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Sample records for changed mitochondrial function

  1. Mitochondrial function adaptations to changed metabolic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Bakkman, Linda

    2010-01-01

    The skeletal muscle mitochondria play a decisive role for the metabolic capacity of the body. A capability to adapt to changed metabolic conditions and energy demands is crucial for weight control and physical exercise. The aim of this thesis was to describe how the mitochondria adapt its function to different environmental conditions and changed metabolic demands. In study I, the aim was to evaluate mitochondrial adaptations to hypoxic exercise. The effect of one-legged...

  2. Loss of Drp1 function alters OPA1 processing and changes mitochondrial membrane organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNAi mediated loss of Drp1 function changes mitochondrial morphology in cultured HeLa and HUVEC cells by shifting the balance of mitochondrial fission and fusion towards unopposed fusion. Over time, inhibition of Drp1 expression results in the formation of a highly branched mitochondrial network along with 'bulge'-like structures. These changes in mitochondrial morphology are accompanied by a reduction in levels of Mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and 2 (Mfn2) and a modified proteolytic processing of OPA1 isoforms, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, our data imply that bulge formation is driven by Mfn1 action along with particular proteolytic short-OPA1 (s-OPA1) variants: Loss of Mfn2 in the absence of Drp1 results in an increase of Mfn1 levels along with processed s-OPA1-isoforms, thereby enhancing continuous 'fusion' and bulge formation. Moreover, bulge formation might reflect s-OPA1 mitochondrial membrane remodeling activity, resulting in the compartmentalization of cytochrome c deposits. The proteins Yme1L and PHB2 appeared not associated with the observed enhanced OPA1 proteolysis upon RNAi of Drp1, suggesting the existence of other OPA1 processing controlling proteins. Taken together, Drp1 appears to affect the activity of the mitochondrial fusion machinery by unbalancing the protein levels of mitofusins and OPA1.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide markedly changes glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function in the longissimus muscle of pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H; Huang, Y; Yin, C; Guo, J; Zhao, R; Yang, X

    2016-07-01

    Most previous studies on the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in pigs focused on the body's immune response, and few reports paid attention to body metabolism changes. To better understand the glucose metabolism changes in skeletal muscle following LPS challenge and to clarify the possible mechanism, 12 growing pigs were employed. Animals were treated with either 2 ml of saline or 15 µg/kg BW LPS, and samples were collected 6 h later. The glycolysis status and mitochondrial function in the longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of pigs were analyzed. The results showed that serum lactate content and NADH content in LD muscle significantly increased compared with the control group. Most glycolysis-related genes expression, as well as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase and lactic dehydrogenase activity, in LD muscle was significantly higher compared with the control group. Mitochondrial complexes I and IV significantly increased, while mitochondrial ATP concentration markedly decreased. Significantly increased calcium content in the mitochondria was observed, and endoplasm reticulum (ER) stress has been demonstrated in the present study. The results showed that LPS treatment markedly changes glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function in the LD muscle of pigs, and increased calcium content induced by ER stress was possibly involved. The results provide new clues for clarifying metabolic diseases in muscle induced by LPS. PMID:26863995

  4. Hypoxia signaling controls postnatal changes in cardiac mitochondrial morphology and function

    OpenAIRE

    Neary, Marianne T.; Ng, Keat-Eng; Ludtmann, Marthe H. R.; Hall, Andrew R.; Piotrowska, Izabela; Ong, Sang-Bing; Hausenloy, Derek J.; Mohun, Timothy J; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Breckenridge, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal cardiomyocyte adaptation to low levels of oxygen in utero is incompletely understood, and is of interest as hypoxia tolerance is lost after birth, leading to vulnerability of adult cardiomyocytes. It is known that cardiac mitochondrial morphology, number and function change significantly following birth, although the underlying molecular mechanisms and physiological stimuli are undefined. Here we show that the decrease in cardiomyocyte HIF-signaling in cardiomyocytes immediately after b...

  5. Cisplatin impairs rat liver mitochondrial functions by inducing changes on membrane ion permeability: Prevention by thiol group protecting agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is the most important platinum anticancer drug widely used in the treatment of head, neck, ovarian and testicular cancers. However, the mechanisms by which CisPt induces cytotoxicity, namely hepatotoxicity, are not completely understood. The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of CisPt on rat liver mitochondrial functions (Ca2+-induced mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), mitochondrial bioenergetics, and mitochondrial oxidative stress) to better understand the mechanism underlying its hepatotoxicity. The effect of thiol group protecting agents and some antioxidants against CisPt-induced mitochondrial damage was also investigated. Treatment of rat liver mitochondria with CisPt (20 nmol/mg protein) induced Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial swelling, depolarization of membrane potential (ΔΨ), Ca2+ release, and NAD(P)H fluorescence intensity decay. These effects were prevented by cyclosporine A (CyA), a potent and specific inhibitor of the MPT. In the concentration range of up to 40 nmol/mg protein, CisPt slightly inhibited state 3 and stimulated state 2 and state 4 respiration rates using succinate as respiratory substrate. The respiratory indexes, respiratory control ratio (RCR) and ADP/O ratios, the ΔΨ, and the ADP phosphorylation rate were also depressed. CisPt induced mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization to protons (proton leak) but did not induce significant changes on mitochondrial H2O2 generation. All the effects induced by CisPt on rat liver mitochondria were prevented by thiol group protecting agents namely, glutathione (GSH), dithiothreitol (DTT), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine (CYS), whereas superoxide-dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate (ASC) were without effect. In conclusion, the anticancer drug CisPt: (1) increases the sensitivity of mitochondria to Ca2+-induced MPT; (2) interferes with mitochondrial bioenergetics by increasing mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization to H+; (3

  6. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial function in humans with mitochondrial haplogroup H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Rabøl, Rasmus;

    2014-01-01

    determined their mitochondrial haplogroup, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase (CS)) and VO2max. Intrinsic mitochondrial function is calculated as mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity divided by mitochondrial content (CS). Haplogroup H showed a 30......% higher intrinsic mitochondrial function compared with the other haplo group U. There was no relationship between haplogroups and VO2max. In skeletal muscle from men with mitochondrial haplogroup H, an increased intrinsic mitochondrial function is present....

  7. CFTR activity and mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Gabriel Valdivieso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR. Before the discovery of the CFTR gene, several hypotheses attempted to explain the etiology of this disease, including the possible role of a chloride channel, diverse alterations in mitochondrial functions, the overexpression of the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase and a deficiency in the cytosolic enzyme glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because of the diverse mitochondrial changes found, some authors proposed that the affected gene should codify for a mitochondrial protein. Later, the CFTR cloning and the demonstration of its chloride channel activity turned the mitochondrial, lysosomal and cytosolic hypotheses obsolete. However, in recent years, using new approaches, several investigators reported similar or new alterations of mitochondrial functions in Cystic Fibrosis, thus rediscovering a possible role of mitochondria in this disease. Here, we review these CFTR-driven mitochondrial defects, including differential gene expression, alterations in oxidative phosphorylation, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, apoptosis and innate immune response, which might explain some characteristics of the complex CF phenotype and reveals potential new targets for therapy.

  8. Changes in mitochondrial function are pivotal in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders: How important is BDNF?

    OpenAIRE

    Markham, A.; Bains, R; Franklin, P; Spedding, M.

    2014-01-01

    The brain is at the very limit of its energy supply and has evolved specific means of adapting function to energy supply, of which mitochondria form a crucial link. Neurotrophic and inflammatory processes may not only have opposite effects on neuroplasticity, but also involve opposite effects on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and glycolytic processes, respectively, modulated by stress and glucocorticoids, which also have marked effects on mood. Neurodegenerative processes show marked...

  9. Time-Dependent and Organ-Specific Changes in Mitochondrial Function, Mitochondrial DNA Integrity, Oxidative Stress and Mononuclear Cell Infiltration in a Mouse Model of Burn Injury.

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    Bartosz Szczesny

    Full Text Available Severe thermal injury induces a pathophysiological response that affects most of the organs within the body; liver, heart, lung, skeletal muscle among others, with inflammation and hyper-metabolism as a hallmark of the post-burn damage. Oxidative stress has been implicated as a key component in development of inflammatory and metabolic responses induced by burn. The goal of the current study was to evaluate several critical mitochondrial functions in a mouse model of severe burn injury. Mitochondrial bioenergetics, measured by Extracellular Flux Analyzer, showed a time dependent, post-burn decrease in basal respiration and ATP-turnover but enhanced maximal respiratory capacity in mitochondria isolated from the liver and lung of animals subjected to burn injury. Moreover, we detected a tissue-specific degree of DNA damage, particularly of the mitochondrial DNA, with the most profound effect detected in lungs and hearts of mice subjected to burn injury. Increased mitochondrial biogenesis in lung tissue in response to burn injury was also observed. Burn injury also induced time dependent increases in oxidative stress (measured by amount of malondialdehyde and neutrophil infiltration (measured by myeloperoxidase activity, particularly in lung and heart. Tissue mononuclear cell infiltration was also confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The amount of poly(ADP-ribose polymers decreased in the liver, but increased in the heart in later time points after burn. All of these biochemical changes were also associated with histological alterations in all three organs studied. Finally, we detected a significant increase in mitochondrial DNA fragments circulating in the blood immediately post-burn. There was no evidence of systemic bacteremia, or the presence of bacterial DNA fragments at any time after burn injury. The majority of the measured parameters demonstrated a sustained elevation even at 20-40 days post injury suggesting a long-lasting effect of thermal

  10. Mitochondrial Cristae: Where Beauty Meets Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogliati, Sara; Enriquez, Jose A; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are dynamic bioenergetic compartments whose shape changes under different physiological conditions. Recent discoveries have unveiled the relation between cristae shape and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) function, suggesting that membrane morphology modulates the organization and function of the OXPHOS system, with a direct impact on cellular metabolism. As a corollary, cristae-shaping proteins have emerged as potential modulators of mitochondrial bioenergetics, a concept confirmed by genetic experiments in mouse models of respiratory chain deficiency. Here, we review our knowledge of mitochondrial ultrastructural organization and how it impacts mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26857402

  11. Changed mitochondrial function by pre- and/or postpartum diet alterations in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Wenche; Gam, Christiane Marie Bourgin; Andersen, Jesper Løvind;

    2009-01-01

    In a sheep model, we investigated diet effects on skeletal muscle mitochondria to look for fetal programming. During pregnancy, ewes were fed normally (N) or were 50% food restricted (L) during the last trimester, and lambs born to these ewes received a normal (N) or a high-fat diet (H) for the...... first 6 mo of life. We examined mitochondrial function in permeabilized muscle fibers from the lambs at 6 mo of age (adolescence) and after 24 mo of age (adulthood). The postpartum H diet for the lambs induced an approximately 30% increase (P < 0.05) of mitochondrial VO(2max) and an approximately 50......% increase (P < 0.05) of the respiratory coupling ratio (RCR) combined with lower levels of UCP3 and PGC-1alpha mRNA levels (P < 0.05). These effects proved to be reversible by a normal diet from 6 to 24 mo of age. However, at 24 mo, a long-term effect of the maternal gestational diet restriction (fetal...

  12. Increasing tetrahydrobiopterin in cardiomyocytes adversely affects cardiac redox state and mitochondrial function independently of changes in NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Whitsett, Jennifer; Bennett, Brian; Ionova, Irina A; Pieper, Galen M; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2016-04-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) represents a potential strategy for the treatment of cardiac remodeling, fibrosis and/or diastolic dysfunction. The effects of oral treatment with BH4 (Sapropterin™ or Kuvan™) are however dose-limiting with high dose negating functional improvements. Cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of GTP cyclohydrolase I (mGCH) increases BH4 several-fold in the heart. Using this model, we aimed to establish the cardiomyocyte-specific responses to high levels of BH4. Quantification of BH4 and BH2 in mGCH transgenic hearts showed age-based variations in BH4:BH2 ratios. Hearts of mice (nitrosyl complexes were detected in any of the age groups. Increased BH4 production in cardiomyocytes resulted in a significant loss of mitochondrial function. Diminished oxygen consumption and reserve capacity was verified in mitochondria isolated from hearts of 12-month old compared to 3-month old mice, even though at 12 months an improved BH4:BH2 ratio is established. Accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and decreased glutathione levels were found in the mGCH hearts and isolated mitochondria. Taken together, our results indicate that the ratio of BH4:BH2 does not predict changes in neither NO levels nor cellular redox state in the heart. The BH4 oxidation essentially limits the capacity of cardiomyocytes to reduce oxidant stress. Cardiomyocyte with chronically high levels of BH4 show a significant decline in redox state and mitochondrial function. PMID:26826575

  13. Cadmium Induced Changes in Metabolic Function of Mitochondrial Isolated from Potato Tissue (Solanum tuberosum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chagra Ali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Cadmium is highly toxic at low concentrations, but the mechanism of its toxicity is still not understood particularly at the cellular and subcellular level. Approach: In this study we examined the effects of cadmium on the oxidophosphorylation properties of mitochondria isolated from potatoes. Results: Cadmium strongly disturbed the respiratory metabolism of mitochondria isolated especially in the transfer of electrons by cyanide pathway. Meanwhile, cadmium altered the composition of lipid fatty acids polar while inhibiting catalase activity, a key enzyme in the detoxification (antioxidant process. In addition, cadmium caused an increase in mitochondrial volume associated with strong inhibition of ATPase activity, which could be explained by a transport of the potassium ion stimulation at the origin of the massive influx of H+ by antiport through the K+/H+ leading to a decoupling (cut of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The swelling of mitochondria was accompanied by the rupture of the mitochondrial outer membrane and thus the release of Cytochrome C, which appears to be the initial phase of apoptosis. Conclusion: Following this study, it appeared that cadmium generates in potato the isolated mitochondria a concentration-dependent oxidative stress.

  14. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes

  15. Mitochondrial functions on oocytes and preimplantation embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-ya WANG; Da-hui WANG; Xiang-yang ZOU; Chen-ming XU

    2009-01-01

    Oocyte quality has long been considered as a main limiting factor for in vitro fertilization (IVF). In the past decade,extensive observations demonstrated that the mitochondrion plays a vital role in the oocyte cytoplasm, for it can provide adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for fertilization and preimplantation embryo development and also act as stores of intracellular calcium and proapoptotic factors. During the oocyte maturation, mitochondria are characterized by distinct changes of their distribution pattern from being homogeneous to heterogeneous, which is correlated with the cumulus apoptosis. Oocyte quality decreases with the increasing maternal age. Recent studies have shown that low quality oocytes have some age-related dysfunctions, which include the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increase of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damages, chromosomal aneuploidies,the incidence of apoptosis, and changes in mitochondrial gene expression. All these dysfunctions may cause a high level of developmental retardation and arrest of preimplantation embryos. It has been suggested that these mitochondrial changes may arise from excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) that is closely associated with the oxidative energy production or calcium overload,which may trigger permeability transition pore opening and subsequent apoptosis. Therefore, mitochondria can be seen as signs for oocyte quality evaluation, and it is possible that the oocyte quality can be improved by enhancing the physical function of mitochondria. Here we reviewed recent advances in mitochondrial functions on oocytes.

  16. Natural Compounds Modulating Mitochondrial Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Gibellini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are organelles responsible for several crucial cell functions, including respiration, oxidative phosphorylation, and regulation of apoptosis; they are also the main intracellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS. In the last years, a particular interest has been devoted to studying the effects on mitochondria of natural compounds of vegetal origin, quercetin (Qu, resveratrol (RSV, and curcumin (Cur being the most studied molecules. All these natural compounds modulate mitochondrial functions by inhibiting organelle enzymes or metabolic pathways (such as oxidative phosphorylation, by altering the production of mitochondrial ROS and by modulating the activity of transcription factors which regulate the expression of mitochondrial proteins. While Qu displays both pro- and antioxidant activities, RSV and Cur are strong antioxidant, as they efficiently scavenge mitochondrial ROS and upregulate antioxidant transcriptional programmes in cells. All the three compounds display a proapoptotic activity, mediated by the capability to directly cause the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria or indirectly by upregulating the expression of proapoptotic proteins of Bcl-2 family and downregulating antiapoptotic proteins. Interestingly, these effects are particularly evident on proliferating cancer cells and can have important therapeutic implications.

  17. Cutaneous mitochondrial respirometry: non-invasive monitoring of mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Floor A; Bodmer, Sander I A; Raat, Nicolaas J H; Mik, Egbert G

    2015-08-01

    The recently developed technique for measuring cutaneous mitochondrial oxygen tension (mitoPO2) by means of the Protoporphyrin IX-Triplet State Lifetime Technique (PpIX-TSLT) provides new opportunities for assessing mitochondrial function in vivo. The aims of this work were to study whether cutaneous mitochondrial measurements reflect mitochondrial status in other parts of the body and to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique for potential clinical use. The first part of this paper demonstrates a correlation between alterations in mitochondrial parameters in skin and other tissues during endotoxemia. Experiments were performed in rats in which mitochondrial dysfunction was induced by a lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis (n = 5) and a time control group (n = 5). MitoPO2 and mitochondrial oxygen consumption (mitoVO2) were measured using PpIX-TSLT in skin, liver and buccal mucosa of the mouth. Both skin and buccal mucosa show a significant mitoPO2-independent decrease (P paper describes the clinical concept of monitoring cutaneous mitochondrial respiration in man. A first prototype of a clinical PpIX-TSLT monitor is described and its usability is demonstrated on human skin. We expect that clinical implementation of this device will greatly contribute to our understanding of mitochondrial oxygenation and oxygen metabolism in perioperative medicine and in critical illness. Our ultimate goal is to develop a clinical monitor for mitochondrial function and the current results are an important step forward. PMID:25388510

  18. CFTR activity and mitochondrial function

    OpenAIRE

    Angel Gabriel Valdivieso; Santa-Coloma, Tomás A.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR). Before the discovery of the CFTR gene, several hypotheses attempted to explain the etiology of this disease, including the possible role of a chloride channel, diverse alterations in mitochondrial functions, the overexpression of the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase and a deficiency in the cytosolic enzyme glucose 6-p...

  19. Mitochondrial cholesterol: mechanisms of import and effects on mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laura A; Kennedy, Barry E; Karten, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria require cholesterol for biogenesis and membrane maintenance, and for the synthesis of steroids, oxysterols and hepatic bile acids. Multiple pathways mediate the transport of cholesterol from different subcellular pools to mitochondria. In steroidogenic cells, the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) interacts with a mitochondrial protein complex to mediate cholesterol delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane for conversion to pregnenolone. In non-steroidogenic cells, several members of a protein family defined by the presence of a StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain play key roles in the delivery of cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes. Subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), form membrane contact sites with mitochondria and may contribute to the transport of ER cholesterol to mitochondria, either independently or in conjunction with lipid-transfer proteins. Model systems of mitochondria enriched with cholesterol in vitro and mitochondria isolated from cells with (patho)physiological mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial cholesterol levels affect mitochondrial function. Increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels have been observed in several diseases, including cancer, ischemia, steatohepatitis and neurodegenerative diseases, and influence disease pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms maintaining mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis may reveal additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we give a brief overview of mitochondrial cholesterol import in steroidogenic cells, and then focus on cholesterol trafficking pathways that deliver cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes in non-steroidogenic cells. We also briefly discuss the consequences of increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels on mitochondrial function and their potential role in disease pathology. PMID:25425472

  20. Mitochondrial oxidative function and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Boushel, Robert; Dela, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    discussed. Several studies show reduced activity of oxidative enzymes in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetics. The reductions are independent of muscle fiber type, and are accompanied by visual evidence of damaged mitochondria. In most studies, the reduced oxidative enzyme activity is explained by decreases...... in mitochondrial content; thus, evidence of a functional impairment in mitochondria in type 2 diabetes is not convincing. These impairments in oxidative function and mitochondrial morphology could reflect the sedentary lifestyle of the diabetic subjects, and the influence of physical activity on...... insulin stimulation. The decreased basal ATP production does not affect overall lipid or glucose oxidation, and no studies linking changes in oxidative activity and insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes have been published. It is concluded that evidence of a functional impairment in mitochondria in type...

  1. Overexpression of mitochondrial sirtuins alters glycolysis and mitochondrial function in HEK293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Barbi de Moura

    Full Text Available SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are mitochondrial deacylases that impact multiple facets of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. SIRT3 activates several mitochondrial enzymes, SIRT4 represses its targets, and SIRT5 has been shown to both activate and repress mitochondrial enzymes. To gain insight into the relative effects of the mitochondrial sirtuins in governing mitochondrial energy metabolism, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 overexpressing HEK293 cells were directly compared. When grown under standard cell culture conditions (25 mM glucose all three sirtuins induced increases in mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation, but with no change in growth rate or in steady-state ATP concentration. Increased proton leak, as evidenced by oxygen consumption in the presence of oligomycin, appeared to explain much of the increase in basal oxygen utilization. Growth in 5 mM glucose normalized the elevations in basal oxygen consumption, proton leak, and glycolysis in all sirtuin over-expressing cells. While the above effects were common to all three mitochondrial sirtuins, some differences between the SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 expressing cells were noted. Only SIRT3 overexpression affected fatty acid metabolism, and only SIRT4 overexpression altered superoxide levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. We conclude that all three mitochondrial sirtuins can promote increased mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism. SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 appear to respond to excess glucose by inducing a coordinated increase of glycolysis and respiration, with the excess energy dissipated via proton leak.

  2. Overexpression of Mitochondrial Sirtuins Alters Glycolysis and Mitochondrial Function in HEK293 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbi de Moura, Michelle; Uppala, Radha; Zhang, Yuxun; Van Houten, Bennett; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are mitochondrial deacylases that impact multiple facets of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. SIRT3 activates several mitochondrial enzymes, SIRT4 represses its targets, and SIRT5 has been shown to both activate and repress mitochondrial enzymes. To gain insight into the relative effects of the mitochondrial sirtuins in governing mitochondrial energy metabolism, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 overexpressing HEK293 cells were directly compared. When grown under standard cell culture conditions (25 mM glucose) all three sirtuins induced increases in mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation, but with no change in growth rate or in steady-state ATP concentration. Increased proton leak, as evidenced by oxygen consumption in the presence of oligomycin, appeared to explain much of the increase in basal oxygen utilization. Growth in 5 mM glucose normalized the elevations in basal oxygen consumption, proton leak, and glycolysis in all sirtuin over-expressing cells. While the above effects were common to all three mitochondrial sirtuins, some differences between the SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 expressing cells were noted. Only SIRT3 overexpression affected fatty acid metabolism, and only SIRT4 overexpression altered superoxide levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. We conclude that all three mitochondrial sirtuins can promote increased mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism. SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 appear to respond to excess glucose by inducing a coordinated increase of glycolysis and respiration, with the excess energy dissipated via proton leak. PMID:25165814

  3. Mitochondrial Composition,Function and Stress Response in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard P.Jacoby; Lei Li; Shaobai Huang; Chun Pong Lee; A.Harvey Millar; Nicolas L.Taylor

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of mitochondria is respiration,where catabolism of substrates is coupled to ATP synthesis via oxidative phosphorylation.In plants,mitochondrial composition is relatively complex and flexible and has specific pathways to support photosynthetic processes in illuminated leaves.This review begins with outlining current models of mitochondrial composition in plant cells,with an emphasis upon the assembly of the complexes of the classical electron transport chain (ETC).Next,we focus upon the comparative analysis of mitochondrial function from different tissue types.A prominent theme in the plant mitochondrial literature involves linking mitochondrial composition to environmental stress responses,and this review then gives a detailed outline of how oxidative stress impacts upon the plant mitochondrial proteome with particular attention to the role of transition metals.This is followed by an analysis of the signaling capacity of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species,which studies the transcriptional changes of stress responsive genes as a framework to define specific signals emanating from the mitochondrion.Finally,specific mitochondrial roles during exposure to harsh environments are outlined,with attention paid to mitochondrial delivery of energy and intermediates,mitochondrial support for photosynthesis,and mitochondrial processes operating within root cells that mediate tolerance to anoxia and unfavorable soil chemistries.

  4. Age-related changes of glutathione content, glucose transport and metabolism, and mitochondrial electron transfer function in mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the oxidative stress-related parameters and to determine their order of appearance in the brain aging process, radionuclide experiments were carried out on male DBF1 mice at 3, 12, 24 and 30 months of age. The content of nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds, mainly glutathione, was estimated with technetium-99m meso-hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime ([99mTc]meso-HMPAO) tissue sampling. Glucose transport and metabolism was examined with [1-14C]2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) tissue sampling. Mitochondrial electron transport function was estimated with [15O]O2 gas-tissue ARG. [99mTc]Meso-HMPAO uptake in brain expressed as standardized uptake value (SUV), (radioactivity in brain tissue/tissue weight)/(total administered radioactivity/body weight), reached maximum at 12 months of age and decreased at 24 and 30 months of age in every region examined. The pattern of 2-DG, expressed as SUV, showed a tendency to increase rather than decrease with aging. [15O]O2 fixation in brain slices remained constant until 24 months, while it decreased significantly at 30 months of age. The results suggested the possibility of using imaging techniques in vivo for longitudinal evaluation of the aging process and indicated reduction of nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds including GSH at the early stages of aging may also accelerate the dysfunction of mitochondrial electron transport and neurodegeneration

  5. Preventing mitochondrial fission impairs mitochondrial function and leads to loss of mitochondrial DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe A Parone

    Full Text Available Mitochondria form a highly dynamic tubular network, the morphology of which is regulated by frequent fission and fusion events. However, the role of mitochondrial fission in homeostasis of the organelle is still unknown. Here we report that preventing mitochondrial fission, by down-regulating expression of Drp1 in mammalian cells leads to a loss of mitochondrial DNA and a decrease of mitochondrial respiration coupled to an increase in the levels of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. At the cellular level, mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from the lack of fission leads to a drop in the levels of cellular ATP, an inhibition of cell proliferation and an increase in autophagy. In conclusion, we propose that mitochondrial fission is required for preservation of mitochondrial function and thereby for maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  6. Exercise training improves vascular mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Gifford, Jayson R; Bharath, Leena P; Bauersachs, Johann; Richardson, Russell S; Abel, E Dale; Symons, J David; Riehle, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Exercise training is recognized to improve cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity; however, the impact of chronic exercise on vascular mitochondrial respiratory function is unknown. We hypothesized that exercise training concomitantly increases both vascular mitochondrial respiratory capacity and vascular function. Arteries from both sedentary (SED) and swim-trained (EX, 5 wk) mice were compared in terms of mitochondrial respiratory function, mitochondrial content, markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, redox balance, nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and vessel function. Mitochondrial complex I and complex I + II state 3 respiration and the respiratory control ratio (complex I + II state 3 respiration/complex I state 2 respiration) were greater in vessels from EX relative to SED mice, despite similar levels of arterial citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, compared with the SED mice, arteries from EX mice displayed elevated transcript levels ofperoxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ coactivator-1αand the downstream targetscytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1,isocitrate dehydrogenase(Idh)2, andIdh3a, increased manganese superoxide dismutase protein expression, increased endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation (Ser(1177)), and suppressed reactive oxygen species generation (allPrespiratory capacity and evidence of improved redox balance, which may, at least in part, be attributable to elevated NO bioavailability, have the potential to protect against age- and disease-related challenges to arterial function. PMID:26825520

  7. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  8. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H., E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu

    2012-01-15

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  9. Tissue mitochondrial DNA changes. A stochastic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsidas, G; Kovalenko, S A; Heffernan, D R; Yarovaya, N; Kramarova, L; Stojanovski, D; Borg, J; Islam, M M; Caragounis, A; Linnane, A W

    2000-06-01

    Several lines of evidence support the view that the bioenergetic function of the mitochondria in postmitotic tissue deteriorates during normal aging. Skeletal muscle is one such tissue that undergoes age-related fiber loss and atrophy and an age-associated rise in the number of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficient fibers. With such metabolic pressure placed on skeletal muscle it would be an obvious advantage to supplement the cellular requirement for energy by up-regulating glycolysis, and alternative pathway for energy synthesis. Analysis of rat skeletal muscle utilizing antibodies directed against key enzymes involved in glycolysis has provided evidence of an age-associated increase in the enzymes involved in glycolysis. Fructose-6-phosphate kinase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase protein levels appeared to increase in the soleus, gracilis, and quadriceps muscle from aged rats. The increase in the level of these proteins appeared to correlate to a corresponding decrease in the amount of cytochrome c oxidase protein measured in the same tissue. Together these results are interpreted to represent a general upregulation of glycolysis that occurs in response to the age-associated decrease in mitochondrial energy capacity. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and mutations may accumulate with advancing age until they reach a threshold level were they impinge on the bioenergy capacity of the cell or tissue. Evidence indicates that mtDNA from the skeletal muscle of both aged rats and humans not only undergoes changes at the nucleotide sequence level (mutations and DNA damage), but also undergoes modifications at the tertiary level to generate unique age-related conformational mtDNA species. One particular age-related conformational form was only detected in aged rat tissues with high demands on respiration, specifically in heart, kidney, soleus muscle, and, to a lesser extent, the quadriceps muscle. The age-related form was not

  10. Structure and function of mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Christophe; Brandt, Ulrich; Hunte, Carola; Zickermann, Volker

    2016-07-01

    Proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the largest and most complicated enzyme of the respiratory chain. Fourteen central subunits represent the minimal form of complex I and can be assigned to functional modules for NADH oxidation, ubiquinone reduction, and proton pumping. In addition, the mitochondrial enzyme comprises some 30 accessory subunits surrounding the central subunits that are not directly associated with energy conservation. Complex I is known to release deleterious oxygen radicals (ROS) and its dysfunction has been linked to a number of hereditary and degenerative diseases. We here review recent progress in structure determination, and in understanding the role of accessory subunits and functional analysis of mitochondrial complex I. For the central subunits, structures provide insight into the arrangement of functional modules including the substrate binding sites, redox-centers and putative proton channels and pump sites. Only for two of the accessory subunits, detailed structures are available. Nevertheless, many of them could be localized in the overall structure of complex I, but most of these assignments have to be considered tentative. Strikingly, redox reactions and proton pumping machinery are spatially completely separated and the site of reduction for the hydrophobic substrate ubiquinone is found deeply buried in the hydrophilic domain of the complex. The X-ray structure of complex I from Yarrowia lipolytica provides clues supporting the previously proposed two-state stabilization change mechanism, in which ubiquinone redox chemistry induces conformational states and thereby drives proton pumping. The same structural rearrangements may explain the active/deactive transition of complex I implying an integrated mechanistic model for energy conversion and regulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26921811

  11. IDH2 deficiency impairs mitochondrial function in endothelial cells and endothelium-dependent vasomotor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Bum; Nagar, Harsha; Choi, Sujeong; Jung, Saet-Byel; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Shin Kwang; Lee, Jun Wan; Lee, Jin Hyup; Park, Jeen-Woo; Irani, Kaikobad; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Song, Hee-Jung; Kim, Cuk-Seong

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2) plays an essential role protecting cells against oxidative stress-induced damage. A deficiency in IDH2 leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiomyocytes and cancer cells. However, the function of IDH2 in vascular endothelial cells is mostly unknown. In this study the effects of IDH2 deficiency on mitochondrial and vascular function were investigated in endothelial cells. IDH2 knockdown decreased the expression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes I, II and III, which lead to increased mitochondrial superoxide. In addition, the levels of fission and fusion proteins (Mfn-1, OPA-1, and Drp-1) were significantly altered and MnSOD expression also was decreased by IDH2 knockdown. Furthermore, knockdown of IDH2 decreased eNOS phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO) concentration in endothelial cells. Interestingly, treatment with Mito-TEMPO, a mitochondrial-specific superoxide scavenger, recovered mitochondrial fission-fusion imbalance and blunted mitochondrial superoxide production, and reduced the IDH2 knockdown-induced decrease in MnSOD expression, eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in endothelial cells. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation was impaired, and the concentration of bioavailable NO decreased in the aortic ring in IDH2 knockout mice. These findings suggest that IDH2 deficiency induces endothelial dysfunction through the induction of dynamic mitochondrial changes and impairment in vascular function. PMID:26898144

  12. Sugarcane genes related to mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Ghislaine V.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria function as metabolic powerhouses by generating energy through oxidative phosphorylation and have become the focus of renewed interest due to progress in understanding the subtleties of their biogenesis and the discovery of the important roles which these organelles play in senescence, cell death and the assembly of iron-sulfur (Fe/S centers. Using proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana we searched the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for the presence of expressed sequence tags (ESTs with similarity to nuclear genes related to mitochondrial functions. Starting with 869 protein sequences, we searched for sugarcane EST counterparts to these proteins using the basic local alignment search tool TBLASTN similarity searching program run against 260,781 sugarcane ESTs contained in 81,223 clusters. We were able to recover 367 clusters likely to represent sugarcane orthologues of the corresponding genes from S. cerevisiae, H. sapiens and A. thaliana with E-value <= 10-10. Gene products belonging to all functional categories related to mitochondrial functions were found and this allowed us to produce an overview of the nuclear genes required for sugarcane mitochondrial biogenesis and function as well as providing a starting point for detailed analysis of sugarcane gene structure and physiology.

  13. Functionalized Nanosystems for Targeted Mitochondrial Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Durazo, Shelley A.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction including oxidative stress and DNA mutations underlies the pathology of various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes, necessitating the development of mitochondria targeted therapeutic agents. Nanotechnology offers unique tools and materials to target therapeutic agents to mitochondria. As discussed in this paper, a variety of functionalized nanosystems including polymeric and metallic nanoparticles as well as liposomes are more effective than plain dr...

  14. Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Svendsen, Pernille Maj; Skovbro, Mette;

    2011-01-01

    Objective Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with skeletal muscle insulin resistance, which has been linked to decreased mitochondrial function. We measured mitochondrial respiration in lean and obese women with and without PCOS using high-resolution respirometry. Methods Hyperinsul......Objective Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with skeletal muscle insulin resistance, which has been linked to decreased mitochondrial function. We measured mitochondrial respiration in lean and obese women with and without PCOS using high-resolution respirometry. Methods...... mitochondrial function and indices of insulin sensitivity. Conclusions In contrast to previous reports we found no evidence that skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration is reduced in skeletal muscle of women with PCOS compared to control subjects. Furthermore, mitochondrial content did not differ between our...... control and PCOS groups. These results question the causal relationship between reduced mitochondrial function and skeletal muscle insulin resistance in PCOS....

  15. Bezafibrate improves mitochondrial function in the CNS of a mouse model of mitochondrial encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Noe, Natalie; Dillon, Lloye; Lellek, Veronika; Diaz, Francisca; Hida, Aline; Carlos T. Moraes; Wenz, Tina

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction frequently affects the central nervous system. Here, we investigated the effect of bezafibrate treatment on neuronal mitochondrial function and its impact on the progression of a mitochondrial encephalopathy. We used a murine model with a forebrain-specific cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by conditional deletion of the COX10 gene. In this mouse model, bezafibrate-administration improved the phenotype of the mice associated with an increase in mitochondrial pro...

  16. MARCH5 inactivation supports mitochondrial function during neurodegenerative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal cell death is accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction with mitochondrial maintenance critical to neuronal survival. The mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MARCH5 has dual roles in the upkeep of mitochondrial function. MARCH5 is involved in targeted degradation of proteins harmful to mitochondria and impacts mitochondrial morphology upstream of the fission protein Drp1. In a neuronal cell model, dominant-negative MARCH5 prevents mitochondrial fragmentation during neurodegenerative stress induced by the neuron-specific reactive oxygen generator 6 hydroxydopamine, the complex I inhibitor rotenone or Alzheimer’s-releated Aβ peptide. In addition, preservation of mitochondrial function in terms of membrane potential and lower reactive oxygen generation was observed following inactivation of MARCH5. Our findings connect MARCH5 to neuronal stress responses and further emphasize the link between mitochondrial dynamics and function.

  17. Altered Mitochondrial Function, Mitochondrial DNA and Reduced Metabolic Flexibility in Patients With Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Czajka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if mitochondrial dysfunction plays a role in diabetic nephropathy (DN, a kidney disease which affects >100 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of renal failure despite therapy. A cross-sectional study comparing DN with diabetes patients without kidney disease (DC and healthy controls (HCs; and renal mesangial cells (HMCs grown in normal and high glucose, was carried out. Patients with diabetes (DC had increased circulating mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA, and HMCs increased their MtDNA within 24 h of hyperglycaemia. The increased MtDNA content in DCs and HMCs was not functional as transcription was unaltered/down-regulated, and MtDNA damage was present. MtDNA was increased in DC compared to HC, conversely, patients with DN had lower MtDNA than DC. Hyperglycaemic HMCs had fragmented mitochondria and TLR9 pathway activation, and in diabetic patients, mitophagy was reduced. Despite MtDNA content and integrity changing within 4 days, hyperglycaemic HMCs had a normal bio-energetic profile until 8 days, after which mitochondrial metabolism was progressively impaired. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from DN patients had reduced reserve capacity and maximal respiration, loss of metabolic flexibility and reduced Bioenergetic Health Index (BHI compared to DC. Our data show that MtDNA changes precede bioenergetic dysfunction and that patients with DN have impaired mitochondrial metabolism compared to DC, leading us to propose that systemic mitochondrial dysfunction initiated by glucose induced MtDNA damage may be involved in the development of DN. Longitudinal studies are needed to define a potential cause–effect relationship between changes in MtDNA and bioenergetics in DN.

  18. Changes in liver mitochondrial plasticity induced by brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulating data suggest that liver is a major target organ of systemic effects observed in the presence of a cancer. In this study, we investigated the consequences of the presence of chemically induced brain tumors in rats on biophysical parameters accounting for the dynamics of water in liver mitochondria. Tumors of the central nervous system were induced by intraveinous administration of ethylnitrosourea (ENU) to pregnant females on the 19th day of gestation. The mitochondrial crude fraction was isolated from the liver of each animal and the dynamic parameters of total water and its macromolecule-associated fraction (structured water, H2Ost) were calculated from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements. The presence of a malignant brain tumor induced a loss of water structural order that implicated changes in the physical properties of the hydration shells of liver mitochondria macromolecules. This feature was linked to an increase in the membrane cholesterol content, a way to limit water penetration into the bilayer and then to reduce membrane permeability. As expected, these alterations in mitochondrial plasticity affected ionic exchanges and led to abnormal features of mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation. This study enlightens the sensitivity of the structured water phase in the liver mitochondria machinery to external conditions such as tumor development at a distant site. The profound metabolic and functional changes led to abnormal features of ion transport, mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation

  19. Changes in liver mitochondrial plasticity induced by brain tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debien Emilie

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulating data suggest that liver is a major target organ of systemic effects observed in the presence of a cancer. In this study, we investigated the consequences of the presence of chemically induced brain tumors in rats on biophysical parameters accounting for the dynamics of water in liver mitochondria. Methods Tumors of the central nervous system were induced by intraveinous administration of ethylnitrosourea (ENU to pregnant females on the 19th day of gestation. The mitochondrial crude fraction was isolated from the liver of each animal and the dynamic parameters of total water and its macromolecule-associated fraction (structured water, H2Ost were calculated from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR measurements. Results The presence of a malignant brain tumor induced a loss of water structural order that implicated changes in the physical properties of the hydration shells of liver mitochondria macromolecules. This feature was linked to an increase in the membrane cholesterol content, a way to limit water penetration into the bilayer and then to reduce membrane permeability. As expected, these alterations in mitochondrial plasticity affected ionic exchanges and led to abnormal features of mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation. Conclusion This study enlightens the sensitivity of the structured water phase in the liver mitochondria machinery to external conditions such as tumor development at a distant site. The profound metabolic and functional changes led to abnormal features of ion transport, mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation.

  20. Dynamics of morphological changes for mitochondrial fission and fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria experience continuous fusion and fission in a living cell, but their dynamics remains poorly quantified. Here a theoretical model was developed, upon a simplified population balance equation (PBE), to predict the morphological changes induced by mitochondrial fission and fusion. Assuming that both fission and fusion events are statistically independent, the survival probability of mitochondria staying in the fission or fusion state was formulated as an exponentially-decayed function with time, which depended on the time-dependent distribution of the mitochondrial volume and the fission and fusion rates. Parametric analysis was done for two typical volume distributions. One was Gamma distribution and the other was Gaussian distribution, derived from the measurements of volume distribution for individual mitochondria in a living cell and purified mitochondria in vitro. The predictions indicated that the survival probability strongly depended on morphological changes of individual mitochondria and was inversely correlated to the fission and fusion rates. This work provided a new insight into quantifying the mitochondrial dynamics via monitoring the evolution of the mitochondrial volume.

  1. [Exercise and aging: regulation of mitochondrial function and redox system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Juan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Jian-Kang

    2014-10-01

    Evidence shows that aging is closely related to mitochondrial decay and redox imbalance. With aging, both mitochondrial content and protein synthesis declined and free radicals, the by-products of mitochondrial metabolism and their oxidation to lipids, proteins and nuclear acids increased. The age-related declines in mitochondrial function and redox imbalance affect physical function, induce insulin resistance and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, thus, play a major role in regulation of life span. Therefore, mitochondrion may be the most important determinant of life span. Increasing evidence demonstrates that long-term aerobic exercise could prevent age-related diseases and improve life quality of aged people. Exercise may possibly stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II antioxidant defense system to regulate mitochondrial function and balance of redox system. Therefore, regular aerobic exercise may prevent age-related diseases, increase life quality and prolong life span through regulation of mitochondrial function and redox balance. PMID:25764789

  2. Loss of the SIN3 transcriptional corepressor results in aberrant mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüttemann Maik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SIN3 is a transcriptional repressor protein known to regulate many genes, including a number of those that encode mitochondrial components. Results By monitoring RNA levels, we find that loss of SIN3 in Drosophila cultured cells results in up-regulation of not only nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes, but also those encoded by the mitochondrial genome. The up-regulation of gene expression is accompanied by a perturbation in ATP levels in SIN3-deficient cells, suggesting that the changes in mitochondrial gene expression result in altered mitochondrial activity. In support of the hypothesis that SIN3 is necessary for normal mitochondrial function, yeast sin3 null mutants exhibit very poor growth on non-fermentable carbon sources and show lower levels of ATP and reduced respiration rates. Conclusions The findings that both yeast and Drosophila SIN3 affect mitochondrial activity suggest an evolutionarily conserved role for SIN3 in the control of cellular energy production.

  3. Quantifying small molecule phenotypic effects using mitochondrial morpho-functional fingerprinting and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Lionel; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet E.; Vogels, Caroline; Pellegrini, Mina; Jonckheere, An I.; Rodenburg, Richard J. T.; Buydens, Lutgarde M. C.; Beyrath, Julien; Willems, Peter H. G. M.; Koopman, Werner J. H.

    2015-01-01

    In primary fibroblasts from Leigh Syndrome (LS) patients, isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency is associated with increased reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial morpho-functional changes. Empirical evidence suggests these aberrations constitute linked therapeutic targets for small chemical molecules. However, the latter generally induce multiple subtle effects, meaning that in vitro potency analysis or single-parameter high-throughput cell screening are of limited use to identify these molecules. We combine automated image quantification and artificial intelligence to discriminate between primary fibroblasts of a healthy individual and a LS patient based upon their mitochondrial morpho-functional phenotype. We then evaluate the effects of newly developed Trolox variants in LS patient cells. This revealed that Trolox ornithylamide hydrochloride best counterbalanced mitochondrial morpho-functional aberrations, effectively scavenged ROS and increased the maximal activity of mitochondrial complexes I, IV and citrate synthase. Our results suggest that Trolox-derived antioxidants are promising candidates in therapy development for human mitochondrial disorders.

  4. Impaired Mitochondrial Function and Insulin Resistance of Skeletal Muscle in Mitochondrial Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Szendroedi, Julia; Schmid, Albrecht Ingo; Meyerspeer, Martin; Cervin, Camilla; Kacerovsky, Michaela; Smekal, Gerhard; Gräser-Lang, Sabine; Groop, Leif; Roden, Michael

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired muscular mitochondrial function is related to common insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Mitochondrial diseases frequently lead to diabetes, which is mostly attributed to defective β-cell mitochondria and secretion. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We assessed muscular mitochondrial function and lipid deposition in liver (hepatocellular lipids [HCLs]) and muscle (intramyocellular lipids [IMCLs]) using 31P/1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy and insulin sensitivity and endogeno...

  5. Gestational Exposure to a Viral Mimetic Poly(I:C Results in Long-Lasting Changes in Mitochondrial Function by Leucocytes in the Adult Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Giulivi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal immune activation (MIA is a potential risk factor for autism spectrum disorder (ASD and schizophrenia (SZ. In rodents, MIA results in changes in cytokine profiles and abnormal behaviors in the offspring that model these neuropsychiatric conditions. Given the central role that mitochondria have in immunity and other metabolic pathways, we hypothesized that MIA will result in a fetal imprinting that leads to postnatal deficits in the bioenergetics of immune cells. To this end, splenocytes from adult offspring exposed gestationally to the viral mimic poly(I:C were evaluated for mitochondrial outcomes. A significant decrease in mitochondrial ATP production was observed in poly(I:C-treated mice (45% of controls mainly attributed to a lower complex I activity. No differences were observed between the two groups in the coupling of electron transport to ATP synthesis, or the oxygen uptake under uncoupling conditions. Concanavalin A- (ConA- stimulated splenocytes from poly(I:C animals showed no statistically significant changes in cytokine levels compared to controls. The present study reports for the first time that MIA activation by poly(I:C at early gestation, which can lead to behavioral impairments in the offspring similar to SZ and ASD, leads to long-lasting effects in the bioenergetics of splenocytes of adult offspring.

  6. Alterations in mitochondrial number and function in Alzheimer's disease fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Nora E; Quinn, Joseph F

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in brains of Alzheimer's Disease patients as well as many rodent model systems including those modeling mutations in preseinilin 1 (PSEN1). The aim of our study was to characterize mitochondrial function and number in fibroblasts from AD patients with PSEN1 mutations. We used biochemical assays, metabolic profiling and fluorescent labeling to assess mitochondrial number and function in fibroblasts from three AD patients compared to fibroblasts from three controls. The mutant AD fibroblasts had increased Aβ42 relative to controls along with reduction in ATP, basal and maximal mitochondrial respiration as well as impaired spare mitochondrial respiratory capacity. Fluorescent staining and expression of genes encoding electron transport chain enzymes showed diminished mitochondrial content in the AD fibroblasts. This study demonstrates that mitochondrial dysfunction is observable in AD fibroblasts and provides evidence that this model system could be useful as a tool to screen disease-modifying compounds. PMID:25862550

  7. Towards a functional definition of the mitochondrial human proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Fasano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial human proteome project (mt-HPP was initiated by the Italian HPP group as a part of both the chromosome-centric initiative (C-HPP and the “biology and disease driven” initiative (B/D-HPP. In recent years several reports highlighted how mitochondrial biology and disease are regulated by specific interactions with non-mitochondrial proteins. Thus, it is of great relevance to extend our present view of the mitochondrial proteome not only to those proteins that are encoded by or transported to mitochondria, but also to their interactors that take part in mitochondria functionality. Here, we propose a graphical representation of the functional mitochondrial proteome by retrieving mitochondrial proteins from the NeXtProt database and adding to the network their interactors as annotated in the IntAct database. Notably, the network may represent a reference to map all the proteins that are currently being identified in mitochondrial proteomics studies.

  8. Mitochondrial Function in Permeabilized Cardiomyocytes Is Largely Preserved in the Senescent Rat Myocardium

    OpenAIRE

    Picard, Martin; Wright, Kathryn J.; Ritchie, Darmyn; Thomas, Melissa M.; Hepple, Russell T.

    2012-01-01

    The aging heart is characterized by a progressive decline in contractile function and diastolic relaxation. Amongst the factors implicated in these changes is a progressive replacement fibrosis secondary to cardiomyoctye death, oxidative damage, and energetic deficit, each of which may be secondary to impaired mitochondrial function. Here, we performed an in-depth examination of mitochondrial function in saponin-permeabilized cardiomyocyte bundles, a preparation where all mitochondria are rep...

  9. Neurodegenerative and Fatiguing Illnesses, Infections and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Use of Natural Supplements to Improve Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth L. Nicolson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many chronic diseases and illnesses are associated with one or more chronic infections, dysfunction of mitochondria and reduced production of ATP. This results in fatigue and other symptoms that occur in most if not all chronic conditions and diseases. Methods: This is a review of the published literature on chronic infections in neurodegenerative diseases and fatiguing illnesses that are also typified by mitochondrial dysfunction. This contribution also reviews the use of natural supplements to enhance mitochondrial function and reduce the effects of chronic infections to improve overall function in various chronic illnesses. Results: Mitochondrial function can be enhanced by the use of various natural supplements, notably Lipid Replacement Therapy (LRT using glyerolphospholipids and other mitochondrial supplements. In various chronic illnesses that are characterized by the presence of chronic infections, such as intracellular bacteria (Mycoplasma, Borrelia, Chlamydia and other infections and viruses, LRT has proven useful in multiple clinical trials. For example, in clinical studies on chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia syndrome and other chronic fatiguing illnesses where a large majority of patients have chronic infections, LRT significantly reduced fatigue by 35-43% in different clinical trials and increased mitochondrial function. In clinical trials on patients with multiple intracellular bacterial infections and intractable fatigue LRT plus other mitochondrial supplements significantly decreased fatigue and improved mood and cognition. Conclusions: LRT formulations designed to improve mitochondrial function appear to be useful as non-toxic dietary supplements for reducing fatigue and restoring mitochondrial and other cellular membrane functions in patients with chronic illnesses and multiple chronic infections.

  10. Selenium preserves mitochondrial function, stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, and reduces infarct volume after focal cerebral ischemia

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    Mehta Suresh L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the major events responsible for activation of neuronal cell death pathways during cerebral ischemia. Trace element selenium has been shown to protect neurons in various diseases conditions. Present study is conducted to demonstrate that selenium preserves mitochondrial functional performance, activates mitochondrial biogenesis and prevents hypoxic/ischemic cell damage. Results The study conducted on HT22 cells exposed to glutamate or hypoxia and mice subjected to 60-min focal cerebral ischemia revealed that selenium (100 nM pretreatment (24 h significantly attenuated cell death induced by either glutamate toxicity or hypoxia. The protective effects were associated with reduction of glutamate and hypoxia-induced ROS production and alleviation of hypoxia-induced suppression of mitochondrial respiratory complex activities. The animal studies demonstrated that selenite pretreatment (0.2 mg/kg i.p. once a day for 7 days ameliorated cerebral infarct volume and reduced DNA oxidation. Furthermore, selenite increased protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1α and nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1, two key nuclear factors that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. Finally, selenite normalized the ischemia-induced activation of Beclin 1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II, markers for autophagy. Conclusions These results suggest that selenium protects neurons against hypoxic/ischemic damage by reducing oxidative stress, restoring mitochondrial functional activities and stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis.

  11. Muscle mitochondrial changes with aging and exercise1234

    OpenAIRE

    Lanza, Ian R.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2008-01-01

    Aging has been reported to be accompanied by reduced mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity. Whether these deleterious effects result from chronological age or lifestyle-related factors such as adiposity and physical inactivity remains debatable. The beneficial effects of exercise on mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity are well documented; however, it is unclear whether exercise can effectively prevent, reverse, or delay the onset of these age-related dysfunctions. Other in...

  12. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  13. Mitochondrial Function in Physically Active Elders with Sarcopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, DL; Mullins, PG; Qualls, CR; Raj, DR; Gasparovic, C; Baumgartner, RN

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity is reported to protect against sarcopenia and preserve mitochondrial function. Healthy normal lean (NL: n=15) and sarcopenic (SS: n=9) participants were recruited based on body composition (DXA, Lunar DPX™), age, and physical activity. Gastrocnemius mitochondrial function was assessed by 31P MRS using steady-state exercise in a 4 T Bruker Biospin. Total work (429.3 ± 160.2 vs 851.0 ± 211.7 J, p

  14. The mitochondrial function was impaired in APP knockout mouse embryo fibroblast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG BaiYang; NIU Ying; ZHOU Hui; YAN JiaXin; ZHAO NanMing; ZHANG XiuFang; GONG YanDao

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is recognized as the source of Aβ, which plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease. However, the biological function of APP is obscure. Previous studies showed that mitochondria could be a target of APP. In this work, APP knockout mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells were used to test if APP plays any role in maintaining the mitochondrial function. As the result, APP knockout MEF cells (APP-/- cells) showed the abnormal mitochondrial function, including slower cell proliferation, lower mitochondrial membrane potential, lower intracellular ROS, higher mitochon-drial membrane fluidity and lower cytochrome c oxidase activity than their wild-type counterparts. However, no change was found in the amount of mitochondria in MEF APP-/- cells.

  15. Quantifying small molecule phenotypic effects using mitochondrial morpho-functional fingerprinting and machine learning

    OpenAIRE

    Blanchet, L.M.; Smeitink, J; van Emst-de Vries, S E; Vogels, C.; Pellegrini, M; Jonckheere, A.I.; Rodenburg, R J; Buydens, L.M.; Beyrath, J.D.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    In primary fibroblasts from Leigh Syndrome (LS) patients, isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency is associated with increased reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial morpho-functional changes. Empirical evidence suggests these aberrations constitute linked therapeutic targets for small chemical molecules. However, the latter generally induce multiple subtle effects, meaning that in vitro potency analysis or single-parameter high-throughput cell screening are of limited use to id...

  16. The functional organization of mitochondrial genomes in human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Hiroshi

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We analyzed the organization and function of mitochondrial DNA in a stable human cell line (ECV304, which is also known as T-24 containing mitochondria tagged with the yellow fluorescent protein. Results Mitochondrial DNA is organized in ~475 discrete foci containing 6–10 genomes. These foci (nucleoids are tethered directly or indirectly through mitochondrial membranes to kinesin, marked by KIF5B, and microtubules in the surrounding cytoplasm. In living cells, foci have an apparent diffusion constant of 1.1 × 10-3 μm2/s, and mitochondria always split next to a focus to distribute all DNA to one daughter. The kinetics of replication and transcription (monitored by immunolabelling after incorporating bromodeoxyuridine or bromouridine reveal that each genome replicates independently of others in a focus, and that newly-made RNA remains in a focus (residence half-time ~43 min long after it has been made. This mitochondrial RNA colocalizes with components of the cytoplasmic machinery that makes and imports nuclear-encoded proteins – that is, a ribosomal protein (S6, a nascent peptide associated protein (NAC, and the translocase in the outer membrane (Tom22. Conclusions The results suggest that clusters of mitochondrial genomes organize the translation machineries on both sides of the mitochondrial membranes. Then, proteins encoded by the nuclear genome and destined for the mitochondria will be made close to mitochondrial-encoded proteins so that they can be assembled efficiently into mitochondrial complexes.

  17. A role of taurine in mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Svend Høime; Andersen, Mogens Larsen; Cornett, Claus;

    2010-01-01

    The mitochondrial pH gradient across the inner-membrane is stabilised by buffering of the matrix. A low-molecular mass buffer compound has to be localised in the matrix to maintain its alkaline pH value. Taurine is found ubiquitously in animal cells with concentrations in the millimolar range and...... enzymes, which are pivotal for beta-oxidation of fatty acids, are demonstrated to have optimal activity in a taurine buffer. By application of the model presented, taurine depletion caused by hyperglycemia could provide a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and diabetes....

  18. Mitochondrial stress signaling in longevity: A new role for mitochondrial function in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shauna Hill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are principal regulators of cellular function and metabolism through production of ATP for energy homeostasis, maintenance of calcium homeostasis, regulation of apoptosis and fatty acid oxidation to provide acetyl CoA for fueling the electron transport chain. In addition, mitochondria play a key role in cell signaling through production of reactive oxygen species that modulate redox signaling. Recent findings support an additional mechanism for control of cellular and tissue function by mitochondria through complex mitochondrial–nuclear communication mechanisms and potentially through extracellular release of mitochondrial components that can act as signaling molecules. The activation of stress responses including mitophagy, mitochondrial number, fission and fusion events, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRMT requires mitochondrial–nuclear communication for the transcriptional activation of nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial quality control and metabolism. The induction of these signaling pathways is a shared feature in long-lived organisms spanning from yeast to mice. As a result, the role of mitochondrial stress signaling in longevity has been expansively studied. Current and exciting studies provide evidence that mitochondria can also signal among tissues to up-regulate cytoprotective activities to promote healthy aging. Alternatively, mitochondria release signals to modulate innate immunity and systemic inflammatory responses and could consequently promote inflammation during aging. In this review, established and emerging models of mitochondrial stress response pathways and their potential role in modulating longevity are discussed.

