- cotransporter (KCC) in surface epithelium, we proposed this stimulatory Isc could represent a KCC-mediated Cl- absorptive current. In support of this hypothesis, ion substitution experiments established Cl- dependency of this absorptive Isc and transport inhibitor studies demonstrated the involvement of an apical Cl- conductance. Current distribution and RNA sequencing analyses revealed that this Cl- absorptive Isc is closely associated with epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) but is not dependent on ENaC activity. Thus, inhibition of ENaC by 10 μM amiloride or benzamil neither altered the direction nor its activity. Physiological studies suggested that this Cl- absorptive Isc senses dietary Cl- content; thus when dietary Cl- was low, Cl- absorptive Isc was up-regulated. In contrast, when dietary Cl- was increased, Cl- absorptive Isc was down-regulated. We conclude that an active Cl- extrusion mechanism exists in ENaC-expressing late distal colon and likely operates in parallel with ENaC to facilitate NaCl absorption.

  14. The uptake of Cs, Cl, I, Co, U and Pu by C-S-H, portlandite and ettringite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Callonnec, C.; Richet, C.; Ayache, R.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the retention of Pu, Cs, Cl, U, Co and I onto the three phases of a cement paste: calcium silicate hydrates or C-S-H (Ca/Si=1.65), portlandite (Ca(OH) 2 ) and ettringite (Ca 6 Al 2 S 3 O 21 .32H 2 O). C-S-H of Ca/Si molar ratio of 1.65 and ettringite were prepared in suspension, while portlandite was provided by an industrial laboratory. The sorptive power for each ion was determined by a batch model at 20 degrees Celsius. The uptake of ions onto the phases has been obtained by introducing a very small volume of radioactive Cs, Co, Cl, I, U and Pu solution in each batch. Aliquots of solution were periodically removed for analysis. The results show that there are two kinds of ions whatever the solid phase: those which are poorly sorbed: Cs, Cl, I and Co, U and Pu which are strongly sorbed (by a factor 100 to 10000). Elsewhere, the comparison between the sorptive power of each phase reveals that C-S-H develops a significant sorption potential for pluri-valent ions (Pu, U, Co) as well as for Cl. The retention capacity of portlandite mainly towards pluri-valent cations is one or two orders of magnitude weaker than C-S-H capacity. Ettringite only plays a sorptive role relatively to Cs. However, iodine does not have a strong affinity for any solid at all. The data allow us to calculate a global sorption coefficient Kd of the cement paste for each ion. Assuming that the proportion of C-S-H, portlandite, ettringite is respectively 65%, 15% and 5% in a Portland cement, the global sorption coefficient is in good agreement with literature regarding on U, Cs, I and Cl. Cementitious materials appear to be an interesting chemical barrier that can limit the diffusion of pluri-valent cations. As C-S-H represent from 60% to 75% of the cement paste, this study leads to underline that C-S-H is mainly responsible for the retention capacity of cementitious materials specially towards U, Pu, Co, Cl although its sorption power is limited concerning

  15. Chemical effects of nuclear transformations in mixed crystals. 7. Chemical effects of the 35Cl(n,γ)36Cl nuclear reaction in K2ReCl6-K2ReBr6 mixed crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.; Diefallah, E.H.M.; Martin, S.

    1981-01-01

    The solid-state reactions occurring during the moderation of recoiling 36 Cl, produced by the (n,γ) reaction, have been studied in K 2 ReCl 6 -K 2 ReBr 6 mixed crystals. The main reaction products are Re 36 ClCl 5 2- , Re 36 ClBr 5 2- , and 36 Cl - , but the more intimately mixed species Re 36 ClCl/sub n/Br/sub 5-n/ 2- (n = 1, 2, 3, 4) are found in significant amounts. The production of the different recoil-labeled species can be explained by elementary impact models: 6% of the recoils do not leave their original lattice site (primary retetion); between 6% and 23%, dependent upon the mixed-crystal composition, appear as interstitials; 31 to 48% give rise to direct displacement reactions of one halide ligand; and 40% produce larger disruption by substitution of at least two halide ligands. The results have been compared with Roessler's 38 Cl recoil experiments

  16. 31 CFR 575.320 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 575.320... § 575.320 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. person.... This term includes those branches, offices and agencies of foreign financial institutions which are...

  17. 31 CFR 587.311 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 587.311... MONTENEGRO) MILOSEVIC SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 587.311 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. entity (including its foreign branches) that is engaged...

  18. 31 CFR 586.317 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 586.317... & MONTENEGRO) KOSOVO SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 586.317 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. entity (including foreign branches) that is engaged in the...

  19. An unexpected oxidation: NaK5Cl2(S2O62 revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T. A. Harrison

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, NaK5Cl2(S2O62 [systematic name: sodium pentapotassium dichloride bis(dithionate], arose as an unexpected product from an organic synthesis that used dithionite (S2O42− ions as a reducing agent to destroy excess permanganate ions. Compared to the previous study [Stanley (1953. Acta Cryst. 6, 187–196], the present tetragonal structure exhibits a root 2a × root 2a × c super-cell due to subtle changes in the orientations of the dithionate anions. The structure can be visualized as a three-dimensional framework of [001] columns of alternating trans-NaO4Cl2 and KO4Cl2 octahedra cross-linked by the dithionate ions with the interstices occupied by KO6Cl2 polyhedra to generate a densely packed three-dimensional framework. The asymmetric unit comprises two sodium ions (site symmetries 4 and -4, four potassium ions (site symmetries = -4, 4, 1 and 1, three chloride ions (site symmetries = 4, 4 and 2 and two half-dithionate ions (all atoms on general positions. Both dithionate ions are completed by crystallographic inversion symmetry. The crystal chosen for data collection was found to be rotationally twinned by 180° about the [100] axis in reciprocal space with a 0.6298 (13:0.3702 (13 domain ratio.

  20. CHANNEL ESTIMATION FOR ZT DFT-s-OFDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2018-01-01

    A signal modulated according to zero-tail discrete Fourier transform spread orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ZT DFT-s-OFDM) is received over a channel. The signal is down-sampled into a first sequence comprising N samples, N corresponding to the number of used subcarriers. The first Nh...

  1. Inhibition of cell proliferation by a selective inhibitor of the Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup -} channel, Ano1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzone, Amelia; Eisenman, Seth T.; Strege, Peter R. [Enteric NeuroScience Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Yao, Zhen [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, UCSF, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ordog, Tamas; Gibbons, Simon J. [Enteric NeuroScience Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Farrugia, Gianrico, E-mail: farrugia.gianrico@mayo.edu [Enteric NeuroScience Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T16A{sub inh}-A01 blocked Ano1 currents in HEK cells expressing Ano1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T16A{sub inh}-A01 reduced proliferation in ICC primary cultures and CFPAC-1 cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T16A{sub inh}-A01 reduced proliferation of ICC in intact smooth muscle strips. -- Abstract: Background: Ion channels play important roles in regulation of cellular proliferation. Ano1 (TMEM16A) is a Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup -} channel expressed in several tumors and cell types. In the muscle layers of the gastrointestinal tract Ano1 is selectively expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and appears to be required for normal gastrointestinal slow wave electrical activity. However, Ano1 is expressed in all classes of ICC, including those that do not generate slow waves suggesting that Ano1 may have other functions. Indeed, a role for Ano1 in regulating proliferation of tumors and ICC has been recently suggested. Recently, a high-throughput screen identified a small molecule, T16A{sub inh}-A01 as a specific inhibitor of Ano1. Aim: To investigate the effect of the T16A{sub inh}-A01 inhibitor on proliferation in ICC and in the Ano1-expressing human pancreatic cancer cell line CFPAC-1. Methods: Inhibition of Ano1 was demonstrated by whole cell voltage clamp recordings of currents in cells transfected with full-length human Ano1. The effect of T16A{sub inh}-A01 on ICC proliferation was examined in situ in organotypic cultures of intact mouse small intestinal smooth muscle strips and in primary cell cultures prepared from these tissues. ICC were identified by Kit immunoreactivity. Proliferating ICC and CFPAC-1 cells were identified by immunoreactivity for the nuclear antigen Ki67 or EdU incorporation, respectively. Results: T16A{sub inh}-A01 inhibited Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup -} currents by 60% at 10 {mu}M in a voltage-independent fashion. Proliferation of ICC was significantly reduced in primary cultures

  2. 31 CFR 546.311 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 546.311... Definitions § 546.311 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. entity.... This term includes those branches, offices, and agencies of foreign financial institutions that are...

  3. 31 CFR 538.316 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 538.316... Definitions § 538.316 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. entity.... This term includes those branches, offices and agencies of foreign financial institutions which are...

  4. 31 CFR 548.311 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 548.311... Definitions § 548.311 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. entity... foregoing. This term includes those branches, offices, and agencies of foreign financial institutions that...

  5. 31 CFR 594.314 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 594.314... Definitions § 594.314 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. person.... This term includes those branches, offices and agencies of foreign financial institutions that are...

  6. 31 CFR 537.320 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 537.320... Definitions § 537.320 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. entity.... This term includes those branches, offices and agencies of foreign financial institutions that are...

  7. 31 CFR 542.311 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 542.311... Definitions § 542.311 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. entity.... This term includes those branches, offices and agencies of foreign financial institutions that are...

  8. 31 CFR 541.311 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 541.311... Definitions § 541.311 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. entity.... This term includes those branches, offices and agencies of foreign financial institutions that are...

  9. 31 CFR 543.311 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 543.311... Definitions § 543.311 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. entity.... This term includes those branches, offices and agencies of foreign financial institutions that are...

  10. 31 CFR 595.316 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 595.316... Definitions § 595.316 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. person.... This term includes those branches, offices and agencies of foreign financial institutions which are...

  11. 31 CFR 551.310 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 551.310... Definitions § 551.310 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U.S. entity... foregoing. This term includes those branches, offices and agencies of foreign financial institutions that...

  12. Proton resonance elastic scattering of $^{30}$Mg for single particle structure of $^{31}$Mg

    CERN Multimedia

    The single particle structure of $^{31}$Mg, which is located in the so-called “island of inversion”, will be studied through measuring Isobaric Analog Resonances (IARs) of bound states of $^{31}$Mg. They are located in the high excitation energy of $^{31}$Al. We are going to determine the spectroscopic factors and angular momenta of the parent states by measuring the excitation function of the proton resonance elastic scattering around 0 degrees in the laboratory frame with around 3 MeV/nucleon $^{30}$Mg beam. The present study will reveal the shell evolution around $^{32}$Mg. In addition, the spectroscopic factor of the (7/2)$^{−}$ state which was not yet determined experimentally, may allow one to study the shape coexistence in this nucleus.

  13. Stoichiometry and local bond configuration of In{sub 2}S{sub 3}:Cl thin films by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juma, Albert O., E-mail: jumaa@biust.ac.bw

    2016-10-15

    In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films deposited using chemical methods always contain residual elements from the precursors, which modify their properties. As buffer layers in solar cells, the residual elements in the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} layer affect the performance of these devices. The stoichiometry of In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films deposited by spray ion layer gas reaction (ILGAR) was studied as a function of the residual Cl from InCl{sub 3} precursor by varying the deposition parameters. The chemical formula was deduced from the elemental composition determined using Rutherford backscattering (RBS). Incomplete sulfurization of the precursor implies that residual Cl{sup −} remains bonded to the In{sup 3+} ions while some occupy interstitial and/or antisite positions in the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} matrix. This results in thin films with different stoichiometry, described by the formula In{sub 4}S{sub 6−x}Cl{sub 2x+2y}. This changes the local bond configuration and geometry and underpins the influence of residual Cl on the physical properties of In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films.

  14. Beta decay of /sup 39/Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G.; Warburton, E.K.; Alburger, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    The β decay of /sup 39/Cl, produced in the /sup 37/Cl(t,p)/sup 39/Cl reaction at E/sub t/ = 3.1 MeV, has been investigated with a Ge-NaI(Tl) Compton-suppression γ-ray spectrometer. Nineteen γ-ray transitions were observed, including 10 previously known. Precision energy measurements were carried out on six of the strongest lines. In the proposed decay scheme a weak new β-ray branch is established to the 2950-keV level of /sup 39/Ar, and the populations of /sup 39/Ar levels at 2093 and 2433 keV are accounted for by γ-ray decays from higher excited states. Spin-parity assignments are given

  15. Search for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at sqrt(s)=161 GeV and 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-02-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 pb-1 at sqrt(s)=161 GeV, 1.1 pb-1 at 170 GeV and 9.5 pb-1 at 172 GeV. The e+e--->νν¯γ(γ) cross section is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 GeV/c2 at 95% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralino (τχ10<= 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models. © 1998

  16. Expression of Kv3.1b potassium channel is widespread in macaque motor cortex pyramidal cells: A histological comparison between rat and macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, David; Goldrick, Isabelle; Lemon, Roger N; Kraskov, Alexander; Greensmith, Linda; Kalmar, Bernadett

    2017-06-15

    There are substantial differences across species in the organization and function of the motor pathways. These differences extend to basic electrophysiological properties. Thus, in rat motor cortex, pyramidal cells have long duration action potentials, while in the macaque, some pyramidal neurons exhibit short duration "thin" spikes. These differences may be related to the expression of the fast potassium channel Kv3.1b, which in rat interneurons is associated with generation of thin spikes. Rat pyramidal cells typically lack these channels, while there are reports that they are present in macaque pyramids. Here we made a systematic, quantitative comparison of the Kv3.1b expression in sections from macaque and rat motor cortex, using two different antibodies (NeuroMab, Millipore). As our standard reference, we examined, in the same sections, Kv3.1b staining in parvalbumin-positive interneurons, which show strong Kv3.1b immunoreactivity. In macaque motor cortex, a large sample of pyramidal neurons were nearly all found to express Kv3.1b in their soma membranes. These labeled neurons were identified as pyramidal based either by expression of SMI32 (a pyramidal marker), or by their shape and size, and lack of expression of parvalbumin (a marker for some classes of interneuron). Large (Betz cells), medium, and small pyramidal neurons all expressed Kv3.1b. In rat motor cortex, SMI32-postive pyramidal neurons expressing Kv3.1b were very rare and weakly stained. Thus, there is a marked species difference in the immunoreactivity of Kv3.1b in pyramidal neurons, and this may be one of the factors explaining the pronounced electrophysiological differences between rat and macaque pyramidal neurons. © 2017 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A mass spectrometric study of the neutral and ionic vapor components of ytterbium chlorides; formation enthalpies of YbCl2 and YbCl3 molecules, and YbCl3- and YbCl4- ions in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, F.Yh.; Kudin, L.S.; Pogrebnoj, A.M.; Butman, M.F.; Burdukovskaya, G.G.

    1997-01-01

    Ionic and neutral components of saturated vapour over the ytterbium di-and trichloride is studied through the Knudsen effusive method with mass-spectromic registration of evaporated products within the temperature range of 1000-1300 K. It is found that ytterbium trichloride is subjected to thermal decomposition with formation of ytterbium dichloride and molecular chloride. Sublimation enthalpy and enthalpy of YbCl 2 and YbCl 3 molecules formation in a gaseous phase at 298 K, comprising 356±6, 293±8, -425±6 and -667±6 kJ/mole correspondingly, are determined with application of 2 and 3 thermodynamical laws. Enthalpies of YbCl 3 - and YbCl 4 - negative ions formation in a gaseous phase at 298 K equal to -895 and -1211±30 kJ/mole correspondingly are calculated by measured equilibrium constants ion-molecular reaction. 30 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  18. The Cathodic Behavior of Ti(III) Ion in a NaCl-2CsCl Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Jiao, Shuqiang; Hu, Liwen; Guo, Zhancheng

    2016-02-01

    The cathodic behavior of Ti(III) ions in a NaCl-2CsCl melt was investigated by cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and square wave voltammetry with a tungsten electrode being the working electrode at different temperatures. The results show that the cathodic behavior of Ti(III) ion consists of two irreversible steps: Ti3+ + e = Ti2+ and Ti2+ + 2 e = Ti. The diffusion coefficient for the Ti(III) ion in the NaCl-2CsCl eutectic is 1.26 × 10-5 cm2 s-1 at 873 K (600 °C), increases to be 5.57 × 10-5 cm2 s-1 at 948K (675°C), and further rises to 10.8 × 10-5 cm2 s-1 at 1023 (750 °C). Moreover, galvanostatic electrolysis performed on a titanium electrode further presents the feasibility of electrodepositing metallic titanium in the molten NaCl-2CsCl-TiCl3 system.

  19. 31 CFR 593.312 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 593.312... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 593.312 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial... financial institutions that are located in the United States, but not such institutions' foreign branches...

  20. 31 CFR 540.319 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 540.319... CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.319 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial... financial institutions that are located in the United States, but not such institutions' foreign branches...

  1. 31 CFR 585.318 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 585.318... General Definitions § 585.318 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U... foregoing. This term includes those branches, offices and agencies of foreign financial institutions which...

  2. 31 CFR 536.317 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 536.317... General Definitions § 536.317 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U... foregoing. This term includes those branches, offices and agencies of foreign financial institutions which...

  3. 31 CFR 547.311 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 547.311... REGULATIONS General Definitions § 547.311 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution... financial institutions that are located in the United States, but not such institutions' foreign branches...

  4. 31 CFR 544.311 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 544.311... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 544.311 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial... financial institutions that are located in the United States, but not such institutions' foreign branches...

  5. Caracterización clínico genética del síndrome Prader Willi

    OpenAIRE

    Travieso Tellez, Anitery; Menéndez García, Reinaldo; Licourt Otero, Deysi

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: el síndrome Prader Willi es un desorden genético causado por la pérdida de genes contenidos en la región 15q11-q13 del cromosoma paterno. Objetivo: describir las características clínicas y genéticas de los pacientes con síndrome Prader Willi. Material y método: se realizó un estudio descriptivo, de corte transversal, con el universo de 15 pacientes con sospecha de síndrome Prader Willi remitidos a consulta provincial de Genética Clínica durante el año 2013. Se consideraron como ...

  6. Importance of glycosylation on function of a potassium channel in neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M K Hall

    Full Text Available The Kv3.1 glycoprotein, a voltage-gated potassium channel, is expressed throughout the central nervous system. The role of N-glycans attached to the Kv3.1 glycoprotein on conducting and non-conducting functions of the Kv3.1 channel are quite limiting. Glycosylated (wild type, partially glycosylated (N220Q and N229Q, and unglycosylated (N220Q/N229Q Kv3.1 proteins were expressed and characterized in a cultured neuronal-derived cell model, B35 neuroblastoma cells. Western blots, whole cell current recordings, and wound healing assays were employed to provide evidence that the conducting and non-conducting properties of the Kv3.1 channel were modified by N-glycans of the Kv3.1 glycoprotein. Electrophoretic migration of the various Kv3.1 proteins treated with PNGase F and neuraminidase verified that the glycosylation sites were occupied and that the N-glycans could be sialylated, respectively. The unglycosylated channel favored a different whole cell current pattern than the glycoform. Further the outward ionic currents of the unglycosylated channel had slower activation and deactivation rates than those of the glycosylated Kv3.1 channel. These kinetic parameters of the partially glycosylated Kv3.1 channels were also slowed. B35 cells expressing glycosylated Kv3.1 protein migrated faster than those expressing partially glycosylated and much faster than those expressing the unglycosylated Kv3.1 protein. These results have demonstrated that N-glycans of the Kv3.1 glycoprotein enhance outward ionic current kinetics, and neuronal migration. It is speculated that physiological changes which lead to a reduction in N-glycan attachment to proteins will alter the functions of the Kv3.1 channel.

  7. Single-top s channel cross-section measurement with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Monini, Caterina; Lucotte, Arnaud

    The work reported in this thesis is aimed at measuring with the ATLAS detector the only mechanism of top quark electroweak production which has not yet been observed at the Large Hadron Collider: the s-channel. Its interest relies in the confirmation of the Standard Model predictions but, as well, in the possibility of constraining several new physics scenarios when comparing the s-channel cross section with the one of the other single top production modes (the Wt and t-channel). After a general introduction upon top physics and the experimental setup employed for the detection and the reconstruction of the physics objects, we present two analyses realized with proton-proton collisions collected by the ATLAS detector at a center of mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV. Since the s-channel production is characterized by a very low purity and, at the same time, is not favoured at the LHC because it proceeds via quark-antiquark annihilation, a multivariate approach is applied in both cases to discriminate the signal. For ...

  8. Divergent Synthesis of Revised Apratoxin E, 30-epi-Apratoxin E, and 30S/30R-Oxoapratoxin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhuo-Ya; Si, Chang-Mei; Liu, Yi-Wen; Dong, Han-Qing; Wei, Bang-Guo; Lin, Guo-Qiang

    2017-10-20

    In this report, originally proposed apratoxin E (30S-7), revised apratoxin E (30R-7), and (30S)/(30R)-oxoapratoxin E (30S)-38/(30R)-38 were efficiently prepared by two synthetic methods. The chiral lactone 10, recycled from the degradation of saponin glycosides, was utilized to prepare the key nonpeptide fragment 9. Our alternative convergent assembly strategy was applied to the divergent synthesis of revised apratoxin E and its three analogues. Moreover, ring-closing metathesis (RCM) was for the first time found to be an efficient strategy for the macrocyclization of apratoxins.

  9. 31 CFR 598.319 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 598.319... General Definitions § 598.319 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U..., offices, and agencies of foreign financial institutions which are located in the United States, but not...

  10. 31 CFR 588.311 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 588.311... General Definitions § 588.311 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U... financial institutions that are located in the United States, but not such institutions' foreign branches...

  11. 31 CFR 545.314 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 545.314... General Definitions § 545.314 U.S. financial institution. The term U.S. financial institution means any U... financial institutions that are located in the United States, but not such institutions' foreign branches...

  12. It takes two T to shape immunity: emerging role for T-type calcium channels in immune cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lacinová, L.; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 4 (2016), s. 393-396 ISSN 0231-5882 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S; GA MŠk 7AMB15FR015 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : calcium channel * T-type channel * Ca(v)3.1 * immune cells Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.170, year: 2016

  13. HI structures in M31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinks, E.; Bajaja, E.

    1983-01-01

    The author reports on the preparation of a list of some 250 holes found in an HI survey of M31. The maps which have been used in search for holes in the HI distribution were done at a resolution of Δα x Δd x ΔV = 24'' x 36'' x 8.2 km s -1 . All these 147 channel maps cover the whole velocity range of HI over most of the optical image of M31. The list is made eliminating any personal bias or accidental mistakes. The list could be divided into three classes: spatially-unresolved holes (in velocity); resolved small holes; and large holes. Two holes are discussed in more detail. (Auth.)

  14. Electric discharge effects on a XeCl pumped S2 heat-pipe laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, K.; Greenberg, K.; Verdeyen, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that an electrical discharge can dissociate the higher-order sulfur molecules S(3-8) into dimers S2 and thus create the proper environment for efficient conversion of XeCl radiation at 308 nm to the blue-green. The use of a heat-pipe configuration greatly alleviates the technological problems.

  15. Impaired control of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in experimental hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pintérová, Mária; Líšková, Silvia; Dobešová, Zdenka; Behuliak, M.; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, Suppl.2 (2009), S43-S54 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/08/0139; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0336; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110902; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : calcium -activated K+ and Cl- channels * vasoactive systems * EDCF Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009

  16. New insights on the voltage dependence of the KCa3.1 channel block by internal TBA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banderali, Umberto; Klein, Hélène; Garneau, Line; Simoes, Manuel; Parent, Lucie; Sauvé, Rémy

    2004-10-01

    We present in this work a structural model of the open IKCa (KCa3.1) channel derived by homology modeling from the MthK channel structure, and used this model to compute the transmembrane potential profile along the channel pore. This analysis showed that the selectivity filter and the region extending from the channel inner cavity to the internal medium should respectively account for 81% and 16% of the transmembrane potential difference. We found however that the voltage dependence of the IKCa block by the quaternary ammonium ion TBA applied internally is compatible with an apparent electrical distance delta of 0.49 +/- 0.02 (n = 6) for negative potentials. To reconcile this observation with the electrostatic potential profile predicted for the channel pore, we modeled the IKCa block by TBA assuming that the voltage dependence of the block is governed by both the difference in potential between the channel cavity and the internal medium, and the potential profile along the selectivity filter region through an effect on the filter ion occupancy states. The resulting model predicts that delta should be voltage dependent, being larger at negative than positive potentials. The model also indicates that raising the internal K+ concentration should decrease the value of delta measured at negative potentials independently of the external K+ concentration, whereas raising the external K+ concentration should minimally affect delta for concentrations >50 mM. All these predictions are born out by our current experimental results. Finally, we found that the substitutions V275C and V275A increased the voltage sensitivity of the TBA block, suggesting that TBA could move further into the pore, thus leading to stronger interactions between TBA and the ions in the selectivity filter. Globally, these results support a model whereby the voltage dependence of the TBA block in IKCa is mainly governed by the voltage dependence of the ion occupancy states of the selectivity filter.

  17. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON SEDIMENT DISTRIBUTION AT CHANNEL BIFURCATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.M. Tarekul ISLAM; M.R. KABIR; Ainun NISHAT

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental results on the distribution of sediments at channel bifurcation.The experiments have been conducted in a physical model of channel bifurcation. It consists of a straight main channel which bifurcates into two branch channels of different widths. The test rig is a mobile bed with fixed bank. Four different noses have been used to study the phenomenon. For each nose, three upstream discharges viz. 20 l/s, 30 l/s and 40 l/s have been employed. From the measured data, discharges and sediment transport ratios per unit width are calculated in the downstream branches.These data have been set to the general nodal point relation and a set of equations has been developed to describe the distribution of sediments to the downstream branches for different nose angles.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH OUTCOMES WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS -RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC, 7/30-31/2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    To better define ORD's Environmental Public Health Outcomes (EPHO) research agenda, a workshop was held 7/30-31/2002 at EPA facilities in Research Triangle Park, NC. The intent of this workshop was to engage federal and other organizations in a dialog that will assist ORD in deve...

  19. Search in s channel for production of 1--2 MeV/c2 long-lived e+e- resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, S.D.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Greenberg, J.S.; Lynn, K.G.; McCorkle, S.; McDonough, J.; Phlips, B.F.; Weber, M.

    1992-01-01

    The search for s-channel production of light neutral particles coupled to e + e- has been extended by more than 3 orders of magnitude in lifetime beyond the region which is accessible to elastic e + e- scattering. The whole mass range 1500 approx-lt M X 0 approx-lt 1860 keV/c 2 suggested by the observation of anomalous e + e- pairs in heavy-ion collisions has been investigated. These measurements find no evidence for e + e- states within lifetime ranges (90% C.L.) of 1.4x10 -12 approx-lt τ approx-lt 4x10 -10 sec (J=0) and 1.4x10 -12 approx-lt τ approx-lt 6x10 -10 sec (J=1), assuming that the state does not break up by interacting within the target

  20. Controllable synthesis and enhanced photocatalytic properties of Cu2O/Cu31S16 composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xueqin; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Facile sonochemical route. ► The content of Cu 31 S 16 in the Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 can be easily controlled. ► Structure and optical properties of Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 were discussed. ► Enhanced photocatalytic property of Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 . ► Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 core/shell structures were more stable than single Cu 2 O particles. -- Abstract: The controlled synthesis of Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 microcomposites with hierarchical structures had been prepared via a convenient sonochemical route. Ultrasonic irradiation of a mixture of Cu 2 O and (NH 2 ) 2 CS in an aqueous medium yielded Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 composites. The content of Cu 31 S 16 in the Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 can be easily controlled by adjusting the synthesis time. The Cu 31 S 16 layer not only protected and stabilized Cu 2 O particles, but also prohibited the recombination of photogenerated electrons–holes pair between Cu 31 S 16 and Cu 2 O. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra, ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were used to characterize the products. Photocatalytic performance of the Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 hierarchical structures was evaluated by measuring the decomposition rate of methyl orange solution under natural light. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the preparation and photocatalytic activity of Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 microcomposite. Additionally, the Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 core/shell structures were more stable than single Cu 2 O particles during photocatalytic process since the photocatalytic activity of the second reused architecture sample was much higher than that of pure Cu 2 O. The Cu 2 O/Cu 31 S 16 microcomposites may be a good promising candidate for wastewater treatment.

  1. Enfermedad de Hodgkin: nuevos conceptos clínico-patológicos Hodgkin´s disease: new clinico-pathologic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José René Mesa Cuervo

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Hodgkin, considerada una neoplasia linfoide, se clasifica en 5 grupos a partir de la conferencia de Rye en 1966. La variedad esclerosis nodular es la más frecuente, afecta generalmente regiones supradiafragmáticas y se divide en 2 grados, con características morfológicas y pronósticas diferentes. El grado II, de mal pronóstico, exige formas de tratamiento más agresivas. La celularidad mixta suele tener mayor diseminación de la enfermedad y junto a la esclerosis nodular, se catalogan como formas clásicas de la enfermedad, con positividad para los marcadores inmunofenotípicos CD15 y CD30. El predominio linfocítico se considera un linfoma de células del centro germinal y emerge como entidad clínicopatológica diferente. La depleción linfocítica se diagnostica con baja frecuencia y tiene un pronóstico desfavorable. El diagnóstico diferencial con linfomas no hodgkinianos no siempre es posible y actualmente se señala que la delimitación entre ambos tipos de linfomas no está bien definida. El grupo no clasificado tiende a desaparecerHodgkin´s disease, considered a lymphoid neoplasia, is classified in 5 groups, since Rye Conference in 1960. Nodular sclerosis variety is commonest, generally involve supradiaphragmatic regions and is divided in two grades with distinct morphologic ant prognostic features. Grade II of badly prognosis demand a more aggresive treatment. Mixed cellularity ussualy has a greater disease spreading level and joined with nodular sclerosis, are classified as classic forms of disease, positive to immunophenotypical markers, CD15 and CD30. Lymphocytic predominance is to be considered as a cell lymphoma of germinal center and emerge as a distinct clinico-pathologic entity with a unfavourable prognosis. Differential diagnosis in non-Hodgkin´s lymphomas, unusually is possible and at present, delimitation between both types of lymphoma, es not well defined. Non classified group have a tendency to

  2. Effect of Non-specific HCN1 Blocker CsCl on Spatial Learning and Memory in Mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xin; GUO Lianjun; YIN Guangfu; ZONG Xiangang; AI Yongxun

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that HCN1 is primarily expressed in hippocampus, however little is known about its effects on spatial learning and memory. In the present study, we investigated the effects of non-specific HCN1 blocker CsCl on spatial learning and memory by using Morris water maze and in situ hybridization in mice. The results showed CsCl 160 mg/kg ip for 4 days, and the mean escape latency was 34 s longer than that of normal control (P<0.01). In hippocampal tissues, staining for the HCN1 mRNA was stronger in the DG and CA1 region of the hippocampus (P <0.05, P<0.05, when CsCl-administration group was compared with normal group). Our results suggested that CsCl could significantly affect the spatial learning and memory in mice, and HCN channel is involved in the process of learning and memory.