  19. Mitochondrial cereblon functions as a Lon-type protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Nakamura, China; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Lon protease plays a major role in the protein quality control system in mammalian cell mitochondria. It is present in the mitochondrial matrix, and degrades oxidized and misfolded proteins, thereby protecting the cell from various extracellular stresses, including oxidative stress. The intellectual disability-associated and thalidomide-binding protein cereblon (CRBN) contains a large, highly conserved Lon domain. However, whether CRBN has Lon protease-like function remains unknown. Here, we determined if CRBN has a protective function against oxidative stress, similar to Lon protease. We report that CRBN partially distributes in mitochondria, suggesting it has a mitochondrial function. To specify the mitochondrial role of CRBN, we mitochondrially expressed CRBN in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The resulting stable SH-SY5Y cell line showed no apparent effect on the mitochondrial functions of fusion, fission, and membrane potential. However, mitochondrially expressed CRBN exhibited protease activity, and was induced by oxidative stress. In addition, stably expressed cells exhibited suppressed neuronal cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that CRBN functions specifically as a Lon-type protease in mitochondria. PMID:27417535

  20. Effects of magnesium sulfate on brain mitochondrial respiratory function in rats after experimental traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许民辉; 代文光; 邓洵鼎

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of magnesium sulfate on brain mitochondrial respiratory function in rats after experimental traumatic brain injury and the possible mechanism.Methods: The middle degree brain injury in rats was made by BIM-III multi-function impacting machine. The brain mitochondrial respiratory function was measured with oxygen electrode and the ultra-structural changes were observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM).Results: 1. The brain mitochondrial respiratory stage III and respiration control rate reduced significantly in the untreated groups within 24 and 72 hours. But treated Group A showed certain degree of recovery of respiratory function; treated Group B showed further improvement. 2. Untreated Group, treated Groups A and B had different degrees of mitochondrial ultra-structural damage respectively, which could be attenuated after the treatment with magnesium sulfate.Conclusions: The mitochondrial respiratory function decreases significantly after traumatic brain injury. But it can be apparently improved after magnesium sulfate management along with the attenuated damage of mitochondria discovered by TEM. The longer course of treatment can obtain a better improvement of mitochondrial respiratory function.

  1. SUMO-regulated mitochondrial function in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra de Souza, Ana Cristina; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Cimarosti, Helena

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cardinal motor signs such as rigidity, bradykinesia or rest tremor that arise from a significant death of dopaminergic neurons. Non-dopaminergic degeneration also occurs and it seems to induce the deficits in olfactory, emotional, and memory functions that precede the classical motor symptoms in PD. Despite the majority of PD cases being sporadic, several genes have previously been associated with the hereditary forms of the disease. The proteins encoded by some of these genes, including α-synuclein, DJ-1, and parkin, are modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO), a post-translational modification that regulates a variety of cellular processes. Among the several pathogenic mechanisms proposed for PD is mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent studies suggest that SUMOylation can interfere with mitochondrial dynamics, which is essential for neuronal function, and may play a pivotal role in PD pathogenesis. Here, we present an overview of recent studies on mitochondrial disturbance in PD and the potential SUMO-modified proteins and pathways involved in this process. SUMOylation, a post-translational modification, interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, and may play a pivotal role in Parkinson's disease (PD). SUMOylation maintains α-synuclein (α-syn) in a soluble form and activates DJ-1, decreasing mitochondrial oxidative stress. SUMOylation may reduce the amount of parkin available for mitochondrial recruitment and decreases mitochondrial biogenesis through suppression of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator 1 α (PGC-1α). Mitochondrial fission can be regulated by dynamin-related protein 1 SUMO-1- or SUMO-2/3-ylation. A fine balance for the SUMOylation/deSUMOylation of these proteins is required to ensure adequate mitochondrial function in PD. PMID:26932327

  2. Multiple proteins with essential mitochondrial functions have glycosylated isoforms

    OpenAIRE

    Burnham-Marusich, Amanda R.; Berninsone, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleocytosolic and secreted proteins are commonly glycosylated. However, reports of glycosylated mitochondrial proteins are rare. Using lectin chromatography on bovine heart, we detected low-abundance glycoforms of nuclear-encoded proteins with well-established mitochondrial function: pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α, NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] iron-sulfur protein 3, ADP/ATP translocase, ATP synthase d and oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein. Notably, the latter two have been previously...

  3. Mitochondrial function in normal and diabetic beta-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Maechler, Pierre; Wollheim, Claes

    2001-01-01

    The aetiology of type 2, or non-insulin-dependent, diabetes mellitus has been characterized in only a limited number of cases. Among these, mitochondrial diabetes, a rare subform of the disease, is the consequence of pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA, which is distinct from the nuclear genome. The impact of such mutations on beta-cell function reflects the importance of mitochondria in the control of insulin secretion. The beta-cell mitochondria serve a...

  4. Muscle structural changes in mitochondrial myopathy relate to genotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, David B.; Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Ørngreen, Mette C.;

    2003-01-01

    typically not been associated with mitochondrial disease. We investigated gross and microscopic muscle morphology in thigh muscles by muscle biopsy and MRI in 16 patients with MM, and compared findings with those obtained in muscular dystrophy patients and healthy subjects. Changes of muscle architecture......It is well known that morphological changes at the cellular level occur in muscle of patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM), but changes in muscle structure with fat infiltration and gross variation of muscle fiber size with giant fibers, normally encountered in the muscular dystrophies, have...

  5. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups modify the risk of osteoarthritis by altering mitochondrial function and intracellular mitochondrial signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hezhi; Zhang, Fengjiao; Li, Fengjie; Shi, Hao; Ma, Lin; Du, Miaomiao; You, Yanting; Qiu, Ruyi; Nie, Hezhongrong; Shen, Lijun; Bai, Yidong; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-04-01

    Haplogroup G predisposes one to an increased risk of osteoarthritis (OA) occurrence, while haplogroup B4 is a protective factor against OA onset. However, the underlying mechanism is not known. Here, by using trans-mitochondrial technology, we demonstrate that the activity levels of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I and III are higher in G cybrids than in haplogroup B4. Increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) promotes mitochondrial-related ATP generation in G cybrids, thereby shifting the ATP generation from glycolysis to OXPHOS. Furthermore, we found that lower glycolysis in G cybrids decreased cell viability under hypoxia (1% O2) compared with B4 cybrids. In contrast, G cybrids have a lower NAD(+)/NADH ratio and less generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under both hypoxic (1% O2) and normoxic (20% O2) conditions than B4 cybrids, indicating that mitochondrial-mediated signaling pathways (retrograde signaling) differ between these cybrids. Gene expression profiling of G and B4 cybrids using next-generation sequencing technology showed that 404 of 575 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between G and B4 cybrids are enriched in 17 pathways, of which 11 pathways participate in OA. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses confirmed that G cybrids had lower glycolysis activity than B4 cybrids. In addition, we confirmed that the rheumatoid arthritis pathway was over-activated in G cybrids, although the remaining 9 pathways were not further tested by qRT-PCR. In conclusion, our findings indicate that mtDNA haplogroup G may increase the risk of OA by shifting the metabolic profile from glycolysis to OXPHOS and by over-activating OA-related signaling pathways. PMID:26705675

  6. DNA methylation status of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes underlies the tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takasugi Masaki

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria are semi-autonomous, semi-self-replicating organelles harboring their own DNA (mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA, and their dysregulation is involved in the development of various diseases. While mtDNA does not generally undergo epigenetic modifications, almost all mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear DNA. However, the epigenetic regulation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes (nuclear mt genes has not been comprehensively analyzed. Results We analyzed the DNA methylation status of 899 nuclear mt genes in the liver, brain, and heart tissues of mouse, and identified 636 nuclear mt genes carrying tissue-dependent and differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs. These nuclar mt genes are involved in various mitochondrial functions and they also include genes related to human diseases. T-DMRs regulate the expression of nuclear mt genes. Nuclear mt genes with tissue-specific hypomethylated T-DMRs were characterized by enrichment of the target genes of specific transcription factors such as FOXA2 in the liver, and CEBPA and STAT1 in the brain. Conclusions A substantial proportion of nuclear mt genes contained T-DMRs, and the DNA methylation status of numerous T-DMRs should underlie tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions.

  7. The mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in mitochondrial base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Maynard, Scott; Bayne, Anne-Cécile V;

    2010-01-01

    mitochondria, whereas base excision repair (BER) has been comprehensively characterized in these organelles. The BER proteins are associated with the inner membrane in mitochondria and thus with the mitochondrial nucleoid, where TFAM is also situated. However, a function for TFAM in BER has not yet been...

  8. Glutamatergic Neurotransmission Links Sensitivity to Volatile Anesthetics with Mitochondrial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimin, Pavel I; Woods, Christian B; Quintana, Albert; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Morgan, Philip G; Sedensky, Margaret M

    2016-08-22

    An enigma of modern medicine has persisted for over 150 years. The mechanisms by which volatile anesthetics (VAs) produce their effects (loss of consciousness, analgesia, amnesia, and immobility) remain an unsolved mystery. Many attractive putative molecular targets have failed to produce a significant effect when genetically tested in whole-animal models [1-3]. However, mitochondrial defects increase VA sensitivity in diverse organisms from nematodes to humans [4-6]. Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mice lack a subunit of mitochondrial complex I and are strikingly hypersensitive to VAs yet resistant to the intravenous anesthetic ketamine [7]. The change in VA sensitivity is the largest reported for a mammal. Limiting NDUFS4 loss to a subset of glutamatergic neurons recapitulates the VA hypersensitivity of Ndufs4(KO) mice, while loss in GABAergic or cholinergic neurons does not. Baseline electrophysiologic function of CA1 pyramidal neurons does not differ between Ndufs4(KO) and control mice. Isoflurane concentrations that anesthetize only Ndufs4(KO) mice (0.6%) decreased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) only in Ndufs4(KO) CA1 neurons, while concentrations effective in control mice (1.2%) decreased sEPSC frequencies in both control and Ndufs4(KO) CA1 pyramidal cells. Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) were not differentially affected between genotypes. The effects of isoflurane were similar on evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and paired pulse facilitation (PPF) in KO and control hippocampal slices. We propose that CA1 presynaptic excitatory neurotransmission is hypersensitive to isoflurane in Ndufs4(KO) mice due to the inhibition of pre-existing reduced complex I function, reaching a critical reduction that can no longer meet metabolic demands. PMID:27498564

  9. Cryopreservation of human skeletal muscle impairs mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Wright-Paradis, C; Gnaiger, E;

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated if cryopreservation is a viable approach for functional mitochondrial analysis. Different tissues have been studied, and conflicting results have been published. The aim of the present study was to investigate if mitochondria in human skeletal muscle maintain...... functionality after long term cryopreservation (1 year). Skeletal muscle samples were preserved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for later analysis. Human skeletal muscle fibres were thawed and permeabilised with saponin, and mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry. The capacity...... of oxidative phosphorylation was significantly (P skeletal muscle samples. Cryopreservation impaired respiration with substrates linked to Complex I more than for Complex II (P

  10. Mutant Parkin impairs mitochondrial function and morphology in human fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Grünewald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in Parkin are the most common cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD. The mitochondrially localized E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Parkin has been reported to be involved in respiratory chain function and mitochondrial dynamics. More recent publications also described a link between Parkin and mitophagy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the impact of Parkin mutations on mitochondrial function and morphology in a human cellular model. Fibroblasts were obtained from three members of an Italian PD family with two mutations in Parkin (homozygous c.1072delT, homozygous delEx7, compound-heterozygous c.1072delT/delEx7, as well as from two relatives without mutations. Furthermore, three unrelated compound-heterozygous patients (delEx3-4/duplEx7-12, delEx4/c.924C>T and delEx1/c.924C>T and three unrelated age-matched controls were included. Fibroblasts were cultured under basal or paraquat-induced oxidative stress conditions. ATP synthesis rates and cellular levels were detected luminometrically. Activities of complexes I-IV and citrate synthase were measured spectrophotometrically in mitochondrial preparations or cell lysates. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured with 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide. Oxidative stress levels were investigated with the OxyBlot technique. The mitochondrial network was investigated immunocytochemically and the degree of branching was determined with image processing methods. We observed a decrease in the production and overall concentration of ATP coinciding with increased mitochondrial mass in Parkin-mutant fibroblasts. After an oxidative insult, the membrane potential decreased in patient cells but not in controls. We further determined higher levels of oxidized proteins in the mutants both under basal and stress conditions. The degree of mitochondrial network branching was comparable in mutants and

  11. Cryopreservation of human skeletal muscle impairs mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S; Wright-Paradis, C; Gnaiger, E;

    2012-01-01

    functionality after long term cryopreservation (1 year). Skeletal muscle samples were preserved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for later analysis. Human skeletal muscle fibres were thawed and permeabilised with saponin, and mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry. The capacity of...

  12. Insulin signaling regulates mitochondrial function in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siming Liu

    Full Text Available Insulin/IGF-I signaling regulates the metabolism of most mammalian tissues including pancreatic islets. To dissect the mechanisms linking insulin signaling with mitochondrial function, we first identified a mitochondria-tethering complex in beta-cells that included glucokinase (GK, and the pro-apoptotic protein, BAD(S. Mitochondria isolated from beta-cells derived from beta-cell specific insulin receptor knockout (betaIRKO mice exhibited reduced BAD(S, GK and protein kinase A in the complex, and attenuated function. Similar alterations were evident in islets from patients with type 2 diabetes. Decreased mitochondrial GK activity in betaIRKOs could be explained, in part, by reduced expression and altered phosphorylation of BAD(S. The elevated phosphorylation of p70S6K and JNK1 was likely due to compensatory increase in IGF-1 receptor expression. Re-expression of insulin receptors in betaIRKO cells partially restored the stoichiometry of the complex and mitochondrial function. These data indicate that insulin signaling regulates mitochondrial function and have implications for beta-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.

  13. Functional recovery of human cells harbouring the mitochondrial DNA mutation MERRF A8344G via peptide-mediated mitochondrial delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Liu, Ko-Hung; Li, Yu-Chi; Kou, Shou-Jen; Wei, Yau-Huei; Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Hsieh, Mingli; Liu, Chin-San

    2013-01-01

    We explored the feasibility of mitochondrial therapy using the cell-penetrating peptide Pep-1 to transfer mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) between cells and rescue a cybrid cell model of the mitochondrial disease myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibres (MERRF) syndrome. Pep-1-conjugated wild-type mitochondria isolated from parent cybrid cells incorporating a mitochondria-specific tag were used as donors for mitochondrial delivery into MERRF cybrid cells (MitoB2) and mtDNA-depleted Rho-zero cells (Mitoρ°). Forty-eight hours later, translocation of Pep-1-labelled mitochondria into the mitochondrial regions of MitoB2 and Mitoρ° host cells was observed (delivery efficiencies of 77.48 and 82.96%, respectively). These internalized mitochondria were maintained for at least 15 days in both cell types and were accompanied by mitochondrial function recovery and cell survival by preventing mitochondria-dependent cell death. Mitochondrial homeostasis analyses showed that peptide-mediated mitochondrial delivery (PMD) also increased mitochondrial biogenesis in both cell types, but through distinct regulatory pathways involving mitochondrial dynamics. Dramatic decreases in mitofusin-2 (MFN2) and dynamin-related protein 1/fission 1 were observed in MitoB2 cells, while Mitoρ° cells showed a significant increase in optic atrophy 1 and MFN2. These findings suggest that PMD can be used as a potential therapeutic intervention for mitochondrial disorders. PMID:23006856

  14. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viitanen, Matti [Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Geriatrics, Turku City Hospital and University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Sundström, Erik [Division of Neurodegeneration, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Baumann, Marc [Protein Chemistry Unit, Institute of Biomedicine/Anatomy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Poyhonen, Minna [Department of Clinical Genetics, Helsinki University Hospital, HUSLAB, Helsinki (Finland); Tikka, Saara [Protein Chemistry Unit, Institute of Biomedicine/Anatomy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Behbahani, Homira, E-mail: homira.behbahani@ki.se [Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  15. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  16. Coordinated Evolution of Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Regulation for Mitochondrial Functions in Yeast Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuepeng; Wang, Zhe; Guo, Xiaoxian; Li, Hongye; Gu, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    Evolution of gene regulation has been proposed to play an important role in environmental adaptation. Exploring mechanisms underlying coordinated evolutionary changes at various levels of gene regulation could shed new light on how organism adapt in nature. In this study, we focused on regulatory differences between a laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4742 and a pathogenic S. cerevisiae strain, YJM789. The two strains diverge in many features, including growth rate, morphology, high temperature tolerance, and pathogenicity. Our RNA-Seq and ribosomal footprint profiling data showed that gene expression differences are pervasive, and genes functioning in mitochondria are mostly divergent between the two strains at both transcriptional and translational levels. Combining functional genomics data from other yeast strains, we further demonstrated that significant divergence of expression for genes functioning in the electron transport chain (ETC) was likely caused by differential expression of a transcriptional factor, HAP4, and that post-transcriptional regulation mediated by an RNA-binding protein, PUF3, likely led to expression divergence for genes involved in mitochondrial translation. We also explored mito-nuclear interactions via mitochondrial DNA replacement between strains. Although the two mitochondrial genomes harbor substantial sequence divergence, neither growth nor gene expression were affected by mitochondrial DNA replacement in both fermentative and respiratory growth media, indicating compatible mitochondrial and nuclear genomes between these two strains in the tested conditions. Collectively, we used mitochondrial functions as an example to demonstrate for the first time that evolution at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels could lead to coordinated regulatory changes underlying strain specific functional variations. PMID:27077367

  17. Assay of mitochondrial functions by resazurin in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-xia ZHANG; Guan-hua DU; Jun-tian ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism of resazurin as indicator of mitochondrial function and to develop a rapid and sensitive assay for measuring metabolic activity of isolated mitochondria from rat liver in vitro. METHODS: The screening was carried out on 96-well microtitre plates by monitoring fluorescence intensity of resazurin reduced by mitochondria. Experimental conditions were optimized and influences of several inhibitors on mitochondrial function were observed. RESULTS: Fluorescence intensity increased in a linear manner when the mitochondrial protein concentration from 5 to 50 μg protein per well was incubated with resazurin (5 μmol/L) during 230 min period at 37 ℃. Edetic acid could promote the reduction of resazurin in mitochondria. The fluorescence intensity decreased greatly after pretreatment with NaN3, antimycin A, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP),and oligomycin compared with the control. However, the typical complex I inhibitor, rotenone enhanced the fluorescence intensity without mitochondria. CONCLUSION: Using resazurin to determine mitochondrial function is sensitive, inexpensive and could be easily automated for high throughput screening.

  18. Mitochondrial function in ageing: coordination with signalling and transcriptional pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Sancheti, Harsh; Liu, Zhigang; Cadenas, Enrique

    2016-04-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction entailing decreased energy-transducing capacity and perturbed redox homeostasis is an early and sometimes initiating event in ageing and age-related disorders involving tissues with high metabolic rate such as brain, liver and heart. In the central nervous system (CNS), recent findings from our and other groups suggest that the mitochondrion-centred hypometabolism is a key feature of ageing brains and Alzheimer's disease. This hypometabolic state is manifested by lowered neuronal glucose uptake, metabolic shift in the astrocytes, and alternations in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle function. Similarly, in liver and adipose tissue, mitochondrial capacity around glucose and fatty acid metabolism and thermogenesis is found to decline with age and is implicated in age-related metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. These mitochondrion-related disorders in peripheral tissues can impact on brain functions through metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory signals. At the cellular level, studies in CNS and non-CNS tissues support the notion that instead of being viewed as autonomous organelles, mitochondria are part of a dynamic network with close interactions with other cellular components through energy- or redox-sensitive cytosolic kinase signalling and transcriptional pathways. Hence, it would be critical to further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the communication between mitochondria and the rest of the cell. Therapeutic strategies that effectively preserves or improve mitochondrial function by targeting key component of these signalling cascades could represent a novel direction for numerous mitochondrion-implicated, age-related disorders. PMID:26293414

  19. Axonal Protein Synthesis and the Regulation of Local Mitochondrial Function

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Axons and presynaptic nerve terminals of both invertebrate and mammalian SCG neurons contain a heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs and a local cytosolic protein synthetic system. Nearly one quarter of the total protein synthesized in these structural/functional domains of the neuron is destined for mitochondria. Acute inhibition of axonal protein synthesis markedly reduces the functional activity of mitochondria. The blockade of axonal protein into mitochondria had...

  20. Axonal protein synthesis and the regulation of local mitochondrial function

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, B.B.; Gioio, A.E.; Hillefors, M.; Aschrafi, A.

    2009-01-01

    Axons and presynaptic nerve terminals of both invertebrate and mammalian SCG neurons contain a heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs and a local cytosolic protein synthetic system. Nearly one quarter of the total protein synthesized in these structural/functional domains of the neuron is destined for mitochondria. Acute inhibition of axonal protein synthesis markedly reduces the functional activity of mitochondria. The blockade of axonal protein into mitochondria had...

  1. Genetically enhancing mitochondrial antioxidant activity improves muscle function in aging

    OpenAIRE

    Umanskaya, Alisa; Santulli, Gaetano; Xie, Wenjun; Andersson, Daniel C; Reiken, Steven R.; Marks, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related muscle weakness has major adverse consequences on quality of life, increasing the risk of falls, fractures, and movement impairments. Albeit an increased oxidative state has been shown to contribute to age-dependent reduction in skeletal muscle function, little is known about the mechanisms connecting oxidation and muscle weakness. We show here that genetically enhancing mitochondrial antioxidant activity causes improved skeletal muscle function and voluntary exercise in aged mice...

  2. Sphingolipids and mitochondrial function, lessons learned from yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Spincemaille

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, but also of cancer, diabetes and rare diseases such as Wilson’s disease (WD and Niemann Pick type C1 (NPC. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying human pathologies has often been associated with an aberrant cellular sphingolipid metabolism. Sphingolipids (SLs are important membrane constituents that also act as signaling molecules. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been pivotal in unraveling mammalian SL metabolism, mainly due to the high degree of conservation of SL metabolic pathways. In this review we will first provide a brief overview of the major differences in SL metabolism between yeast and mammalian cells and the use of SL biosynthetic inhibitors to elucidate the contribution of specific parts of the SL metabolic pathway in response to for instance stress. Next, we will discuss recent findings in yeast SL research concerning a crucial signaling role for SLs in orchestrating mitochondrial function, and translate these findings to relevant disease settings such as WD and NPC. In summary, recent research shows that S. cerevisiae is an invaluable model to investigate SLs as signaling molecules in modulating mitochondrial function, but can also be used as a tool to further enhance our current knowledge on SLs and mitochondria in mammalian cells.

  3. Diabetes and mitochondrial function: Role of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperglycemia resulting from uncontrolled glucose regulation is widely recognized as the causal link between diabetes and diabetic complications. Four major molecular mechanisms have been implicated in hyperglycemia-induced tissue damage: activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms via de novo synthesis of the lipid second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG), increased hexosamine pathway flux, increased advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation, and increased polyol pathway flux. Hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of superoxide is the causal link between high glucose and the pathways responsible for hyperglycemic damage. In fact, diabetes is typically accompanied by increased production of free radicals and/or impaired antioxidant defense capabilities, indicating a central contribution for reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the onset, progression, and pathological consequences of diabetes. Besides oxidative stress, a growing body of evidence has demonstrated a link between various disturbances in mitochondrial functioning and type 2 diabetes. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and decreases in mtDNA copy number have been linked to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The study of the relationship of mtDNA to type 2 diabetes has revealed the influence of the mitochondria on nuclear-encoded glucose transporters, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and nuclear-encoded uncoupling proteins (UCPs) in β-cell glucose toxicity. This review focuses on a range of mitochondrial factors important in the pathogenesis of diabetes. We review the published literature regarding the direct effects of hyperglycemia on mitochondrial function and suggest the possibility of regulation of mitochondrial function at a transcriptional level in response to hyperglycemia. The main goal of this review is to include a fresh consideration of pathways involved in hyperglycemia-induced diabetic complications

  4. Viable RNaseH1 knockout mice show RNaseH1 is essential for R loop processing, mitochondrial and liver function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Walt F; Murray, Heather M; Damle, Sagar S; Hart, Christopher E; Hung, Gene; De Hoyos, Cheryl Li; Liang, Xue-Hai; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-06-20

    Viable constitutive and tamoxifen inducible liver-specific RNase H1 knockout mice that expressed no RNase H1 activity in hepatocytes showed increased R-loop levels and reduced mitochondrial encoded DNA and mRNA levels, suggesting impaired mitochondrial R-loop processing, transcription and mitochondrial DNA replication. These changes resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction with marked changes in mitochondrial fusion, fission, morphology and transcriptional changes reflective of mitochondrial damage and stress. Liver degeneration ensued, as indicated by apoptosis, fibrosis and increased transaminase levels. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) designed to serve as substrates for RNase H1 were inactive in the hepatocytes from the RNase H1 knockout mice and in vivo, demonstrating that RNase H1 is necessary for the activity of DNA-like ASOs. During liver regeneration, a clone of hepatocytes that expressed RNase H1 developed and partially restored mitochondrial and liver function. PMID:27131367

  5. Characterization of mitochondrial function in cells with impaired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlante, Anna; Favia, Maria; Bobba, Antonella; Guerra, Lorenzo; Casavola, Valeria; Reshkin, Stephan Joel

    2016-06-01

    Evidence supporting the occurrence of oxidative stress in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is well established and the literature suggests that oxidative stress is inseparably linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we have characterized mitochondrial function, in particular as it regards the steps of oxidative phosphorylation and ROS production, in airway cells either homozygous for the F508del-CFTR allele or stably expressing wt-CFTR. We find that oxygen consumption, ΔΨ generation, adenine nucleotide translocator-dependent ADP/ATP exchange and both mitochondrial Complex I and IV activities are impaired in CF cells, while both mitochondrial ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation increase. Importantly, treatment of CF cells with the small molecules VX-809 and 4,6,4'-trimethylangelicin, which act as "correctors" for F508del CFTR by rescuing the F508del CFTR-dependent chloride secretion, while having no effect per sè on mitochondrial function in wt-CFTR cells, significantly improved all the above mitochondrial parameters towards values found in the airway cells expressing wt-CFTR. This novel study on mitochondrial bioenergetics provides a springboard for future research to further understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for the involvement of mitochondria in CF and identify the proteins primarily responsible for the F508del-CFTR-dependent mitochondrial impairment and thus reveal potential novel targets for CF therapy. PMID:27146408

  6. Data on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of old mice in response to different exercise intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Chounghun; Lim, Wonchung

    2016-01-01

    Endurance exercise is securely linked to muscle metabolic adaptations including enhanced mitochondrial function (“Effects of exercise on mitochondrial oxygen uptake and respiratory enzyme activity in skeletal muscle” [1], “Effects of exercise on mitochondrial content and function in aging human skeletal muscle” [2]). However, the link between exercise intensity and mitochondrial function in aging muscle has not been fully investigated. In order to understand how strenuous exercise affects mit...

  7. Data on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of old mice in response to different exercise intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chounghun; Lim, Wonchung

    2016-06-01

    Endurance exercise is securely linked to muscle metabolic adaptations including enhanced mitochondrial function ("Effects of exercise on mitochondrial oxygen uptake and respiratory enzyme activity in skeletal muscle" [1], "Effects of exercise on mitochondrial content and function in aging human skeletal muscle" [2]). However, the link between exercise intensity and mitochondrial function in aging muscle has not been fully investigated. In order to understand how strenuous exercise affects mitochondrial function in aged mice, male C57BL/6 mice at age 24 months were randomly assigned to 3 groups: non-exercise (NE), low-intensity (LE) and high-intensity treadmill exercise group (HE). Mitochondrial complex activity and respiration were measured to evaluate mitochondrial function in mouse skeletal muscle. The data described here are related to the research article entitled "Strenuous exercise induces mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of old mice" [3]. PMID:27222846

  8. Effects of Endurance Exercise on Mitochondrial Function in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Gun-Soo; Kim, Seon-Rye

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 8 weeks of endurance exercise on the cardiac mitochondrial function of mice. [Subjects] Ten 129 SvJ/C57BL6 Male mice were used. The mice were randomly divided into an exercise group (n=5; mean ± SD weight, 27.4 ± 1.6 g) and a control (n=5; mean ± SD weight, 28.2 ± 1.1 g). The exercise mice ran on a motor driven treadmill 5 days per week for 30 minutes at a speed of 24 m/min for 8 weeks. Mitochondrial function as measured RC...

  9. Tetracyclines Disturb Mitochondrial Function across Eukaryotic Models: A Call for Caution in Biomedical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Moullan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, tetracyclines, such as doxycycline, have become broadly used to control gene expression by virtue of the Tet-on/Tet-off systems. However, the wide range of direct effects of tetracycline use has not been fully appreciated. We show here that these antibiotics induce a mitonuclear protein imbalance through their effects on mitochondrial translation, an effect that likely reflects the evolutionary relationship between mitochondria and proteobacteria. Even at low concentrations, tetracyclines induce mitochondrial proteotoxic stress, leading to changes in nuclear gene expression and altered mitochondrial dynamics and function in commonly used cell types, as well as worms, flies, mice, and plants. Given that tetracyclines are so widely applied in research, scientists should be aware of their potentially confounding effects on experimental results. Furthermore, these results caution against extensive use of tetracyclines in livestock due to potential downstream impacts on the environment and human health.

  10. Mechanisms of Disease: Is Mitochondrial Function Altered in Heart Failure?

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Dale J.

    2013-01-01

    The human heart sustains an exceptional energy transfer rate, consuming more energy per gram weight than any other organ system. The healthy heart can rapidly adapt to changes in demand, while the failing heart cannot. Cardiac energy flux systems falter in the failing heart. The purpose of this review is to characterize the fundamental role of mitochondria in this energy transfer system and describe our local research on mitochondrial respiratory capacity in failing human hearts.

  11. Alternative mitochondrial functions in cell physiopathology: beyond ATP production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowaltowski A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that mitochondria are the main site for ATP generation within most tissues. However, mitochondria also participate in a surprising number of alternative activities, including intracellular Ca2+ regulation, thermogenesis and the control of apoptosis. In addition, mitochondria are the main cellular generators of reactive oxygen species, and may trigger necrotic cell death under conditions of oxidative stress. This review concentrates on these alternative mitochondrial functions, and their role in cell physiopathology.

  12. Quercetin Affects Erythropoiesis and Heart Mitochondrial Function in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina M. Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quercetin, a dietary flavonoid used as a food supplement, showed powerful antioxidant effects in different cellular models. However, recent in vitro and in vivo studies in mammals have suggested a prooxidant effect of quercetin and described an interaction with mitochondria causing an increase in O2∙- production, a decrease in ATP levels, and impairment of respiratory chain in liver tissue. Therefore, because of its dual actions, we studied the effect of quercetin in vivo to analyze heart mitochondrial function and erythropoiesis. Mice were injected with 50 mg/kg of quercetin for 15 days. Treatment with quercetin decreased body weight, serum insulin, and ceruloplasmin levels as compared with untreated mice. Along with an impaired antioxidant capacity in plasma, quercetin-treated mice showed a significant delay on erythropoiesis progression. Heart mitochondrial function was also impaired displaying more protein oxidation and less activity for IV, respectively, than no-treated mice. In addition, a significant reduction in the protein expression levels of Mitofusin 2 and Voltage-Dependent Anion Carrier was observed. All these results suggest that quercetin affects erythropoiesis and mitochondrial function and then its potential use as a dietary supplement should be reexamined.

  13. The mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine carrier: function, structure and physiopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiveri, Cesare; Iacobazzi, Vito; Tonazzi, Annamaria; Giangregorio, Nicola; Infantino, Vittoria; Convertini, Paolo; Console, Lara; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2011-08-01

    The carnitine/acylcarnitine carrier (CAC) is a transport protein of the inner mitochondrial membrane that belongs to the mitochondrial carrier protein family. In its cytosolic conformation the carrier consists of a bundle of six transmembrane α-helices, which delimit a water filled cavity opened towards the cytosol and closed towards the matrix by a network of interacting charged residues. Most of the functional data on this transporter come from studies performed with the protein purified from rat liver mitochondria or recombinant proteins from different sources incorporated into phospholipid vesicles (liposomes). The carnitine/acylcarnitine carrier transports carnitine and acylcarnitines with acyl chains of various lengths from 2 to 18 carbon atoms. The mammalian transporter exhibits higher affinity for acylcarnitines with longer carbon chains. The functional data indicate that CAC plays the important function of catalyzing transport of acylcarnitines into the mitochondria in exchange for intramitochondrial free carnitine. This results in net transport of fatty acyl units into the mitochondrial matrix where they are oxidized by the β-oxidation enzymes. The essential role of the transporter in cell metabolism is demonstrated by the fact that alterations of the human gene SLC25A20 coding for CAC are associated with a severe disease known as carnitine carrier deficiency. This autosomal recessive disorder is characterized by life-threatening episodes of coma induced by fasting, cardiomyopathy, liver dysfunction, muscle weakness, respiratory distress and seizures. Until now 35 different mutations of CAC gene have been identified in carnitine carrier deficient patients. Some missense mutations concern residues of the signature motif present in all mitochondrial carriers. Diagnosis of carnitine carrier deficiency requires biochemical and genetic tests; treatment is essentially limited to important dietetic measures. Recently, a pharmacological approach based on the

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction impairs tumor suppressor p53 expression/function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Shannon; Kim, Chul; Griner, Nicholas B; Potluri, Prasanth; Scheffler, Immo E; Sen, Sabyasachi; Jerry, D Joseph; Schneider, Sallie; Yadava, Nagendra

    2011-06-10

    Recently, mitochondria have been suggested to act in tumor suppression. However, the underlying mechanisms by which mitochondria suppress tumorigenesis are far from being clear. In this study, we have investigated the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and the tumor suppressor protein p53 using a set of respiration-deficient (Res(-)) mammalian cell mutants with impaired assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery. Our data suggest that normal mitochondrial function is required for γ-irradiation (γIR)-induced cell death, which is mainly a p53-dependent process. The Res(-) cells are protected against γIR-induced cell death due to impaired p53 expression/function. We find that the loss of complex I biogenesis in the absence of the MWFE subunit reduces the steady-state level of the p53 protein, although there is no effect on the p53 protein level in the absence of the ESSS subunit that is also essential for complex I assembly. The p53 protein level was also reduced to undetectable levels in Res(-) cells with severely impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis. This suggests that p53 protein expression is differentially regulated depending upon the type of electron transport chain/respiratory chain deficiency. Moreover, irrespective of the differences in the p53 protein expression profile, γIR-induced p53 activity is compromised in all Res(-) cells. Using two different conditional systems for complex I assembly, we also show that the effect of mitochondrial dysfunction on p53 expression/function is a reversible phenomenon. We believe that these findings will have major implications in the understanding of cancer development and therapy. PMID:21502317

  15. Mutant desmin substantially perturbs mitochondrial morphology, function and maintenance in skeletal muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Lilli; Wittig, Ilka; Peeva, Viktoriya; Eggers, Britta; Heidler, Juliana; Chevessier, Frederic; Kley, Rudolf A; Barkovits, Katalin; Strecker, Valentina; Berwanger, Carolin; Herrmann, Harald; Marcus, Katrin; Kornblum, Cornelia; Kunz, Wolfram S; Schröder, Rolf; Clemen, Christoph S

    2016-09-01

    Secondary mitochondrial dysfunction is a feature in a wide variety of human protein aggregate diseases caused by mutations in different proteins, both in the central nervous system and in striated muscle. The functional relationship between the expression of a mutated protein and mitochondrial dysfunction is largely unknown. In particular, the mechanism how this dysfunction drives the disease process is still elusive. To address this issue for protein aggregate myopathies, we performed a comprehensive, multi-level analysis of mitochondrial pathology in skeletal muscles of human patients with mutations in the intermediate filament protein desmin and in muscles of hetero- and homozygous knock-in mice carrying the R349P desmin mutation. We demonstrate that the expression of mutant desmin causes disruption of the extrasarcomeric desmin cytoskeleton and extensive mitochondrial abnormalities regarding subcellular distribution, number and shape. At the molecular level, we uncovered changes in the abundancy and assembly of the respiratory chain complexes and supercomplexes. In addition, we revealed a marked reduction of mtDNA- and nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial proteins in parallel with large-scale deletions in mtDNA and reduced mtDNA copy numbers. Hence, our data demonstrate that the expression of mutant desmin causes multi-level damage of mitochondria already in early stages of desminopathies. PMID:27393313

  16. Modulation of cadmium-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and volume changes by temperature in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onukwufor, John O. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Interactions of Cd and temperature exacerbate mitochondrial dysfunction and enhance Cd accumulation. • Cd uptake by mitochondria occurs through the Ca uniporter. • Temperature exacerbates Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes. • Low concentrations of Cd inhibit mitochondrial swelling. - Abstract: We investigated how temperature modulates cadmium (Cd)-induced mitochondrial bioenergetic disturbances, metal accumulation and volume changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the first set of experiments, rainbow trout liver mitochondrial function and Cd content were measured in the presence of complex I substrates, malate and glutamate, following exposure to Cd (0–100 μM) at three (5, 13 and 25 °C) temperatures. The second set of experiments assessed the effect of temperature on Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes, including the underlying mechanisms, at 15 and 25 °C. Although temperature stimulated both state 3 and 4 rates of respiration, the coupling efficiency was reduced at temperature extremes due to greater inhibition of state 3 at low temperature and greater stimulation of state 4 at the high temperature. Cadmium exposure reduced the stimulatory effect of temperature on state 3 respiration but increased that on state 4, consequently exacerbating mitochondrial uncoupling. The interaction of Cd and temperature yielded different responses on thermal sensitivity of state 3 and 4 respiration; the Q{sub 10} values for state 3 respiration increased at low temperature (5–13 °C) while those for state 4 increased at high temperature (13–25 °C). Importantly, the mitochondria accumulated more Cd at high temperature suggesting that the observed greater impairment of oxidative phosphorylation with temperature was due, at least in part, to a higher metal burden. Cadmium-induced mitochondrial volume changes were characterized by an early phase of contraction followed by swelling, with temperature changing the kinetics and

  17. Modulation of cadmium-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and volume changes by temperature in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Interactions of Cd and temperature exacerbate mitochondrial dysfunction and enhance Cd accumulation. • Cd uptake by mitochondria occurs through the Ca uniporter. • Temperature exacerbates Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes. • Low concentrations of Cd inhibit mitochondrial swelling. - Abstract: We investigated how temperature modulates cadmium (Cd)-induced mitochondrial bioenergetic disturbances, metal accumulation and volume changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the first set of experiments, rainbow trout liver mitochondrial function and Cd content were measured in the presence of complex I substrates, malate and glutamate, following exposure to Cd (0–100 μM) at three (5, 13 and 25 °C) temperatures. The second set of experiments assessed the effect of temperature on Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes, including the underlying mechanisms, at 15 and 25 °C. Although temperature stimulated both state 3 and 4 rates of respiration, the coupling efficiency was reduced at temperature extremes due to greater inhibition of state 3 at low temperature and greater stimulation of state 4 at the high temperature. Cadmium exposure reduced the stimulatory effect of temperature on state 3 respiration but increased that on state 4, consequently exacerbating mitochondrial uncoupling. The interaction of Cd and temperature yielded different responses on thermal sensitivity of state 3 and 4 respiration; the Q10 values for state 3 respiration increased at low temperature (5–13 °C) while those for state 4 increased at high temperature (13–25 °C). Importantly, the mitochondria accumulated more Cd at high temperature suggesting that the observed greater impairment of oxidative phosphorylation with temperature was due, at least in part, to a higher metal burden. Cadmium-induced mitochondrial volume changes were characterized by an early phase of contraction followed by swelling, with temperature changing the kinetics and intensifying the

  18. Increased androgen levels in rats impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongdong; Wang, Xiaping; Zhu, Yunxia; Chen, Fang; Sun, Yujie; Han, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Although insulin resistance is recognized to contribute to the reproductive and metabolic phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), pancreatic beta cell dysfunction plays an essential role in the progression from PCOS to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the role of insulin secretory abnormalities in PCOS has received little attention. In addition, the precise changes in beta cells and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we therefore attempted to elucidate potential mechanisms involved in beta cell alterations in a rat model of PCOS. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was measured in islets isolated from DHT-treated and control rats. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR), ATP production, and mitochondrial copy number were assayed to evaluate mitochondrial function. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is significantly decreased in islets from DHT-treated rats. On the other hand, significant reductions are observed in the expression levels of several key genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and in mitochondrial OCR and ATP production in DHT-treated rat islets. Meanwhile, we found that androgens can directly impair beta cell function by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro in an androgen receptor dependent manner. For the first time, our study demonstrates that increased androgens in female rats can impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion partly through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function. This work has significance for hyperandrogenic women with PCOS: excess activation of the androgen receptor by androgens may provoke beta cell dysfunction via mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26348137

  19. Human 2'-phosphodiesterase localizes to the mitochondrial matrix with a putative function in mitochondrial RNA turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Kjær, Karina Hansen; Durand, Fiona; Faou, Pierre; Vestergaard, Anna Lindeløv; Talbo, Gert Hoy; Hoogenraad, Nick; Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov; Justesen, Just; Martensen, Pia Møller

    2011-01-01

    The vertebrate 2-5A system is part of the innate immune system and central to cellular antiviral defense. Upon activation by viral double-stranded RNA, 5′-triphosphorylated, 2′–5′-linked oligoadenylate polyribonucleotides (2-5As) are synthesized by one of several 2′–5′-oligoadenylate synthetases....... role in the cellular immune system, may also function in mitochondrial RNA turnover.......The vertebrate 2-5A system is part of the innate immune system and central to cellular antiviral defense. Upon activation by viral double-stranded RNA, 5′-triphosphorylated, 2′–5′-linked oligoadenylate polyribonucleotides (2-5As) are synthesized by one of several 2′–5′-oligoadenylate synthetases....... Interestingly, 2′-PDE shares both functionally and structurally characteristics with the CCR4-type exonuclease–endonuclease–phosphatase family of deadenylases. Here we show that 2′-PDE locates to the mitochondrial matrix of human cells, and comprise an active 3′–5′ exoribonuclease exhibiting a preference for...

  20. Mitochondrial DNA damage and vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fetterman, Jessica L.; Holbrook, Monica; Westbrook, David G.; Brown, Jamelle A.; Kyle P. Feeley; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Linder, Erika A.; Berk, Brittany D.; Weisbrod, Robert M.; Widlansky, Michael E.; Gokce, Noyan; Ballinger, Scott W.; Hamburg, Naomi M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Prior studies demonstrate mitochondrial dysfunction with increased reactive oxygen species generation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress-mediated damage to mitochondrial DNA promotes atherosclerosis in animal models. Thus, we evaluated the relation of mitochondrial DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells s with vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Approach and results ...

  1. Formoterol Restores Mitochondrial and Renal Function after Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jesinkey, Sean R.; Funk, Jason A.; Stallons, L. Jay; Wills, Lauren P.; Megyesi, Judit K.; Beeson, Craig C.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis may be an adaptive response necessary for meeting the increased metabolic and energy demands during organ recovery after acute injury, and renal mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of AKI. We proposed that stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis 24 hours after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)–induced AKI, when renal dysfunction is maximal, would accelerate recovery of mitochondrial and renal function in mice. We recently showed that formoterol,...

  2. Theophylline treatment improves mitochondrial function after upper cervical spinal cord hemisection

    OpenAIRE

    Hüttemann, Maik; Nantwi, Kwaku D; Lee, Icksoo; Liu, Jenney; Mohiuddin, Syed; Petrov, Theodor

    2010-01-01

    The importance of mitochondria in spinal cord injury has mainly been attributed to their participation in apoptosis at the site of injury. But another aspect of mitochondrial function is the generation of more than 90% of cellular energy in the form of ATP, mediated by the oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) process. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a central OxPhos component and changes in its activity reflect changes in energy demand. A recent study suggests that respiratory muscle function in ...

  3. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Trigger Loss of Function and Perturbation of Mitochondrial Dynamics in Primary Hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishaali Natarajan

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles are one of the most highly manufactured and employed nanomaterials in the world with applications in copious industrial and consumer products. The liver is a major accumulation site for many nanoparticles, including TiO2, directly through intentional exposure or indirectly through unintentional ingestion via water, food or animals and increased environmental contamination. Growing concerns over the current usage of TiO2 coupled with the lack of mechanistic understanding of its potential health risk is the motivation for this study. Here we determined the toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (commercially available rutile, anatase and P25 on primary rat hepatocytes. Specifically, we evaluated events related to hepatocyte functions and mitochondrial dynamics: (1 urea and albumin synthesis using colorimetric and ELISA assays, respectively; (2 redox signaling mechanisms by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS production, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD activity and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; (3 OPA1 and Mfn-1 expression that mediates the mitochondrial dynamics by PCR; and (4 mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker Green FM staining. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss (p < 0.05 in hepatocyte functions even at concentrations as low as 50 ppm with commercially used P25 causing maximum damage. TiO2 nanoparticles induced a strong oxidative stress in primary hepatocytes. TiO2 nanoparticles exposure also resulted in morphological changes in mitochondria and substantial loss in the fusion process, thus impairing the mitochondrial dynamics. Although this study demonstrated that TiO2 nanoparticles exposure resulted in substantial damage to primary hepatocytes, more in vitro and in vivo studies are required to determine the complete toxicological mechanism in primary hepatocytes and subsequently liver function.

  4. Understanding structure, function, and mutations in the mitochondrial ATP synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial ATP synthase is a multimeric enzyme complex with an overall molecular weight of about 600,000 Da. The ATP synthase is a molecular motor composed of two separable parts: F1 and Fo. The F1 portion contains the catalytic sites for ATP synthesis and protrudes into the mitochondrial matrix. Fo forms a proton turbine that is embedded in the inner membrane and connected to the rotor of F1. The flux of protons flowing down a potential gradient powers the rotation of the rotor driving the synthesis of ATP. Thus, the flow of protons though Fo is coupled to the synthesis of ATP. This review will discuss the structure/function relationship in the ATP synthase as determined by biochemical, crystallographic, and genetic studies. An emphasis will be placed on linking the structure/function relationship with understanding how disease causing mutations or putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes encoding the subunits of the ATP synthase, will affect the function of the enzyme and the health of the individual. The review will start by summarizing the current understanding of the subunit composition of the enzyme and the role of the subunits followed by a discussion on known mutations and their effect on the activity of the ATP synthase. The review will conclude with a summary of mutations in genes encoding subunits of the ATP synthase that are known to be responsible for human disease, and a brief discussion on SNPs.

  5. Plectin isoform P1b and P1d deficiencies differentially affect mitochondrial morphology and function in skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Lilli; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Grimm, Michael; Zeöld, Anikó; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Plectin, a versatile 500-kDa cytolinker protein, is essential for muscle fiber integrity and function. The most common disease caused by mutations in the human plectin gene, epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD), is characterized by severe skin blistering and progressive muscular dystrophy. Besides displaying pathological desmin-positive protein aggregates and degenerative changes in the myofibrillar apparatus, skeletal muscle specimens of EBS-MD patients and plectin-deficient mice are characterized by massive mitochondrial alterations. In this study, we demonstrate that structural and functional alterations of mitochondria are a primary aftermath of plectin deficiency in muscle, contributing to myofiber degeneration. We found that in skeletal muscle of conditional plectin knockout mice (MCK-Cre/cKO), mitochondrial content was reduced, and mitochondria were aggregated in sarcoplasmic and subsarcolemmal regions and were no longer associated with Z-disks. Additionally, decreased mitochondrial citrate synthase activity, respiratory function and altered adenosine diphosphate kinetics were characteristic of plectin-deficient muscles. To analyze a mechanistic link between plectin deficiency and mitochondrial alterations, we comparatively assessed mitochondrial morphology and function in whole muscle and teased muscle fibers of wild-type, MCK-Cre/cKO and plectin isoform-specific knockout mice that were lacking just one isoform (either P1b or P1d) while expressing all others. Monitoring morphological alterations of mitochondria, an isoform P1b-specific phenotype affecting the mitochondrial fusion–fission machinery and manifesting with upregulated mitochondrial fusion-associated protein mitofusin-2 could be identified. Our results show that the depletion of distinct plectin isoforms affects mitochondrial network organization and function in different ways. PMID:26019234

  6. Mitochondrial remodeling following fission inhibition by 15d-PGJ2 involves molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Chemical inhibition of fission protein Drp1 leads to mitochondrial fusion. → Increased fusion stimulates molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. → Proteolysis of larger isoforms, new synthesis and ubiquitination of OPA1 occur. → Loss of mitochondrial tubular rigidity and disorganization of cristae. → Generation of large swollen dysfunctional mitochondria. -- Abstract: We showed earlier that 15 deoxy Δ12,14 prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) inactivates Drp1 and induces mitochondrial fusion . However, prolonged incubation of cells with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in remodeling of fused mitochondria into large swollen mitochondria with irregular cristae structure. While initial fusion of mitochondria by 15d-PGJ2 required the presence of both outer (Mfn1 and Mfn2) and inner (OPA1) mitochondrial membrane fusion proteins, later mitochondrial changes involved increased degradation of the fusion protein OPA1 and ubiquitination of newly synthesized OPA1 along with decreased expression of Mfn1 and Mfn2, which likely contributed to the loss of tubular rigidity, disorganization of cristae, and formation of large swollen degenerated dysfunctional mitochondria. Similar to inhibition of Drp1 by 15d-PGJ2, decreased expression of fission protein Drp1 by siRNA also resulted in the loss of fusion proteins. Prevention of 15d-PGJ2 induced mitochondrial elongation by thiol antioxidants prevented not only loss of OPA1 isoforms but also its ubiquitination. These findings provide novel insights into unforeseen complexity of molecular events that modulate mitochondrial plasticity.

  7. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Ortiz-Avila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats. Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm, besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress.

  8. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress. PMID:26180820

  9. DNA methylation status of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes underlies the tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions

    OpenAIRE

    Takasugi Masaki; Yagi Shintaro; Hirabayashi Keiji; Shiota Kunio

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Mitochondria are semi-autonomous, semi-self-replicating organelles harboring their own DNA (mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA), and their dysregulation is involved in the development of various diseases. While mtDNA does not generally undergo epigenetic modifications, almost all mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear DNA. However, the epigenetic regulation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes (nuclear mt genes) has not been comprehensively analyzed. Results We analyzed the...

  10. PFOS prenatal exposure induce mitochondrial injury and gene expression change in hearts of weaned SD rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    heart function. The results indicate PFOS prenatal exposure can induce cardiac mitochondrial injury and gene transcript change, which may be a significant mechanism of the developmental toxicity of PFOS to rat.

  11. Upstream Pathways Controlling Mitochondrial Function in Major Psychosis: A Focus on Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Pan, Alexander Yongshuai; da Silva, Tatiane Morgana; Duong, Angela; Andreazza, Ana Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is commonly observed in bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia (SCZ) and may be a central feature of psychosis. These illnesses are complex and heterogeneous, which is reflected by the complexity of the processes regulating mitochondrial function. Mitochondria are typically associated with energy production; however, dysfunction of mitochondria affects not only energy production but also vital cellular processes, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, cell cycle and survival, intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, and neurotransmission. In this review, we characterize the upstream components controlling mitochondrial function, including 1) mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, 2) mitochondrial dynamics, and 3) intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Characterizing and understanding the upstream factors that regulate mitochondrial function is essential to understand progression of these illnesses and develop biomarkers and therapeutics. PMID:27310240

  12. Mitochondrial Function and Energy Metabolism in Umbilical Cord Blood- and Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomäki, Sami; Lehtonen, Siri; Ritamo, Ilja; Valmu, Leena; Nystedt, Johanna; Laitinen, Saara; Leskelä, Hannnu-Ville; Sormunen, Raija; Pesälä, Juha; Nordström, Katrina; Vepsäläinen, Ari; Lehenkari, Petri

    2012-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are an attractive choice for a variety of cellular therapies. hMSCs can be isolated from many different tissues and possess unique mitochondrial properties that can be used to determine their differentiation potential. Mitochondrial properties may possibly be used as a quality measure of hMSC-based products. Accordingly, the present work focuses on the mitochondrial function of hMSCs from umbilical cord blood (UCBMSC) cells and bone marrow cells from donors younger than 18 years of age (BMMSC 50). Changes of ultrastructure and energy metabolism during osteogenic differentiation in all hMSC types were studied in detail. Results show that despite similar surface antigen characteristics, the UCBMSCs had smaller cell surface area and possessed more abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum than BMMSC >50. BMMSC 50 and BMMSC 50 showed a lower level of mitochondrial maturation and differentiation capacity. UCBMSCs and BMMSCs also showed a different pattern of exocytosed proteins and glycoproteoglycansins. These results indicate that hMSCs with similar cell surface antigen expression have different mitochondrial and functional properties, suggesting different maturation levels and other significant biological variations of the hMSCs. Therefore, it appears that mitochondrial analysis presents useful characterization criteria for hMSCs intended for clinical use. PMID:21615273

  13. Tissue-Specific Effects of Bariatric Surgery Including Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon N. Dankel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the molecular links between obesity and disease is potentially of great benefit for society. In this paper we discuss proposed mechanisms whereby bariatric surgery improves metabolic health, including acute effects on glucose metabolism and long-term effects on metabolic tissues (adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and liver and mitochondrial function. More short-term randomized controlled trials should be performed that include simultaneous measurement of metabolic parameters in different tissues, such as tissue gene expression, protein profile, and lipid content. By directly comparing different surgical procedures using a wider array of metabolic parameters, one may further unravel the mechanisms of aberrant metabolic regulation in obesity and related disorders.

  14. Impact of aging on mitochondrial function in cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepple, R T

    2016-09-01

    Both skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle are subject to marked structural and functional impairment with aging and these changes contribute to the reduced capacity for exercise as we age. Since mitochondria are involved in multiple aspects of cellular homeostasis including energetics, reactive oxygen species signaling, and regulation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways, defects in this organelle are frequently implicated in the deterioration of skeletal and cardiac muscle with aging. On this basis, the purpose of this review is to evaluate the evidence that aging causes dysfunction in mitochondria in striated muscle with a view towards drawing conclusions about the potential of these changes to contribute to the deterioration seen in striated muscle with aging. As will be shown, impairment in respiration and reactive oxygen species emission with aging are highly variable between studies and seem to be largely a consequence of physical inactivity. On the other hand, both skeletal and cardiac muscle mitochondria are more susceptible to permeability transition and this seems a likely cause of the increased recruitment of mitochondrial-mediated pathways of apoptosis seen in striated muscle. The review concludes by examining the role of degeneration of mitochondrial DNA versus impaired mitochondrial quality control mechanisms in the accumulation of mitochondria that are sensitized to permeability transition, whereby the latter mechanism is favored as the most likely cause. PMID:27033952

  15. Reduced Mitochondrial Function in Human Huntington Disease Lymphoblasts is Not Due to Alterations in Cardiolipin Metabolism or Mitochondrial Supercomplex Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Edgard M; Chau, Sarah; Sparagna, Genevieve C; Sipione, Simonetta; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-05-01

    Huntington's Disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disease that occurs as a result of expansion of the trinucleotide repeat CAG (glutamine) on the HTT gene. HD patients exhibit various forms of mitochondrial dysfunction within neurons and peripheral tissues. Cardiolipin (Ptd2Gro) is a polyglycerophospholipid found exclusively in mitochondria and is important for maintaining mitochondrial function. We examined if altered Ptd2Gro metabolism was involved in the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with HD. Mitochondrial basal respiration, spare respiratory capacity, ATP coupling efficiency and rate of glycolysis were markedly diminished in Epstein-Barr virus transformed HD lymphoblasts compared to controls (CTRL). Mitochondrial supercomplex formation and Complex I activity within these supercomplexes did not vary between HD patients with different length of CAG repeats and appeared unaltered compared to CTRL. In contrast, in vitro Complex I enzyme activity in mitochondrial enriched samples was reduced in HD lymphoblasts compared to CTRL. The total cellular pool size of Ptd2Gro and its synthesis/remodeling from [(3)H]acetate/[(14)C]oleate were unaltered in HD lymphoblasts compared to CTRL. In addition, the molecular species of Ptd2Gro were essentially unaltered in HD lymphoblasts compared to CTRL. We conclude that compared to CTRL lymphoblasts, HD lymphoblasts display impaired mitochondrial basal respiration, spare respiratory capacity, ATP coupling efficiency and rate of glycolysis with any pathological CAG repeat length, but this is not due to alterations in Ptd2Gro metabolism. We suggest that HD patient lymphoblasts may be a useful model to study defective energy metabolism that does not involve alterations in Ptd2Gro metabolism. PMID:26846325

  16. The morphological changes of cardiomyocytes and mitochondrial dysfunction in spontaneous hypertensive rats with experimental diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesnyk M.Yu.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The conception of energetic deficiency in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus presents new perspectives in the understanding of molecular and biochemical mechanisms of these diseases. It was performed the comparison between morphological changes and mitochondrial dysfunction in spontaneous hypertensive rats with experimental diabetes mellitus. The mitochondrial state was assessed by investigation of the permeability of the giant mitochondrial pore. It was found that the permeability of mitochondrial pore is increased in spontaneous hypertensive rats. It was registrated the significant increasing of mitochondrial membrane permeability in case of diabetes. It was observed the increased area of cardiomyocytes’ nuclei and decreased nuclear cytoplasmic ratio in diabetic animals. It was demonstrated that nucleic and cytoplasmic RNA concentration is decreased in comparison with the intact spontaneous hypertensive rats. The RNA biosynthesis abnormalities are associated with the degree of mitochondrial dysfunction in the myocardium of spontaneous hypertensive rats with experimental diabetes mellitus.

  17. Is Placental Mitochondrial Function a Regulator that Matches Fetal and Placental Growth to Maternal Nutrient Intake in the Mouse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaratti, Marcos R.; Malik, Sajida; Diot, Alan; Rapa, Elizabeth; Macleod, Lorna; Morten, Karl; Vatish, Manu; Boyd, Richard; Poulton, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective fetal growth requires adequate maternal nutrition coupled to active transport of nutrients across the placenta, which, in turn requires ATP. Epidemiological and experimental evidence has shown that impaired maternal nutrition in utero results in an adverse postnatal phenotype for the offspring. Placental mitochondrial function might link maternal food intake to fetal growth since impaired placental ATP production, in response to poor maternal nutrition, could be a pathway linking maternal food intake to reduced fetal growth. Method We assessed the effects of maternal diet on placental water content, ATP levels and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in mice at embryonic (E) day 18 (E18). Females maintained on either low- (LPD) or normal- (NPD) protein diets were mated with NPD males. Results To investigate the possibility of an underlying mitochondrial stress response, we studied cultured human trophoblast cells (BeWos). High throughput imaging showed that amino acid starvation induces changes in mitochondrial morphology that suggest stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion. This is a defensive response, believed to increase mitochondrial efficiency, that could underlie the increase in ATP observed in placenta. Conclusions These findings reinforce the pathophysiological links between maternal diet and conceptus mitochondria, potentially contributing to metabolic programming. The quiet embryo hypothesis proposes that pre-implantation embryo survival is best served by a relatively low level of metabolism. This may extend to post-implantation trophoblast responses to nutrition. PMID:26132581

  18. Mitofusin 2 regulates the oocytes development and quality by modulating meiosis and mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun; Kang, Lina; Wang, Lingjuan; Zhang, Ling; Xiang, Wenpei

    2016-01-01

    Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), one of the mitochondrial dynamic proteins plays a key role in maintaining the integrity of mitochondrial morphology and function. However, it is unknown if Mfn2 influences the quality of oocytes in the process of development by modulating mitochondrial function in vitro. In this study, immature oocytes were transfected with Mfn2-siRNA for 16 h. We found that the expression level of the Mfn2 gene was significantly lower than those of the control group. The rates of maturation and fertility were also found to have declined. Moreover, mitochondrial structure and function, especially the morphogenesis of spindles, were observed as abnormal during meiosis. Thus, the above findings indicate that down-regulation of Mfn2 may have an impact on the maturation and fertilization of immature oocytes in vitro by modulating meiosis and mitochondrial function. PMID:27469431

  19. Mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle following high-altitude exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Robert A; Boushel, Robert; Wright-Paradis, Cynthia; Calbet, Jose A L; Robach, Paul; Gnaiger, Erich; Lundby, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Studies regarding mitochondrial modifications in human skeletal muscle following acclimatization to high altitude are conflicting, and these inconsistencies may be due to the prevalence of representing mitochondrial function through static and isolated measurements of specific mitochondrial...... characteristics. The aim of this study, therefore, was to investigate mitochondrial function in response to high-altitude acclimatization through measurements of respiratory control in the vastus lateralis muscle. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from 10 lowland natives prior to and again after a total of 9......-11 days of exposure to 4559 m. High-resolution respirometry was performed on the muscle samples to compare respiratory chain function and respiratory capacities. Respirometric analysis revealed that mitochondrial function was largely unaffected, because high-altitude exposure did not affect the capacity...

  20. Mitofusin 2 regulates the oocytes development and quality by modulating meiosis and mitochondrial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun; Kang, Lina; Wang, Lingjuan; Zhang, Ling; Xiang, Wenpei

    2016-01-01

    Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), one of the mitochondrial dynamic proteins plays a key role in maintaining the integrity of mitochondrial morphology and function. However, it is unknown if Mfn2 influences the quality of oocytes in the process of development by modulating mitochondrial function in vitro. In this study, immature oocytes were transfected with Mfn2-siRNA for 16 h. We found that the expression level of the Mfn2 gene was significantly lower than those of the control group. The rates of maturation and fertility were also found to have declined. Moreover, mitochondrial structure and function, especially the morphogenesis of spindles, were observed as abnormal during meiosis. Thus, the above findings indicate that down-regulation of Mfn2 may have an impact on the maturation and fertilization of immature oocytes in vitro by modulating meiosis and mitochondrial function. PMID:27469431

  1. Altered mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in leukocytes of anorexia nervosa patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M Victor

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Anorexia nervosa is a common illness among adolescents and is characterised by oxidative stress. OBJECTIVE: The effects of anorexia on mitochondrial function and redox state in leukocytes from anorexic subjects were evaluated. DESIGN AND SETTING: A multi-centre, cross-sectional case-control study was performed. PATIENTS: Our study population consisted of 20 anorexic patients and 20 age-matched controls, all of which were Caucasian women. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anthropometric and metabolic parameters were evaluated in the study population. To assess whether anorexia nervosa affects mitochondrial function and redox state in leukocytes of anorexic patients, we measured mitochondrial oxygen consumption, membrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, glutathione levels, mitochondrial mass, and complex I and III activity in polymorphonuclear cells. RESULTS: Mitochondrial function was impaired in the leukocytes of the anorexic patients. This was evident in a decrease in mitochondrial O2 consumption (P<0.05, mitochondrial membrane potential (P<0.01 and GSH levels (P<0.05, and an increase in ROS production (P<0.05 with respect to control subjects. Furthermore, a reduction of mitochondrial mass was detected in leukocytes of the anorexic patients (P<0.05, while the activity of mitochondrial complex I (P<0.001, but not that of complex III, was found to be inhibited in the same population. CONCLUSIONS: Oxidative stress is produced in the leukocytes of anorexic patients and is closely related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results lead us to propose that the oxidative stress that occurs in anorexia takes place at mitochondrial complex I. Future research concerning mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress should aim to determine the physiological mechanism involved in this effect and the physiological impact of anorexia.

  2. Hepatic mitochondrial function analysis using needle liver biopsy samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J J Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS AND AIM: Current assessment of pre-operative liver function relies upon biochemical blood tests and histology but these only indirectly measure liver function. Mitochondrial function (MF analysis allows direct measurement of cellular metabolic function and may provide an additional index of hepatic health. Conventional MF analysis requires substantial tissue samples (>100 mg obtained at open surgery. Here we report a method to assess MF using <3 mg of tissue obtained by a Tru-cut® biopsy needle making it suitable for percutaneous application. METHODS: An 18G Bard® Max-core® biopsy instrument was used to collect samples. The optimal Tru-cut® sample weight, stability in ice-cold University of Wisconsin solution, reproducibility and protocol utility was initially evaluated in Wistar rat livers then confirmed in human samples. MF was measured in saponin-permeabilized samples using high-resolution respirometry. RESULTS: The average mass of a single rat and human liver Tru-cut® biopsy was 5.60±0.30 and 5.16±0.15 mg, respectively (mean; standard error of mean. Two milligram of sample was found the lowest feasible mass for the MF assay. Tissue MF declined after 1 hour of cold storage. Six replicate measurements within rats and humans (n = 6 each showed low coefficient of variation (<10% in measurements of State-III respiration, electron transport chain (ETC capacity and respiratory control ratio (RCR. Ischemic rat and human liver samples consistently showed lower State-III respiration, ETC capacity and RCR, compared to normal perfused liver samples. CONCLUSION: Consistent measurement of liver MF and detection of derangement in a disease state was successfully demonstrated using less than half the tissue from a single Tru-cut® biopsy. Using this technique outpatient assessment of liver MF is now feasible, providing a new assay for the evaluation of hepatic function.

  3. Mitochondrial functions modulate neuroendocrine, metabolic, inflammatory, and transcriptional responses to acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin; McManus, Meagan J; Gray, Jason D; Nasca, Carla; Moffat, Cynthia; Kopinski, Piotr K; Seifert, Erin L; McEwen, Bruce S; Wallace, Douglas C

    2015-12-01

    The experience of psychological stress triggers neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic, and transcriptional perturbations that ultimately predispose to disease. However, the subcellular determinants of this integrated, multisystemic stress response have not been defined. Central to stress adaptation is cellular energetics, involving mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that abnormal mitochondrial functions would differentially modulate the organism's multisystemic response to psychological stress. By mutating or deleting mitochondrial genes encoded in the mtDNA [NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] or nuclear DNA [adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT)], we selectively impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain function, energy exchange, and mitochondrial redox balance in mice. The resulting impact on physiological reactivity and recovery from restraint stress were then characterized. We show that mitochondrial dysfunctions altered the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal-medullary activation and catecholamine levels, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, circulating metabolites, and hippocampal gene expression responses to stress. Each mitochondrial defect generated a distinct whole-body stress-response signature. These results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial energetics and redox balance as modulators of key pathophysiological perturbations previously linked to disease. This work establishes mitochondria as stress-response modulators, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of stress pathophysiology and mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26627253

  4. MELAS syndrome and cardiomyopathy: linking mitochondrial function to heart failure pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Yogasundaram, Haran; Parajuli, Nirmal; Valtuille, Lucas; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure remains an important clinical burden, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in its pathogenesis. The heart has a high metabolic demand, and mitochondrial function is a key determinant of myocardial performance. In mitochondrial disorders, hypertrophic remodeling is the early pattern of cardiomyopathy with progression to dilated cardiomyopathy, conduction defects and ventricular pre-excitation occurring in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiac dysfunction occurs in approximately a third of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, a stereotypical example of a mitochondrial disorder leading to a cardiomyopathy. We performed unique comparative ultrastructural and gene expression in a MELAS heart compared with non-failing controls. Our results showed a remarkable increase in mitochondrial inclusions and increased abnormal mitochondria in MELAS cardiomyopathy coupled with variable sarcomere thickening, heterogeneous distribution of affected cardiomyocytes and a greater elevation in the expression of disease markers. Investigation and management of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy should follow the well-described contemporary heart failure clinical practice guidelines and include an important role of medical and device therapies. Directed metabolic therapy is lacking, but current research strategies are dedicated toward improving mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disorders. PMID:26712328

  5. Effects of Vinpocetine on mitochondrial function and neuroprotection in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárnok, K; Kiss, E; Luiten, P G M; Nyakas, C; Tihanyi, K; Schlett, K; Eisel, U L M

    2008-12-01

    Vinpocetine (ethyl apovincaminate), a synthetic derivative of the Vinca minor alkaloid vincamine, is widely used for the treatment of cerebrovascular-related diseases. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying its action is to protect against the cytotoxic effects of glutamate overexposure. Glutamate excitotoxicity leads to the disregulation of mitochondrial function and neuronal metabolism. As Vinpocetine has a binding affinity to the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) involved in the mitochondrial transition pore complex, we investigated whether neuroprotection can be at least partially due to Vinpocetine's effects on PBRs. Neuroprotective effects of PK11195 and Ro5-4864, two drugs with selective and high affinity to PBR, were compared to Vinpocetine in glutamate excitotoxicity assays on primary cortical neuronal cultures. Vinpocetine exerted a neuroprotective action in a 1-50microM concentration range while PK11195 and Ro5-4864 were only slightly neuroprotective, especially in high (>25microM) concentrations. Combined pretreatment of neuronal cultures with Vinpocetine and PK11195 or Ro5-4864 showed increased neuroprotection in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that the different drugs may have different targets. To test this hypothesis, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) of cultured neurons was measured by flow cytometry. 25microM Vinpocetine reduced the decrease of mitochondrial inner membrane potential induced by glutamate exposure, but Ro5-4864 in itself was found to be more potent to block glutamate-evoked changes in MMP. Combination of Ro5-4864 and Vinpocetine treatment was found to be even more effective. In summary, the present results indicate that the neuroprotective action of vinpocetine in culture can not be explained by its effect on neuronal PBRs alone and that additional drug targets are involved. PMID:18793690

  6. Alterations of Mitochondrial Function and Insulin Sensitivity in Human Obesity and Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koliaki, Chrysi; Roden, Michael

    2016-07-17

    Mitochondrial function refers to a broad spectrum of features such as resting mitochondrial activity, (sub)maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), and mitochondrial dynamics, turnover, and plasticity. The interaction between mitochondria and insulin sensitivity is bidirectional and varies depending on tissue, experimental model, methodological approach, and features of mitochondrial function tested. In human skeletal muscle, mitochondrial abnormalities may be inherited (e.g., lower mitochondrial content) or acquired (e.g., impaired OXPHOS capacity and plasticity). Abnormalities ultimately lead to lower mitochondrial functionality due to or resulting in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Similar mechanisms can also operate in adipose tissue and heart muscle. In contrast, mitochondrial oxidative capacity is transiently upregulated in the liver of obese insulin-resistant humans with or without fatty liver, giving rise to oxidative stress and declines in advanced fatty liver disease. These data suggest a highly tissue-specific interaction between insulin sensitivity and oxidative metabolism during the course of metabolic diseases in humans. PMID:27146012

  7. Decreased in vitro mitochondrial function is associated with enhanced brain metabolism, blood flow, and memory in Surf1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Pulliam, Daniel A; Deepa, Sathyaseelan S; Halloran, Jonathan J; Hussong, Stacy A; Burbank, Raquel R; Bresnen, Andrew; Liu, Yuhong; Podlutskaya, Natalia; Soundararajan, Anuradha; Muir, Eric; Duong, Timothy Q; Bokov, Alex F; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Richardson, Arlan G; Van Remmen, Holly; Fox, Peter T; Galvan, Veronica

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have challenged the prevailing view that reduced mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress are correlated with reduced longevity. Mice carrying a homozygous knockout (KO) of the Surf1 gene showed a significant decrease in mitochondrial electron transport chain Complex IV activity, yet displayed increased lifespan and reduced brain damage after excitotoxic insults. In the present study, we examined brain metabolism, brain hemodynamics, and memory of Surf1 KO mice using in vitro measures of mitochondrial function, in vivo neuroimaging, and behavioral testing. We show that decreased respiration and increased generation of hydrogen peroxide in isolated Surf1 KO brain mitochondria are associated with increased brain glucose metabolism, cerebral blood flow, and lactate levels, and with enhanced memory in Surf1 KO mice. These metabolic and functional changes in Surf1 KO brains were accompanied by higher levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha, and by increases in the activated form of cyclic AMP response element-binding factor, which is integral to memory formation. These findings suggest that Surf1 deficiency-induced metabolic alterations may have positive effects on brain function. Exploring the relationship between mitochondrial activity, oxidative stress, and brain function will enhance our understanding of cognitive aging and of age-related neurologic disorders. PMID:23838831

  8. A 9-wk docosahexaenoic acid-enriched supplementation improves endurance exercise capacity and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guen, Marie; Chaté, Valérie; Hininger-Favier, Isabelle; Laillet, Brigitte; Morio, Béatrice; Pieroni, Gérard; Schlattner, Uwe; Pison, Christophe; Dubouchaud, Hervé

    2016-02-01

    Decline in skeletal muscle mass and function starts during adulthood. Among the causes, modifications of the mitochondrial function could be of major importance. Polyunsaturated fatty (ω-3) acids have been shown to play a role in intracellular functions. We hypothesize that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation could improve muscle mitochondrial function that could contribute to limit the early consequences of aging on adult muscle. Twelve-month-old male Wistar rats were fed a low-polyunsaturated fat diet and were given DHA (DHA group) or placebo (control group) for 9 wk. Rats from the DHA group showed a higher endurance capacity (+56%, P supplementation could be of potential interest for the muscle function in adults and for fighting the decline in exercise tolerance with age that could imply energy-sensing pathway, as suggested by changes in phospho-AMPK/AMPK ratio. PMID:26646102

  9. DJ-1 KNOCK-DOWN IMPAIRS ASTROCYTE MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION

    OpenAIRE

    LARSEN, N. J.; Ambrosi, G.; MULLETT, S. J.; BERMAN, S. B.; HINKLE, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). PD brain tissues show evidence for mitochondrial respiratory chain Complex I deficiency. Pharmacological inhibitors of Complex I, such as rotenone, cause experimental parkinsonism. The cytoprotective protein DJ-1, whose deletion is sufficient to cause genetic PD, is also known to have mitochondria-stabilizing properties. We have previously shown that DJ-1 is over-expressed in PD astrocytes, and...

  10. The plant mitochondrial carrier family: functional and evolutionary aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Ilka eHaferkamp; Stephan eSchmitz-Esser

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in respiration and energy production and are involved in multiple eukaryotic but also in several plant specific metabolic pathways. Solute carriers in the inner mitochondrial membrane connect the internal metabolism with that of the surrounding cell. Because of their common basic structure, these transport proteins affiliate to the mitochondrial carrier family (MCF). Generally, MCF proteins consist of six membrane-spanning helices, exhibit typical conserved domain...

  11. Effects of the Czech Propolis on Sperm Mitochondrial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedikova, Miroslava; Miklikova, Michaela; Stachova, Lenka; Grundmanova, Martina; Tuma, Zdenek; Vetvicka, Vaclav; Zech, Nicolas; Kralickova, Milena; Kuncova, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product that honeybees collect from various plants. It is known for its beneficial pharmacological effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of propolis on human sperm motility, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and membrane potential. Semen samples from 10 normozoospermic donors were processed according to the World Health Organization criteria. Propolis effects on the sperm motility and mitochondrial activity parameters were tested in the fresh ejaculate and purified spermatozoa. Propolis preserved progressive motility of spermatozoa in the native semen samples. Oxygen consumption determined in purified permeabilized spermatozoa by high-resolution respirometry in the presence of adenosine diphosphate and substrates of complex I and complex II (state OXPHOSI+II) was significantly increased in the propolis-treated samples. Propolis also increased uncoupled respiration in the presence of rotenone (state ETSII) and complex IV activity, but it did not influence state LEAK induced by oligomycin. Mitochondrial membrane potential was not affected by propolis. This study demonstrates that propolis maintains sperm motility in the native ejaculates and increases activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes II and IV without affecting mitochondrial membrane potential. The data suggest that propolis improves the total mitochondrial respiratory efficiency in the human spermatozoa in vitro thereby having potential to improve sperm motility. PMID:25104965

  12. Histological changes and impairment of liver mitochondrial bioenergetics after long-term treatment with α-naphthyl-isothiocyanate (ANIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of long-term treatment with α-naphthyl-isothiocyanate (ANIT) on liver histology and at the mitochondrial bioenergetic level. Since, ANIT has been used as a cholestatic agent and it has been pointed out that an impairment of mitochondrial function is a cause of hepatocyte dysfunction leading to cholestatic liver injury, serum markers of liver injury were measured and liver sections were analyzed in ANIT-treated rats (i.p. 80 mg/kg/weekx16 weeks). Mitochondrial parameters such as transmembrane potential, respiration, calcium capacity, alterations in permeability transition susceptibility and ATPase activity were monitored. Histologically, the most important features were the marked ductular proliferation, proliferation of mast cells and the presence of iron deposits in ANIT-treated liver. Mitochondria isolated from ANIT-treated rats showed no alterations in state 4 respiration, respiratory control ratio and ADP/O ratio, while state 3 respiration was significantly decreased. No changes were observed on transmembrane potential, but the repolarization rate was decreased in treated rats. Consistently with these data, there was a significant decrease in the ATPase activity of treated mitochondria. Associated with these parameters, mitochondria from treated animals exhibited increased susceptibility to mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening (lower calcium capacity). Since, human cholestatic liver disease progress slowly overtime, these data provide further insight into the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the process

  13. Translating the basic knowledge of mitochondrial functions to metabolic therapy: role of L-carnitine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcovina, Santica M; Sirtori, Cesare; Peracino, Andrea; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Borum, Peggy; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in human physiological processes, and therefore, their dysfunction can lead to a constellation of metabolic and nonmetabolic abnormalities such as a defect in mitochondrial gene expression, imbalance in fuel and energy homeostasis, impairment in oxidative phosphorylation, enhancement of insulin resistance, and abnormalities in fatty acid metabolism. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, vascular disease, and chronic heart failure. The increased knowledge on mitochondria and their role in cellular metabolism is providing new evidence that these disorders may benefit from mitochondrial-targeted therapies. We review the current knowledge of the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to chronic diseases, the outcomes of experimental studies on mitochondrial-targeted therapies, and explore the potential of metabolic modulators in the treatment of selected chronic conditions. As an example of such modulators, we evaluate the efficacy of the administration of L-carnitine and its analogues acetyl and propionyl L-carnitine in several chronic diseases. L-carnitine is intrinsically involved in mitochondrial metabolism and function as it plays a key role in fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism. In addition to the transportation of free fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane, L-carnitine modulates their oxidation rate and is involved in the regulation of vital cellular functions such as apoptosis. Thus, L-carnitine and its derivatives show promise in the treatment of chronic conditions and diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction but further translational studies are needed to fully explore their potential. PMID:23138103

  14. Prohibitin-2 Depletion Unravels Extra-Mitochondrial Functions at the Kidney Filtration Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ising, Christina; Bharill, Puneet; Brinkkoetter, Sibylle; Brähler, Sebastian; Schroeter, Christina; Koehler, Sybille; Hagmann, Henning; Merkwirth, Carsten; Höhne, Martin; Müller, Roman U; Fabretti, Francesca; Schermer, Bernhard; Bloch, Wilhelm; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Kurschat, Christine E; Benzing, Thomas; Brinkkoetter, Paul T

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial fusion is essential for maintenance of mitochondrial function and requires the prohibitin ring complex subunit prohibitin-2 (PHB2) at the mitochondrial inner membrane. Loss of the stomatin/PHB/flotillin/HflK/C (SPFH) domain containing protein PHB2 causes mitochondrial dysfunction and defective mitochondria-mediated signaling, which is implicated in a variety of human diseases, including progressive renal disease. Here, we provide evidence of additional, extra-mitochondrial functions of this membrane-anchored protein. Immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling detected PHB2 at mitochondrial membranes and at the slit diaphragm, a specialized cell junction at the filtration slit of glomerular podocytes. PHB2 coprecipitated with podocin, another SPFH domain-containing protein, essential for the assembly of the slit diaphragm protein-lipid supercomplex. Consistent with an evolutionarily conserved extra-mitochondrial function, the ortholog of PHB2 in Caenorhabditis elegans was also not restricted to mitochondria but colocalized with the mechanosensory complex that requires the podocin ortholog MEC2 for assembly. Knockdown of phb-2 partially phenocopied loss of mec-2 in touch neurons of the nematode, resulting in impaired gentle touch sensitivity. Collectively, these data indicate that, besides its established role in mitochondria, PHB2 may have an additional function in conserved protein-lipid complexes at the plasma membrane. PMID:27105734

  15. miR-125b affects mitochondrial biogenesis and impairs brite adipocyte formation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maude Giroud

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-125b-5p plays an important role in the repression of brite adipocyte function by modulating oxygen consumption and mitochondrial gene expression.

  16. The role of recovery of mitochondrial structure and function in desiccation tolerance of pea seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial repair is of fundamental importance for seed germination. When mature orthodox seeds are imbibed and germinated, they lose their desiccation tolerance in parallel. To gain a better understanding of this process, we studied the recovery of mitochondrial structure and function in pea...... (Pisum sativum cv. Jizhuang) seeds with different tolerance to desiccation. Mitochondria were isolated and purified from the embryo axes of control and imbibed–dehydrated pea seeds after (re-)imbibition for various times. Recovery of mitochondrial structure and function occurred both in control and...

  17. Metalloprotease OMA1 Fine-tunes Mitochondrial Bioenergetic Function and Respiratory Supercomplex Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Iryna Bohovych; Fernandez, Mario R.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Stackley, Krista D.; Bestman, Jennifer E.; Annadurai Anandhan; Rodrigo Franco; Claypool, Steven M.; Robert E. Lewis; Chan, Sherine S. L.; Oleh Khalimonchuk

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in key cellular functions including energy production, metabolic homeostasis, and apoptosis. Normal mitochondrial function is preserved by several interrelated mechanisms. One mechanism – intramitochondrial quality control (IMQC) – is represented by conserved proteases distributed across mitochondrial compartments. Many aspects and physiological roles of IMQC components remain unclear. Here, we show that the IMQC protease Oma1 is required for the stability of the res...

  18. Effects of exercise training on mitochondrial function in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Skaaby, Stinna; Helge, Jørn Wulff;

    2014-01-01

    intensity training) improves insulin sensitivity in healthy humans and in patients with type 2 diabetes. Whether patients with type 2 diabetes have the same beneficial effects (same improvement) as control subjects, when it comes to regular physical activity in regard to mitochondrial function, is not...... established in the literature. This review will focus only on the effect of physical activity on skeletal muscle (mitochondrial function) in patients with type 2 diabetes....

  19. The Adipocyte-Expressed Forkhead Transcription Factor Foxc2 Regulates Metabolism Through Altered Mitochondrial Function

    OpenAIRE

    Lidell, Martin E.; Seifert, Erin L.; Westergren, Rickard; Heglind, Mikael; Gowing, Adrienne; Sukonina, Valentina; Arani, Zahra; Itkonen, Paula; Wallin, Simonetta; Westberg, Fredrik; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Julia; Laakso, Markku; Nilsson, Tommy; Peng, Xiao-Rong; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous findings demonstrate that enhanced expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxc2 in adipose tissue leads to a lean and insulin-sensitive phenotype. These findings prompted us to further investigate the role of Foxc2 in the regulation of genes of fundamental importance for metabolism and mitochondrial function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The effects of Foxc2 on expression of genes involved in mitochondriogenesis and mitochondrial function were assessed by quantitati...

  20. PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF SALVIFOLIN ON LIVER MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION IN RATS WITH EXPERIMENTAL DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    POZILOV MAMURJON KOMILJONOVICH; ASRAROV MUZAFFAR ISLAMOVICH; URMANOVA GULBAKHOR URUNBOEVNA; ESHBAKOVA KOMILA ALIBEKOVNA

    2015-01-01

    The influence of diterpenoid salvifolin on mitochondrial function was investigated. It was shown that in streptozotocin-induced diabetes damaged functional systems of rat liver mitochondria: respiration and oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial permeability transition pore and ATP -dependent potassium channel. Pharmacotherapy with salvifolin (intraperitoneally in dose of 3,5 mg/kg body weight) for 8 days has a protective effect on mitochondria in experimental diabetes, correction membrane ...

  1. Erythropoietin treatment enhances mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla ePlenge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Erythropoietin (Epo treatment has been shown to induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac muscle along with enhanced mitochondrial capacity in mice. We hypothesized that recombinant human Epo (rhEpo treatment enhances skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS capacity in humans. In six healthy volunteers rhEpo was administered by sub-cutaneous injection over eight weeks with oral iron (100 mg supplementation taken daily. Mitochondrial OXPHOS was quantified by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized muscle fibers obtained from biopsies of the vastus lateralis before and after rhEpo treatment. OXPHOS was determined with the mitochondrial complex I substrates malate, glutamate, pyruvate and complex II substrate succinate in the presence of saturating ADP concentrations, while maximal electron transport capacity (ETS was assessed by addition of an uncoupler. rhEpo treatment increased OXPHOS (from 92±5 to 113±7 pmol.sec-1.mg-1 and ETS (107±4 to 143±14 pmol.sec-1.mg-1, P<0.05, demonstrating that Epo treatment induces an upregulation of OXPHOS and ETS in human skeletal muscle.

  2. Apolipoprotein E4 (1–272 fragment is associated with mitochondrial proteins and affects mitochondrial function in neuronal cells

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    Michikawa Makoto

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein E allele ε4 (apoE4 is a strong risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD. Secreted apoE has a critical function in redistributing lipids among central nervous system cells to maintain normal lipid homeostasis. In addition, previous reports have shown that apoE4 is cleaved by a protease in neurons to generate apoE4(1–272 fragment, which is associated with neurofibrillary tanglelike structures and mitochondria, causing mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it still remains unclear how the apoE fragment associates with mitochondria and induces mitochondrial dysfunction. Results To clarify the molecular mechanism, we carried out experiments to identify intracellular apoE-binding molecules and their functions in modulating mitochondria function. Here, we found that apoE4 binds to ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase core protein 2 (UQCRC2 and cytochrome C1, both of which are components of mitochondrial respiratory complex III, and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4 isoform 1 (COX IV 1, which is a component of complex IV, in Neuro-2a cells. Interestingly, these proteins associated with apoE4(1–272 more strongly than intact apoE4(1–299. Further analysis showed that in Neuro-2a cells expressing apoE4(1–272, the enzymatic activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV were significantly lower than those in Neuro-2a cells expressing apoE4(1–299. Conclusion ApoE4(1–272 fragment expressed in Neuro2a cells is associated with mitochondrial proteins, UQCRC2 and cytochrome C1, which are component of respiratory complex III, and with COX IV 1, which is a member of complex IV. Overexpression of apoE4(1–272 fragment impairs activities of complex III and IV. These results suggest that the C-terminal-truncated fragment of apoE4 binds to mitochondrial complexes and affects their activities, and thereby leading to neurodegeneration.

  3. Cromakalin pretreatment affects mitochondrial structure and function in a rat model of ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shilei Wang; Peng Wang; Qingxian Chang; Yu Li; Yan Jiang; Shiduan Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial structural changes and energy dysmetabolism frequently occur subsequent to cerebral ischemia. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channel openers exhibit protective effects on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. OBJECTIVE: To validate the effects of cromakalin on mitochondrial structure and function in ischemic penumbra brain tissue in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The present single-factor analysis of variance, randomized, controlled, animal experiment was performed at the Institute of Brain Science, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College between October 2007 and March 2008. MATERIALS: Forty male, Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups, with 10 rats per group: sham-operated, MCAO, MCAO+ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener (cromakalin), and MCAO+eromakalin+ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocking agent (glibenclamide). METHODS: Focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury was induced by MCAO in all groups except the sham-operated group. The MCAO cromakalin group was administered 10 mg/kg cromakalin (i.p.) prior to MCAO induction. The MCAO+cromakalin+glibenclamide group received an injection of 10 mg/kg cromakalin (i.v.), and subsequently an injection of 10 mg/kg cromakalin (i.p.) prior to MCAO induction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: At 24 hours after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, cellular apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick-end labeling technique. Cytochrome C expression was measured by immunohistochemistry. In addition, mitochondrial swelling, membrane fluidity, membrane phospholipid and malonaldehyde (MDA) contents, as well as Na+-K+-ATPase, Ca2+-ATPase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined. RESULTS: Compared with the sham-operated group, the three ischemia groups exhibited significantly elevated mitochondrial MDA content, reduced membrane

  4. Prediction of mitochondrial protein function by comparative physiology and phylogenetic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yiming; Perocchi, Fabiana

    2015-01-01

    According to the endosymbiotic theory, mitochondria originate from a free-living alpha-proteobacteria that established an intracellular symbiosis with the ancestor of present-day eukaryotic cells. During the bacterium-to-organelle transformation, the proto-mitochondrial proteome has undergone a massive turnover, whereby less than 20 % of modern mitochondrial proteomes can be traced back to the bacterial ancestor. Moreover, mitochondrial proteomes from several eukaryotic organisms, for example, yeast and human, show a rather modest overlap, reflecting differences in mitochondrial physiology. Those differences may result from the combination of differential gain and loss of genes and retargeting processes among lineages. Therefore, an evolutionary signature, also called "phylogenetic profile", could be generated for every mitochondrial protein. Here, we present two evolutionary biology approaches to study mitochondrial physiology: the first strategy, which we refer to as "comparative physiology," allows the de novo identification of mitochondrial proteins involved in a physiological function; the second, known as "phylogenetic profiling," allows to predict protein functions and functional interactions by comparing phylogenetic profiles of uncharacterized and known components. PMID:25631025

  5. Impaired Cerebral Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation Function in a Rat Model of Ventricular Fibrillation and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Postcardiac arrest brain injury significantly contributes to mortality and morbidity in patients suffering from cardiac arrest (CA. Evidence that shows that mitochondrial dysfunction appears to be a key factor in tissue damage after ischemia/reperfusion is accumulating. However, limited data are available regarding the cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction during CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and its relationship to the alterations of high-energy phosphate. Here, we sought to identify alterations of mitochondrial morphology and oxidative phosphorylation function as well as high-energy phosphates during CA and CPR in a rat model of ventricular fibrillation (VF. We found that impairment of mitochondrial respiration and partial depletion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr developed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus following a prolonged cardiac arrest. Optimal CPR might ameliorate the deranged phosphorus metabolism and preserve mitochondrial function. No obvious ultrastructural abnormalities of mitochondria have been found during CA. We conclude that CA causes cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction along with decay of high-energy phosphates, which would be mitigated with CPR. This study may broaden our understanding of the pathogenic processes underlying global cerebral ischemic injury and provide a potential therapeutic strategy that aimed at preserving cerebral mitochondrial function during CA.

  6. Survival and mitochondrial function in septic patients according to mitochondrial DNA haplogroup

    OpenAIRE

    Lorente, Leonardo; Iceta, Ruth; Martín, María M.; López-Gallardo, Esther; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Labarta, Lorenzo; Díaz, César; Jiménez, Alejandro; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We recently found that platelet cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activities and quantities in 6-month-survival septic patients are significantly higher than those of patients who died before 6 months. Other studies suggested that the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genotype could play a major role in sepsis survival. Given that COX catalytic subunits are encoded by mtDNA, the objective of the present study was to explore whether mtDNA population genetic variation could affect COX activity an...

  7. Impaired mitochondrial function in chronically ischemic human heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stride, Nis Ottesen; Larsen, Steen; Hey-Mogensen, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ischemic heart disease is associated with myocardial hypoperfusion. The resulting hypoxia potentially inflicts damage upon the mitochondria, leading to a compromised energetic state. Furthermore, ischemic damage may cause excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), producing...... mitochondrial damage, hereby reinforcing a vicious circle. Ischemic preconditioning has been proven protective in acute ischemia, but the subject of chronic ischemic preconditioning has not been explored in humans. We hypothesized that mitochondrial respiratory capacity would be diminished in chronic ischemic...... regions of human myocardium but that these mitochondria would be more resistant to ex vivo ischemia and, second, that ROS generation would be higher in ischemic myocardium. The aim of this study was to test mitochondrial respiratory capacity during hyperoxia and hypoxia, to investigate ROS production, and...

  8. Abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology as early pathological changes in human models of spinal muscular atrophy

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    Chong-Chong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, characterized by specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons, is caused by mutations in the survival of motor neuron 1, telomeric (SMN1 gene and subsequent decreased levels of functional SMN. How the deficiency of SMN, a ubiquitously expressed protein, leads to spinal motor neuron-specific degeneration in individuals affected by SMA remains unknown. In this study, we examined the role of SMN in mitochondrial axonal transport and morphology in human motor neurons by generating SMA type 1 patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and differentiating these cells into spinal motor neurons. The initial specification of spinal motor neurons was not affected, but these SMA spinal motor neurons specifically degenerated following long-term culture. Moreover, at an early stage in SMA spinal motor neurons, but not in SMA forebrain neurons, the number of mitochondria, mitochondrial area and mitochondrial transport were significantly reduced in axons. Knocking down of SMN expression led to similar mitochondrial defects in spinal motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells, confirming that SMN deficiency results in impaired mitochondrial dynamics. Finally, the application of N-acetylcysteine (NAC mitigated the impairment in mitochondrial transport and morphology and rescued motor neuron degeneration in SMA long-term cultures. Furthermore, NAC ameliorated the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential in SMA spinal motor neurons, suggesting that NAC might rescue apoptosis and motor neuron degeneration by improving mitochondrial health. Overall, our data demonstrate that SMN deficiency results in abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology and a subsequent reduction in mitochondrial health, which are implicated in the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons in SMA.

  9. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitotempo protects mitochondrial function against amyloid beta toxicity in primary cultured mouse neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongtao; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial defects including excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and compromised ATP generation are featured pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta (Aβ)-mediated mitochondrial ROS overproduction disrupts intra-neuronal Redox balance, in turn exacerbating mitochondrial dysfunction leading to neuronal injury. Previous studies have found the beneficial effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants in preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal injury in AD animal and cell models, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS scavengers hold promise for the treatment of this neurological disorder. In this study, we have determined that mitotempo, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant protects mitochondrial function from the toxicity of Aβ in primary cultured neurons. Our results showed that Aβ-promoted mitochondrial superoxide production and neuronal lipid oxidation were significantly suppressed by the application of mitotempo. Moreover, mitotempo also demonstrated protective effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics evidenced by preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c oxidase activity as well as ATP production. In addition, the Aβ-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and decreased expression levels of mtDNA replication-related DNA polymerase gamma (DNA pol γ) and Twinkle were substantially mitigated by mitotempo. Therefore, our study suggests that elimination of excess mitochondrial ROS rescues mitochondrial function in Aβ-insulted neruons; and mitotempo has the potential to be a promising therapeutic agent to protect mitochondrial and neuronal function in AD. PMID:27444386

  10. The Effects of NAD+ on Apoptotic Neuronal Death and Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function after Glutamate Excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowan Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available NAD+ is an essential co-enzyme for cellular energy metabolism and is also involved as a substrate for many cellular enzymatic reactions. It has been shown that NAD+ has a beneficial effect on neuronal survival and brain injury in in vitro and in vivo ischemic models. However, the effect of NAD+ on mitochondrial biogenesis and function in ischemia has not been well investigated. In the present study, we used an in vitro glutamate excitotoxicity model of primary cultured cortical neurons to study the effect of NAD+ on apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Our results show that supplementation of NAD+ could effectively reduce apoptotic neuronal death, and apoptotic inducing factor translocation after neurons were challenged with excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Using different approaches including confocal imaging, mitochondrial DNA measurement and Western blot analysis of PGC-1 and NRF-1, we also found that NAD+ could significantly attenuate glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and the impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, NAD+ treatment effectively inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and NADH redistribution after excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Taken together, our results demonstrated that NAD+ is capable of inhibiting apoptotic neuronal death after glutamate excitotoxicity via preserving mitochondrial biogenesis and integrity. Our findings provide insights into potential neuroprotective strategies in ischemic stroke.

  11. Applied proteomics: mitochondrial proteins and effect on function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mary F; Melov, Simon

    2002-03-01

    The identification of a majority of the polypeptides in mitochondria would be invaluable because they play crucial and diverse roles in many cellular processes and diseases. The endogenous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major limiter of life as illustrated by studies in which the transgenic overexpression in invertebrates of catalytic antioxidant enzymes results in increased lifespans. Mitochondria have received considerable attention as a principal source---and target---of ROS. Mitochondrial oxidative stress has been implicated in heart disease including myocardial preconditioning, ischemia/reperfusion, and other pathologies. In addition, oxidative stress in the mitochondria is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, prion diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) as well as aging itself. The rapidly emerging field of proteomics can provide powerful strategies for the characterization of mitochondrial proteins. Current approaches to mitochondrial proteomics include the creation of detailed catalogues of the protein components in a single sample or the identification of differentially expressed proteins in diseased or physiologically altered samples versus a reference control. It is clear that for any proteomics approach prefractionation of complex protein mixtures is essential to facilitate the identification of low-abundance proteins because the dynamic range of protein abundance within cells has been estimated to be as high as 10(7). The opportunities for identification of proteins directly involved in diseases associated with or caused by mitochondrial dysfunction are compelling. Future efforts will focus on linking genomic array information to actual protein levels in mitochondria. PMID:11884366

  12. Experimental Approaches to Study Mitochondrial Localization and Function of a Nuclear Cell Cycle Kinase, Cdk1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candas, Demet; Qin, Lili; Fan, Ming; Li, Jian-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Although mitochondria possess their own transcriptional machinery, merely 1% of mitochondrial proteins are synthesized inside the organelle. The nuclear-encoded proteins are transported into mitochondria guided by their mitochondria targeting sequences (MTS); however, a majority of mitochondrial localized proteins lack an identifiable MTS. Nevertheless, the fact that MTS can instruct proteins to go into the mitochondria provides a valuable tool for studying mitochondrial functions of normally nuclear and/or cytoplasmic proteins. We have recently identified the cell cycle kinase CyclinB1/Cdk1 complex in the mitochondria. To specifically study the mitochondrial functions of this complex, mitochondrial overexpression and knock-down of this complex without interfering with its nuclear or cytoplasmic functions were essential. By tagging CyclinB1/Cdk1 with MTS, we were able to achieve mitochondrial overexpression of this complex to study its mitochondrial targets as well as functions. Via tagging dominant-negative Cdk1 with MTS, inhibition of Cdk1 activity was accomplished particularly in the mitochondria. Potential mitochondrial targets of CyclinB1/Cdk1 complex were identified using a gel-based proteomics approach. Unlike traditional 2D gel analysis, we employed 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) technology followed by phosphoprotein staining to fluorescently label differentially phosphorylated proteins in mitochondrial Cdk1 expressing cells. Identification of phosphoprotein spots that were altered in wild type versus dominant negative Cdk1 bearing mitochondria revealed the identity of mitochondrial targets of Cdk1. Finally, to determine the effect of CyclinB1/Cdk1 mitochondrial localization in cell cycle progression, a cell proliferation assay using a synthetic thymidine analogue EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) was used to monitor the cells as they go through the cell cycle and replicate their DNA. Altogether, we demonstrated a variety of approaches

  13. Oxidative stress causes reversible changes in mitochondrial permeability and structure

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Nelson B.; Daniels, Mathew P.; LEVINE, RODNEY L.; Kim, Geumsoo

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are a primary source as well a principal target of reactive oxygen species within cells. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we have found that a number of mitochondrial matrix proteins are normally undetectable in formaldehyde fixed cells permeabilized with the cholesterol-binding detergent saponin. However, exogenous or endogenous oxidative stress applied prior to fixation altered the permeability of mitochondria, rendering these matrix proteins accessible to antibodies. Elect...

  14. Emerging role of Lon protease as a master regulator of mitochondrial functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinti, Marcello; Gibellini, Lara; Nasi, Milena; De Biasi, Sara; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto; Iannone, Anna; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Lon protease is a nuclear-encoded, mitochondrial ATP-dependent protease highly conserved throughout the evolution, crucial for the maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis. Lon acts as a chaperone of misfolded proteins, and is necessary for maintaining mitochondrial DNA. The impairment of these functions has a deep impact on mitochondrial functionality and morphology. An altered expression of Lon leads to a profound reprogramming of cell metabolism, with a switch from respiration to glycolysis, which is often observed in cancer cells. Mutations of Lon, which likely impair its chaperone properties, are at the basis of a genetic inherited disease named of the cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, skeletal (CODAS) syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27033304

  15. Expanding the functional human mitochondrial DNA database by the establishment of primate xenomitochondrial cybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Kenyon, Lesley; Moraes, Carlos T.

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear and mitochondrial genomes coevolve to optimize approximately 100 different interactions necessary for an efficient ATP-generating system. This coevolution led to a species-specific compatibility between these genomes. We introduced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from different primates into mtDNA-less human cells and selected for growth of cells with a functional oxidative phosphorylation system. mtDNA from common chimpanzee, pigmy chimpanzee, and gorilla were able to restore oxidative...

  16. Myocardial mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in mice lacking adiponectin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Braun

    Full Text Available Adiponectin deficiency leads to increased myocardial infarct size following ischemia reperfusion and to exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy following pressure overload, entities that are causally linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. In skeletal muscle, lack of adiponectin results in impaired mitochondrial function. Thus, it was our objective to investigate whether adiponectin deficiency impairs mitochondrial energetics in the heart. At 8 weeks of age, heart weight-to-body weight ratios were not different between adiponectin knockout (ADQ-/- mice and wildtypes (WT. In isolated working hearts, cardiac output, aortic developed pressure and cardiac power were preserved in ADQ-/- mice. Rates of fatty acid oxidation, glucose oxidation and glycolysis were unchanged between groups. While myocardial oxygen consumption was slightly reduced (-24% in ADQ-/- mice in isolated working hearts, rates of maximal ADP-stimulated mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis in saponin-permeabilized cardiac fibers were preserved in ADQ-/- mice with glutamate, pyruvate or palmitoyl-carnitine as a substrate. In addition, enzymatic activity of respiratory complexes I and II was unchanged between groups. Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and SIRT1 activity were not decreased, expression and acetylation of PGC-1α were unchanged, and mitochondrial content of OXPHOS subunits was not decreased in ADQ-/- mice. Finally, increasing energy demands due to prolonged subcutaneous infusion of isoproterenol did not differentially affect cardiac contractility or mitochondrial function in ADQ-/- mice compared to WT. Thus, mitochondrial and contractile function are preserved in hearts of mice lacking adiponectin, suggesting that adiponectin may be expendable in the regulation of mitochondrial energetics and contractile function in the heart under non-pathological conditions.

  17. Albendazole Sensitive vs. Resistant Nematodes – The Mitochondrial Ultra-Structural Changes

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    Romeo T. CRISTINA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on microtubule inhibitors have shown that the loss of equilibrium between tubulin and microtubules can generate a multitude of histochemical changes in mitochondria. This disruption of balance is also considered the basis of benzimidazole anthelmintic (BZ activity. Studies have shown that BZ does not bond to the tubulin of the BZ-resistant Haemonchus contortus, as opposed to sensitive ones. This affinity alteration can be easily recognised by changes in the optical density and can help in the classification of H. contortus mitochondria, into sensitive (dark and resistant (clear, unmodified zones. In order to confirm this hypothesis, we started our study from albendazole (ABZ resistant and sensible H. contortus individuals, collected from the intestinal tract of sheep, aiming towards the identification of mitochondrial features, using the Electron Microscopy Transmission (EMT technique. The EMT has confirmed that the structure of sensitive trichostrongilian populations was affected rapidly, only four hours after ABZ treatments. The main changes that appeared in the intestinal mitochondria of sensitive helminths were: cristae thickening and decreasing in number and cellular membrane thickening. Twelve hours after anthelmintic administration, a total blocking of metabolic functionality was observed, and finally, these changes completely altered the optical density of the mitochondria. In ABZ resistant populations, the optical density has remained normal; and the cristae number, size or functionality of resistant nematode mitochondria has remained unchanged.

  18. Nuclear genomic control of naturally occurring variation in mitochondrial function in Drosophila melanogaster

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    Jumbo-Lucioni Patricia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria are organelles found in nearly all eukaryotic cells that play a crucial role in cellular survival and function. Mitochondrial function is under the control of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. While the latter has been the focus of most genetic research, we remain largely ignorant about the nuclear-encoded genomic control of inter-individual variability in mitochondrial function. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster as our model organism to address this question. Results We quantified mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiration rates and P:O ratio in mitochondria isolated from the thoraces of 40 sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel. We found significant within-population genetic variability for all mitochondrial traits. Hence, we performed genome-wide association mapping and identified 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with differences in mitochondrial respiration and efficiency (P ≤1 × 10-5. Gene-centered regression models showed that 2–3 SNPs can explain 31, 13, and 18% of the phenotypic variation in state 3, state 4, and P:O ratio, respectively. Most of the genes tagged by the SNPs are involved in organ development, second messenger-mediated signaling pathways, and cytoskeleton remodeling. One of these genes, sallimus (sls, encodes a component of the muscle sarcomere. We confirmed the direct effect of sls on mitochondrial respiration using two viable mutants and their coisogenic wild-type strain. Furthermore, correlation network analysis revealed that sls functions as a transcriptional hub in a co-regulated module associated with mitochondrial respiration and is connected to CG7834, which is predicted to encode a protein with mitochondrial electron transfer flavoprotein activity. This latter finding was also verified in the sls mutants. Conclusions Our results provide novel insights into the genetic factors regulating natural variation in

  19. Mitochondrial structure, function and dynamics are temporally controlled by c-Myc.

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    J Anthony Graves

    Full Text Available Although the c-Myc (Myc oncoprotein controls mitochondrial biogenesis and multiple enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, the coordination of these events and the mechanistic underpinnings of their regulation remain largely unexplored. We show here that re-expression of Myc in myc-/- fibroblasts is accompanied by a gradual accumulation of mitochondrial biomass and by increases in membrane polarization and mitochondrial fusion. A correction of OXPHOS deficiency is also seen, although structural abnormalities in electron transport chain complexes (ETC are not entirely normalized. Conversely, the down-regulation of Myc leads to a gradual decrease in mitochondrial mass and a more rapid loss of fusion and membrane potential. Increases in the levels of proteins specifically involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion support the idea that Myc affects mitochondrial mass by influencing both of these processes, albeit favoring the latter. The ETC defects that persist following Myc restoration may represent metabolic adaptations, as mitochondrial function is re-directed away from producing ATP to providing a source of metabolic precursors demanded by the transformed cell.

  20. Flow cytometric probing of mitochondrial function in equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coignoul Freddy

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The morphopathological picture of a subset of equine myopathies is compatible with a primary mitochondrial disease, but functional confirmation in vivo is still pending. The cationic dye JC-1 exhibits potential-dependent accumulation in mitochondria that is detectable by a fluorescence shift from green to orange. As a consequence, mitochondrial membrane potential can be optically measured by the orange/green fluorescence intensity ratio. A flow cytometric standardized analytic procedure of the mitochondrial function of equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells is proposed along with a critical appraisal of the crucial questions of technical aspects, reproducibility, effect of time elapsed between blood sampling and laboratory processing and reference values. Results The JC-1-associated fluorescence orange and green values and their ratio were proved to be stable over time, independent of age and sex and hypersensitive to intoxication with a mitochondrial potential dissipator. Unless time elapsed between blood sampling and laboratory processing does not exceed 5 hours, the values retrieved remain stable. Reference values for clinically normal horses are given. Conclusion Whenever a quantitative measurement of mitochondrial function in a horse is desired, blood samples should be taken in sodium citrate tubes and kept at room temperature for a maximum of 5 hours before the laboratory procedure detailed here is started. The hope is that this new test may help in confirming, studying and preventing equine myopathies that are currently imputed to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  1. Abnormal mitochondrial function impairs calcium influx in diabetic mouse pancreatic beta cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fei; D. Marshall Porterfield; ZHENG Xi-yan; WANG Wen-jun; XU Yue; ZHANG Zong-ming

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal insulin secretion of pancreatic beta cells is now regarded as the more primary defect than the insulin function in the etiology of type 2 diabetes.Previous studies found impaired mitochondrial function and impaired Ca2+ influx in beta cells in diabetic patients and animal models,suggesting a role for these processes in proper insulin secretion.The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed relationship of mitochondrial function,Ca2+ influx,and defective insulin secretion.Methods We investigated mitochondrial function and morphology in pancreatic beta cell of diabetic KK-Ay mice and C57BL/6J mice.Two types of Ca2+ channel activities,L-type and store-operated Ca2+ (SOC),were evaluated using whole-cell patch-clamp recording.The glucose induced Ca2+ influx was measured by a non-invasive micro-test technique (NMT).Results Mitochondria in KK-Ay mice pancreatic beta cells were swollen with disordered cristae,and mitochondrial function decreased compared with C57BL/6J mice.Ca2+ channel activity was increased and glucose induced Ca2+ influx was impaired,but could be recovered by genipin.Conclusion Defective mitochondrial function in diabetic mice pancreatic beta cells is a key cause of abnormal insulin secretion by altering Ca2+ influx,but not via Ca2+ channel activity.

  2. Role of mitochondrial function in cell death and body metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the key players in apoptosis and necrosis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted r0 cells were resistant to diverse apoptosis inducers such as TNF-alpha, TNFSF10, staurosporine and p53. Apoptosis resistance was accompanied by the absence of mitochondrial potential loss or cytochrome c translocation. r0 cells were also resistant to necrosis induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) donors due to upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as manganese superoxide dismutase. Mitochondria also has a close relationship with autophagy that plays a critical role in the turnover of senescent organelles or dysfunctional proteins and may be included in 'cell death' category. It was demonstrated that autophagy deficiency in insulin target tissues such as skeletal muscle induces mitochondrial stress response, which leads to the induction of FGF21 as a 'mitokine' and affects the whole body metabolism. These results show that mitochondria are not simply the power plants of cells generating ATP, but are closely related to several types of cell death and autophagy. Mitochondria affect various pathophysiological events related to diverse disorders such as cancer, metabolic disorders and aging. PMID:27100503

  3. [Value of protecting mitochondrial functions during treatment with cyclosporin A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, N; Albengres, E; Barré, J; Jolliet, P; Urien, S; Settaf, A; Tillement, J P

    1997-01-01

    The use of cyclosporin A is often limited by its nephrotoxicity. This dose-dependent toxicity can occur in all kinds of transplantation and is reversed with drug withdrawal. Cyclosporin A induces a vasoconstriction leading to an increase of renal vascular resistance and a reduction of glomerular filtration. Histochemical studies show mitochondrial alterations and an excess of cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium leading to a decrease of ATP synthesis. Two strategies can be evoked for limiting cyclosporin-A-induced nephrotoxicity. First, the use of drugs counteracting the vasoconstriction has been proposed. Second, drugs acting by restoration of ATP synthesis could also be of interest. For example, calcium channel blockers may be used for limiting the Ca2+ fluxes into cells. Another way to protect ATP synthesis is to inhibit the cyclosporin-A-induced increase of mitochondrial Ca2+ concentrations; Trimetazidine has shown its efficiency in vitro for protecting mitochondria against these modifications of Ca2+ homeostasis and is under clinical evaluation. PMID:9231511

  4. Muscle biopsies from human muscle diseases with myopathic pathology reveal common alterations in mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunitha, Balaraju; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Kumar, Manish; Keshava Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya; Nalini, Atchayaram; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2016-07-01

    Muscle diseases are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and manifest as dystrophic, inflammatory and myopathic pathologies, among others. Our previous study on the cardiotoxin mouse model of myodegeneration and inflammation linked muscle pathology with mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies from muscle disease patients, represented by dysferlinopathy (dysfy) (dystrophic pathology; n = 43), polymyositis (PM) (inflammatory pathology; n = 24), and distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles (DMRV) (distal myopathy; n = 31) were analyzed. Mitochondrial damage (ragged blue and COX-deficient fibers) was revealed in dysfy, PM, and DMRV cases by enzyme histochemistry (SDH and COX-SDH), electron microscopy (vacuolation and altered cristae) and biochemical assays (significantly increased ADP/ATP ratio). Proteomic analysis of muscle mitochondria from all three muscle diseases by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis demonstrated down-regulation of electron transport chain (ETC) complex subunits, assembly factors and Krebs cycle enzymes. Interestingly, 80 of the under-expressed proteins were common among the three pathologies. Assay of ETC and Krebs cycle enzyme activities validated the MS data. Mitochondrial proteins from muscle pathologies also displayed higher tryptophan (Trp) oxidation and the same was corroborated in the cardiotoxin model. Molecular modeling predicted Trp oxidation to alter the local structure of mitochondrial proteins. Our data highlight mitochondrial alterations in muscle pathologies, represented by morphological changes, altered mitochondrial proteome and protein oxidation, thereby establishing the role of mitochondrial damage in human muscle diseases. We investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies

  5. An Essential Role for COPI in mRNA Localization to Mitochondria and Mitochondrial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabezhinsky, Dmitry; Slobodin, Boris; Rapaport, Doron; Gerst, Jeffrey E

    2016-04-19

    Nuclear-encoded mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins (mMPs) can localize directly to the mitochondrial surface, yet how mMPs target mitochondria and whether RNA targeting contributes to protein import into mitochondria and cellular metabolism are unknown. Here, we show that the COPI vesicle coat complex is necessary for mMP localization to mitochondria and mitochondrial function. COPI inactivation leads to reduced mMP binding to COPI itself, resulting in the dissociation of mMPs from mitochondria, a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, a decrease in protein import in vivo and in vitro, and severe deficiencies in mitochondrial respiration. Using a model mMP (OXA1), we observed that COPI inactivation (or mutation of the potential COPI-interaction site) led to altered mRNA localization and impaired cellular respiration. Overall, COPI-mediated mMP targeting is critical for mitochondrial protein import and function, and transcript delivery to the mitochondria or endoplasmic reticulum is regulated by cis-acting RNA sequences and trans-acting proteins. PMID:27068463

  6. An Essential Role for COPI in mRNA Localization to Mitochondria and Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Zabezhinsky

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear-encoded mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins (mMPs can localize directly to the mitochondrial surface, yet how mMPs target mitochondria and whether RNA targeting contributes to protein import into mitochondria and cellular metabolism are unknown. Here, we show that the COPI vesicle coat complex is necessary for mMP localization to mitochondria and mitochondrial function. COPI inactivation leads to reduced mMP binding to COPI itself, resulting in the dissociation of mMPs from mitochondria, a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, a decrease in protein import in vivo and in vitro, and severe deficiencies in mitochondrial respiration. Using a model mMP (OXA1, we observed that COPI inactivation (or mutation of the potential COPI-interaction site led to altered mRNA localization and impaired cellular respiration. Overall, COPI-mediated mMP targeting is critical for mitochondrial protein import and function, and transcript delivery to the mitochondria or endoplasmic reticulum is regulated by cis-acting RNA sequences and trans-acting proteins.