  3. Functional Importance of L- and P/Q-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Human Renal Vasculature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B; Poulsen, Christian B; Walter, Steen

    2011-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers are widely used for treatment of hypertension, because they decrease peripheral vascular resistance through inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Animal studies of renal vasculature have shown expression of several types of calcium channels that are involved......-type subtype (Ca(v) 3.1 and Ca(v) 3.2) voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca(v)s), and quantitative PCR showed highest expression of L-type channels in renal arteries and variable expression between patients of subtypes of calcium channels in intrarenal vessels. Immunohistochemical labeling of kidney sections...

  4. Electrochemical noise transient analysis for 316 and Duplex 2205 stainless steels in NaCl and FeCl; Analisis de los transitorios de ruido electroquimico para aceros inoxidables 316 Y - DUPLEX 2205 en NaCl Y FeCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeraya-Calderaon, F.; Estupinan, F.; Zambrano, P.; Martinez-Villafane, A.; Borunda, A.; Colas, R.; Gaona-Tiburcio, C.

    2012-11-01

    This work shows the results obtained from electrochemical noise measurements for different materials exhibiting pitting corrosion. The transients presented in the potential and current time, correlates with the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) surface analysis. Electrochemical measurements were made at different exposure times to obtain the correlation. The materials used were stainless steel austenitic 316 and duplex 2205, immersed in ferric chloride (FeCl3) and sodium chloride (NaCl) electrolytes. SEM analysis shows that the transients observed in the time series, really correspond to the activity of pit nucleation developed over the surface of the electrodes. (Author) 31 refs.

  5. Single top quarks at the Tevatron and observation of the s-channel production mode

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The presentation gives an overview of single-top-quark production at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The talk covers measurements of the total s+t channel production cross section and the extraction of the CKM matrix element |V_tb|. Furthermore, separate analyses of the s-channel and t-channel production modes are discussed. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1 per experiment and represent in most cases the full Run-II dataset. Through a combination of the CDF and D0 measurements the first observation of single-top-quark production in the s-channel is claimed. This is particularly highlighted in the seminar.

  6. CLC Chloride Channels and Transporters: Structure, Function, Physiology, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentsch, Thomas J; Pusch, Michael

    2018-07-01

    CLC anion transporters are found in all phyla and form a gene family of eight members in mammals. Two CLC proteins, each of which completely contains an ion translocation parthway, assemble to homo- or heteromeric dimers that sometimes require accessory β-subunits for function. CLC proteins come in two flavors: anion channels and anion/proton exchangers. Structures of these two CLC protein classes are surprisingly similar. Extensive structure-function analysis identified residues involved in ion permeation, anion-proton coupling and gating and led to attractive biophysical models. In mammals, ClC-1, -2, -Ka/-Kb are plasma membrane Cl - channels, whereas ClC-3 through ClC-7 are 2Cl - /H + -exchangers in endolysosomal membranes. Biological roles of CLCs were mostly studied in mammals, but also in plants and model organisms like yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans. CLC Cl - channels have roles in the control of electrical excitability, extra- and intracellular ion homeostasis, and transepithelial transport, whereas anion/proton exchangers influence vesicular ion composition and impinge on endocytosis and lysosomal function. The surprisingly diverse roles of CLCs are highlighted by human and mouse disorders elicited by mutations in their genes. These pathologies include neurodegeneration, leukodystrophy, mental retardation, deafness, blindness, myotonia, hyperaldosteronism, renal salt loss, proteinuria, kidney stones, male infertility, and osteopetrosis. In this review, emphasis is laid on biophysical structure-function analysis and on the cell biological and organismal roles of mammalian CLCs and their role in disease.

  7. The human red cell voltage-dependent cation channel. Part III: Distribution homogeneity and pH dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennekou, P.; Barksmann, T. L.; Christophersen, P.

    2006-01-01

    The homogeneity of the distribution of the non-selective voltage-dependent cation channel (the NSVDC channel) in the human erythrocyte, and the pH dependence was investigated. Activation of this channel caused a uniform cellular dehydration, which was characterized by the changes in the erythrocyte...... osmotic resistance profiles: After 1/2 h of activation, the osmolarity at 50% hemolysis changed from 73 mM (control) to 34 mM NaCl, corresponding to 0.48% and 0.21% NaCl respectively. Unchanging standard deviations show participation of the entire erythrocyte population, which implies an even distribution...... of the NSVDC channel among the cells. Inactivation of the NSVDC channel with N-ethyl-maleimide (NEM) or blocking of the Cl- conductance with NS1652 retarded the migration of the resistance profiles towards lower osmolarities. The NSVDC channel activation was blocked by a decrease of the intracellular...

  8. Hyperpolarization moves S4 sensors inward to open MVP, a methanococcal voltage-gated potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesti, Federico; Rajan, Sindhu; Gonzalez-Colaso, Rosana; Nikolaeva, Natalia; Goldstein, Steve A N

    2003-04-01

    MVP, a Methanococcus jannaschii voltage-gated potassium channel, was cloned and shown to operate in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Like pacemaker channels, MVP opens on hyperpolarization using S4 voltage sensors like those in classical channels activated by depolarization. The MVP S4 span resembles classical sensors in sequence, charge, topology and movement, traveling inward on hyperpolarization and outward on depolarization (via canaliculi in the protein that bring the extracellular and internal solutions into proximity across a short barrier). Thus, MVP opens with sensors inward indicating a reversal of S4 position and pore state compared to classical channels. Homologous channels in mammals and plants are expected to function similarly.

  9. A proton-activated, outwardly rectifying chloride channel in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhiyong; Zhang Wei; Chen Liang; Wang Rong; Kan Xiaohong; Sun Guizhen; Liu Chunxi; Li Li; Zhang Yun

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular acidic pH-activated chloride channel I Cl,acid , has been characterized in HEK 293 cells and mammalian cardiac myocytes. This study was designed to characterize I Cl,acid in human umbilical vein endothelial cells(HUVECs). The activation and deactivation of the current rapidly and repeatedly follows the change of the extracellular solution at pH 4.3, with the threshold pH 5.3. In addition, at very positive potentials, the current displays a time-dependent facilitation. pH-response relationship for I Cl,acid revealed that EC 50 is pH 4.764 with a threshold pH value of pH 5.3 and nH of 14.545. The current can be blocked by the Cl - channel inhibitor DIDS (100 μM). In summary, for the first time we report the presence of proton-activated, outwardly rectifying chloride channel in HUVECs. Because an acidic environment can develop in local myocardium under pathological conditions such as myocardial ischemia, I Cl,acid would play a role in regulation of EC function under these pathological conditions

  10. Novel Phenolic Inhibitors of Small/Intermediate-Conductance Ca(2+)-Activated K(+) Channels, KCa3.1 and KCa2.3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivan-Viguera, Aida; Valero, Marta Sofía; Murillo, María Divina

    2013-01-01

    -inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with known cytoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and/or cytostatic activities. METHODOLOGYPRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In electrophysiological experiments, we identified the natural phenols, caffeic acid (EC50 1.3 µM) and resveratrol (EC50 10 µM) as KCa3.1 inhibitors with moderate potency....... The phenols, vanillic acid, gallic acid, and hydroxytyrosol had weak or no blocking effects. Out of the NSAIDs, flufenamic acid was moderately potent (EC50 1.6 µM), followed by mesalamine (EC50≥10 µM). The synthetic fluoro-trivanillic ester, 13b ([3,5-bis[(3-fluoro-4-hydroxy-benzoyl)oxymethyl]phenyl]methyl 3.......3 activation. CONCLUSIONSSIGNIFICANCE: We identified the natural phenols, caffeic acid and resveratrol, the NSAID, flufenamic acid, and the polyphenol 13b as novel KCa3.1 inhibitors. The high potency of 13b with pan-activity on KCa3.1/KCa2 channels makes 13b a new pharmacological tool to manipulate...

  11. Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Acetophenone N-Benzylimine Using [(RuCl)-Cl-II((S,S)-TsDPEN)(eta(6)-p-cymene)]: A DFT Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šot, P.; Kuzma, Marek; Václavík, J.; Pecháček, J.; Přech, J.; Januščák, J.; Kačer, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 17 (2012), s. 6496-6499 ISSN 0276-7333 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/1497; GA ČR GAP106/12/1276 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : CARBONYL-COMPOUNDS * KETONES * IMINES Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.145, year: 2012

  12. A thermodynamic analysis of chloride corrosion in biomass-fired boilers for Fe-O-Cl-S system

    OpenAIRE

    Kaczmarczyk Robert; Mlonka-Mędrala Agata; Gurgul Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of chlorideinduced corrosion in the Fe-O-Cl-S system. The influence of steam concentration in the gas phase on chloride-induced corrosion process was presented. Based on the parametric equations the equilibrium concentration of the gas phase was determined. The effect of alkali metals chlorides in gas phase (Na,K)Cl on formation of (Na,K)FeO2 in the passive oxide scale layer (FeO/Fe3O4/Fe2O3) was analysed. Condensation of (Na,K)Cl vapors, formation ...

  13. Two-section semiconductor optical amplifier used as an efficient channel dropping node

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Carsten; Storkfelt, Niels; Durhuus, T.

    1992-01-01

    High responsivity in a two-section semiconductor optical amplifier/detector, serving as a channel dropping mode is described. A simple receiver constructed using a 50 Ω amplifier with a sensitivity of -30.2 dBm at 140 Mb/s is demonstrated......High responsivity in a two-section semiconductor optical amplifier/detector, serving as a channel dropping mode is described. A simple receiver constructed using a 50 Ω amplifier with a sensitivity of -30.2 dBm at 140 Mb/s is demonstrated...

  14. A Comparative Electrochemical Study of AZ31 and AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Salman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study has been carried out on AZ31 and AZ91 magnesium alloys in order to understand the electrochemical behavior in both alkaline and chloride containing solutions. The open circuit potential (OCP was examined in 1 M NaOH and 3.5 mass % NaCl solutions. AZ31 magnesium alloy shows several potential drops throughout the immersion in 1 M NaOH solution, though AZ91 does not show this phenomenon. The specimens were anodized at a constant potential of 3 V for 30 minutes at 298 K in 1 M NaOH solution. The anticorrosion behavior of the anodized specimens was better than those of nonanodized specimens. The anodized AZ91 has better corrosion resistance compared to nonanodized specimen and anodized AZ31 magnesium alloy.

  15. Two-center three-electron bonding in ClNH{sub 3} revealed via helium droplet infrared laser Stark spectroscopy: Entrance channel complex along the Cl + NH{sub 3} → ClNH{sub 2} + H reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Christopher P.; Douberly, Gary E., E-mail: douberly@uga.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2556 (United States); Xie, Changjian; Guo, Hua [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Kaufmann, Matin [Department of Physical Chemistry II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-04-28

    Pyrolytic dissociation of Cl{sub 2} is employed to dope helium droplets with single Cl atoms. Sequential addition of NH{sub 3} to Cl-doped droplets leads to the formation of a complex residing in the entry valley to the substitution reaction Cl + NH{sub 3} → ClNH{sub 2} + H. Infrared Stark spectroscopy in the NH stretching region reveals symmetric and antisymmetric vibrations of a C{sub 3v} symmetric top. Frequency shifts from NH{sub 3} and dipole moment measurements are consistent with a ClNH{sub 3} complex containing a relatively strong two-center three-electron (2c–3e) bond. The nature of the 2c–3e bonding in ClNH{sub 3} is explored computationally and found to be consistent with the complexation-induced blue shifts observed experimentally. Computations of interconversion pathways reveal nearly barrierless routes to the formation of this complex, consistent with the absence in experimental spectra of two other complexes, NH{sub 3}Cl and Cl–HNH{sub 2}, which are predicted in the entry valley to the hydrogen abstraction reaction Cl + NH{sub 3} → HCl + NH{sub 2}.

  16. Quasi-static tensile properties of the Cranial Cruciate Ligament (CrCL) in adult cattle: towards the design of a prosthetic CrCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diotalevi, Lucien; Petit, Yvan; Brailovski, Vladimir; Nichols, Sylvain; Marchionatti, Emma; Wagnac, Éric

    2018-03-01

    Mechanical properties of the Cranial Cruciate Ligament (CrCL) in adult cattle are not well documented and protocols used in the literature focus on testing a full femur-CrCL-tibia complex rather than an isolated CrCL. The aim of this study was to assess a wider range of tensile properties of the CrCL along its anatomic axis with experimental measurements of the global elongation, displacement and strain fields, in order to provide guidelines for the design of CrCL prosthetic surrogates. Fourteen bovine CrCL were harvested from seven mature cows (5.1 ± 1.3 years) weighing 631 ± 90kg. The mean CrCL length was 41.4 ± 1.5mm and its mean cross-section was 103.9 ± 23.8mm 2 . Pre-conditioning was achieved with 30 cycles of loading from 30 to 200N at a strain rate of 0.02s -1 . Specimens were then loaded to failure at the same strain rate. The following results were obtained: the mean ultimate tensile load (UTL) 4372 ± 1485N and the median [quartiles] maximal global elongation 19.3 [17.8; 21.4] %. At first physical signs of tearing, the mean load was 3315 ± 1336N and mean elongation 13.5 ± 4.9%. The mean absorbed energy at failure was 5.23 ± 2.08 MJ.mm -3 and the mean stiffness at various levels of elongation was: 220 ± 195N.% -1 (5%), 285 ± 162N.% -1 (10%), 239 ± 200N.% -1 (15%), 146 ± 59N.% -1 (20%), 153 ± 136N.% -1 (25%). None of these properties were related to the bovine weight, age and side of the body (p > 0.05). An ideal prosthetic surrogate should then follow these sets of properties and the experimental data suggest that the in-vivo maximal elongation is below 13.5%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Continuous sheathless microparticle and cell patterning using CL-SSAWs (conductive liquid-based standing surface acoustic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghun Nam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present continuous, sheathless microparticle patterning using conductive liquid (CL-based standing surface acoustic waves (SSAWs. Conventional metal electrodes patterned on a piezoelectric substrate were replaced with electrode channels filled with a CL. The device performance was evaluated with 5-μm fluorescent polystyrene particles at different flow rate and via phase shifting. In addition, our device was further applied to continuous concentration of malaria parasites at the sidewalls of the fluidic channel.

  18. S-Channel Dark Matter Simplified Models and Unitarity

    CERN Document Server

    Englert, Christoph; Spannowsky, Michael

    The ultraviolet structure of $s$-channel mediator dark matter simplified models at hadron colliders is considered. In terms of commonly studied $s$-channel mediator simplified models it is argued that at arbitrarily high energies the perturbative description of dark matter production in high energy scattering at hadron colliders will break down in a number of cases. This is analogous to the well documented breakdown of an EFT description of dark matter collider production. With this in mind, to diagnose whether or not the use of simplified models at the LHC is valid, perturbative unitarity of the scattering amplitude in the processes relevant to LHC dark matter searches is studied. The results are as one would expect: at the LHC and future proton colliders the simplified model descriptions of dark matter production are in general valid. As a result of the general discussion, a simple new class of previously unconsidered `Fermiophobic Scalar' simplified models is proposed, in which a scalar mediator couples to...

  19. Pharmacological investigation of the role of ion channels in salivary secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, Tina C; Poulsen, Jørgen H; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2003-01-01

    The role of K+ and Cl- channels in salivary secretion was investigated, with emphasis on the potential role of Ca2+ -activated K+ channels. Ligand saturation kinetic assays and autoradiography showed large-conductance (BK) K+ channels to be highly expressed in rat submandibular and parotid glands...

  20. Lactate per se improves the excitability of depolarized rat skeletal muscle by reducing the Cl- conductance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Ørtenblad, Niels; Pedersen, Thomas Holm

    2010-01-01

    Studies on rats have shown that lactic acid can improve excitability and function of depolarized muscles. The effect has been related to the ensuing reduction in intracellular pH causing inhibition of muscle fibre Cl- channels. Since, however, several carboxylic acids with structural similarities...... to lactate can inhibit muscle Cl- channels it is possible that lactate per se can increase muscle excitability by exerting a direct effect on these channels. We therefore examined effects of lactate on the function of intact muscles and skinned fibres together with effects on pH and Cl- conductance....... In muscles where extracellular compound action potentials (M-waves) and tetanic force response to excitation were reduced by 82±4 and 83±2 %, respectively, by depolarization with 11 mM extracellular K+, both M-waves and force exhibited an up to 4-fold increase when 20 mM lactate was added. This effect...

  1. Imbibition and percentage of germination of cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L. seeds under NaCl stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Diego

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available

    In Colombia cape gooseberry is often grown on salt affected soils. The present study evaluated the effect of increasing NaCl concentrations on imbibition and percentage of germination of ‘Colombia’ ecotype cape gooseberry seeds. Under controlled laboratory conditions (25/20°C day/night temperature, 80% relative humidity, and a 12 hour photoperiod, the seeds were subjected to 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 mM NaCl concentrations (corresponding to respective electrical conductivity levels of 0.8, 3.0, 6.0, 9.0, and 12.2 dS m-1, during an evaluation period of 299 hours. A significantly lower imbibition level, expressed as 35% of the fresh weight accumulated by the control seeds, was observed in the 120 mM NaCl treatment. At the end of the experiment, respective germination percentages of 97.6% and 96.4% were recorded in the salt-free seeds and in those exposed to 30 mM NaCl. In contrast, only 62.5% of those seeds treated with 120 mM NaCl germinated. Root malformations such as lack of elongation were observed in the highest NaCl concentration treatment. Regarding its germination process, cape gooseberry can be classified as moderately tolerant to sodium. In effect, after 299 h of treatment, there was no statistical difference in imbibition level or percentage of germination between the 0, 30 and 60 mM NaCl treatments.

  2. Structural studies of precursor and partially oxidized conducting complexes. XIII. A neutron diffraction and x-ray diffuse scattering study of the dimerized platinum chain in rubidium tetracyanoplatinate chloride (2:1:0.3) trihydrate, Rb2[Pt(CN)4]Cl03.3.0H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.; Johnson, P.L.; Schultz, A.J.; Coffey, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    The crystal structure and molecular formula of the one-dimensional conductor Rb 2 [Pt(CN) 4 ]Cl 0 . 30 . 3.0H 2 O, RbCP(Cl), have been fully characterized using single-crystal neutron diffraction, x-ray diffuse scattering data, and thermogravimetric analysis. RbCP(Cl) is isostructural with KCP(Cl) and KCP(Br) except that only one halide site can be identified. From thermogravimetric analyses RbCP(Cl) is a 3.0 hydrate as is KCP(Br). RbCP(Cl) crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4mm, with unit cell dimensions a = 10.142 (6) A, c = 5.801 (4) A, V/sub c/ = 596.7 A 3 , and Z = 2. Using x-ray diffuse scattering techniques we have established the Pt oxidation as +2.31 (2) from which the molecular formula Rb 2 [Pt(CN) 4 ]Cl/sub 0.31(2)/ . 3.0H 2 O is obtained. The structure consists of nearly planar Pt(CN) 4 moieties stacked along the c axis forming a perfectly linear Pt-Pt chain. The crystal asymmetric unit contains two independent Pt(CN) 4 1 . 7- groups, two H 2 O sites, one Rb + site, and one Cl - site. The asymmetric ordering of the Rb + ion and the H 2 O molecules constitutes the main source of crystal asymmetry. The two-independent Pt-Pt chain distances are definitely unequal (2.877 (8) and 2.924 (8) A) with the average intrachain separation (2.90 A) being slightly longer than in KCP(Br) (2.88 A) and KCP(Cl) (2.87 A). The replacement of K + by Rb + results in lattice expansion along c, which produces larger Pt-Pt intrachain separations. Thus the unequal and slightly longer Pt-Pt separations in RbCP(Cl), apparently result in increased electron localization along the Pt-atom chain and a concomitant decrease in the electrical conductivity. 10 figures, 3 tables

  3. A compilation of information on the {sup 31}P(p,{alpha}){sup 28}Si reaction and properties of excited levels in the compound nucleus {sup 32}S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.E.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Technology Development Div.

    1997-11-01

    This report documents a survey of the literature, and provides a compilation of data contained therein, for the {sup 31}P(p,{alpha}){sup 28}Si reaction. Attention is paid here to resonance states in the compound-nuclear system {sup 32}S formed by {sup 31}P + p, with emphasis on the alpha-particle decay channels, {sup 28}Si + {alpha} which populate specific levels in {sup 28}Si. The energy region near the proton separation energy for {sup 32}S is especially important in this context for applications in nuclear astrophysics. Properties of the excited states in {sup 28}Si are also considered. Summaries of all the located references are provided and numerical data contained in them are compiled in EXFOR format where applicable.

  4. 31 CFR 537.323 - U.S. registered money transmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. registered money transmitter. 537.323 Section 537.323 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... General Definitions § 537.323 U.S. registered money transmitter. The term U.S. registered money...

  5. 31 CFR 538.319 - U.S. registered money transmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. registered money transmitter. 538.319 Section 538.319 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... General Definitions § 538.319 U.S. registered money transmitter. The term U.S. registered money...

  6. 78 FR 54466 - Federal Open Market Committee; Domestic Policy Directive of July 30-31, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... percent. The Committee directs the Desk to undertake open market operations as necessary to maintain such... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM Federal Open Market Committee; Domestic Policy Directive of July 30-31... 271), there is set forth below the domestic policy directive issued by the Federal Open Market...

  7. Putting the pieces together: a crystal clear window into CLC anion channel regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    CLC anion transport proteins function as Cl (-) channels and Cl (-) /H (+) exchangers and are found in all major groups of life including archaebacteria. Early electrophysiological studies suggested that CLC anion channels have two pores that are opened and closed independently by a "fast" gating process operating on a millisecond timescale, and a "common" or "slow" gate that opens and closes both pores simultaneously with a timescale of seconds (Figure 1A). Subsequent biochemical and molecular experiments suggested that CLC channels/transporters are homodomeric proteins ( 1-3) .

  8. Specific non-bonding contacts in the crystal structure of [Mo3(μ3-S)(μ-S2)3(S2CNEt2)3]Cl0.53Br0.47 solid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virovets, A.V.; Volkov, O.V.

    2000-01-01

    Solid solution [Mo 3 S 7 (dtc) 3 ]Cl 0.53 Br 0.47 (dtc diethyl-dithiocarbamate) featuring the following parameters of monoclinic all: a = 14.541(2), b = 12.407(2), c = 18.117(2) A, β = 90.032(9) deg, sp.gr. P2 1 /n, Z = 4, d cal = 2.107 g/cm 3 , was studied by the method of X-ray diffraction analysis. Formation of ionic pairs with axial contact 3S ax ...Br, its length 3.028-3.105 A, in the compound structure was ascertained. For compounds [Mo 3 S 7 (dtc) 3 ] Hal (Hal = Cl, Br, I) a regular growth in S...Hal distances in the series Cl-Br-I was pointed out, meanwhile the distances remained shorted than the van-der-Waals sums of sulfur and halogen radii [ru

  9. Lesão renal aguda séptica versus não séptica em pacientes graves: características e desfechos clínicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Galvão Cruz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Descrever e comparar as características e os desfechos clínicos de pacientes com lesão renal aguda séptica e não séptica. Métodos: Coorte aberta com 117 pacientes graves com lesão renal aguda consecutivamente admitidos em unidade de terapia intensiva, sendo excluídos aqueles que apresentavam doença renal crônica em estágio avançado, transplante renal, internação ou morte em um período inferior a 24 horas. Presença de sepse e óbito intra-hospitalar representaram, respectivamente, a exposição e o desfecho principal. Análise de confundimento foi realizada com a regressão logística. Resultados: Não houve diferenças na média de idade entre os grupos com lesão renal aguda séptica e não séptica [65,30±(21,27 anos versus 66,35±12,82 anos; p=0,75]. Nos dois grupos, similarmente, observou-se predomínio do sexo feminino (57,4% versus 52,4%; p=0,49 e de afrodescendentes (81,5% versus 76,2%; p=0,49. Os pacientes com sepse apresentaram maiores médias de escore Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [21,73±7,26 versus 15,75± (5,98; p18,5 (OR: 9,77; IC95%: 3,73-25,58 foram associados ao óbito. Conclusão: Sepse foi um preditor independente para óbito. Existem diferenças entre as características e desfechos clínicos dos pacientes com lesão renal aguda séptica versus não séptica.

  10. Studies of alpha-helicity and intersegmental interactions in voltage-gated Na+ channels: S2D4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongming Ma

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Much data, including crystallographic, support structural models of sodium and potassium channels consisting of S1-S4 transmembrane segments (the "voltage-sensing domain" clustered around a central pore-forming region (S5-S6 segments and the intervening loop. Voltage gated sodium channels have four non-identical domains which differentiates them from the homotetrameric potassium channels that form the basis for current structural models. Since potassium and sodium channels also exhibit many different functional characteristics and the fourth domain (D4 of sodium channels differs in function from other domains (D1-D3, we have explored its structure in order to determine whether segments in D4 of sodium channels differ significantly from that determined for potassium channels. We have probed the secondary and tertiary structure and the role of the individual amino acid residues of the S2D4 of Na(v1.4 by employing cysteine-scanning mutagenesis (with tryptophan and glutamine substituted for native cysteine. A Fourier transform power spectrum of perturbations in free energy of steady-state inactivation gating (using midpoint potentials and slopes of Boltzmann equation fits of channel availability, h(infinity-V plots indicates a substantial amount of alpha-helical structure in S2D4 (peak at 106 degrees, alpha-Periodicity Index (alpha-PI of 3.10, This conclusion is supported by alpha-PI values of 3.28 and 2.84 for the perturbations in rate constants of entry into (beta and exit from (alpha fast inactivation at 0 mV for mutant channels relative to WT channels assuming a simple two-state model for transition from the open to inactivated state. The results of cysteine substitution at the two most sensitive sites of the S2D4 alpha-helix (N1382 and E1392C support the existence of electrostatic network interactions between S2 and other transmembrane segments within Na(v1.4D4 similar to but not identical to those proposed for K+ channels.

  11. 30 CFR 36.31 - Fire extinguisher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Construction and Design Requirements § 36.31 Fire extinguisher. Each unit of mobile diesel-powered... an active charge of not less than 4 pounds. Pressurized dry chemical extinguishers shall contain an...

  12. Chloride Ion Transport by the E. coli CLC Cl-/H+ Antiporter: A Combined Quantum-Mechanical and Molecular-Mechanical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Hung; Duster, Adam W; Aydintug, Baris O; Zarecki, MacKenzie G; Lin, Hai

    2018-01-01

    We performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) and umbrella sampling simulations of Cl - ion migration through the transmembrane domain of a prototypical E. coli CLC Cl - /H + antiporter by employing combined quantum-mechanical (QM) and molecular-mechanical (MM) calculations. The SMD simulations revealed interesting conformational changes of the protein. While no large-amplitude motions of the protein were observed during pore opening, the side chain rotation of the protonated external gating residue Glu148 was found to be critical for full access of the channel entrance by Cl - . Moving the anion into the external binding site (S ext ) induced small-amplitude shifting of the protein backbone at the N-terminal end of helix F. As Cl - traveled through the pore, rigid-body swinging motions of helix R separated it from helix D. Helix R returned to its original position once Cl - exited the channel. Population analysis based on polarized wavefunction from QM/MM calculations discovered significant (up to 20%) charge loss for Cl - along the ion translocation pathway inside the pore. The delocalized charge was redistributed onto the pore residues, especially the functional groups containing π bonds (e.g., the Tyr445 side chain), while the charges of the H atoms coordinating Cl - changed almost negligibly. Potentials of mean force computed from umbrella sampling at the QM/MM and MM levels both displayed barriers at the same locations near the pore entrance and exit. However, the QM/MM PMF showed higher barriers (~10 kcal/mol) than the MM PMF (~2 kcal/mol). Binding energy calculations indicated that the interactions between Cl - and certain pore residues were overestimated by the semi-empirical PM3 Hamiltonian and underestimated by the CHARMM36 force fields, both of which were employed in the umbrella sampling simulations. In particular, CHARMM36 underestimated binding interactions for the functional groups containing π bonds, missing the stabilizations of the Cl - ion due

  13. Measurement of Reactions on 30P for Nova Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z.; Guidry, M. W.; Hix, W. R.; Smith, M. S.

    2003-05-01

    Replace these paragraphs with your abstract. We encourage you to include a sentence acknowledging your funding agency. In a recent study the 30P(p,gamma)31S rate played a crucial role in the synthesis of heavier nuclear species, from Si to Ca, in nova outbursts on ONe White Dwarfs [1]. The adopted rate of this reaction, based on a Hauser-Feshbach calculation [2], has a large uncertainty and could be as much as a factor of 100 too high or too low [3]. In their study, Jose et al.[1] varied the 30P(p,gamma)31S reaction rate within this uncertainty and found that, when rate is reduced by a factor of 100, the synthesis of elements above Si is lowered by a factor 10 with respect to the values found with the nominal rate. This has important consequences for nova nucleosynthesis, as overproduction of isotopes in the Si to Ca mass region has been observed in the ejecta from some nova explosions (e.g.,[4,5]). While generally valid at higher temperatures, Hauser-Feshbach calculations of the rates at nova temperatures can have large uncertainties. At these temperatures, the rate is more likely dominated by a few individual nuclear resonances. At present there are about 10 31S resonances known above the 30P + p threshold that may contribute to the 30P(p,gamma)31S reaction rate at nova temperatures. The excitation energies of these levels are known but spins and parities (for all but two) are not. We plan to measure the 30P(p,p)30P and 30P(p,gamma)31S reactions at HRIBF to better determine this reaction rate. A detailed description of the experiments will be given. We are also conducting a new nova nucleosynthesis simulation over multiple spatial zones of the exploding envelope to investigate the influence of the 30P(p,gamma)31S reaction rate on nova nucleosynthesis. The results of these calculations will be discussed. 1. Jose , J., Coc, A., Hernanz, M., Astrophys. J., 560, 897(2001). 2. Thielemann, F.-K et al., 1987, Advances in Nuclear Astrophysics, ed. E. Vangioni-Flam ( Gif

  14. Charge-Transfer-Induced p-Type Channel in MoS2 Flake Field Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sung-Wook; Yoon, Minho; Yang, Sung Jin; Ko, Kyeong Rok; Im, Seongil

    2018-01-31

    The two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide semiconductor MoS 2 has received extensive attention for decades because of its outstanding electrical and mechanical properties for next-generation devices. One weakness of MoS 2 , however, is that it shows only n-type conduction, revealing its limitations for homogeneous PN diodes and complementary inverters. Here, we introduce a charge-transfer method to modify the conduction property of MoS 2 from n- to p-type. We initially deposited an n-type InGaZnO (IGZO) film on top of the MoS 2 flake so that electron charges might be transferred from MoS 2 to IGZO during air ambient annealing. As a result, electron charges were depleted in MoS 2 . Such charge depletion lowered the MoS 2 Fermi level, which makes hole conduction favorable in MoS 2 when optimum source/drain electrodes with a high work function are selected. Our IGZO-supported MoS 2 flake field effect transistors (FETs) clearly display channel-type conversion from n- to p-channel in this way. Under short- and long-annealing conditions, n- and p-channel MoS 2 FETs are achieved, respectively, and a low-voltage complementary inverter is demonstrated using both channels in a single MoS 2 flake.