  7. Training intensity modulates changes in PGC-1α and p53 protein content and mitochondrial respiration, but not markers of mitochondrial content in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Cesare; Oliveira, Rodrigo S F; Little, Jonathan P; Renner, Kathrin; Bishop, David J

    2016-02-01

    Exercise training has been associated with increased mitochondrial content and respiration. However, no study to date has compared in parallel how training at different intensities affects mitochondrial respiration and markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. Twenty-nine healthy men performed 4 wk (12 cycling sessions) of either sprint interval training [SIT; 4-10 × 30-s all-out bouts at ∼200% of peak power output (WPeak)], high-intensity interval training (HIIT; 4-7 × 4-min intervals at ∼90% WPeak), or sublactate threshold continuous training (STCT; 20-36 min at ∼65% WPeak). The STCT and HIIT groups were matched for total work. Resting biopsy samples (vastus lateralis) were obtained before and after training. The maximal mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized muscle fibers increased significantly only after SIT (25%). Similarly, the protein content of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator (PGC)-1α, p53, and plant homeodomain finger-containing protein 20 (PHF20) increased only after SIT (60-90%). Conversely, citrate synthase activity, and the protein content of TFAM and subunits of the electron transport system complexes remained unchanged throughout. Our findings suggest that training intensity is an important factor that regulates training-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration and that there is an apparent dissociation between training-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial content. Moreover, changes in the protein content of PGC-1α, p53, and PHF20 are more strongly associated with training-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration than mitochondrial content. PMID:26572168

  8. Exercise training increases mitochondrial content and ex vivo mitochondrial function similarly in patients with type 2 diabetes and in control individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Phielix, E.; Meex, R.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Hesselink, M. K. C.; Schrauwen, P

    2010-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis We previously showed that type 2 diabetic patients are characterised by compromised intrinsic mitochondrial function. Here, we examined if exercise training could increase intrinsic mitochondrial function in diabetic patients compared with control individuals. Methods Fifteen male type 2 diabetic patients and 14 male control individuals matched for age, BMI and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\u...

  9. Interactive effects of pH and metals on mitochondrial functions of intertidal bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Interactive effects of trace metals Cd and Cu and pH were studied in mitochondria of clams and oysters. •Mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential of bivalves were robust to pH variation (6.6–7.8). •Elevated levels of Cd and Cu inhibited mitochondrial respiration in the pH-dependent manner but did not affect the membrane potential. •Negative effects of Cd and Cd on mitochondrial respiration were alleviated at low pH (7.0 and below). •Moderate acidosis may protect molluscan mitochondria from metal toxicity. -- Abstract: Intertidal bivalves experience broad fluctuations of environmental temperature, pH and oxygen content which could change their intracellular pH. They are also exposed to trace metals such as cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) that accumulate in their tissues and may negatively affect mitochondrial functions and bioenergetics. We determined the interactive effects of pH and trace metals (25 μM Cd or Cu) on mitochondrial functions (including respiration and membrane potentials in both ADP-stimulated (state 3) and resting (state 4) states) of two common marine bivalves, the hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) and eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica). In the absence of the trace metals, mitochondrial functions of C. virginica and M. mercenaria were insensitive to pH in a broad physiologically relevant range (6.6–7.8). Mitochondrial respiration was generally suppressed by 25 μM Cd or Cu (with the stronger effects observed for ADP-stimulated compared to the resting respiration) while the mitochondrial membrane potential was unaffected. pH modulated the effects of Cu and Cd on mitochondrial respiration of the bivalves. In oysters, Cu suppressed ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration at high and low pH values (6.6 and 7.8, respectively), but had no effect in the intermediate pH range (7.0–7.4). In clams, the negative effect of Cu on ADP-stimulated respiration was only observed at extremely high pH (7.8). A decrease in p

  10. Interactive effects of pH and metals on mitochondrial functions of intertidal bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanina, Anna V.; Sokolova, Inna M., E-mail: isokolov@uncc.edu

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Interactive effects of trace metals Cd and Cu and pH were studied in mitochondria of clams and oysters. •Mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential of bivalves were robust to pH variation (6.6–7.8). •Elevated levels of Cd and Cu inhibited mitochondrial respiration in the pH-dependent manner but did not affect the membrane potential. •Negative effects of Cd and Cd on mitochondrial respiration were alleviated at low pH (7.0 and below). •Moderate acidosis may protect molluscan mitochondria from metal toxicity. -- Abstract: Intertidal bivalves experience broad fluctuations of environmental temperature, pH and oxygen content which could change their intracellular pH. They are also exposed to trace metals such as cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) that accumulate in their tissues and may negatively affect mitochondrial functions and bioenergetics. We determined the interactive effects of pH and trace metals (25 μM Cd or Cu) on mitochondrial functions (including respiration and membrane potentials in both ADP-stimulated (state 3) and resting (state 4) states) of two common marine bivalves, the hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) and eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica). In the absence of the trace metals, mitochondrial functions of C. virginica and M. mercenaria were insensitive to pH in a broad physiologically relevant range (6.6–7.8). Mitochondrial respiration was generally suppressed by 25 μM Cd or Cu (with the stronger effects observed for ADP-stimulated compared to the resting respiration) while the mitochondrial membrane potential was unaffected. pH modulated the effects of Cu and Cd on mitochondrial respiration of the bivalves. In oysters, Cu suppressed ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration at high and low pH values (6.6 and 7.8, respectively), but had no effect in the intermediate pH range (7.0–7.4). In clams, the negative effect of Cu on ADP-stimulated respiration was only observed at extremely high pH (7.8). A decrease in p

  11. Implication of bidirectional promoters containing duplicated GGAA motifs of mitochondrial function-associated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Uchiumi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are well known as the primary required organelle in all eukaryotic cells. They have their own mtDNA containing genes that encode tRNAs, rRNAs and a set of functional proteins required for energy (ATP production. However, almost all (99% of mitochondrial proteins are encoded by host nuclear genes. Therefore, expression of mitochondrial protein-encoding genes should be regulated similarly to genes that are present in the host nuclear chromosomes. Interestingly, from genomic database assisted surveillance, it was revealed that a lot of mitochondrial function associated protein-encoding genes are oppositely linked in a head-head manner. If the two head-head conjugated genes are regulated by the same transcription factor(s, their expression would be dependent on the direction of transcription machinery that contains RNA polymerase II to execute mRNA synthesis. In this article, we will focus on several examples of the mitochondrial and the partner gene sets and discuss putative functions of transcription factor binding elements in the bidirectional promoters of mitochondrial function-associated genes in chromosomes.

  12. Separation of the gluconeogenic and mitochondrial functions of pgc-1α through s6 kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lustig, Y.; Ruas, J.L.; Estall, J.L.; Lo, J.C.; Devarakonda, S.; Laznik, D.; Choi, J.H.; Spiegelman, B.M.; Ono, H.; Olsen, J.V.

    2011-01-01

    PGC-1α is a transcriptional coactivator that powerfully regulates many pathways linked to energy homeostasis. Specifically, PGC-1α controls mitochondrial biogenesis in most tissues but also initiates important tissue-specific functions, including fiber type switching in skeletal muscle and...... leaving undisturbed the interactions of PGC-1α with ERRα and PPARα, factors important for mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. These data illustrate that S6 kinase can modify PGC 1α and thus allow molecular dissection of its functions, providing metabolic flexibility needed for dietary...... gluconeogenesis in cultured hepatocytes and in vivo, while leaving the functions of PGC-1α as an activator of mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation genes completely intact. These phosphorylations interfere with the ability of PGC-1α to bind to HNF4α, a transcription factor required for gluconeogenesis, while...

  13. The measurement of reversible redox dependent post-translational modifications and their regulation of mitochondrial and skeletal muscle function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Philip A.; Duan, Jicheng; Qian, Weijun; Marcinek, David J.

    2015-11-25

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a common feature of skeletal myopathies across multiple conditions; however, the mechanism by which it contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction remains controversial. Oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA has received the most attention, yet an important role for reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs) in pathophysiology is emerging. The possibility that these PTMs can exert dynamic control of muscle function implicates them as a mechanism contributing to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic disease. Herein, we discuss the significance of thiol-based redox dependent modifications to mitochondrial, myofibrillar and excitation-contraction (EC) coupling proteins with an emphasis on how these changes could alter skeletal muscle performance under chronically stressed conditions. A major barrier to a better mechanistic understanding of the role of reversible redox PTMs in muscle function is the technical challenges associated with accurately measuring the changes of site-specific redox PTMs. Here we will critically review current approaches with an emphasis on sample preparation artifacts, quantitation, and specificity. Despite these challenges, the ability to accurately quantify reversible redox PTMs is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic diseases.

  14. The 2-thiouridylase function of the human MTU1 (TRMU) enzyme is dispensable for mitochondrial translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasarman, Florin; Antonicka, Hana; Horvath, Rita; Shoubridge, Eric A

    2011-12-01

    MTU1 (TRMU) is a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for the 2-thiolation of the wobble U in tRNA(Lys), tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Gln), a post-transcriptional modification believed to be important for accurate and efficient synthesis of the 13 respiratory chain subunits encoded by mtDNA. Mutations in MTU1 are associated with acute infantile liver failure, and this has been ascribed to a transient lack of cysteine, the sulfur donor for the thiouridylation reaction, resulting in a mitochondrial translation defect during early development. A mutation in tRNA(Lys) that causes myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) is also reported to prevent modification of the wobble U. Here we show that mitochondrial translation is unaffected in fibroblasts from an MTU1 patient, in which MTU1 is undetectable by immunoblotting, despite the severe reduction in the 2-thiolation of mitochondrial tRNA(Lys), tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Gln). The only respiratory chain abnormality that we could observe in these cells was an accumulation of a Complex II assembly intermediate, which, however, did not affect the level of the fully assembled enzyme. The identical phenotype was observed by siRNA-mediated knockdown of MTU1 in HEK 293 cells. Further, the mitochondrial translation deficiencies present in myoblasts from mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episode and MERRF patients, which are associated with defects in post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs, did not worsen following knockdown of MTU1 in these cells. This study demonstrates that MTU1 is not required for mitochondrial translation at normal steady-state levels of tRNAs, and that it may possess an as yet uncharacterized function in another sulfur-trafficking pathway. PMID:21890497

  15. [Effects of exogenous spermidine on mitochondrial function of tomato seedling roots under salinity-alkalinity stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiong-bo; Xiang, Li-xia; Hu, Xiao-hui; Ren, Wen-qi; Zhang, Li; Ni, Xin-xin

    2016-02-01

    Two cultivars of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, cvs. 'Jinpengchaoguan' and 'Zhongza No. 9', with the former being more tolerant to saline-alkaline stress) seedlings grown hydroponically were subjected to salinity-alkalinity stress condition (NaCl: Na2SO4:NaHCO3:Na2CO3 = 1:9:9:1) without or with foliar application of 0.25 mmol . L-1 spermidine (Spd), and the root morphology and physiological characteristics of mitochondrial membrane were analyzed 8 days after treatment, to explore the protective effects of exogenous Spd on mitochondrial function in tomato roots under salinity-alkalinity stress. The results showed that the salinity-alkalinity stress increased the concentrations of both mitochondrial H2O2 and MDA as well as the mitochondrial membrane permeability in the roots of the two cultivars, while it decreased the mitochondrial membrane fluidity, membrane potential, Cyt c/a and H+-ATPase activity, which impaired the mitochondria and therefore inhibited the root growth; and these effects were more obvious in 'Zhongza No. 9' than in 'Jinpengechaoguan'. Under the salinity-alkalinity stress, foliar application Spd could effectively decrease the concentrations of mitochondrial H2O2 and MDA and mitochondrial membrane permeability, while increased the mitochondrial membrane fluidity, membrane potential, Cyt c/a and H+-ATPase activity. These results suggested that exogenous Spd could effectively mitigate the damage on mitochondria induced by salinity-alkalinity stress, and the alleviation effect was more obvious in 'Zhongza No. 9' than in 'Jinpengchaoguan'. PMID:27396122

  16. Changes in the human mitochondrial genome after treatment of malignant disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the only extrachromosomal DNA in human cells. The mitochondrial genome encodes essential information for the synthesis of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Inherited defects of this genome are an important cause of human disease. In addition, the mitochondrial genome seems to be particularly prone to DNA damage and acquired mutations may have a role in ageing, cancer and neurodegeneration. We wished to determine if radiotherapy and chemotherapy used in the treatment of cancer could induce changes in the mitochondrial genome. Such changes would be an important genetic marker of DNA damage and may explain some of the adverse effects of treatment. We studied samples from patients who had received radiotherapy and chemotherapy for point mutations within the mtDNA control region, and for large-scale deletions. In blood samples from patients, we found a significantly increased number of point mutations compared to the control subjects. In muscle biopsies from 7 of 8 patients whom had received whole body irradiation as well as chemotherapy, the level of a specific mtDNA deletion was significantly greater than in control subjects. Our studies have shown that in patients who have been treated for cancer there is an increased level of mtDNA damage

  17. Morphological and functional changes of mitochondrial in apoptotic esophageal carcinoma cell induced by oridonin%冬凌草甲素诱导食管癌细胞凋亡过程中线粒体结构与膜电位的改变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛庆锋; 陈俊辉; 谢晓原; 沈忠英

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate that mitochondrial morphological and functional changes in the course of ap-optosis in esophageal carcinoma cell induced by oridonin (ORI ). Methods: The cultural esophageal carcinoma cell line SHEEC was treated with ORI (32μg/ml). After 2,4,6,12,24 hours of drug adding,the SHEEC cells were collected for TUNEL and electron microscopic examination. The mitochondria transmembrane potential (MTP, △Ψm) change was calculated by Rhodamine 123(Rho123) fluorescence probe and the fluorescent intensity of the mitochondria was measured by flowcytometer and cytofluorimetric analysis. Results: In the early - stage (2h) after adding oridonin an adaptive proliferation of mitochondria appeared; In the mid — stage(4h) ,the mitochondria swelled with outer membrane broken; Then after 8 hours,the cell nucleus showed typical apoptotic changes. After 24 hours,the fluorescent intensity decreased. Conclusion: Under the inducement of oridonin,the apoptotic changes of SHEEC cells were apparent morphological and functional changes of mitochondria with decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. It is considered that changes of mitochondrial are important intermediate link in the course of aopotosis of esophageal carcinoma cells induced by ORI.%目的:研究冬凌草甲素(Oridonin,ORI)诱导食管癌细胞凋亡的过程中线粒体超微结构和功能的变化.方法:采用末端脱氧核苷酸转移酶介导的dUTP缺口末端标记(TUNEL)法和透射电镜法检测细胞凋亡和超微结构改变;罗丹明123(Rhodamine 123,Rho123)荧光探针标记流式细胞仪检测和分析线粒体跨膜电位(MTP,△Ψm)的改变.结果:32μg/ml ORI作用2h后电镜下SHEEC细胞线粒体增多,4h后线粒体肿胀空泡化、内部结构消失,8h后细胞核染色质成块状边集,细胞凋亡.ORI作用24h后,代表线粒体膜电位的Rho123荧光强度降低.结论:在ORI诱导下,SHEEC细胞线粒体有明显的形态和功能改变伴随线粒体△

  18. MCUR1 Is a Scaffold Factor for the MCU Complex Function and Promotes Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanendra Tomar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial Ca2+ Uniporter (MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is the primary mechanism for increasing matrix Ca2+ in most cell types. However, a limited understanding of the MCU complex assembly impedes the comprehension of the precise mechanisms underlying MCU activity. Here, we report that mouse cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells lacking MCU regulator 1 (MCUR1 have severely impaired [Ca2+]m uptake and IMCU current. MCUR1 binds to MCU and EMRE and function as a scaffold factor. Our protein binding analyses identified the minimal, highly conserved regions of coiled-coil domain of both MCU and MCUR1 that are necessary for heterooligomeric complex formation. Loss of MCUR1 perturbed MCU heterooligomeric complex and functions as a scaffold factor for the assembly of MCU complex. Vascular endothelial deletion of MCU and MCUR1 impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics, cell proliferation, and migration but elicited autophagy. These studies establish the existence of a MCU complex that assembles at the mitochondrial integral membrane and regulates Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial metabolism.

  19. Mitochondrial depolarization and electrophysiological changes during ischemia in the rabbit and human heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkin, Matthew S.; Boukens, Bas J.; Tetlow, Megan; Gutbrod, Sarah R.; Ng, Fu Siong

    2014-01-01

    Instability of the inner mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) has been implicated in electrical dysfunction, including arrhythmogenesis during ischemia-reperfusion. Monitoring ΔΨm has led to conflicting results, where depolarization has been reported as sporadic and as a propagating wave. The present study was designed to resolve the aforementioned difference and determine the unknown relationship between ΔΨm and electrophysiology. We developed a novel imaging modality for simultaneous optical mapping of ΔΨm and transmembrane potential (Vm). Optical mapping was performed using potentiometric dyes on preparations from 4 mouse hearts, 14 rabbit hearts, and 7 human hearts. Our data showed that during ischemia, ΔΨm depolarization is sporadic and changes asynchronously with electrophysiological changes. Spatially, ΔΨm depolarization was associated with action potential duration shortening but not conduction slowing. Analysis of focal activity indicated that ΔΨm is not different within the myocardium where the focus originates compared with normal ventricular tissue. Overall, our data suggest that during ischemia, mitochondria maintain their function at the expense of sarcolemmal electrophysiology, but ΔΨm depolarization does not have a direct association to ischemia-induced arrhythmias. PMID:25128175

  20. Temporal increase of platelet mitochondrial respiration is negatively associated with clinical outcome in patients with sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Morota, Saori; Hansson, Magnus J;

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested as a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of sepsis-induced multiple organ failure. Also, restoration of mitochondrial function, known as mitochondrial biogenesis, has been implicated as a key factor for the recovery of organ function in patients wi...... sepsis. Here we investigated temporal changes in platelet mitochondrial respiratory function in patients with sepsis during the first week after disease onset.......Mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested as a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of sepsis-induced multiple organ failure. Also, restoration of mitochondrial function, known as mitochondrial biogenesis, has been implicated as a key factor for the recovery of organ function in patients with...

  1. Elucidation of separate, but collaborative functions of the rRNA methyltransferase-related human mitochondrial transcription factors B1 and B2 in mitochondrial biogenesis reveals new insight into maternally inherited deafness

    OpenAIRE

    Cotney, Justin; McKay, Sharen E.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is controlled by signaling networks that relay information to and from the organelles. However, key mitochondrial factors that mediate such pathways and how they contribute to human disease are not understood fully. Here we demonstrate that the rRNA methyltransferase-related human mitochondrial transcription factors B1 and B2 are key downstream effectors of mitochondrial biogenesis that perform unique, yet cooperative functions. The primary function of h-mtTFB2 is mtD...

  2. What cost mitochondria? The maintenance of functional mitochondrial DNA within and across generations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, D.K.; Spelbrink, J.N.; Beekman, M.

    2014-01-01

    The peculiar biology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) potentially has detrimental consequences for organismal health and lifespan. Typically, eukaryotic cells contain multiple mitochondria, each with multiple mtDNA genomes. The high copy number of mtDNA implies that selection on mtDNA functionality is r

  3. Functional Genomic Analysis of Human Mitochondrial RNA Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley R. Wolf

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Both strands of human mtDNA are transcribed in continuous, multigenic units that are cleaved into the mature rRNAs, tRNAs, and mRNAs required for respiratory chain biogenesis. We sought to systematically identify nuclear-encoded proteins that contribute to processing of mtRNAs within the organelle. First, we devised and validated a multiplex MitoString assay that quantitates 27 mature and precursor mtDNA transcripts. Second, we applied MitoString profiling to evaluate the impact of silencing each of 107 mitochondrial-localized, predicted RNA-binding proteins. With the resulting data set, we rediscovered the roles of recently identified RNA-processing enzymes, detected unanticipated roles of known disease genes in RNA processing, and identified new regulatory factors. We demonstrate that one such factor, FASTKD4, modulates the half-lives of a subset of mt-mRNAs and associates with mtRNAs in vivo. MitoString profiling may be useful for diagnosing and deciphering the pathogenesis of mtDNA disorders.

  4. Mitochondrial Function and Energy Metabolism in Umbilical Cord Blood- and Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pietilä, Mika; Palomäki, Sami; Lehtonen, Siri; Ritamo, Ilja; Valmu, Leena; Nystedt, Johanna; Laitinen, Saara; Leskelä, Hannnu-Ville; Sormunen, Raija; Pesälä, Juha; Nordström, Katrina; Vepsäläinen, Ari; Lehenkari, Petri

    2011-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are an attractive choice for a variety of cellular therapies. hMSCs can be isolated from many different tissues and possess unique mitochondrial properties that can be used to determine their differentiation potential. Mitochondrial properties may possibly be used as a quality measure of hMSC-based products. Accordingly, the present work focuses on the mitochondrial function of hMSCs from umbilical cord blood (UCBMSC) cells and bone marrow cells from donor...

  5. Acute effects of TCDD administration:special emphasis on testicular and sperm mitochondrial function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paula C Mota; Renata S Tavares; Marlia Cordeiro; Susana P Pereira; Stephen J Publicover; Paulo J Oliveira; Joo Ramalho-Santos

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to verify if 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) could have any effect on male germ cells mitochondria and in this way add new insights in how male reproductive alterations observed in other studies occur. Methods:In vivo and in vitro approaches using rat testis and human sperm as models were employed to evaluate TCDD effects on testicular and sperm mitochondria after 24 h of exposure. Results:Testicular mitochondria from TCDD-treated rats presented no differences in the bioenergetic parameters monitored except for a significantly higher electric membrane potential in the presence of ADP, corroborated when TCDD was directly added to testicular mitochondria from untreated rats. Nevertheless, sperm mitochondrial membrane potential, motility, viability, capacitation and acrosomal integrity did not change after TCDD treatment. Moreover, only few sperm cells exposed to TCDD increased their intracellular Ca2+concentration. Conlusions:TCDD can interact directly with rat testicular mitochondria inducing small changes. This effect, however, does not seem to occur in human sperm or it may be insufficient to induce significant alterations as observed by the maintenance of sperm function.

  6. Opposing roles of mitochondrial and nuclear PARP1 in the regulation of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA integrity: implications for the regulation of mitochondrial function

    OpenAIRE

    Szczesny, Bartosz; Brunyanszki, Attila; Olah, Gabor; Mitra, Sankar; Szabo, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    The positive role of PARP1 in regulation of various nuclear DNA transactions is well established. Although a mitochondrial localization of PARP1 has been suggested, its role in the maintenance of the mitochondrial DNA is currently unknown. Here we investigated the role of PARP1 in the repair of the mitochondrial DNA in the baseline and oxidative stress conditions. We used wild-type A549 cells or cells depleted of PARP1. Our data show that intra-mitochondrial PARP1 interacts with a key mitocho...

  7. Role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 in higher brain functions, neuronal plasticity and network oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Hermes

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: We conclude that disruptions in mitochondrial function may play a critical role in pathophysiology of mental illness. Specifically, we have shown that NMDA driven behavioral, synaptic, and brain oscillatory functions are impaired in UCP2 knockout mice.

  8. The role of exercise and exercise-related factors in the control of mitochondrial oxidative function

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Brandon

    2002-01-01

    The effects of exercise and exercise-related factors on the control of mitochondrial oxidative function were investigated in human and rat skeletal muscle. Oxidative function was assessed through the measurement of oxygen consumption in chemically permeabilized (skinned) fibers. Mitochondria in skinned muscle fibers remain in their natural structural environment, permitting sophisticated mechanisms of respiratory control to be studied while allowing the surrounding milieu to...

  9. Protection of melatonin against damage of sperm mito-chondrial function induced by reactive oxygen species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-JunShang; Yu-FengHuang; Zhang-QunYe; XiaoYu; Wan-JiaGu

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To study the mitochondrial function damage of sperm in-duced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the protection of melatonin (MLT) against the damage. Methods: Normal function spermatozoa were selected from semen samples by Percoll gradi-ent centrifugation technique. The ROS generated by the hypoxan-thine xanthine oxidase system was incubated with the normal sper-matozoa in the presence or absence of MLT (6 retool/L) for 30 and 60 minutes.

  10. Beneficial effects of a Q-ter based nutritional mixture on functional performance, mitochondrial function, and oxidative stress in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinze Xu

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are central mechanisms underlying the aging process and the pathogenesis of many age-related diseases. Selected antioxidants and specific combinations of nutritional compounds could target many biochemical pathways that affect both oxidative stress and mitochondrial function and, thereby, preserve or enhance physical performance.In this study, we evaluated the potential anti-aging benefits of a Q-ter based nutritional mixture (commercially known as Eufortyn mainly containing the following compounds: terclatrated coenzyme Q(10 (Q-ter, creatine and a standardized ginseng extract. We found that Eufortyn supplementation significantly ameliorated the age-associated decreases in grip strength and gastrocnemius subsarcolemmal mitochondria Ca(2+ retention capacity when initiated in male Fischer344 x Brown Norway rats at 21 months, but not 29 months, of age. Moreover, the increases in muscle RNA oxidation and subsarcolemmal mitochondrial protein carbonyl levels, as well as the decline of total urine antioxidant power, which develop late in life, were mitigated by Eufortyn supplementation in rats at 29 months of age.These data imply that Eufortyn is efficacious in reducing oxidative damage, improving the age-related mitochondrial functional decline, and preserving physical performance when initiated in animals at early midlife (21 months. The efficacy varied, however, according to the age at which the supplementation was provided, as initiation in late middle age (29 months was incapable of restoring grip strength and mitochondrial function. Therefore, the Eufortyn supplementation may be particularly beneficial when initiated prior to major biological and functional declines that appear to occur with advancing age.

  11. Protein kinase CK2 inhibition induces cell death via early impact on mitochondrial function*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaiser, Fatima; Trembley, Janeen H.; Kren, Betsy T.; Wu, Jing-Jiang; Naveed, A. Khaliq; Ahmed, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    CK2 (official acronym for casein kinase 2 or II) is a potent suppressor of apoptosis in response to diverse apoptotic stimuli —thus its molecular downregulation or activity inhibition results in potent induction of cell death. CK2 downregulation is known to impact mitochondrial apoptotic circuitry but the underlying mechanism(s) remain unclear. Utilizing prostate cancer cell lines subjected to CK2-specific inhibitors which cause loss of cell viability, we have found that CK2 inhibition in cells causes rapid early decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). Cells treated with the CK2 inhibitors TBB (4,5,6,7-tetrabromobenzotriazole) or TBCA (tetrabromocinnamic acid) demonstrate changes in Δψm which become apparent within 2 h, i.e., significantly prior to evidence of activation of other mitochondrial apoptotic signals whose temporal expression ensues subsequent to loss of Δψm. Further, we have demonstrated the presence of CK2 in purified mitochondria and it appears that the effect on Δψm evoked by inhibition of CK2 may involve mitochondrial localized CK2. Results also suggest that alterations in Ca2+ signaling may be involved in the CK2 mediated regulation of Δψm and mitochondrial permeability. Thus, we propose that a key mechanism of CK2 impact on mitochondrial apoptotic circuitry and cell death involves early loss of Δψm which may be a primary trigger for apoptotic signaling and cell death resulting from CK2 inhibition. PMID:25043911

  12. Estradiol affects liver mitochondrial function in ovariectomized and tamoxifen-treated ovariectomized female rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given the tremendous importance of mitochondria to basic cellular functions as well as the critical role of mitochondrial impairment in a vast number of disorders, a compelling question is whether 17β-estradiol (E2) modulates mitochondrial function. To answer this question we exposed isolated liver mitochondria to E2. Three groups of rat females were used: control, ovariectomized and ovariectomized treated with tamoxifen. Tamoxifen has antiestrogenic effects in the breast tissue and is the standard endocrine treatment for women with breast cancer. However, under certain circumstances and in certain tissues, tamoxifen can also exert estrogenic agonist properties. We observed that at basal conditions, ovariectomy and tamoxifen treatment do not induce any statistical alteration in oxidative phosphorylation system and respiratory chain parameters. Furthermore, tamoxifen treatment increases the capacity of mitochondria to accumulate Ca2+ delaying the opening of the permeability transition pore. The presence of 25 μM E2 impairs respiration and oxidative phosphorylation system these effects being similar in all groups of animals studied. Curiously, E2 protects against lipid peroxidation and increases the production of H2O2 in energized mitochondria of control females. Our results indicate that E2 has in general deleterious effects that lead to mitochondrial impairment. Since mitochondrial dysfunction is a triggering event of cell degeneration and death, the use of exogenous E2 must be carefully considered

  13. Tigecycline targets nonsmall cell lung cancer through inhibition of mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xuefeng; Gu, Zhenfang; Chen, Wenming; Jiao, Junbo

    2016-08-01

    Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer with a high mortality rate and still remains therapeutically a challenge. A strategy to target NSCLC is to identify agents that are effective against NSCLC cells while sparing normal cells. We show that tigecycline, an FDA-approved antibiotic drug, preferentially targets NSCLC cells. Tigecycline is effective in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of multiple cell lines derived from two common NSCLC subtypes: adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Tigecycline also dose-dependently inhibits colony formation of NSCLC subpopulation of cells with highly proliferative and invasive properties. Compared to NSCLC cells, tigecycline affects proliferation and survival of normal fibroblast cells significantly to a less extent. More importantly, tigecycline significantly inhibits NSCLC tumor growth through decreasing proliferation and increasing apoptosis of tumor cells in vivo. Tigecycline significantly inhibits mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP levels and increases reactive oxygen species (ROS), suggesting that tigecycline impairs mitochondrial functions. Our study suggests that tigecycline may be a useful therapeutic agent, and inhibiting mitochondrial functions may represent a new targeted therapy for NSCLC. PMID:27009695

  14. Hsp90 inhibition decreases mitochondrial protein turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daciana H Margineantu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells treated with hsp90 inhibitors exhibit pleiotropic changes, including an expansion of the mitochondrial compartment, accompanied by mitochondrial fragmentation and condensed mitochondrial morphology, with ultimate compromise of mitochondrial integrity and apoptosis. FINDINGS: We identified several mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complex subunits, including several encoded by mtDNA, that are upregulated by hsp90 inhibitors, without corresponding changes in mRNA abundance. Post-transcriptional accumulation of mitochondrial proteins observed with hsp90 inhibitors is also seen in cells treated with proteasome inhibitors. Detailed studies of the OSCP subunit of mitochondrial F1F0-ATPase revealed the presence of mono- and polyubiquitinated OSCP in mitochondrial fractions. We demonstrate that processed OSCP undergoes retrotranslocation to a trypsin-sensitive form associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. Inhibition of proteasome or hsp90 function results in accumulation of both correctly targeted and retrotranslocated mitochondrial OSCP. CONCLUSIONS: Cytosolic turnover of mitochondrial proteins demonstrates a novel connection between mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Analogous to defective protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, a mitochondrial unfolded protein response may play a role in the apoptotic effects of hsp90 and proteasome inhibitors.

  15. Modulation of mitochondrial function and morphology by interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with the mitochondrial fusion factor OPA1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieper, Nicole; Holmstroem, Kira M.; Ciceri, Dalila; Fiesel, Fabienne C. [Center of Neurology and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Wolburg, Hartwig [Institute of Pathology, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Ziviani, Elena; Whitworth, Alexander J. [Medical Research Council Centre for Developmental and Biomedical Genetics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Martins, L. Miguel [Cell Death Regulation Laboratory, MRC Toxicology Unit, Leicester LE1 9HN (United Kingdom); Kahle, Philipp J., E-mail: philipp.kahle@uni-tuebingen.de [Center of Neurology and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Krueger, Rejko, E-mail: rejko.krueger@uni-tuebingen.de [Center of Neurology and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Loss of Omi/HtrA2 function leads to nerve cell loss in mouse models and has been linked to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Omi/HtrA2 is a serine protease released as a pro-apoptotic factor from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol. Under physiological conditions, Omi/HtrA2 is thought to be involved in protection against cellular stress, but the cytological and molecular mechanisms are not clear. Omi/HtrA2 deficiency caused an accumulation of reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. In Omi/HtrA2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, as well as in Omi/HtrA2 silenced human HeLa cells and Drosophila S2R+ cells, we found elongated mitochondria by live cell imaging. Electron microscopy confirmed the mitochondrial morphology alterations and showed abnormal cristae structure. Examining the levels of proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion, we found a selective up-regulation of more soluble OPA1 protein. Complementation of knockout cells with wild-type Omi/HtrA2 but not with the protease mutant [S306A]Omi/HtrA2 reversed the mitochondrial elongation phenotype and OPA1 alterations. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation showed direct interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with endogenous OPA1. Thus, we show for the first time a direct effect of loss of Omi/HtrA2 on mitochondrial morphology and demonstrate a novel role of this mitochondrial serine protease in the modulation of OPA1. Our results underscore a critical role of impaired mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Modulation of mitochondrial function and morphology by interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with the mitochondrial fusion factor OPA1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss of Omi/HtrA2 function leads to nerve cell loss in mouse models and has been linked to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Omi/HtrA2 is a serine protease released as a pro-apoptotic factor from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol. Under physiological conditions, Omi/HtrA2 is thought to be involved in protection against cellular stress, but the cytological and molecular mechanisms are not clear. Omi/HtrA2 deficiency caused an accumulation of reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. In Omi/HtrA2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, as well as in Omi/HtrA2 silenced human HeLa cells and Drosophila S2R+ cells, we found elongated mitochondria by live cell imaging. Electron microscopy confirmed the mitochondrial morphology alterations and showed abnormal cristae structure. Examining the levels of proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion, we found a selective up-regulation of more soluble OPA1 protein. Complementation of knockout cells with wild-type Omi/HtrA2 but not with the protease mutant [S306A]Omi/HtrA2 reversed the mitochondrial elongation phenotype and OPA1 alterations. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation showed direct interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with endogenous OPA1. Thus, we show for the first time a direct effect of loss of Omi/HtrA2 on mitochondrial morphology and demonstrate a novel role of this mitochondrial serine protease in the modulation of OPA1. Our results underscore a critical role of impaired mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Regulation of mitochondrial functions by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Sangbin; Smith, Kelly R.; Lim, Ssang-Taek Steve; Tian, Rong; Lu, Jianrong; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondria are double membrane-bound organelles found in most eukaryotic cells. They generate most of the cell’s energy supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are critical mechanisms in the regulation of cell signaling networks and are essential for almost all the cellular functions. For many decades, mitochondria were considered autonomous organelles merely functioning to generate energy for cells to survive and proliferate, and were thoug...

  18. Evaluation of Mitochondrial Function in the CNS of Rodent Models of Alzheimer's Disease - High Resolution Respirometry Applied to Acute Hippocampal Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Candida; Barbosa, Rui M; Laranjinha, Joao; Ledo, Ana

    2014-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial disease characterized by extracellular deposits of amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. These hallmark alterations are preceded by synaptic deterioration, changes in neuromolecular plasticity phenomena, mitochondrial dysfunction, increase in oxidative damage to cellular constituents and decreased energy metabolism. The hippocampus is a structure of the temporal medial lobe implicated in specific forms of memory processes. It is also one of the first and most affected regions of the CNS in AD. Here we present a novel approach to the study if mitochondrial function/disfunction in 2 rodent models of AD: an acute rat model obtained by intracerebroventricular injection of the toxin streptozotocin (STZ) and a progressive triple transgenic mouse model (3TgAD) harboring PS1M146V, APPSwe, and tauP301L transgenes. Mitochondrial dysfunction has classically been assessed in such models by isolating mitochondria, synaptossoms or working with cell cultures. Anyone of these approaches destroys the intricate intercellular connectivity and cytoarchitecture of neuronal tissue. We used acute hippocampal slices obtained from the 2 models of AD and evaluated changes in mitochondrial function as a function of disease and/or age. Mitochondrial stress test were performed on the high resolution respirometry (Oroboros 2K Oxymeter). Upon analysis of oxygen consumption rates (OCR) we observed significant decreases in basal OCR, maximal respiratory capacity, ATP turnover and a tendency for decrease in sparing capacity in the STZ rat model compared to shame injected animals. Regarding the 3TgAD model we observed an age-dependent decrease in all parameters evaluated in the mitochondrial stress test, in both 3TgAD and NTg animals. However, although a tendency towards decreased OCR was observed when comparing 3TgAD and age-matched NTg animals, no statistically significant difference was observed. PMID:26461355

  19. Impaired Mitochondrial Respiratory Functions and Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbuswamy K. Prabu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown a tissue-specific increase in oxidative stress in the early stages of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats. In this study, we investigated oxidative stress-related long-term complications and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the different tissues of STZ-induced diabetic rats (>15 mM blood glucose for 8 weeks. These animals showed a persistent increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively production. Oxidative protein carbonylation was also increased with the maximum effect observed in the pancreas of diabetic rats. The activities of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes ubiquinol: cytochrome c oxidoreductase (Complex III and cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV were significantly decreased while that of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I and succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex II were moderately increased in diabetic rats, which was confirmed by the increased expression of the 70 kDa Complex II sub-unit. Mitochondrial matrix aconitase, a ROS sensitive enzyme, was markedly inhibited in the diabetic rat tissues. Increased expression of oxidative stress marker proteins Hsp-70 and HO-1 was also observed along with increased expression of nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that mitochondrial respiratory complexes may play a critical role in ROS/RNS homeostasis and oxidative stress related changes in type 1 diabetes and may have implications in the etiology of diabetes and its complications.

  20. Analysis of mitochondrial function and localisation during human embryonic stem cell differentiation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowse, Andrew B J; Chong, Fenny; Elliott, David A; Elefanty, Andrew G; Stanley, Edouard G; Gray, Peter P; Munro, Trent P; Osborne, Geoffrey W

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivatives show promise as viable cell therapy options for multiple disorders in different tissues. Recent advances in stem cell biology have lead to the reliable production and detailed molecular characterisation of a range of cell-types. However, the role of mitochondria during differentiation has yet to be fully elucidated. Mitochondria mediate a cells response to altered energy requirements (e.g. cardiomyocyte contraction) and, as such, the mitochondrial phenotype is likely to change during the dynamic process of hESC differentiation. We demonstrate that manipulating mitochondrial biogenesis alters mesendoderm commitment. To investigate mitochondrial localisation during early lineage specification of hESCs we developed a mitochondrial reporter line, KMEL2, in which sequences encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) are targeted to the mitochondria. Differentiation of KMEL2 lines into the three germ layers showed that the mitochondria in these differentiated progeny are GFP positive. Therefore, KMEL2 hESCs facilitate the study of mitochondria in a range of cell types and, importantly, permit real-time analysis of mitochondria via the GFP tag. PMID:23284940

  1. Putative Structural and Functional Coupling of the Mitochondrial BKCa Channel to the Respiratory Chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bednarczyk

    Full Text Available Potassium channels have been found in the inner mitochondrial membranes of various cells. These channels regulate the mitochondrial membrane potential, the matrix volume and respiration. The activation of these channels is cytoprotective. In our study, the single-channel activity of a large-conductance Ca(2+-regulated potassium channel (mitoBKCa channel was measured by patch-clamping mitoplasts isolated from the human astrocytoma (glioblastoma U-87 MG cell line. A potassium-selective current was recorded with a mean conductance of 290 pS in symmetrical 150 mM KCl solution. The channel was activated by Ca(2+ at micromolar concentrations and by the potassium channel opener NS1619. The channel was inhibited by paxilline and iberiotoxin, known inhibitors of BKCa channels. Western blot analysis, immuno-gold electron microscopy, high-resolution immunofluorescence assays and polymerase chain reaction demonstrated the presence of the BKCa channel β4 subunit in the inner mitochondrial membrane of the human astrocytoma cells. We showed that substrates of the respiratory chain, such as NADH, succinate, and glutamate/malate, decrease the activity of the channel at positive voltages. This effect was abolished by rotenone, antimycin and cyanide, inhibitors of the respiratory chain. The putative interaction of the β4 subunit of mitoBKCa with cytochrome c oxidase was demonstrated using blue native electrophoresis. Our findings indicate possible structural and functional coupling of the mitoBKCa channel with the mitochondrial respiratory chain in human astrocytoma U-87 MG cells.

  2. Mitochondrial function and regulation of macrophage sterol metabolism and inflammatory responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annette; Graham; Anne-Marie; Allen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to explore the role of mitochondria in regulating macrophage sterol homeostasis and inflammatory responses within the aetiology of atherosclerosis.Macrophage generation of oxysterol activators of liver X receptors(LXRs),via sterol 27-hydroxylase,is regulated by the rate of flux of cholesterolto the inner mitochondrial membrane,via a complex of cholesterol trafficking proteins.Oxysterols are key signalling molecules,regulating the transcriptional activity of LXRs which coordinate macrophage sterol metabolism and cytokine production,key features influencing the impact of these cells within atherosclerotic lesions.The precise identity of the complex of proteins mediating mitochondrial cholesterol trafficking in macrophages remains a matter of debate,but may include steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and translocator protein.There is clear evidence that targeting either of these proteins enhances removal of cholesterol via LXRα-dependent induction of ATP binding cassette transporters(ABCA1,ABCG1) and limits the production of inflammatory cytokines; interventions which influence mitochondrial structure and bioenergetics also impact on removal of cholesterol from macrophages.Thus,molecules which can sustain or improve mitochondrial structure,the function of the electron transport chain,or increase the activity of components of the protein complex involved in cholesterol transfer,may therefore have utility in limiting or regressing atheroma development,reducing the incidence of coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction.

  3. Genetic risk factors affecting mitochondrial function are associated with kidney disease in people with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swan, E J; Salem, R M; Sandholm, N;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association with diabetic kidney disease of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. METHODS: The mitochondrial genome and 1039 nuclear genes that are integral to mitochondrial function were investigated using a case (n = 823...... phenotypes to those of the discovery collection. Association analyses were performed using the plink genetic analysis toolset, with adjustment for relevant covariates. RESULTS: A total of 25 SNPs were evaluated in the mitochondrial genome, but none were significantly associated with diabetic kidney disease...... or end-stage renal disease. A total of 38 SNPs in nuclear genes influencing mitochondrial function were nominally associated with diabetic kidney disease and 16 SNPS were associated with end-stage renal disease, secondary to diabetic kidney disease, with meta-analyses confirming the same direction of...

  4. Exercise-Induced Changes in Caveolin-1, Depletion of Mitochondrial Cholesterol, and the Inhibition of Mitochondrial Swelling in Rat Skeletal Muscle but Not in the Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Jozef Flis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction in cholesterol in mitochondria, observed after exercise, is related to the inhibition of mitochondrial swelling. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 plays an essential role in the regulation of cellular cholesterol metabolism and is required by various signalling pathways. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolonged swimming on the mitochondrial Cav-1 concentration; additionally, we identified the results of these changes as they relate to the induction of changes in the mitochondrial swelling and cholesterol in rat skeletal muscle and liver. Male Wistar rats were divided into a sedentary control group and an exercise group. The exercised rats swam for 3 hours and were burdened with an additional 3% of their body weight. After the cessation of exercise, their quadriceps femoris muscles and livers were immediately removed for experimentation. The exercise protocol caused an increase in the Cav-1 concentration in crude muscle mitochondria; this was related to a reduction in the cholesterol level and an inhibition of mitochondrial swelling. There were no changes in rat livers, with the exception of increased markers of oxidative stress in mitochondria. These data indicate the possible role of Cav-1 in the adaptive change in the rat muscle mitochondria following exercise.

  5. A novel method for determining human ex vivo submaximal skeletal muscle mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Gram, Martin; Jensen, Martin Borch; Lund, Michael Taulo; Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Dela, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    previously used. Muscle biopsies were taken from 64 old or young male subjects (60-70 or 20-30 years old). Aged subjects were recruited as trained or untrained. Muscle biopsies were used for isolation of mitochondria and subsequent measurements of DNA repair, antioxidant capacity and mitochondrial protein......, with higher manganese superoxide dismuthase (MnSOD) content the trained aged subjects may actually have lower or similar mitochondrial superoxide emission when compared with the untrained subjects. We conclude that aging, and the physical activity level in aged subjects, are both related to changes in...... potential and was not affected by training status. State 3 respiration was lower in the aged untrained subjects. This effect, however, was alleviated in the aged trained subjects. H2 O2 emission with PM was higher in the aged subjects, and exacerbated by training, but was not changed when using SR. However...

  6. Mitochondrial function in vascular endothelial cell in diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Pangare, Meenal; Makino, Ayako

    2012-01-01

    Micro- and macrovascular complications are commonly seen in diabetic patients and endothelial dysfunction contributes to the development and progression of the complications. Abnormal functions in endothelial cells lead to the increase in vascular tension and atherosclerosis, followed by systemic hypertension as well as increased incident of ischemia and stroke in diabetic patients. Mitochondria are organelles serving as a source of energy production and as regulators of cell survival (e.g., ...

  7. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Cardiovascular Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Andrew R. Hall; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2013-01-01

    Significance: Mitochondria are dynamic organelles capable of changing their shape and distribution by undergoing either fission or fusion. Changes in mitochondrial dynamics, which is under the control of specific mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins, have been implicated in cell division, embryonic development, apoptosis, autophagy, and metabolism. Although the machinery for modulating mitochondrial dynamics is present in the cardiovascular system, its function there has only recently be...

  8. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β deletion increases mitochondrial function and protects mice from LXR-induced hepatic steatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► LXR agonist activation increases liver TG accumulation by increasing lipogenesis. ► C/EBPβ−/− mouse prevents LXR activation-mediated induction of hepatic lipogenesis. ► C/EBPβ deletion increases mitochondrial transport chain function. ► Beneficial effects of LXR activation on liver cholesterol metabolism did not change. ► C/EBPβ inhibition might have important therapeutic potential. -- Abstract: Drugs designed specifically to activate liver X receptors (LXRs) have beneficial effects on lowering cholesterol metabolism and inflammation but unfortunately lead to severe hepatic steatosis. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) is an important regulator of liver gene expression but little is known about its involvement in LXR-based steatosis and cholesterol metabolism. The present study investigated the role of C/EBPβ expression in LXR agonist (T0901317)-mediated alteration of hepatic triglyceride (TG) and lipogenesis in mice. C/EBPβ deletion in mice prevented LXR agonist-mediated induction of lipogenic gene expression in liver in conjunction with significant reduction of liver TG accumulation. Surprisingly, C/EBPβ−/− mice showed a major increase in liver mitochondrial electron chain function compared to WT mice. Furthermore, LXR activation in C/EBPβ−/− mice increased the expression of liver ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG1, a gene implicated in cholesterol efflux and reducing blood levels of total and LDL-cholesterol. Together, these findings establish a central role for C/EBPβ in the LXR-mediated steatosis and mitochondrial function, without impairing the influence of LXR activation on lowering LDL and increasing HDL-cholesterol. Inactivation of C/EBPβ might therefore be an important therapeutic strategy to prevent LXR activation-mediated adverse effects on liver TG metabolism without disrupting its beneficial effects on cholesterol metabolism.

  9. Proteomic and functional analyses reveal a mitochondrial dysfunction in P301L tau transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    David, D C; Hauptmann, S.; Scherping, I; Schuessel, K; U. Keil; Rizzu, P.; Ravid, R; Dröse, S; Brandt, U.; Müller, W E; Eckert, A; Götz, J.

    2005-01-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing the P301L mutant human tau protein exhibit an accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau and develop neurofibrillary tangles. The consequences of tau pathology were investigated here by proteomics followed by functional analysis. Mainly metabolism-related proteins including mitochondrial respiratory chain complex components, antioxidant enzymes, and synaptic proteins were identified as modified in the proteome pattern of P301L tau mice. Significantly, the reduction...

  10. Altered Mitochondrial Function and Oxidative Stress in Leukocytes of Anorexia Nervosa Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Victor, Victor M.; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Saiz-Alarcon, Vanessa; Sangüesa, Maria C.; Rojo-Bofill, Luis; Bañuls, Celia; Falcón, Rosa; Castelló, Raquel; Rojo, Luis; Rocha, Milagros; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Context Anorexia nervosa is a common illness among adolescents and is characterised by oxidative stress. Objective The effects of anorexia on mitochondrial function and redox state in leukocytes from anorexic subjects were evaluated. Design and setting A multi-centre, cross-sectional case-control study was performed. Patients Our study population consisted of 20 anorexic patients and 20 age-matched controls, all of which were Caucasian women. Main outcome measures Anthropometric and metabolic...

  11. Overexpression of mtDNA-associated AtWhy2 compromises mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou-Rached Charbel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background StWhy1, a member of the plant-specific Whirly single-stranded DNA-binding protein family, was first characterized as a transcription factor involved in the activation of the nuclear PR-10a gene following defense-related stress in potato. In Arabidopsis thaliana, Whirlies have recently been shown to be primarily localized in organelles. Two representatives of the family, AtWhy1 and AtWhy3 are imported into plastids while AtWhy2 localizes to mitochondria. Their function in organelles is currently unknown. Results To understand the role of mitochondrial Whirlies in higher plants, we produced A. thaliana lines with altered expression of the atwhy2 gene. Organellar DNA immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that AtWhy2 binds to mitochondrial DNA. Overexpression of atwhy2 in plants perturbs mitochondrial function by causing a diminution in transcript levels and mtDNA content which translates into a low activity level of respiratory chain complexes containing mtDNA-encoded subunits. This lowered activity of mitochondria yielded plants that were reduced in size and had distorted leaves that exhibited accelerated senescence. Overexpression of atwhy2 also led to early accumulation of senescence marker transcripts in mature leaves. Inactivation of the atwhy2 gene did not affect plant development and had no detectable effect on mitochondrial morphology, activity of respiratory chain complexes, transcription or the amount of mtDNA present. This lack of phenotype upon abrogation of atwhy2 expression suggests the presence of functional homologues of the Whirlies or the activation of compensating mechanisms in mitochondria. Conclusion AtWhy2 is associated with mtDNA and its overexpression results in the production of dysfunctional mitochondria. This report constitutes the first evidence of a function for the Whirlies in organelles. We propose that they could play a role in the regulation of the gene expression machinery of organelles.

  12. Increased uncoupling protein 3 content does not affect mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Hesselink, M.K.C.; Greenhaff, P L; Constantin-Teodosu, D.; Hultman, E; Saris, W. H. M.; Nieuwlaat, R.; Schaart, G.; Kornips, C.F.P.; P. Schrauwen

    2003-01-01

    Phosphocreatine (PCr) resynthesis rate following intense anoxic contraction can be used as a sensitive index of in vivo mitochondrial function. We examined the effect of a diet-induced increase in uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) expression on postexercise PCr resynthesis in skeletal muscle. Nine healthy male volunteers undertook 20 one-legged maximal voluntary contractions with limb blood flow occluded to deplete muscle PCr stores. Exercise was performed following 7 days consumption of low-fat (L...

  13. Magnesium regulates neural stem cell proliferation in the mouse hippocampus by altering mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shanshan; Mou, Chengzhi; Ma, Yihe; Han, Ruijie; Li, Xue

    2016-04-01

    In the adult brain, neural stem cells from the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the cortex progress through the following five developmental stages: radial glia-like cells, neural progenitor cells, neuroblasts, immature neurons, and mature neurons. These developmental stages are linked to both neuronal microenvironments and energy metabolism. Neurogenesis is restricted and has been demonstrated to arise from tissue microenvironments. We determined that magnesium, a key nutrient in cellular energy metabolism, affects neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in cells derived from the embryonic hippocampus by influencing mitochondrial function. Densities of proliferating cells and NSCs both showed their highest values at 0.8 mM [Mg(2+) ]o , whereas lower proliferation rates were observed at 0.4 and 1.4 mM [Mg(2+) ]o . The numbers and sizes of the neurospheres reached the maximum at 0.8 mM [Mg(2+) ]o and were weaker under both low (0.4 mM) and high (1.4 mM) concentrations of magnesium. In vitro experimental evidence demonstrates that extracellular magnesium regulates the number of cultured hippocampal NSCs, affecting both magnesium homeostasis and mitochondrial function. Our findings indicate that the effect of [Mg(2+) ]o on NSC proliferation may lie downstream of alterations in mitochondrial function because mitochondrial membrane potential was highest in the NSCs in the moderate [Mg(2+) ]o (0.8 mM) group and lower in both the low (0.4 mM) and high (1.4 mM) [Mg(2+) ]o groups. Overall, these findings demonstrate a new function for magnesium in the brain in the regulation of hippocampal neural stem cells: affecting their cellular energy metabolism. PMID:26634890

  14. Functional Recurrent Mutations in the Human Mitochondrial Phylogeny: Dual Roles in Evolution and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Liron; Zhidkov, Ilia; Gurman, Yotam; Hawlena, Hadas; Mishmar, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Mutations frequently reoccur in the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). However, it is unclear whether recurrent mtDNA nodal mutations (RNMs), that is, recurrent mutations in stems of unrelated phylogenetic nodes, are functional and hence selectively constrained. To answer this question, we performed comprehensive parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses of 9,868 publicly available whole human mtDNAs revealing 1,606 single nodal mutations (SNMs) and 679 RNMs. We then evaluated the potential fun...

  15. Pharmacological protection of mitochondrial function mitigates acute limb ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Wei; Bi, Yue; Gao, Xiang; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Yanrong; Harris, Jackie; Legalley, Thomas D; Gibson, K Michael; Bi, Lanrong

    2016-08-15

    We describe several novel curcumin analogues that possess both anti-inflammatory antioxidant properties and thrombolytic activities. The therapeutic efficacy of these curcumin analogues was verified in a mouse ear edema model, a rat arterial thrombosis assay, a free radical scavenging assay performed in PC12 cells, and in both in vitro and in vivo ischemia/reperfusion models. Our findings suggest that their protective effects partially reside in maintenance of optimal mitochondrial function. PMID:27390069

  16. Changes in base composition bias of nuclear and mitochondrial genes in lice (Insecta: Psocodea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Kazunori; Johnson, Kevin P

    2013-12-01

    While it is well known that changes in the general processes of molecular evolution have occurred on a variety of timescales, the mechanisms underlying these changes are less well understood. Parasitic lice ("Phthiraptera") and their close relatives (infraorder Nanopsocetae of the insect order Psocodea) are a group of insects well known for their unusual features of molecular evolution. We examined changes in base composition across parasitic lice and bark lice. We identified substantial differences in percent GC content between the clade comprising parasitic lice plus closely related bark lice (=Nanopsocetae) versus all other bark lice. These changes occurred for both nuclear and mitochondrial protein coding and ribosomal RNA genes, often in the same direction. To evaluate whether correlations in base composition change also occurred within lineages, we used phylogenetically controlled comparisons, and in this case few significant correlations were identified. Examining more constrained sites (first/second codon positions and rRNA) revealed that, in comparison to the other bark lice, the GC content of parasitic lice and close relatives tended towards 50 % either up from less than 50 % GC or down from greater than 50 % GC. In contrast, less constrained sites (third codon positions) in both nuclear and mitochondrial genes showed less of a consistent change of base composition in parasitic lice and very close relatives. We conclude that relaxed selection on this group of insects is a potential explanation of the change in base composition for both mitochondrial and nuclear genes, which could lead to nucleotide frequencies closer to random expectation (i.e., 50 % GC) in the absence of any mutation bias. Evidence suggests this relaxed selection arose once in the non-parasitic common ancestor of Phthiraptera + Nanopsocetae and is not directly related to the evolution of the parasitism in lice. PMID:24233690

  17. Effects of Long-Term Rice Bran Extract Supplementation on Survival, Cognition and Brain Mitochondrial Function in Aged NMRI Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagl, Stephanie; Asseburg, Heike; Heinrich, Martina; Sus, Nadine; Blumrich, Eva-Maria; Dringen, Ralf; Frank, Jan; Eckert, Gunter P

    2016-09-01

    Aging represents a major risk factor for the development of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD). As mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in brain aging and occurs early in the development of AD, the prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction might help to slow brain aging and the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Rice bran extract (RBE) contains high concentrations of vitamin E congeners and γ-oryzanol. We have previously shown that RBE increased mitochondrial function and protected from mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro and in short-term in vivo feeding studies. To mimic the use of RBE as food additive, we have now investigated the effects of a long-term (6 months) feeding of RBE on survival, behavior and brain mitochondrial function in aged NMRI mice. RBE administration significantly increased survival and performance of aged NMRI mice in the passive avoidance and Y-maze test. Brain mitochondrial dysfunction found in aged mice was ameliorated after RBE administration. Furthermore, data from mRNA and protein expression studies revealed an up-regulation of mitochondrial proteins in RBE-fed mice, suggesting an increase in mitochondrial content which is mediated by a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α)-dependent mechanism. Our findings suggest that a long-term treatment with a nutraceutical containing RBE could be useful for slowing down brain aging and thereby delaying or even preventing AD. PMID:27350374

  18. Green's functions for topology change

    CERN Document Server

    Martín, J; Soares, I D; Martin, Jerome; Pinto-Neto, Nelson; Soares, Ivano Damiao

    2005-01-01

    We explicitly calculate Green's functions for quantum changes of topology in Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker Universes, whose spacelike sections are compact but with distinct topologies depending on the curvature parameter $k$. We use the long-wavelength approximation at second order, and we demonstrate that quantum topological transitions from $k=-1$ to $k=1$ (and vice-versa) are allowed whereas no transition to a flat section is possible establishing thus a selection rule. Finally, a toy model is considered where all these properties are investigated concretely.

  19. A Mitochondrial Magnesium Transporter Functions in Arabidopsis Pollen Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Le-Gong Li; Lubomir N.Sokolov; Yong-Hua Yang; Dong-Ping Li; Julie Ting; Girdhar K.Pandy; Sheng Luan

    2008-01-01

    Magnesium is an abundant divalent cation in plant cells and plays a critical role in many physiological processes.We have previously described the jdentification of a 10-member Arabidopsis gene family encoding putative magnesium transport(MGT)proteins.Here,we report that a member of the MGT family,AtMGT5, functions as a dual-functional Mg-transporter that operates in a concentration-dependent manner, namely it serves as a Mg-importer at micromolar levels and facilitates the efflux in the millimolar range.The AtMGT5 protein is localized in the mitochondria,suggesting that AtMGT5 mediates Mg-trafficking between the cytosol and mitochondria.The AtMGT5 gene was exclusively expressed in anthers at early stages of flower development.Examination of two independent T-DNA insertional mutants of AtMGT5 gene demonstrated that AtMG7-5 played an essential role for pollen development and male fertility.This study suggests a critical role for Mg2+ transport between cytosol and mitochondria in male gametogenesis in plants.

  20. Association of mitochondrial function and feed efficiency in poultry and livestock species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottje, W G; Carstens, G E

    2009-04-01

    As grain prices have increased dramatically in the past year, understanding the fundamental genetic, cellular, and biochemical mechanisms responsible for feed efficiency (FE; g of gain/g of feed) or residual feed intake (RFI; an alternative feed efficiency trait that quantifies interanimal variation in DMI that is unexplained by differences in BW and growth rate) in livestock and poultry is extremely important with respect to maintaining viable meat production practices in the United States. Although breed and diet have long been known to affect mitochondrial function, few studies have investigated differences in mitochondrial function and biochemistry due to interanimal phenotypic differences in FE or RFI (i.e., variation among animals of the same breed and fed the same diet). This paper reviews existing literature on relationships of mitochondrial function and biochemistry with FE and RFI in poultry and livestock. The overall goal of all of this paper is to assist the development of tools (e.g., genetic markers or biomarkers) to aid commercial breeding companies in genetic selection that, in turn, will help maintain viable livestock and poultry industries in the United States and around the world. PMID:19028862

  1. Changes in the mitochondrial antioxidant systems in neurodegenerative diseases and acute brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszkiewicz, Joanna; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress (ONS) contributes to the pathogenesis of most brain maladies, and the magnitude of ONS is related to the ability of cellular antioxidants to neutralize the accumulating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). While the major ROS/RNS scavengers and regenerators of bio-oxidized molecules, superoxide dysmutases (SODs), glutathione (GSH), thioredoxin (Trx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx), are distributed in all cellular compartments. This review specifically focuses on the role of the systems operating in mitochondria. There is a growing consensus that the mitochondrial SOD isoform - SOD2 and GSH are critical for the cellular antioxidant defense. Variable changes of the expression or activities of one or more of the mitochondrial antioxidant systems have been documented in the brains derived from human patients and/or in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), cerebral ischemia, toxic brain cell damage associated with overexposure to mercury or excitotoxins, or hepatic encephalopathy. In many cases, ambiguity of the responses of the different antioxidant systems in one and the same disease needs to be more conclusively evaluated before the balance of the changes is viewed as beneficial or detrimental. Modulation of the mitochondrial antioxidant systems may in the future become a target of antioxidant therapy. PMID:25576182

  2. Defective mitochondrial function in vivo in skeletal muscle in adults with Down's syndrome: a 31P-MRS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander C Phillips

    Full Text Available Down's syndrome (DS is a developmental disorder associated with intellectual disability (ID. We have previously shown that people with DS engage in very low levels of exercise compared to people with ID not due to DS. Many aspects of the DS phenotype, such as dementia, low activity levels and poor muscle tone, are shared with disorders of mitochondrial origin, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in cultured DS tissue. We undertook a phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31P-MRS study in the quadriceps muscle of 14 people with DS and 11 non-DS ID controls to investigate the post-exercise resynthesis kinetics of phosphocreatine (PCr, which relies on mitochondrial respiratory function and yields a measure of muscle mitochondrial function in vivo. We found that the PCr recovery rate constant was significantly decreased in adults with DS compared to non-DS ID controls (1.7 ± 0.1 min(-1 vs 2.1 ± 0.1 min(-1 respectively who were matched for physical activity levels, indicating that muscle mitochondrial function in vivo is impaired in DS. This is the first study to investigate mitochondrial function in vivo in DS using (31P-MRS. Our study is consistent with previous in vitro studies, supporting a theory of a global mitochondrial defect in DS.

  3. Ablation of PGC-1beta results in defective mitochondrial activity, thermogenesis, hepatic function, and cardiac performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Lelliott

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1beta (PGC-1beta has been implicated in important metabolic processes. A mouse lacking PGC-1beta (PGC1betaKO was generated and phenotyped using physiological, molecular, and bioinformatic approaches. PGC1betaKO mice are generally viable and metabolically healthy. Using systems biology, we identified a general defect in the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial function and, specifically, the electron transport chain. This defect correlated with reduced mitochondrial volume fraction in soleus muscle and heart, but not brown adipose tissue (BAT. Under ambient temperature conditions, PGC-1beta ablation was partially compensated by up-regulation of PGC-1alpha in BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT that lead to increased thermogenesis, reduced body weight, and reduced fat mass. Despite their decreased fat mass, PGC1betaKO mice had hypertrophic adipocytes in WAT. The thermogenic role of PGC-1beta was identified in thermoneutral and cold-adapted conditions by inadequate responses to norepinephrine injection. Furthermore, PGC1betaKO hearts showed a blunted chronotropic response to dobutamine stimulation, and isolated soleus muscle fibres from PGC1betaKO mice have impaired mitochondrial function. Lack of PGC-1beta also impaired hepatic lipid metabolism in response to acute high fat dietary loads, resulting in hepatic steatosis and reduced lipoprotein-associated triglyceride and cholesterol content. Altogether, our data suggest that PGC-1beta plays a general role in controlling basal mitochondrial function and also participates in tissue-specific adaptive responses during metabolic stress.

  4. c-Myc and AMPK Control Cellular Energy Levels by Cooperatively Regulating Mitochondrial Structure and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia R Edmunds

    Full Text Available The c-Myc (Myc oncoprotein and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK regulate glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (Oxphos although often for different purposes. Because Myc over-expression depletes ATP with the resultant activation of AMPK, we explored the potential co-dependency of and cross-talk between these proteins by comparing the consequences of acute Myc induction in ampk+/+ (WT and ampk-/- (KO murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs. KO MEFs showed a higher basal rate of glycolysis than WT MEFs and an appropriate increase in response to activation of a Myc-estrogen receptor (MycER fusion protein. However, KO MEFs had a diminished ability to increase Oxphos, mitochondrial mass and reactive oxygen species in response to MycER activation. Other differences between WT and KO MEFs, either in the basal state or following MycER induction, included abnormalities in electron transport chain function, levels of TCA cycle-related oxidoreductases and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox states. Transcriptional profiling of pathways pertinent to glycolysis, Oxphos and mitochondrial structure and function also uncovered significant differences between WT and KO MEFs and their response to MycER activation. Finally, an unbiased mass-spectrometry (MS-based survey capable of quantifying ~40% of all mitochondrial proteins, showed about 15% of them to be AMPK- and/or Myc-dependent in their steady state. Significant differences in the activities of the rate-limiting enzymes pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase, which dictate pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A abundance, were also differentially responsive to Myc and AMPK and could account for some of the differences in basal metabolite levels that were also detected by MS. Thus, Myc and AMPK are highly co-dependent and appear to engage in significant cross-talk across numerous pathways which support metabolic and ATP-generating functions.

  5. Effect of S-nitrosoglutathione on renal mitochondrial function: a new mechanism for reversible regulation of manganese superoxide dismutase activity?

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Naeem K.; Saba, Hamida; MacMillan-Crow, Lee Ann

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are at the heart of all cellular processes as they provide the majority of the energy needed for various metabolic processes. Nitric oxide has been shown to have numerous roles in the regulation of mitochondrial function. Mitochondria have enormous pools of glutathione (GSH≈5–10 mM). Nitric oxide can react with glutathione to generate a physiological molecule, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). The impact GSNO has on mitochondrial function has been intensively studied in recent years, ...

  6. Nutrition And Reproduction: Is There Evidence To Support A “Fertility Diet” To Improve Mitochondrial Function?

    OpenAIRE

    Shaum, Katherine M; Polotsky, Alex J.

    2013-01-01

    Normal function of mitochondria plays an essential role in enabling reproductive capacity. To date, few studies have investigated the role of promoting mitochondrial health in relation to fertility in humans. Selected nutritional interventions have demonstrated a potential to enhance mitochondrial function, suggesting a promise for future research for fertility treatment. This review summarizes the extant literature and highlights a putative role of particular nutrients in promotion of mitoch...

  7. The Zinc Finger Protein Mig1 Regulates Mitochondrial Function and Azole Drug Susceptibility in the Pathogenic Fungus Cryptococcus neoformans

    OpenAIRE

    Caza, Mélissa; Hu, Guanggan; Price, Michael; Perfect, John R.; Kronstad, James W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes fungal meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals. In previous studies, we found that the Hap complex in this pathogen represses genes encoding mitochondrial respiratory functions and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle components under low-iron conditions. The orthologous Hap2/3/4/5 complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exerts a regulatory influence on mitochondrial functions, and Hap4 is subject to glucose repression via ...

  8. Mitochondrial functions of RECQL4 are required for the prevention of aerobic glycolysis-dependent cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Jyoti; Hussain, Mansoor; De, Siddharth; Chandra, Suruchika; Modi, Priyanka; Tikoo, Shweta; Singh, Archana; Sagar, Chandrasekhar; Sepuri, Naresh Babu V; Sengupta, Sagar

    2016-04-01

    Germline mutations in RECQL4 helicase are associated with Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, which is characterized by a predisposition to cancer. RECQL4 localizes to the mitochondria, where it acts as an accessory factor during mitochondrial DNA replication. To understand the specific mitochondrial functions of RECQL4, we created isogenic cell lines, in which the mitochondrial localization of the helicase was either retained or abolished. The mitochondrial integrity was affected due to the absence of RECQL4 in mitochondria, leading to a decrease in F1F0-ATP synthase activity. In cells where RECQL4 does not localize to mitochondria, the membrane potential was decreased, whereas ROS levels increased due to the presence of high levels of catalytically inactive SOD2. Inactive SOD2 accumulated owing to diminished SIRT3 activity. Lack of the mitochondrial functions of RECQL4 led to aerobic glycolysis that, in turn, led to an increased invasive capability within these cells. Together, this study demonstrates for the first time that, owing to its mitochondrial functions, the accessory mitochondrial replication helicase RECQL4 prevents the invasive step in the neoplastic transformation process. PMID:26906415

  9. Oxidation of intramyocellular lipids is dependent on mitochondrial function and the availability of extracellular fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corpeleijn, Eva; Hessvik, Nina P; Bakke, Siril S;

    2010-01-01

    were extended by comparing these processes in primary cultured myotubes established from healthy lean and obese type 2 diabetic (T2D) individuals, two extremes in a range of metabolic phenotypes. ICLs were prelabeled for 2 days with 100 microM [(14)C]oleic acid (OA). ICL(OX) was studied using a (14)CO......Obesity and insulin resistance are related to both enlarged intramyocellular triacylglycerol stores and accumulation of lipid intermediates. We investigated how lipid overflow can change the oxidation of intramyocellular lipids (ICL(OX)) and intramyocellular lipid storage (ICL). These experiments...... all, a lower mitochondrial mass and lower ICL(OX) were related to a higher cell-associated OA accumulation. Second, myotubes established from obese T2D individuals showed reduced ICL(OX). ICL(OX) remained lower during uncoupling (P <0.001), even with comparable mitochondrial mass, suggesting decreased...

  10. Effect of eccentric training on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in the skeletal muscle of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of eccentric training on the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes, oxidative stress, muscle damage, and inflammation of skeletal muscle. Eighteen male mice (CF1 weighing 30-35 g were randomly divided into 3 groups (N = 6: untrained, trained eccentric running (16°; TER, and trained running (0° (TR, and were submitted to an 8-week training program. TER increased muscle oxidative capacity (succinate dehydrogenase and complexes I and II in a manner similar to TR, and TER did not decrease oxidative damage (xylenol and creatine phosphate but increased antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase and catalase similar to TR. Muscle damage (creatine kinase and inflammation (myeloperoxidase were not reduced by TER. In conclusion, we suggest that TER improves mitochondrial function but does not reduce oxidative stress, muscle damage, or inflammation induced by eccentric contractions.

  11. A combination of nutriments improves mitochondrial biogenesis and function in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent evidence indicates that insulin resistance in skeletal muscle may be related to reduce mitochondrial number and oxidation capacity. However, it is not known whether increasing mitochondrial number and function improves insulin resistance. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a combination of nutrients on insulin resistance and mitochondrial biogenesis/function in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated that defect of glucose and lipid metabolism is associated with low mitochondrial content and reduced mitochondrial enzyme activity in skeletal muscle of the diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. The treatment of combination of R-alpha-lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, nicotinamide, and biotin effectively improved glucose tolerance, decreased the basal insulin secretion and the level of circulating free fatty acid (FFA, and prevented the reduction of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The nutrients treatment also significantly increased mRNA levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (Ppar alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (Ppar delta, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (Mcpt-1 and activity of mitochondrial complex I and II in skeletal muscle. All of these effects of mitochondrial nutrients are comparable to that of the antidiabetic drug, pioglitazone. In addition, the treatment with nutrients, unlike pioglitazone, did not cause body weight gain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that a combination of mitochondrial targeting nutrients may improve skeletal mitochondrial dysfunction and exert hypoglycemic effects, without causing weight gain.

  12. Age-related changes of serum mitochondrial uncoupling 1, rumen and rectal temperature in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfuso, Francesca; Rizzo, Maria; Giannetto, Claudia; Giudice, Elisabetta; Fazio, Francesco; Piccione, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Thermoregulatory processes are induced not only by exposure to cold or heat but also by a variety of physiological situations including age, fasting and food intake that result in changes in body temperature. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the differences in serum mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), rumen temperature (TRUMEN) and rectal temperature (TRECTAL) values between adult and kids goats. Ten adult male Maltese goats aged 3-5 years old (Group A) and 30 male kids, raised for meat, were enrolled in this study. The kids were equally divided into 3 groups according to their age: Group B included kids aged 3 months, Group C included kids aged 4 months and Group D included kids aged 5 months. Blood samples and measurements of TRUMEN and TRECTAL were obtained from each animal. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to evaluate the effect of age on the studied parameters. Statistically significant higher serum UCP1 levels (P<0.001) were found in Group A as compared to Groups B, C and D. Higher TRUMEN values (P<0.001) were found in Group A than in Groups B, C and D, and in Group B than in Groups C and D. Group A showed lower TRECTAL values (P<0.001) than Groups B, C and D. The Pearson's Correlation test was applied to assess significant relationship among studied parameters showing a statistically significant negative correlation between the values of TRECTAL and serum UCP1 in all studied Groups (P<0.001). These results indicate that goats have good control of body temperature suggesting that further details about the thermogenic capacity and the function of UCP1 in kids and adult goats are worth exploring. PMID:27264887

  13. Inhibition of mitochondrial functions by margosa oil: possible implications in the pathogenesis of Reye's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Y; Yoshida, I; Kimura, A; Yoshino, M; Yamashita, F; Sinniah, D

    1987-08-01

    Margosa oil (MO), a fatty acid-rich extract of the seeds of the neem tree and a reported cause of Reye's syndrome, has been used in the induction of an experimental model of Reye's syndrome in rats. It has been reported that MO causes a decrease in in vivo mitochondrial enzyme activity similar to that seen in Reye's syndrome. We have attempted to uncover some of the biochemical mechanisms of MO's toxicity by examining its effect in vitro on isolated rat liver mitochondria. Male rat liver mitochondria were isolated by centrifugation; oxygen uptake, reduced forms of cytochrome b, c + c1, a + a3, and flavoprotein, intramitochondrial concentrations of acetyl coA, acid-soluble coA, acid-insoluble coA, and ATP content were measured after incubation with and without MO. Our results reveal that MO is a mitochondrial uncoupler. State 4 respiration was increased while the respiratory control ratio was decreased. The intramitochondrial content of ATP was also decreased. There were substantial changes in the reduction of the respiratory chain components after incubation of mitochondria with MO. This decelerative effect on mitochondrial electron transport was alleviated by the addition of coenzyme Q and/or carnitine. These effects of MO on mitochondrial respiration may be due to changes in fatty acid metabolism caused by MO as MO caused a shift in the proportion of acid-soluble or acid-insoluble coA esters. Supplementary therapy with L-carnitine and coenzyme Q may be useful in the management of MO-induced Reye's syndrome. PMID:3658544

  14. Effect of melatonin on motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadayian, A G; Bustamante, J; Czerniczyniec, A; Cutrera, R A; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2014-06-01

    Increased reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial dysfunction occur during ethanol hangover. The aim of this work was to study the effect of melatonin pretreatment on motor performance and mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover. Male mice received melatonin solution or its vehicle in drinking water during 7 days and i.p. injection with EtOH (3.8 g/kg BW) or saline at the eighth day. Motor performance and mitochondrial function were evaluated at the onset of hangover (6h after injection). Melatonin improved motor coordination in ethanol hangover mice. Malate-glutamate-dependent oxygen uptake was decreased by ethanol hangover treatment and partially prevented by melatonin pretreatment. Melatonin alone induced a decrease of 30% in state 4 succinate-dependent respiratory rate. Also, the activity of the respiratory complexes was decreased in melatonin-pretreated ethanol hangover group. Melatonin pretreatment before the hangover prevented mitochondrial membrane potential collapse and induced a 79% decrement of hydrogen peroxide production as compared with ethanol hangover group. Ethanol hangover induced a 25% decrease in NO production. Melatonin alone and as a pretreatment before ethanol hangover significantly increased NO production by nNOS and iNOS as compared with control groups. No differences were observed in nNOS protein expression, while iNOS expression was increased in the melatonin group. Increased NO production by melatonin could be involved in the decrease of succinate-dependent oxygen consumption and the inhibition of complex IV observed in our study. Melatonin seems to act as an antioxidant agent in the ethanol hangover condition but also exhibited some dual effects related to NO metabolism. PMID:24713372

  15. Brain mitochondrial function in a murine model of cerebral malaria and the therapeutic effects of rhEPO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Michael; Hempel, Casper; Sjövall, Fredrik;

    2013-01-01

    connection between disease severity and mitochondrial respiratory function. Treatment with rhEPO similarly had no effect on respiratory function. Thus cerebral metabolic dysfunction in CM does not seem to be directly linked to altered mitochondrial respiratory capacity as analyzed in brain homogenates ex...... cellular respiration of mitochondria. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is a promising new therapy that has been shown to reduce mortality in a mouse model of CM. In order to further elucidate the metabolic dysfunction in CM the objective of the present study was to assess brain mitochondrial...... respiratory function in CM with and without rhEPO treatment. The P. berghei ANKA - C57BL/6 murine model of CM was used. Mitochondrial respiration was analyzed in brain homogenates using high-resolution respirometry and a multiple substrate and inhibitor protocol. The animals were divided into four groups...

  16. Vital mitochondrial functions show profound changes during yeast culture ageing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Volejníková, Andrea; Hlousková, Jana; Sigler, Karel; Pichová, Alena

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2013), s. 7-15. ISSN 1567-1356 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/07/0339; GA MŠk ME09043; GA MŠk 1M0570 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Saccharomyces cerevisiae * chronological ageing * mitochondria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.436, year: 2013

  17. Effects of amiodarone on cardiac function and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation during ischemia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, D; Clauw, F; Martine, L; Grynberg, A; Rochette, L; Demaison, L

    1999-04-01

    This study was carried out in order to determine if the efficiency of amiodarone, a class III antiarrhythmic agent, is associated with changes in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. A population of 30 rats were treated with amiodarone (100 mg/kg/day) for 5 days. A second population receiving only vehicle was used as control. The hearts were perfused according to the working mode. After 15 min of normoxic perfusion, the left main coronary artery was ligated and the ligation was maintained for 20 min. The ligation was removed and reperfusion continued for a further 30 min. The electrocardiogram was monitored continuously. At the end of perfusion, the ischemic and non ischemic areas were visually separated and mitochondria were harvested from each area. Their oxidative and energy metabolism were assessed with palmitoylcarnitine as substrate in 2 respiration media differing in their free calcium concentration (0 or 0.34 microm). In normoxic conditions, amiodarone treatment increased the cardiac metabolic efficiency (mechanical work to oxygen consumption ratio). The local ischemia decreased the aortic and coronary flows without modifying the cardiac metabolic efficiency. Amiodarone treatment maintained the aortic flow at a significantly higher value; the duration of severe arrhythmias was significantly decreased by the drug. The reperfusion of the ischemic area allowed the partial recovery of fluid dynamics. The coronary flow was restored to 89% of the pre ischemic value. Conversely, the aortic flow never exceeded that measured at the end of ischemia, partly due to the important development of severe arrhythmias. The recovery of aortic flow and metabolic efficiency during reperfusion was improved by amiodarone treatment; ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation duration were reduced. In the mitochondria issued from the normoxic area, the energy metabolism was not altered by the amiodarone treatment, but the presence of calcium in the respiration medium modified the

  18. Heart Mitochondrial Proteome Study Elucidates Changes in Cardiac Energy Metabolism and Antioxidant PRDX3 in Human Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Tarazón, Estefanía; Barderas, María G.; Ortega, Ana; Otero, Manuel; Molina-Navarro, Maria Micaela; Lago, Francisca; González-Juanatey, Jose Ramón; Salvador, Antonio; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a public health problem with no available curative treatment, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in its development. The present study is the first to analyze the mitochondrial proteome in cardiac tissue of patients with DCM to identify potential molecular targets for its therapeutic intervention. Methods and Results 16 left ventricular (LV) samples obtained from explanted human hearts with DCM (n = 8) and control donors (n = 8) were extracted to perform a proteomic approach to investigate the variations in mitochondrial protein expression. The proteome of the samples was analyzed by quantitative differential electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry. These changes were validated by classical techniques and by novel and precise selected reaction monitoring analysis and RNA sequencing approach increasing the total heart samples up to 25. We found significant alterations in energy metabolism, especially in molecules involved in substrate utilization (ODPA, ETFD, DLDH), energy production (ATPA), other metabolic pathways (AL4A1) and protein synthesis (EFTU), obtaining considerable and specific relationships between the alterations detected in these processes. Importantly, we observed that the antioxidant PRDX3 overexpression is associated with impaired ventricular function. PRDX3 is significantly related to LV end systolic and diastolic diameter (r = 0.73, p value<0.01; r = 0.71, p value<0.01), fractional shortening, and ejection fraction (r = −0.61, p value<0.05; and r = −0.62, p value<0.05, respectively). Conclusion This work could be a pivotal study to gain more knowledge on the cellular mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of this disease and may lead to the development of etiology-specific heart failure therapies. We suggest new molecular targets for therapeutic interventions, something that up to now has been lacking. PMID:25397948

  19. Heart mitochondrial proteome study elucidates changes in cardiac energy metabolism and antioxidant PRDX3 in human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Roselló-Lletí

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is a public health problem with no available curative treatment, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in its development. The present study is the first to analyze the mitochondrial proteome in cardiac tissue of patients with DCM to identify potential molecular targets for its therapeutic intervention.16 left ventricular (LV samples obtained from explanted human hearts with DCM (n = 8 and control donors (n = 8 were extracted to perform a proteomic approach to investigate the variations in mitochondrial protein expression. The proteome of the samples was analyzed by quantitative differential electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry. These changes were validated by classical techniques and by novel and precise selected reaction monitoring analysis and RNA sequencing approach increasing the total heart samples up to 25. We found significant alterations in energy metabolism, especially in molecules involved in substrate utilization (ODPA, ETFD, DLDH, energy production (ATPA, other metabolic pathways (AL4A1 and protein synthesis (EFTU, obtaining considerable and specific relationships between the alterations detected in these processes. Importantly, we observed that the antioxidant PRDX3 overexpression is associated with impaired ventricular function. PRDX3 is significantly related to LV end systolic and diastolic diameter (r = 0.73, p value<0.01; r = 0.71, p value<0.01, fractional shortening, and ejection fraction (r = -0.61, p value<0.05; and r = -0.62, p value<0.05, respectively.This work could be a pivotal study to gain more knowledge on the cellular mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of this disease and may lead to the development of etiology-specific heart failure therapies. We suggest new molecular targets for therapeutic interventions, something that up to now has been lacking.

  20. High fat diet-induced changes in mouse muscle mitochondrial phospholipids do not impair mitochondrial respiration despite insulin resistance.

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    Joris Hoeks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus and muscle insulin resistance have been associated with reduced capacity of skeletal muscle mitochondria, possibly as a result of increased intake of dietary fat. Here, we examined the hypothesis that a prolonged high-fat diet consumption (HFD increases the saturation of muscle mitochondrial membrane phospholipids causing impaired mitochondrial oxidative capacity and possibly insulin resistance. METHODOLOGY: C57BL/6J mice were fed an 8-week or 20-week low fat diet (10 kcal%; LFD or HFD (45 kcal%. Skeletal muscle mitochondria were isolated and fatty acid (FA composition of skeletal muscle mitochondrial phospholipids was analyzed by thin-layer chromatography followed by GC. High-resolution respirometry was used to assess oxidation of pyruvate and fatty acids by mitochondria. Insulin sensitivity was estimated by HOMA-IR. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At 8 weeks, mono-unsaturated FA (16∶1n7, 18∶1n7 and 18∶1n9 were decreased (-4.0%, p<0.001, whereas saturated FA (16∶0 were increased (+3.2%, p<0.001 in phospholipids of HFD vs. LFD mitochondria. Interestingly, 20 weeks of HFD descreased mono-unsaturated FA while n-6 poly-unsaturated FA (18∶2n6, 20∶4n6, 22∶5n6 showed a pronounced increase (+4.0%, p<0.001. Despite increased saturation of muscle mitochondrial phospholipids after the 8-week HFD, mitochondrial oxidation of both pyruvate and fatty acids were similar between LFD and HFD mice. After 20 weeks of HFD, the increase in n-6 poly-unsaturated FA was accompanied by enhanced maximal capacity of the electron transport chain (+49%, p = 0.002 and a tendency for increased ADP-stimulated respiration, but only when fuelled by a lipid-derived substrate. Insulin sensitivity in HFD mice was reduced at both 8 and 20 weeks. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our findings do not support the concept that prolonged HF feeding leads to increased saturation of skeletal muscle mitochondrial phospholipids resulting in a decrease in

  1. Mitochondrial genome variations and functional characterization in Han Chinese families with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Rui; Tang, Jinsong; Zhang, Wen; Li, Xiao; Chen, Shi-Yi; Yu, Dandan; Chen, Xiaogang; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants and schizophrenia has been strongly debated. To test whether mtDNA variants are involved in schizophrenia in Han Chinese patients, we sequenced the entire mitochondrial genomes of probands from 11 families with a family history and maternal inheritance pattern of schizophrenia. Besides the haplogroup-specific variants, we found 11 nonsynonymous private variants, one rRNA variant, and one tRNA variant in 5 of 11 probands. Among the nonsynonymous private variants, mutations m.15395 A>G and m.8536 A>G were predicted to be deleterious after web-based searches and in silico program affiliated analysis. Functional characterization further supported the potential pathogenicity of the two variants m.15395 A>G and m.8536 A>G to cause mitochondrial dysfunction at the cellular level. Our results showed that mtDNA variants were actively involved in schizophrenia in some families with maternal inheritance of this disease. PMID:26822593

  2. Alterations of motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during ethanol hangover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Juanita; Karadayian, Analia G; Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia; Cutrera, Rodolfo A

    2012-08-01

    Ethanol has been known to affect various behavioral parameters in experimental animals, even several hours after ethanol (EtOH) is absent from blood circulation, in the period known as hangover. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of acute ethanol hangover on motor performance in association with the brain cortex energetic metabolism. Evaluation of motor performance and brain cortex mitochondrial function during alcohol hangover was performed in mice 6 hours after a high ethanol dose (hangover onset). Animals were injected i.p. either with saline (control group) or with ethanol (3.8 g/kg BW) (hangover group). Ethanol hangover group showed a bad motor performance compared with control animals (p hangover animals showed a 34% decrease in the respiratory control rate as compared with the control group. Mitochondrial complex activities were decreased being the complex I-III the less affected by the hangover condition; complex II-III was markedly decreased by ethanol hangover showing 50% less activity than controls. Complex IV was 42% decreased as compared with control animals. Hydrogen peroxide production was 51% increased in brain cortex mitochondria from the hangover group, as compared with the control animals. Quantification of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential indicated that ethanol injected animals presented 17% less ability to maintain the polarized condition as compared with controls. These results indicate that a clear decrease in proton motive force occurs in brain cortex mitochondria during hangover conditions. We can conclude that a decreased motor performance observed in the hangover group of animals could be associated with brain cortex mitochondrial dysfunction and the resulting impairment of its energetic metabolism. PMID:22608205

  3. EFFECT OF PERILLA FRUTESCENS EXTRACTS AND ROSMARINIC ACID ON RAT HEART MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudone, Lina; Burdulis, Deividas; Raudonis, Raimondas; Janulis, Valdimaras; Jankauskiene, Laima; Viskelis, Pranas; Trumbeckaite, Sonata

    2016-01-01

    Perilla frutescens L. due to its aromatic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant traits has been traditionally used as medicinal plant in Eastern Asia. Alterations of mitochondria are interconnected with many chronic diseases. Bioactives of herbal extracts can modulate mitochondrial effects and be beneficial in prevention of mitochondrial related chronic diseases. Direct effects of the red-leaf form P. frutescens extract (PFE) and the green-leaf form P. frutescens var. crispa f. viridis extract (PCE) were evaluated investigating activities on the oxidative phosphorylation and antioxidant activity in the rat heart mitochondria in vitro. HPLC-MS analysis was applied for the identification of phenolic compounds. Cell with a Clark-type oxygen electrode was used for mitochondrial respiration measurement. The generation of reactive oxygen species was estimated in isolated rat heart mitochondria and determined fluorimetrically. State 3 respiration rate was not affected by lower concentrations, however, it was inhibited at higher concentrations by 22-70% for PFE and by 45-55% for PCE. PFE containing anthocyanins induced the concentration-dependent stimulation (by 23-76%) of the State 4 respiration rate after addition of cytochrome c due to reducing properties. Significant reduction of H₂O₂ pro- duction was observed with investigated concentrations of rosmarinic acid and both perilla extracts. Our results demonstrate that the effect of PFE and PCE extracts on rat heart mitochondria depend on the qualitative characteristics of complex of biologically active compounds. Selective effects on mitochondrial function could enable the regulation of apoptosis or another mechanisms occurring in cells. PMID:27008808

  4. A Hypertension-Associated tRNAAla Mutation Alters tRNA Metabolism and Mitochondrial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pingping; Wang, Meng; Xue, Ling; Xiao, Yun; Yu, Jialing; Wang, Hui; Yao, Juan; Liu, Hao; Peng, Yanyan; Liu, Hanqing; Li, Haiying; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we investigated the pathophysiology of a novel hypertension-associated mitochondrial tRNAAla 5655A → G (m.5655A → G) mutation. The destabilization of a highly conserved base pairing (A1-U72) at the aminoacyl acceptor stem by an m.5655A → G mutation altered the tRNAAla function. An in vitro processing analysis showed that the m.5655A → G mutation reduced the efficiency of tRNAAla precursor 5′ end cleavage catalyzed by RNase P. By using cybrids constructed by transferring mitochondria from lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from a Chinese family into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-less (ρo) cells, we showed a 41% reduction in the steady-state level of tRNAAla in mutant cybrids. The mutation caused an improperly aminoacylated tRNAAla, as suggested by aberrantly aminoacylated tRNAAla and slower electrophoretic mobility of mutated tRNA. A failure in tRNAAla metabolism contributed to variable reductions in six mtDNA-encoded polypeptides in mutant cells, ranging from 21% to 37.5%, with an average of a 29.1% reduction, compared to levels of the controls. The impaired translation caused reduced activities of mitochondrial respiration chains. Furthermore, marked decreases in the levels of mitochondrial ATP and membrane potential were observed in mutant cells. These caused increases in the production of reactive oxygen species in the mutant cybrids. The data provide evidence for the association of the tRNAAla 5655A → G mutation with hypertension. PMID:27161322

  5. Mitochondrial function is involved in regulation of cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein (apoA-I from murine RAW 264.7 macrophages

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    Allen Anne Marie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA damage, increased production of reactive oxygen species and progressive respiratory chain dysfunction, together with increased deposition of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters, are hallmarks of atherosclerosis. This study investigated the role of mitochondrial function in regulation of macrophage cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I, by the addition of established pharmacological modulators of mitochondrial function. Methods Murine RAW 264.7 macrophages were treated with a range of concentrations of resveratrol, antimycin, dinitrophenol, nigericin and oligomycin, and changes in viability, cytotoxicity, membrane potential and ATP, compared with efflux of [3H]cholesterol to apolipoprotein (apo A-I. The effect of oligomycin treatment on expression of genes implicated in macrophage cholesterol homeostasis were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting, relative to the housekeeping enzyme, Gapdh, and combined with studies of this molecule on cholesterol esterification, de novo lipid biosynthesis, and induction of apoptosis. Significant differences were determined using analysis of variance, and Dunnett’s or Bonferroni post t-tests, as appropriate. Results The positive control, resveratrol (24 h, significantly enhanced cholesterol efflux to apoA-I at concentrations ≥30 μM. By contrast, cholesterol efflux to apoA-I was significantly inhibited by nigericin (45%; ppAbca1 mRNA. Oligomycin treatment did not affect cholesterol biosynthesis, but significantly inhibited cholesterol esterification following exposure to acetylated LDL, and induced apoptosis at ≥30 μM. Finally, oligomycin induced the expression of genes implicated in both cholesterol efflux (Abca1, Abcg4, Stard1 and cholesterol biosynthesis (Hmgr, Mvk, Scap, Srebf2, indicating profound dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis. Conclusions Acute loss of mitochondrial function, and in particular Δψm, reduces

  6. Phosphatidylcholine is essential for efficient functioning of the mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase Gut2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijken, Pieter J; De Kruijff, Ben; De Kroon, Anton I P M

    2007-01-01

    Gut2, the mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, was previously shown to become preferentially labelled with photoactivatable phosphatidylcholine (PC), pointing to a functional relation between these molecules. In the present study we analyzed whether Gut2 functioning depends on the PC content of yeast cells, using PC biosynthetic mutants in which the PC content was lowered. PC depletion was found to reduce growth on glycerol and to increase glycerol excretion, both indicating that PC is needed for optimal Gut2 functioning in vivo. Using several in vitro approaches the nature of the dependence of Gut2 functioning on cellular PC contents was investigated. The results of these experiments suggest that it is unlikely that the effects observed in vivo are due to changes in cellular Gut2 content, in specific activity of Gut2 in isolated mitochondria, or in the membrane association of Gut2, upon lowering the PC level. The in vivo effects are more likely an indirect result of PC depletion-induced changes in the cellular context in which Gut2 functions, that are not manifested in the in vitro systems used. PMID:17520483

  7. Decreased in vitro mitochondrial function is associated with enhanced brain metabolism, blood flow, and memory in Surf1-deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Pulliam, Daniel A.; Deepa, Sathyaseelan S.; Halloran, Jonathan J.; Hussong, Stacy A.; Burbank, Raquel R.; Bresnen, Andrew; Liu, Yuhong; Podlutskaya, Natalia; Soundararajan, Anuradha; Muir, Eric; Duong, Timothy Q; Alex F. Bokov; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have challenged the prevailing view that reduced mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress are correlated with reduced longevity. Mice carrying a homozygous knockout (KO) of the Surf1 gene showed a significant decrease in mitochondrial electron transport chain Complex IV activity, yet displayed increased lifespan and reduced brain damage after excitotoxic insults. In the present study, we examined brain metabolism, brain hemodynamics, and memory of Surf1 KO mice usi...

  8. Mutant p53 exhibits trivial effects on mitochondrial functions which can be reactivated by ellipticine in lymphoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Jianfeng; Robbins, Delira; Morris, Kerri; Sit, Amos; Liu, Yong-Yu; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that a fraction of the wild-type (wt) form of the tumor suppressor p53, can translocate to mitochondria due to genotoxic stress. The mitochondrial targets of wt p53 have also been studied. However, whether mutant p53, which exists in 50% of human cancers, translocates to mitochondria and affects mitochondrial functions is unclear. In this study, we used doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic drug, to treat five human lymphoma cell lines with wt, mutant or deficient in p...

  9. Protective effect of trimetazidine on myocardial mitochondrial function in an ex-vivo model of global myocardial ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Pedro; Duarte, Ana I.; Gonçalves, Lino M.; Moreno, António; Providência, Luís A

    2004-01-01

    Trimetazidine is an anti-ischemic drug whose cytoprotective mechanisms are not yet fully understood (but until now mainly related to the trimetazidine-induced "metabolic shift" from lipid [beta]-oxidation to glucose aerobic oxidation). We studied the effect of trimetazidine on the mitochondrial function of ischemic Wistar rat hearts perfused with glucose, using a model of ex-vivo perfusion (Langendorff system). We measured the electrical potential of the mitochondrial membrane, O2 consumption...

  10. Combined effects of temperature acclimation and cadmium exposure on mitochondrial function in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica gmelin (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkasov, Anton S; Ringwood, Amy H; Sokolova, Inna M

    2006-09-01

    Cadmium and temperature have strong impacts on the metabolic physiology of aquatic organisms. To analyze the combined impact of these two stressors on aerobic capacity, effects of Cd exposure (50 microg/L) on mitochondrial function were studied in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) acclimated to 12 and 20 degrees C in winter and to 20 and 28 degrees C in fall. Cadmium exposure had different effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics of oysters depending on the acclimation temperature. In oysters acclimated to 12 degrees C, Cd exposure resulted in elevated intrinsic rates of mitochondrial oxidation, whereas at 28 degrees C, a rapid and pronounced decrease of mitochondrial oxidative capacity was found in Cd-exposed oysters. At the intermediate acclimation temperature (20 degrees C), effects of Cd exposure on intrinsic rates of mitochondrial oxidation were negligible. Degree of coupling significantly decreased in mitochondria from 28 degrees C-acclimated oysters but not in that from 12 degrees C- or 20 degrees C-acclimated oysters. Acclimation at elevated temperatures also increased sensitivity of oyster mitochondria to extramitochondrial Cd. Variation in mitochondrial membrane potential explained 41% of the observed variation in mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate synthesis and proton leak between different acclimation groups of oysters. Temperature-dependent sensitivity of metabolic physiology to Cd has significant implications for toxicity testing and for extrapolation of laboratory studies to field populations of aquatic poikilotherms, indicating the importance of taking into account the thermal regime of the environment. PMID:16986802

  11. Comparison of in vivo postexercise phosphocreatine recovery and resting ATP synthesis flux for the assessment of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, N M A; Ciapaite, J; Nicolay, K; Prompers, J J

    2010-11-01

    (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been used to assess skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in vivo by measuring 1) phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery after exercise or 2) resting ATP synthesis flux with saturation transfer (ST). In this study, we compared both parameters in a rat model of mitochondrial dysfunction with the aim of establishing the most appropriate method for the assessment of in vivo muscle mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial dysfunction was induced in adult Wistar rats by daily subcutaneous injections with the complex I inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) for 2 wk. In vivo (31)P MRS measurements were supplemented by in vitro measurements of oxygen consumption in isolated mitochondria. Two weeks of DPI treatment induced mitochondrial dysfunction, as evidenced by a 20% lower maximal ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption rate in isolated mitochondria from DPI-treated rats oxidizing pyruvate plus malate. This was paralleled by a 46% decrease in in vivo oxidative capacity, determined from postexercise PCr recovery. Interestingly, no significant difference in resting, ST-based ATP synthesis flux was observed between DPI-treated rats and controls. These results show that PCr recovery after exercise has a more direct relationship with skeletal muscle mitochondrial function than the ATP synthesis flux measured with (31)P ST MRS in the resting state. PMID:20668212

  12. Simultaneous monitoring of ionophore- and inhibitor-mediated plasma and mitochondrial membrane potential changes in cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, David G

    2006-05-26

    Although natural and synthetic ionophores are widely exploited in cell studies, for example, to influence cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations and to depolarize in situ mitochondria, their inherent lack of membrane selectivity means that they affect the ion permeability of both plasma and mitochondrial membranes. A similar ambiguity affects the interpretation of signals from fluorescent membrane-permeant cations (usually termed "mitochondrial membrane potential indicators"), because the accumulation of these probes is influenced by both plasma and mitochondrial membrane potentials. To resolve some of these problems a technique is developed to allow simultaneous monitoring of plasma and mitochondrial membrane potentials at single-cell resolution using a cationic and anionic fluorescent probe. A computer program is described that transforms the fluorescence changes into dynamic estimates of changes in plasma and mitochondrial potentials. Exploiting this technique, primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons display a concentration-dependent response to ionomycin: low concentrations mimic nigericin by hyperpolarizing the mitochondria while slowly depolarizing the plasma membrane and maintaining a stable elevated cytoplasmic calcium. Higher ionomycin concentrations induce a stochastic failure of calcium homeostasis that precedes both mitochondrial depolarization and an enhanced rate of plasma membrane depolarization. In addition, the protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone only selectively depolarizes mitochondria at submicromolar concentrations. ATP synthase reversal following respiratory chain inhibition depolarizes the mitochondria by 26 mV. PMID:16551630

  13. Mitochondrial cytopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform a variety of essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Most of mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear DNA (nDNA) whereas a very small fraction is encoded by the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes can result in mitochondrial dysfunction which leads to a wide range of cellular perturbations including aberrant calcium homeostasis, excessive reactive oxygen species production, dysregulated apoptosis, and insufficient energy generation to meet the needs of various organs, particularly those with high energy demand. Impaired mitochondrial function in various tissues and organs results in the multi-organ manifestations of mitochondrial diseases including epilepsy, intellectual disability, skeletal and cardiac myopathies, hepatopathies, endocrinopathies, and nephropathies. Defects in nDNA genes can be inherited in an autosomal or X-linked manners, whereas, mtDNA is maternally inherited. Mitochondrial diseases can result from mutations of nDNA genes encoding subunits of the electron transport chain complexes or their assembly factors, proteins associated with the mitochondrial import or networking, mitochondrial translation factors, or proteins involved in mtDNA maintenance. MtDNA defects can be either point mutations or rearrangements. The diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders can be challenging in many cases and is based on clinical recognition, biochemical screening, histopathological studies, functional studies, and molecular genetic testing. Currently, there are no satisfactory therapies available for mitochondrial disorders that significantly alter the course of the disease. Therapeutic options include symptomatic treatment, cofactor supplementation, and exercise. PMID:26996063

  14. Legionella pneumophila infection of Drosophila S2 cells induces only minor changes in mitochondrial dynamics.

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    Elizabeth Wen Sun

    Full Text Available During infection of cells by Legionella pneumophila, the bacterium secretes a large number of effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm, allowing it to alter many cellular processes and make the vacuole and the host cell into more hospitable environments for bacterial replication. One major change induced by infection is the recruitment of ER-derived vesicles to the surface of the vacuole, where they fuse with the vacuole membrane and prevent it from becoming an acidified, degradative compartment. However, the recruitment of mitochondria to the region of the vacuole has also been suggested by ultrastructural studies. In order to test this idea in a controlled and quantitative experimental system, and to lay the groundwork for a genome-wide screen for factors involved in mitochondrial recruitment, we examined the behavior of mitochondria during the early stages of Legionella pneumophila infection of Drosophila S2 cells. We found that the density of mitochondria near vacuoles formed by infection with wild type Legionella was not different from that found in dotA(- mutant-infected cells during the first 4 hours after infection. We then examined 4 parameters of mitochondrial motility in infected cells: velocity of movement, duty cycle of movement, directional persistence and net direction. In the 4 hours following infection, most of these measures were indistinguishable between wild type and dotA(-.infection. However, wild type Legionella did induce a modest shift in the velocity distribution toward faster movement compared dotA(- infection, and a small downward shift in the duty cycle distribution. In addition, wild type infection produced mitochondrial movement that was biased in the direction of the bacterial vacuole relative to dotA-, although not enough to cause a significant accumulation within 10 um of the vacuole. We conclude that in this host cell, mitochondria are not strongly recruited to the vacuole, nor is their motility

  15. L-carnitine protects against nickel-induced neurotoxicity by maintaining mitochondrial function in Neuro-2a cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to be a part of the mechanism underlying nickel-induced neurotoxicity. L-carnitine (LC), a quaternary ammonium compound biosynthesized from the amino acids lysine and methionine in all mammalian species, manifests its neuroprotective effects by improving mitochondrial energetics and function. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether LC could efficiently protect against nickel-induced neurotoxicity. Here, we exposed a mouse neuroblastoma cell line (Neuro-2a) to different concentrations of nickel chloride (NiCl2) (0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mM) for 24 h, or to 0.5 mM and 1 mM NiCl2 for various periods (0, 3, 6, 12, or 24 h). We found that nickel significantly increased the cell viability loss and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in Neuro-2a cells. In addition, nickel exposure significantly elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), reduced adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentrations and decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy numbers and mtRNA transcript levels. However, all of the cytotoxicities and mitochondrial dysfunctions that were triggered by nickel were efficiently attenuated by pretreatment with LC. These protective effects of LC may be attributable to its role in maintaining mitochondrial function in nickel-treated cells. Our results suggest that LC may have great pharmacological potential in protecting against the adverse effects of nickel in the nervous system.

  16. Genetic risk factors affecting mitochondrial function are associated with kidney disease in people with Type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, E J; Salem, R M; Sandholm, N; Tarnow, L; Rossing, P; Lajer, M; Groop, P H; Maxwell, A P; McKnight, A J

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the association with diabetic kidney disease of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods The mitochondrial genome and 1039 nuclear genes that are integral to mitochondrial function were investigated using a case (n = 823 individuals with diabetic kidney disease) vs. control (n = 903 individuals with diabetes and no renal disease) approach. All people included in the analysis were of white European origin and were diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes before the age of 31 years. Replication was conducted in 5093 people with similar phenotypes to those of the discovery collection. Association analyses were performed using the plink genetic analysis toolset, with adjustment for relevant covariates. Results A total of 25 SNPs were evaluated in the mitochondrial genome, but none were significantly associated with diabetic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. A total of 38 SNPs in nuclear genes influencing mitochondrial function were nominally associated with diabetic kidney disease and 16 SNPS were associated with end-stage renal disease, secondary to diabetic kidney disease, with meta-analyses confirming the same direction of effect. Three independent signals (seven SNPs) were common to the replication data for both phenotypes with Type 1 diabetes and persistent proteinuria or end-stage renal disease. Conclusions Our results suggest that SNPs in nuclear genes that influence mitochondrial function are significantly associated with diabetic kidney disease in a white European population. What’s new? Mitochondrial dysfunction has been identified in diabetic kidney disease, but relatively large-scale genetic and epigenetic studies focused on mitochondria have not yet been described. We report a novel case–control analysis, with independent replication, of genetic variation focused on the mitochondrial genome and 1039 nuclear genes that are important for mitochondrial function. Single nucleotide

  17. A functional test of Neandertal and modern human mitochondrial targeting sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Two mutations in mitochondrial targeting peptides occurred during human evolution, possibly after Neandertals split off from modern human lineage. → The ancestral and modern human versions of these two targeting peptides were tested functionally for their effects on localization and cleavage rate. → In spite of recent evolution, and to the contrary of other mutations in targeting peptides, these mutations had no visible effects. -- Abstract: Targeting of nuclear-encoded proteins to different organelles, such as mitochondria, is a process that can result in the redeployment of proteins to new intracellular destinations during evolution. With the sequencing of the Neandertal genome, it has become possible to identify amino acid substitutions that occurred on the modern human lineage since its separation from the Neandertal lineage. Here we analyze the function of two substitutions in mitochondrial targeting sequences that occurred and rose to high frequency recently during recent human evolution. The ancestral and modern versions of the two targeting sequences do not differ in the efficiency with which they direct a protein to the mitochondria, an observation compatible with the neutral theory of molecular evolution.

  18. Maintenance of structure and function of mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperones requires the chaperone Hep1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichting, Martin; Mokranjac, Dejana; Azem, Abdussalam; Neupert, Walter; Hell, Kai

    2005-01-01

    Hsp70 chaperones mediate folding of proteins and prevent their misfolding and aggregation. We report here on a new kind of Hsp70 interacting protein in mitochondria, Hep1. Hep1 is a highly conserved protein present in virtually all eukaryotes. Deletion of HEP1 results in a severe growth defect. Cells lacking Hep1 are deficient in processes that need the function of mitochondrial Hsp70s, such as preprotein import and biogenesis of proteins containing FeS clusters. In the mitochondria of these cells, Hsp70s, Ssc1 and Ssq1 accumulate as insoluble aggregates. We show that it is the nucleotide-free form of mtHsp70 that has a high tendency to self-aggregate. This process is efficiently counteracted by Hep1. We conclude that Hep1 acts as a chaperone that is necessary and sufficient to prevent self-aggregation and to thereby maintain the function of the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperones. PMID:15719019

  19. A functional test of Neandertal and modern human mitochondrial targeting sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gralle, Matthias, E-mail: gralle@bioqmed.ufrj.br [Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Schaefer, Ingo; Seibel, Peter [Department of Molecular Cell Therapy, Leipzig University, Deutscher Platz 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Paeaebo, Svante [Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} Two mutations in mitochondrial targeting peptides occurred during human evolution, possibly after Neandertals split off from modern human lineage. {yields} The ancestral and modern human versions of these two targeting peptides were tested functionally for their effects on localization and cleavage rate. {yields} In spite of recent evolution, and to the contrary of other mutations in targeting peptides, these mutations had no visible effects. -- Abstract: Targeting of nuclear-encoded proteins to different organelles, such as mitochondria, is a process that can result in the redeployment of proteins to new intracellular destinations during evolution. With the sequencing of the Neandertal genome, it has become possible to identify amino acid substitutions that occurred on the modern human lineage since its separation from the Neandertal lineage. Here we analyze the function of two substitutions in mitochondrial targeting sequences that occurred and rose to high frequency recently during recent human evolution. The ancestral and modern versions of the two targeting sequences do not differ in the efficiency with which they direct a protein to the mitochondria, an observation compatible with the neutral theory of molecular evolution.

  20. Targeting Mitochondrial Function to Treat Quiescent Tumor Cells in Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The disorganized nature of tumor vasculature results in the generation of microenvironments characterized by nutrient starvation, hypoxia and accumulation of acidic metabolites. Tumor cell populations in such areas are often slowly proliferating and thus refractory to chemotherapeutical drugs that are dependent on an active cell cycle. There is an urgent need for alternative therapeutic interventions that circumvent growth dependency. The screening of drug libraries using multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS or glucose-starved tumor cells has led to the identification of several compounds with promising therapeutic potential and that display activity on quiescent tumor cells. Interestingly, a common theme of these drug screens is the recurrent identification of agents that affect mitochondrial function. Such data suggest that, contrary to the classical Warburg view, tumor cells in nutritionally-compromised microenvironments are dependent on mitochondrial function for energy metabolism and survival. These findings suggest that mitochondria may represent an “Achilles heel” for the survival of slowly-proliferating tumor cells and suggest strategies for the development of therapy to target these cell populations.

  1. UV-B exposure reduces locomotor performance by impairing muscle function but not mitochondrial ATP production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh Kazerouni, Ensiyeh; Franklin, Craig E; Seebacher, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B) can reduce swimming performance by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. High concentrations of ROS can damage mitochondria, resulting in reduced ATP production. ROS can also damage muscle proteins, thereby leading to impaired muscle contractile function. We have shown previously that UV-B exposure reduces locomotor performance in mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) without affecting metabolic scope. Our aim was therefore to test whether UV-B influences swimming performance of mosquitofish by ROS-induced damage to muscle proteins without affecting mitochondrial function. In a fully factorial design, we exposed mosquitofish to UV-B and no-UV-B controls in combination with exposure to N-acetylcysteine (NAC) plus no-NAC controls. We used NAC, a precursor of glutathione, as an antioxidant to test whether any effects of UV-B on swimming performance were at least partly due to UV-B-induced ROS. UV-B significantly reduced critical sustained swimming performance and tail beat frequencies, and it increased ROS-induced damage (protein carbonyl concentrations and lipid peroxidation) in muscle. However, UV-B did not affect the activity of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA), an enzyme associated with muscle calcium cycling and muscle relaxation. UV-B did not affect ADP phosphorylation (state 3) rates of mitochondrial respiration, and it did not alter the amount of ATP produced per atom of oxygen consumed (P:O ratio). However, UV-B reduced the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio. Under UV-B exposure, fish treated with NAC showed greater swimming performance and tail beat frequencies, higher glutathione concentrations, and lower protein carbonyl concentrations and lipid peroxidation than untreated fish. Tail beat amplitude was not affected by any treatment. Our results showed, firstly, that the effects of UV-B on locomotor performance were mediated by ROS and, secondly, that reduced swimming performance was not caused by

  2. Developmental Changes in Executive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kerry; Bull, Rebecca; Ho, Ringo M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Although early studies of executive functioning in children supported Miyake et al.'s (2000) three-factor model, more recent findings supported a variety of undifferentiated or two-factor structures. Using a cohort-sequential design, this study examined whether there were age-related differences in the structure of executive functioning among…

  3. Mitochondrial Defects in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa Salgado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play important roles in cellular energy metabolism, free radical generation, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial DNA has been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis because of its high susceptibility to mutations and limited repair mechanisms in comparison to nuclear DNA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer type among women in the world and, although exhaustive research has been done on nuclear DNA changes, several studies describe a variety of mitochondrial DNA alterations present in breast cancer. In this review article, we to provide a summary of the mitochondrial genomic alterations reported in breast cancer and their functional consequences.

  4. Mitochondrial response and calcium ion change in apoptotic insect cells induced by SfaMNPV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIU Meihong; PENG Jianxin; HONG Huazhu

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial responses and changes of calcium ions in apoptotic insect SL-1 cells induced by Syngrapha falcifera multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (SfaMNPV) are reported in this paper. By using Rhodamine 123 as a fluorescent labeling probe, flow cytometry analysis and confocal laser scanning microscope observation we observed that the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (△Ψm) began to decrease in SL-1 cells at 4 h post infection and △Ψm reduced continuously with the extension of virus infection. Western blotting indicated that the Bcl-2 level in the mitochondria gradually declined and was down- regulated. Cells undergoing apoptosis were found to have an elevation of cytochrome c in the cytosol and a corresponding decrease in the mitochondria, which indicated that cytochrome c was released from mitochondria into cytosol. These results suggest that mitochondrion-mediated apoptotic signal transduction pathway exists in apoptotic insect cell induced by SfaMNPV. Cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]i) concentration rapidly increased after SfaMNPV infection and the elevated calcium was tested to come partly from extracelllular calcium ion influx. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that the apoptosis in SL-1 cells was not influenced by established cytosolic calcium clamped conditions and the EGTA inhibiting calcium influx. Therefore, neither the elevation of cytosolic calcium ion nor extracellular calcium entry was the inducing factor of apoptosis, which hinted that the depletion of ER Ca2+ store contributed to SL-1 cell apoptosis induced by SfaMNPV.

  5. Insulin Resistance in Human iPS Cells Reduces Mitochondrial Size and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Burkart, Alison M.; Tan, Kelly; Warren, Laura; Iovino, Salvatore; Hughes, Katelyn J.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance, a critical component of type 2 diabetes (T2D), precedes and predicts T2D onset. T2D is also associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. To define the cause-effect relationship between insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction, we compared mitochondrial metabolism in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from 5 healthy individuals and 4 patients with genetic insulin resistance due to insulin receptor mutations. Insulin-resistant iPSC had increased mitochondrial number...

  6. Activation-induced spatiotemporal cerebral blood flow changes and behavioral deficit after developmental mTBI in rats can be favorably altered by facilitating mitochondrial calcium uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuvika eMurugan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI leads to secondary neuronal loss via excitotoxic mechanisms, including mitochondrial Ca2+ overload. However in the surviving cellular population, mitochondrial Ca2+ influx and oxidative metabolism are diminished leading to suboptimal neuronal circuit activity and poor prognosis. Hence we tested the impact of boosting neuronal electrical activity and oxidative metabolism by facilitating mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in a rat model of mTBI. In developing rats (P25-P26 sustaining an mTBI, we demonstrate post-traumatic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF in the sensorimotor cortex in response to whisker stimulation compared to sham using functional Laser Doppler Imaging (fLDI at adulthood (P67-P73. Compared to sham, whisker stimulation-evoked positive CBF responses decreased while negative CBF responses increased in the mTBI animals. The spatiotemporal CBF changes representing underlying neuronal activity suggested profound changes to neurovascular activity after mTBI. Behavioral assessment of the same cohort of animals prior to fLDI showed that mTBI resulted in persistent contralateral sensorimotor behavioral deficit along with ipsilateral neuronal loss compared to sham. Treating mTBI rats with Kaempferol, a dietary flavonol compound that enhanced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, eliminated the inter-hemispheric asymmetry in the whisker stimulation-induced positive CBF responses and the ipsilateral negative CBF responses otherwise observed in the untreated and vehicle-treated mTBI animals in adulthood. Kaempferol also improved somatosensory behavioral measures compared to untreated and vehicle treated mTBI animals without augmenting post-injury neuronal loss. The results indicate that reduced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in the surviving populations affect post-traumatic neural activation leading to persistent behavioral deficits. Improvement in sensorimotor behavior and spatiotemporal neurovascular activity

  7. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in both nuclei and mitochondria and regulates cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) localizes in nuclei and binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. → mtTFA contains two putative nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the HMG-boxes. → Overexpression of mtTFA enhances the growth of cancer cells, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibits their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). → Knockdown of mtTFA expression induces p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is one of the high mobility group protein family and is required for both transcription from and maintenance of mitochondrial genomes. However, the roles of mtTFA have not been extensively studied in cancer cells. Here, we firstly reported the nuclear localization of mtTFA. The proportion of nuclear-localized mtTFA varied among different cancer cells. Some mtTFA binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that mtTFA can regulate the expression of nuclear genes. Overexpression of mtTFA enhanced the growth of cancer cell lines, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibited their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). Knockdown of mtTFA expression induced p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. These results imply that mtTFA functions in both nuclei and mitochondria to promote cell growth.