  15. Rapport financier trimestriel pour le trimestre qui a pris fin le 31

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sophie Comeau

    31 déc. 2011 ... politiques, de chercheurs et de collectivités de par le monde. ..... qui a été choisi à l'issue d'un processus de recrutement mené ... Les bureaux régionaux constituent une ressource stratégique et un élément clé du modèle de.

  16. Presence of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels in chemosensory cilia support a role in odor transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Ricardo; Saavedra, M Veronica; Schmachtenberg, Oliver; Sierralta, Jimena; Bacigalupo, Juan

    2003-09-01

    Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) respond to odorants with changes in the action potential firing rate. Excitatory responses, consisting of firing increases, are mediated by a cyclic AMP cascade that leads to the activation of cationic nonselective cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and Ca2+-dependent Cl- (ClCa) channels. This process takes place in the olfactory cilia, where all protein components of this cascade are confined. ORNs from various vertebrate species have also been shown to generate inhibitory odor responses, expressed as decreases in action potential discharges. Odor inhibition appears to rely on Ca2+-dependent K+ (KCa) channels, but the underlying transduction mechanism remains unknown. If these channels are involved in odor transduction, they are expected to be present in the olfactory cilia. We found that a specific antibody against a large conductance KCa recognized a protein of approximately 116 kDa in Western blots of purified rat olfactory ciliary membranes. Moreover, the antibody labeled ORN cilia in isolated ORNs from rat and toad (Caudiverbera caudiverbera). In addition, single-channel recordings from inside-out membrane patches excised from toad chemosensory cilia showed the presence of 4 different types of KCa channels, with unitary conductances of 210, 60, 12, and 29 and 60 pS, high K+-selectivity, and Ca2+ sensitivities in the low micromolar range. Our work demonstrates the presence of K+ channels in the ORN cilia and supports their participation in odor transduction.

  17. Theoretical study and rate constant calculation for the reactions of SH (SD) with Cl2, Br2, and BrCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Jing-Yao; Li, Ze-Sheng; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2005-01-30

    The mechanisms of the SH (SD) radicals with Cl2 (R1), Br2 (R2), and BrCl (R3) are investigated theoretically, and the rate constants are calculated using a dual-level direct dynamics method. The optimized geometries and frequencies of the stationary points are calculated at the MP2/6-311G(d,p) and MPW1K/6-311G(d,p) levels. Higher-level energies are obtained at the approximate QCISD(T)/6-311++G(3df, 2pd) level using the MP2 geometries as well as by the multicoefficient correlation method based on QCISD (MC-QCISD) using the MPW1K geometries. Complexes with energies less than those of the reactants or products are located at the entrance or the exit channels of these reactions, which indicate that the reactions may proceed via an indirect mechanism. The enthalpies of formation for the species XSH/XSD (X = Cl and Br) are evaluated using hydrogenation working reactions method. By canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT), the rate constants of SH and SD radicals with Cl2, Br2, and BrCl are calculated over a wide temperature range of 200-2000 K at the a-QCISD(T)/6-311++G(3df, 2pd)//MP2/6-311G(d, p) level. Good agreement between the calculated and experimental rate constants is obtained in the measured temperature range. Our calculations show that for SH (SD) + BrCl reaction bromine abstraction (R3a or R3a') leading to the formation of BrSH (BrSD) + Cl in a barrierless process dominants the reaction with the branching ratios for channels 3a and 3a' of 99% at 298 K, which is quite different from the experimental result of k3a'/k3' = 54 +/- 10%. Negative activation energies are found at the higher level for the SH + Br2 and SH + BrCl (Br-abstraction) reactions; as a result, the rate constants show a slightly negative temperature dependence, which is consistent with the determination in the literature. The kinetic isotope effects for the three reactions are "inverse". The values of kH/kD are 0.88, 0.91, and 0.69 at room temperature, respectively, and they increase

  18. International and Pan-European News Channels: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Thierry Vissol

    2005-01-01

    The European television industry has evolved in a dramatic way since the beginning of the 90’s. The number of channels has been multiplied by 12, the share of the public television decreased to around 30 %, and the number of thematic channels is in thousands. In this general landscape, generalist TV channels (public or private), that still hold the bulk of the audience are nevertheless losing ground. In the same time the trust of their viewers in the quality of the information transmitted in ...

  19. Discrepancias entre diagnósticos clínicos y hallazgos de autopsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Virginia Bürgesser

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo principal del presente trabajo fue identificar las discrepancias clínico-patológicas en las autopsias realizadas en la institución. Se revisaron 53 autopsias de casos clínicos en adultos en el período comprendido entre enero de 2005 y junio de 2009, realizadas en el servicio de Anatomía Patológica del Hospital Privado de Córdoba, Argentina. Se excluyeron seis debido a información insuficiente. Se aplicó la clasificación de Goldman y col. para establecer las discrepancias clínico-patológicas entre los diagnósticos pre y post-mortem. Los diagnósticos clínicos más frecuentes fueron las infecciones respiratorias y el tromboembolismo pulmonar agudo. Los hallazgos de autopsia más frecuentes fueron las infecciones respiratorias y el infarto agudo de miocardio. Se detectaron 17 discrepancias mayores y 30 concordancias, no se detectaron discrepancias menores. Las infecciones respiratorias fueron la principal causa de error, seguidas por el infarto agudo de miocardio. Concluimos que en 17/47 (37% de los casos se realizó un diagnóstico clínico diferente al post-mortem, y que las infecciones respiratorias constituyen el principal tipo de error. Se sugiere adoptar estrategias informativas y educativas, revalorizar la autopsia y las prácticas clínicas tradicionales.

  20. Caracterización clínico genética del síndrome Prader Willi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitery Travieso Tellez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: el síndrome Prader Willi es un desorden genético causado por la pérdida de genes contenidos en la región 15q11-q13 del cromosoma paterno. Objetivo: describir las características clínicas y genéticas de los pacientes con síndrome Prader Willi. Material y método: se realizó un estudio descriptivo, de corte transversal, con el universo de 15 pacientes con sospecha de síndrome Prader Willi remitidos a consulta provincial de Genética Clínica durante el año 2013. Se consideraron como variables clínicas los criterios diagnósticos según Holms, y como variables genéticas los resultados de los estudios cromosómicos y moleculares. Resultados: predominó el sexo femenino en un 66.7%. Las edades estuvieron entre los tres y los 41 años. Los criterios mayores más frecuentes resultaron la obesidad troncular y el retraso del neurodesarrollo en el 100% de los pacientes. Los criterios menores más identificados fueron los disturbios del sueño y las dificultades del lenguaje con un 66.7% cada uno. En ninguno de los casos se detectaron anomalías cromosómicas por cariotipificación. Tres pacientes (60% presentaron la deleción a nivel de la región 15q11-q13 identificada por la técnica de hibridación in sito con fluorescencia. Conclusiones: la definición del diagnóstico en la provincia resulta demorada. Se requiere de reevaluación según los criterios clínicos en las diferentes etapas de la vida para diagnóstico de certeza. La presencia de hipotonía neonatal y dificultades en la alimentación son elementos asociados al diagnóstico por deleción 15q11-q13.

  1. A theoretical study of the mechanism of the atmospherically relevant reaction of chlorine atoms with methyl nitrate, and calculation of the reaction rate coefficients at temperatures relevant to the troposphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Maggie; Mok, Daniel K W; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2015-03-21

    The reaction between atomic chlorine (Cl) and methyl nitrate (CH3ONO2) is significant in the atmosphere, as Cl is a key oxidant, especially in the marine boundary layer, and alkyl nitrates are important nitrogen-containing organic compounds, which are temporary reservoirs of the reactive nitrogen oxides NO, NO2 and NO3 (NOx). Four reaction channels HCl + CH2ONO2, CH3OCl + NO2, CH3Cl + NO3 and CH3O + ClNO2 were considered. The major channel is found to be the H abstraction channel, to give the products HCl + CH2ONO2. For all channels, geometry optimization and frequency calculations were carried out at the M06-2X/6-31+G** level, while relative electronic energies were improved to the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS level. The reaction barrier (ΔE(‡)0K) and reaction enthalpy (ΔH(RX)298K) of the H abstraction channel were computed to be 0.61 and -2.30 kcal mol(-1), respectively, at the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS//M06-2X/6-31+G** level. Reaction barriers (ΔE(‡)0K) for the other channels are more positive and these pathways do not contribute to the overall reaction rate coefficient in the temperature range considered (200-400 K). Rate coefficients were calculated for the H-abstraction channel at various levels of variational transition state theory (VTST) including tunnelling. Recommended ICVT/SCT rate coefficients in the temperature range 200-400 K are presented for the first time for this reaction. The values obtained in the 200-300 K region are particularly important as they will be valuable for atmospheric modelling calculations involving reactions with methyl nitrate. The implications of the results to atmospheric chemistry are discussed. Also, the enthalpies of formation, ΔHf,298K, of CH3ONO2 and CH2ONO2 were computed to be -29.7 and 19.3 kcal mol(-1), respectively, at the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS level.

  2. Possíveis contribuições de Husserl e Heidegger para a clínica fenomenológica Possibles contribuciones de Husserl y Heidegger para la clínica fenomenológica Husserl´s and Heidegger´s possible contributions to clinical phenomenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Moreira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como objetivo descrever as possíveis contribuições das filosofias de Edmund Husserl e Martin Heidegger para o desenvolvimento de uma clínica fenomenológica. Reconhece-se que Husserl, com sua Psicologia Fenomenológica, inaugura uma psicologia da subjetividade que pode servir de base para a clínica fenomenológica. O artigo também discute as contribuições e possíveis limitações das propostas clínicas de Ludwig Binswanger e Medard Boss, que procuram fundamentar-se na Analítica do Dasein de Heidegger, e propõe a fenomenologia existencial de Merleau-Ponty, que retoma o último pensamento de Husserl tendo como fio condutor o conceito de Lebenswelt, como um caminho fecundo para a clínica fenomenológica.Este artículo tiene como objetivo describir las posibles contribuciones de las filosofías de Edmund Husserl y Martin Heidegger para el desarrollo de una clínica fenomenológica. Reconoce que Husserl, con su Psicología Fenomenológica, inaugura una psicología de la subjetividad, que puede servir de base para la clínica fenomenológica. Discute las contribuciones y posibles limitaciones de las propuestas clínicas de Ludwig Binswanger y Medard Boss, que se proponen a tener como fundamentó la Analítica del Dasein de Heidegger. Sugiere la fenomenología existencial de Merleau-Ponty, que retoma el pensamiento del último Husserl teniendo como hilo conductor el concepto de Lebenswelt, como un camino fecundo para la clínica fenomenológica.This article aims to describe the possible contributions of Edmund Husserl´s and Martin Heidegger´s philosophies to the development of a phenomenological clinic. It recognizes that Husserl, with his Phenomenological Psychology, inaugurates a psychology of subjective, which may serve as basis to the phenomenological clinic. It discusses the contributions and possible limitations of Ludwig Binswanger´s and Medard Boss’s clinical proposals, which aim to be funded on Heidegger´s

  3. 31 CFR 29.311 - Credit only for service performed on or before June 30, 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Credit only for service performed on or before June 30, 1997. 29.311 Section 29.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of... Benefits General Principles for Determining Service Credit to Calculate Federal Benefit Payments § 29.311...

  4. Specification for switching magnets type S30, S45 and S60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornell, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    This document specifies 3 types of symmetric, water-cooled dipole switching magnets, type S30 with a maximum bend angle of plus minus 30 0 type S45 with bend angles of +45 0 and -45 0 only and type S60 with bend angles up to plus minus 60 0 . One magnet of each type will be required. These magnets will form part of the beam distribution system for the 200 MeV separated-sector cyclotron at the National Accelerator Centre of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research at Faure

  5. A cyclic nucleotide-gated channel mutation associated with canine daylight blindness provides insight into a role for the S2 segment tri-Asp motif in channel biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Tanaka

    Full Text Available Cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels are tetramers formed by CNGA3 and CNGB3 subunits; CNGA3 subunits function as homotetrameric channels but CNGB3 exhibits channel function only when co-expressed with CNGA3. An aspartatic acid (Asp to asparagine (Asn missense mutation at position 262 in the canine CNGB3 (D262N subunit results in loss of cone function (daylight blindness, suggesting an important role for this aspartic acid residue in channel biogenesis and/or function. Asp 262 is located in a conserved region of the second transmembrane segment containing three Asp residues designated the Tri-Asp motif. This motif is conserved in all CNG channels. Here we examine mutations in canine CNGA3 homomeric channels using a combination of experimental and computational approaches. Mutations of these conserved Asp residues result in the absence of nucleotide-activated currents in heterologous expression. A fluorescent tag on CNGA3 shows mislocalization of mutant channels. Co-expressing CNGB3 Tri-Asp mutants with wild type CNGA3 results in some functional channels, however, their electrophysiological characterization matches the properties of homomeric CNGA3 channels. This failure to record heteromeric currents suggests that Asp/Asn mutations affect heteromeric subunit assembly. A homology model of S1-S6 of the CNGA3 channel was generated and relaxed in a membrane using molecular dynamics simulations. The model predicts that the Tri-Asp motif is involved in non-specific salt bridge pairings with positive residues of S3/S4. We propose that the D262N mutation in dogs with CNGB3-day blindness results in the loss of these inter-helical interactions altering the electrostatic equilibrium within in the S1-S4 bundle. Because residues analogous to Tri-Asp in the voltage-gated Shaker potassium channel family were implicated in monomer folding, we hypothesize that destabilizing these electrostatic interactions impairs the monomer folding state in D262N mutant CNG

  6. The ladder-shaped polyether toxin gambierol anchors the gating machinery of Kv3.1 channels in the resting state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopljar, Ivan; Labro, Alain J.; de Block, Tessa; Rainier, Jon D.; Tytgat, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) and sodium (Nav) channels are key determinants of cellular excitability and serve as targets of neurotoxins. Most marine ciguatoxins potentiate Nav channels and cause ciguatera seafood poisoning. Several ciguatoxins have also been shown to affect Kv channels, and we showed previously that the ladder-shaped polyether toxin gambierol is a potent Kv channel inhibitor. Most likely, gambierol acts via a lipid-exposed binding site, located outside the K+ permeation pathway. However, the mechanism by which gambierol inhibits Kv channels remained unknown. Using gating and ionic current analysis to investigate how gambierol affected S6 gate opening and voltage-sensing domain (VSD) movements, we show that the resting (closed) channel conformation forms the high-affinity state for gambierol. The voltage dependence of activation was shifted by >120 mV in the depolarizing direction, precluding channel opening in the physiological voltage range. The (early) transitions between the resting and the open state were monitored with gating currents, and provided evidence that strong depolarizations allowed VSD movement up to the activated-not-open state. However, for transition to the fully open (ion-conducting) state, the toxin first needed to dissociate. These dissociation kinetics were markedly accelerated in the activated-not-open state, presumably because this state displayed a much lower affinity for gambierol. A tetrameric concatemer with only one high-affinity binding site still displayed high toxin sensitivity, suggesting that interaction with a single binding site prevented the concerted step required for channel opening. We propose a mechanism whereby gambierol anchors the channel’s gating machinery in the resting state, requiring more work from the VSD to open the channel. This mechanism is quite different from the action of classical gating modifier peptides (e.g., hanatoxin). Therefore, polyether toxins open new opportunities in structure

  7. Characterization of acid flux in osteoclasts from patients harboring a G215R mutation in ClC-7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Kim; Gram, Jeppe; Neutzsky-Wulff, Anita Vibsig

    2008-01-01

    -I, calcium release, and pit area when comparing to age and sex matched controls. In addition, the ADOII osteoclasts showed no differences in actin ring formation. Finally, V-ATPase and chloride channel inhibitors completely abrogated the H(+) and Cl(-) driven acidification. Finally, the acid influx...... mutation in ClC-7 (G215R) were isolated, and used these to investigate bone resorption measured by CTX-I, calcium release and pit scoring. The actin cytoskeleton of the osteoclasts was also investigated. ClC-7 enriched membranes from the osteoclasts were isolated, and used to test acidification rates...... in the presence of a V-ATPase and a chloride channel inhibitor, using a H(+) and Cl(-) driven approach. Finally, acidification rates in ClC-7 enriched membranes from ADOII osteoclasts and their corresponding controls were compared. Resorption by the G215R osteoclasts was reduced by 60% when measured by both CTX...

  8. Comparative study of SnS recrystallization in molten CdI{sub 2}, SnCl{sub 2}and KI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmo, Kristi; Kauk-Kuusik, Marit; Pilvet, Maris; Mikli, Valdek; Kaerber, Erki; Raadik, Taavi; Leinemann, Inga; Altosaar, Mare; Raudoja, Jaan [Department of Materials Science, Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2016-01-15

    In the present study, the recrystallization of polycrystalline SnS in different molten salts CdI{sub 2}, SnCl{sub 2} and KI as flux materials are presented. The recrystallization and growth of polycrystalline material in molten salts produces unique SnS monograin powders usable in monograin layer solar cells. XRD and Raman analysis revealed that single phase SnS powder can be obtained in KI at 740 C and in SnCl{sub 2} at 500 C. Long time heating of SnS in molten CdI{sub 2} was accompanied by chemical interaction between SnS and CdI{sub 2} that resulted in a mixture of CdS and Sn{sub 2}S{sub 3} crystals. SEM images showed that morphology of crystals can be controlled by the nature of the flux materials: needle-like Sn{sub 2}S{sub 3} together with round edged crystals of CdS in CdI{sub 2}, flat crystals of SnS with smooth surfaces in SnCl{sub 2} and well-formed SnS crystals with rounded edges in KI had been formed. The temperatures of phase transitions and/or the interactions of SnS and flux materials were determined by differential thermal analysis. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Modular version of SIMCON, FPGA based, DSP integrated, LLRF control system for TESLA FEL part II: measurement of SIMCON 3.0 DSP daughterboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giergusiewicz, Wojciech; Koprek, Waldemar; Jalmuzna, Wojciech; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2006-02-01

    The paper describes design, construction and initial measurements of an eight channel electronic LLRF device predicted for building of the control system for the W-FEL accelerator at DESY (Hamburg). The device, referred in the paper to as the SIMCON 3.0 (from the SC cavity simulator and controller) consists of a 16 layer, VME size, PCB, a large FPGA chip (VirtexII-4000 by Xilinx), eight fast ADCs and four DACs (by Analog Devices). To our knowledge, the proposed device is the first of this kind for the accelerator technology in which there was achieved (the FPGA based) DSP latency below 200 ns. With the optimized data transmission system, the overall LLRF system latency can be as low as 500 ns. The SIMCON 3.0 sub-system was applied for initial tests with the ACCl module of the VUV FEL accelerator (eight channels) and with the CHECHIA test stand (single channel), both at the DESY. The promising results with the SIMCON 3.0. encouraged us to enter the design of SIMCON 3.1. possessing 10 measurement and control channels and some additional features to be reported in the next technical note. SIMCON 3.0. is a modular solution, while SIMCON 3.1. will be an integrated board of the all-in-one type. Two design approaches - modular and all-in-one - after branching off in this version of the Simcon, will be continued.

  10. Development of mechanical properties in a CaO added AZ31 magnesium alloy processed by equal-channel angular pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Seong-Hwan [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Metal Forming Technology R& D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Ki Ho; Shin, Young-Chul; Yoon, Duk Jae [Metal Forming Technology R& D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kawasaki, Megumi, E-mail: megumi@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Departments of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Processing through the application of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) is recognized as one of the attractive severe plastic deformation techniques where the processed bulk metals generally achieve ultrafine-grained microstructure leading to improved physical characteristics and mechanical properties. Magnesium has received much attention to date for its lightweight, high strength and excellent elasticity. Mg alloys with addition of CaO is reported to provide the successful casting procedure without usage of greenhouse gas, SF{sub 6}, whereas it is generally used for preventing the oxidation of Mg during casting. In the present investigation, a CaO added AZ31 (AZ31-CaO) magnesium alloy was processed by ECAP at elevated temepratures with a few steps of reduction which result in significant grain refinement to ~ 1.5 μm after 6 passes. Compression testing at room temperature demonstrated the AZ31-CaO alloy after ECAP showed enhanced yield strength more than the as-processed commercial AZ31 alloy while both alloys maintained ductility in spite of significant reduction in grain size. The improved strength in the AZ31-CaO alloy was attributed to the formation of fine Al{sub 2}Ca precipitates which experience breaking-up through ECAP and accelerate the microstructural refinement. Moreover, the preservation of ductility was attributed to the enhancement of strain hardening capability in the AZ31 alloy at room temperature. This study discusses the feasibility of using ECAP to improve both strength and ductility on magnesium alloys by applying the diagram describing the paradox of strength and ductility. - Highlights: • AZ31 and AZ31-CaO magnesium alloys were processed by ECAP up to 6 passes. • AZ31-CaO alloy after ECAP showed improved yield strength without losing ductility. • CaO in AZ31 forms fine Al{sub 2}Ca accelerating microstructural refinement during ECAP. • Feasibility of using ECAP was shown to improve both strength and ductility in Mg.

  11. Development of mechanical properties in a CaO added AZ31 magnesium alloy processed by equal-channel angular pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Seong-Hwan; Jung, Ki Ho; Shin, Young-Chul; Yoon, Duk Jae; Kawasaki, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    Processing through the application of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) is recognized as one of the attractive severe plastic deformation techniques where the processed bulk metals generally achieve ultrafine-grained microstructure leading to improved physical characteristics and mechanical properties. Magnesium has received much attention to date for its lightweight, high strength and excellent elasticity. Mg alloys with addition of CaO is reported to provide the successful casting procedure without usage of greenhouse gas, SF 6 , whereas it is generally used for preventing the oxidation of Mg during casting. In the present investigation, a CaO added AZ31 (AZ31-CaO) magnesium alloy was processed by ECAP at elevated temepratures with a few steps of reduction which result in significant grain refinement to ~ 1.5 μm after 6 passes. Compression testing at room temperature demonstrated the AZ31-CaO alloy after ECAP showed enhanced yield strength more than the as-processed commercial AZ31 alloy while both alloys maintained ductility in spite of significant reduction in grain size. The improved strength in the AZ31-CaO alloy was attributed to the formation of fine Al 2 Ca precipitates which experience breaking-up through ECAP and accelerate the microstructural refinement. Moreover, the preservation of ductility was attributed to the enhancement of strain hardening capability in the AZ31 alloy at room temperature. This study discusses the feasibility of using ECAP to improve both strength and ductility on magnesium alloys by applying the diagram describing the paradox of strength and ductility. - Highlights: • AZ31 and AZ31-CaO magnesium alloys were processed by ECAP up to 6 passes. • AZ31-CaO alloy after ECAP showed improved yield strength without losing ductility. • CaO in AZ31 forms fine Al 2 Ca accelerating microstructural refinement during ECAP. • Feasibility of using ECAP was shown to improve both strength and ductility in Mg.

  12. 31 CFR 29.312 - All requirements for credit must be satisfied by June 30, 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false All requirements for credit must be satisfied by June 30, 1997. 29.312 Section 29.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... General Principles for Determining Service Credit to Calculate Federal Benefit Payments § 29.312 All...

  13. Chemometric analysis of the consumption of oral rinse chlorite (ClO2-) by human salivary biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hubert; Blackburn, John; Grootveld, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Oral rinse formulations containing chlorite anion (ClO(2)(-)) as an active agent exert a range of valuable oral healthcare activities. However, salivary biomolecules which chemically react with this oxidant can, at least in principle, serve as potentially significant barriers to these therapeutic properties in the oral environment. Therefore, in this investigation, we have explored the extent of ClO(2)(-) consumption by biomolecules which scavenge this agent in human salivary supernatants (HSSs) in vitro. HSS samples were equilibrated with oral rinse formulations containing this active agent (30 s at 35 °C in order to mimic oral rinsing episodes). Differential spectrophotometric and ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic analyses were employed to determine residual ClO(2)(-) in these admixtures. Bioanalytical data acquired revealed the rapid consumption of ClO(2)(-) by biomolecular electron donors and/or antioxidants present in HSS samples. Mean ± 95 % confidence interval (CI) consumption levels of 7.14 ± 0.69 and 5.34 ± 0.69 % of the total ClO(2)(-) available were found for oral rinse products containing 0.10 and 0.40 % (w/v) ClO(2)(-), respectively. A mixed model analysis-of-variance performed on experimental data acquired demonstrated highly-significant differences between oral rinse ClO(2)(-) contents (p biomolecules for both oral rinse formulations investigated. These observations are of much clinical significance in view of the retention of these products' active agent, i.e. biomolecules within recommended 30 s oral rinsing episodes, and hence, the bulk of this oxyhalogen oxidant (>90 %) may effectively exert its essential microbicidal, anti-periodontal and oral malodour-neutralising actions.

  14. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl- ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Electrical membrane properties of skeletal muscle fibers have been thoroughly studied over the last five to six decades. This has shown that muscle fibers from a wide range of species, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, are all characterized by high resting membrane...... temporal resolution in action potential firing muscle fibers. These and other techniques have revealed that ClC-1 function is controlled by multiple cellular signals during muscle activity. Thus, onset of muscle activity triggers ClC-1 inhibition via protein kinase C, intracellular acidosis, and lactate...

  15. Angiotensin II stimulates basolateral 50-pS K channels in the thick ascending limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxiao; Luan, Haiyan; Wu, Peng; Fan, Lili; Wang, Lijun; Duan, Xinpeng; Zhang, Dandan; Wang, Wen-Hui; Gu, Ruimin

    2014-03-01

    We used the patch-clamp technique to examine the effect of angiotensin II (ANG II) on the basolateral K channels in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the rat kidney. Application of ANG II increased the channel activity and the current amplitude of the basolateral 50-pS K channel. The stimulatory effect of ANG II on the K channels was completely abolished by losartan, an inhibitor of type 1 angiotensin receptor (AT1R), but not by PD123319, an AT2R antagonist. Moreover, inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) also abrogated the stimulatory effect of ANG II on the basolateral K channels in the TAL. This suggests that the stimulatory effect of ANG II on the K channels was induced by activating PLC and PKC pathways. Western blotting demonstrated that ANG II increased the phosphorylation of c-Src at tyrosine residue 416, an indication of c-Src activation. This effect was mimicked by PKC stimulator but abolished by calphostin C. Moreover, inhibition of NADPH oxidase (NOX) also blocked the effect of ANG II on c-Src tyrosine phosphorylation. The role of Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (SFK) in mediating the effect of ANG II on the basolateral K channel was further suggested by the experiments in which inhibition of SFK abrogated the stimulatory effect of ANG II on the basolateral 50-pS K channel. We conclude that ANG II increases basolateral 50-pS K channel activity via AT1R and that activation of AT1R stimulates SFK by a PLC-PKC-NOX-dependent mechanism.

  16. Phosphole complexes of Gold(I) halides: Comparison of solution and solid-state structures by a combination of solution and CP/MAS 31P NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attar, S.; Nelson, J.H.; Bearden, W.H.; Alcock, N.W.; Alyea, E.C.

    1990-01-01

    A series of complexes of 1-phenyldibenzophosphole (DBP), 1-phenyl-3,4,-dimethylphosphole (DMPP), and triphenylphosphine of the type L n AuX (n = 1, L = DBP, DMPP, Ph 3 P, X = Cl, Br, I; n = 3, L = DBP, X = Cl, Br, I; n = 3, L = Ph 3 P, X = Cl; n = 4, L = DBP, DMPP, X = PF 6 ) have been prepared and characterized. The structures of (DBP)AuCl (1), (DBP) 3 AuCl (2), and (DMPP)AuCl (3) have been determined from three-dimensional x-ray data collected by counter methods. Crystal structure of the complexes is reported. The CP/MAS 31 P( 1 H) NMR spectrum of complex 1 shows two resonances in a 1:1 intensity ratio, and the CP/MAS 31 P( 1 H) NMR spectrum of complex 3 shows three resonances in a 1:1:1 intensity ratio for reasons that are not yet understood. Though the three phospholes are crystallographically inequivalent (d(AuP) = 2.359 (1), 2.382 (1), and 2.374 (2) angstrom) the molecule has effective C s symmetry as evidenced by the observation of two 31 P resonances in a 2:1 intensity ratio in its CP/MAS 31 P( 1 H) NMR spectrum. Variable-temperature 31 P( 1 H) NMR spectra obtained on solutions of LAuCl + L in various ratios were analyzed to determine the nature of the species present in solution and to gain information regarding their relative stabilities as a function of the nature of the phosphine. 79 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs

  17. Measurement of single top production in the tW channel and search for s channel in pp collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Merola, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of single top quark production in the tW and s channels in pp collisions are presented, based on data collected in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. In the tW channel a top quark is produced in association with a W boson. The experimental signature is similar to top pair production, and there is interference at higher orders between the two processes. The measurement is perfomed using final states in which the associated W boson as well as the one originating from the top quark decay leptonically. Multivariate methods are used to extract the cross section and the result is compared with current standard model theory predictions. Multivariatetechniques are also adopted in the search for s-channel single top quark production inorder to discriminate the very small signal from the huge contribution of background processes. In both analyses the signal contribution is determined together with the background estimation by performing a maximum-likelihood fit to the Boosted Decision Trees discrimi...

  18. ZnCl 2- and NH 4Cl-hydroponics gel electrolytes for zinc-carbon batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, N. H.; Ismail, Y. M. Baba; Mohamad, A. A.

    Absorbency testing is used to determine the percentage of ZnCl 2 or NH 4Cl solution absorbed by a hydroponics gel (HPG). It is found that the absorbency of ZnCl 2 or NH 4Cl solution decreases with increasing solution concentration. The conductivity of ZnCl 2- and NH 4Cl-HPG electrolytes is dependent on the solution concentration. A mixture of salt solution with HPG yields excellent gel polymer electrolytes with conductivities of 0.026 and 0.104 S cm -1 at 3 M ZnCl 2 and 7 M NH 4Cl, respectively. These gel electrolytes are then used to produce zinc-carbon cells. The fabricated cells give capacities of 8.8 and 10.0 mAh, have an internal resistance of 25.4 and 19.8 Ω, a maximum power density of 12.7 and 12.2 mW cm -2, and a short-circuit current density of 29.1 and 33.9 mA cm -2 for ZnCl 2- and NH 4Cl-HPG electrolytes, respectively.