  8. Functional categories and categorial change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2016-01-01

    , communicative) acts.      A functional category consists of linguistic units (formally expressed as e.g. a clause, a phrase, a word or an affix) that are the products of an interpersonal act, which include SPEECH ACTS (Austin 1962), THETICAL ACTS (Kaltenböck et al. 2011), PROPOSITIONAL ACTS (predicating...... and semantic categories, functional categories (as defined here) have played a rather marginal role in linguistics. In the tentative typology of functional categories proposed below, linguistic forms and constructions are classified on the basis of various kinds of interpersonal (discourse...

  9. Naringin Improves Neuronal Insulin Signaling, Brain Mitochondrial Function, and Cognitive Function in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Yan, Junqiang; Chen, Jing; Wu, Wenlan; Zhu, Xiaoying; Wang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    The epidemic and experimental studies have confirmed that the obesity induced by high-fat diet not only caused neuronal insulin resistance, but also induced brain mitochondrial dysfunction as well as learning impairment in mice. Naringin has been reported to posses biological functions which are beneficial to human cognitions, but its protective effects on HFD-induced cognitive deficits and underlying mechanisms have not been well characterized. In the present study Male C57BL/6 J mice were fed either a control or high-fat diet for 20 weeks and then randomized into four groups treated with their respective diets including control diet, control diet + naringin, high-fat diet (HFD), and high-fat diet + naringin (HFDN). The behavioral performance was assessed by using novel object recognition test and Morris water maze test. Hippocampal mitochondrial parameters were analyzed. Then the protein levels of insulin signaling pathway and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the hippocampus were detected by Western blot method. Our results showed that oral administration of naringin significantly improved the learning and memory abilities as evidenced by increasing recognition index by 52.5% in the novel object recognition test and inducing a 1.05-fold increase in the crossing-target number in the probe test, and ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction in mice caused by HFD consumption. Moreover, naringin significantly enhanced insulin signaling pathway as indicated by a 34.5% increase in the expression levels of IRS-1, a 47.8% decrease in the p-IRS-1, a 1.43-fold increase in the p-Akt, and a 1.89-fold increase in the p-GSK-3β in the hippocampus of the HFDN mice versus HFD mice. Furthermore, the AMPK activity significantly increased in the naringin-treated (100 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) group. These findings suggest that an enhancement in insulin signaling and a decrease in mitochondrial dysfunction through the activation of AMPK may be one of the mechanisms that naringin

  10. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A reduction and mitochondrial dysfunction in Hashimoto's hypothyroid myopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Siciliano, Gabriele; Monzani, Fabio; Manca, Maria Laura; Tessa, Alessandra; Caraccio, Nadia; Tozzi, Giulia; Piemonte, Fiorella; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Ferrannini, Eleuterio; Murri, Luigi

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial changes have been described in muscle tissue in acquired hypothyroidism. Among the molecular mechanisms by which thyroid hormones regulate expression of nuclear genes encoding for regulatory proteins of mitochondrial respiratory function, the mitochondrial transcription factor A (h-mtTFA) has been proposed to be a target of thyroid hormone action. The aim of this study has been to relate h-mtTFA levels in the skeletal muscle of patients affected by Hashimoto's hypoth...

  11. Effect of bevacizumab (Avastin™) on mitochondrial function of in vitro retinal pigment epithelial, neurosensory retinal and microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Saurabh; Sharma, Ashish; Dong, Joyce; Neekhra, Aneesh; Gramajo, Ana L; Seigel, Gail M; Kenney, M Cristina; Kuppermann, Baruch D

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of bevacizumab on the mitochondrial function of human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19), rat neurosensory retinal (R28) and human microvascular endothelial (HMVEC) cells in culture. Materials and Methods: ARPE-19 and R28 cells were treated with 0.125, 0.25, 0.50 and 1 mg/ml of bevacizumab. The HMVEC cultures were treated with 0.125, 0.25, 0.50 and 1 mg/ml of bevacizumab or 1 mg/ml of immunoglobulin G (control). Mitochondrial function assessed by mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity (MDA) was determined using the WST-1 assay. Results: Bevacizumab doses of 0.125 to 1 mg/ml for 5 days did not significantly affect the MDA of ARPE-19 cells. Bevacizumab treatment at 0.125 and 0.25 mg/ml (clinical dose) did not significantly affect the MDA of R28 cells; however, 0.50 and 1 mg/ml doses significantly reduced the R28 cell mitochondrial function. All doses of bevacizumab significantly reduced the MDA of proliferating and non-proliferating HMVEC. Conclusion: Bevacizumab exposure for 5 days was safe at clinical doses in both ARPE-19 and R28 retinal neurosensory cells in culture. By contrast, bevacizumab exposure at all doses show a significant dose-dependent decrease in mitochondrial activity in both the proliferating and non-proliferating HMVEC in vitro. This suggests a selective action of bevacizumab on endothelial cells at clinical doses. PMID:24413824

  12. The fungicide Pristine® inhibits mitochondrial function in vitro but not flight metabolic rates in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jacob B; Nath, Rachna; Gadau, Juergen; Fox, Trevor; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Harrison, Jon F

    2016-03-01

    Honey bees and other pollinators are exposed to fungicides that act by inhibiting fungal mitochondria. Here we test whether a common fungicide (Pristine®) inhibits the function of mitochondria of honeybees, and whether consumption of ecologically-realistic concentrations can cause negative effects on the mitochondria of flight muscles, or the capability for flight, as judged by CO2 emission rates and thorax temperatures during flight. Direct exposure of mitochondria to Pristine® levels above 5 ppm strongly inhibited mitochondrial oxidation rates in vitro. However, bees that consumed pollen containing Pristine® at ecologically-realistic concentrations (≈ 1 ppm) had normal flight CO2 emission rates and thorax temperatures. Mitochondria isolated from the flight muscles of the Pristine®-consuming bees had higher state 3 oxygen consumption rates than control bees, suggesting that possibly Pristine®-consumption caused compensatory changes in mitochondria. It is likely that the lack of a strong functional effect of Pristine®-consumption on flight performance and the in vitro function of flight muscle mitochondria results from maintenance of Pristine® levels in the flight muscles at much lower levels than occur in the food, probably due to metabolism and detoxification. As Pristine® has been shown to negatively affect feeding rates and protein digestion of honey bees, it is plausible that Pristine® consumption negatively affects gut wall function (where mitochondria may be exposed to higher concentrations of Pristine®). PMID:26685059

  13. Farm functionality changes in relation to changes in Agricultural policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Stubkjær; Vejre, Henrik; Dalgaard, Tommy;

    2015-01-01

    Changes in European agriculture over the last 70 year have frequently been labelled with the keywords intensification, specialisation and concentration. A variety of empirical studies of the development in farm characteristics and landscape structures have been undertaken to describe the change in...... details. The structural changes in agriculture are well accounted for in national and European statistics, however changes in farm functions have also occurred. It has been suggested that European agriculture nowadays are undergoing changes from monofunctional focus on production to a wider...... functional focused analysis of the temporal changes in four selected farm functions – production, residence, habitat and recreation. The studies are based on data from an interview study conducted in the end 1990s and in 2008 in three study area in Denmark. To quantify the functional changes an indicator...

  14. Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Different Routes to Alzheimer’s Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Picone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are dynamic ATP-generating organelle which contribute to many cellular functions including bioenergetics processes, intracellular calcium regulation, alteration of reduction-oxidation potential of cells, free radical scavenging, and activation of caspase mediated cell death. Mitochondrial functions can be negatively affected by amyloid β peptide (Aβ, an important component in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis, and Aβ can interact with mitochondria and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. One of the most accepted hypotheses for AD onset implicates that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are one of the primary events in the insurgence of the pathology. Here, we examine structural and functional mitochondrial changes in presence of Aβ. In particular we review data concerning Aβ import into mitochondrion and its involvement in mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetics, biogenesis, trafficking, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP formation, and mitochondrial protein interaction. Moreover, the development of AD therapy targeting mitochondria is also discussed.

  15. Uptake rate of cationic mitochondrial inhibitor MKT-077 determines cellular oxygen consumption change in carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L Chunta

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Since tumor radiation response is oxygen-dependent, radiosensitivity can be enhanced by increasing tumor oxygenation. Theoretically, inhibiting cellular oxygen consumption is the most efficient way to increase oxygen levels. The cationic, rhodacyanine dye-analog MKT-077 inhibits mitochondrial respiration and could be an effective metabolic inhibitor. However, the relationship between cellular MKT-077 uptake and metabolic inhibition is unknown. We hypothesized that rat and human mammary carcinoma cells would take up MKT-077, causing a decrease in oxygen metabolism related to drug uptake. METHODS: R3230Ac rat breast adenocarcinoma cells were exposed to MKT-077. Cellular MKT-077 concentration was quantified using spectroscopy, and oxygen consumption was measured using polarographic electrodes. MKT-077 uptake kinetics were modeled by accounting for uptake due to both the concentration and potential gradients across the plasma and mitochondrial membranes. These kinetic parameters were used to model the relationship between MKT-077 uptake and metabolic inhibition. MKT-077-induced changes in oxygen consumption were also characterized in MDA-MB231 human breast carcinoma cells. RESULTS: Cells took up MKT-077 with a time constant of ∼1 hr, and modeling showed that over 90% of intracellular MKT-077 was bound or sequestered, likely by the mitochondria. The uptake resulted in a rapid decrease in oxygen consumption, with a time constant of ∼30 minutes. Surprisingly the change in oxygen consumption was proportional to uptake rate, not cellular concentration. MKT-077 proved a potent metabolic inhibitor, with dose-dependent decreases of 45-73% (p = 0.003. CONCLUSIONS: MKT-077 caused an uptake rate-dependent decrease in cellular metabolism, suggesting potential efficacy for increasing tumor oxygen levels and radiosensitivity in vivo.

  16. The defective expression of gtpbp3 related to tRNA modification alters the mitochondrial function and development of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Danni; Li, Feng; Yang, Qingxian; Tian, Miao; Zhang, Zengming; Zhang, Qinghai; Chen, Ye; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-08-01

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been associated with a wide spectrum of clinical abnormalities. However, nuclear modifier gene(s) modulate the phenotypic expression of pathogenic mtDNA mutations. In our previous investigation, we identified the human GTPBP3 related to mitochondrial tRNA modification, acting as a modifier to influence of deafness-associated mtDNA mutation. Mutations in GTPBP3 have been found to be associated with other human diseases. However, the pathophysiology of GTPBP3-associated disorders is still not fully understood. Here, we reported the generation and characterization of Gtpbp3 depletion zebrafish model using antisense morpholinos. Zebrafish gtpbp3 has three isoforms localized at mitochondria. Zebrafish gtpbp3 is expressed at various embryonic stages and in multiple tissues. In particular, the gtpbp3 was expressed more abundantly in adult zebrafish ovary and testis. The expression of zebrafish gtpbp3 can functionally restore the growth defects caused by the mss1/gtpbp3 mutation in yeast. A marked decrease of mitochondrial ATP generation accompanied by increased levels of apoptosis and reactive oxygen species were observed in gtpbp3 knockdown zebrafish embryos. The Gtpbp3 morphants exhibited defective in embryonic development including bleeding, melenin, oedema and curved tails within 5days post fertilization, as compared with uninjected controls. The co-injection of wild type gtpbp3 mRNA partially rescued these defects in Gtpbp3 morphants. These data suggest that zebrafish Gtpbp3 is a structural and functional homolog of human and yeast GTPBP3. The mitochondrial dysfunction caused by defective Gtpbp3 may alter the embryonic development in the zebrafish. In addition, this zebrafish model of mitochondrial disease may provide unique opportunities for studying defective tRNA modification, mitochondrial biogenesis, and pathophysiology of mitochondrial disorders. PMID:27184967

  17. Mammalian mitochondrial intermediate peptidase: Structure/function analysis of a new homologue from Schizophyllum commune and relationship to thimet oligopeptidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaya, G.; Sakati, W.R.; Rollins, R.A. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-10

    Mitochondrial intermediate peptidase (MIP) is a component of the mitochondrial protein import machinery required for maturation of nuclear-encoded precursor proteins targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or inner membrane. We previously characterized this enzyme in rat (RMIP) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (YMIP) and showed that MIP activity is essential for mitochondrial function in yeast. We have now defined the structure of a new MIP homologue (SMIP) from the basidiomycete fungus Schizophyllum commune. SMIP includes 4 exons of 523, 486, 660, and 629 bp separated by 3 short introns. The predicted SMIP, YMIP, and RMIP sequences share 31-37% identity and 54-57% similarity over 700 amino acids. When SMIP and RMIP were expressed in a yeast mip1{Delta} mutant, they were both able to rescue the respiratory-deficient phenotype caused by genetic inactivation of YMIP, indicating that the function of this enzyme is conserved in eukaryotes. Moreover, the MIP sequences show 20-24% identity and 40-47% similarity to a family of oligopeptidases from bacteria, yeast, and mammals. MIP and these proteins are characterized by a highly conserved motif, F-H-E-X-G-H-(X){sub 12}-G-(X){sub 5}-D-(X){sub 2}-E-X-P-S-(X){sub 3}-E-X, centered around a zinc-binding site and appear to represent a new family of genes associated with proteolytic processing in the mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments. 48 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Mitochondrial structure and function are not different between nonfailing donor and end-stage failing human hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzem, Katherine M; Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Ravikumar, Vinod K; Madden, Eli J; Ewald, Gregory A; Dikranian, Krikor; Beard, Daniel A; Efimov, Igor R

    2016-08-01

    During human heart failure, the balance of cardiac energy use switches from predominantly fatty acids (FAs) to glucose. We hypothesized that this substrate shift was the result of mitochondrial degeneration; therefore, we examined mitochondrial oxidation and ultrastructure in the failing human heart by using respirometry, transmission electron microscopy, and gene expression studies of demographically matched donor and failing human heart left ventricular (LV) tissues. Surprisingly, respiratory capacities for failing LV isolated mitochondria (n = 9) were not significantly diminished compared with donor LV isolated mitochondria (n = 7) for glycolysis (pyruvate + malate)- or FA (palmitoylcarnitine)-derived substrates, and mitochondrial densities, assessed via citrate synthase activity, were consistent between groups. Transmission electron microscopy images also showed no ultrastructural remodeling for failing vs. donor mitochondria; however, the fraction of lipid droplets (LDs) in direct contact with a mitochondrion was reduced, and the average distance between an LD and its nearest neighboring mitochondrion was increased. Analysis of FA processing gene expression between donor and failing LVs revealed 0.64-fold reduced transcript levels for the mitochondrial-LD tether, perilipin 5, in the failing myocardium (P = 0.003). Thus, reduced FA use in heart failure may result from improper delivery, potentially via decreased perilipin 5 expression and mitochondrial-LD tethering, and not from intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction.-Holzem, K. M., Vinnakota, K. C., Ravikumar, V. K., Madden, E. J., Ewald, G. A., Dikranian, K., Beard, D. A., Efimov, I. R. Mitochondrial structure and function are not different between nonfailing donor and end-stage failing human hearts. PMID:27075244

  19. Overfeeding reduces insulin sensitivity and increases oxidative stress, without altering markers of mitochondrial content and function in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Samocha-Bonet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress are associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. High fat feeding induces insulin resistance and increases skeletal muscle oxidative stress in rodents, but there is controversy as to whether skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and function is altered. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Forty (37 ± 2 y non-obese (25.6 ± 0.6 kg/m(2 sedentary men (n = 20 and women (n = 20 were overfed (+1040 ± 100 kcal/day, 46 ± 1% of energy from fat for 28 days. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed at baseline and day 28 of overfeeding and skeletal muscle biopsies taken at baseline, day 3 and day 28 of overfeeding in a sub cohort of 26 individuals (13 men and 13 women that consented to having all 3 biopsies performed. Weight increased on average in the whole cohort by 0.6 ± 0.1 and 2.7 ± 0.3 kg at days 3 and 28, respectively (P<0.0001, without a significant difference in the response between men and women (P = 0.4. Glucose infusion rate during the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp decreased from 54.8 ± 2.8 at baseline to 50.3 ± 2.5 µmol/min/kg FFM at day 28 of overfeeding (P = 0.03 without a significant difference between men and women (P = 0.4. Skeletal muscle protein carbonyls and urinary F2-isoprostanes increased with overfeeding (P<0.05. Protein levels of muscle peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC1α and subunits from complex I, II and V of the electron transport chain were increased at day 3 (all P<0.05 and returned to basal levels at day 28. No changes were detected in muscle citrate synthase activity or ex vivo CO(2 production at either time point. CONCLUSIONS: Peripheral insulin resistance was induced by overfeeding, without reducing any of the markers of mitochondrial content that were examined. Oxidative stress was however increased, and may have contributed to the reduction in insulin sensitivity observed.

  20. Oroxylin A modulates mitochondrial function and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells by inducing mitochondrial translocation of wild-type p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Chen; Lu, Na; Zhou, Yuxin; Ni, Ting; Dai, Yuanyuan; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Wei, Libin

    2016-03-29

    Oroxylin A is a flavonoid extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi. We previously demonstrated that oroxylin A induced apoptosis in human colon cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway. In the present study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms responsible for the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway triggered by oroxylin A. p53 regulates mitochondrial survival, mitochondrial DNA integrity, and protection from oxidative stress. We determined that oroxylin A induces p53 mitochondrial translocation and inhibits SOD2 activity. Additionally, our studies demonstrate that oroxylin A promotes the formation and mitochondrial translocation of the p53-Recql4 complex in HCT-116 cells. Finally, we showed that oroxylin A triggers cytosolic p53 activation, thereby promoting apoptosis. Mitochondrial translocation of p53 was also validated in vivo. Thus, oroxylin A induces mitochondrial translocation of p53 and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction in human colon cancer cells. PMID:26958937

  1. Mito-Morphosis: Mitochondrial Fusion, Fission, and Cristae Remodeling as Key Mediators of Cellular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernas, Lena; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Permanent residency in the eukaryotic cell pressured the prokaryotic mitochondrial ancestor to strategize for intracellular living. Mitochondria are able to autonomously integrate and respond to cellular cues and demands by remodeling their morphology. These processes define mitochondrial dynamics and inextricably link the fate of the mitochondrion and that of the host eukaryote, as exemplified by the human diseases that result from mutations in mitochondrial dynamics proteins. In this review, we delineate the architecture of mitochondria and define the mechanisms by which they modify their shape. Key players in these mechanisms are discussed, along with their role in manipulating mitochondrial morphology during cellular action and development. Throughout, we highlight the evolutionary context in which mitochondrial dynamics emerged and consider unanswered questions whose dissection might lead to mitochondrial morphology-based therapies. PMID:26667075

  2. Nrf2 activation in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases: a focus on its role in mitochondrial bioenergetics and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteras, Noemí; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2016-05-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2 (NF-E2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor well-known for its function in controlling the basal and inducible expression of a variety of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. As part of its cytoprotective activity, increasing evidence supports its role in metabolism and mitochondrial bioenergetics and function. Neurodegenerative diseases are excellent candidates for Nrf2-targeted treatments. Most neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia and Friedreich's ataxia are characterized by oxidative stress, misfolded protein aggregates, and chronic inflammation, the common targets of Nrf2 therapeutic strategies. Together with them, mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in the pathogenesis of most neurodegenerative disorders. The recently recognized ability of Nrf2 to regulate intermediary metabolism and mitochondrial function makes Nrf2 activation an attractive and comprehensive strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. This review aims to focus on the potential therapeutic role of Nrf2 activation in neurodegeneration, with special emphasis on mitochondrial bioenergetics and function, metabolism and the role of transporters, all of which collectively contribute to the cytoprotective activity of this transcription factor. PMID:26812787

  3. Preserved cardiac mitochondrial function and reduced ischaemia/reperfusion injury afforded by chronic continuous hypoxia: Role of opioid receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maslov, L. N.; Naryzhnaya, N. V.; Prokudina, E. S.; Kolář, František; Gorbunov, A. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, H.; Tsibulnikov, S.Yu.; Portnichenko, A. G.; Lasukova, T. V.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2015), s. 496-501. ISSN 1440-1681 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1162 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cardioprotection * chronic hypoxia * ischaemia/reperfusion * mitochondrial function * opioid receptors Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.372, year: 2014

  4. Effects of prolonged endotoxemia on liver, skeletal muscle and kidney mitochondrial function

    OpenAIRE

    Porta, Francesca; Takala, Jukka; Weikert, Christian; Bracht, Hendrik; Kolarova, Anna; Lauterburg, Bernhard H.; Borotto, Erika; Jakob, Stephan M

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis may impair mitochondrial utilization of oxygen. Since hepatic dysfunction is a hallmark of sepsis, we hypothesized that the liver is more susceptible to mitochondrial dysfunction than the peripheral tissues, such as the skeletal muscle. We studied the effect of prolonged endotoxin infusion on liver, muscle and kidney mitochondrial respiration and on hepatosplanchnic oxygen transport and microcirculation in pigs. Methods Twenty anesthetized pigs were randomized to receive e...

  5. 脾气虚型HIV/AIDS患者淋巴细胞线粒体功能状态在常温和热应激条件下的改变情况%Changes of lymphocytes mitochondrial function in room temperature and heat stress conditions in patients with HIV/AIDS of spleen deficiency type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙萌; 刘颖; 王克林; 徐淑玲; 孙刚; 王笑红; 翟志光; 杨凤珍; 王健

    2013-01-01

    研究比较脾气虚证人类获得性免疫缺陷病毒患者(HIV/AIDS患者)与健康人群淋巴细胞在37℃和40℃条件(模拟热应激)下,淋巴细胞线粒体膜电位差异,结果显示脾气虚证HIV/AIDS患者淋巴细胞线粒体膜电位明显下降,特别是在热应激条件下(40℃孵育1h),反映了其机体在发热情况下能量代谢功能的下降,另一方面揭示了HIV/AIDS患者脾气虚病机的部分细胞免疫学基础,为中医药防治HIV/AIDS提供理论支持和依据.%The research compare the mitochondrial membrane potential (△Ψ) of lymphocytes in healthy people with in HIV/AIDS infector of spleen qi deficiency.The results indicated that the mitochondrial membrane potential (△Ψ) of lymphocytes in HIV/AIDS infection was obviously lower than in healthy people,especially in the condition of heat stress (1 hour incubation on 40℃),to reflect the function of energy metabolism in the HIV/AIDS infector of spleen qi deficiency descent under the condition of fever,and on the other hand to reveal their pathogenesis of cellular immunology.Through the exploration,the theoretical evidence was provided for HIV/AIDS prevention and cure by Traditional Chinese Medicine.

  6. The loss of LRPPRC function induces the mitochondrial unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Fabian; Müller-Rischart, Anne Kathrin; Conradt, Barbara; Rolland, Stéphane Guy

    2015-09-01

    The inactivation of the LRPPRC gene, which has previously been associated with the neurodegenerative French Canadian Leigh Syndrome, results in a decrease in the production of mitochondria-encoded subunits of complex IV, thereby causing a reduction in complex IV activity. Previously we have shown that reducing complex IV activity triggers a compensatory and conserved mitochondrial hyperfusion response. We now demonstrate that LRPPRC knock-down in mammalian cells leads to an imbalance between mitochondria-encoded and nuclear-encoded subunits of complex IV and that this imbalance triggers the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)). The inactivation of the LRPPRC-like gene mma-1 in C. elegans also induces UPR(mt), which demonstrates that this response is conserved. Furthermore, we provide evidence that mitochondrial hyperfusion and UPR(mt) are coordinated but mediated by genetically distinct pathways. We propose that in the context of LRPPRC mma-1 knock-down, mitochondrial hyperfusion helps to transiently maintain mitochondrial ATP production while UPR(mt) participates in the restoration of mitochondrial proteostasis. Mitochondrial proteostasis is not only critical in pathophysiology but also during aging, as proteotoxic stress has been shown to increase with age. Therefore, we speculate that the coordination of these two mitochondrial stress responses plays a more global role in mitochondrial proteostasis. PMID:26412102

  7. E3 Ligase Subunit Fbxo15 and PINK1 Kinase Regulate Cardiolipin Synthase 1 Stability and Mitochondrial Function in Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill B. Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is linked to mitochondrial injury, resulting in impaired cellular oxygen utilization; however, it is unknown how these events are linked on the molecular level. Cardiolipin, a mitochondrial-specific lipid, is generated by cardiolipin synthase (CLS1. Here, we show that S. aureus activates a ubiquitin E3 ligase component, Fbxo15, that is sufficient to mediate proteasomal degradation of CLS1 in epithelia, resulting in decreased cardiolipin availability and disrupted mitochondrial function. CLS1 is destabilized by the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1, which binds CLS1 to phosphorylate and regulates CLS1 disposal. Like Fbxo15, PINK1 interacts with and regulates levels of CLS1 through a mechanism dependent upon Thr219. S. aureus infection upregulates this Fbxo15-PINK1 pathway to impair mitochondrial integrity, and Pink1 knockout mice are less prone to S. aureus-induced ALI. Thus, ALI-associated disruption of cellular bioenergetics involves bioeffectors that utilize a phosphodegron to elicit ubiquitin-mediated disposal of a key mitochondrial enzyme.

  8. Improved mitochondrial function in brain aging and Alzheimer disease - the new mechanism of action of the old metabolic enhancer piracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Leuner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Piracetam, the prototype of the so-called nootropic drugs’ is used since many years in different countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging and dementia. Findings that piracetam enhances fluidity of brain mitochondrial membranes led to the hypothesis that piracetam might improve mitochondrial function, e.g. might enhance ATP synthesis. This assumption has recently been supported by a number of observations showing enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, enhanced ATP production, and reduced sensitivity for apoptosis in a variety of cell and animal models for aging and Alzheimer disease (AD. As a specific consequence, substantial evidence for elevated neuronal plasticity as a specific effect of piracetam has emerged. Taken together, these new findings can explain many of the therapeutic effects of piracetam on cognition in aging and dementia as well as different situations of brain dysfunctions.

  9. Inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain function abrogates quartz induced DNA damage in lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respirable quartz dust has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate the mechanisms of DNA damage by DQ12 quartz in RLE-6TN rat lung epithelial type II cells (RLE). Transmission electron microscopy and flow-cytometry analysis showed a rapid particle uptake (30 min to 4 h) of quartz by the RLE cells, but particles were not found within the cell nuclei. This suggests that DNA strand breakage and induction of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine - as also observed in these cells during these treatment intervals - did not result from direct physical interactions between particles and DNA, or from short-lived particle surface-derived reactive oxygen species. DNA damage by quartz was significantly reduced in the presence of the mitochondrial inhibitors rotenone and antimycin-A. In the absence of quartz, these inhibitors did not affect DNA damage, but they reduced cellular oxygen consumption. No signs of apoptosis were observed by quartz. Flow-cytometry analysis indicated that the reduced DNA damage by rotenone was not due to a possible mitochondria-mediated reduction of particle uptake by the RLE cells. Further proof of concept for the role of mitochondria was shown by the failure of quartz to elicit DNA damage in mitochondria-depleted 143B (rho-0) osteosarcoma cells, at concentrations where it elicited DNA damage in the parental 143B cell line. In conclusion, our data show that respirable quartz particles can elicit oxidative DNA damage in vitro without entering the nuclei of type II cells, which are considered to be important target cells in quartz carcinogenesis. Furthermore, our observations indicate that such indirect DNA damage involves the mitochondrial electron transport chain function, by an as-yet-to-be elucidated mechanism

  10. Insulin Resistance Is Not Associated with an Impaired Mitochondrial Function in Contracting Gastrocnemius Muscle of Goto-Kakizaki Diabetic Rats In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Macia

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance, altered lipid metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle would play a major role in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM development, but the causal relationships between these events remain conflicting. To clarify this issue, gastrocnemius muscle function and energetics were investigated throughout a multidisciplinary approach combining in vivo and in vitro measurements in Goto-Kakizaki (GK rats, a non-obese T2DM model developing peripheral insulin resistant without abnormal level of plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA. Wistar rats were used as controls. Mechanical performance and energy metabolism were assessed strictly non-invasively using magnetic resonance (MR imaging and 31-phosphorus MR spectroscopy (31P-MRS. Compared with control group, plasma insulin and glucose were respectively lower and higher in GK rats, but plasma NEFA level was normal. In resting GK muscle, phosphocreatine content was reduced whereas glucose content and intracellular pH were both higher. However, there were not differences between both groups for basal oxidative ATP synthesis rate, citrate synthase activity, and intramyocellular contents for lipids, glycogen, ATP and ADP (an important in vivo mitochondrial regulator. During a standardized fatiguing protocol (6 min of maximal repeated isometric contractions electrically induced at a frequency of 1.7 Hz, mechanical performance and glycolytic ATP production rate were reduced in diabetic animals whereas oxidative ATP production rate, maximal mitochondrial capacity and ATP cost of contraction were not changed. These findings provide in vivo evidence that insulin resistance is not caused by an impairment of mitochondrial function in this diabetic model.

  11. A γ-Secretase Independent Role for Presenilin in Calcium Homeostasis Impacts Mitochondrial Function and Morphology in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarasija, Shaarika; Norman, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in the presenilin (PSEN) encoding genes (PSEN1 and PSEN2) occur in most early onset familial Alzheimer's Disease. Despite the identification of the involvement of PSEN in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) ∼20 years ago, the underlying role of PSEN in AD is not fully understood. To gain insight into the biological function of PSEN, we investigated the role of the PSEN homolog SEL-12 in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using genetic, cell biological, and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that mutations in sel-12 result in defects in calcium homeostasis, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, consistent with mammalian PSEN, we provide evidence that SEL-12 has a critical role in mediating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium release. Furthermore, we found that in SEL-12-deficient animals, calcium transfer from the ER to the mitochondria leads to fragmentation of the mitochondria and mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, we show that the impact that SEL-12 has on mitochondrial function is independent of its role in Notch signaling, γ-secretase proteolytic activity, and amyloid plaques. Our results reveal a critical role for PSEN in mediating mitochondrial function by regulating calcium transfer from the ER to the mitochondria. PMID:26500256

  12. Role of Pterocarpus santalinus against mitochondrial dysfunction and membrane lipid changes induced by ulcerogens in rat gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Shoba; Devi, R S; Devi, C S Shyamala

    2007-11-20

    Free radicals produced by ulcerogenic agents affect the TCA cycle enzymes located in the outer membrane of the mitochondria. Upon induction with ulcerogens, peroxidation of membrane lipids bring about alterations in the mitochondrial enzyme activity. This indicates an increase in the permeability levels of the mitochondrial membrane. The ability of PSE to scavenge the reactive oxygen species results in restoration of activities of TCA cycle enzymes. NSAIDs interfere with the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo, resulting in uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation process. This usually results in diminished cellular ATP production. The recovery of gastric mucosal barrier function through maintenance of energy metabolism results in maintenance of ATP levels, as observed in this study upon treatment with PSE. Membrane integrity altered by peroxidation is known to have a modified fatty acid composition, a disruption of permeability, a decrease in electrical resistance, and increase in flip-flopping between monolayers and inactivated cross-linked proteins. The severe depletion of arachidonic acid in ulcer induced groups was prevented upon treatment with PSE. The acid inhibitory property of the herbal extract enables the maintenance of GL activity upon treatment with PSE. The ability to prevent membrane peroxidation has been traced to the presence of active constituents in the PSE. In essence, PSE has been found to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction, provide mitochondrial cell integrity, through the maintenance of lipid bilayer by its ability to provide a hydrophobic character to the gastric mucosa, further indicating its ability to reverse the action of NSAIDs and mast cell degranulators in gastric mucosa. PMID:17719569

  13. Functional recurrent mutations in the human mitochondrial phylogeny: dual roles in evolution and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Liron; Zhidkov, Ilia; Gurman, Yotam; Hawlena, Hadas; Mishmar, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Mutations frequently reoccur in the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). However, it is unclear whether recurrent mtDNA nodal mutations (RNMs), that is, recurrent mutations in stems of unrelated phylogenetic nodes, are functional and hence selectively constrained. To answer this question, we performed comprehensive parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses of 9,868 publicly available whole human mtDNAs revealing 1,606 single nodal mutations (SNMs) and 679 RNMs. We then evaluated the potential functionality of synonymous, nonsynonymous and RNA SNMs and RNMs. For synonymous mutations, we have implemented the Codon Adaptation Index. For nonsynonymous mutations, we assessed evolutionary conservation, and employed previously described pathogenicity score assessment tools. For RNA genes' mutations, we designed a bioinformatic tool which compiled evolutionary conservation and potential effect on RNA structure. While comparing the functionality scores of nonsynonymous and RNA SNMs and RNMs with those of disease-causing mtDNA mutations, we found significant difference (P SNMs had comparable values with disease-causing mutations reflecting their potential function thus being the best candidates to participate in adaptive events of unrelated lineages. Strikingly, some functional RNMs occurred in unrelated mtDNA lineages that independently altered susceptibility to the same diseases, thus suggesting common functionality. To our knowledge, this is the most comprehensive analysis of selective signatures in the mtDNA not only within proteins but also within RNA genes. For the first time, we discover virtually all positively selected RNMs in our phylogeny while emphasizing their dual role in past evolutionary events and in disease today. PMID:23563965

  14. Mitochondrial morphology and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic and are able to interchange their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and a fragmented disconnected arrangement by the processes of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. Changes in mitochondrial morphology are regulated by the mitochondrial fusion proteins (mitofusins 1 and 2, and optic atrophy 1) and the mitochondrial fission proteins (dynamin-related peptide 1 and mitochondrial fission protein 1) and have been implicated in a...

  15. Impaired mitochondrial function in HepG2 cells treated with hydroxy-cobalamin[c-lactam]: A cell model for idiosyncratic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegler, Patrizia; Grünig, David; Berger, Benjamin; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Bouitbir, Jamal

    2015-10-01

    The vitamin B12 analog hydroxy-cobalamin[c-lactam] (HCCL) impairs mitochondrial protein synthesis and the function of the electron transport chain. Our goal was to establish an in vitro model for mitochondrial dysfunction in human hepatoma cells (HepG2), which can be used to investigate hepatotoxicity of idiosyncratic mitochondrial toxicants. For that, HepG2 cells were treated with HCCL, which inhibits the function of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and impairs mitochondrial protein synthesis. Secondary, cells were incubated with propionate that served as source of propionyl-CoA, a percursor of methylmalonyl-CoA. Dose-finding experiments were conducted to evaluate the optimal dose and treatment time of HCCL and propionate for experiments on mitochondrial function. 50 μM HCCL was cytotoxic after exposure of HepG2 cells for 2d and 10 and 50 μM HCCL enhanced the cytotoxicity of 100 or 1000 μM propionate. Co-treatment with HCCL (10 μM) and propionate (1000 μM) dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential and impaired the activity of enzyme complex IV of the electron transport chain. Treatment with HCCL decreased the mRNA content of mitochondrially encoded proteins, whereas the mtDNA content remained unchanged. We observed mitochondrial ROS accumulation and decreased mitochondrial SOD2 expression. Moreover, electron microscopy showed mitochondrial swelling. Finally, HepG2 cells pretreated with a non-cytotoxic combination of HCCL (10 μM) and propionate (100 μM) were more sensitive to the mitochondrial toxicants dronedarone, benzbromarone, and ketoconazole than untreated cells. In conclusion, we established and characterized a cell model, which could be used for testing drugs with idiosyncratic mitochondrial toxicity. PMID:26219506

  16. Impaired mitochondrial function in HepG2 cells treated with hydroxy-cobalamin[c-lactam]: A cell model for idiosyncratic toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vitamin B12 analog hydroxy-cobalamin[c-lactam] (HCCL) impairs mitochondrial protein synthesis and the function of the electron transport chain. Our goal was to establish an in vitro model for mitochondrial dysfunction in human hepatoma cells (HepG2), which can be used to investigate hepatotoxicity of idiosyncratic mitochondrial toxicants. For that, HepG2 cells were treated with HCCL, which inhibits the function of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and impairs mitochondrial protein synthesis. Secondary, cells were incubated with propionate that served as source of propionyl-CoA, a percursor of methylmalonyl-CoA. Dose-finding experiments were conducted to evaluate the optimal dose and treatment time of HCCL and propionate for experiments on mitochondrial function. 50 μM HCCL was cytotoxic after exposure of HepG2 cells for 2 d and 10 and 50 μM HCCL enhanced the cytotoxicity of 100 or 1000 μM propionate. Co-treatment with HCCL (10 μM) and propionate (1000 μM) dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential and impaired the activity of enzyme complex IV of the electron transport chain. Treatment with HCCL decreased the mRNA content of mitochondrially encoded proteins, whereas the mtDNA content remained unchanged. We observed mitochondrial ROS accumulation and decreased mitochondrial SOD2 expression. Moreover, electron microscopy showed mitochondrial swelling. Finally, HepG2 cells pretreated with a non-cytotoxic combination of HCCL (10 μM) and propionate (100 μM) were more sensitive to the mitochondrial toxicants dronedarone, benzbromarone, and ketoconazole than untreated cells. In conclusion, we established and characterized a cell model, which could be used for testing drugs with idiosyncratic mitochondrial toxicity

  17. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Ortiz-Avila; Mauricio Esquivel-Martínez; Berenice Eridani Olmos-Orizaba; Alfredo Saavedra-Molina; Alain R. Rodriguez-Orozco; Christian Cortés-Rojo

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the...

  18. Insulin acutely improves mitochondrial function of rat and human skeletal muscle by increasing coupling efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Nisr, Raid B.; Affourtit, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is essential for the regulation of fuel metabolism and triggers the uptake of glucose by skeletal muscle. The imported glucose is either stored or broken down, as insulin stimulates glycogenesis and ATP synthesis. The mechanism by which ATP production is increased is incompletely understood at present and, generally, relatively little functional information is available on the effect of insulin on mitochondrial function. In this paper we have exploited extracellular flux technology to...

  19. A novel method to promote behavioral improvement and enhance mitochondrial function following an embolic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapchak, Paul A; Boitano, Paul D

    2016-09-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only FDA-approved treatment for stroke; tPA increases cerebral reperfusion, blood flow and improved behavior. Novel transcranial laser therapy (TLT) also enhances cerebral blood flow and activates mitochondrial function. Using the rabbit small clot embolic stroke model (RSCEM), we studied the effects of continuous wave TLT (7.5mW/cm(2)) alone or in combination with standardized intravenous (IV) tPA (3.3mg/kg) applied 1h post-embolization on 3 endpoints: 1) behavioral function measured 2 days [effective stroke dose (P50 in mg) producing neurological deficits in 50% of embolized rabbits], 2) intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) rate, and 3) cortical adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) content was measured 6h following embolization. TLT and tPA significantly (p0.05) for the TLT-tPA combination to further increase P50. TLT and tPA both attenuated stroke-induced ATP deficits, and the combination of tPA and TLT produced an additive effect on ATP levels. This study demonstrates that the combination of TLT-tPA enhances ATP production, and suggests that tPA-induced reperfusion in combination with TLT neuroprotection therapy may optimally protect viable cells in the cortex measured using ATP levels as a marker. PMID:27180104

  20. Mitochondrial function and glucose metabolism in the placenta with gestational diabetes mellitus: role of miR-143.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralimanoharan, Sribalasubashini; Maloyan, Alina; Myatt, Leslie

    2016-06-01

    A predisposing factor for development of the hyperglycaemic state of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is obesity. We previously showed that increasing maternal obesity is associated with significant reductions in placental mitochondrial respiration. MicroRNA (miR)-143 has been previously shown to regulate the metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis in cancer tissues. We hypothesized that mitochondrial respiration is reduced and aerobic glycolysis is up-regulated via changes in miR-143 expression in the placenta of women with GDM. Placental tissue was collected at term from women with A1GDM (controlled by diet), A2GDM (controlled by medication) and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls (CTRL). miR-143 expression was measured by RT-PCR. Expression of mitochondrial complexes, transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator 1α (PGC1α) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), components of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling, glucose transporter GLUT1 and glycolytic enzymes [hexokinase-2 (HK-2), phosphofructokinase (PFK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)] were measured by Western blot. Trophoblast respiration was measured by XF24 Analyser. Expression of miR-143, mitochondrial complexes, and PPARγ and PGC1α, which act downstream of miR-143, were significantly decreased in A2GDM placentae compared with A1GDM and CTRL (Pplacentae. Overexpression of miR-143 was able to increase mitochondrial respiration, increase protein expression of mitochondrial complexes and decrease expression of glycolytic enzymes by 40% compared with A2GDM. Down-regulation of miR-143 mediates the metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis in placenta of women with A2GDM. PMID:26993250

  1. Changes in gastrointestinal tract function and structure in functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanheel, Hanne; Farré, Ricard

    2013-03-01

    Functional dyspepsia is an extremely common disorder of gastrointestinal function. The disorder is thought to be heterogeneous, with different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying varied symptom patterns. A diversity of changes in gastrointestinal tract function and structure has been described in functional dyspepsia. These involve alterations in the stomach, such as impaired accommodation, delayed gastric emptying and hypersensitivity, and alterations in the duodenum, such as increased sensitivity to duodenal acid and/or lipids and low-grade inflammation. In this Review, we summarize all these abnormalities in an attempt to provide an integrated overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms in functional dyspepsia. PMID:23318268

  2. Mitochondrial Fragmentation Due to Inhibition of Fusion Increases Cyclin B through Mitochondrial Superoxide Radicals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas M Gupte

    Full Text Available During the cell cycle, mitochondria undergo regulated changes in morphology. Two particularly interesting events are first, mitochondrial hyperfusion during the G(1-S transition and second, fragmentation during entry into mitosis. The mitochondria remain fragmented between late G(2- and mitotic exit. This mitotic mitochondrial fragmentation constitutes a checkpoint in some cell types, of which little is known. We bypass the 'mitotic mitochondrial fragmentation' checkpoint by inducing fragmented mitochondrial morphology and then measure the effect on cell cycle progression. Using Drosophila larval hemocytes, Drosophila S2R(+ cell and cells in the pouch region of wing imaginal disc of Drosophila larvae we show that inhibiting mitochondrial fusion, thereby increasing fragmentation, causes cellular hyperproliferation and an increase in mitotic index. However, mitochondrial fragmentation due to over-expression of the mitochondrial fission machinery does not cause these changes. Our experiments suggest that the inhibition of mitochondrial fusion increases superoxide radical content and leads to the upregulation of cyclin B that culminates in the observed changes in the cell cycle. We provide evidence for the importance of mitochondrial superoxide in this process. Our results provide an insight into the need for mitofusin-degradation during mitosis and also help in understanding the mechanism by which mitofusins may function as tumor suppressors.

  3. 5-(4-hydroxy-3-dimethoxybenzylidene)-rhodanine (RD-1)-improved mitochondrial function prevents anxiety- and depressive-like states induced by chronic corticosterone injections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nan; Ren, Zhili; Zheng, Ji; Feng, Lu; Li, Dongmei; Gao, Kai; Zhang, Lianfeng; Liu, Yanyong; Zuo, Pingping

    2016-06-01

    Most current pharmacologic antidepressant treatments target monoaminergic systems confronts some problems such as low rate of remission and high risk for relapse indicating new therapeutic strategy is urgently need. Evidences showed that impairments in mitochondrial function were associated with the pathogenesis of mood disorders and improvement in its function may be a novel therapeutic choice. In the present study, effects of 5-(4-hydroxy-3-dimethoxybenzylidene)-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone (RD-1) were investigated in mice model of depression/anxiety induced by corticosterone (20 mg/kg) subcutaneously repeated injections in 5-week male BALB/c mice. Our results showed that five weeks of corticosterone administration induced anxiety/depressive-like behavioral changes, including decreased central activities in open field test, increased the immobility time in forced swimming test and the latency in the novelty-suppressed feeding test, as well as reduced bodyweight. Results showed that oral administration with RD-1 at the doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg for five weeks significantly improved the anxiety/depressive-like behavioral changes induced by corticosterone. In glucose metabolism analysis by photon emission computed tomography/-computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging, corticosterone significantly deactivated the prefrontal cortex (PFC), temporal lobe and hippocampus. RD-1 treatment obviously improved the energy metabolism in the involved brain regions. In primary cultured hippocampal neuron, corticosterone reduced speed of anterograde transport, yet speed of retrograde transport was increased. Furthermore, RD-1 enhanced the mitochondrial anterograde transport to supply energy for the neurotransmitter release. In conclusion, RD-1 prevents anxiety/depressive-like behavior of mice induced by corticosterone repeated injections with novel mechanism of improvement in the mitochondrial function. PMID:26926430

  4. Metformin impairs mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of both lean and diabetic rats in a dose-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Wessels

    Full Text Available Metformin is a widely prescribed drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have demonstrated in vitro that metformin specifically inhibits Complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This seems contraindicative since muscle mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. However, its significance for in vivo skeletal muscle mitochondrial function has yet to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of metformin on in vivo and ex vivo skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in a rat model of diabetes. Healthy (fa/+ and diabetic (fa/fa Zucker diabetic fatty rats were treated by oral gavage with metformin dissolved in water (30, 100 or 300 mg/kg bodyweight/day or water as a control for 2 weeks. After 2 weeks of treatment, muscle oxidative capacity was assessed in vivo using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ex vivo by measuring oxygen consumption in isolated mitochondria using high-resolution respirometry. Two weeks of treatment with metformin impaired in vivo muscle oxidative capacity in a dose-dependent manner, both in healthy and diabetic rats. Whereas a dosage of 30 mg/kg/day had no significant effect, in vivo oxidative capacity was 21% and 48% lower after metformin treatment at 100 and 300 mg/kg/day, respectively, independent of genotype. High-resolution respirometry measurements demonstrated a similar dose-dependent effect of metformin on ex vivo mitochondrial function. In conclusion, metformin compromises in vivo and ex vivo muscle oxidative capacity in Zucker diabetic fatty rats in a dose-dependent manner.

  5. Formation of a Stabilized Cysteine Sulfinic Acid Is Critical for the Mitochondrial Function of the Parkinsonism Protein DJ-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackinton, Jeff; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Thomas, Kelly J.; Ahmad, Rili; Greggio, Elisa; Raza, Ashraf S.; Cookson, Mark R.; Wilson, Mark A.; (NIH); (UNL)

    2009-03-02

    The formation of cysteine-sulfinic acid has recently become appreciated as a modification that links protein function to cellular oxidative status. Human DJ-1, a protein associated with inherited parkinsonism, readily forms cysteine-sulfinic acid at a conserved cysteine residue (Cys{sup 106} in human DJ-1). Mutation of Cys{sup 106} causes the protein to lose its normal protective function in cell culture and model organisms. However, it is unknown whether the loss of DJ-1 protective function in these mutants is due to the absence of Cys{sup 106} oxidation or the absence of the cysteine residue itself. To address this question, we designed a series of substitutions at a proximal glutamic acid residue (Glu{sup 18}) in human DJ-1 that alter the oxidative propensity of Cys{sup 106} through changes in hydrogen bonding. We show that two mutations, E18N and E18Q, allow Cys{sup 106} to be oxidized to Cys{sup 106}-sulfinic acid under mild conditions. In contrast, the E18D mutation stabilizes a cysteine-sulfenic acid that is readily reduced to the thiol in solution and in vivo. We show that E18N and E18Q can both partially substitute for wild-type DJ-1 using mitochondrial fission and cell viability assays. In contrast, the oxidatively impaired E18D mutant behaves as an inactive C106A mutant and fails to protect cells. We therefore conclude that formation of Cys{sup 106}-sulfinic acid is a key modification that regulates the protective function of DJ-1.

  6. Caspase cleavage of cytochrome c1 disrupts mitochondrial function and enhances cytochrome c release

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yushan Zhu; Min Li; Xiaohui Wang; Haijing Jin; Shusen Liu; Jianxin Xu; Quan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial catastrophe can be the cause or consequence of apoptosis and is associated with a number of pathophysiological conditions.The exact relationship between mitochondrial catastrophe and caspase activation is not completely understood.Here we addressed the underlying mechanism,explaining how activated caspase could feedback to attack mitochondria to amplify further cytochrome e (cyto.c) release.We discovered that cytochrome c1 (cyto.c1) in the bc1 complex of the mitochondrial respiration chain was a novel substrate of caspase 3 (casp.3).We found that cyto.c1 was cleaved at the site of D106,which is critical for binding with cyto.c,following apoptotic stresses or targeted expression of casp.3 into tbe mitochondrial intermembrane space.We demonstrated that this cleavage was closely linked with further cyto.c release and mitochondrial catastrophe.These mitochondrial events could be effectively blocked by expressing non-cleavable cyto.c1 (D106A) or by caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk.Our results demonstrate that the cleavage of cyto.c1 represents a critical step for the feedback amplification of cyto.c release by caspases and subsequent mitochondrial catastrophe.

  7. Adiponectin ameliorates the apoptotic effects of paraquat on alveolar type II cells via improvements in mitochondrial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    HE, YARONG; ZOU, LIQUN; ZHOU, YAXIONG; HU, HAI; YAO, RONG; JIANG, YAOWEN; LAU, WAYNE BOND; YUAN, TUN; HUANG, WEN; ZENG, ZHI; CAO, YU

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that excessive reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-induced apoptosis is an important feature of the injury to the lung epithelium in paraquat (PQ) poisoning. However the precise mechanisms of PQ-induced dysfunction of the mitochondria, where ROS/RNS are predominantly produced, remain to be fully elucidated. Whether globular adiponectin (gAd), a potent molecule protective to mitochondria, regulates the mitochondrial function of alveolar type II cells to reduce PQ-induced ROS/RNS production remains to be investigated. The current study aimed to investigate the precise mechanisms of PQ poisoning in the mitochondria of alveolar type II cells, and to elucidate the role of gAd in protecting against PQ-induced lung epithelium injury. Therefore, lung epithelial injury was induced by PQ co-culture of alveolar type II A549 cells for 24 h. gAd was administrated to and removed from the injured cells in after 24 h. PQ was observed to reduce cell viability and increase apoptosis by ~1.5 fold in A549 cells. The oxidative/nitrative stress, resulting from ROS/RNS and disordered mitochondrial function were evidenced by increased O2−., NO production and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) content in PQ-poisoned A549 cells. gAd treatment significantly reversed the PQ-induced cell injury and mitochondrial dysfunction in A549 cells. The protective effects of gAd were partly abrogated by an adenosine 5′-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor, compound C. The results suggest that reduced ΔΨ and ATP content may result in PQ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction of the lung epithelium, which constitutes a novel mechanism for gAd exerting pulmonary protection against PQ poisoning via AMPK activation. PMID:27220901

  8. Effects of curcumin on cancer cell mitochondrial function and potential monitoring with ¹⁸F-FDG uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Jin Hee; Park, Jin Won; Moon, Seung-Hwan; Cho, Young Seok; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2016-02-01

    A better understanding of how curcumin influences cancer cell biology could help devise new strategies to enhance its antitumor effect. Many curcumin actions are proposed to occur by targeting mitochondrial function, among which glucose metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production are pivotal. However, little is known of how curcumin influences cancer cell glucose metabolism. We thus evaluated the effect of curcumin on cancer cell glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function, and further investigated whether these responses could be modified to enhance the anticancer potency of the compound. MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with curcumin were measured for 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F‑FDG) uptake, lactate production, hexokinase activity, oxygen consumption rate (OCR), ROS production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Activation of signaling pathways was evaluated by western blots, and cell survival was assessed with sulforhodamine B assays. Curcumin stimulated a 3.6-fold increase of 18F-FDG uptake in MCF-7 cells, along with augmented hexokinase activity and lactate efflux. This was accompanied by significantly suppressed cellular OCR, consistent with a metabolic shift to glycolytic flux. Inhibiting this metabolic response with 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) blocked curcumin-induced mTOR activation and resulted in a greater anti-proliferative effect. Curcumin-induced MMP depolarization led to reduced ROS production, which may hinder the anticancer effect of the compound. Intracellular ROS was completely restored by adding Cu2+, which can bind and modify the curcumin's physico-chemical property, and this resulted in a marked potentiation of its anti-proliferative effect. Thus, curcumin suppresses cancer cell MMP and ROS generation, and this response is accompanied by stimulated 18F-FDG uptake via shifting of metabolism from mitochondrial respiration to glycolytic flux. These mitochondrial and metabolic responses may provide potential targets that can

  9. Mitochondrial Sulfide Detoxification Requires a Functional Isoform O-Acetylserine(thiol)lyase C in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Consolación (A)lvarez; Irene García; Luis C.Romero; Cecilia Gotor

    2012-01-01

    In non-cyanogenic species,the main source of cyanide derives from ethylene and camalexin biosyntheses.In mitochondria,cyanide is a potent inhibitor of the cytochrome c oxidase and is metabolized bythe β-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1,catalyzing the conversion of cysteine and cyanide to hydrogen sulfide and β-cyanoalanine.The hydrogen sulfide released also inhibits the cytochrome c oxidase and needs to be detoxified by the O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase mitochondrial isoform,OAS-C,which catalyzes the incorporation of sulfide to O-acetylserine to produce cysteine,thus generating a cyclic pathway in the mitochondria.The loss of functional OAS-C isoforms causes phenotypic characteristics very similar to the loss of the CYS-C1 enzyme,showing defects in root hair formation.Genetic complementation with the OAS-C gene rescues the impairment of root hair elongation,restoring the wild-type phenotype.The mitochondria compromise their capacity to properly detoxify cyanide and the resulting sulfide because the latter cannot re-assimilate into cysteine in the oas-c null mutant.Consequently,we observe an accumulation of sulfide and cyanide and of the alternative oxidase,which is unable to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species probably due to the accumulation of both toxic molecules.Our results allow us to suggest that the significance of OAS-C is related to its role in the proper sulfide and cyanide detoxification in mitochondria.

  10. Estrogen-related receptor α is essential for the expression of antioxidant protection genes and mitochondrial function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. To investigate the transcriptional network controlling these phenomena, we investigated mitochondrial gene expression in embryonic fibroblasts isolated from ERRα null mice. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) stimulated mitochondrial gene expression program in control cells, but not in the ERRα null cells. Interestingly, the induction of levels of mitochondrial oxidative stress protection genes in response to increased PGC-1α levels was dependent on ERRα. Furthermore, we found that the PGC-1α-mediated induction of estrogen-related receptor γ and nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), was dependent on the presence of ERRα. Basal levels of NRF-2 were decreased in the absence of ERRα. The absence of ERRα resulted in a decrease in citrate synthase enzyme activity in response to PGC-1α overexpression. Our results indicate an essential role for ERRα as a key regulator of oxidative metabolism

  11. Traditional chinese medicine shuang shen ning xin attenuates myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury by preserving of mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueli; Liu, Jianxun; Lin, Li; Guo, Yujie; Lin, Chengren; Zhang, Cuixiang; Yang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential cardioprotective effects of Shuang Shen Ning Xin on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Wistar rats were treated with trimetazidine (10 mg/kg/day, ig), Shuang Shen Ning Xin (22.5, 45 mg/kg/day, ig), or saline for 5 consecutive days. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury was induced by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery for 40 min and reperfusion for 120 min on the last day of administration. It is found that Shuang Shen Ning Xin pretreatment markedly decreased infarct size and serum LDH levels, and this observed protection was associated with reduced myocardial oxidative stress and cardiomyocyte apoptosis after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. In addition, further studies on mitochondrial function showed that rats treated with Shuang Shen Ning Xin displayed decreased mitochondrial swelling and cytosolic cytochrome c levels, which were accompanied by a preservation of complex I activities and inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition. In conclusion, the mitochondrial protective effect of Shuang Shen Ning Xin could be a new mechanism, by which Shuang Shen Ning Xin attenuates myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:25031602

  12. Mitochondrial Dynamics and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Jun; Nakatsuka, Atsuko

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondria are involved in active and dynamic processes, such as mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy to maintain mitochondrial and cellular functions. In obesity and type 2 diabetes, impaired oxidation, reduced mitochondrial contents, lowered rates of oxidative phosphorylation and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production have been reported. Mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by various transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), estrogen-related receptors (ERRs), and nuclear respiratory factors (NRFs). Mitochondrial fusion is promoted by mitofusin 1 (MFN1), mitofusin 2 (MFN2) and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), while fission is governed by the recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) by adaptor proteins such as mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), mitochondrial dynamics proteins of 49 and 51 kDa (MiD49 and MiD51), and fission 1 (FIS1). Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and PARKIN promote DRP1-dependent mitochondrial fission, and the outer mitochondrial adaptor MiD51 is required in DRP1 recruitment and PARKIN-dependent mitophagy. This review describes the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial dynamics, its abnormality in diabetes and obesity, and pharmaceuticals targeting mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy. PMID:27339203

  13. Post-hatching development of mitochondrial function, organ mass and metabolic rate in two ectotherms, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirsat, Sarah K G; Sirsat, Tushar S; Price, Edwin R; Dzialowski, Edward M

    2016-01-01

    The ontogeny of endothermy in birds is associated with disproportionate growth of thermogenic organs and increased mitochondrial oxidative capacity. However, no similar study has been made of the development of these traits in ectotherms. For comparison, we therefore investigated the metabolism, growth and muscle mitochondrial function in hatchlings of a turtle and a crocodilian, two ectotherms that never develop endothermy. Metabolic rate did not increase substantially in either species by 30 days post-hatching. Yolk-free body mass and heart mass did not change through 30 days in alligators and heart mass was a constant proportion of body mass, even after 1 year. Yolk-free body mass and liver mass grew 36% and 27%, respectively, in turtles during the first 30 days post-hatch. The mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity of mitochondria, assessed using permeabilized muscle fibers, increased by a non-significant 47% in alligator thigh and a non-significant 50% in turtle thigh over 30 days, but did not increase in the heart. This developmental trajectory of mitochondrial function is slower and shallower than that previously observed in ducks, which demonstrate a 90% increase in mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity in thigh muscles over just a few days, a 60% increase in mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the heart over a few days, and disproportionate growth of the heart and other organs. Our data thus support the hypothesis that these developmental changes in ducks represent mechanistic drivers for attaining endothermy. PMID:26962048

  14. Post-hatching development of mitochondrial function, organ mass and metabolic rate in two ectotherms, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis and the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. G. Sirsat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The ontogeny of endothermy in birds is associated with disproportionate growth of thermogenic organs and increased mitochondrial oxidative capacity. However, no similar study has been made of the development of these traits in ectotherms. For comparison, we therefore investigated the metabolism, growth and muscle mitochondrial function in hatchlings of a turtle and a crocodilian, two ectotherms that never develop endothermy. Metabolic rate did not increase substantially in either species by 30 days post-hatching. Yolk-free body mass and heart mass did not change through 30 days in alligators and heart mass was a constant proportion of body mass, even after 1 year. Yolk-free body mass and liver mass grew 36% and 27%, respectively, in turtles during the first 30 days post-hatch. The mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity of mitochondria, assessed using permeabilized muscle fibers, increased by a non-significant 47% in alligator thigh and a non-significant 50% in turtle thigh over 30 days, but did not increase in the heart. This developmental trajectory of mitochondrial function is slower and shallower than that previously observed in ducks, which demonstrate a 90% increase in mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity in thigh muscles over just a few days, a 60% increase in mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the heart over a few days, and disproportionate growth of the heart and other organs. Our data thus support the hypothesis that these developmental changes in ducks represent mechanistic drivers for attaining endothermy.