  19. Copper diffusion in In2S3 and charge separation at In2S3/CuSCN and TiO2/In2S3 interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juma, Albert Owino

    2013-01-01

    The concept of inorganic nanostructured solar cells consists of a very thin absorber layer sandwiched between highly structured electron and hole conductors. When a TiO 2 /In 2 S 3 /CuSCN nanocomposite heterostructure is illuminated with light, photo-generated electrons in In 2 S 3 can be injected into the conduction band of TiO 2 and holes into the valence band of CuSCN. Charge transfer at the interfaces is limited by the deposition parameters, band alignment and diffusion of Cu from CuSCN into In 2 S 3 , which was the focus of this work. TiO 2 nanoparticles were screen printed onto SnO 2 :F (FTO)-coated glass substrates to give a layer of nanoporous (np) TiO 2 . In 2 S 3 layers were deposited by thermal evaporation or ion layer gas reaction (ILGAR) methods producing Cl-free (In(acac) 3 precursor) and Cl-containing (InCl 3 precursor) layers. A spray-spin method was developed for deposition of CuSCN onto In 2 S 3 . Diffusion of Cu into In 2 S 3 layers was investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) while charge transport mechanisms were studied with surface photovoltage (SPV) technique in the fixed capacitor configuration. The activation energy (Ea) for Cu diffusion in thermally evaporated and Cl-free ILGAR In 2 S 3 layers was 0.30 and 0.24 eV, respectively but increased to between 0.72 and 0.78 eV for Cl-containing In 2 S 3 with residual Cl concentrations of 7.8 - 13.8 at.%. The diffusion prefactor (D 0 ) was six orders of magnitude higher for Cl-containing compared to Cl-free layers. The relationship between E a and D 0 was described by the Meyer-Neldel rule with a Meyer-Neldel energy of 40 meV. The presence of Cl has no significant influence on the structural properties of In 2 S 3 but resulted in a modified diffusion mechanism for Cu diffusion. The photovoltage of In 2 S 3 /CuSCN samples decreased after annealing for longer than 2 min at 200 C. A defect band was formed near the interface where holes accumulated and electrons tunneled through

  20. Analyzing velocity map images to distinguish the primary methyl photofragments from those produced upon C-Cl bond photofission in chloroacetone at 193 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alligood, Bridget W.; Straus, Daniel B.; Butler, Laurie J.

    2011-07-01

    We use a combination of crossed laser-molecular beam scattering experiments and velocity map imaging experiments to investigate the three primary photodissociation channels of chloroacetone at 193 nm: C-Cl bond photofission yielding CH3C(O)CH2 radicals, C-C bond photofission yielding CH3CO and CH2Cl products, and C-CH3 bond photofission resulting in CH3 and C(O)CH2Cl products. Improved analysis of data previously reported by our group quantitatively identifies the contribution of this latter photodissociation channel. We introduce a forward convolution procedure to identify the portion of the signal, derived from the methyl image, which results from a two-step process in which C-Cl bond photofission is followed by the dissociation of the vibrationally excited CH3C(O)CH2 radicals to CH3 + COCH2. Subtracting this from the total methyl signal identifies the methyl photofragments that result from the CH3 + C(O)CH2Cl photofission channel. We find that about 89% of the chloroacetone molecules undergo C-Cl bond photofission to yield CH3C(O)CH2 and Cl products; approximately 8% result in C-C bond photofission to yield CH3CO and CH2Cl products, and the remaining 2.6% undergo C-CH3 bond photofission to yield CH3 and C(O)CH2Cl products.

  1. Activation of H2O2-induced VSOR Cl- currents in HTC cells require phospholipase Cgamma1 phosphorylation and Ca2+ mobilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe; Olivero, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    )R) blocker 2-APB. In line with these results, manoeuvres that prevented PLCgamma1 activation and/or [Ca(2+)](i) rise, abolished H(2)O(2)-induced VSOR Cl(-) currents. Furthermore, in cells that overexpress a phosphorylation-defective dominant mutant of PLCgamma1, H(2)O(2) did not induce activation......Volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR) Cl(-) channels participate in several physiological processes such as regulatory volume decrease, cell cycle regulation, proliferation and apoptosis. Recent evidence points to a significant role of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in VSOR Cl(-) channel...... activation. The aim of this study was to determine the signalling pathways responsible for H(2)O(2)-induced VSOR Cl(-) channel activation. In rat hepatoma (HTC) cells, H(2)O(2) elicited a transient increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCgamma1) that was blocked by PP2, a Src...

  2. Developers@CERN Forum | Python at CERN | 3031 May

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The Developers@CERN Forum is an event by developers for developers aimed at promoting knowledge- and experience-sharing (see here). The second forum will take place in the IT auditorium in the afternoons of 30 and 31 May.   With the topic “Python at CERN”, it will consist of a series of talks regarding the Python language, frameworks and tools used at CERN. Are you a Python guru or would you like to learn? Come and share your Python experiences with other developers! Submissions for presentations and workshops are open until 9 May at http://cern.ch/dev-forum. If you would like to stay informed about this or future events, please subscribe to the announcement e-group (just a few e-mails per year) here. 

  3. 31 CFR 30.4 - Q-4: What actions are necessary for a TARP recipient to comply with the standards established...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-4: What actions are necessary for a... or manipulation of earnings)? 30.4 Section 30.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.4 Q-4: What actions are...

  4. Mechanism for modulation of gating of connexin26-containing channels by taurine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieken, Fabien; Tao, Liang; Sorgen, Paul L.; Harris, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of action of endogenous modulatory ligands of connexin channels are largely unknown. Previous work showed that protonated aminosulfonates (AS), notably taurine, directly and reversibly inhibit homomeric and heteromeric channels that contain Cx26, a widely distributed connexin, but not homomeric Cx32 channels. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of connexin channel modulation by taurine, using hemichannels and junctional channels composed of Cx26 (homomeric) and Cx26/Cx32 (heteromeric). The addition of a 28–amino acid “tag” to the carboxyl-terminal domain (CT) of Cx26 (Cx26T) eliminated taurine sensitivity of homomeric and heteromeric hemichannels in cells and liposomes. Cleavage of all but four residues of the tag (Cx26Tc) resulted in taurine-induced pore narrowing in homomeric hemichannels, and restored taurine inhibition of heteromeric hemichannels (Cx26Tc/Cx32). Taurine actions on junctional channels were fully consistent with those on hemichannels. Taurine-induced inhibition of Cx26/Cx32T and nontagged Cx26 junctional channels was blocked by extracellular HEPES, a blocker of the taurine transporter, confirming that the taurine-sensitive site of Cx26 is cytoplasmic. Nuclear magnetic resonance of peptides corresponding to Cx26 cytoplasmic domains showed that taurine binds to the cytoplasmic loop (CL) and not the CT, and that the CT and CL directly interact. ELISA showed that taurine disrupts a pH-dependent interaction between the CT and the CT-proximal half of the CL. These studies reveal that AS disrupt a pH-driven cytoplasmic interdomain interaction in Cx26-containing channels, causing closure, and that the Cx26CT has a modulatory role in Cx26 function. PMID:21844220

  5. Comparison of detector systems for the separation of 36Cl and 36S with a 3-MV tandem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, Tobias; Forstner, Oliver; Golser, Robin; Kutschera, Walter; Merchel, Silke; Martschini, Martin; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Vockenhuber, Christof; Wallner, Anton

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of detecting 36 Cl for geological exposure dating has been explored for several years at VERA (the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator). First results on real samples were obtained with an ionization chamber (developed at the ETH/PSI, Zuerich, Switzerland) with two anodes. To improve the suppression of 36 S, we equipped the ionization chamber with an exit window and added a Time-of-Flight (TOF) system with a double-sided silicon strip detector (50 x 50 mm 2 ) as stop detector. We optimized the TOF setup by using silicon nitride foils to reduce scattering tails in the energy spectra. At 3 MV terminal voltage, corresponding to a particle energy of 24 MeV of 36 Cl 7+ , we achieved a 36 S 7+ -suppression of 21,500 (50% 36 Cl-detector-efficiency).

  6. Subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in inferior olive neurons are dynamically regulated by P/Q- and T-type calcium channels: a study in mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Daesoo; Urbano, Francisco J; Makarenko, Vladimir; Shin, Hee-Sup; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2010-08-15

    The role of P/Q- and T-type calcium channels in the rhythmic oscillatory behaviour of inferior olive (IO) neurons was investigated in mutant mice. Mice lacking either the CaV2.1 gene of the pore-forming alpha1A subunit for P/Q-type calcium channel, or the CaV3.1 gene of the pore-forming alpha1G subunit for T-type calcium channel were used. In vitro intracellular recording from IO neurons reveals that the amplitude and frequency of sinusoidal subthreshold oscillations (SSTOs) were reduced in the CaV2.1-/- mice. In the CaV3.1-/- mice, IO neurons also showed altered patterns of SSTOs and the probability of SSTO generation was significantly lower (15%, 5 of 34 neurons) than that of wild-type (78%, 31 of 40 neurons) or CaV2.1-/- mice (73%, 22 of 30 neurons). In addition, the low-threshold calcium spike and the sustained endogenous oscillation following rebound potentials were absent in IO neurons from CaV3.1-/- mice. Moreover, the phase-reset dynamics of oscillatory properties of single neurons and neuronal clusters in IO were remarkably altered in both CaV2.1-/- and CaV3.1-/- mice. These results suggest that both alpha1A P/Q- and alpha1G T-type calcium channels are required for the dynamic control of neuronal oscillations in the IO. These findings were supported by results from a mathematical IO neuronal model that incorporated T and P/Q channel kinetics.

  7. CdCl{sub 2} treatment related diffusion phenomena in Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S/CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartopu, G., E-mail: giray.kartopu@glyndwr.ac.uk; Clayton, A. J.; Barrioz, V.; Lamb, D. A.; Irvine, S. J. C. [Centre for Solar Energy Research (CSER), Glyndŵr University, OpTIC, St. Asaph Business Park, St. Asaph LL17 0JD (United Kingdom); Taylor, A. A. [Physics Department, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-14

    Utilisation of wide bandgap Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S alloys as an alternative to the CdS window layer is an attractive route to enhance the performance of CdTe thin film solar cells. For successful implementation, however, it is vital to control the composition and properties of Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S through device fabrication processes involving the relatively high-temperature CdTe deposition and CdCl{sub 2} activation steps. In this study, cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy and depth profiling methods were employed to investigate chemical and structural changes in CdTe/Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S/CdS superstrate device structures deposited on an ITO/boro-aluminosilicate substrate. Comparison of three devices in different states of completion—fully processed (CdCl{sub 2} activated), annealed only (without CdCl{sub 2} activation), and a control (without CdCl{sub 2} activation or anneal)—revealed cation diffusion phenomena within the window layer, their effects closely coupled to the CdCl{sub 2} treatment. As a result, the initial Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S/CdS bilayer structure was observed to unify into a single Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S layer with an increased Cd/Zn atomic ratio; these changes defining the properties and performance of the Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S/CdTe device.

  8. Measurement of the spectral shift of the 3d→4p transitions in Ar+, Cl+ and S+ by means of collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, A.

    1981-01-01

    The spectral shift of the 3d→4p transitions in Ar + ( 36 Ar + and 40 Ar + ) Cl + ( 35 Cl + and 37 Cl + ) and S + ( 32 S + + 34 S + ) were measured by means of collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy. Since the volume effect is neglectible only the normal and specific mass effect give contributions to the spectral shift. (BEF)

  9. THz-TDS Characterization of the Digital Communication Channels of the Atmosphere and the Enabled Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yihong; Mandehgar, Mahboubeh; Grischkowsky, D.

    2015-02-01

    Our measurements and complete linear dispersion theory calculations of amplitude and phase show that it is possible to have seven high performance point-to-point, 10.7 Gb/s to 28.4 Gb/s, digital THz ground links in the atmosphere. At a RH 58% (10g/m3) and 20 °C including O2 absorption, and for an absorption loss of 10 dB, the seven links are: Channel 1: at 96 GHz, Bandwidth (BW) 30 GHz, 10.7 Gb/s for 17.5 km, Channel 2: at 144 GHz, BW 30 GHz, 12.0 Gb/s for 7.4 km, Channel 3: at 252 GHz, BW 50 GHz, 25.2 Gb/s for 2.5 km, Channel 4: at 342 GHz, BW 24 GHz, 11.4 Gb/s for 840 m, Channel 5: at 408 GHz, BW 30 GHz, 13.6 Gb/s for 440 m, Channel 6: at 672 GHz, BW 60 GHz, 22.6 Gb/s for 140 m, and Channel 7: at 852 GHz, BW 60 GHz, 28.4 Gb/s for 120 m. The enabled long-path THz links are discussed. Two applications are presented in detail, namely, a long-path 17.5 km THz ground-link operating at 96 GHz, BW 30 GHz, 10.7 Gb/s, and a GEO satellite link at 252 GHz, BW 50 GHz, 25.2 Gb/s. In addition, Channel 7 at 852 GHz is studied by calculated pulse propagation to understand the relationships between high bit-rates and propagation distance. It is shown that good digital transmission could be obtained with 852 GHz, BW 108 GHz, 56.8 Gb/s for a 160 m propagation distance in the atmosphere with RH 58% (10g/m3) and 20 °C. Good digital transmission could also be obtained with 852 GHz, BW 108 GHz, 71.0 Gb/s for 80 m. These results are discussed with respect to high bit-rate, short-path applications. These digital THz communication channels were determined together with a new measurement of the water vapor continuum absorption from 0.35 to 1 THz. The THz pulses propagate though a 137 m long humidity-controlled chamber and are measured by THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The average relative humidity along the entire THz path is precisely obtained by measuring the difference between transit times of the sample and reference THz pulses to an accuracy of 0.1 ps. Using the measured

  10. Life-time resolved emission spectra in CdCl2 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, S.; Nakagawa, H.; Kitaura, M.

    2005-01-01

    The emission spectrum of CdCl 2 is composed of ultraviolet (UV) and yellow (Y) bands peaking at 3.70 and 2.30 eV, respectively. In order to determine the initial states of the Y-luminescence, decay curves of the Y-emission were measured at 8K by varying emission energy in the range from 1.64 eV to 3.13 eV. The observed decay curves are composed of two or three exponential components. The values of lifetime for them were 900, 460 and 60 μs. The emission spectrum for each decay component, i.e., life-time resolved emission spectrum, was analyzed by the observed decay curves. The emission spectrum for the component of 460 μs lifetime exhibits a dominant band at 2.30 eV and a satellite band at 3.03 eV. The emission spectrum for the component of 60 μs lifetime is reproduced by the three Gaussian bands peaking at 2.21, 2.65 and 2.87 eV. For the component of 900 μs lifetime, only a single band appears at 1.73 eV. The origin of the emission bands in life-time resolved emission spectra is briefly discussed, and the initial states of Y-luminescence are explained by the excited states of a [Cd 2+ Cl - 6 ] 4- complex molecular ion. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in the ZH→νν¯bb¯ channel in 9.5 fb−1 of pp¯ collisions at √(s)=1.96 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D.V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in 9.5 fb -1 of pp ¯ collisions at √(s)=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The final state considered contains a pair of b jets and is characterized by an imbalance in transverse energy, as expected from pp ¯ →ZH→νν ¯ bb ¯ production. The search is also sensitive to the WH→ℓνbb ¯ channel when the charged lepton is not identified. The data are found to be in good agreement with the expected background. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, we set a limit at the 95% C.L. on the cross section σ(pp ¯ →[Z/W]H), assuming standard model branching fractions, that is a factor of 4.3 times larger than the theoretical standard model value, while the expected factor is 3.9. The search is also used to measure a combined WZ and ZZ production cross section that is a factor of 0.94±0.31(stat)±0.34(syst) times the standard model prediction of 4.4 pb, with an observed significance of 2.0 standard deviations.

  12. Cytoplasmic Domain of MscS Interacts with Cell Division Protein FtsZ: A Possible Non-Channel Function of the Mechanosensitive Channel in Escherichia Coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Koprowski

    Full Text Available Bacterial mechano-sensitive (MS channels reside in the inner membrane and are considered to act as emergency valves whose role is to lower cell turgor when bacteria enter hypo-osmotic environments. However, there is emerging evidence that members of the Mechano-sensitive channel Small (MscS family play additional roles in bacterial and plant cell physiology. MscS has a large cytoplasmic C-terminal region that changes its shape upon activation and inactivation of the channel. Our pull-down and co-sedimentation assays show that this domain interacts with FtsZ, a bacterial tubulin-like protein. We identify point mutations in the MscS C-terminal domain that reduce binding to FtsZ and show that bacteria expressing these mutants are compromised in growth on sublethal concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics. Our results suggest that interaction between MscS and FtsZ could occur upon inactivation and/or opening of the channel and could be important for the bacterial cell response against sustained stress upon stationary phase and in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics.

  13. Cytoplasmic Domain of MscS Interacts with Cell Division Protein FtsZ: A Possible Non-Channel Function of the Mechanosensitive Channel in Escherichia Coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Piotr; Grajkowski, Wojciech; Balcerzak, Marcin; Filipiuk, Iwona; Fabczak, Hanna; Kubalski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial mechano-sensitive (MS) channels reside in the inner membrane and are considered to act as emergency valves whose role is to lower cell turgor when bacteria enter hypo-osmotic environments. However, there is emerging evidence that members of the Mechano-sensitive channel Small (MscS) family play additional roles in bacterial and plant cell physiology. MscS has a large cytoplasmic C-terminal region that changes its shape upon activation and inactivation of the channel. Our pull-down and co-sedimentation assays show that this domain interacts with FtsZ, a bacterial tubulin-like protein. We identify point mutations in the MscS C-terminal domain that reduce binding to FtsZ and show that bacteria expressing these mutants are compromised in growth on sublethal concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics. Our results suggest that interaction between MscS and FtsZ could occur upon inactivation and/or opening of the channel and could be important for the bacterial cell response against sustained stress upon stationary phase and in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics.

  14. 31 CFR 597.319 - U.S. financial institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. financial institution. 597.319 Section 597.319 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE... financial institution's foreign branches; (b) Any financial institution operating or doing business in the...

  15. 31 CFR 537.319 - U.S. depository institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. depository institution. 537.319 Section 537.319 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE..., that is engaged primarily in the business of banking (for example, banks, savings banks, savings...

  16. 31 CFR 538.317 - U.S. depository institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. depository institution. 538.317 Section 538.317 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE..., that is engaged primarily in the business of banking (for example, banks, savings banks, savings...

  17. Fluid inclusions in jadeitite and jadeite-rich rock from serpentinite mélanges in northern Hispaniola: Trapped ambient fluids in a cold subduction channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Hertwig, Andreas; Schertl, Hans-Peter; Maresch, Walter V.

    2018-05-01

    Freezing-point depression was measured in aqueous fluid inclusions to determine salinities in six samples of jadeitite and jadeite-rich rock from the Jagua Clara serpentinite mélange of the Rio San Juan Complex, Dominican Republic. The mélange represents a fossil subduction-zone channel from a cold, mature subduction zone with a geothermal gradient of 6 °C/km. One hundred and twenty-five determinations of salinity in primary inclusions hosted in jadeite, quartz, apatite and lawsonite range between extremes of 1.2 and 8.7, but yield a well-defined mean of 4.5 ± 1.1 wt% (±1 s.d.) NaCl equiv, slightly higher than mean seawater (3.5 wt%). In one sample, eight additional fluid inclusions in quartz aligned along grain boundaries yield slightly lower values of 2.7 ± 1.3 wt% NaCl equiv. Homogenization temperatures were also measured for 47 fluid inclusions in two samples, but primary entrapment densities are not preserved. It is significant that the suite includes two types of samples: those precipitated directly from an aqueous fluid as well as examples of metasomatic replacement of a pre-existing magmatic rock. Nevertheless, the results indicate identical salinity for both types and suggest a much stronger genetic link between the two types of jadeitite and jadeite-rich rock than has previously been assumed. Based on the results of conductivity measurements in modern subduction zones, we envision a pervasive fluid in the subduction channel that evolved from salinity levels lower than those in sea-water up to the measured values due to on-going but largely completed serpentinization in the subduction channel. The present data represent a reference marker for the subduction channel of the Rio San Juan intra-oceanic subduction zone at 30-50 km depth and after 50-60 Myr of operation.

  18. Probing the pre-reactive a Cl (2P) + H2(D2) Van der Waals well through the photodetachment spectroscopy of Cl- H2(D2). CP-31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosal, Subhas; Mahapatra, Susanta

    2004-01-01

    The photodetachment spectrum of ClH 2 - and ClD 2 , probing the van der Waals well region of the reactive Cl( 2 P) + H 2 (D 2 ) potential energy surface, is theoretically calculated and compared with the experiment. A time-dependent wave packet approach is employed using the Capecchi-Werner coupled multi-sheeted ab initio potential energy surfaces of neutral ClH 2 for this purpose

  19. Significance of CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels for pressure- and flow-dependent vasomotor responses in rat and mouse mesenteric small arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Jørn; Björling, K.; Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard

    RNA was similar in WT vs. CaV3.2-/- mice. CONCLUSION: FMVD responses appear to rely on an endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization in rat small mesenteric arteries. CaV3.2 channels are negative feedback modulators of myogenic tone in small mesenteric artery in young mice. The age-dependent decline in CaV3...... in young CaV3.2-/- mice (8-15 weeks) vs. age-matched WT mice (Pyoung WT mice, the CaV3.2 blocker NiCl2 (30 µM) significantly enhanced myogenic tone (P... was not seen (N=4). In young and old CaV3.2-/- mice no effects of NiCl2 were observed. The FMVD response in rat mesenteric arteries was not blocked by L-NAME, but was almost abolished by the SKCa/IKCa channel blockers apamin/TRAM-34 (50 nM/1 µM) (P

  20. Influence of ligand polarizability on the reversible binding of O2 by trans-[Rh(X)(XNC)(PPh3)2] (X = Cl, Br, SC6F5, C2Ph; XNC = xylyl isocyanide). Structures and a kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Laurence; Mokoena, Lebohang V; Fernandes, Manuel A

    2008-10-06

    The complexes trans-[Rh(X)(XNC)(PPh 3) 2] (X = Cl, 1; Br, 2; SC 6F 5, 3; C 2Ph, 4; XNC = xylyl isocyanide) combine reversibly with molecular oxygen to give [Rh(X)(O 2)(XNC)(PPh 3) 2] of which [Rh(SC 6F 5)(O 2)(XNC)(PPh 3) 2] ( 7) and [Rh(C 2Ph)(O 2)(XNC)(PPh 3) 2] ( 8) are sufficiently stable to be isolated in crystalline form. Complexes 2, 3, 4, and 7 have been structurally characterized. Kinetic data for the dissociation of O 2 from the dioxygen adducts of 1- 4 were obtained using (31)P NMR to monitor changes in the concentration of [Rh(X)(O 2)(XNC)(PPh 3) 2] (X = Cl, Br, SC 6F 5, C 2Ph) resulting from the bubbling of argon through the respective warmed solutions (solvent chlorobenzene). From data recorded at temperatures in the range 30-70 degrees C, activation parameters were obtained as follows: Delta H (++) (kJ mol (-1)): 31.7 +/- 1.6 (X = Cl), 52.1 +/- 4.3 (X = Br), 66.0 +/- 5.8 (X = SC 6F 5), 101.3 +/- 1.8 (X = C 2Ph); Delta S (++) (J K (-1) mol (-1)): -170.3 +/- 5.0 (X = Cl), -120 +/- 13.6 (X = Br), -89 +/- 18.2 (X = SC 6F 5), -6.4 +/- 5.4 (X = C 2Ph). The values of Delta H (++) and Delta S (++) are closely correlated (R (2) = 0.9997), consistent with a common dissociation pathway along which the rate-determining step occurs at a different position for each X. Relative magnitudes of Delta H (++) are interpreted in terms of differing polarizabilities of ligands X.

  1. A possible CO2 conducting and concentrating mechanism in plant stomata SLAC1 channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Shi Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The plant SLAC1 is a slow anion channel in the membrane of stomatal guard cells, which controls the turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells, thereby regulating the exchange of water vapour and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought, high levels of carbon dioxide, and bacterial invasion. Recent study demonstrated that bicarbonate is a small-molecule activator of SLAC1. Higher CO(2 and HCO(3(- concentration activates S-type anion channel currents in wild-type Arabidopsis guard cells. Based on the SLAC1 structure a theoretical model is derived to illustrate the activation of bicarbonate to SLAC1 channel. Meanwhile a possible CO(2 conducting and concentrating mechanism of the SLAC1 is proposed. METHODOLOGY: The homology structure of Arabidopsis thaliana SLAC1 (AtSLAC1 provides the structural basis for study of the conducting and concentrating mechanism of carbon dioxide in SLAC1 channels. The pK(a values of ionizable amino acid side chains in AtSLAC1 are calculated using software PROPKA3.0, and the concentration of CO(2 and anion HCO(3(- are computed based on the chemical equilibrium theory. CONCLUSIONS: The AtSLAC1 is modeled as a five-region channel with different pH values. The top and bottom layers of channel are the alkaline residue-dominated regions, and in the middle of channel there is the acidic region surrounding acidic residues His332. The CO(2 concentration is enhanced around 10(4 times by the pH difference between these regions, and CO(2 is stored in the hydrophobic region, which is a CO(2 pool. The pH driven CO(2 conduction from outside to inside balances the back electromotive force and maintain the influx of anions (e.g. Cl(- and NO(3(- from inside to outside. SLAC1 may be a pathway providing CO(2 for photosynthesis in the guard cells.

  2. Properties and function of KCNQ1 K+ channels isolated from the rectal gland of Squalus acanthias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerst, G; Beschorner, U; Unsöld, B; von Hahn, T; Schreiber, R; Greger, R; Gerlach, U; Lang, H J; Kunzelmann, K; Bleich, M

    2001-10-01

    KCNQ1 (KVLQT1) K+ channels play an important role during electrolyte secretion in airways and colon. KCNQ1 was cloned recently from NaCl-secreting shark rectal glands. Here we study the properties and regulation of the cloned sKVLQT1 expressed in Xenopus oocytes and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and compare the results with those obtained from in vitro perfused rectal gland tubules (RGT). The expression of sKCNQ1 induced voltage-dependent, delayed activated K+ currents, which were augmented by an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca2+. The chromanol derivatives 293B and 526B potently inhibited sKCNQ1 expressed in oocytes and CHO cells, but had little effect on RGT electrolyte transport. Short-circuit currents in RGT were activated by alkalinization and were decreased by acidification. In CHO cells an alkaline pH activated and an acidic pH inhibited 293B-sensitive KCNQ1 currents. Noise analysis of the cell-attached basolateral membrane of RGT indicated the presence of low-conductance (<3 pS) K+ channels, in parallel with other K+ channels. sKCNQ1 generated similar small-conductance K+ channels upon expression in CHO cells and Xenopus oocytes. The results suggest the presence of low-conductance KCNQ1 K+ channels in RGT, which are probably regulated by changes in intracellular cAMP, Ca2+ and pH.

  3. Intermolecular Interactions in the TMEM16A Dimer Controlling Channel Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudieri, Paolo; Musante, Ilaria; Gianotti, Ambra; Moran, Oscar; Galietta, Luis J V

    2016-12-08

    TMEM16A and TMEM16B are plasma membrane proteins with Ca 2+ -dependent Cl - channel function. By replacing the carboxy-terminus of TMEM16A with the equivalent region of TMEM16B, we obtained channels with potentiation of channel activity. Progressive shortening of the chimeric region restricted the "activating domain" to a short sequence close to the last transmembrane domain and led to TMEM16A channels with high activity at very low intracellular Ca 2+ concentrations. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this effect, we carried out experiments based on double chimeras, Forster resonance energy transfer, and intermolecular cross-linking. We also modeled TMEM16A structure using the Nectria haematococca TMEM16 protein as template. Our results indicate that the enhanced activity in chimeric channels is due to altered interaction between the carboxy-terminus and the first intracellular loop in the TMEM16A homo-dimer. Mimicking this perturbation with a small molecule could be the basis for a pharmacological stimulation of TMEM16A-dependent Cl - transport.

  4. Thermal Microstructural Stability of AZ31 Magnesium after Severe Plastic Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, John P.; Askari, Hesam A.; Hovanski, Yuri; Heiden, Michael J.; Field, David P.

    2015-03-01

    Both equal channel angular pressing and friction stir processing have the ability to refine the grain size of twin roll cast AZ31 magnesium and potentially improve its superplastic properties. This work used isochronal and isothermal heat treatments to investigate the microstructural stability of twin roll cast, equal channel angular pressed and friction stir processed AZ31 magnesium. For both heat treatment conditions, it was found that the twin roll casted and equal channel angular pressed materials were more stable than the friction stir processed material. Calculations of the grain growth kinetics showed that severe plastic deformation processing decreased the activation energy for grain boundary motion with the equal channel angular pressed material having the greatest Q value of the severely plastically deformed materials and that increasing the tool travel speed of the friction stir processed material improved microstructural stability. The Hollomon-Jaffe parameter was found to be an accurate means of identifying the annealing conditions that will result in substantial grain growth and loss of potential superplastic properties in the severely plastically deformed materials. In addition, Humphreys’s model of cellular microstructural stability accurately predicted the relative microstructural stability of the severely plastically deformed materials and with some modification, closely predicted the maximum grain size ratio achieved by the severely plastically deformed materials.

  5. Table_S4.xls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnold Emerson

    33, 30, 1ch4A, Module-subs chimera hemoglobin beta-alpha, 21.26, 16.98, 16.7, 14.35, 14.35, 14.35, 14.35, 14.3, 14.04, 11.86. 34, 31, 1chrA, Chloromuconate cycloisomerase, 24.54, 43.97, 87.67, 18.91, 18.91, 18.91, 18.91, 18.89, 18.8, 18.46. 35, 32, 1cl1A, Cystathionine beta-lyase, -0.61, 9.64, 55.44, 20.48, 20.48, 20.48 ...

  6. Zγ production in p bar p collisions at √ (s) =1.8TeV and limits on anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, B.; Hoeneisen, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P.; Davis, K.; Fein, D.; Forden, G.E.; Guida, J.A.; James, E.; Johns, K.; Nang, F.; Narayanan, A.; Rutherfoord, J.; Butler, J.M.; Fatyga, M.; Gibbard, B.; Gordon, H.; Graf, N.; Kahn, S.; Kotcher, J.; Protopopescu, S.; Rajagopalan, S.; Bantly, J.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cutts, D.; Guida, J.M.; Hoftun, J.S.; Partridge, R.; Grinstein, S.; Piegaia, R.; Bloom, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Glenn, S.; Grim, G.; Klopfenstein, C.; Lander, R.; Mani, S.; Fahland, T.; Hall, R.E.; Boswell, C.; Choudhary, B.C.; Cochran, J.; Ellison, J.; Gartung, P.; Gounder, K.; Heinson, A.P.; Huehn, T.; Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; Maciel, A.K.; Motta, H.; Santoro, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Gonzalez Solis, J.L.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Magana-Mendoza, L.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Adam, I.; Kotwal, A.V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Ahn, S.; Baldin, B.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bhat, P.C.; Boehnlein, A.; Borcherding, F.; Brandt, A.; Bross, A.; Christenson, J.H.; Cooper, W.E.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Diehl, H.T.; Diesburg, M.; Feher, S.; Fisk, H.E.; Flattum, E.; Fuess, S.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C.E.; Green, D.R.; Greenlee, H.; Grossman, N.; Haggerty, H.; Hansen, S.; Heintz, U.; Hobbs, J.D.; Ito, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    We present a study of Zγ+X production in p bar p collisions at √ (s) =1.8TeV from 97 (87)pb -1 of data collected in the eeγ (μmuγ) decay channel with the D0 detector at Fermilab. The event yield and kinematic characteristics are consistent with the standard model predictions. We obtain limits on anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings for form factor scales Λ=500GeV and Λ=750GeV. Combining this analysis with our previous results yields 95% C.L. limits [h 30 Z ] 40 Z ] 30 γ ] 40 γ ]<0.05 for a form factor scale Λ=750GeV. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  7. The effect of pH on the toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles to Folsomia candida in amended field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waalewijn-Kool, Pauline L; Ortiz, Maria Diez; Lofts, Stephen; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2013-10-01

    The effect of soil pH on the toxicity of 30 nm ZnO to Folsomia candida was assessed in Dorset field soils with pHCaCl2 adjusted to 4.31, 5.71, and 6.39. To unravel the contribution of particle size and dissolved Zn, 200 nm ZnO and ZnCl2 were tested. Zinc sorption increased with increasing pH, and Freundlich kf values ranged from 98.9 (L/kg)(1/n) to 333 (L/kg)(1/n) for 30 nm ZnO and from 64.3 (L/kg)(1/n) to 187 (L/kg)(1/n) for ZnCl2. No effect of particle size was found on sorption, and little difference was found in toxicity between 30 nm and 200 nm ZnO. The effect on reproduction decreased with increasing pH for all Zn forms, with 28-d median effective concentrations (EC50s) of 553 mg Zn/kg, 1481 mg Zn/kg, and 3233 mg Zn/kg for 30 nm ZnO and 331 mg Zn/kg, 732 mg Zn/kg, and 1174 mg Zn/kg for ZnCl2 at pH 4.31, 5.71, and 6.39, respectively. The EC50s based on porewater Zn concentrations increased with increasing pH for 30 nm ZnO from 4.77 mg Zn/L to 18.5 mg Zn/L, while for ZnCl2 no consistent pH-related trend in EC50s was found (21.0-63.3 mg Zn/L). Porewater calcium levels were 10 times higher in ZnCl2 -spiked soils than in ZnO-spiked soils. The authors' results suggest that the decreased toxicity of ZnCl2 compared with 30 nm ZnO based on porewater concentrations was because of a protective effect of calcium and not a particle effect. © 2013 SETAC.

  8. Oxidation of substituted alkyl radicals by IrCl62-, Fe(CN)63-, and MnO4- in aqueous solution. Electron transfer versus chlorine transfer from IrCl62-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenken, S.; Neta, P.

    1982-01-01

    Alkyl radicals substituted at C/sub α/ by alkyl, carboxyl, hydroxyl, alkoxyl, and chlorine react in aqueous solutions with Ir/sup IV/Cl 6 2- to yield Ir(III) species. In the case of substitution by hydroxyl and alkoxyl, the rate constants are in the diffusion-controlled range ((4-6) x 10 9 M -1 s -1 ) and the reaction proceeds by electron transfer. In the case of ethyl, methyl, carboxymethyl, and chloromethyl radicals the rate constants range from 3.1 x 10 9 for ethyl to 2.8 x 10 7 M -1 s -1 for trichloromethyl and the reaction proceeds by chlorine transfer from IrCl 6 2- to the alkyl radical. With isopropyl and tert-butyll radicals the reaction proceeds by both electron and chlorine transfer. Alkyl radicals also react with Fe(CN) 6 3- . The rate constants increase strongly with increasing alkylation at C/sub α/ from 5 x 10 6 for methyl to 3.6 x 10 9 M -1 s -1 for tert-butyl, indicating that the transition state for the reaction is highly polar. Rate constants for reaction of MnO 4 - with alkyl radicals are of the order 10 9 M -1 s -1 . 4 figures, 1 table

  9. 75 FR 37994 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-1A11 (CL-600), CL-600-2A12 (CL-601), CL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... provides data for replacement of the accumulators. The commenter requests that stronger language be... numbers 1004 through 1085 inclusive; (2) Bombardier, Inc. CL-600-2A12 (CL-601) airplanes, serial numbers 3001 through 3066 inclusive; and (3) Bombardier, Inc. CL-600-2B16 (CL-601-3A, CL-601-3R, and CL- 604...

  10. Clofilium inhibits Slick and Slack potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Angeles Tejada, Maria; Stolpe, Kathleen; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Klaerke, Dan A

    2012-01-01

    Slick and Slack high-conductance potassium channels have been recently discovered, and are found in the central nervous system and in the heart. Both channels are activated by Na(+) and Cl(-), and Slick channels are also inhibited by adenosine triphospate (ATP). An important role of setting the resting membrane potential and controlling the basal excitability of neurons has been suggested for these channels. In addition, no specific blockers for these channels are known up to the present. With the purpose of studying the pharmacological characteristics of Slick and Slack channels, the effects of exposure to the antiarrhythmic compound clofilium were evaluated. Clofilium was able to modulate the activity of Slick and Slack channels effectively, with a stronger effect on Slack than Slick channels. In order to evaluate the pharmacological behavior of Slick and Slack channels further, 38 commonly used potassium channel blockers were tested. Screening of these compounds did not reveal any modulators of Slick and Slack channels, except for clofilium. The present study provides a first approach towards elucidating the pharmacological characteristics of Slick and Slack channels and could be the basis for future studies aimed at developing potent and specific blockers and activators for these channels.

  11. CCSDS Advanced Orbiting Systems Virtual Channel Access Service for QoS MACHETE Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Esther H.; Segui, John S.

    2011-01-01

    To support various communications requirements imposed by different missions, interplanetary communication protocols need to be designed, validated, and evaluated carefully. Multimission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE), described in "Simulator of Space Communication Networks" (NPO-41373), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 8 (August 2005), p. 44, combines various tools for simulation and performance analysis of space networks. The MACHETE environment supports orbital analysis, link budget analysis, communications network simulations, and hardware-in-the-loop testing. By building abstract behavioral models of network protocols, one can validate performance after identifying the appropriate metrics of interest. The innovators have extended the MACHETE model library to include a generic link-layer Virtual Channel (VC) model supporting quality-of-service (QoS) controls based on IP streams. The main purpose of this generic Virtual Channel model addition was to interface fine-grain flow-based QoS (quality of service) between the network and MAC layers of the QualNet simulator, a commercial component of MACHETE. This software model adds the capability of mapping IP streams, based on header fields, to virtual channel numbers, allowing extended QoS handling at link layer. This feature further refines the QoS v existing at the network layer. QoS at the network layer (e.g. diffserv) supports few QoS classes, so data from one class will be aggregated together; differentiating between flows internal to a class/priority is not supported. By adding QoS classification capability between network and MAC layers through VC, one maps multiple VCs onto the same physical link. Users then specify different VC weights, and different queuing and scheduling policies at the link layer. This VC model supports system performance analysis of various virtual channel link-layer QoS queuing schemes independent of the network-layer QoS systems.

  12. Patrones de personalidad, síndromes clínicos y bienestar psicológico en adolescentes

    OpenAIRE

    Casullo, María Martina; Castro Solano, Alejandro

    2002-01-01

    El presente trabajo analiza dimensiones del bienestar psicológico y patrones de personalidad en estudiantes adolescentes con y sin presencia de síntomas y síndromes clínicos. Las pruebas SCL-90-R y MACI, y una escala de bienestar psicológico, fueron

  13. NaCl-assisted one-step growth of MoS2-WS2 in-plane heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhan; Xie, Yong; Wang, Haolin; Wu, Ruixue; Nan, Tang; Zhan, Yongjie; Sun, Jing; Jiang, Teng; Zhao, Ying; Lei, Yimin; Yang, Mei; Wang, Weidong; Zhu, Qing; Ma, Xiaohua; Hao, Yue

    2017-08-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have attracted considerable interest for exploration of next-generation electronics and optoelectronics in recent years. Fabrication of in-plane lateral heterostructures between TMDs has opened up excellent opportunities for engineering two-dimensional materials. The creation of high quality heterostructures with a facile method is highly desirable but it still remains challenging. In this work, we demonstrate a one-step growth method for the construction of high-quality MoS2-WS2 in-plane heterostructures. The synthesis was carried out using ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) with the assistance of sodium chloride (NaCl). It was found that the addition of NaCl played a key role in lowering the growth temperatures, in which the Na-containing precursors could be formed and condensed on the substrates to reduce the energy of the reaction. As a result, the growth regimes of MoS2 and WS2 are better matched, leading to the formation of in-plane heterostructures in a single step. The heterostructures were proved to be of high quality with a sharp and clear interface. This newly developed strategy with the assistance of NaCl is promising for synthesizing other TMDs and their heterostructures.

  14. Formation of uniform carrot-like Cu31S16-CuInS2 heteronanostructures assisted by citric acid at the oil/aqueous interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongjie; Tang, Aiwei; Liu, Zhenyang; Peng, Lan; Yuan, Yi; Shi, Xifeng; Yang, Chunhe; Teng, Feng

    2018-01-07

    A simple two-phase strategy was developed to prepare Cu 31 S 16 -CuInS 2 heterostructures (HNS) at the oil/aqueous interface, in which the In(OH) 3 phase was often obtained in the products due to the reaction between indium ions and hydroxyl ions in the aqueous phase. To prevent the formation of the In(OH) 3 phase, citric acid was incorporated into the aqueous phase to assist in the synthesis of uniform carrot-like Cu 31 S 16 -CuInS 2 semiconductor HNS at the oil/aqueous interface for the first time. By manipulating the dosage of citric acid and Cu/In precursor ratios, the morphology of the Cu 31 S 16 -CuInS 2 HNS could be tailored from mushroom to carrot-like, and the presence of citric acid played a critical role in the synthesis of high-quality Cu 31 S 16 -CuInS 2 HNS, which inhibited the formation of the In(OH) 3 phase due to the formation of the indium(iii)-citric acid complex. The formation mechanism was studied by monitoring the morphology and phase evolution of the Cu 31 S 16 -CuInS 2 HNS with reaction time, which revealed that the Cu 31 S 16 seeds were first formed and then the cation-exchange reaction directed the subsequent anisotropic growth of the Cu 31 S 16 -CuInS 2 HNS.

  15. Endothelial Small- and Intermediate-Conductance KCa Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Heike; Köhler, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT:: Most cardiovascular researchers are familiar with intermediate-conductance KCa3.1 and small-conductance KCa2.3 channels because of their contribution to endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH). However, to immunologists and neuroscientists these channels are primarily known...... for their role in lymphocyte activation and neuronal excitability. KCa3.1 is involved in the proliferation and migration of T cells, B cell, mast cells, macrophages, fibroblasts and dedifferentiated vascular smooth muscle cells and is, therefore, being pursued as a potential target for use in asthma...

  16. Magnetic Properties of the S=2 Heisenberg Antiferromagnetic Chain Compound MnCl3(bpy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, M; Idutsu, Y; Honda, Z; Yamamoto, S

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of magnetic susceptibilities at temperatures between 2 and 300 K, and magnetization in magnetic fields of up to 52 T on polycrystalline samples of MnCl 3 (bpy) (bpy=2, 2'-bipyridine) and the comparison with numerical calculations. This compound is one of the rare examples of the spin 2 quasi-one-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnet, and the magnetic properties of tiny single crystal samples were reported previously. The temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility and the magnetization curve after subtracting the contribution of magnetic impurity are well fitted to those calculated by a quantum Monte Carlo method with the intrachain exchange constant J/k B =31.2 K and the g-value g=2.02 which are comparable to reported values (J/k B =34.8±1.6 K and g=2.04±0.04).

  17. Mutagenesis in mammalian cells can be modulated by radiation-induced voltage-dependent potassium channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, A.H.; Zhou, L.Y.; Lambe, E.K.; Hahn, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    In mammalian cells, little is known about the initial events whose ultimate consequence is mutagenesis or DNA repair. The role the plasma membrane may play as an initiator of such a pathway is not understood. We show, for the first time, that membrane voltage-dependent potassium (K + ) currents, activated by ionizing radiation play a significant role in radiation mutagenesis. Specifically, we show that the frequency of mutation at the HGPRT locus is increased as expected to 37.6±4.0 mutations per 100,000 survivors by 800 cGy of ionizing radiation from a spontaneous frequency of 1.5±1.5. This increase, however, is abolished if either K + channel blocker, CsCl or BaCl 2 , is present for 2h following irradiation of the cells. RbCl, chemically similar to CsCl but known not to block K + channels, is ineffective in reducing the mutation frequency. Treatment of cells with CsCl or BaCl 2 had no effect on radiation-induced cell killing

  18. Constants of hyperfine interaction of lanthanoid-phosphorus for [LnCl2Hmpa4]BPh4 composition compounds from data on 1H and 31P NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skopenko, V.V.; Amirkhanov, V.M.; Turov, A.V.; Trachevskij, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    By the method of 1 H and 31 P NMR at 233 and 298 K acetone solutions of lanthanide complexes of the composition [LnCl 2 Hmpa 4 ]BPh 4 (Hmpa=OP[N(CH 3 ) 2 ] 3 , Ln=La, Ce-Lu) have been considered. Two series of complexes having similar structure of coordination sphere (Ln=Pr-Ho and Ln=Er-Yb) are revealed and for each series the values of hyperfine interaction constants, which are 0.49 and 0.28 MHz respectively, have been determined

  19. Observation of s-channel production of single top quarks at the Tevatron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurisano, A; Avila, C; Azfar, F; Badaud, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartlett, J F; Bartos, P; Bassler, U; Bauce, M; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Bedeschi, F; Begalli, M; Behari, S; Bellantoni, L; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bortoletto, D; Borysova, M; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brigliadori, L; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brucken, E; Bu, X B; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camacho-Pérez, E; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Chokheli, D; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Clutter, J; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corbo, M; Corcoran, M; Cordelli, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cutts, D; Das, A; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; Davies, G; de Barbaro, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; D'Errico, M; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Edmunds, D; Elagin, A; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Farrington, S; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fernández Ramos, J P; Fiedler, F; Field, R; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Fuess, S; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gershtein, Y; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Ginther, G; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Golovanov, G; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Grinstein, S; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hahn, S R; Haley, J; Han, J Y; Han, L; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Harder, K; Hare, M; Harel, A; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinrich, J; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herndon, M; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hocker, A; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ito, A S; Ivanov, A; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; James, E; Jang, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Jindariani, S; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jonsson, P; Joo, K K; Joshi, J; Jun, S Y; Jung, A W; Junk, T R; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Karmanov, D; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Kiselevich, I; Knoepfel, K; Kohli, J M; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurata, M; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lammers, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Limosani, A; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipeles, E; Lipton, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Luna-Garcia, R; Lungu, G; Lyon, A L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Mansour, J; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez-Ortega, J; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miao, T; Miconi, F; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondal, N K; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nagy, E; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Nunnemann, T; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Orduna, J; Ortolan, L; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pagliarone, C; Pal, A; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parker, W; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Pondrom, L; Popov, A V; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ranjan, N; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ripp-Baudot, I; Ristori, L; Rizatdinova, F; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Rominsky, M; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sajot, G; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santi, L; Santos, A S; Sato, K; Savage, G; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwanenberger, C; Schwarz, T; Schwienhorst, R; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Sekaric, J; Semenov, A; Severini, H; Sforza, F; Shabalina, E; Shalhout, S Z; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simak, V; Simonenko, A; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, H; Sonnenschein, L; Sorin, V; Soustruznik, K; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stark, J; Stentz, D; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Titov, M; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tokmenin, V V; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Verkheev, A Y; Vernieri, C; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vidal, M; Vilanova, D; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wahl, H D; Wallny, R; Wang, M H L S; Wang, S M; Warchol, J; Waters, D; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wobisch, M; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wood, D R; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, S; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Youn, S W; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, J M; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zucchelli, S

    2014-06-13

    We report the first observation of single-top-quark production in the s channel through the combination of the CDF and D0 measurements of the cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb(-1) per experiment. The measured cross section is σ(s) = 1.29(-0.24)(+0.26) pb. The probability of observing a statistical fluctuation of the background to a cross section of the observed size or larger is 1.8 × 10(-10), corresponding to a significance of 6.3 standard deviations for the presence of an s-channel contribution to the production of single-top quarks.

  20. Liquid-vapor equilibrium in LaCl3-LuCl3 and PrCl3-NdCl3 systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisel'son, L.A.; Lyzlov, Yu.N.; Solov'ev, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    The liquid-vapour equilibrium in the systems LaCl 3 -LuCl 3 and PrCl 3 -NdCl 3 was studied by the boiling-point method. It was established that the system LaCl 3 -LuCl 3 is near-ideal. In the PrCl 3 -NdCl 3 system, a considerable positive deviation from the ideal with the formation of an azeotrope was detected. The azeotrope has a ''smeared-out'' minimum, which falls on a mixture containing approximately 65 mol.% neodymium trichloride. The boiling point of this mixture at a pressure of 1 mm Hg is approximately 975 deg C. The relative volatility coefficients in both systems were studied by the Raleigh distillation method. The presence of the azeotrope in the system PrCl 3 -NdCl 3 is confirmed by the nature of the dependence of the relative volatility coefficient on the composition of the mixture

  1. STIGA’s Integrated Multiple Selling Channels in China’s Table Tennis Market

    OpenAIRE

    LI, HUA; HUANG, LERONG

    2007-01-01

    Rapid technological advancements and fast developing economy have completely changed Chinese people’s lifestyle. Based on internet technology, a new revolution is also renewing the conception in the business world today. When e-tailing and sports consumption have become fashionable life-styles in China in the beginning of new century, the discussion for sports equipment multi-channel selling will follow the tendency of business developing in China. The purpose of this thesis is discovering an...

  2. Accidentes de trabajo en el Hospital Clínico de la Universidad de Chile durante el año 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Valdés

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo, Conocer el número de los accidentes laborales en el Hospital Clínico de la Universidad de Chile (HCUCH el año 2007 y su caracterización de acuerdo a variables como, sexo, edad, tipo de lesión, día de la semana, mes del año, cargo desempeñado y días perdidos. Diseño, Estudio descriptivo, transversal, retrospectivo y observacional. Lugar, Hospital Clínico de la Universidad de Chile (HCUCH. Participantes, Accidentes laborales reportados entre el 1 de Enero y el 31 de Diciembre del 2007. Intervención, Se utilizó la base de datos del Registro de Notificación de Accidentes Laborales, proporcionada por el Departamento de Prevención de Riesgos del HCUCH Principales medidas de Resultados, Porcentajes y Medidas de Tendencia Central, tabuladas en una base de datos con ayuda del programa Microsoft Excel 2003 para Windows ®. Resultados: Se observan 104 accidentes laborales, con un mayor número de eventos en el personal femenino (69,2%, en el rango etareo de 30-39 años (34,3%, el tipo de lesión más frecuente fueron las contusiones/policontusiones (39,4%, el grupo más accidentado fue los auxiliares y técnicos (71.1%. El estudio por días de la semana revela que hay más accidentes los días miércoles y jueves (43,27% y los meses del año con más accidentes fueron enero, agosto y diciembre. La mayor cantidad de accidentes laborales comprometen entre 1 a 5 días perdidos. Conclusiones: Durante el año 2007, se pesquisó 104 accidentes laborales, lo que significó 804 días de ausentismo. Este estudio muestra que el sexo femenino, tener entre 30-39 años y ejercer como auxiliar o técnico fueron factores de asociados al incremento de los accidentes laborales.

  3. ¿Creen haber cambiado los docentes un año después de un curso de docencia clínica?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Herskovic

    Full Text Available Introducción. Los cursos de formación pedagógica pueden mejorar el desempeño de los docentes clínicos. Diseñamos un curso de diez sesiones para mejorar las competencias docentes de profesionales que tienen responsabilidades como tutores clínicos. En el año 2008 se realizaron tres cursos. Las actividades se programaron una vez a la semana, de 08:30 a 10:00 h de la mañana, para facilitar la asistencia. El curso se componía de tres módulos -currículo, metodología y evaluación- y se diseñó para centrarse en los alumnos. Fueron facilitadores de los cursos docentes clínicos con formación en docencia en ciencias de la salud (con diploma o maestría. Objetivo. Evaluar si los asistentes percibían haber realizado cambios en sus prácticas docentes a un año de haber finalizado el curso. Sujetos y métodos. Se administró de modo anónimo, mediante una plataforma informática, un cuestionario con 13 preguntas cerradas y espacio para comentarios. Se envió por correo electrónico una invitación a responder el cuestionario a los 55 tutores clínicos que fueron alumnos de los tres cursos realizados durante el año 2008. El cuestionario se remitió un año después de haber finalizado el curso respectivo. Resultados. El cuestionario fue respondido por 41 tutores clínicos (74,5%. Las respuestas apuntaron a cambios realizados en todos los aspectos consultados: programas (34%, metodología (83% y evaluación (71%. Conclusiones. La mayoría de los participantes en estos cursos de formación docente perciben haber hecho cambios positivos en sus prácticas docentes. Actualmente se está dictando el noveno curso de estas características.

  4. Influência do agente de cloração do catalisador à base de veodímio e da razão molar Cl: Nd na polimerização do butadieno Influence of the chlorinating agent of neodymium based catalysts and Cl: Nd molar ratio on butadiene polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia N. Ferreira

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foi utilizado um sistema catalítico composto por hidreto de diisobutilalumínio (DIBAH, versatato de neodímio (NdV e um agente de cloração para avaliar a influência da fonte de cloro e da razão molar Cl:Nd nas características da reação de polimerização (conversão e constante de velocidade de propagação e do polibutadieno (massa molecular e microestrutura. Os agentes de cloração estudados foram cloreto de t-butila (t-BuCl, sesquicloreto de etilalumínio (EASC e cloreto de dietilalumínio (DEAC. As razões molares Cl:Nd utilizadas foram: 1:1, 3:1 e 5:1 para o t-BuCl; 0,5:1, 1:1 e 3:1 para o EASC e 1:1, 1,5:1, 3:1 e 5:1 para o DEAC. Foi observada a existência, para cada agente de cloração, de um valor ótimo de razão molar Cl:Nd para o qual a conversão foi máxima. O DEAC apresentou uma maior conversão em relação aos outros agentes de cloração; em contrapartida, o t-BuCl produziu polibutadienos com maior teor de unidades 1,4-cis e maior massa molecular (n e wIn this work catalyst systems consisting of diisobutylaluminium hydride (DIBAH, neodymium versatate (NdV and a chlorinating agent were employed to study the influence of the chloride source and Cl:Nd molar ratio on 1,3-butadiene polymerization and polybutadiene's characteristics (molecular weight and microstructure. The chloride sources studied were t-butyl chloride, ethylaluminium sesquichloride (EASC and diethylaluminium chloride (DEAC. The Cl:Nd molar ratios used were 1:1, 3:1 e 5:1 for t-butyl chloride; 0.5:1, 1:1 and 3:1 for EASC and 1:1, 1.5:1, 3:1 and 5:1 for DEAC. A maximum value of Cl:Nd molar ratio exists. Moreover, DEAC showed to be more reactive than EASC and t-BuCl but t-BuCl produced higher molecular weight and cis-1,4 units contents.

  5. Search for the Xb and other hidden-beauty states in the π+π−ϒ(1S channel at ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Aad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This Letter presents a search for a hidden-beauty counterpart of the X(3872 in the mass ranges of 10.05–10.31 GeV and 10.40–11.00 GeV, in the channel Xb→π+π−ϒ(1S(→μ+μ−, using 16.2 fb−1 of s=8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No evidence for new narrow states is found, and upper limits are set on the product of the Xb cross section and branching fraction, relative to those of the ϒ(2S, at the 95% confidence level using the CLS approach. These limits range from 0.8% to 4.0%, depending on mass. For masses above 10.1 GeV, the expected upper limits from this analysis are the most restrictive to date. Searches for production of the ϒ(13DJ, ϒ(10860, and ϒ(11020 states also reveal no significant signals.

  6. Luminescence of BaCl2:Eu2+ particles dispersed in the NaCl host excited by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushak, A.S.; Savchyn, P.V.; Vistovskyy, V.V.; Demkiv, T.M.; Dacyuk, J.R.; Myagkota, S.V.; Voloshinovskii, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    BaCl 2 :Eu 2+ microcrystals embedded in the NaCl host have been obtained in the NaCl–BaCl 2 (1 mol%)–EuCl 3 (0.02 mol%) crystalline system. The influence of the annealing conditions on the formation of such particles has been studied. In particular, long-term annealing (at 200 °S during 100 h) promotes the microcrystals formation in the NaCl–BaCl 2 –Eu crystalline system. The subsequent heat treatment (annealed at 600 °S during 72 h and quenched to room temperature) is shown to lead to the destruction of the majority of these particles. The luminescent-kinetic properties of BaCl 2 :Eu 2+ microcrystals have been studied upon the ultra-violet excitation by the synchrotron radiation. The X-ray excited luminescence has been measured in order to estimate the distribution of europium ions between microcrystals and the NaCl host. The excitation mechanisms of Eu 2+ ions in the NaCl–BaCl 2 –Eu crystalline system are discussed. - Highlights: ► The formation of BaCl 2 :Eu 2+ microcrystals of 1–100 μm size embedded in the NaCl host is revealed. ► Annealing at 600 °C leads to the destruction of significant number of embedded microcrystals. ► The luminescent parameters of microcrystals is similar to ones of single crystal analogs.

  7. 31 CFR 30.14 - Q-14: How does section 111 of EESA operate in connection with an acquisition, merger, or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-14: How does section 111 of EESA operate in connection with an acquisition, merger, or reorganization? 30.14 Section 30.14 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE...

  8. Microelectrode array measurement of potassium ion channel remodeling on the field action potential duration in rapid atrial pacing rabbits model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Juan; Yan, Huang; Wugeti, Najina; Guo, Yujun; Zhang, Ling; Ma, Mei; Guo, Xingui; Jiao, Changan; Xu, Wenli; Li, Tianqi

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) arises from abnormalities in atrial structure and electrical activity. Microelectrode arrays (MEA) is a real-time, nondestructive measurement of the resting and action potential signal, from myocardial cells, to the peripheral circuit of electrophysiological activity. This study examined the field action potential duration (fAPD) of the right atrial appendage (RAA) by MEA in rapid atrial pacing (RAP) in the right atrium of rabbits. In addition, this study also investigated the effect of potassium ion channel blockers on fAPD. 40 New Zealand white rabbits of either sex were randomly divided into 3 groups: 1) the control, 2) potassium ion channel blocker (TEA, 4-Ap and BaCl2), and 3) amiodarone groups. The hearts were quickly removed and right atrial appendage sectioned (slice thickness 500 μm). Each slice was perfused with Tyrode's solution and continuously stimulated for 30 minutes. Sections from the control group were superfused with Tyrode's solution for 10 minutes, while the blocker groups and amiodarone were both treated with their respective compounds for 10 minutes each. The fAPD of RAA and action field action potential morphology were measured using MEA. In non-pace (control) groups, fAPD was 188.33 ± 18.29 ms after Tyrode's solution superfusion, and 173.91 ± 6.83 ms after RAP. In pace/potassium ion channel groups, TEA and BaCl2 superfusion prolonged atrial field action potential (fAPD) (control vs blocker: 176.67 ± 8.66 ms vs 196.11 ± 10.76 ms, 182.22 ± 12.87 ms vs 191.11 ± 13.09 ms with TEA and BaCl2 superfusion, respectively, P action potential in animal heart slices. After superfusing potassium ion channel blockers, fAPD was prolonged. These results suggest that Ito, IKur and IK1 remodel and mediate RAP-induced atrial electrical remodeling. Amiodarone alter potassium ion channel activity (Ito, IKur, IK1 and IKs), shortening fAPD.

  9. Pr{sub 3}S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}[AsS{sub 3}]: a praseodymium(III) sulfide chloride thioarsenate(III) with double chains of condensed [SPr{sub 4}]{sup 10+} tetrahedra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dong-Hee [Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, ON (Canada); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ledderboge, Florian; Schleid, Thomas [Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Kleinke, Holger [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Single crystals of Pr{sub 3}S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}[AsS{sub 3}] were obtained by reacting praseodymium sesquisulfide and trichloride with arsenic and sulfur (molar ratio: 7:4:6:9) in torch-sealed evacuated silica ampoules at 850 C for a week and subsequent slow cooling to room temperature. The transparent, pale yellowish green platelets crystallize monoclinically (Pr{sub 3}S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}[AsS{sub 3}]: a = 2190.96(9) pm, b = 685.49(3) pm, c = 701.87(3) pm, β = 98.752(3) ) in the non-centrosymmetric space group Cc with Z = 4. The crystal structure of Pr{sub 3}S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}[AsS{sub 3}] comprises three crystallographically different Pr{sup 3+} cations. (Pr1){sup 3+} and (Pr2){sup 3+} exhibit bicapped trigonal prismatic environments of five sulfur and three chlorine atoms (C.N. = 8) each, whereas only seven sulfur atoms arranged as capped trigonal prism (C.N. = 7) are present in the case of (Pr3){sup 3+}. Two of the five crystallographically different sulfur atoms (S1 and S2) are coordinated by four Pr{sup 3+} cations, each in the shape of slightly distorted [SPr{sub 4}]{sup 10+} tetrahedra (d(S-Pr) = 278-294 pm). Hence, the crystal structure of Pr{sub 3}S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}[AsS{sub 3}] contains double chains with the composition {sup 1}{sub ∞}{[S_2Pr_3]"5"+}, consisting of two parallel edge-fused chains of anti-SiS{sub 2}-analogous single strands {sup 1}{sub ∞}{[SPr_2]"4"+}, formed by trans-edge sharing [SPr{sub 4}]{sup 10+} tetrahedra. The arrangement of the {sup 1}{sub ∞}{[S_2Pr_3]"5"+} double chains running along [001] can be described as a hexagonal rod-packing. Chloride anions (Cl1 and Cl2) as well as the isolated, ψ{sup 1}-tetrahedral thioarsenate(III) groups [AsS{sub 3}]{sup 3-} (d(As-S) = 228-229 pm) consisting of three sulfur atoms (S3, S4, and S5) and an As{sup 3+} cation carrying a stereochemically active non-bonding electron pair take care of the three-dimensional interconnection and the charge balance of the {sup 1}{sub ∞}{[S_2Pr_3]"5"+} double

  10. Historia de la historia clínica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª José Fombella Posada

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available La historia clínica es el documento esencial del aprendizaje y la práctica clínica. Las primeras historias clínicas completas están contenidas en los libros Las Epidemias I y III del Corpus Hipocraticum. Su elaboración se recupera en la Edad Media con Los Consilea y se mantiene a lo largo del renacimiento denominándose Observatio. Sydenham perfecciona su con-tenido completándose a lo largo del s. XVIII con el método anatomoclínico y del XIX con el desarrollo de técnicas fisiopatológicas. El s. XX representa un rápido crecimiento de pruebas complementarias con aumento de la complejidad de la historia clínica que se convierte en multidisciplinar y de obligado cumplimiento. La informatización de la historia clínica conllevará cambios radicales en el s. XXI.