  15. Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on mitochondrial function of neuronal cells in the cortex of neonatal rats after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The timing and mechanisms of protection by hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD have only been partially elucidated. We monitored the effect of HBO on the mitochondrial function of neuronal cells in the cerebral cortex of neonatal rats after HIBD. Neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats (total of 360 of both genders were randomly divided into normal control, HIBD, and HIBD+HBO groups. The HBO treatment began immediately after hypoxia-ischemia (HI and continued once a day for 7 consecutive days. Animals were euthanized 0, 2, 4, 6, and 12 h post-HI to monitor the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm occurring soon after a single dose of HBO treatment, as well as 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 days post-HI to study ΔΨm changes after a series of HBO treatments. Fluctuations in ΔΨm were observed in the ipsilateral cortex in both HIBD and HIBD+HBO groups. Within 2 to 12 h after HI insult, the ΔΨm of the HIBD and HIBD+HBO groups recovered to some extent. A secondary drop in ΔΨm was observed in both groups during the 1-4 days post-HI period, but was more severe in the HIBD+HBO group. There was a secondary recovery of ΔΨm observed in the HIBD+HBO group, but not in the HIBD group, during the 5-7 days period after HI insult. HBO therapy may not lead to improvement of neural cell mitochondrial function in the cerebral cortex in the early stage post-HI, but may improve it in the sub-acute stage post-HI.

  16. Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on mitochondrial function of neuronal cells in the cortex of neonatal rats after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L; Hei, M Y; Dai, J J; Hu, N; Xiang, X Y

    2016-01-01

    The timing and mechanisms of protection by hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) have only been partially elucidated. We monitored the effect of HBO on the mitochondrial function of neuronal cells in the cerebral cortex of neonatal rats after HIBD. Neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats (total of 360 of both genders) were randomly divided into normal control, HIBD, and HIBD+HBO groups. The HBO treatment began immediately after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and continued once a day for 7 consecutive days. Animals were euthanized 0, 2, 4, 6, and 12 h post-HI to monitor the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) occurring soon after a single dose of HBO treatment, as well as 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 days post-HI to study ΔΨm changes after a series of HBO treatments. Fluctuations in ΔΨm were observed in the ipsilateral cortex in both HIBD and HIBD+HBO groups. Within 2 to 12 h after HI insult, the ΔΨm of the HIBD and HIBD+HBO groups recovered to some extent. A secondary drop in ΔΨm was observed in both groups during the 1-4 days post-HI period, but was more severe in the HIBD+HBO group. There was a secondary recovery of ΔΨm observed in the HIBD+HBO group, but not in the HIBD group, during the 5-7 days period after HI insult. HBO therapy may not lead to improvement of neural cell mitochondrial function in the cerebral cortex in the early stage post-HI, but may improve it in the sub-acute stage post-HI. PMID:27119428

  17. Mitochondrial changes in ageing Caenorhabditis elegans--what do we learn from superoxide dismutase knockouts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gruber

    Full Text Available One of the most popular damage accumulation theories of ageing is the mitochondrial free radical theory of ageing (mFRTA. The mFRTA proposes that ageing is due to the accumulation of unrepaired oxidative damage, in particular damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. Within the mFRTA, the "vicious cycle" theory further proposes that reactive oxygen species (ROS promote mtDNA mutations, which then lead to a further increase in ROS production. Recently, data have been published on Caenorhabditis elegans mutants deficient in one or both forms of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD. Surprisingly, even double mutants, lacking both mitochondrial forms of SOD, show no reduction in lifespan. This has been interpreted as evidence against the mFRTA because it is assumed that these mutants suffer from significantly elevated oxidative damage to their mitochondria. Here, using a novel mtDNA damage assay in conjunction with related, well established damage and metabolic markers, we first investigate the age-dependent mitochondrial decline in a cohort of ageing wild-type nematodes, in particular testing the plausibility of the "vicious cycle" theory. We then apply the methods and insights gained from this investigation to a mutant strain for C. elegans that lacks both forms of mitochondrial SOD. While we show a clear age-dependent, linear increase in oxidative damage in WT nematodes, we find no evidence for autocatalytic damage amplification as proposed by the "vicious cycle" theory. Comparing the SOD mutants with wild-type animals, we further show that oxidative damage levels in the mtDNA of SOD mutants are not significantly different from those in wild-type animals, i.e. even the total loss of mitochondrial SOD did not significantly increase oxidative damage to mtDNA. Possible reasons for this unexpected result and some implications for the mFRTA are discussed.

  18. Mitochondrial Transcription Factor B2 Is Essential for Metabolic Function in Drosophila melanogaster Development*

    OpenAIRE

    Adán, Cristina; Matsushima, Yuichi; Hernández-Sierra, Rosana; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel Ángel; González-Vioque, Emiliano; Calleja, Manuel; Aragón, Juan J.; Kaguni, Laurie S.; Garesse, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of the basal transcription machinery of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is critical to understand mitochondrial pathophysiology. In mammalian in vitro systems, mtDNA transcription requires mtRNA polymerase, transcription factor A (TFAM), and either transcription factor B1 (TFB1M) or B2 (TFB2M). We have silenced the expression of TFB2M by RNA interference in Drosophila melanogaster. RNA interference knockdown of TF2BM causes lethality by arrest of larval deve...

  19. Structural and functional studies of mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I)

    OpenAIRE

    King, Martin

    2010-01-01

    NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the largest and most complicated enzyme in the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. It catalyses the oxidation of NADH and the reduction of ubiquinone, coupled to the translocation of protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane, maintaining the proton motive force used for ATP synthesis. Complex I is the least understood of the respiratory enzymes; although the mechanisms of NADH oxidation and intramolecular electron transfer are gradually b...

  20. Functional Differences between Mitochondrial Haplogroup T and Haplogroup H in HEK293 Cybrid Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Edith E Mueller; Brunner, Susanne M.; Mayr, Johannes A; Olaf Stanger; Wolfgang Sperl; Barbara Kofler

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological case-control studies have revealed associations between mitochondrial haplogroups and the onset and/or progression of various multifactorial diseases. For instance, mitochondrial haplogroup T was previously shown to be associated with vascular diseases, including coronary artery disease and diabetic retinopathy. In contrast, haplogroup H, the most frequent haplogroup in Europe, is often found to be more prevalent in healthy control subjects than in patient study gr...

  1. Functional Differences between Mitochondrial Haplogroup T and Haplogroup H in HEK293 Cybrid Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Edith E.; Brunner, Susanne M.; Mayr, Johannes A.; Stanger, Olaf; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological case-control studies have revealed associations between mitochondrial haplogroups and the onset and/or progression of various multifactorial diseases. For instance, mitochondrial haplogroup T was previously shown to be associated with vascular diseases, including coronary artery disease and diabetic retinopathy. In contrast, haplogroup H, the most frequent haplogroup in Europe, is often found to be more prevalent in healthy control subjects than in patient study gro...

  2. Aspects of thyroid hormone regulation of mitochondrial function in diabetes and diabetic complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthonsen, Stine

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has been related to lifestyle, obesity and age; however, T2DM has also been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondria produce ATP and during this synthesis, reactive oxygen species are generated. Increased levels of reactive oxygen species are associated with...... development of diabetic complications. ATP-synthesis and ROS-generation are dependent on mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), which indicate the activity of the mitochondria....

  3. Alterations in mitochondrial respiratory functions, redox metabolism and apoptosis by oxidant 4-hydroxynonenal and antioxidants curcumin and melatonin in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular oxidative stress and alterations in redox metabolisms have been implicated in the etiology and pathology of many diseases including cancer. Antioxidant treatments have been proven beneficial in controlling these diseases. We have recently shown that 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a by-product of lipid peroxidation, induces oxidative stress in PC12 cells by compromising the mitochondrial redox metabolism. In this study, we have further investigated the deleterious effects of 4-HNE on mitochondrial respiratory functions and apoptosis using the same cell line. In addition, we have also compared the effects of two antioxidants, curcumin and melatonin, used as chemopreventive agents, on mitochondrial redox metabolism and respiratory functions in these cells. 4-HNE treatment has been shown to cause a reduction in glutathione (GSH) pool, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein carbonylation and apoptosis. A marked inhibition in the activities of the mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, cytochrome c oxidase and aconitase was observed after 4-HNE treatment. Increased nuclear translocation of NF-kB/p65 protein was also observed after 4-HNE treatment. Curcumin and melatonin treatments, on the other hand, maintained the mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions without a marked effect on ROS production and cell viability. These results suggest that 4-HNE-induced cytotoxicity may be associated, at least in part, with the altered mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions. The alterations in mitochondrial energy metabolism and redox functions may therefore be critical in determining the difference between cell death and survival

  4. Separate and combined effects of a 10-d exposure to hypoxia and inactivity on oxidative function in vivo and mitochondrial respiration ex vivo in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadego, Desy; Keramidas, Michail E; Brocca, Lorenza; Domenis, Rossana; Mavelli, Irene; Rittweger, Jörn; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B; Grassi, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    An integrative evaluation of oxidative metabolism was carried out in 9 healthy young men (age, 24.1 ± 1.7 yr mean ± SD) before (CTRL) and after a 10-day horizontal bed rest carried out in normoxia (N-BR) or hypoxia (H-BR, FiO2 = 0.147). H-BR was designed to simulate planetary habitats. Pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2) and vastus lateralis fractional O2 extraction (changes in deoxygenated hemoglobin+myoglobin concentration, Δ[deoxy(Hb+Mb)] evaluated using near-infrared spectroscopy) were evaluated in normoxia and during an incremental cycle ergometer (CE) and one-leg knee extension (KE) exercise (aimed at reducing cardiovascular constraints to oxidative function). Mitochondrial respiration was evaluated ex vivo by high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized vastus lateralis fibers. During CE V̇o2peak and Δ[deoxy(Hb+Mb)]peak were lower (P work rate exercise was greater in N-BR and H-BR than CTRL, whereas during KE a significant difference vs. CTRL was observed only after N-BR. Maximal mitochondrial respiration determined ex vivo was not affected by either intervention. In N-BR, a significant impairment of oxidative metabolism occurred downstream of central cardiovascular O2 delivery and upstream of mitochondrial function, possibly at the level of the intramuscular matching between O2 supply and utilization and peripheral O2 diffusion. Superposition of hypoxia on bed rest did not aggravate, and partially reversed, the impairment of muscle oxidative function in vivo induced by bed rest. The effects of longer exposures will have to be determined. PMID:27197861

  5. Mitochondrial function and sirtuin expression in hippocampus of young and old high- and low-capacity runner rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kontro, Hilkka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Exercise and aerobic capacity are associated with improved learning in animals and humans. The hippocampus is a brain structure involved in learning and memory. High rates of neurogenesis have been shown to take place in the dental gyrus of hippocampus in response to physical exercise. It is not known whether mitochondrial dysfunction in the hippocampus is responsible for decline in cognitive function associated with low fitness level and aging, and whether intrinsic aerobic cap...

  6. Whole body metabolism, muscle and mitochondrial function, and the role of uncoupling protein-3 in a mouse model of sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Zolfaghari, P. S.

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis, the exaggerated systemic inflammatory response to infection, often leads to multi-organ failure (MOF) and death. Skeletal muscle function is often profoundly affected, with patients requiring prolonged ventilatory support and rehabilitation. The pathophysiology underlying MOF and muscle failure in sepsis remains poorly understood. Recent evidence points to mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular energetic down-regulation, related in part to excess generation of reacti...

  7. Effects of neuroglobin over-expression on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress following hypoxia/reoxygenation in cultured neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jianxiang; Yu, Zhanyang; Guo, Shuzhen; Lee, Sun-Ryung; Xing, Changhong; Zhang, Chenggang; Gao, Yan; Nichools, David G.; Lo, Eng H.; Wang, Xiaoying

    2009-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a recently discovered tissue globin with a high affinity for oxygen that is widely and specifically expressed in neurons of vertebrate central and peripheral nervous systems. Our laboratory and others have showed Ngb over-expression can protect neurons against hypoxic/ischemic insults, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we examined the effects of Ngb over-expression on mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and neurotoxicity in primar...

  8. Mitochondrial plasticity in response to changing abiotic factors in Antarctic fish and cephalopods

    OpenAIRE

    Strobel, Anneli

    2013-01-01

    Antarctic species possess very low metabolic rates and poor capacities to change their physiological state, thus making them extremely vulnerable to changing environmental conditions. Mitochondria are a key element in shaping whole organism energy turnover and functional capacity. In my study, the effects of rising temperature and increased seawater PCO2 on the energy metabolism were compared between various nototheniids from sub-Antarctic and cold-temperate and Antarctic waters, and between ...

  9. Estrogen receptor alpha activation enhances mitochondrial function and systemic metabolism in high-fat-fed ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Dale J; Minze, Laurie J; Kumar, Tanvi; Cao, Tram N; Lyon, Christopher J; Geiger, Paige C; Hsueh, Willa A; Gupte, Anisha A

    2016-09-01

    Estrogen impacts insulin action and cardiac metabolism, and menopause dramatically increases cardiometabolic risk in women. However, the mechanism(s) of cardiometabolic protection by estrogen remain incompletely understood. Here, we tested the effects of selective activation of E2 receptor alpha (ERα) on systemic metabolism, insulin action, and cardiac mitochondrial function in a mouse model of metabolic dysfunction (ovariectomy [OVX], insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, and advanced age). Middle-aged (12-month-old) female low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr)(-/-) mice were subjected to OVX or sham surgery and fed "western" high-fat diet (WHFD) for 3 months. Selective ERα activation with 4,4',4″-(4-Propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) (PPT), prevented weight gain, improved insulin action, and reduced visceral fat accumulation in WHFD-fed OVX mice. PPT treatment also elevated systemic metabolism, increasing oxygen consumption and core body temperature, induced expression of several metabolic genes such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha, and nuclear respiratory factor 1 in heart, liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, and increased cardiac mitochondrial function. Taken together, selective activation of ERα with PPT enhances metabolic effects including insulin resistance, whole body energy metabolism, and mitochondrial function in OVX mice with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27582063

  10. Nuclear Perilipin 5 integrates lipid droplet lipolysis with PGC-1α/SIRT1-dependent transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Montejano, Violeta I.; Saxena, Geetu; Kusminski, Christine M.; Yang, Chaofeng; McAfee, John L.; Hahner, Lisa; Hoch, Kathleen; Dubinsky, William; Narkar, Vihang A.; Bickel, Perry E.

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctional cellular lipid metabolism contributes to common chronic human diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, fatty liver disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy. How cells balance lipid storage and mitochondrial oxidative capacity is poorly understood. Here we identify the lipid droplet protein Perilipin 5 as a catecholamine-triggered interaction partner of PGC-1α. We report that during catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis, Perilipin 5 is phosphorylated by protein kinase A and forms transcriptional complexes with PGC-1α and SIRT1 in the nucleus. Perilipin 5 promotes PGC-1α co-activator function by disinhibiting SIRT1 deacetylase activity. We show by gain-and-loss of function studies in cells that nuclear Perilipin 5 promotes transcription of genes that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function. We propose that Perilipin 5 is an important molecular link that couples the coordinated catecholamine activation of the PKA pathway and of lipid droplet lipolysis with transcriptional regulation to promote efficient fatty acid catabolism and prevent mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27554864

  11. Targeting and function of the mitochondrial fission factor GDAP1 are dependent on its tail-anchor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstanze M Wagner

    Full Text Available Proteins controlling mitochondrial dynamics are often targeted to and anchored into the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM by their carboxyl-terminal tail-anchor domain (TA. However, it is not known whether the TA modulates protein function. GDAP1 is a mitochondrial fission factor with two neighboring hydrophobic domains each flanked by basic amino acids (aa. Here we define GDAP1 as TA MOM protein. GDAP1 carries a single transmembrane domain (TMD that is, together with the adjacent basic aa, critical for MOM targeting. The flanking N-terminal region containing the other hydrophobic domain is located in the cytoplasm. TMD sequence, length, and high hydrophobicity do not influence GDAP1 fission function if MOM targeting is maintained. The basic aa bordering the TMD in the cytoplasm, however, are required for both targeting of GDAP1 as part of the TA and GDAP1-mediated fission. Thus, this GDAP1 region contains critical overlapping motifs defining intracellular targeting by the TA concomitant with functional aspects.

  12. Taurine as a constituent of mitochondrial tRNAs: new insights into the functions of taurine and human mitochondrial diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Wada, Takeshi; Saigo, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Kimitsuna

    2002-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulphonic acid), a naturally occurring, sulfur-containing amino acid, is found at high concentrations in mammalian plasma and tissues. Although taurine is involved in a variety of processes in humans, it has never been found as a component of a protein or a nucleic acid, and its precise biochemical functions are not fully understood. Here, we report the identification of two novel taurine-containing modified uridines (5-taurinomethyluridine and 5-taurinomethyl-2-thiourid...

  13. The Mitochondrial Genome of Raphanus sativus and Gene Evolution of Cruciferous Mitochondrial Types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengxin Chang; Jianmei Chen; Yankun Wang; Bingchao Gu; Jianbo He; Pu Chu; Rongzhan Guan

    2013-01-01

    To explore the mitochondrial genes of the Cruciferae family,the mitochondrial genome of Raphanus sativus (sat) was sequenced and annotated.The circular mitochondrial genome of sat is 239,723 bp and includes 33 protein-coding genes,three rRNA genes and 17 tRNA genes.The mitochondrial genome also contains a pair of large repeat sequences 5.9 kb in length,which may mediate genome reorganization into two sub-genomic circles,with predicted sizes of 124.8 kb and 115.0 kb,respectively.Furthermore,gene evolution of mitochondrial genomes within the Cruciferae family was analyzed using sat mitochondrial type (mitotype),together with six other reported mitotypes.The cruciferous mitochondrial genomes have maintained almost the same set of functional genes.Compared with Cycas taitungensis (a representative gymnosperm),the mitochondrial genomes of the Cruciferae have lost nine protein-coding genes and seven mitochondrial-like tRNA genes,but acquired six chloroplast-like tRNAs.Among the Cruciferae,to maintain the same set of genes that are necessary for mitochondrial function,the exons of the genes have changed at the lowest rates,as indicated by the numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms.The open reading frames (ORFs) of unknown function in the cruciferous genomes are not conserved.Evolutionary events,such as mutations,genome reorganizations and sequence insertions or deletions (indels),have resulted in the nonconserved ORFs in the cruciferous mitochondrial genomes,which is becoming significantly different among mitotypes.This work represents the first phylogenic explanation of the evolution of genes of known function in the Cruciferae family.It revealed significant variation in ORFs and the causes of such variation.

  14. Beneficial Effects of Ethanolic and Hexanic Rice Bran Extract on Mitochondrial Function in PC12 Cells and the Search for Bioactive Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagl, Stephanie; Berressem, Dirk; Bruns, Bastian; Sus, Nadine; Frank, Jan; Eckert, Gunter P

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in the aging processes that ultimately lead to neurodegeneration and the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A healthy lifestyle, including a diet rich in antioxidants and polyphenols, represents one strategy to protect the brain and to prevent neurodegeneration. We recently reported that a stabilized hexanic rice bran extract (RBE) rich in vitamin E and polyphenols (but unsuitable for human consumption) has beneficial effects on mitochondrial function in vitro and in vivo (doi:10.1016/j.phrs.2013.06.008, 10.3233/JAD-132084). To enable the use of RBE as food additive, a stabilized ethanolic extract has been produced. Here, we compare the vitamin E profiles of both extracts and their effects on mitochondrial function (ATP concentrations, mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis) in PC12 cells. We found that vitamin E contents and the effects of both RBE on mitochondrial function were similar. Furthermore, we aimed to identify components responsible for the mitochondria-protective effects of RBE, but could not achieve a conclusive result. α-Tocotrienol and possibly also γ-tocotrienol, α-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol might be involved, but hitherto unknown components of RBE or a synergistic effect of various components might also play a role in mediating RBE's beneficial effects on mitochondrial function. PMID:26378512

  15. Beneficial Effects of Ethanolic and Hexanic Rice Bran Extract on Mitochondrial Function in PC12 Cells and the Search for Bioactive Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Hagl

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved in the aging processes that ultimately lead to neurodegeneration and the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. A healthy lifestyle, including a diet rich in antioxidants and polyphenols, represents one strategy to protect the brain and to prevent neurodegeneration. We recently reported that a stabilized hexanic rice bran extract (RBE rich in vitamin E and polyphenols (but unsuitable for human consumption has beneficial effects on mitochondrial function in vitro and in vivo (doi:10.1016/j.phrs.2013.06.008, 10.3233/JAD-132084. To enable the use of RBE as food additive, a stabilized ethanolic extract has been produced. Here, we compare the vitamin E profiles of both extracts and their effects on mitochondrial function (ATP concentrations, mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in PC12 cells. We found that vitamin E contents and the effects of both RBE on mitochondrial function were similar. Furthermore, we aimed to identify components responsible for the mitochondria-protective effects of RBE, but could not achieve a conclusive result. α-Tocotrienol and possibly also γ-tocotrienol, α-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol might be involved, but hitherto unknown components of RBE or a synergistic effect of various components might also play a role in mediating RBE’s beneficial effects on mitochondrial function.

  16. Maternal Metabolic Syndrome Programs Mitochondrial Dysfunction via Germline Changes across Three Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saben, Jessica L; Boudoures, Anna L; Asghar, Zeenat; Thompson, Alysha; Drury, Andrea; Zhang, Wendy; Chi, Maggie; Cusumano, Andrew; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Moley, Kelle H

    2016-06-28

    Maternal obesity impairs offspring health, but the responsible mechanisms are not fully established. To address this question, we fed female mice a high-fat/high-sugar diet from before conception until weaning and then followed the outcomes in the next three generations of offspring, all fed a control diet. We observed that female offspring born to obese mothers had impaired peripheral insulin signaling that was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamic and complex proteins in skeletal muscle. This mitochondrial phenotype persisted through the female germline and was passed down to the second and third generations. Our results indicate that maternal programming of metabolic disease can be passed through the female germline and that the transfer of aberrant oocyte mitochondria to subsequent generations may contribute to the increased risk for developing insulin resistance. PMID:27320925

  17. Maternal Metabolic Syndrome Programs Mitochondrial Dysfunction via Germline Changes across Three Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Saben

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Maternal obesity impairs offspring health, but the responsible mechanisms are not fully established. To address this question, we fed female mice a high-fat/high-sugar diet from before conception until weaning and then followed the outcomes in the next three generations of offspring, all fed a control diet. We observed that female offspring born to obese mothers had impaired peripheral insulin signaling that was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamic and complex proteins in skeletal muscle. This mitochondrial phenotype persisted through the female germline and was passed down to the second and third generations. Our results indicate that maternal programming of metabolic disease can be passed through the female germline and that the transfer of aberrant oocyte mitochondria to subsequent generations may contribute to the increased risk for developing insulin resistance.

  18. Postnatal microcephaly and pain insensitivity due to a de novo heterozygous DNM1L mutation causing impaired mitochondrial fission and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffer, Ruth; Douiev, Liza; Edvardson, Simon; Shaag, Avraham; Tamimi, Khaled; Soiferman, Devorah; Meiner, Vardiella; Saada, Ann

    2016-06-01

    An emerging class of mitochondrial disorders is caused by mutations in nuclear genes affecting mitochondrial dynamics and function. One of these is the DNM1L gene encoding the dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), which is pivotal in the mitochondrial fission process. Here, we describe a patient with a novel dominant-negative, de novo DNM1L mutation, which expands the clinical spectrum. The patient reported here exhibits a chronic neurological disorder, characterized by postnatal microcephaly, developmental delay, and pain insensitivity. Muscle biopsy disclosed decreased respiratory chain complex IV activity. Exome sequencing showed a de novo heterozygous c.1084G>A (p.G362S) mutation. Subsequent studies of patient skin fibroblasts showed markedly impaired mitochondrial fission and a partial respiratory chain defect while peroxisomal morphology remained intact. Human foreskin fibroblasts over-expressing the mutant DNM1L gene displayed aberrant mitochondrial morphology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26992161

  19. Treatment of human muscle cells with popular dietary supplements increase mitochondrial function and metabolic rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan Roger A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a common pathology with increasing incidence, and is associated with increased mortality and healthcare costs. Several treatment options for obesity are currently available ranging from behavioral modifications to pharmaceutical agents. Many popular dietary supplements claim to enhance weight loss by acting as metabolic stimulators, however direct tests of their effect on metabolism have not been performed. Purpose This work identified the effects popular dietary supplements on metabolic rate and mitochondrial biosynthesis in human skeletal muscle cells. Methods Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells were treated with popular dietary supplements at varied doses for 24 hours. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α, an important stimulator of mitochondrial biosynthesis, was quantified using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Mitochondrial content was measured using flow cytometry confirmed with confocal microscopy. Glycolytic metabolism was quantified by measuring extracellular acidification rate (ECAR and oxidative metabolism was quantified by measuring oxygen consumption rate (OCR. Total relative metabolism was quantified using WST-1 end point assay. Results Treatment of human rhabdomyosarcoma cells with dietary supplements OxyElite Pro (OEP or Cellucore HD (CHD induced PGC-1α leading to significantly increased mitochondrial content. Glycolytic and oxidative capacities were also significantly increased following treatment with OEP or CHD. Conclusion This is the first work to identify metabolic adaptations in muscle cells following treatment with popular dietary supplements including enhanced mitochondrial biosynthesis, and glycolytic, oxidative and total metabolism.

  20. Functional dissection of the proton pumping modules of mitochondrial complex I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Dröse

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial complex I, the largest and most complicated proton pump of the respiratory chain, links the electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone to the pumping of four protons from the matrix into the intermembrane space. In humans, defects in complex I are involved in a wide range of degenerative disorders. Recent progress in the X-ray structural analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic complex I confirmed that the redox reactions are confined entirely to the hydrophilic peripheral arm of the L-shaped molecule and take place at a remarkable distance from the membrane domain. While this clearly implies that the proton pumping within the membrane arm of complex I is driven indirectly via long-range conformational coupling, the molecular mechanism and the number, identity, and localization of the pump-sites remains unclear. Here, we report that upon deletion of the gene for a small accessory subunit of the Yarrowia complex I, a stable subcomplex (nb8mΔ is formed that lacks the distal part of the membrane domain as revealed by single particle analysis. The analysis of the subunit composition of holo and subcomplex by three complementary proteomic approaches revealed that two (ND4 and ND5 of the three subunits with homology to bacterial Mrp-type Na(+/H(+ antiporters that have been discussed as prime candidates for harbouring the proton pumps were missing in nb8mΔ. Nevertheless, nb8mΔ still pumps protons at half the stoichiometry of the complete enzyme. Our results provide evidence that the membrane arm of complex I harbours two functionally distinct pump modules that are connected in series by the long helical transmission element recently identified by X-ray structural analysis.

  1. Mitochondrial Inhibitory Factor Protein 1 Functions as an Endogenous Inhibitor for Coupling Factor 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Misato; Osanai, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Magota, Koji; Tomita, Hirofumi; Okumura, Ken

    2016-07-01

    Coupling factor 6 (CF6) forces a counter-clockwise rotation of plasma membrane F1 Fo complex unlike a proton-mediated clockwise rotation in the mitochondria, resulting in ATP hydrolysis, proton import, and apoptosis. Inhibitory peptide 1 (IF1) inhibits a unidirectional counter-clockwise rotation of F1 Fo complex without affecting ATP synthesis by a clockwise rotation. We tested the hypothesis that IF1 may antagonize the biological action of CF6 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. We generated mature and immature IF1 expression vectors and those labeled with GFP at the C-terminus. In the immature IF1-GFP overexpressing cells, the mitochondrial network of IF1-GFP was newly found at the plasma membrane after peripheral translocation, whereas in mature IF1-GFP transfected cells, a less punctuate rather homogenous pattern was found in the cytoplasm. IF1 protein was detected in the exosome fraction of culture media, and it was enhanced by mature or immature IF1 transfection. Extracellular ATP hydrolysis was enhanced by CF6, whereas immature or mature IF1 transfection suppressed ATP hydrolysis in response to CF6. Intracellular pH was decreased by CF6 but was unchanged after immature IF1 transfection. CF6-induced increase in apoptotic cells was blocked by immature or mature IF1, being accompanied by protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation. IF1 antagonizes the pro-apoptotic action of CF6 by relief of intracellular acidification and resultant phosphorylation of PKB. Given the widespread biological actions of CF6, the physiological and pathological functions of IF1 may be expected to be complex. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1680-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26659871

  2. Production of ROS and its effects on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, human spermatozoa, and sperm function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardi Darmawan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades many researchers studying the causes of male infertility have recently focused on the role played by reactive oxygen species (ROS – highly reactive oxidizing agents belonging to the class of free radicals. If ROS levels rise, oxidative stress (OS occurs, which results in oxygen and oxygen derived oxidants, and in turn increases the rates of cellular damage. In human, ROS are produced by a variety of semen components, and antioxidants in the seminal fluid keep their level balance. Small amounts of ROS help spermatozoa acquire their necessary fertilizing capabilities. Many researches showed that ROS attack DNA integrity in the sperm nucleus by causing base modification, DNA strand breaks, and chromatin cross linking. The DNA damage induced excessive levels of ROS and might accelerate the process of germ cell apoptosis leading to a decline in sperm counts associated with male infertility. This paper will review the molecular (cellular origins of ROS in human semen, how ROS damage sperm nuclear DNA, and how such DNA damage contributes to male infertility. Increased ROS production by spermatozoa is associated with a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, which is an important indicator of functional integrity of the spermatozoa. Germ cell apoptosis is essential for normal spermatogenesis and its dysregulation may lead to male infertility. Thus, understanding the causes and mechanisms of germ cell apoptosis is of major importance in preventing male reproductive problems. Levels of apoptosis in mature spermatozoa that were significantly correlated with levels of seminal ROS determined by chemiluminescence assay indicate the linkage between ROS and male fertility problems. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:127-33 Keywords: Apoptosis, infertility, free radicals

  3. The BARD1 BRCT domain contributes to p53 binding, cytoplasmic and mitochondrial localization, and apoptotic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembe, Varsha; Martino-Echarri, Estefania; Marzec, Kamila A; Mok, Myth T S; Brodie, Kirsty M; Mills, Kate; Lei, Ying; DeFazio, Anna; Rizos, Helen; Kettle, Emma; Boadle, Ross; Henderson, Beric R

    2015-09-01

    BARD1 is a breast cancer tumor suppressor with multiple domains and functions. BARD1 comprises a tandem BRCT domain at the C-terminus, and this sequence has been reported to target BARD1 to distinct subcellular locations such as nuclear DNA breakage sites and the centrosome through binding to regulatory proteins such as HP1 and OLA1, respectively. We now identify the BRCT domain as a binding site for p53. We first confirmed previous reports that endogenous BARD1 binds to p53 by immunoprecipitation assay, and further show that BARD1/p53 complexes locate at mitochondria suggesting a cellular location for p53 regulation of BARD1 apoptotic activity. We used a proximity ligation assay to map three distinct p53 binding sequences in human BARD1, ranging from weak (425-525) and modest (525-567) to strong (551-777 comprising BRCT domains). Deletion of the BRCT sequence caused major defects in the ability of BARD1 to (1) bind p53, (2) localize to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, and (3) induce Bax oligomerization and apoptosis. Our data suggest that BARD1 can move to mitochondria independent of p53, but subsequently associates with p53 to induce Bax clustering in part by decreasing mitochondrial Bcl-2 levels. We therefore identify a role for the BRCT domain in stimulating BARD1 nuclear export and mitochondrial localization, and in assembling mitochondrial BARD1/p53 complexes to regulate specific activities such as apoptotic function. PMID:26022179

  4. Mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins: in search for new functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomáska, L; Nosek, J; Kucejová, B

    2001-02-01

    During the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, genes encoding proteins involved in the metabolism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been transferred from the endosymbiont into the host genome. Mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding (mtSSB) proteins serve as an excellent argument supporting this aspect of the endosymbiotic theory. The crystal structure of the human mtSSB, together with an abundance of biochemical and genetic data, revealed several exciting features of mtSSB proteins and enabled a detailed comparison with their prokaryotic counterparts. Moreover, identification of a novel member of the mtSSB family, mitochondrial telomere-binding protein of the yeast Candida parapsilosis, has raised interesting questions regarding mtDNA metabolism and evolution. PMID:11308016

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection affects mitochondrial function and DNA repair, thus, mediating genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Madsen, Claus Desler; Bøggild, Cecilie Sisse Line;

    2013-01-01

    causes mtDNA mutations and a decrease of mtDNA content. Consequently, we show a decrease of respiration coupled ATP turnover and respiratory capacity and accordingly a lower level and activity of complex I of the electron transport chain. We wanted to investigate if the increased mutational load in the...... mitochondrial genome was caused by down-regulation of mitochondrial DNA repair pathways. We lowered the expression of APE-1 and YB-1, which are believed to be involved in mitochondrial base excision repair and mismatch repair. Our results suggest that both APE-1 and YB-1 are involved in mtDNA repair during H....... pylori infection, furthermore, the results demonstrate that multiple DNA repair activities are involved in protecting mtDNA during infection....

  6. Ultrastructural study of mother and daughter muscle changes with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, E; Schmidt-Sidor, B; Mierzewska, H; Pasennik, E; Kohutnicka, M

    2001-01-01

    We present the light and electron microscopy examinations of skeletal muscle biopsies from a 36-year-old mother and her 13-year-old daughter with mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. Clinical signs and symptoms suggesting mitochondrial disease, such as disseminated neurological symptoms, visual and hearing disturbances, mental disability, exercise intolerance, heart conduction disturbances, short stature, family history, were present in both patients. The mother's niece (8 years old) also died with progressive neurological disorder. CT showed cerebral and cerebellar atrophy in mother and multifocal subcortical atrophy in daughter. There was lactic acidosis in blood serum and cerebrospinal fluid in daughter. In the daughter's muscle a lot of fibres looked like ragged red fibres. Electron microscopic examination revealed the alterations of mitochondria in skeletal muscle of both patients that concerned the number, size, shape and the fine structural appearance of the mitochondria. The most characteristic mitochondrial abnormalities in daughter's muscles were paracrystalline inclusions in the intracristal space. In mother's muscles most of the mitochondria were markedly enlarged and they possessed aberrant configurations of cristae. The mitochondrial matrix contained sometimes spherical electron dense bodies different in size and vacuoles. Ring-shaped mitochondria were also observed. The most prominent ultrastructural feature, similarly as in daughter, was the occurrence of intramitochondrial highly ordered paracrystalline inclusions. PMID:11928899

  7. Sepsis and mitochondrial function damage%脓毒症与线粒体功能障碍

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨雪(综述); 蔡小狄; 陆国平(审校)

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a complex systemic inflammatory response syndrome caused by invasion of a varie-ty of pathogenic bacteria. The disease spectrum includes sepsis, severe sepsis, septic shock and multiple organ failure. Mitochondria are referred to as “power plants”, providing energy for viscera to maintain normal func-tion. Immune disorders,the activation and release of a series of inflammatory factors,anomalies of intracellular signal transmission and oxidative stress in sepsis can induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent research suggests that mitochondrial autophagy also plays a certain role in mitochondrial dysfunction. This article reviews the mechanism of mitochondrial functional damage during the pathogenesis of sepsis.%脓毒症为各种病原菌侵入机体后引起的全身炎症反应综合征。脓毒症、严重脓毒症、脓毒症休克、多脏器功能衰竭为疾病的进展过程。线粒体被称为“动力工厂”,为各脏器维持正常功能提供能量。脓毒症时免疫异常、多种炎症因子的激活及释放、细胞内信号传递异常及氧化应激等可引起线粒体功能障碍。最近研究提出,线粒体自噬在线粒体功能障碍中也起着一定作用。该文就脓毒症时引起机体线粒体损伤的机制进行综述。

  8. Human, donkey and cow milk differently affects energy efficiency and inflammatory state by modulating mitochondrial function and gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchese, Giovanna; Cavaliere, Gina; Canani, Roberto Berni; Matamoros, Sebastien; Bergamo, Paolo; De Filippo, Chiara; Aceto, Serena; Gaita, Marcello; Cerino, Pellegrino; Negri, Rossella; Greco, Luigi; Cani, Patrice D; Mollica, Maria Pina

    2015-11-01

    Different nutritional components are able, by modulating mitochondrial function and gut microbiota composition, to influence body composition, metabolic homeostasis and inflammatory state. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects produced by the supplementation of different milks on energy balance, inflammatory state, oxidative stress and antioxidant/detoxifying enzyme activities and to investigate the role of the mitochondrial efficiency and the gut microbiota in the regulation of metabolic functions in an animal model. We compared the intake of human milk, gold standard for infant nutrition, with equicaloric supplementation of donkey milk, the best substitute for newborns due to its nutritional properties, and cow milk, the primary marketed product. The results showed a hypolipidemic effect produced by donkey and human milk intake in parallel with enhanced mitochondrial activity/proton leakage. Reduced mitochondrial energy efficiency and proinflammatory signals (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 and lipopolysaccharide levels) were associated with a significant increase of antioxidants (total thiols) and detoxifying enzyme activities (glutathione-S-transferase, NADH quinone oxidoreductase) in donkey- and human milk-treated animals. The beneficial effects were attributable, at least in part, to the activation of the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 pathway. Moreover, the metabolic benefits induced by human and donkey milk may be related to the modulation of gut microbiota. In fact, milk treatments uniquely affected the proportions of bacterial phyla and genera, and we hypothesized that the increased concentration of fecal butyrate in human and donkey milk-treated rats was related to the improved lipid and glucose metabolism and detoxifying activities. PMID:26118693

  9. Cyclin D1 repression of nuclear respiratory factor 1 integrates nuclear DNA synthesis and mitochondrial function

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chenguang; Li, Zhiping; Lu, Yinan; Du, Runlei; Katiyar, Sanjay; Yang, Jianguo; Fu, Maofu; Leader, Jennifer E.; Quong, Andrew; Novikoff, Phyllis M.; Pestell, Richard G

    2006-01-01

    Cyclin D1 promotes nuclear DNA synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of the pRb tumor suppressor. Herein, cyclin D1 deficiency increased mitochondrial size and activity that was rescued by cyclin D1 in a Cdk-dependent manner. Nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), which induces nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes, was repressed in expression and activity by cyclin D1. Cyclin D1-dependent kinase phosphorylates NRF-1 at S47. Cyclin D1 abundance thus coordinates nuclear DNA synthesis...

  10. Patients with type 2 diabetes have normal mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, R; Gnaiger, E; Schjerling, P;

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport capacity are diminished in the skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic subjects, as a res......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport capacity are diminished in the skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic subjects...

  11. Association of downregulated HDAC 2 with the impaired mitochondrial function and cytokine secretion in the monocytes/macrophages from gestational diabetes mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xin; Yu, Hongna; Jia, Bei; Yu, Xiaoyan; Cui, Qing; Liu, Zhifen; Sun, Chengming; Chu, Yongli

    2016-06-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases in later life, yet with underlying mechanisms unclear. The present study was to explore the association of upregulated histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC 2) with the impaired mitochondrial function and the cytokine secretion in the monocytes/macrophages from GDM patients. In this study, we examined the mitochondrial function, proinflamatory cytokine secretion and the HDAC 2 level in the serum or in the monocytes/macrophages from GDM patients, investigated the influence by HDAC 2 inhibitor, AR-42 (N-hydroxy-4-[[(2S)-3-methyl-2-phenylbutanoyl]amino]benzamide), on the mitochondrial function and cytokine secretion in the isolated GDM monocytes/macrophages. Results demonstrated an increased mitochondria size, mitochondrial superoxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and an undermined mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) in the GDM monocytes/macrophages. And the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6 were also markedly higher in the GDM pregnancies, while the expression and activity of HDAC 2 was downregulated. Moreover, AR-42-mediated HDAC 2 inhibition in vitro contributed to the impaired mitochondrial function and the proinflamatory cytokine secretion. In conclusion, this study suggests an association of the impaired mitochondrial function and the promoted proinflamatory cytokine secretion with the reduced HDAC 2 activity in GDM. These findings may present HDAC 2 as a target for GDM treatment. PMID:26936353

  12. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  13. Mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species action in relation to boar motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flow cytometric assays were developed for reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (ROS-induced oxidization of hydroethidine to ethidium), membrane lipid peroxidation (C11-BODIPY-581/591 oxidation), and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MMP) (MMP-induced JC-1 aggregation, red fluorescence) in vi...

  14. Neonatal SSRI exposure improves mitochondrial function and antioxidant defense in rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Glauber Ruda F; Freitas, Cristiane M; Nascimento, Luciana; Pedroza, Anderson A; da Silva, Aline Isabel; Lagranha, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Protein restriction during prenatal, postnatal, or in both periods has a close relationship with subsequent development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Elevated brain levels of serotonin and its metabolites have been found in malnourished states. The aim in the present study was to investigate whether treatment with fluoxetine (Fx), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, mimics the detrimental effect of low-protein diet during the perinatal period on the male rat heart. Our hypothesis is that increased circulating serotonin as a result of pharmacologic treatment with Fx leads to cardiac dysfunction similar to that observed in protein-restricted rats. Male Wistar rat pups received daily subcutaneous injection of Fx or vehicle from postnatal day 1 to postnatal day 21. Male rats were euthanized at 60 days of age and the following parameters were evaluated in the cardiac tissue: mitochondrial respiratory capacity, respiratory control ratio, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential, and biomarkers of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense. We found that Fx treatment increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity (123%) and membrane potential (212%) and decreased ROS production (55%). In addition we observed an increase in the antioxidant capacity (elevation in catalase activity (5-fold) and glutathione peroxidase (4.6-fold)). Taken together, our results suggest that Fx treatment in the developmental period positively affects the mitochondrial bioenergetics and antioxidant defense in the cardiac tissue. PMID:26939042

  15. Fast-twitch glycolytic skeletal muscle is predisposed to age-induced impairments in mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Robert A; Díaz, Víctor; Soldini, Lavinia;

    2013-01-01

    -resolution respirometry and mitochondrial protein expression in soleus, quadricep, and lateral gastrocnemius skeletal muscles, which represent type 1 slow-twitch oxidative muscle (soleus) and type 2 fast-twitch glycolytic muscle (quadricep and gastrocnemius), respectively, in young (10-12 weeks) and mature (74-76 weeks...

  16. Impairment of mitochondrial function of rat hepatocytes by high fat diet and oxidative stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Garnol, T.; Endlicher, R.; Kučera, O.; Drahota, Zdeněk; Červinková, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2014), s. 271-274. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Grant ostatní: Univerzita Karlova(CZ) PRVOUK P37/02 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : hepatocytes * high fat diet * mitochondrial activities * ROS Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  17. Effect of resveratrol on mitochondrial function: Implications in parkin-associated familiar Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ferretta (Anna); A. Gaballo (Antonio); P. Tanzarella (Paola); C. Piccoli (Claudia); N. Capitanio (Nazzareno); B. Nico (Beatrice); T. Annese (Tiziana); M. Di Paola (Marco); E. Dell'Aquila (Emanuela); M. de Mari; E. Ferranini (Ermanno); V. Bonifati (Vincenzo); C. Pacelli (Consiglia); T. Cocco (Tiziana)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress occur in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the molecular mechanisms controlling these events are not completely understood. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional coactivator known as master

  18. Intact primary mitochondrial function in myotubes established from women with PCOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette Brandt; Minet, Ariane Denise; Glintborg, Dorte;

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5-8% of fertile women and is often accompanied by insulin resistance, leading to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant PCOS subjects display reduced expression of nuclear encoded genes involved in mitochondrial...

  19. Dual Function MITO-Porter, a Nano Carrier Integrating Both Efficient Cytoplasmic Delivery and Mitochondrial Macromolecule Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Yuma; Furukawa, Ryo; Yasuzaki, Yukari; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a variety of human diseases including inherited mitochondrial diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Effective medical therapies for mitochondrial diseases will ultimately require an optimal drug delivery system, which will likely be achieved through innovations in the nanotechnology of intracellular trafficking. To achieve efficient mitochondrial drug delivery, two independent processes, i.e., “cytoplasmic delivery t...

  20. Dual function MITO-Porter, a nano carrier integrating both efficient cytoplasmic delivery and mitochondrial macromolecule delivery.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Yuma; Furukawa, Ryo; Yasuzaki, Yukari; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a variety of human diseases including inherited mitochondrial diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Effective medical therapies for mitochondrial diseases will ultimately require an optimal drug delivery system, which will likely be achieved through innovations in the nanotechnology of intracellular trafficking. To achieve efficient mitochondrial drug delivery, two independent processes, i.e., "cytoplasmic delivery t...

  1. The mitochondrial complex I activity is reduced in cells with impaired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel G Valdivieso

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease. It results from different possible mutations in the CFTR gene, which encodes the CFTR chloride channel. We have previously studied the differential expression of genes in CF and CF corrected cell lines, and found a reduced expression of MTND4 in CF cells. MTND4 is a mitochondrial gene encoding the MTND4 subunit of the mitochondrial Complex I (mCx-I. Since this subunit is essential for the assembly and activity of mCx-I, we have now studied whether the activity of this complex was also affected in CF cells. By using Blue Native-PAGE, the in-gel activity (IGA of the mCx-I was found reduced in CFDE and IB3-1 cells (CF cell lines compared with CFDE/6RepCFTR and S9 cells, respectively (CFDE and IB3-1 cells ectopically expressing wild-type CFTR. Moreover, colon carcinoma T84 and Caco-2 cells, which express wt-CFTR, either treated with CFTR inhibitors (glibenclamide, CFTR(inh-172 or GlyH101 or transfected with a CFTR-specific shRNAi, showed a significant reduction on the IGA of mCx-I. The reduction of the mCx-I activity caused by CFTR inhibition under physiological or pathological conditions may have a profound impact on mitochondrial functions of CF and non-CF cells.

  2. Cytochrome P450 or high pH induce structural and functional changes of Coenzyme Q10

    OpenAIRE

    Gulaboski, Rubin; Bogeski, Ivan; Mirceski, Valentin; Reinhard, Kappl; Hoth, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a lipid soluble compound indispensable for optimal functioning of all living organisms, and it is the only non-protein in the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. Using voltammetry, UV-VIS spectrophotometry, EPR and NMR we have shown that Cytochrome P450 and high pH's induce structural and functional changes in Coenzyme Q10. The new derivative has much greater antioxidative potential and ability to bind Ca2+ and other earth-alkaline cations.

  3. Changing the functionality of cocoa butter

    OpenAIRE

    De Clercq, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Cocoa butter is an essential ingredient in chocolate as it forms the continuous phase of chocolate. It’s therefore responsible for the gloss, texture and typical melting behaviour of ‘irresistible’ chocolate. The aim of this research was to change the functionality of cocoa butter by two different methods. In the first part, cocoa butter was modified by physical refining by using packed column steam refining with or without silica pretreatment. The physicochemical properties of the refined co...

  4. Glom is a novel mitochondrial DNA packaging protein in Physarum polycephalum and causes intense chromatin condensation without suppressing DNA functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Narie; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Nishitani, Chikako; Takano, Hiroyoshi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tamaki; Shirai, Yuki; Sakai, Atsushi; Kawano, Shigeyuki; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2003-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is packed into highly organized structures called mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nucleoids). To understand the organization of mtDNA and the overall regulation of its genetic activity within the mt-nucleoids, we identified and characterized a novel mtDNA packaging protein, termed Glom (a protein inducing agglomeration of mitochondrial chromosome), from highly condensed mt-nucleoids of the true slime mold, Physarum polycephalum. This protein could bind to the entire mtDNA and package mtDNA into a highly condensed state in vitro. Immunostaining analysis showed that Glom specifically localized throughout the mt-nucleoid. Deduced amino acid sequence revealed that Glom has a lysine-rich region with proline-rich domain in the N-terminal half and two HMG boxes in C-terminal half. Deletion analysis of Glom revealed that the lysine-rich region was sufficient for the intense mtDNA condensation in vitro. When the recombinant Glom proteins containing the lysine-rich region were expressed in Escherichia coli, the condensed nucleoid structures were observed in E. coli. Such in vivo condensation did not interfere with transcription or replication of E. coli chromosome and the proline-rich domain was essential to keep those genetic activities. The expression of Glom also complemented the E. coli mutant lacking the bacterial histone-like protein HU and the HMG-boxes region of Glom was important for the complementation. Our results suggest that Glom is a new mitochondrial histone-like protein having a property to cause intense DNA condensation without suppressing DNA functions. PMID:12960433

  5. Mitochondria-targeted ROS scavenger improves post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobales, Nelson; Nuñez, Rebeca E; Jang, Sehwan; Parodi-Rullan, Rebecca; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Sacher, Joshua R; Skoda, Erin M; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter; Javadov, Sabzali

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of aging and age-associated diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of XJB-5-131 (XJB), a mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, on cardiac resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced oxidative stress in aged rats. Male adult (5-month old, n=17) and aged (29-month old, n=19) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: adult (A), adult+XJB (AX), aged (O), and aged+XJB (OX). XJB was administered 3 times per week (3mg/kg body weight, IP) for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, cardiac function was continuously monitored in excised hearts using the Langendorff technique for 30 min, followed by 20 min of global ischemia, and 60-min reperfusion. XJB improved post-ischemic recovery of aged hearts, as evidenced by greater left ventricular developed-pressures and rate-pressure products than the untreated, aged-matched group. The state 3 respiration rates at complexes I, II and IV of mitochondria isolated from XJB-treated aged hearts were 57% (P<0.05), 25% (P<0.05) and 28% (P<0.05), respectively, higher than controls. Ca(2+)-induced swelling, an indicator of permeability transition pore opening, was reduced in the mitochondria of XJB-treated aged rats. In addition, XJB significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane as well as the total and mitochondrial ROS levels in cultured cardiomyocytes. This study underlines the importance of mitochondrial ROS in aging-induced cardiac dysfunction and suggests that targeting mitochondrial ROS may be an effective therapeutic approach to protect the aged heart against IR injury. PMID:25451170

  6. A protective effect of melatonin on intestinal permeability is induced by diclofenac via regulation of mitochondrial function in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao MEI; Lei DIAO; Jian-ming XU; Xiao-chang LIU; Juan JIN

    2011-01-01

    Aim:This study investigated the effect of intragastrically administered melatonin on intestinal mucosal permeability induced by diclofenac in mice.Methods:Intestinal mucosal permeability was induced in mice by intragastric administration of diclofenac(2.5 mg/kg).Melatonin was given intragastrically(10 mg/kg)once per day for 3 d after diclofenac administration.The small intestine was examined macroscopically and microscopically for pathologic jnjury to the iritestinal mucosa.Intestinal mucosal permeability was evaluated by Evans blue and FITC-dextran methods.Mitochondrial functionaI parameters.including mitochondrial membrane potential.mitochondrial ATPase and succinate dehydrogenase(SDH)activity,were assessed.The malondiaIdehyde(MDA)and myeloperoxidase (MPO)levels were determined from small intestinal mucosal homogenates.Results:As compared with control mice.the permeability,pathologic score, MDA and MPO levels and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were increased significantly by diclofenac treatment,and a broadened junctional complex and enlarged intercellular space were observed by transmission electron microscopy(TEM).Melatonin treatment significantly reduced the intestinal mucosal permeability.pathologic score,MDA,and MPO levels and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa.By TEM, the small intestine villus morphology and intercellular spaces were nearly normal in melatonin-treated mice.At the level of the mitochondria, melatonin treatment significantly restored the activities of ATPase and SDH.Conclusion:The intestinal damage and increased intestinal permeability induced by diclofenac in mice was limited by melatonin:moreover, melatonin preserved several aspects of mitochondrial function.

  7. Tracking cellular stress with labeled FMAU reflects changes in mitochondrial TK2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluoropyrimidines like 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-β-d-arabinofuranosyl)-thymine (FMAU) and 3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine (FLT) accumulate in tumors and are being used as positron emission tomography tumor-imaging tracers. Proliferating tissues with high thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) activity retain FLT; however, the mechanism of selective accumulation of FMAU in tumors and certain other tissues requires further study. Retention of [3H]FLT and [3H]FMAU was measured in prostate cancer cell lines PC3, LNCaP, DU145, and the breast cancer cell line MD-MBA-231, and the tracer metabolites were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). FMAU retention, thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) activity, and mitochondrial mass were determined in cells stressed by depleted cell culture medium or by treating with oxidative, reductive, and energy stress, or specific adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activator, or eIF2 inhibitor. TK1 and TK2 activities and mitochondrial mass were determined by FLT phosphorylation, 1-β-d-arabinofuranosylthymine (Ara-T) phosphorylation, and flow cytometry, respectively. FMAU retention in rapidly proliferating cancer cell lines was five to ten times lower than FLT after 10 min incubation. HPLC analysis of the cellular extracts showed that phosphorylated tracers are the main retained metabolites. Nutritional stress decreased TK1 activity and FLT retention but increased retained FMAU. TK2 inhibition decreased FMAU retention and phosphorylation with negligible effects on FLT. Oxidative, reductive, or energy stress increased FMAU retention and correlated with mitochondrial mass (r 2 = 0.88, p = 0.006). FMAU phosphorylation correlated with increased TK2 activity (r 2 = 0.87, p = 0.0002). FMAU is preferably phosphorylated by TK2 and can track TK2 activity and mitochondrial mass in cellular stress. FMAU may provide an early marker of treatment effects. (orig.)

  8. Changes in Neutrophil Functions in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Indreshpal; Simons, Elizabeth R.; Castro, Victoria; Pierson, Duane L.

    2002-01-01

    Neutrophil functions (phagocytosis, oxidative burst, degranulation) and expression of surface markers involved in these functions were studied in 25 astronauts before and after 4 space shuttle missions. Space flight duration ranged from 5 to 11 days. Blood specimens were obtained 10 days before launch (preflight or L-10), immediately after landing (landing or R+0), and again at 3 days after landing (postflight or R+3). Blood samples were also collected from 9 healthy low-stressed subjects at 3 time points simulating a 10-day shuttle mission. The number of neutrophils increased at landing by 85 percent when compared to the preflight numbers. Neutrophil functions were studied in whole blood using flow cytometric methods. Phagocytosis of E.coli-FITC and oxidative burst capacity of the neutrophils following the 9 to 11 day missions were lower at all three sampling points than the mean values for control subjects. Phagocytosis and oxidative burst capacity of the astronauts was decreased even 10-days before space flight. Mission duration appears to be a factor in phagocytic and oxidative functions. In contrast, following the short-duration (5-days) mission, these functions were unchanged from control values. No consistent changes in degranulation were observed following either short or medium length space missions. The expression of CD16, CD32, CD11a, CD11b, CD11c, L-selectin and CD36 was measured and found to be variable. Specifically, CD16 and CD32 did not correlate with the changes in oxidative burst and phagocytosis. We can conclude from this study that the stresses associated with space flight can alter the important functions of neutrophils.

  9. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Chronic Disease: Treatment With Natural Supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolson, Garth L.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of function in mitochondria, the key organelle responsible for cellular energy production, can result in the excess fatigue and other symptoms that are common complaints in almost every chronic disease. At the molecular level, a reduction in mitochondrial function occurs as a result of the following changes: (1) a loss of maintenance of the electrical and chemical transmembrane potential of the inner mitochondrial membrane, (2) alterations in the function of the electron transport chain,...