  11. F/Cl + C2H2 reactions: Are the addition and hydrogen abstraction direct processes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jilai; Geng Caiyun; Huang Xuri; Zhan Jinhui; Sun Chiachung

    2006-01-01

    The reactions of atomic radical F and Cl with acetylene have been studied theoretically using ab initio quantum chemistry methods and transition state theory. The doublet potential energy surfaces were calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ//CCSD/6-31G(d,p), CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ//UMP2/6-311++G(d,p) and compound method Gaussian-3 levels. Two reaction mechanisms including the addition-elimination and the hydrogen abstraction reaction mechanisms are considered. In the addition-elimination reactions, the halogen atoms approach C 2 H 2 , perpendicular to the C≡C triple bond, forming the pre-reactive complex C1 at the reaction entrance. C1 transforms to intermediate isomer I1 via transition state TSC1/1 with a negative/small barrier for C 2 H 2 F/C 2 H 2 Cl system, which can proceed by further eliminating H atom endothermally. While the hydrogen abstraction reactions also involve C1 for the fluorine atom abstraction of hydrogen, yet the hydrogen abstraction by chlorine atom first forms a collinear hydrogen-bonded complex C2. The other reaction pathways on the doublet PES are less competitive due to thermodynamical or kinetic factors. According to our results, the presence of pre-reactive complexes indicates that the simple hydrogen abstraction and addition in the halogen atoms reaction with unsaturated hydrocarbon should be more complex. Furthermore, based on the analysis of the kinetics of all channels through which the addition and abstraction reactions proceed, we expect that the actual feasibility of the reaction channels may depend on the reaction conditions in the experiment. The present study may be helpful for probing the mechanisms of the title reactions and understanding the halogen chemistry

  12. Search for Higgs Boson in the channel with missing energy with the detector ALEPH at LEP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kado, Marumi

    1999-01-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the channel e + e - → Hνν-bar is presented. An event selection method using Neural Network techniques is developed. The analysis is based on a 254 pb -1 data sample taken at center-of-mass energies from √ s = 161 up to 189 GeV (from 1996 to 1998), by the ALEPH detector within the LEP2 program at CERN. The experimental systematic defects are studied and the corrections and uncertainties are evaluated. The study of this channel alone results in a mass lower limit of the Standard Model Higgs boson of 85.8 GeV/c 2 with a sensitivity of 89 GeV/c 2 at the 95% CL. Combined with all studied final states, the limit at 95% CL obtained is: m H > 90.2 GeV/c 2 (observed) and m H > 95.7 GeV/c 2 (expected). An interpolation of these results within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model is presented along with the combination of all channels, including those originating from the associated production process (e + e - → hA, leading to an exclusion at the 95% CL, for any value of tanβ≥ 1, of the h and A neutral Higgs boson masses of: m H > 80.1 GeV/c 2 (observed) and m A > 81.7 GeV/c 2 (observed). (author)

  13. The S4-S5 linker acts as a signal integrator for HERG K+ channel activation and deactivation gating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Ann Ng

    Full Text Available Human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG K(+ channels have unusual gating kinetics. Characterised by slow activation/deactivation but rapid inactivation/recovery from inactivation, the unique gating kinetics underlie the central role hERG channels play in cardiac repolarisation. The slow activation and deactivation kinetics are regulated in part by the S4-S5 linker, which couples movement of the voltage sensor domain to opening of the activation gate at the distal end of the inner helix of the pore domain. It has also been suggested that cytosolic domains may interact with the S4-S5 linker to regulate activation and deactivation kinetics. Here, we show that the solution structure of a peptide corresponding to the S4-S5 linker of hERG contains an amphipathic helix. The effects of mutations at the majority of residues in the S4-S5 linker of hERG were consistent with the previously identified role in coupling voltage sensor movement to the activation gate. However, mutations to Ser543, Tyr545, Gly546 and Ala548 had more complex phenotypes indicating that these residues are involved in additional interactions. We propose a model in which the S4-S5 linker, in addition to coupling VSD movement to the activation gate, also contributes to interactions that stabilise the closed state and a separate set of interactions that stabilise the open state. The S4-S5 linker therefore acts as a signal integrator and plays a crucial role in the slow deactivation kinetics of the channel.

  14. Influence of CdCl{sub 2} activation treatment on ultra-thin Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S/CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, A.J., E-mail: a.clayton@glyndwr.ac.uk [Centre for Solar Energy Research, Glyndŵr University, OpTIC, St. Asaph LL17 0JD (United Kingdom); Baker, M.A.; Babar, S. [Faculty of Engineering & Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gibson, P.N. [Institute for Health & Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre, 21020 Ispra, VA (Italy); Irvine, S.J.C.; Kartopu, G.; Lamb, D.A.; Barrioz, V. [Centre for Solar Energy Research, Glyndŵr University, OpTIC, St. Asaph LL17 0JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-01

    Ultra-thin CdTe photovoltaic solar cells with an absorber thickness of 0.5 μm were produced by metal organic chemical vapour deposition onto indium tin oxide coated boroaluminosilicate glass. A wide band gap Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S alloy window layer was employed to improve spectral response in the blue region of the solar spectrum. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to monitor changes in the chemical composition and microstructure of the Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S/CdTe solar cell after varying the post-deposition CdCl{sub 2} activation treatment time and annealing temperature. The CdCl{sub 2} treatment leached Zn from the Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S layer causing a redshift in the spectral response onset of window absorption. S diffusion occurred across the Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S/CdTe interface, which was more pronounced as the CdCl{sub 2} treatment was increased. A CdTe{sub 1−y}S{sub y} alloy was formed at the interface, which thickened with CdCl{sub 2} treatment time. Small concentrations of S (up to 2 at.%) were observed throughout the CdTe layer as the degree of CdCl{sub 2} treatment was increased. Greater S diffusion across the Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S/CdTe interface caused the device open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) to increase. The higher V{sub oc} is attributed to enhanced strain relaxation and associated reduction of defects in the interface region as well as the increase in CdTe grain size. - Highlights: • Increased CdCl{sub 2} activation treatment resulted in loss of Zn from Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S. • Sulphur diffusion into CdTe was enhanced with greater CdCl{sub 2} activation treatment. • Improvement to V{sub oc} correlated with increased sulphur diffusion into CdTe.

  15. Explosive hydrogen brning of 35Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilidas, C.; Goerres, J.; Ross, J.G.; Scheller, K.W.; Wiescher, M.; Azuma, R.E.; Roters, G.; Trautvetter, H.P.; Evans, H.C.

    1994-01-01

    Proton threshold states in 36 Ar have been studied via the reactions 35 Cl( 3 He,d) 36 Ar, 32 S( 6 Li,d) 36 Ar, 32 S(α,γ) 36 Ar, 35 Cl(p,γ) 36 Ar and 35 Cl(p,α) 32 S to investigate their influence on a possible SCl reaction cycle in explosive hydrogen burning. Three new states in 36 Ar have been observed in the ( 3 He,d) reaction at E x =8806, 8887 and 8923 keV. Deuteron angular distributions were measured for 14 states near the 35 Cl+p threshold and were analyzed with DWBA calculations. Values of transferred orbital angular momenta, spectroscopic factors and proton partial widths were determined. Gamma-ray spectra have been measured at ten (p,γ) resonances. Three new resonances were observed at E R =311, 416 and 627 keV, corresponding to 36 Ar states at E x =8806, 8909 and 9117 keV, respectively. Excitation and resonance energies, γ-ray branching ratios and resonance strengths are presented. The astrophysical implications of our results for explosive hydrogen burning of 35 Cl are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Caracterización clínica de los casos de dengue hospitalizados en la E.S.E. Hospital ""Antonio Roldán Betancur"", Apartadó, Antioquia, Colombia, 2000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Arboleda

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Desde 1998 se vienen notificando casos de dengue hemorrágico en el municipio de Apartadó y actualmente el dengue se considera endemo-epidémico. Objetivo. Describir el comportamiento clínico del dengue en pacientes hospitalizados por esta causa en la Empresa Social del Estado Hospital Antonio Roldán Betancur de Apartadó en el año 2000. Materiales y métodos. Estudio descriptivo retrospectivo de revisión de historias clínicas de pacientes hospitalizados por dengue. Resultados. Se hospitalizaron 45 casos con diagnóstico serológico de dengue. Tres (6,7% pacientes con dengue clásico, 22 (48,9% con dengue con manifestaciones hemorrágicas y 20 (44,4% con dengue hemorrágico. La edad osciló entre 4 meses y 68 años con un promedio de 22,1 años. La mayoría procedía del área urbana (82,8%. Las manifestaciones clínicas más frecuentes fueron: fiebre (100%, mialgias y artralgias (71,1%, cefalea (70,5% y dolor abdominal (67,5%. Las manifestaciones hemorrágicas más frecuentes fueron petequias (60%, hematuria (31,7%, equimosis en sitios de venopunción (24,4%, melenas (22,2%, hematemesis (15,5% y hemorragias vaginales anormales (15,5%. El recuento de plaquetas osciló entre 11.000 y 186.000/mm3, con un promedio de 48.688. Los hematocritos oscilaron entre 26 y 59%, con un promedio de 41,5%. Fallecieron 4 (8,8% pacientes, tres de éstos menores de un año. En el 40% de los casos se hicieron otros diagnósticos simultáneamente, siendo malaria la coinfección más frecuente, con 17,7% (8/45 de los casos. Conclusión. En este estudio las personas en edad productiva tuvieron mayor riesgo de sufrir dengue y la población menor de un año fue la de mayor riesgo de letalidad; existe, además, la posibilidad de coinfección con otras enfermedades, particularmente malaria.

  17. A polyether biotoxin binding site on the lipid-exposed face of the pore domain of Kv channels revealed by the marine toxin gambierol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopljar, Ivan; Labro, Alain J.; Cuypers, Eva; Johnson, Henry W. B.; Rainier, Jon D.; Tytgat, Jan; Snyders, Dirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Gambierol is a marine polycyclic ether toxin belonging to the group of ciguatera toxins. It does not activate voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) but inhibits Kv1 potassium channels by an unknown mechanism. While testing whether Kv2, Kv3, and Kv4 channels also serve as targets, we found that Kv3.1 was inhibited with an IC50 of 1.2 ± 0.2 nM, whereas Kv2 and Kv4 channels were insensitive to 1 μM gambierol. Onset of block was similar from either side of the membrane, and gambierol did not compete with internal cavity blockers. The inhibition did not require channel opening and could not be reversed by strong depolarization. Using chimeric Kv3.1–Kv2.1 constructs, the toxin sensitivity was traced to S6, in which T427 was identified as a key determinant. In Kv3.1 homology models, T427 and other molecular determinants (L348, F351) reside in a space between S5 and S6 outside the permeation pathway. In conclusion, we propose that gambierol acts as a gating modifier that binds to the lipid-exposed surface of the pore domain, thereby stabilizing the closed state. This site may be the topological equivalent of the neurotoxin site 5 of VGSCs. Further elucidation of this previously undescribed binding site may explain why most ciguatoxins activate VGSCs, whereas others inhibit voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels. This previously undescribed Kv neurotoxin site may have wide implications not only for our understanding of channel function at the molecular level but for future development of drugs to alleviate ciguatera poisoning or to modulate electrical excitability in general. PMID:19482941

  18. Differential Effects of TRPA and TRPV Channels on Behaviors of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Thies

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available TRPA and TRPV ion channels are members of the transient receptor potential (TRP cation channel superfamily, which mediates various sensory transductions. In Caenorhabditis elegans , the TRPV channels are known to affect chemosensation, while the TRPA-1 channel is associated with thermosensation and mechanosensation. We examined thermosensation, chemosensation, and osmosensation in strains lacking TRPA-1 or TRPV channels. We found that TRPV channel knockout worms exhibited similar behavioral deficits associated with thermotaxis as the TRPA-1 channel knockout, suggesting a dual role for TRPV channels. In contrast, chemosensation responses, assessed by both avoidance reversal behavior and NaCl osmosensation, were dependent on TRPV channels but seemed independent of TRPA-1 channel. Our findings suggest that, in addition to TRPA-1 channel, TRPV channels are necessary for thermotaxis and may activate, or modulate, the function of TRPA-1 channels. In contrast, TRPA-1 channels do not have a dual responsibility, as they have no functional role in odorant avoidance or osmosensation.

  19. Spin dynamics in the high-field phase of quantum-critical S =1/2 TlCuCl sub 3

    CERN Document Server

    Rueegg, C; Furrer, A; Krämer, K; Güdel, H U; Vorderwisch, P; Mutka, H

    2002-01-01

    An external magnetic field suppresses the spin-energy gap in singlet ground state S=1/2 TlCuCl sub 3. The system becomes quantum-critical at H sub c approx 5.7 T, where the energy of the lowest Zeeman-split triplet excitation crosses the nonmagnetic ground state. Antiferromagnetic ordering is reported above H sub c , which underlines the three-dimensional nature of the observed quantum phase transition. The intrinsic parameters of S=1/2 TlCuCl sub 3 allow us to access the critical region microscopically by neutron scattering. A substantial study of the spin dynamics in the high-field phase of TlCuCl sub 3 at T=1.5 K up to H=12 T was performed for the first time. The results possibly indicate two dynamical regimes, which can be understood within characteristically renormalized triplet modes and a low-lying dynamics of potentially collective origin. (orig.)

  20. Posttransplant sCD30 as a predictor of kidney graft outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süsal, Caner; Döhler, Bernd; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Salmela, Kaija T; Weimer, Rolf; Zeier, Martin; Opelz, Gerhard

    2011-06-27

    Reliable markers for assessing the biological effect of immunosuppressive drugs and identification of transplant recipients at risk of developing rejection are not available. In a prospective multicenter study, we investigated whether posttransplant measurement of the T-cell activation marker soluble CD30 (sCD30) can be used for estimating the risk of graft loss in kidney transplant recipients. Pre- and posttransplant sera of 2322 adult deceased-donor kidney recipients were tested for serum sCD30 content using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. sCD30 decreased posttransplant and reached a nadir on day 30. Patients with a high sCD30 of more than or equal to 40 U/mL on day 30 showed a subsequent graft survival rate after 3 years of 78.3±4.1%, significantly lower than the 90.3±1.0% rate in recipients with a low sCD30 on day 30 of less than 40 U/mL (log-rank PsCD30 levels, patients with high sCD30 on posttransplant day 30 demonstrated significantly lower 3-year graft survival irrespective of the pretransplant level. Our data suggest that posttransplant measurement of sCD30 on day 30 is a predictor of subsequent graft loss in kidney transplant recipients and that sCD30 may potentially serve as an indicator for adjustment of immunosuppressive medication.

  1. TMS320C31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gwi Tae; Lee, Sang Rak

    1998-01-01

    This book is divided into four parts, which introduces TMS320C31 with C language. The first part deals with digital signal processor on what is DPS?, types of DPS and structure of TMS320C31. The second part introduces program development by C language, cstartup cord and C compiler. The third part describes OS30, Emile 30 and BIOS. The last part is for application board design of T31 and test examples of T31 board : external flag test, ram test, external read port test and communication test.

  2. Lithium fluxes indicate presence of Na-Cl cotransport (NCC) in human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauf, Peter K; Chimote, Ameet A; Adragna, Norma C

    2008-01-01

    During regulatory volume decrease (RVD) of human lens epithelial cells (hLECs) by clotrimazole (CTZ)-sensitive K fluxes, Na-K-2Cl cotransport (NKCC) remains active and K-Cl cotransport (KCC) inactive. To determine whether such an abnormal behavior was caused by RVD-induced cell shrinkage, NKCC was measured in the presence of either CTZ or in high K media to prevent RVD. NKCC transports RbCl + NaCl, and LiCl + KCl; thus ouabain-insensitive, bumetanide-sensitive (BS) or Cl-dependent (ClD) Rb and Li fluxes were determined in hyposmotic high NaCl media with CTZ, or in high KCl media alone, or with sulfamate (Sf) or nitrate as Cl replacement at varying Rb, Li or Cl mol fractions (MF). Unexpectedly, NKCC was inhibited by 80% with CTZ (IC(50) = 31 microM). In isosmotic (300 mOsM) K, Li influx was approximately 1/3 of Rb influx in Na, 50% lower in Sf, and bumetanide-insensitive (BI). In hypotonic (200 mOsM) K, only the ClD but not BS Li fluxes were detected. At Li MFs from 0.1-1, Li fluxes fitted a bell-shaped curve maxing at approximately 0.6 Li MF, with the BS fluxes equaling approximately 1/4 of the ClD-Li influx. The difference, i.e. the BI/ClD Li influx, saturated with increasing Li and Cl MFs, with K(ms) for Li of 11 with, and 7 mM without K, and of approximately 46 mM for Cl. Inhibition of this K-independent Li influx by thiazides was weak whilst furosemide (<100 microM) was ineffective. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blots verified presence of both NKCC1 and Na-Cl cotransport (NCC). In conclusion, in hyposmotic high K media, which prevents CTZ-sensitive K flux-mediated RVD in hLECs, NKCC1, though molecularly expressed, was functionally silent. However, a K-independent and moderately thiazide-sensitive ClD-Li flux, i.e. LiCC, likely occurring through NCC was detected operationally and molecularly. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Reduction behaviors of Zr for LiCl-KCl-ZrCl4 and LiCl-KCl-ZrCl4-CdCl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Si Hyung; Yoon, Jongho; Kim, Gha Young; Kim, Tack Jin; Shim, Joon Bo; Kim, Kwang Rag; Jung, Jae Hoo; Ahn, Do Hee; Paek, Seungwoo

    2013-01-01

    The reduction potentials of most of the zirconium ions on the solid cathode are smaller (about 0.4V) than that of uranium, and thus zirconium can be recovered prior to uranium during the reduction stage. In the case of a liquid cadmium cathode, which is one of the major cathodes, the reduction potential can be changed because zirconium reacts with the liquid cadmium. Up to now, it has not been well known what the reduction potential of Zr was on the liquid Cd cathode. According to the Cd-Zr phase diagram, there are four intermetallic compounds between cadmium and zirconium. It is easier to use the solid cathode than the liquid cadmium cathode in LiCl-KCl-ZrCl 4 containing CdCl 2 to identify the formation of the Cd-Zr phase. In this study, the reduction behaviors of zirconium were compared in the LiCl-KCl-ZrCl 4 and LiCl-KCl-ZrCl 4 -CdCl 2 solutions when using a solid cathode. The reduction behavior of Zr at a solid W cathode and a Cd-coated W cathode was compared in a LiCl-KCl-ZrCl 4 solution at 500 .deg. C. It was observed from the results using a solid W cathode that Zr 4+ ions were gradually oxidized to Zr 2+ , Zr, and ZrCl during the reduction sweep, but the final oxidation peak of Zr 2+ to Zr 4+ seemed to be unclear during the oxidation sweep. In the case of the Cd-coated W electrode, only a Cd 2 Zr phase was formed at 500 .deg. C, which seemed to be related to the melting point of Cd-Zr intermetallics. Through additional studies at different temperatures, the formation behavior will be studied

  4. Fluorescence-tracking of activation gating in human ERG channels reveals rapid S4 movement and slow pore opening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeineb Es-Salah-Lamoureux

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available hERG channels are physiologically important ion channels which mediate cardiac repolarization as a result of their unusual gating properties. These are very slow activation compared with other mammalian voltage-gated potassium channels, and extremely rapid inactivation. The mechanism of slow activation is not well understood and is investigated here using fluorescence as a direct measure of S4 movement and pore opening.Tetramethylrhodamine-5-maleimide (TMRM fluorescence at E519 has been used to track S4 voltage sensor movement, and channel opening and closing in hERG channels. Endogenous cysteines (C445 and C449 in the S1-S2 linker bound TMRM, which caused a 10 mV hyperpolarization of the V((1/2 of activation to -27.5+/-2.0 mV, and showed voltage-dependent fluorescence signals. Substitution of S1-S2 linker cysteines with valines allowed unobstructed recording of S3-S4 linker E519C and L520C emission signals. Depolarization of E519C channels caused rapid initial fluorescence quenching, fit with a double Boltzmann relationship, F-V(ON, with V((1/2 (,1 = -37.8+/-1.7 mV, and V((1/2 (,2 = 43.5+/-7.9 mV. The first phase, V((1/2 (,1, was approximately 20 mV negative to the conductance-voltage relationship measured from ionic tail currents (G-V((1/2 = -18.3+/-1.2 mV, and relatively unchanged in a non-inactivating E519C:S620T mutant (V((1/2 = -34.4+/-1.5 mV, suggesting the fast initial fluorescence quenching tracked S4 voltage sensor movement. The second phase of rapid quenching was absent in the S620T mutant. The E519C fluorescence upon repolarization (V((1/2 = -20.6+/-1.2, k = 11.4 mV and L520C quenching during depolarization (V((1/2 = -26.8+/-1.0, k = 13.3 mV matched the respective voltage dependencies of hERG ionic tails, and deactivation time constants from -40 to -110 mV, suggesting they detected pore-S4 rearrangements related to ionic current flow during pore opening and closing.THE DATA INDICATE: 1 that rapid environmental changes occur at the

  5. Channelling and electromagnetic radiation of channelling particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikov, N.

    1983-01-01

    A brief description is presented of the channelling of charged particles between atoms in the crystal lattice. The specificities are discussed of the transverse motion of channelling particles as are the origin and properties of quasi-characteristic radiation of channelling particles which accompany transfers from one band of permissible energies of the transverse motion of channelling particles to the other. (B.S.)

  6. Molecular, biophysical, and pharmacological properties of calcium-activated chloride channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaleddin, Mohammad Amin

    2018-02-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) are a family of anionic transmembrane ion channels. They are mainly responsible for the movement of Cl - and other anions across the biological membranes, and they are widely expressed in different tissues. Since the Cl - flow into or out of the cell plays a crucial role in hyperpolarizing or depolarizing the cells, respectively, the impact of intracellular Ca 2+ concentration on these channels is attracting a lot of attentions. After summarizing the molecular, biophysical, and pharmacological properties of CaCCs, the role of CaCCs in normal cellular functions will be discussed, and I will emphasize how dysregulation of CaCCs in pathological conditions can account for different diseases. A better understanding of CaCCs and a pivotal regulatory role of Ca 2+ can shed more light on the therapeutic strategies for different neurological disorders that arise from chloride dysregulation, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, and neuropathic pain. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. ?????????? ?????, ?????????? ??????????? ?? ?????????? ?????????? ????? ? ?????? ???????? ZnCl2 +NH4Cl

    OpenAIRE

    Kuntyi, Orest; Zozulya, Galyna

    2010-01-01

    Zinc cementation by magnesium from ZnCl2 + NH4Cl aqueous solutions has been investigated. The amount of magnesium has been established as 0.8?2.0 g per 1 g of conditioned zinc to obtain recovery degree ? 99 %. At low concentrations of Zn2+ ions (0.025?0.1 M ZnCl2) dispersed deposit is formed with nanoparticles of reduced metal; at high concentrations (0.25?0.5 M) coarse-crystalline and fern-shaped deposit is formed. ?????????? ?????????? ????? ??????? ? ?????? ???????? ZnCl2 + NH4Cl. ????????...

  8. Search for lepton flavour violation in the $e\\mu$ continuum with the ATLAS detector in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV pp collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Aktas, Adil; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Aleppo, Mario; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Makoto; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asner, David; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Graham; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Giovanni; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bona, Marcella; Bondioli, Mario; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Booth, Peter; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Brambilla, Elena; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Brett, Nicolas; Bright-Thomas, Paul; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brubaker, Erik; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Buis, Ernst-Jan; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byatt, Tom; Caballero, Jose; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caccia, Massimo; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camard, Arnaud; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Cammin, Jochen; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Caramarcu, Costin; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carpentieri, Carmen; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavallari, Alvise; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Cazzato, Antonio; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Li; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciba, Krzysztof; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Coelli, Simone; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Coluccia, Rita; Comune, Gianluca; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cranshaw, Jack; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cuneo, Stefano; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, Aline; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dahlhoff, Andrea; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Daly, Colin; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dankers, Reinier; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne, Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; de Saintignon, Paul; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Deile, Mario; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Deng, Wensheng; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietl, Hans; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djilkibaev, Rashid; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Dogan, Ozgen Berkol; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Drevermann, Hans; Dris, Manolis; Drohan, Janice; Dubbert, Jörg; Dubbs, Tim; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Dzahini, Daniel; Düren, Michael; Ebke, Johannes; Eckert, Simon; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Egorov, Kirill; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Ely, Robert; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Facius, Katrine; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falou, Alain; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fasching, Damon; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Ivan; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandes, Bruno; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flammer, Joachim; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Föhlisch, Florian; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Fopma, Johan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; Freestone, Julian; French, Sky; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gieraltowski, Gerry; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouanère, Michel; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grabski, Varlen; Grafström, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Green, Barry; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griesmayer, Erich; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grognuz, Joel; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Gruwe, Magali; Grybel, Kai; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Christian Johan; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heldmann, Michael; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Hemperek, Tomasz; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmes, Alan; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hott, Thomas; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Idzik, Marek; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imhaeuser, Martin; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ionescu, Gelu; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishii, Koji; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Itoh, Yuki; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Kazi, Sandor Istvan; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kilvington, Graham; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Koblitz, Birger; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; König, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Henri; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasel, Olaf; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuykendall, William; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvasnicka, Ondrej; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Lapin, Vladimir; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Lau, Wing; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorato, Antonia; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazzaro, Alfio; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Leahu, Marius; Lebedev, Alexander; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewandowska, Marta; Lewis, George; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Jiansen; Lu, Liang; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Magrath, Caroline; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchesotti, Marco; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Alex; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Maß, Martin; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meuser, Stefan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikulec, Bettina; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Misawa, Shigeki; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohn, Bjarte; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Moneta, Lorenzo; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morais, Antonio; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morita, Youhei; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morone, Maria Cristina; Morris, John; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muijs, Sandra; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murakami, Koichi; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nderitu, Simon Kirichu; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicoletti, Giovanni; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomoto, Hiroshi; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Notz, Dieter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nožička, Miroslav; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohska, Tokio Kenneth; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Ordonez, Gustavo; Oreglia, Mark; Orellana, Frederik; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Ortega, Eduardo; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Øye, Ola; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Paoloni, Alessandro; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Peric, Ivan; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Perus, Antoine; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Onne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Pfeifer, Bernhard; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Plano, Will; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Porter, Robert; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potekhin, Maxim; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Potter, Keith; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Weiming; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rajek, Silke; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rensch, Bertram; Rescia, Sergio; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Rodriguez Garcia, Yohany; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Maltrana, Diego; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rossi, Lucio; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rottländer, Iris; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rulikowska-Zarebska, Elzbieta; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandhu, Pawan; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savine, Alexandre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Savva, Panagiota; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmidt, Michael; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Christian; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloan, Terrence; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yuri; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorbi, Massimo; Sosebee, Mark; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taga, Adrian; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Tevlin, Christopher; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonazzo, Alessandra; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Treis, Johannes; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Twomey, Matthew Shaun; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Typaldos, Dimitrios; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; Van Eijk, Bob; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villani, Giulio; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Viret, Sébastien; Virzi, Joseph; Vitale, Antonio; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vovenko, Anatoly; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Wastie, Roy; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Werthenbach, Ulrich; Wessels, Martin; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wright, Dennis; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Yabsley, Bruce; Yamada, Miho; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Weiming; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite, Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zema, Pasquale Federico; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Anton; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Qizhi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zilka, Branislav; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2012-06-14

    This paper presents a search for the t-channel exchange of an R-parity violating scalar top quark ($\\tilde{t}$) in the $e^{\\pm}\\mu^{\\pm}$ continuum using 2.1/fb of data collected by the ATLAS detector in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV pp collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Data are found to be consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model backgrounds. Limits on R-parity-violating couplings at 95% C.L. are calculated as a function of the scalar top mass ($m_{\\tilde{t}}$). The upper limits on the production cross section for $pp \\to e\\mu X$, through the t-channel exchange of a scalar top quark, ranges from 170 fb for $m_{\\tilde{t}}$=95 GeV to 30 fb for $m_{\\tilde{t}}$=1000 GeV.

  9. A Study on the Corrosion Behavior of Carbon Steel Exposed to a H2S-Containing NH4Cl Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-bo; Li, Yun; Cheng, Guang-xu; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yao-heng

    2018-04-01

    NH4Cl corrosion failure often occurs in the overhead systems of hydrotreaters, and this failure is always accompanied by the appearance of H2S. A combination of electrochemical and surface spectroscopic (SEM/EDS, AFM, XRD) techniques was used to investigate the effect of different factors, including the surface roughness, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and H2S concentration, on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in an NH4Cl environment with the presence of H2S. The effect of H2S concentrations (at the ppm level) on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel was systematically revealed. The experimental results clearly indicated that the corrosion rate reached a minimum value at 10 ppm H2S. The steel surface was covered by a uniform corrosion product film in a 10 ppm H2S environment, and the corrosion product film was tight and protective. The ammonia from NH4Cl helped maintaining the protectiveness of the corrosion films in this environment. Dissolved oxygen mainly accelerated the cathodic reaction. The cathodic limiting current density increased with increasing temperature, and the anodic branch polarization curves were similar at different temperatures. The anodic current density decreased as the pH decreased, and the cathodic current density increased as the pH decreased. The absolute surface roughness (R a) of carbon steel increased from 132.856 nm at 72 h to 153.973 nm at 144 h, and the rougher surface resulted in a higher corrosion rate. The critical innovation in this research was that multiple influential factors were revealed in the NH4Cl environment with the presence of H2S.

  10. A Study on the Corrosion Behavior of Carbon Steel Exposed to a H2S-Containing NH4Cl Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-bo; Li, Yun; Cheng, Guang-xu; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yao-heng

    2018-05-01

    NH4Cl corrosion failure often occurs in the overhead systems of hydrotreaters, and this failure is always accompanied by the appearance of H2S. A combination of electrochemical and surface spectroscopic (SEM/EDS, AFM, XRD) techniques was used to investigate the effect of different factors, including the surface roughness, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and H2S concentration, on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in an NH4Cl environment with the presence of H2S. The effect of H2S concentrations (at the ppm level) on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel was systematically revealed. The experimental results clearly indicated that the corrosion rate reached a minimum value at 10 ppm H2S. The steel surface was covered by a uniform corrosion product film in a 10 ppm H2S environment, and the corrosion product film was tight and protective. The ammonia from NH4Cl helped maintaining the protectiveness of the corrosion films in this environment. Dissolved oxygen mainly accelerated the cathodic reaction. The cathodic limiting current density increased with increasing temperature, and the anodic branch polarization curves were similar at different temperatures. The anodic current density decreased as the pH decreased, and the cathodic current density increased as the pH decreased. The absolute surface roughness ( R a) of carbon steel increased from 132.856 nm at 72 h to 153.973 nm at 144 h, and the rougher surface resulted in a higher corrosion rate. The critical innovation in this research was that multiple influential factors were revealed in the NH4Cl environment with the presence of H2S.

  11. Comparación entre la respuesta de la actividad muscular lumbar en plataforma vibratoria y en ejercicio clásico de squat isométrico en 30º y 60º. (A comparison of the lumbar muscle activity responsein 30º and 60º isometric squat between whole-body vibration and a classic exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Santos-Lozano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Whole-body vibration (WBV has improved as a variety of exercises, so it is necessary know muscles responses to the vibration stimulus.The aim of this work was to study and to compare the change in muscle activation in the lumbar area and lower body between the whole-body vibration exercise and classic strength exercises in isometric squat.23 subjects were exposed to six different loads in one of each exercise mode: vibration or classic strength. Both exercises were performed at 30º and 60º semi-squat position. Muscle activity of the lower body and lumbar area was measured using surface electromyography activity (EMG.The results showed that the response of lumbar area in WBV was lower than in the classic strength exercise at the same value of lower body sEMG. Lumbar sEMG was highest for the classic exercise. Moreover, during 30º squat sEMG was higher than during 60ºsquat.ResumenEl aumento del uso de la plataforma vibratoria como forma de realizar ejercicio conlleva la necesidad de conocer las respuestas musculares al estímulo de la misma.El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido estudiar y comparar la respuesta de la activación muscular de la zona lumbar y del tren inferior en el trabajo de plataforma vibratoria con el trabajo clásico de fuerza en un squat isométrico.23 sujetos fueron sometidos a 6 condiciones de vibración y a 6 de un trabajo clásico de pesas. Se analizó la sEMG del tren inferior y de la zona lumbar en un trabajo isométrico de un squat con flexión de 30º y 60º de rodilla.Los resultados muestran que para un mismo valor de sEMG del tren inferior, los valores de sEMG de la zona lumbar son menores en el ejercicio vibratorio. Existiendo en el trabajo de pesas una mayor exigencia en la zona lumbar. Además, con una flexión de 30º la activación muscular es mayor en todas las condiciones. (p

  12. Characterization Ag/AgCl reference electrode by U/U3+ equilibrium potential measurements in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Kitawaki, Shinichi; Amamoto, Ippei; Igarashi, Miyuki

    1999-02-01

    The Ag/ AgCl reference electrode is often used in electrochemical measurements of molten chloride system. By measuring the U/U 3+ equilibrium potential in the cell, U(s) | UCl 3 , LiCl-KCl parallel LiCl-KCl, Ag + | Ag (s), the characterization of the Ag/AgCl reference electrode was made. The behavior of two types of reference electrode having either a mullite or a Pyrex-glass membrane bridge was examined. It was confirmed that the two types of reference electrode can be regarded as almost equivalent. The reproducibility of the reading from the electrodes having the identical construction was showing to be within 0.003 V. (author)

  13. ZnCl{sub 2}- and NH{sub 4}Cl-hydroponics gel electrolytes for zinc-carbon batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalid, N.H.; Ismail, Y.M. Baba; Mohamad, A.A. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2008-01-21

    Absorbency testing is used to determine the percentage of ZnCl{sub 2} or NH{sub 4}Cl solution absorbed by a hydroponics gel (HPG). It is found that the absorbency of ZnCl{sub 2} or NH{sub 4}Cl solution decreases with increasing solution concentration. The conductivity of ZnCl{sub 2}- and NH{sub 4}Cl-HPG electrolytes is dependent on the solution concentration. A mixture of salt solution with HPG yields excellent gel polymer electrolytes with conductivities of 0.026 and 0.104 S cm{sup -1} at 3 M ZnCl{sub 2} and 7 M NH{sub 4}Cl, respectively. These gel electrolytes are then used to produce zinc-carbon cells. The fabricated cells give capacities of 8.8 and 10.0 mAh, have an internal resistance of 25.4 and 19.8 {omega}, a maximum power density of 12.7 and 12.2 mW cm{sup -2}, and a short-circuit current density of 29.1 and 33.9 mA cm{sup -2} for ZnCl{sub 2}- and NH{sub 4}Cl-HPG electrolytes, respectively. (author)

  14. The L‐type Ca2+ channel facilitates abnormal metabolic activity in the cTnI‐G203S mouse model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Helena; Johnstone, Victoria; Cserne Szappanos, Henrietta; Richman, Tara; Tsoutsman, Tatiana; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Semsarian, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Key points Genetic mutations in cardiac troponin I (cTnI) are associated with development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy characterized by myocyte remodelling, disorganization of cytoskeletal proteins and altered energy metabolism.The L‐type Ca2+ channel is the main route for calcium influx and is crucial to cardiac excitation and contraction. The channel also regulates mitochondrial function in the heart by a functional communication between the channel and mitochondria via the cytoskeletal network.We find that L‐type Ca2+ channel kinetics are altered in cTnI‐G203S cardiac myocytes and that activation of the channel causes a significantly greater increase in mitochondrial membrane potential and metabolic activity in cTnI‐G203S cardiac myocytes.These responses occur as a result of impaired communication between the L‐type Ca2+ channel and cytoskeletal protein F‐actin, involving decreased movement of actin–myosin and block of the mitochondrial voltage‐dependent anion channel, resulting in a ‘hypermetabolic’ mitochondrial state.We propose that L‐type Ca2+ channel antagonists, such as diltiazem, might be effective in reducing the cardiomyopathy by normalizing mitochondrial metabolic activity. Abstract Genetic mutations in cardiac troponin I (cTnI) account for 5% of families with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is associated with disorganization of cytoskeletal proteins and altered energy metabolism. The L‐type Ca2+ channel (ICa‐L) plays an important role in regulating mitochondrial function. This involves a functional communication between the channel and mitochondria via the cytoskeletal network. We investigate the role of ICa‐L in regulating mitochondrial function in 25‐ to 30‐week‐old cardiomyopathic mice expressing the human disease‐causing mutation Gly203Ser in cTnI (cTnI‐G203S). The inactivation rate of ICa‐L is significantly faster in cTnI‐G203S myocytes [cTnI‐G203S: τ1 = 40.68 ± 3.22, n

  15. Application of Future State Decision Making in the Eagle Combat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. 1 7 Cosati Codes 18 S:iDj,.ct Terms (continue on... cncd 30 40 co el C14N- LI)I E- . IC041 00 E E. C) CD 0 06. 4104 xd- .r - 1 w a S.CL U.~- 0 S.31 Cl- w cu N ~ ~ -.- - f Lin EEn LM 0f CCN. ’C4 0 4-it 0

  16. The Salty Scrambled Egg: Detection of NaCl Toward CRL 2688

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highberger, J. L.; Thomson, K. J.; Young, P. A.; Arnett, D.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2003-08-01

    NaCl has been detected toward the circumstellar envelope of the post-AGB star CRL 2688 using the IRAM 30 m telescope, the first time this molecule has been identified in a source other than IRC +10216. The J=7-->6, 11-->10, 12-->11, and 18-->17 transitions of NaCl at 1, 2, and 3 mm have been observed, as well as the J=8-->7 line of the 37Cl isotopomer. The J=12-->11 line was also measured at the ARO 12 m telescope. An unsuccessful search was additionally conducted for AlCl toward CRL 2688, although in the process new transitions of NaCN were observed. Both NaCl and NaCN were found to be present in the AGB remnant wind, as suggested by their U-shaped line profiles, indicative of emission arising from an optically thin, extended shell-like source of radius ~10"-12". These data contrast with past results in IRC +10216, where the distribution of both molecules is confined to within a few arcseconds of the star. A high degree of excitation is required for the transitions observed for NaCl and NaCN; therefore, these two species likely arise in the region where the high-velocity outflow has collided with the remnant wind. Here the effects of shocks and clumping due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities have raised the densities and temperatures significantly. The shell source is thus likely to be clumpy and irregular. The chemistry producing the sodium compounds is consequently more complex than simple LTE formation. Abundances of NaCl and NaCN, relative to H2, are f~1.6×10-10 and ~5.2×10-9, respectively, while the upper limit to AlCl is f<2×10-9. These values differ substantially from those in IRC +10216, where AlCl has an abundance near 10-7. The NaCl observations additionally indicate a chlorine isotope ratio of 35Cl/37Cl=2.1+/-0.8 in CRL 2688, suggestive of s-process enhancement of chlorine 37.

  17. Relationship between NaCl- and H2O2-induced cytosolic Ca2+ increases in response to stress in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghao Jiang

    Full Text Available Salinity is among the environmental factors that affect plant growth and development and constrain agricultural productivity. Salinity stress triggers increases in cytosolic free Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+]i via Ca(2+ influx across the plasma membrane. Salinity stress, as well as other stresses, induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. It is well established that ROS also triggers increases in [Ca(2+]i. However, the relationship and interaction between salinity stress-induced [Ca(2+]i increases and ROS-induced [Ca(2+]i increases remain poorly understood. Using an aequorin-based Ca(2+ imaging assay we have analyzed [Ca(2+]i changes in response to NaCl and H2O2 treatments in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that NaCl and H2O2 together induced larger increases in [Ca(2+]i in Arabidopsis seedlings than either NaCl or H2O2 alone, suggesting an additive effect on [Ca(2+]i increases. Following a pre-treatment with either NaCl or H2O2, the subsequent elevation of [Ca(2+]i in response to a second treatment with either NaCl or H2O2 was significantly reduced. Furthermore, the NaCl pre-treatment suppressed the elevation of [Ca(2+]i seen with a second NaCl treatment more than that seen with a second treatment of H2O2. A similar response was seen when the initial treatment was with H2O2; subsequent addition of H2O2 led to less of an increase in [Ca(2+]i than did addition of NaCl. These results imply that NaCl-gated Ca(2+ channels and H2O2-gated Ca(2+ channels may differ, and also suggest that NaCl- and H2O2-evoked [Ca(2+]i may reduce the potency of both NaCl and H2O2 in triggering [Ca(2+]i increases, highlighting a feedback mechanism. Alternatively, NaCl and H2O2 may activate the same Ca(2+ permeable channel, which is expressed in different types of cells and/or activated via different signaling pathways.

  18. 36Cl in shallow, perched aquifers from central Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, S.; Elmore, D.; Fritz, S. J.

    1994-06-01

    36Cl/Cl ratios and chloride concentrations were measured in several shallow, perched aquifers situated within glacial till in west-central Indiana (USA). Most of these aquifers show 36Cl/Cl ratios which have to be attributed to admixed 36Cl from nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s and 1960s. Two wells from Purdue's Horticultural Farm tap perched aquifers uninfluenced by anthropogenic sources of chloride, and their 36Cl/Cl ratios are comparable with ratios measured in modern, local precipitation. As such, the chloride contents of these wells (1 to 3 ppm) reflect evaporative concentration of the precipitation's chloride contents (averaging 0.17 ppm) in the vadose zone. Since one of these two wells (HA-2a) does not contain any detectable tritium, we conclude that recent pre-bomb 36Cl/Cl ratios and 36Cl deposition in precipitation are quite similar to those in modern precipitation. We attribute the slight 36Cl excess of about 20% in both of these wells largely to 36Cl deposition associated with dry fall-out. As much as 2 × 10 4 at. 36Cl/cm 2 might reach the surface via dry fall-out annually.

  19. AMS of 36Cl with the VERA 3 MV tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martschini, Martin; Andersson, Pontus; Forstner, Oliver; Golser, Robin; Hanstorp, Dag; Lindahl, Anton O.; Kutschera, Walter; Pavetich, Stefan; Priller, Alfred; Rohlén, Johan; Steier, Peter; Suter, Martin; Wallner, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress with compact ionization chambers has opened new possibilities for isobar suppression in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Separation of 36 Cl (t 1/2 = 0.30 Ma) at natural isotopic levels from its stable isobar 36 S became feasible at particle energies of 24 MeV, which are also accessible for medium-sized tandem accelerators with 3 MV terminal voltage like VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator). Investigations with an ionization chamber revealed how physics favors isobar separation even at energies below the maximum of the Bragg curve. The strong energy focusing effect at high energy losses reduces energy straggling significantly and isobar separation steadily increases up to almost full energy loss. With an optimized detection setup, sulfur suppression factors of 2 × 10 4 have been achieved. Refraining from the additional use of degrader foils has the benefit of high transmission to the detector (∼16%), but requires a low sulfur output from the ion source. Therefore several backing materials have been screened for sulfur content. The dependence of the sulfur output on the AgCl sample size has been investigated as well. Precision and accuracy have been thoroughly assessed over the last two years. Since drifts in the spectra are efficiently corrected by monitoring the position of the 36 S peak, the reproducibility for high ratio samples ( 36 Cl/Cl > 10 −12 ) is better than 2%. Our blank value of 36 Cl/Cl ≈ (5 ± 5) × 10 −16 is competitive to other labs. 36 Cl has become a routine AMS-isotope at VERA. Recently we also explored novel techniques for additional sulfur suppression already in the ion source. While results with a small gas reaction cell in front of the sputter target were discouraging, a decrease in the sulfur/chlorine ratio by one order of magnitude was achieved by directing 300 mW continuous wave laser beam at 445 nm towards the cathode in the ion source.

  20. ROS activate KCl cotransport in nonadherent Ehrlich ascites cells but K+ and Cl- channels in adherent Ehrlich Lettré and NIH3T3 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, Ian Henry; Klausen, Thomas Kjær; Bergdahl, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Addition of H2O2 (0.5 mM) to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells under isotonic conditions results within 25 min in a substantial (22 +/- 1 %) reduction in cell volume. The cell shrinkage is paralleled by net loss of K(+), which was significant within 8 min, whereas no concomitant increase in the K......(+) or Cl(-) conductances could be observed. The H2O2-induced cell shrinkage was unaffected by the presence of clofilium and clotrimazole, that block volume-sensitive and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, respectively, and unaffected by a raise in extracellular K(+) concentration to a value which eliminates...... the electrochemical driving force for K(+). On the other hand, the H2O2-induced cell shrinkage was impaired in the presence of the KCl cotransport inhibitor DIOA, following substitution of NO3(-) for Cl(-), and when the driving force for KCl cotransport was omitted. It is suggested that H2O2 activates electro neutral...

  1. Areva as of December 31, 2011; Areva au 31 decembre 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, Patricia; Briand, Pauline; Michaut, Maxime; Scorbiac, Marie de; Repaire, Philippine du

    2012-01-26

    In 2011, AREVA's consolidated revenue came to 8.872 billion euros, down slightly (-2.6%) compared with 2010 (-1.2% like for like). The decrease in revenue in nuclear operations was partially offset by significant growth in the renewable energies business. Foreign exchange and changes in the scope of consolidation had respectively a negative impact of 113 million euros and 16 million euros over the period. Revenue totaled 2.922 billion euros in the fourth quarter of 2011, stable compared with the fourth quarter of 2010 (-0.5% on a reported basis and -0.5% like for like). Foreign exchange had a negligible impact during the period. Led by nuclear operations, the group's backlog was 45.6 billion euros at December 31, 2011, up 3.1% year on year and 6.7% in relation to September 30, 2011. Order cancellations since Fukushima were limited to 464 million euros as of December 31, 2011. In accordance with the requirements of IFRS 8, AREVA's business segment information is presented for each operating Business Group (BG), which is the level of information examined by the group's governance bodies. Subsequent to the establishment of a subsidiary combining all of the group's mining operations, data for the Mining Business Group are now reported separately from those of the Front End Business Group. Data used for comparisons with 2010 were restated to reflect this new organization. The business segment information therefore corresponds to AREVA's five operating Business Groups: Mining, Front End, Reactors and Services, Back End and Renewable Energies

  2. The effect of ratio between rigid plant height and water depth on the manning’s coefficient in open channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizalihadi, M.; Ziana; Shaskia, Nina; Asharly, H.

    2018-05-01

    One of the important factors in channel dimension is the Manning’s coefficient ( n ). This coefficient is influenced not only by the channel roughness but also by the presence of plants in the channel. The aim of the study is to see the effect of the ratio between the height of the rigid plant and water depth on the Manning’s coefficient (n) in open channel. The study was conducted in open channel with 15.5 m long, 0.5 m wide and 1.0 m high, in which at the center of the channel is planted with the rigid plants with a density of 42 plants/m2. The flow was run with a discharge of 0.013 m3/s at 6 ratios of Hplants/Hwater, namely: 0; 0.2; 0.6; 0.8; 1,0 and 1,2, to obtain the velocity and water profiles. Then the value of n is analyzed using Manning’s equation. The results showed that the mean velocity becomes decrease 17.81-34.01% as increase the ratio of Hplants/Hwater. This results in increasing n value to become 1.22-1.52 times compared to the unplanted channel ( no =0.038). So, it can be concluded that the ratio between the rigid plant’s height and water depth in the open channel can affect the value of Manning coefficient.

  3. No apparent role for T-type Ca2+ channels in renal autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus Hassing; Salomonsson, Max; Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard

    2016-01-01

    -type and CaV3.1 knockout mice were assessed. Autoregulation of renal blood flow was examined during acute increases in RPP in normo- and hypertensive rats under pharmacological blockade of T- and L-type calcium channels using mibefradil (0.1 μM) and nifedipine (1 μM). In contrast to the results from previous......Renal autoregulation protects glomerular capillaries against increases in renal perfusion pressure (RPP). In the mesentery, both L- and T-type calcium channels are involved in autoregulation. L-type calcium channels participate in renal autoregulation, but the role of T-type channels is not fully...... pharmacological studies, genetic deletion of T-type channels CaV3.1 did not affect renal autoregulation. Pharmacological blockade of T-type channels using concentrations of mibefradil which specifically blocks T-type channels also had no effect in wild-type or knockout mice. Blockade of L-type channels...

  4. Global Properties of M31's Stellar Halo from the SPLASH Survey. I. Surface Brightness Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Karoline M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Beaton, Rachael L.; Bullock, James; Geha, Marla C.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Kirby, Evan N.; Majewski, Steven R.; Ostheimer, James C.; Patterson, Richard J.; Tollerud, Erik J.; Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi

    2012-11-01

    We present the surface brightness profile of M31's stellar halo out to a projected radius of 175 kpc. The surface brightness estimates are based on confirmed samples of M31 red giant branch stars derived from Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations. A set of empirical spectroscopic and photometric M31 membership diagnostics is used to identify and reject foreground and background contaminants. This enables us to trace the stellar halo of M31 to larger projected distances and fainter surface brightnesses than previous photometric studies. The surface brightness profile of M31's halo follows a power law with index -2.2 ± 0.2 and extends to a projected distance of at least ~175 kpc (~2/3 of M31's virial radius), with no evidence of a downward break at large radii. The best-fit elliptical isophotes have b/a = 0.94 with the major axis of the halo aligned along the minor axis of M31's disk, consistent with a prolate halo, although the data are also consistent with M31's halo having spherical symmetry. The fact that tidal debris features are kinematically cold is used to identify substructure in the spectroscopic fields out to projected radii of 90 kpc and investigate the effect of this substructure on the surface brightness profile. The scatter in the surface brightness profile is reduced when kinematically identified tidal debris features in M31 are statistically subtracted; the remaining profile indicates that a comparatively diffuse stellar component to M31's stellar halo exists to large distances. Beyond 90 kpc, kinematically cold tidal debris features cannot be identified due to small number statistics; nevertheless, the significant field-to-field variation in surface brightness beyond 90 kpc suggests that the outermost region of M31's halo is also comprised to a significant degree of stars stripped from accreted objects. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California

  5. Coupled-channel optical calculation of electron-hydrogen scattering: elastic scattering from 0.5 to 30 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, I.; Konovalov, D.A.; McCarthy, I.E.

    1991-01-01

    A coupled-channel optical method for electron-atomic hydrogen scattering is presented in a form that treats both the projectile and the target electrons symmetrically. Elastic differential cross sections are calculated at a range of energies from 0.5 to 30 eV and are found to be in complete agreement with the absolute measurements, previously reported. Total and total ionization cross sections are also presented. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  6. Search for a SM Higgs boson in the H → Z*Z → ℓ+ℓ−qq̅ channel in the mass range 120 - 180 GeV with the ATLAS Detector at √s = 7 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zurzolo Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A summary of the first study is given for the decay channel H → Z*Z → ℓ+ℓ−qq̅ (ℓ = e, μ in the Higgs boson mass range 120 - 180 GeV, using the pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at √s = 7 TeV at the LHC. Data driven methods to estimate the background and new techniques to improve the mass resolution of the hadronic Z boson decay are used. Events with 0 or 1 b-jets and events with 2 b-jets are treated as separated channels. No significant excess of events above the estimated background is observed; upper limits at 95% C.L. on the Higgs production cross section are derived.

  7. Kinetic isotope effects in the gas phase reactions of OH and Cl with CH3Cl, CD3Cl, and 13CH3Cl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gola

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic isotope effects in the reactions of CH3Cl, 13CH3Cl and CD3Cl with OH radicals and Cl atoms were studied in relative rate experiments at 298±2 K and 1013±10 mbar. The reactions were carried out in a smog chamber using long path FTIR detection and the spectroscopic data analyzed employing a non-linear least squares spectral fitting method using measured high-resolution infrared spectra as well as absorption cross sections from the HITRAN database. The reaction rates of 13CH3Cl and CD3Cl with OH and Cl were determined relative to CH3Cl as: kOH+CH3ClkOH+CH3Cl/kOH+13CH3Cl}kOH+13CH3Cl=1.059±0.008, kOH+CH3ClkOH+CH3Cl/kOH+CD3ClkOH+CD3Cl=3.9±0.4, kCl+CH3ClkCl+CH3Cl/kCl+13CH3ClkCl+13CH3Cl =1.070±0.010 and kCl+CH3ClkCl+CH3Cl/kCl+CD3ClkCl+CD3Cl=4.91±0.07. The uncertainties given are 2σ from the statistical analyses and do not include possible systematic errors. The unexpectedly large 13C kinetic isotope effect in the OH reaction of CH3Cl has important implications for the global emission inventory of CH3Cl.

  8. 31 CFR 50.30 - General participation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... 50.30 Section 50.30 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM State Residual Market Insurance Entities; Workers' Compensation Funds § 50.30 General participation requirements. (a) Insurers. As defined in § 50.5(f), all State residual market...

  9. Effect of silicon carbide addition on the corrosion behavior of powder metallurgy Cu−30Zn brass in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almomani, Mohammed Ali, E-mail: maalmomani7@just.edu.jo [Department of Industrial Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P. O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan); Tyfour, Wa' il Radwan, E-mail: wrtyfou@just.edu.jo [Department of Industrial Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P. O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan); Nemrat, Mohammed Hani, E-mail: mohammednemrat@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Applied Technology, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-09-15

    A study was made to evaluate the corrosion behavior when Cu−30Zn alloy is reinforced with different weight fractions of silicon carbide (SiC) particles in a simulated sea solution (3.5 wt% NaCl aqueous solution). The composites were produced via powder metallurgy (PM) route. For the sake of comparison, the corrosion behaviors of unreinforced and reinforced alloy were examined. Electrochemical measurements (potentiodynamic testing) showed that the corrosion rate of the composites decreased with increase of SiC weight percentages, as a result of weak microgalvanic couple between reinforcement particles and Cu−30Zn matrix, and the low possibility of intermetallic phases formation. ANOVA test indicated that the variations of corrosion rate of the composites upon changing weight percentages of SiC particles are statistically significant. Polarization curves showed that the passive film tends to be less stable, and the potential difference between passivation and free corrosion points increased with increase of SiC weight percentages, as SiC cathodically protect the matrix material by sacrificial anodic dissolution of crevice regions about reinforcement particles. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of the sample's surfaces before and after testing are in agreement with the electrochemical results. - Highlights: • Effect of adding SiC on both uniform and localized corrosion of Cu−30Zn alloy is studied. • Reinforcing Cu−30Zn with nonconductive SiC particles decreases its tendency to uniform and localized corrosion. • Reinforcement particles cathodically protect the matrix material, and retard pit propagation to the matrix.

  10. Functional characterization of neurotransmitter activation and modulation in a nematode model ligand-gated ion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Stephanie A; Yoluk, Özge; Klement, Göran; Riederer, Erika A; Lindahl, Erik; Howard, Rebecca J

    2016-07-01

    The superfamily of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels includes neurotransmitter receptors that mediate fast synaptic transmission in vertebrates, and are targets for drugs including alcohols, anesthetics, benzodiazepines, and anticonvulsants. However, the mechanisms of ion channel opening, gating, and modulation in these receptors leave many open questions, despite their pharmacological importance. Subtle conformational changes in both the extracellular and transmembrane domains are likely to influence channel opening, but have been difficult to characterize given the limited structural data available for human membrane proteins. Recent crystal structures of a modified Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) in multiple states offer an appealing model system for structure-function studies. However, the pharmacology of the crystallographic GluCl construct is not well established. To establish the functional relevance of this system, we used two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology in Xenopus oocytes to characterize activation of crystallographic and native-like GluCl constructs by L-glutamate and ivermectin. We also tested modulation by ethanol and other anesthetic agents, and used site-directed mutagenesis to explore the role of a region of Loop F which was implicated in ligand gating by molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings indicate that the crystallographic construct functionally models concentration-dependent agonism and allosteric modulation of pharmacologically relevant receptors. Specific substitutions at residue Leu174 in loop F altered direct L-glutamate activation, consistent with computational evidence for this region's role in ligand binding. These insights demonstrate conservation of activation and modulation properties in this receptor family, and establish a framework for GluCl as a model system, including new possibilities for drug discovery. In this study, we elucidate the validity of a modified glutamate

  11. Development and Validation of the Nursing Home Minimum Data Set 3.0 Mortality Risk Score (MRS3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kali S; Ogarek, Jessica A; Teno, Joan M; Gozalo, Pedro L; Mor, Vincent

    2018-03-05

    To develop a score to predict mortality using the Minimum Data Set 3.0 (MDS 3.0) that can be readily calculated from items collected during nursing home (NH) residents' admission assessments. We developed a training cohort of Medicare beneficiaries newly admitted to U.S. NHs during 2012 (N=1,426,815) and a testing cohort from 2013 (N=1,160,964). Data came from the MDS 3.0 assessments linked to the Medicare Beneficiary Summary File. Using the training dataset, we developed a composite MDS 3.0 Mortality Risk Score (MRS3) consisting of 17 clinical items and patients' age groups based on their relation to 30-day mortality. We assessed the calibration and discrimination of the MRS3 in predicting 30-day and 60-day mortality and compared its performance to the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the clinician's assessment of 6-month prognosis measured at admission. The 30-day and 60-day mortality rate for the testing population was 2.8% and 5.6%, respectively. Results from logistic regression models suggest that the MRS3 performed well in predicting death within 30 and 60 days (C-Statistics of 0.744 (95%CL = 0.741, 0.747) and 0.709 (95%CL=0.706, 0.711), respectively). The MRS3 was a superior predictor of mortality compared to the Charlson Comorbidity Index (C-statistics of 0.611 (95%CL=0.607, 0.615) and 0.608 (95%CL=0.605, 0.610)) and the clinicians' assessments of patients' 6-month prognoses (C-statistics of 0.543 (95%CL=0.542, 0.545) and 0.528 (95%CL=0.527, 0.529). The MRS3 is a good predictor of mortality and can be useful in guiding decision-making, informing plans of care, and adjusting for patients' risk of mortality.

  12. Diagnóstico clínico de la enfermedad Charcot-Marie-Tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuselis Pérez Cid

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Charcot-Marie-Tooth es un trastorno polineuropático genéticamente heterogéneo, en la que se han identificado más de 30 genes responsables; sin embargo, el diagnóstico es posible establecerlo sobre las bases de los estudios clínicos y electrofisiológicos. Constituye un reto en la práctica médica de los países del tercer mundo contar con la realización sistemática de estudios genéticos moleculares de las neuropatías hereditarias, por lo que en este trabajo se enfatiza en los estudios clínico-electrofisiológicos para la clasificación de la CMT

  13. Crystallographic characterization of cement pastes hydrated with NaCl; Caracterizacao cristalografica de pastas de cimento hidratadas com NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Carina Gabriela de Melo e; Martinelli, Antonio Eduardo; Melo, Dulce Maria Araujo; Melo, Marcus Antonio de Freitas; Melo, Vitor Rodrigo de Melo e [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    One of the major current challenges faced by oil companies is the exploration of pre salt basins. Salt layers deposited upon the evaporation of ocean water and continental separation are mainly formed by NaCl and isolate immense oil reservoirs. The mechanical stability and zonal isolation of oil wells that run through salt layers must be fulfilled by cement sheaths saturated with NaCl to assure chemical compatibility between cement and salt layer. The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of NaCl addition on the hydration of oil well cement slurries as well as identifying the nature of crystalline phases present in the hardened cement. To that end, cement slurries containing NaCl were mixed, hardened and characterized by X-ray diffraction. The results revealed that the presence of NaCl affects the formation of hydration products by the presence of Friedel's salt. The intensity of the corresponding peaks increase as the contents of NaCl in the slurry increase. High concentrations of NaCl in Portland slurries increase the setting time of cement and the presence of Friedel's salt decreases the strength of the hardened cement. (author)

  14. Comparison of detector systems for the separation of {sup 36}Cl and {sup 36}S with a 3-MV tandem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlowski, Tobias, E-mail: a0447924@unet.univie.ac.a [VERA Laboratory, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Str. 17, Wien 1090 (Austria); Forstner, Oliver; Golser, Robin; Kutschera, Walter [VERA Laboratory, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Str. 17, Wien 1090 (Austria); Merchel, Silke [CEREGE, CNRS-IRD-Universite Aix-Marseille, Europole Mediterraneen de L' Arbois, BP 80, Aix-en-Provence 13545 (France); Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Martschini, Martin; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter [VERA Laboratory, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Str. 17, Wien 1090 (Austria); Vockenhuber, Christof [HPK H 31, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstr. 20 CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Wallner, Anton [VERA Laboratory, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Wien, Waehringer Str. 17, Wien 1090 (Austria)

    2010-04-15

    The possibility of detecting {sup 36}Cl for geological exposure dating has been explored for several years at VERA (the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator). First results on real samples were obtained with an ionization chamber (developed at the ETH/PSI, Zuerich, Switzerland) with two anodes. To improve the suppression of {sup 36}S, we equipped the ionization chamber with an exit window and added a Time-of-Flight (TOF) system with a double-sided silicon strip detector (50 x 50 mm{sup 2}) as stop detector. We optimized the TOF setup by using silicon nitride foils to reduce scattering tails in the energy spectra. At 3 MV terminal voltage, corresponding to a particle energy of 24 MeV of {sup 36}Cl{sup 7+}, we achieved a {sup 36}S{sup 7+}-suppression of 21,500 (50% {sup 36}Cl-detector-efficiency).

  15. Citizens and service channels: channel choice and channel management implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterson, Willem Jan

    2010-01-01

    The arrival of electronic channels in the 1990s has had a huge impact on governmental service delivery. The new channels have led to many new opportunities to improve public service delivery, not only in terms of citizen satisfaction, but also in cost reduction for governmental agencies. However,

  16. Voltage-dependent ion channels in the mouse RPE: comparison with Norrie disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmann, Guido; Lenzner, Steffen; Berger, Wolfgang; Rosenthal, Rita; Karl, Mike O; Strauss, Olaf

    2006-03-01

    We studied electrophysiological properties of cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from mouse and a mouse model for Norrie disease. Wild-type RPE cells revealed the expression of ion channels known from other species: delayed-rectifier K(+) channels composed of Kv1.3 subunits, inward rectifier K(+) channels, Ca(V)1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels and outwardly rectifying Cl(-) channels. Expression pattern and the ion channel characteristics current density, blocker sensitivity, kinetics and voltage-dependence were compared in cells from wild-type and Norrie mice. Although no significant differences were observed, our study provides a base for future studies on ion channel function and dysfunction in transgenic mouse models.

  17. Categorical Regression and Benchmark Dose Software 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this full-day course is to provide participants with interactive training on the use of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Benchmark Dose software (BMDS, version 3.0, released fall 2018) and Categorical Regression software (CatReg, version 3.1...

  18. Single Channel 106 Gbit/s 16QAM Wireless Transmission in the 0.4 THz Band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Xiaodan; Jia, Shi; Ozolins, Oskars

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a single channel 32-GBd 16QAM THz wireless link operating in the 0.4 THz band. Post-FEC net data rate of 106 Gbit/s is successfully achieved without any spatial/frequency multiplexing.......We experimentally demonstrate a single channel 32-GBd 16QAM THz wireless link operating in the 0.4 THz band. Post-FEC net data rate of 106 Gbit/s is successfully achieved without any spatial/frequency multiplexing....

  19. Ab initio investigation of isomerism, structure and stability of complex molecules of salts of oxo- and thiohalide and dihydride borates and aluminates Li[X2MY] (M=B, Al; X=F, Cl, H; Y=O, S)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charkin, D.O.; MakKi, M.L.; Charkin, O.P.

    2000-01-01

    To obtain full summary molecular constants of mixed salts Li[X 2 MY] and to analyze tendencies of their changes during substitution of B for Al, F - for C and H, and O - for S and to trace the character of polarization and deformation of X 2 MY - anions in the field of Li + cation in the cases of their different coordination in the framework of correlated approximation method MP4/6-31(+)G**//MP2/6-31G* + ZPE(MP2/6-31G*) ab initio calculation of surfaces of potential energy of plane trigonal anions X 2 MY - (M=B, Al; X=F, Cl, H; Y=O, S) and their lithium salts are done. Equilibrium geometrical parameters of isomers, frequencies and relative IR intensities of normal vibrations, their relative energies and decomposition energies are determined. Structure where Li + cation is coordinated bidentately to chalcogen and one of the X atom is the most profitable one. Polarization and deformation of X 2 MY - anion in the field of Li + cation in the cases of different ways of their coordination, tendencies in changes of the calculated parameters during B substitution are analyzed [ru

  20. Search for anomalous Wtb couplings and flavour-changing neutral currents in $t$-channel single top quark production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= $ 7 and 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Poyraz, Deniz; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Schöfbeck, Robert; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Forthomme, Laurent; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tongguang; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Elgammal, Sherif; Mohamed, Amr; Mohammed, Yasser; Salama, Elsayed; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Peltola, Timo; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schomakers, Christian; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Zhukov, Valery; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Asin, Ivan; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Filipovic, Nicolas; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bahinipati, Seema; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Kole, Gouranga; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Behnamian, Hadi; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Nardo, Guglielmo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; La Licata, Chiara; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Oh, Sung Bin; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Golunov, Alexander; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbounov, Nikolai; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Korenkov, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Mitsyn, Valeri Valentinovitch; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Tikhonenko, Elena; Zarubin, Anatoli; Chtchipounov, Leonid; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Sulimov, Valentin; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Chadeeva, Marina; Danilov, Mikhail; Markin, Oleg; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Rusakov, Sergey V; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Korneeva, Natalia; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Savrin, Viktor; Volkov, Petr; Vorotnikov, George; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; 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Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; 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Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Bowen, James; Bruner, Christopher; Castle, James; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; 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Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-02-07

    Single top quark events produced in the $t$ channel are used to set limits on anomalous Wtb couplings and to search for top quark flavour-changing neutral current (FCNC) interactions. The data taken with the CMS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 7 and 8 TeV correspond to integrated luminosities of 5.0 and 19.7 fb$^{-1}$, respectively. The analysis is performed using events with one muon and two or three jets. A Bayesian neural network technique, used to discriminate between the signal and backgrounds, is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. The 95% confidence level (CL) exclusion limits on anomalous right-handed vector, and left- and right-handed tensor Wtb couplings are measured to be $|f_{\\rm V}^{\\rm R}|< 0.16$, $|f_{\\rm T}^{\\rm L}|<0.057$, and $-0.049CL upper limits on coupling strengths are $|\\kappa_{\\rm tug}|/\\Lambda < 4.1 \\ti...

  1. Exploring the island of inversion with the d({sup 30}Mg,p){sup 31}Mg reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bildstein, Vinzenz

    2010-12-07

    In this thesis the results of a d({sup 30}Mg,p){sup 31}Mg experiment at REX-ISOLDE are presented. {sup 31}Mg is located directly on the border of the so-called ''Island of Inversion'', a region of the nuclear chart around {sup 32}Mg where deformed intruder states of the fp shell form the ground states of the nuclei instead of the normal spherical states of the sd shell. A recent experiment has shown the ground state of {sup 31}Mg to be a 1/2{sup +} state and indicates more than 90% intruder configuration. The question whether the low-lying excited states of {sup 31}Mg are deformed intruder states as well or rather spherical states from the sd shell, indicating shape coexistence, is still open. The d({sup 30}Mg,p) {sup 31}Mg reaction is thus a good tool to gain more insight into the nature of the Island of Inversion. In the framework of this thesis the angular distribution of protons was measured for the second excited state at 221 keV in coincidence with de-excitation {gamma}-rays. The angular distribution was compared to DWBA calculations for different transferred orbital momenta, identifying the state for the first time as an l=1 state. The experiment was performed with the new charged particle detector setup T-REX. The setup is optimized for transfer reactions with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics. T-REX was developed, built, installed, and used for this first one neutron transfer experiment in the context of this thesis. The T-REX setup consists of {delta}E-E{sub Rest} telescopes made out of position sensitive silicon detectors that cover almost 4{pi} of the solid angle and can be combined with the MINIBALL {gamma}-ray detector array. It has a large solid angle for the detection and identification of the light recoils from transfer reactions. T-REX allows in combination with the MINIBALL Germanium detector array the tagging of the excited states by their characteristic {gamma}-rays. The combination of T-REX and MINIBALL achieves an

  2. Two ternary mixed-anion chlorides with divalent europium: Eu{sub 2}H{sub 3}Cl and Eu{sub 7}F{sub 12}Cl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reckeweg, Olaf [Baker Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); DiSalvo, Francis J. [Baker Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Wolf, Sarah; Schleid, Thomas [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Dark ruby-red, transparent, triangular plate-shaped single crystals of Eu{sub 2}H{sub 3}Cl and colorless, transparent, needle-shaped single crystals of Eu{sub 7}F{sub 12}Cl{sub 2} were obtained by solid-state reactions of Eu, NaH, NaCl, and Na (2:4:1:2 molar ratio) or Eu, EuCl{sub 3}, and LiF (1:1:4 molar ratio), respectively, in silica-jacketed tantalum ampoules at 900 C for 13 h. Eu{sub 2}H{sub 3}Cl crystallizes isotypically to Ba{sub 2}H{sub 3}X (X = Cl, Br, I) in the trigonal space group P anti 3m1 (no. 164) with lattice parameters a = 409.67(4) and c = 696.18(7) pm, whereas Eu{sub 7}F{sub 12}Cl{sub 2} crystallizes isotypically to Ba{sub 7}F{sub 12}Cl{sub 2} or Sr{sub 7}H{sub 12}Cl{sub 2} in the hexagonal space group P anti 6 (no. 174) with lattice parameters a = 1002.31(5) and c = 392.54(2) pm. Both compounds contain Eu{sup 2+} cations with coordination numbers as high as nine (Eu{sub 7}F{sub 12}Cl{sub 2}) and ten (Eu{sub 2}H{sub 3}Cl) with respect to the halide anions (F{sup -} or H{sup -} and Cl{sup -}). The structural results are corroborated by EUTAX and MAPLE calculations on both ternary mixed-anion europium(II) chlorides in comparison to these for related binary and ternary compounds with divalent europium. (Copyright copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Radiometric observations of atmospheric attenuation at 20.6 and 31.65 GHz: The Wave Propagation Laboratory data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Mark D.; Snider, J. B.; Westwater, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) presently operates five dual-channel microwave radiometers, one triple-channel microwave radiometer, and one six-channel microwave radiometer. The dual-channel radiometers operate at frequencies of 20.6 or 23.87 GHz and 31.4 or 31.65 GHz. The triple-channel radiometer operates at 20.6, 31.65, and 90.0 GHz. The six-channel radiometer operates at frequencies of 20.6, 31.65, 52.85, 53.85, 55.45, and 58.8 GHz. Recent brightness temperature measurements and attenuation values from some of the above radiometers are presented. These radiometric measurements, taken in different locations throughout the world, have given WPL a diverse set of measurements under a variety of atmospheric conditions. We propose to do a more complete attenuation analysis on these measurements in the future. In addition, a new spinning reflector was installed recently for the dual-channel radiometer at the Platteville, Colorado site. This reflector will extend our measurement capabilities during precipating conditions. Locating the three-channel and portable dual-channel radiometers at or near Greeley, Colorado to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program is discussed.

  4. Extracellular determinants of anion discrimination of the Cl-/H+ antiporter protein CLC-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefano, Silvia; Pusch, Michael; Zifarelli, Giovanni

    2011-12-23

    Mammalian CLC proteins comprise both Cl- channels and Cl-/H+ antiporters that carry out fundamental physiological tasks by transporting Cl- across plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. The NO3- over Cl- preference of a plant CLC transporter has been pinpointed to a conserved serine residue located at Scen and it is generally assumed that the other two binding sites of CLCs, Sext and Sin, do not substantially contribute to anion selectivity. Here we show for the Cl-/H+ antiporter CLC-5 that the conserved and extracellularly exposed Lys210 residue is critical to determine the anion specificity for transport activity. In particular, mutations that neutralize or invert the charge at this position reverse the NO3- over Cl- preference of WT CLC-5 at a concentration of 100 mm, but do not modify the coupling stoichiometry with H+. The importance of the electrical charge is shown by chemical modification of K210C with positively charged cysteine-reactive compounds that reintroduce the WT preference for Cl-. At saturating extracellular anion concentrations, neutralization of Lys210 is of little impact on the anion preference, suggesting an important role of Lys210 on the association rate of extracellular anions to Sext.

  5. Atmospheric production rate of 36Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrat, Y.; Hajdas, W.; Baltensperger, U.; Synal, H.A.; Kubik, P.W.; Gaeggeler, H.W.; Suter, M.

    1997-01-01

    Using experimental cross sections, a new calculation of the atmospheric production rate of 36 Cl was carried out. A mean production rate of 20 atoms m -2 s -1 was obtained, which is lower than mean 36 Cl deposition rates. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs

  6. Gamma spectroscopy of 33Cl and 29P fed in 32S(p,γ)33Cl and 28Si(p,γ)29P reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleonard, M.-M.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of the levels of the A=4N+1 33 Cl and 29 P nuclei were studied via the 32 S(p,γ) 33 Cl and 28 Si(p,γ) 29 P reactions. Absolute and relative resonance strength measurements were performed in chlorine and phosphorus isotopes with 80cm 3 Ge(Li) detector and natural targets of sulfur or silicon compounds. Three new resonances were observed in the 32 S(p,γ) 33 Cl reaction at E(p)=1588, 1748 and 1880keV and a doublet clearly shown at E(p) approximately equal to 1900keV. The Q-value of the reaction, as well as the energies, γ-branching, and mean lifetimes of the levels below E(x)=4.78MeV were measured. The spins of the E(x)=2.35, 3.82, 3.97 and 4.78MeV levels were determined. A comparison of the γ-ray transition strengths is made against mirror transitions and shell-model or weak coupling model predictions, for positive and negative parity states. Resonance strengths and decays of 29 P levels populated via the 28 Si(p,γ) 29 P reaction were measured for E(p)=0.4 to 2.28MeV. Pecular attention was paid to the E(x)=3447 and 4642keV levels. Resonance strengths as well as γ-branching, mean lifetimes and angular distributions lead to the following characteristics: E(x)=3447keV, J(π)=7/2 - , tau=13+-(9)7fs; E(x)=4642keV, J(π)=3/2 + , 5/2-9/2, tau=52+-20fs. Comparison of the mirror levels characteristics in 29 Si and 29 P favours a J(π)=9/2 + assignment for the E(x)=4642keV level [fr

  7. Two-step crystal engineering of porous nets from [Cr3(μ 3-O)(RCO2)6] and [Cu3(μ 3-Cl)(RNH2)6Cl6] molecular building blocks

    KAUST Repository

    Elsaidi, Sameh K.

    2013-01-01

    Two porous nets have been prepared via a 2-step crystal engineering approach that links decorated trigonal prismatic [Cr3(μ 3-O)(CO2)6] and [Cu3(μ 3-Cl)(RNH2)6Cl6] molecular building blocks, MBBs. tp-PMBB-5-acs-1 is a rare example of a rigid acs underlying net whereas tp-PMBB-6-stp-1, an stp underlying net, exhibits free NH2 groups in its channels and a relatively high isosteric heat of adsorption for CO2. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. Enhancement in CO2 Adsorption Capacity and Selectivity in the Chalcogenide Aerogel CuSb2S4 by Post-synthetic Modification with LiCl

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ejaz

    2015-09-11

    The new chalcogel CuSb2S4 was obtained by reacting Cu(OAc)2·H2O with KSbS2 in a water/formamide mixture at room temperature. In order to modify the gas adsorption capacity the synthesized CuSb2S4 aerogel was loaded with different amounts of LiCl. CO2 adsorption measurements on the CuSb2S4 aerogel before and after treatment with LiCl showed more than three times increased uptake of the LiCl-modified chalcogel. The selectivities of the gas pairs CO2/H2 and CO2/CH4 in the LiCl-treated chalcogel are 235 and 105 respectively and amongst the highest reported for chalcogenide-based aerogels. In comparison with other porous materials like zeolites, activated carbon and most of the Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) or Porous Organic Frameworks (POFs), our synthesized aerogels show good air and moisture stability. Although, the CO2 storage capacity of our aerogels is relatively low, however the selectivity of CO2 over H2 or CH4 in LiCl-loaded aerogels are higher than in zeolites, activated carbon as well as some MOFs like Cu-BTC and MOF-5 etc.

  9. Role of T-type channels in vasomotor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuo, Ivana Y-T; Howitt, Lauren; Sandow, Shaun L

    2014-01-01

    Low-voltage-activated T-type calcium channels play an important role in regulating cellular excitability and are implicated in conditions, such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. T-type channels, especially Cav3.1 and Cav3.2, are also expressed in the vasculature, although patch clamp studies of i...

  10. Release to the gas phase of metals, S and Cl during combustion of dedicated waste fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Frandsen, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    The release to the gas phase of inorganic elements such as alkali metals. Cl, S, and heavy metals in Waste-to-Energy (WtE) boilers is a challenge. Besides the risk of harmful emissions to the environment, inorganic elements released from the grate may cause severe ash deposition and corrosion...... and the link to the formation of fly ash and aerosols in full-scale waste incinerators. The release of metals, S and Cl from four dedicated waste fractions was quantified as a function of temperature in a lab-scale fixed-bed reactor. The waste fractions comprised chromated copper arsenate (CCA) impregnated....... The lab-scale release results were then compared with results from a related, full-scale partitioning study, in which test runs with the addition of similar, dedicated waste fractions to a base-load waste had been performed in a grate-fired WtE boiler. In general, the elements Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Si...

  11. Coupled channel analysis of s-wave ππ and K anti-K photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chueng-Ryong Ji; Szczepaniak, A.; Kaminski, R.; Lesniak, L.; Williams, R.

    1997-10-01

    We present a coupled channel partial wave analysis of non-diffractive S-wave π + π - and K + K - photoproduction focusing on the K anti-K threshold. Final state interactions are included. We calculate total cross sections, angular and effective mass distributions in both ππ and K anti-K channels. Our results indicate that these processes are experimentally measurable and valuable information on the f 0 (980) resonance structure can be obtained. (author)

  12. Channels in cell membranes and synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Xiaohui; Tian Liang; Zhang Xinyi

    2004-01-01

    For long time a lot of scientists have devoted to study how matter, such as water molecules and K + , Na + , Ca 2+ , Cl - ions, move through cell membranes and complete the matter exchange between the inside and outside of cells. Peter Agre discovered and characterized the first water channel protein in 1988 and Roderick MacKinnon elucidated the structural and mechanistic basis for ion channel function in 1998. These achievements have made it possible for us to 'see' these exquisitely designed molecular machines in action at the atomic level. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2003 is shared between these two scientists. In determining the high resolution 3D structure of these channels, the synchrotron X-ray diffraction plays an important role

  13. PIP2 modulation of slick and slack K+ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tejada, Maria de los Angeles; Jensen, Lars Jørn; Klærke, Dan Arne

    2012-01-01

    Slick and Slack are members of the Slo family of high-conductance potassium channels. These channels are activated by Na(+) and Cl(-) and are highly expressed in the CNS, where they are believed to contribute to the resting membrane potential of neurons and the control of excitability. Herein, we...... provide evidence that Slick and Slack channels are regulated by the phosphoinositide PIP(2). Two stereoisomers of PIP(2) were able to exogenously activate Slick and Slack channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and in addition, it is shown that Slick and Slack channels are modulated by endogenous PIP(2......). The activating effect of PIP(2) appears to occur by direct interaction with lysine 306 in Slick and lysine 339 in Slack, located at the proximal C-termini of both channels. Overall, our data suggest that PIP(2) is an important regulator of Slick and Slack channels, yet it is not involved in the recently...

  14. Influence of NaCl salinity on growth analysis of strawberry cv. Camarosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mirdehghan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to study of salinity effect on growth analysis of strawberry, a greenhouse experiment was conducted in Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan in 2010. This study was carried out RCBD design with 4 replications to determine the influence of salinity (30, 60, 90 Mmol and control with distilled water on strawberry growth analysis. Results indicated that relative growth rate (RGR, crop growth rate (CGR, leaf area ratio (LAR and dry matter accumulation were decreased with increasing salinity. The lowest RGR, CGR and LAR were observed in 90 Mmol NaCl salinity. Results also indicated that maximum dry matter accumulations were observed in 1050, 1200 and 1400 degree days in 30, 60 and 90 Mmol NaCl salinity, respectively. Water salinity more than 30 Mmol NaCl L-1 will decreased fresh fruit yield more than 50 percent in hydroponics strawberry production. Dry mass partitioning in NaCl-stressed plants was in favor of crown and petioles and at expense of root, stem and leaf whereas leaf, stem and root DM progressively declined with an increase in salinity.

  15. Regional correlations of V s30 and velocities averaged over depths less than and greater than 30 meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boore, D.M.; Thompson, E.M.; Cadet, H.

    2011-01-01

    Using velocity profiles from sites in Japan, California, Turkey, and Europe, we find that the time-averaged shear-wave velocity to 30 m (V S30), used as a proxy for site amplification in recent ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and building codes, is strongly correlated with average velocities to depths less than 30 m (V Sz, with z being the averaging depth). The correlations for sites in Japan (corresponding to the KiK-net network) show that V S30 is systematically larger for a given V Sz than for profiles from the other regions. The difference largely results from the placement of the KiK-net station locations on rock and rocklike sites, whereas stations in the other regions are generally placed in urban areas underlain by sediments. Using the KiK-net velocity profiles, we provide equations relating V S30 to V Sz for z ranging from 5 to 29 m in 1-m increments. These equations (and those for California velocity profiles given in Boore, 2004b) can be used to estimate V S30 from V Sz for sites in which velocity profiles do not extend to 30 m. The scatter of the residuals decreases with depth, but, even for an averaging depth of 5 m, a variation in log V S30 of 1 standard deviation maps into less than a 20% uncertainty in ground motions given by recent GMPEs at short periods. The sensitivity of the ground motions to V S30 uncertainty is considerably larger at long periods (but is less than a factor of 1.2 for averaging depths greater than about 20 m). We also find that V S30 is correlated with V Sz for z as great as 400 m for sites of the KiK-net network, providing some justification for using V S30 as a site-response variable for predicting ground motions at periods for which the wavelengths far exceed 30 m.

  16. PIP₂ modulation of Slick and Slack K⁺ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Angeles Tejada, Maria; Jensen, Lars Jørn; Klaerke, Dan A

    2012-07-27

    Slick and Slack are members of the Slo family of high-conductance potassium channels. These channels are activated by Na(+) and Cl(-) and are highly expressed in the CNS, where they are believed to contribute to the resting membrane potential of neurons and the control of excitability. Herein, we provide evidence that Slick and Slack channels are regulated by the phosphoinositide PIP(2). Two stereoisomers of PIP(2) were able to exogenously activate Slick and Slack channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and in addition, it is shown that Slick and Slack channels are modulated by endogenous PIP(2). The activating effect of PIP(2) appears to occur by direct interaction with lysine 306 in Slick and lysine 339 in Slack, located at the proximal C-termini of both channels. Overall, our data suggest that PIP(2) is an important regulator of Slick and Slack channels, yet it is not involved in the recently described cell volume sensitivity of Slick channels, since mutated PIP(2)-insensitive Slick channels retained their sensitivity to cell volume. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of Calcium Chloride (CaCl/sub 2/) on Fruit Quality of Pear (Pyrus communis) cv. le conte During Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, M.; Mukhtiar, M.; Rab, M.; Shah, S.R.; Jan, I.

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted at Postharvest laboratory, Department of Horticulture, The University of Agriculture Peshawar, during 2010 to evaluate the 'Influence of calcium chloride (CaCl/sub 2/) on fruit quality of pear (Pyrus communis) cv. Le-conte'. The experiment was laid out in Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with three factors i.e. (CaCl/sub 2/) concentration (0,3,6 and 9%), dipping time (5,10 and 15 minutes) and storage durations (0,10,20,30 and 40 days). The maximum ascorbic acid (7.93 mg/100 g), reducing sugar (5.86%), while the least percent weight loss (4.52%), pH of fruit juice (4.42), total soluble solids (TSS) (19.83%) and percent disease incidence (2.56%) were observed in fruits treated with 9% CaCl/sub 2/ solution. The dipping time also significantly influenced the quality attributes of pear fruits during storage. The more ascorbic acid (6.88 mg/100 g) and reducing sugar (5.44%) were recorded in the pear fruits dipped for 15 minutes. Storage duration significantly affected the fruit quality 40 days storage. The highest reducing sugar recorded in fresh pear fruits while the highest ascorbic acid (7.83 mg/100 g) were observed in pear fruit stored for 10 days storage duration, while more non-reducing sugar (7.03%) recorded in the fruits stored for 30 days. In the interaction of CaCl/sub 2/ concentration x dipping time, the highest total soluble solid (31.88%) noted in the fruits stored for 40 days and dipped for 5 minutes in CaCl/sub 2/ solution. It is concluded that pear fruit perform best in the postharvest life when treated with 9% CaCl/sub 2/ solution and dipped for 15 minutes. It retained most of the quality attributes up to 10 days storage at ambient temperature while a significant decline was recorded in fruit quality when extended the storage duration from 20 to 40 days. (author)

  18. Rootstock Effect on the Tolerance of cv. Hass Avocado Plants to Nacl Stress Efecto del Portainjerto en la Tolerancia de Plantas de Palto cv. Hass al Estrés por NaCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Castro V

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The avocado tree (Persea americana Mill. is one of the species most sensitive to salinity. Since the root system of this species is particularly affected by this type of stress, it is crucial to find a rootstock that is tolerant to saline water irrigation. Plant material from the cv. Hass was grafted on five rootstocks to find possible candidates: the clonal ‘Duke 7’, ‘Nabal’, ‘Degania 117’,’Mexicola’, and ‘Zutano’ seedlings. One year-old plants were placed in 55 L pots; river sand was used as substrate, and the plants were fertilized with a modified Hoagland solution. Vegetative growth and internal nutrient content were compared with control plants with 30 mg L-1 of Cl-, and plants treated with 200 mg L-1 Cl- for 130 days using NaCl in the nutrient solution (5.64 mM. No interaction between NaCl and the rootstocks for the vegetative growth variables was detected neither in K+ internal foliar or root content nor Ca+2 root. With regard to the carbon assimilation rate, the Nabal rootstock showed the highest rates under the NaCl treatment by retaining the highest chloride concentration in the roots and greatly limiting the concentration found in the leaves of the cv. Hass cultivar. It is therefore a promising rootstock for salt tolerance.El palto (Persea americana Mill. es una de las especies más sensibles a la salinidad, debido a que su sistema radical es particularmente afectado por este estrés, es importante identificar un portainjerto tolerante al riego con agua salina. Para encontrar posibles candidatos se utilizó material vegetal del cv. Hass injertado sobre cinco portainjertos, el clonal Duke 7 y los provenientes de semilla, Nabal, Degania 117, Mexícola y Zutano. Plantas de 1 año de edad fueron colocadas en macetas de 55 L, con arena de río como sustrato y fertilizadas con una solución Hoagland modificada. Durante 130 días se comparó el crecimiento vegetativo y los contenidos internos de nutrientes en plantas

  19. Valores de lactato sérico e sua correlação com parâmetros clínicos de cães saudáveis, mensurados durante atendimento ambulatorial veterinário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo P. Franco

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A mensuração do lactato sérico é utilizada na rotina médica como marcador prognóstico de pacientes em estado de emergência. Sua interpretação não deve ser feita de forma isolada, mas conjunta aos demais parâmetros clínicos, pois seus valores podem sofrer interferência do estresse metabólico ou ambiental, contenção física e/ ou manipulação dos pacientes. Assim, buscou-se mensurar os valores do lactato sérico e parâmetros clínicos de cães saudáveis, bem como as suas correlações, durante o atendimento clínico ambulatorial veterinário. Para isso, foram avaliados 80 cães, machos ou fêmeas, com idade de um a oito anos, atendidos para revacinação anual polivalente. Foram considerados cães saudáveis os que não apresentaram intercorrências clínicas nos últimos 60 dias e alterações nos exames físicos e nos valores de hemograma e glicemia sérica. Foram mensurados inicialmente o peso corporal, a frequência cardíaca (FC e respiratória (FR, tempo de preenchimento capilar (TPC, coloração de mucosas, temperatura retal (TR, periférica (TP e a diferença entre TR e a TP, o Delta T°C. Por último, realizaram-se os exames de hemograma e glicemia sérica, juntamente com a mensuração do lactato sérico, utilizando para isso um lactímetro portátil, por meio da amostra sanguínea obtida da veia cefálica. Além disso, havendo a correlação dos valores do lactato séricos com o peso corporal os cães foram divididos conforme o cálculo do 33° e 66° percentil. Os cães avaliados evidenciaram valores médios de 18,3±12,1 kg de peso corporal e 3,0±1,9 anos de idade; FC de 126,6±29,1bpm, FR de 66±24mpm, TR de 38,9±0,4°C, TP de 31,5±1,0°C, Delta TºC de 7,3±1,0°C e lactato sérico de 3,2±0,4mmol/L; com este último, evidenciando intervalo de confiança a 95% de 3,1-3,3mmol/L e correlação significativa (p<0,05 dos seus valores com o peso corporal (r=0,6 e a frequência cardíaca (r=0,4. Os valores do

  20. Exploring the Impact of ClNO2 on the Tropospheric Oxidation Capacity in South East Asia during KORUS-AQ 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, D.; Seco, R.; Gu, D.; Lee, Y.; Knote, C. J.; McGee, T. J.; Sullivan, J. T.; Nault, B.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Blake, D. R.; Sanchez, D.; Guenther, A. B.; Tanner, D.; Huey, L. G.; Ahn, J. Y.; Kim, S.

    2017-12-01

    Nitryl chloride (ClNO2) is a night time radical and NOx reservoir that photolyzes in the morning to release chlorine radicals (Cl·) and NO2. This highly reactive Cl· will react with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to produce organic peroxy radicals (RO2) eventually producing O3 and increasing the HOx (OH+HO2) radical pool. ClNO2 is generated from heterogeneous reactions of chlorine containing aerosols and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5), which is also a night time NOx reservoir. The reactive chlorine can come from both natural (e.g., ocean, biomass burning) and anthropogenic (e.g., steel making, coal combustion, pulp industries etc.) sources. Previous model studies show that the photolysis of ClNO2 can increase O3 and HOx by 20 %. However, ClNO2 observations have been very limited especially in East Asia with only a few field measurements conducted. In this study, we present the ClNO2 observation results from the KORUS-AQ 2016 field campaign conducted in May-June in South Korea. ClNO2 was measured with a chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) on the DC-8 and in two ground sites. Olympic park and Taehwa research forest represents a heavily populated urban area and a forest nearby respectively. Both ground sites are 50 km from the ocean, the largest source of chlorine. A comprehensive set of trace gas, aerosol, and meteorology parameters have also been carried out during the observation period. We explore the influence of ClNO2 on tropospheric oxidation chemistry mainly focusing on 3 main points: 1) What are the factors controlling the production of ClNO2 (night time v.s. morning)? 2) What are the relative importance of the possible sources of reactive chlorine (oceanic v.s. anthropogenic)? 3) What are the implications of ClNO2 on the local radical chemistry based on box model simulations (F0AM v3.1) embedded with heterogeneous and a comprehensive Cl· + VOC chemistry?

  1. Morphological elements of the Lofoten Basin Channel - implications for the properties of the latest turbidity currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberg, J. S.; Forwick, M.; Johannesen, H. B.; Ivanov, M.; Kenyon, N. H.; Vorren, T. O.

    2009-04-01

    A modern turbidite system, the Andøya Canyon - Lofoten Basin Channel and associated deposits, is located on the continental margin offshore northern Norway (Laberg et al., 2005; 2007). Based on swath bathymetry, side-scan sonar records, and high-resolution seismic data, the Lofoten Basin Channel can be followed from the mouth of the canyon at the base of the continental slope into the abyssal plain of the Lofoten Basin. The proximal part of the channel is a straight erosional feature, up to 30 m deep and about 3 km wide with poorly developed levees. Coring retrieved sandy turbidites deposited both on the channel floor and on its levees. Thus, some of the most recent flows were sandy, up to 3 km wide and more than 30 m high in order to overspill the channel. About 50 km off the mouth of the Andøya Canyon, the Lofoten Basin Channel joins with another channel entering from the northeast. Beyond there is a complex sea floor morphology including one main channel, several smaller channels and various erosional features. The main channel terminates 20 - 30 km to the southwest. Further into the basin an elongated, positive lobe-formed deposit is located. In front of it part of an older, smaller lobe is seen. The main channel is continuing into the deepest part of the Lofoten Basin where it terminates at about 3200 m water depth. About 20 - 25 km from its termination the channel splits into several smaller (up to 500 m wide and 10 - 30 m high), meandering channels. The inter-channel areas are dominated by down-flow elongated scour marks, some located near and in parallel with the channels. These were probably formed by smaller flows confined by the meandering channels. Other scour marks are oriented parallel to the overall flow direction and were probably formed by larger unconfined flows that overtopped and moved independently of the meandering channels. The latter may have been up to an order of magnitude wider and higher compared to the confined flows. A depositional

  2. ψ(3S) and Υ(5S) Originating in Heavy Meson Molecules: A Coupled Channel Analysis Based on an Effective Vector Quark–Quark Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Sakai, M.; Hirano, M.

    2013-01-01

    In our previous coupled channel analysis based on the Cornell effective quark–quark interaction, it was indicated that the ψ(3S) solution corresponding to ψ(4040) originates from a D ∗ D¯ ∗ channel state. In this article,