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Mitochondrial Dynamics and Mitophagy and Their Functional Roles in the Cardiovascular System

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Yoshiyuki; Shirakabe, Akihiro; Brady, Christopher; Zablocki, Daniela; OHISHI, Mitsuru; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that produce the cellular energy source, ATP. Dysfunctional mitochondria are involved in the pathophysiology of heart disease, which is associated with reduced levels of ATP and excessive production of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that change their morphology through fission and fusion in order to maintain their function. Fusion connects neighboring depolarized mitochondria and mixes their contents to maintain membrane pote...

  11. Inhibition of ROS elevation and damage to mitochondrial function prevents lead-induced neurotoxic effects on structures and functions of AFD neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuli Wu; Peidang Liu; Yinxia Li; Min Du; Xiaojuan Xing; Dayong Wang

    2012-01-01

    Here we investigated the possible roles of oxidative stress in the formation of decreased thermotaxis to cultivation temperature in lead (Pb)-exposed nematodes Caenorhabditis elagans.Exposure to Pb at the examined concentrations decreased thermotaxis behaviors,and induced severe deficits in the structural properties of AFD sensory neurons.Meanwhile,Pb exposure caused the induction of severe oxidative damage,reactive oxygen species (ROS) production,and mitochondrial dysfunction in young adults.Moreover,pre-treatment with the antioxidants dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO),ascorbate and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC),used to inhibit both the ROS elevation and the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by Pb exposure,at the L2-1arval stage prevented the induction of oxidative damage and the formation of severe deficits in thermotaxis and structural properties of AFD sensory neurons in Pb-exposed young adults.Therefore,the formation of oxidative stress caused by Pb exposure may be due to both the induction of ROS elevation and damage to mitochondrial function,and oxidative stress may play a key role in inducing the neurotoxic effects on the structures and function of AFT sensory neurons in Pb-exposed nematodes.

  12. A short period of high-intensity interval training improves skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Peter M; Jacobs, Robert A; Bonne, Thomas; Flück, Daniela; Bangsbo, Jens; Lundby, Carsten

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether improvements in pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇o2) kinetics following a short period of high-intensity training (HIT) would be associated with improved skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. Ten untrained male volunteers (age 26 ± 2 yr; mean ± SD) performed six HIT sessions (8-12 × 60 s at incremental test peak power; 271 ± 52 W) over a 2-wk period. Before and after the HIT period, V̇o2 kinetics was modeled during moderate-intensity cycling (110 ± 19 W). Mitochondrial function was assessed with high-resolution respirometry (HRR), and maximal activities of oxidative enzymes citrate synthase (CS) and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) were accordingly determined. In response to HIT, V̇o2 kinetics became faster (τ: 20.4 ± 4.4 vs. 28.9 ± 6.1 s; P < 0.01) and fatty acid oxidation (ETFP) and leak respiration (LN) both became elevated (P < 0.05). Activity of CS and COX did not increase in response to training. Both before and after the HIT period, fast V̇o2 kinetics (low τ values) was associated with large values for ETFP, electron transport system capacity (ETS), and electron flow specific to complex II (CIIP) (P < 0.05). Collectively, these findings support that selected measures of mitochondrial function obtained with HRR are important for fast V̇o2 kinetics and better markers than maximal oxidative enzyme activity in describing the speed of the V̇o2 response during moderate-intensity exercise. PMID:26846547

  13. Ionising radiation induces persistent alterations in the cardiac mitochondrial function of C57BL/6 mice 40 weeks after local heart exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Radiotherapy of thoracic and chest-wall tumours increases the long-term risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of local heart irradiation on cardiac mitochondria. Methods: C57BL/6 and atherosclerosis-prone ApoE−/− mice received local heart irradiation with a single X-ray dose of 2 Gy. To investigate the low-dose effect, C57BL/6 mice also received a single heart dose of 0.2 Gy. Functional and proteomic alterations of cardiac mitochondria were evaluated after 40 weeks, compared to age-matched controls. Results: The respiratory capacity of irradiated C57BL/6 cardiac mitochondria was significantly reduced at 40 weeks. In parallel, protein carbonylation was increased, suggesting enhanced oxidative stress. Considerable alterations were found in the levels of proteins of mitochondria-associated cytoskeleton, respiratory chain, ion transport and lipid metabolism. Radiation induced similar but less pronounced effects in the mitochondrial proteome of ApoE−/− mice. In ApoE−/−, no significant change was observed in mitochondrial respiration or protein carbonylation. The dose of 0.2 Gy had no significant effects on cardiac mitochondria. Conclusion: This study suggests that ionising radiation causes non-transient alterations in cardiac mitochondria, resulting in oxidative stress that may ultimately lead to malfunctioning of the heart muscle

  14. Mitochondrial DNA mutations provoke dominant inhibition of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Sauvanet

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that continuously move, fuse and divide. Mitochondrial dynamics modulate overall mitochondrial morphology and are essential for the proper function, maintenance and transmission of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. We have investigated mitochondrial fusion in yeast cells with severe defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS due to removal or various specific mutations of mtDNA. We find that, under fermentative conditions, OXPHOS deficient cells maintain normal levels of cellular ATP and ADP but display a reduced mitochondrial inner membrane potential. We demonstrate that, despite metabolic compensation by glycolysis, OXPHOS defects are associated to a selective inhibition of inner but not outer membrane fusion. Fusion inhibition was dominant and hampered the fusion of mutant mitochondria with wild-type mitochondria. Inhibition of inner membrane fusion was not systematically associated to changes of mitochondrial distribution and morphology, nor to changes in the isoform pattern of Mgm1, the major fusion factor of the inner membrane. However, inhibition of inner membrane fusion correlated with specific alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure, notably with the presence of aligned and unfused inner membranes that are connected to two mitochondrial boundaries. The fusion inhibition observed upon deletion of OXPHOS related genes or upon removal of the entire mtDNA was similar to that observed upon introduction of point mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene that are associated to neurogenic ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP or to maternally inherited Leigh Syndrome (MILS in humans. Our findings indicate that the consequences of mtDNA mutations may not be limited to OXPHOS defects but may also include alterations in mitochondrial fusion. Our results further imply that, in healthy cells, the dominant inhibition of fusion could mediate the exclusion of OXPHOS-deficient mitochondria from

  15. Modulation of the matrix redox signaling by mitochondrial Ca(2.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo-Domingo, Jaime; Wiederkehr, Andreas; De Marchi, Umberto

    2015-11-26

    Mitochondria sense, shape and integrate signals, and thus function as central players in cellular signal transduction. Ca(2+) waves and redox reactions are two such intracellular signals modulated by mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport is of utmost physio-pathological relevance with a strong impact on metabolism and cell fate. Despite its importance, the molecular nature of the proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport has been revealed only recently. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) promotes energy metabolism through the activation of matrix dehydrogenases and down-stream stimulation of the respiratory chain. These changes also alter the mitochondrial NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio, but at the same time will increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Reducing equivalents and ROS are having opposite effects on the mitochondrial redox state, which are hard to dissect. With the recent development of genetically encoded mitochondrial-targeted redox-sensitive sensors, real-time monitoring of matrix thiol redox dynamics has become possible. The discoveries of the molecular nature of mitochondrial transporters of Ca(2+) combined with the utilization of the novel redox sensors is shedding light on the complex relation between mitochondrial Ca(2+) and redox signals and their impact on cell function. In this review, we describe mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling, focusing on a number of newly identified proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and release. We further discuss our recent findings, revealing how mitochondrial Ca(2+) influences the matrix redox state. As a result, mitochondrial Ca(2+) is able to modulate the many mitochondrial redox-regulated processes linked to normal physiology and disease. PMID:26629314

  16. Modulation of the matrix redox signaling by mitochondrial Ca2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime; Santo-Domingo; Andreas; Wiederkehr; Umberto; De; Marchi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria sense,shape and integrate signals,and thus function as central players in cellular signal transduction. Ca2+ waves and redox reactions are two such intracellular signals modulated by mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca2+ transport is of utmost physio-pathological relevance with a strong impact on metabolism and cell fate. Despite its importance,the molecular nature of the proteins involvedin mitochondrial Ca2+ transport has been revealed only recently. Mitochondrial Ca2+ promotes energy metabolism through the activation of matrix dehydrogenases and downstream stimulation of the respiratory chain. These changes also alter the mitochondrial NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio,but at the same time will increase reactive oxygen species(ROS) production. Reducing equivalents and ROS are having opposite effects on the mitochondrial redox state,which are hard to dissect. With the recent development of genetically encoded mitochondrial-targeted redoxsensitive sensors,real-time monitoring of matrix thiol redox dynamics has become possible. The discoveries of the molecular nature of mitochondrial transporters of Ca2+ combined with the utilization of the novel redox sensors is shedding light on the complex relation between mitochondrial Ca2+ and redox signals and their impact on cell function. In this review,we describe mitochondrial Ca2+ handling,focusing on a number of newly identified proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and release. We further discuss our recent findings,revealing how mitochondrial Ca2+ influences the matrix redox state. As a result,mitochondrial Ca2+ is able to modulate the many mitochondrial redox-regulated processes linked to normal physiology and disease.

  17. Downregualtion of dynamin-related protein 1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity via regulating mitochondrial function in a calcium dependent manner in HT22 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chi; Yuan, Xian-rui; Li, Hao-yu; Zhao, Zi-jin; Liao, Yi-wei; Wang, Xiang-yu; Su, Jun; Sang, Shu-shan; Liu, Qing, E-mail: xiangyaliuqing@163.com

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Downregulation of Drp-1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. •Downregulation of Drp-1 inhibits glutamate-induced apoptosis. •Downregulation of Drp-1 reduces glutamate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. •Downregulation of Drp-1 preserves intracellular calcium homeostasis. -- Abstract: Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is involved in many acute and chronic brain diseases. Dynamin related protein 1 (Drp-1), one of the GTPase family of proteins that regulate mitochondrial fission and fusion balance, is associated with apoptotic cell death in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we investigated the effect of downregulating Drp-1 on glutamate excitotoxicity-induced neuronal injury in HT22 cells. We found that downregulation of Drp-1 with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased cell viability and inhibited lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release after glutamate treatment. Downregulation of Drp-1 also inhibited an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Drp-1 siRNA transfection preserved the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reduced cytochrome c release, enhanced ATP production, and partly prevented mitochondrial swelling. In addition, Drp-1 knockdown attenuated glutamate-induced increases of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+}, and preserved the mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} buffering capacity after excitotoxicity. Taken together, these results suggest that downregulation of Drp-1 protects HT22 cells against glutamate-induced excitatory damage, and this neuroprotection may be dependent at least in part on the preservation of mitochondrial function through regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis.

  18. Changes in Reflective Functioning during Psychoanalytic Psychotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörz-Sagstetter, Susanne; Mertens, Wolfgang; Isphording, Sybille; Buchheim, Anna; Taubner, Svenja

    2015-06-01

    This study examines how reflective functioning (RF) can be assessed in analytic sessions and throughout psychoanalytic psychotherapy. The goals are to replicate in part a study by Josephs and colleagues (2004) by applying the RF Scale to analytic sessions and to study fluctuations of RF within each session. Additionally, RF based on sessions was compared with the RF ratings based on the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) during the course of two psychoanalytic psychotherapies with a duration of 240 hours. RF changes based on 10 sessions per patient, assessed at baseline and after 80, 160, and 240 hours of therapy, and RF changes based on AAI ratings measured at baseline and after 240 hours of therapy, and in one case at follow-up, were related to changes of symptoms and attachment classifications over time. Results showed that in both cases RF fluctuated within sessions. The average RF rating per session increased over the course of treatment, while the AAI-based RF rating needed longer to increase. Rather good correspondence was found between session-based RF ratings and independent AAI-based RF ratings. In both cases, changes in RF over time were compared to changes in attachment classification based on the AAI and to symptomatic change. Better correspondence between symptomatic and attachment changes was found with the AAI-based RF rating. It was tentatively interpreted that session-based RF ratings may represent a state of RF that is strongly influenced by the therapist-patient interaction, whereas AAI-based RF can be considered to have more trait characteristics. PMID:26185290

  19. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial transcription factor, sc-mtTFB, shares features with sigma factors but is functionally distinct.

    OpenAIRE

    Shadel, G S; Clayton, D A

    1995-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria, sc-mtTFB is a 341-amino-acid transcription factor required for initiation of transcription from mitochondrial DNA promoters. Specific transcription in vitro requires only sc-mtTFB and the bacteriophage-related core sc-mtRNA polymerase. Mutational analysis of sc-mtTFB has defined two regions of the protein that are important for normal function both in vivo and in vitro. These regions overlap portions of the protein that exhibit similarity to conserved...

  20. Mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle is normal and unrelated to insulin action in young men born with low birth weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Charlotte; Jensen, Christine B; Storgaard, Heidi;

    2008-01-01

    . RESULTS: The LBW subjects displayed a variety of metabolic and prediabetic abnormalities, including elevated fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin levels, reduced insulin-stimulated glycolytic flux, and hepatic insulin resistance. Nevertheless, in vivo mitochondrial function was normal in LBW subjects......, as was the expression of OXPHOS genes. CONCLUSIONS: These data support and expand previous findings of abnormal glucose metabolism in young men with LBW. In addition, we found that the young, healthy men with LBW exhibited hepatic insulin resistance. However, the study does not support the hypothesis that muscle...

  1. A short period of high-intensity interval training improves skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Jacobs, Robert A; Bonne, Thomas Christian;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether improvements in pulmonary V̇O2 kinetics following a short period of high-intensity training (HIT) would be associated with improved skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. Ten untrained male volunteers (age: 26 ± 2; mean ± SD) performed six HIT...... increase in response to training. Both before and after the HIT-period fast V̇O2 kinetics (low τ values) was associated with large values for ETFP, electron transport system capacity (ETS) and electron flow specific to complex II (CIIP) (P<0.05). Collectively these findings support that selected measures...

  2. Changes in functional imaging with aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex interactions between genetic information, endogenous chemical changes, and dietary intake of nutrients and toxins, along with additional factors such as radiation, find expression in the process known as aging. It is becoming clear that studies in nuclear medicine have a distinct role to play in evaluating age-associated changes. Certain functional indices, such as cardiac parameters, can be relatively simply derived and correlated with age and with variables such as height and weight. The images in nuclear medicine can also be subjected to quantitative assay, and age-associated variations are noted in health and disease. Of potential import is the area of immunoscintigraphy, not for tumors but for age-related antigenic markers. Information was presented in a previous paper on the unmasking of red cell antigens with cell aging. The opposite effect also occurs. That is, specific antigens can be lost as a function of age. The effect of age on hair-bulb tyrosinase activity has been studied. The hair bulbs of those with white hair did not express tyrosinase activity in vitro. To confirm that the enzyme protein was absent (in addition to absence of the catalytic effect), antibodies to tyrosinase established that tyrosinase antigen was not detectable in the hair bulbs. Extension of this approach may open up the ability to map functional versus nonfunctional enzyme sites versus age

  3. NAD⁺ repletion improves mitochondrial and stem cell function and enhances life span in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Ryu, Dongryeol; Wu, Yibo; Gariani, Karim; Wang, Xu; Luan, Peiling; D'Amico, Davide; Ropelle, Eduardo R; Lutolf, Matthias P; Aebersold, Ruedi; Schoonjans, Kristina; Menzies, Keir J; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-06-17

    Adult stem cells (SCs) are essential for tissue maintenance and regeneration yet are susceptible to senescence during aging. We demonstrate the importance of the amount of the oxidized form of cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and its effect on mitochondrial activity as a pivotal switch to modulate muscle SC (MuSC) senescence. Treatment with the NAD(+) precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) induced the mitochondrial unfolded protein response and synthesis of prohibitin proteins, and this rejuvenated MuSCs in aged mice. NR also prevented MuSC senescence in the mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd(mdx)/J) mouse model of muscular dystrophy. We furthermore demonstrate that NR delays senescence of neural SCs and melanocyte SCs and increases mouse life span. Strategies that conserve cellular NAD(+) may reprogram dysfunctional SCs and improve life span in mammals. PMID:27127236

  4. An Efficient Genetic Screen in Drosophila to Identify Nuclear-Encoded Genes With Mitochondrial Function

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, T. S. Vivian; Gerald B. Call; Guptan, Preeta; Cespedes, Albert; Marshall, Jamie; Yackle, Kevin; Owusu-Ansah, Edward; Mandal, Sudip; Fang, Q. Angela; Goodstein, Gelsey L.; Kim, William; Banerjee, Utpal

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a screen for glossy-eye flies that fail to incorporate BrdU in the third larval instar eye disc but exhibit normal neuronal differentiation and isolated 23 complementation groups of mutants. These same phenotypes were previously seen in mutants for cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va. We have molecularly characterized six complementation groups and, surprisingly, each encodes a mitochondrial protein. Therefore, we believe our screen to be an efficient method for identifying genes wit...

  5. Endonuclease G is a novel determinant of cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    McDermott-Roe, Ch.; Ye, J.; Ahmed, R.; Sun, X. M.; Serafín, A.; Ware, J.; Bottolo, L.; Muckett, P.; Caňas, X.; Zhang, J.; Rowe, G. C.; Buchan, R.; Lu, H.; Braithwaite, A.; Mancini, M.; Hauton, D.; Martí, R.; García-Arumí, E.; Hubner, N.; Jacob, H.; Serikawa, T.; Zídek, Václav; Papoušek, František; Kolář, František; Cardona, M.; Ruiz-Meana, M.; García-Dorado, D.; Comella, J. X.; Felkin, L. E.; Barton, P. J. R.; Arany, Z.; Pravenec, Michal; Petretto, E.; Sanchis, D.; Cook, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 478, č. 7367 (2011), s. 114-118. ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/08/0166 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : left ventricular hypertrophy * endonuclease G * mitochondrial dysfunction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 36.280, year: 2011

  6. Cardioprotective function of mitochondrial-targeted and transcriptionally inactive STAT3 against ischemia and reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanek, Karol; Xu, Aijun; Hu, Ying; Thompson, Jeremy; He, Jun; Larner, Andrew C; Salloum, Fadi N; Chen, Qun; Lesnefsky, Edward J

    2015-11-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a transcription factor that contributes a crucial role in protection against ischemia (ISC)-reperfusion (REP) injury by driving expression of anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant genes. STAT3 is also present in the mitochondria, where it modulates the activity of the electron transport chain (ETC) and the permeability transition pore. Transgenic mice that overexpress a mitochondrial-targeted, transcriptionally inactive STAT3 in cardiomyocytes (MLS-STAT3E mice) exhibit a persistent, partial blockade of electron transfer through complex I that uniquely did not lead to tissue dysfunction at baseline, yet increased mitochondrial ischemic tolerance. The direct contribution of non-transcriptional, mitochondria-localized STAT3 to protection during ISC-REP remains to be established. We hypothesized that the enhanced mitochondrial tolerance to ischemia present in MLS-STAT3E mice would decrease cardiac injury during ISC-REP. In the isolated buffer-perfused heart model, MLS-STAT3E hearts exhibit a decreased infarct size compared to non-transgenic littermate hearts. Contractile recovery, expressed as a percent of LV developed pressure before ISC, is improved in MLS-STAT3E mice. Mitochondria isolated at the end of 60 min. of REP from MLS-STAT3E hearts show attenuated ROS release. The partial and persistent blockade of complex I present in MLS-STAT3E mice decreases cardiac injury during REP, in part via a persistent decrease in ROS production and attenuation of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening at the onset of REP. In vivo, MLS-STAT3E hearts exhibit substantially higher postoperative survival rate and a substantial decrease in myocardial infarct size. STAT3 mediates cardioprotection not only via canonical action as a transcription factor, but also as a modulator of ETC activity directly in the mitochondria. PMID:26358226

  7. Mitochondrial function and regulation of macrophage sterol metabolism and inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Annette; Allen, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to explore the role of mitochondria in regulating macrophage sterol homeostasis and inflammatory responses within the aetiology of atherosclerosis. Macrophage generation of oxysterol activators of liver X receptors (LXRs), via sterol 27-hydroxylase, is regulated by the rate of flux of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane, via a complex of cholesterol trafficking proteins. Oxysterols are key signalling molecules, regulating the transcriptional activity of L...

  8. Alcohol alters hepatic FoxO1, p53, and mitochondrial SIRT5 deacetylation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic alcohol consumption affects the gene expression of a NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirtuis 1 (SIRT1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator1α (PGC-1α). Our aim was to verify that it also alters the forkhead (FoxO1) and p53 transcription factor proteins, critical in the hepatic response to oxidative stress and regulated by SIRT1 through its deacetylating capacity. Accordingly, rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli alcohol-containing liquid diets for 28 days. Alcohol increased hepatic mRNA expression of FoxO1 (p = 0.003) and p53 (p = 0.001) while corresponding protein levels remained unchanged. However phospho-FoxO1 and phospho-Akt (protein kinase) were both decreased by alcohol consumption (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively) while hepatic p53 was found hyperacetylated (p = 0.017). Furthermore, mitochondrial SIRT5 was reduced (p = 0.0025), and PGC-1α hyperacetylated (p = 0.027), establishing their role in protein modification. Thus, alcohol consumption disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial interactions by post-translation protein modifications, which contribute to alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis through the newly discovered reduction of SIRT5

  9. Morphological and functional changes of mitochondria in apoptotic esophageal carcinoma cells induced by arsenic trioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Ying Shen; Jian Shen; Qiao-Shan Li; Cai-Yun Chen; Jiong-Yu Chen; Yi Zeng

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate that mitochondrial morphological andfunctional changes are an important intermediate link in thecourse of apoptosis in esophageal carcinoma cells inducedby As2O3.METHODS: The esophageal carcinoma cell line SHEEC1,established in our laboratory, was cultured in 199 growthmedium, supplemented with 100mL@ L-1 calf serum and3 mol@L-1 As2O3( the same below). After 2, 4, 6, 12, 24 hof drug adding, the SHEEC1 cells were collected for light-and electron-microscopic examination. The mitochondriawere labeled by Rhodamine fluorescence probe and thefluorescence intensity of the mitochondria was measured byflow cytometer and cytofluorimetric analysis. Further, themitochondrial transmembrane potential ( MTP, ΔΨm )change was also calculated.RESULTS: The mitochondrial morphological change afteradding As2O3 could be divided into three stages. In theearly-stage (2-6h) after adding As2O3, an adaptiveproliferation of mitochondria appeared; in the mid-stage (6-12 h ) e degenerative change was observed; and in the late-stage (12-24 h ) the mitochondria swelled with outermembrana broken down and then calls death with apoptoticchanges of nucleus. The functional change of themitochondria indicated by fluorescent intensity, whichreflected the MTP status of mitochondria, was in accordancewith morphological change of the mitochondria. Thefluorescent intensity increased at early-stage, declined inmid-stage and decreased to the lowest in the late@ stage. 24h after As2O3 adding, the cell nucleus showed typicalapoptotic changes.CONCLUSION: Under the inducement of As2O3, the earlyapoptotic changes of SHEEC1 cells were the apparentmorphological and functional changes of mitochondria,afterwards the nucleus changes followed. lt is consideredthat changes of mitochondria are an important intermediatelink in the course of apoptosis of esophageal carcinomacalls induced by As2O3.

  10. Aging-dependent changes in rat heart mitochondrial glutaredoxins—Implications for redox regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Huang Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and animal studies have documented that hearts of the elderly are more susceptible to ischemia/reperfusion damage compared to young adults. Recently we found that aging-dependent increase in susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to apoptosis was attributable to decrease in cytosolic glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1 and concomitant decrease in NF-κB-mediated expression of anti-apoptotic proteins. Besides primary localization in the cytosol, Grx1 also exists in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS. In contrast, Grx2 is confined to the mitochondrial matrix. Here we report that Grx1 is decreased by 50–60% in the IMS, but Grx2 is increased by 1.4–2.6 fold in the matrix of heart mitochondria from elderly rats. Determination of in situ activities of the Grx isozymes from both subsarcolemmal (SSM and interfibrillar (IFM mitochondria revealed that Grx1 was fully active in the IMS. However, Grx2 was mostly in an inactive form in the matrix, consistent with reversible sequestration of the active-site cysteines of two Grx2 molecules in complex with an iron–sulfur cluster. Our quantitative evaluations of the active/inactive ratio for Grx2 suggest that levels of dimeric Grx2 complex with iron–sulfur clusters are increased in SSM and IFM in the hearts of elderly rats. We found that the inactive Grx2 can be fully reactivated by sodium dithionite or exogenous superoxide production mediated by xanthine oxidase. However, treatment with rotenone, which generates intramitochondrial superoxide through inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain Complex I, did not lead to Grx2 activation. These findings suggest that insufficient ROS accumulates in the vicinity of dimeric Grx2 to activate it in situ.

  11. Functional Diversity of Human Mitochondrial J-proteins Is Independent of Their Association with the Inner Membrane Presequence Translocase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Devanjan; Srivastava, Shubhi; D'Silva, Patrick

    2016-08-12

    Mitochondrial J-proteins play a critical role in governing Hsp70 activity and, hence, are essential for organellar protein translocation and folding. In contrast to yeast, which has a single J-protein Pam18, humans involve two J-proteins, DnaJC15 and DnaJC19, associated with contrasting cellular phenotype, to transport proteins into the mitochondria. Mutation in DnaJC19 results in dilated cardiomyopathy and ataxia syndrome, whereas expression of DnaJC15 regulates the response of cancer cells to chemotherapy. In the present study we have comparatively assessed the biochemical properties of the J-protein paralogs in relation to their association with the import channel. Both DnaJC15 and DnaJC19 formed two distinct subcomplexes with Magmas at the import channel. Knockdown analysis suggested an essential role for Magmas and DnaJC19 in organellar protein translocation and mitochondria biogenesis, whereas DnaJC15 had dispensable supportive function. The J-proteins were found to have equal affinity for Magmas and could stimulate mitochondrial Hsp70 ATPase activity by equivalent levels. Interestingly, we observed that DnaJC15 exhibits bifunctional properties. At the translocation channel, it involves conserved interactions and mechanism to translocate the precursors into mitochondria. In addition to protein transport, DnaJC15 also showed a dual role in yeast where its expression elicited enhanced sensitivity of cells to cisplatin that required the presence of a functional J-domain. The amount of DnaJC15 expressed in the cell was directly proportional to the sensitivity of cells. Our analysis indicates that the differential cellular phenotype displayed by human mitochondrial J-proteins is independent of their activity and association with Magmas at the translocation channel. PMID:27330077

  12. A holistic view of cancer bioenergetics: mitochondrial function and respiration play fundamental roles in the development and progression of diverse tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Maksudul; Lal, Sneha; FitzGerald, Keely E; Zhang, Li

    2016-12-01

    Since Otto Warburg made the first observation that tumor cells exhibit altered metabolism and bioenergetics in the 1920s, many scientists have tried to further the understanding of tumor bioenergetics. Particularly, in the past decade, the application of the state-of the-art metabolomics and genomics technologies has revealed the remarkable plasticity of tumor metabolism and bioenergetics. Firstly, a wide array of tumor cells have been shown to be able to use not only glucose, but also glutamine for generating cellular energy, reducing power, and metabolic building blocks for biosynthesis. Secondly, many types of cancer cells generate most of their cellular energy via mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. Glutamine is the preferred substrate for oxidative phosphorylation in tumor cells. Thirdly, tumor cells exhibit remarkable versatility in using bioenergetics substrates. Notably, tumor cells can use metabolic substrates donated by stromal cells for cellular energy generation via oxidative phosphorylation. Further, it has been shown that mitochondrial transfer is a critical mechanism for tumor cells with defective mitochondria to restore oxidative phosphorylation. The restoration is necessary for tumor cells to gain tumorigenic and metastatic potential. It is also worth noting that heme is essential for the biogenesis and proper functioning of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. Hence, it is not surprising that recent experimental data showed that heme flux and function are elevated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and that elevated heme function promotes intensified oxygen consumption, thereby fueling tumor cell proliferation and function. Finally, emerging evidence increasingly suggests that clonal evolution and tumor genetic heterogeneity contribute to bioenergetic versatility of tumor cells, as well as tumor recurrence and drug resistance. Although mutations are found only in several metabolic enzymes in tumors, diverse

  13. RNA editing changes the identity of a mitochondrial tRNA in marsupials.

    OpenAIRE

    Börner, G V; Mörl, M.; Janke, A.; Pääbo, S

    1996-01-01

    In the mitochondrial genome of marsupials, the tRNA gene located at the position where in other mammals an aspartyl-tRNA is encoded carries the glycine anticodon GCC. Post-transcriptionally, an RNA editing mechanism affects the second position of the anticodon such that the aspartate anticodon GUC is created in approximately 50% of the mature tRNA pool. We show that the unedited version of this tRNA'Asp' (GCC) can be specifically aminoacylated with glycine in vitro, while the edited version b...

  14. Ethanolamine enhances the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells via the mTOR signaling pathway and mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huansheng; Xiong, Xia; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2016-05-01

    Ethanolamine (Etn), which is the base constituent of phosphatidylethanolamine, a major phospholipid in animal cell membranes, is required for the proliferation of many types of mammalian epithelial cells. However, it is not clear whether the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells requires Etn. The present study was conducted to examine the effects of Etn on the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. The addition of Etn at 100 or 200 μM was found to enhance the proliferation of IPEC-1 cells. The expression of cell cycle-related proteins CDK4, RB3, cyclin A, and PCNA was also enhanced by Etn. Moreover, the expression or phosphorylation levels of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway protein and the expression of proteins related to mitochondrial function were also affected by Etn in IPEC-1 cells. These results indicate that Etn promotes the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells by exerting effects on mTOR signaling pathway and mitochondrial function. PMID:27083163

  15. Structure and function of the native and recombinant mitochondrial MRP1/MRP2 complex from

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zíková, Alena; Kopečná, Jana; Schumacher, M. A.; Stuart, K.; Trantírek, Lukáš; Lukeš, Julius

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 38, 8/9 (2008), s. 901-912. ISSN 0020-7519 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06129; GA ČR GA204/06/1558; GA AV ČR IAA500960705; GA ČR GP204/04/P191; GA MŠk LC07032; GA MŠk(CZ) 1K04011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : frataxin * mitochondrie * trypanosoma * rozsivka * evoluční konzervovanost * import Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.752, year: 2008

  16. Peroxisomal and mitochondrial enzymes involved in lipid metabolism : studies on function and regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tillander, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acids constitute a major part of the energy that we obtain from the diet and are also the principal source for mammals to store energy. To use the incoming or stored fatty acids as energy, the fatty acids needs to be metabolized of which the majority of fatty acids will be degraded by the mitochondrial β-oxidation system that in the end generates energy to the cell in the form of ATP. However, this organelle is not able to handle all kinds of fatty acids of which very lon...

  17. Age Related Change in Thyroid Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakila Rahman, Nasim Jahan, Nayma Sultana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Thyroid hormones play a vital role in metabolism, sensitivity of tissues to other hormones and also in oxygen consumption of almost all cells of the body. However, mild to moderate decrease in function of thyroid gland may occur with advancing age even in apparently healthy elderly subjects.Objectives: To observe age related change in thyroid function status in apparently healthy elderly subjects in Bangladesh.Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Sir Salimullah Medical College, Dhaka between 1st January 2011 and 31st December 2011. Sixty apparently healthy elderly subjects of both sexes aged 50 to 75 years were taken as study group. They were collected from Probin Nibash Hitoishi Shangha, Agargaon, Dhaka. In addition, 30 apparently healthy young adult subjects aged 20-40 years were included as control. For assessment of thyroid function, serum free thyroxine (FT4, free triiodothyronine (FT3 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH levels were estimated by ELISA method. Statistical analysis was done by one way ANOVA, Bonferroni test and Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient test as applicable.Results: In this study, mean serum free thyroxine (FT4 and free triiodothyronine (FT3 levels were significantly (p<0.001 lower and serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH level was significantly (p<0.001 higher in apparently healthy elderly subjects in comparison to those of the healthy young subjects. Again, serum FT4 and FT3 levels were negatively correlated whereas serum TSH level was positively correlated with age of the subjects.Conclusion: The present study revealed a progressive decrease in thyroid function with advancement of age.

  18. ACS6, a Hydrogen sulfide-donating derivative of sildenafil, inhibits homocysteine-induced apoptosis by preservation of mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Xiao-Qing

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hydrogen sulfide-releasing sildenafil, ACS6, has been demonstrated to inhibit superoxide formation through donating hydrogen sulfide (H2S. We have found that H2S antagonizes homocysteine-induced oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. The aim of the present study is to explore the protection of ACS6 against homocysteine-triggered cytotoxicity and apoptosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying in PC12 cells. Methods Cell viability was determined by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay. Cell apoptosis was observed using the chromatin dye Hoechst 33258 and analyzed by Flow Cytometry after propidium iodide staining. Mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored using the fluorescent dye Rh123. Intracellular reactive oxygen species were determined by oxidative conversion of cell permeable 2',7'-dichlorfluorescein-diacetate to fluorescent 2',7'-dichlorfluorescein. The expression of cleaved caspase-3 and bcl-2 and the accumulation of cytosolic cytochrome c were analyzed by Western blot. Results We show that ACS6 protects PC12 cells against cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by homocysteine and blocks homocysteine-triggered cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. ACS6 treatment results in not only prevention of homocysteine-caused mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ loss and reactive oxygen species (ROS overproduction but also reversal of Bcl-2 down-expression. Conclusions These results indicate that ACS6 protects PC12 cells against homocysteine-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis by preservation of mitochondrial function though inhibiting both loss of Δψ and accumulation of ROS as well as modulating the expression of Bcl-2. Our study provides evidence both for a neuroprotective effect of ACS6 and for further evaluation of ACS6 as novel neuroprotectants for Alzheimer's disease associated with homocysteine.

  19. Exercise-induced alterations in pancreatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie; Shafarin, Jasmin; Howarth, Frank C

    2016-04-01

    Progressive metabolic complications accompanied by oxidative stress are the hallmarks of type 2 diabetes. The precise molecular mechanisms of the disease complications, however, remain elusive. Exercise-induced nontherapeutic management of type 2 diabetes is the first line of choice to control hyperglycemia and diabetes associated complications. In this study, using 11-month-old type 2 Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, we have investigated the effects of exercise on mitochondrial metabolic and oxidative stress in the pancreas. Our results showed an increase in theNADPHoxidase enzyme activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production inGKrats, which was inhibited after exercise. Increased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation andSODactivity were also inhibited after exercise. Interestingly, glutathione (GSH) level was markedly high in the pancreas ofGKdiabetic rats even after exercise. However,GSH-peroxidase andGSH-reductase activities were significantly reduced. Exercise also induced energy metabolism as observed by increased hexokinase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities. A significant decrease in the activities of mitochondrial ComplexesII/IIIandIVwere observed in theGKrats. Exercise improved only ComplexIVactivity suggesting increased utilization of oxygen. We also observed increased activities of cytochrome P450s in the pancreas ofGKrats which was reduced significantly after exercise.SDS-PAGEresults have shown a decreased expression ofNF-κB, Glut-2, andPPAR-ϒ inGKrats which was markedly increased after exercise. These results suggest differential oxidative stress and antioxidant defense responses after exercise. Our results also suggest improved mitochondrial function and energy utilization in the pancreas of exercisingGKrats. PMID:27095835

  20. In vivo study of hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in rabbits with severe hypotension after propofol prolonged infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Sónia; Félix, Luís; Venâncio, Carlos; de Lurdes Pinto, Maria; Peixoto, Francisco; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Antunes, Luís

    2016-01-01

    In humans, prolonged sedations with propofol or using high doses have been associated with propofol infusion syndrome. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of prolonged high-dose administration of a specific propofol emulsion (Propofol Lipuro) and an improved lipid formulation (SMOFlipid) in liver mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative stress of rabbits, comparatively to a saline control. Twenty-one male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly allocated in three groups that were continuously treated for 20 h. Each group of seven animals received separately: NaCl 0.9 % (saline), SMOFlipid (lipid-based emulsion without propofol) and Lipuro 2 % (propofol lipid emulsion). An intravenous propofol bolus of 20 mg kg(-1) was given to the propofol Lipuro group to allow blind orotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Anesthesia was maintained using infusion rates of: 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 mg kg(-1) h(-1), according to the clinical scale of anesthetic depth and the index of consciousness values. The SMOFlipid and saline groups received the same infusion rate as the propofol Lipuro group, which were infused during 20 consecutive hours. At the end, the animals were euthanized, livers collected and mitochondria isolated by standard differential centrifugation. Mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential, swelling and oxidative stress were evaluated. Data were processed using one-way ANOVA (p respiratory substrate, significant decrease in ADP-stimulated respiration rate was observed for SMOFlipid group (p = 0.002). Lipid peroxides (p rate. The infusion of propofol Lipuro during prolonged periods, in addition to marked hypotension and hypoperfusion, also showed to have higher anti-oxidant activity and lower impairment of the mitochondrial function comparatively to the improved lipid formulation, SMOFlipid, using the rabbit as animal model. PMID:27588242

  1. Mitochondrial and nuclear changes in hippocampal neurons in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhai Tang; Li Zhang; Jianying Sun; Xiaojun Pan

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial damage plays a key role in neuronal damage.OBJECTIVE: To observe ultrastructural damage to mitochondria and nuclei, as well as caspase-3 expression, in hippocampal CA3 neurons of lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rats.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The neuropathological, randomized, controlled study was performed at the Animal Experimental Center, Shandong University, China in May 2008.MATERIALS: A total of 75 healthy, adult, male, Wistar rats were randomly assigned into model (n = 45) and control (n = 30) groups. Lithium-pilocarpine (Sigma, USA) was used in this study.METHODS: Rats in the model group were intraperitoneally injected with lithium chloride (3 mEq/kg),and 24 hours later with pilocarpine (45 mg/kg), to induce seizures for 2 hours. Rats in the control group were intraperitoneally infused with the same volume of saline. Rat hippocampal CA3 tissue was obtained at 3, 12, and 24 hours following status epilepticus.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Neuronal changes were observed under an optical microscope. Ultrastructural changes in mitochondria and nuclei were observed using an electron microscope.caspase-3 mRNA levels were quantified by semiquantitative RT-PCR.RESULTS: After 3 hours of status epilepticus, mitochondria with swollen cristae and ruptured membranes were observed by electron microscopy. Nuclei with marginated chromatin were observed after 24 hours status epilepticus. RT-PCR results demonstrated increased caspase-3 expression at 12 hours, and significantly increased expression at 24 hours following termination of status epilepticus. This was in accordance with acidophilia occurrence, as indicated by hematoxylin-eosin staining, and time of ultrastructural damage to nuclei.CONCLUSION: In lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rat models, ultrastructural damage to mitochondria in hippocampal neurons occurred during early stages, followed by increased caspase-3 expression and nuclear changes. These results suggested

  2. Transcranial laser therapy alters amyloid precursor protein processing and improves mitochondrial function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Thomas; Yu, Jin; El-Amouri, Salim; Gattoni-Celli, Sebastiano; Richieri, Steve; De Taboada, Luis; Streeter, Jackson; Kindy, Mark S.

    2011-03-01

    Transcranial laser therapy (TLT) using a near-infrared energy laser system was tested in the 2x Tg amyloid precursor protein (APP) mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). TLT was administered 3 times/week at escalating doses, starting at 3 months of age, and was compared to a control group which received no laser treatment. Treatment sessions were continued for a total of six months. The brains were examined for amyloid plaque burden, Aβ peptides (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 ), APP cleavage products (sAPPα, CTFβ) and mitochondrial activity. Administration of TLT was associated with a significant, dose-dependent reduction in amyloid load as indicated by the numbers of Aβ plaques. Levels of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 levels were likewise reduced in a dose-dependent fashion. All TLT doses produced an increase in brain sAPPα and a decrease in CTFβ levels consistent with an increase in α-secretase activity and a decrease in β-secretase activity. In addition, TLT increased ATP levels and oxygen utilization in treated animals suggesting improved mitochondrial function. These studies suggest that TLT is a potential candidate for treatment of AD.

  3. Cytokine and nitric oxide levels in patients with sepsis--temporal evolvement and relation to platelet mitochondrial respiratory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Morota, Saori; Frostner, Eleonor Åsander;

    2014-01-01

    -γ), IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-17 and NO were analyzed in 38 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock at three time points during one week following admission to the ICU. Citrate synthase, mitochondrial DNA and cytochrome c were measured as markers of cellular mitochondrial content...... sepsis. Further, the respiratory increase was not accompanied by an increase in markers of mitochondrial content, suggesting a possible role for post-translational enhancement of mitochondrial respiration rather than augmented mitochondrial mass....

  4. Two potential Petunia hybrida mitochondrial DNA replication origins show structural and in vitro functional homology with the animal mitochondrial DNA heavy and light strand replication origins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, Jan M. de; Hille, Jacques; Kors, Frank; Meer, Bert van der; Kool, Ad J.; Folkerts, Otto; Nijkamp, H. John J.

    1991-01-01

    Four Petunia hybrida mitochondrial (mt) DNA fragments have been isolated, sequenced, localized on the physical map and analyzed for their ability to initiate specific DNA synthesis. When all four mtDNA fragments were tested as templates in an in vitro DNA synthesizing lysate system, developed from p

  5. Pleiotropic effects of the yeast Sal1 and Aac2 carriers on mitochondrial function via an activity distinct from adenine nucleotide transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucejova, Blanka; Li, Li; Wang, Xiaowen; Giannattasio, Sergio; Chen, Xin Jie

    2009-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SAL1 encodes a Ca2+-binding mitochondrial carrier. Disruption of SAL1 is synthetically lethal with the loss of a specific function associated with the Aac2 isoform of the ATP/ADP translocase. This novel activity of Aac2 is defined as the V function (for Viability of aac2 sal1 double mutant), which is independent of the ATP/ADP exchange activity required for respiratory growth (the R function). We found that co-inactivation of SAL1 and AAC2 leads to defects in mitochondrial translation and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance. Additionally, sal1Δ exacerbates the respiratory deficiency and mtDNA instability of ggc1Δ, shy1Δ and mtg1Δ mutants, which are known to reduce mitochondrial protein synthesis or protein complex assembly. The V function is complemented by the human Short Ca2+-binding Mitochondrial Carrier (SCaMC) protein, SCaMC-2, a putative ATP-Mg/Pi exchangers on the inner membrane. However, mitochondria lacking both Sal1p and Aac2p are not depleted of adenine nucleotides. The Aac2R252I and Aac2R253I variants mutated at the R252-254 triplet critical for nucleotide transport retain the V function. Likewise, Sal1p remains functionally active when the R479I and R481I mutations were introduced into the structurally equivalent R479-T480-R481 motif. Finally, we found that the naturally occurring V-R+ Aac1 isoform of adenine nucleotide translocase partially gains the V function at the expense of the R function by introducing the mutations P89L and A96V. Thus, our data support the view that the V function is independent of adenine nucleotide transport associated with Sal1p and Aac2p and this evolutionarily conserved activity affects multiple processes in mitochondria. PMID:18431598

  6. Expression changes of human mitochondrial COX genes in human lymphocytes after exposed by 60Co γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the changes of human mitochondrial COX Ⅰ , COX Ⅱ and COX Ⅲ genes expression induced by ionizing irradiation. Methods: Changes of human COX genes expression were detected by RT-PCR and Real-time PCR 8 h after the irradiation in human lymphoblastoid cell lines,which were exposed to 1-10 Gy 60Co γ-rays. The protein levels were detected by flow cytometry and the COX activity was measured by colorimetry. The dose-effect relationships between the expression changes of the genes and the doses were established. The changes of these genes expression were also analyzed at different post-radiation time-points between 0.5 h and 72 h after irradiation of 5 Gy in order to explore the time-effect. Results: The expression of 3 genes at mRNA level was up-regulated. A good dose-effect relationship was showed for COXⅠ and COX Ⅲ at dose range of 0-3 Gy and 0-8 Gy for COX Ⅱ (FCOXⅠ=116. 62, FCOXⅡ=17. 89, FCOXⅢ = 8.20, P<0.05). For the time-effect after irradiation, the gene expression levels of COX Ⅱ and COX Ⅲ genes were up-regulated and the peak change occurred at 4 h after irradiation. For COX Ⅰ gene, the mRNA expression levels were down-regulated during 0.5-72 h (FCOXⅠ=31.99, FCOXⅡ=19.47, FCOXⅢ=20.64, P<0.05 ). At the protein level, the levels of COX Ⅰ and COX Ⅱ were lowered in lower doses and enhanced in higher doses, and the levels of COX Ⅲ were decreased at all dose levels (FCOXⅠ=16.96, FCOXⅡ=32.5, FCOXⅢ=6.51, P<0.05). The protein levels of COX Ⅰ and COX Ⅱ were enhanced during 4-72 h and 8-72 h respectively after 5 Gy irradiation (FCOXⅠ=14.68,FCOXⅡ=17.18, FCOXⅢ =2.52, P<0.05). The activities of COX were lowered at different dose levels and different time-points. Conclusions: Ionizing radiation might induce the changes in mitochondrial COX Ⅰ, COX Ⅱ and COX Ⅲ gene expression, and lead to the reduction of the COX activities. (authors)

  7. Genome-wide and functional annotation of human E3 ubiquitin ligases identifies MULAN, a mitochondrial E3 that regulates the organelle's dynamics and signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Specificity of protein ubiquitylation is conferred by E3 ubiquitin (Ub ligases. We have annotated approximately 617 putative E3s and substrate-recognition subunits of E3 complexes encoded in the human genome. The limited knowledge of the function of members of the large E3 superfamily prompted us to generate genome-wide E3 cDNA and RNAi expression libraries designed for functional screening. An imaging-based screen using these libraries to identify E3s that regulate mitochondrial dynamics uncovered MULAN/FLJ12875, a RING finger protein whose ectopic expression and knockdown both interfered with mitochondrial trafficking and morphology. We found that MULAN is a mitochondrial protein - two transmembrane domains mediate its localization to the organelle's outer membrane. MULAN is oriented such that its E3-active, C-terminal RING finger is exposed to the cytosol, where it has access to other components of the Ub system. Both an intact RING finger and the correct subcellular localization were required for regulation of mitochondrial dynamics, suggesting that MULAN's downstream effectors are proteins that are either integral to, or associated with, mitochondria and that become modified with Ub. Interestingly, MULAN had previously been identified as an activator of NF-kappaB, thus providing a link between mitochondrial dynamics and mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling. These findings suggest the existence of a new, Ub-mediated mechanism responsible for integration of mitochondria into the cellular environment.

  8. Nucleus accumbens deep-brain stimulation efficacy in ACTH-pretreated rats: alterations in mitochondrial function relate to antidepressant-like effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y; McGee, S; Czeczor, J K; Walker, A J; Kale, R P; Kouzani, A Z; Walder, K; Berk, M; Tye, S J

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has a critical role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and treatment response. To investigate this, we established an animal model exhibiting a state of antidepressant treatment resistance in male Wistar rats using 21 days of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration (100 μg per day). First, the effect of ACTH treatment on the efficacy of imipramine (10 mg kg−1) was investigated alongside its effect on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) mitochondrial function. Second, we examined the mood-regulatory actions of chronic (7 day) high-frequency nucleus accumbens (NAc) deep-brain stimulation (DBS; 130 Hz, 100 μA, 90 μS) and concomitant PFC mitochondrial function. Antidepressant-like responses were assessed in the open field test (OFT) and forced swim test (FST) for both conditions. ACTH pretreatment prevented imipramine-mediated improvement in mobility during the FST (Panimals (Panimals (P>0.05). Analyses of PFC mitochondrial function revealed that ACTH-treated animals had decreased capacity for adenosine triphosphate production compared with controls. In contrast, ACTH animals following NAc DBS demonstrated greater mitochondrial function relative to controls. Interestingly, a proportion (30%) of the ACTH-treated animals exhibited heightened locomotor activity in the OFT and exaggerated escape behaviors during the FST, together with general hyperactivity in their home-cage settings. More importantly, the induction of this mania-like phenotype was accompanied by overcompensative increased mitochondrial respiration. Manifestation of a DBS-induced mania-like phenotype in imipramine-resistant animals highlights the potential use of this model in elucidating mechanisms of mood dysregulation. PMID:27327257

  9. Nucleus accumbens deep-brain stimulation efficacy in ACTH-pretreated rats: alterations in mitochondrial function relate to antidepressant-like effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y; McGee, S; Czeczor, J K; Walker, A J; Kale, R P; Kouzani, A Z; Walder, K; Berk, M; Tye, S J

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has a critical role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and treatment response. To investigate this, we established an animal model exhibiting a state of antidepressant treatment resistance in male Wistar rats using 21 days of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration (100 μg per day). First, the effect of ACTH treatment on the efficacy of imipramine (10 mg kg(-1)) was investigated alongside its effect on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) mitochondrial function. Second, we examined the mood-regulatory actions of chronic (7 day) high-frequency nucleus accumbens (NAc) deep-brain stimulation (DBS; 130 Hz, 100 μA, 90 μS) and concomitant PFC mitochondrial function. Antidepressant-like responses were assessed in the open field test (OFT) and forced swim test (FST) for both conditions. ACTH pretreatment prevented imipramine-mediated improvement in mobility during the FST (Panimals (Panimals (P>0.05). Analyses of PFC mitochondrial function revealed that ACTH-treated animals had decreased capacity for adenosine triphosphate production compared with controls. In contrast, ACTH animals following NAc DBS demonstrated greater mitochondrial function relative to controls. Interestingly, a proportion (30%) of the ACTH-treated animals exhibited heightened locomotor activity in the OFT and exaggerated escape behaviors during the FST, together with general hyperactivity in their home-cage settings. More importantly, the induction of this mania-like phenotype was accompanied by overcompensative increased mitochondrial respiration. Manifestation of a DBS-induced mania-like phenotype in imipramine-resistant animals highlights the potential use of this model in elucidating mechanisms of mood dysregulation. PMID:27327257

  10. Effect of p53 on mitochondrial morphology, import, and assembly in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Saleem, Ayesha; Iqbal, Sobia; Zhang, Yuan; Hood, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether p53 regulates mitochondrial function via changes in mitochondrial protein import, complex IV (COX) assembly, or the expression of key proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics and degradation. Mitochondria from p53 KO mice displayed ultra-structural alterations and were more punctate in appearance. This was accompanied by protein-specific alterations in fission, fusion, and mitophagy-related proteins. However, matrix-destined protein impo...

  11. Decreased placental mitochondrial DNA-content in response to air pollution during in utero life

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, Bram; Pieters, Nicky; Munters, Elke; Smeets, Karen; Cuypers, Ann; Penders, Joris; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Gyselaers, Wilfried; Nawrot, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the importance of PM, and its associated metal components, in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation. Mitochondria are the major intracellular sources and primary targets of ROS. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is particularly vulnerable to ROS-induced damage, resulting in a higher mutation rate that impacts mitochondrial function. Given its multiple essential roles in metabolic pathways, mitochondrial dysfunction (i.e. change in mtDNA-content...

  12. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Amy E; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  13. Early changes in costameric and mitochondrial protein expression with unloading are muscle specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flück, Martin; Li, Ruowei; Valdivieso, Paola; Linnehan, Richard M; Castells, Josiane; Tesch, Per; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesised that load-sensitive expression of costameric proteins, which hold the sarcomere in place and position the mitochondria, contributes to the early adaptations of antigravity muscle to unloading and would depend on muscle fibre composition and chymotrypsin activity of the proteasome. Biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis (VL) and soleus (SOL) muscles of eight men before and after 3 days of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) and subjected to fibre typing and measures for costameric (FAK and FRNK), mitochondrial (NDUFA9, SDHA, UQCRC1, UCP3, and ATP5A1), and MHCI protein and RNA content. Mean cross-sectional area (MCSA) of types I and II muscle fibres in VL and type I fibres in SOL demonstrated a trend for a reduction after ULLS (0.05 ≤ P < 0.10). FAK phosphorylation at tyrosine 397 showed a 20% reduction in VL muscle (P = 0.029). SOL muscle demonstrated a specific reduction in UCP3 content (-23%; P = 0.012). Muscle-specific effects of ULLS were identified for linear relationships between measured proteins, chymotrypsin activity and fibre MCSA. The molecular modifications in costamere turnover and energy homoeostasis identify that aspects of atrophy and fibre transformation are detectable at the protein level in weight-bearing muscles within 3 days of unloading. PMID:25313365

  14. ω-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids prevent pressure overload-induced ventricular dilation and decrease in mitochondrial enzymes despite no change in adiponectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Shea Karen M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathological left ventricular (LV hypertrophy frequently progresses to dilated heart failure with suppressed mitochondrial oxidative capacity. Dietary marine ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA up-regulate adiponectin and prevent LV dilation in rats subjected to pressure overload. This study 1 assessed the effects of ω-3 PUFA on LV dilation and down-regulation of mitochondrial enzymes in response to pressure overload; and 2 evaluated the role of adiponectin in mediating the effects of ω-3 PUFA in heart. Methods Wild type (WT and adiponectin-/- mice underwent transverse aortic constriction (TAC and were fed standard chow ± ω-3 PUFA for 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, echocardiography was performed to assess LV function, mice were terminated, and mitochondrial enzyme activities were evaluated. Results TAC induced similar pathological LV hypertrophy compared to sham mice in both strains on both diets. In WT mice TAC increased LV systolic and diastolic volumes and reduced mitochondrial enzyme activities, which were attenuated by ω-3 PUFA without increasing adiponectin. In contrast, adiponectin-/- mice displayed no increase in LV end diastolic and systolic volumes or decrease in mitochondrial enzymes with TAC, and did not respond to ω-3 PUFA. Conclusion These findings suggest ω-3 PUFA attenuates cardiac pathology in response to pressure overload independent of an elevation in adiponectin.

  15. 2,2',4,4'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether injures cell viability and mitochondrial function of mouse spermatocytes by decreasing mitochondrial proteins Atp5b and Uqcrc1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaoping; Wang, Jing; Cui, Yiqiang

    2016-09-01

    Our object was to explore direct effects and mechanism of BDE47 on GC2 (immortalized mouse spermatocyte). GC2 were exposed to DMSO, 0.1, 1, 10, 100μM BDE47 for 48h. Cell viability was detected by trypan-blue exclusion; ultrastructure by electron-microscopy; cell cycle, mitochondrial membrane motential (MMP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) by flow-cytometry; ATP production by luminometer; Atp5b, Uqcrc1, Bcl-2 level by WB. To explore whether the decreased mitochondrial proteins play an important role in apoptosis, MMP and apoptosis were detected after Atp5b or Uqcrc1 knockdown in GC2. Results showed BDE47 reduced cell viability, caused condensation of nuclear and vacuolated mitochondria, decreased MMP and ATP, induced ROS, cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phase, reduced Atp5b, Uqcrc1, Bcl-2 in GC2. Knockdown of Atp5b or Uqcrc1 decreased MMP, induced apoptosis in GC2. Results suggested that BDE47 reduced cell viability, injured mitochondria in spermatocytes probably by decreasing mitochondrial protein Atp5b and Uqcrc1. PMID:27525561

  16. Change and Significance of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongwen Liu; Zhihua Zhao; Qiumin Zhao; Shenglei Li; Dongling Gao; Xia Pang; Kuisheng Chen; Yunhan Zhang

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the differences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)copies among the tissues of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC),para-neoplastic tissue and normal mucous membrane of the esophagus,and to study the relationship between the mtDNA and the occurrence and development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.METHODS The mtDNA copies of 42 specimens with the ESCC,paraneoplastic mucous tissue and normal mucous membrane of the esophagus were determined using real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR.The mtDNA was analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis.RESULTS The mtDNA from all of the tissues (42/42) from the ESCC,para-neoplastic tissue and normal esophageal mucous membranes was analyzed.showing thal there were an average mtDNA copy number of 27.1894x106 μg DNA.9.4102x106 μg DNA and 5.9347x106 μg DNA,from the respective tissues.There were significant differences (F=27.83,P<0.05) in mtDNA copy number among the three.A positive band was shown at 403 bp after qel electrophoresis of the PCR products.and the lane where the ESCC mtDNA located was rather bright.which was in accordance with the result of the real-time PCR determination.CONCLUSION An increase in the mtDNA copy number is related to the occurrence and development of ESCC.

  17. Loss-of-function mutations in MGME1 impair mtDNA replication and cause multi-systemic mitochondrial disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kornblum, Cornelia; Nicholls, Thomas J.; Haack, Tobias B.; Schöler, Susanne; Peeva, Viktoriya; Danhauser, Katharina; Hallmann, Kerstin; Zsurka, Gábor; Rorbach, Joanna; Iuso, Arcangela; Wieland, Thomas; Sciacco, Monica; Ronchi, Dario; Comi, Giacomo P; Moggio, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Known disease mechanisms in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance disorders alter either the mitochondrial replication machinery (POLG1, POLG22 and C10orf23) or the biosynthesis pathways of deoxyribonucleoside 5′-triphosphates for mtDNA synthesis4–11. However, in many of these disorders, the underlying genetic defect has not yet been discovered. Here, we identified homozygous nonsense and missense mutations in the orphan gene C20orf72 in three families with a mitochondrial syndrome characteri...

  18. Structural and Functional Studies of the Mitochondrial Cysteine Desulfurase from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valeria R; Turowski; Maria V.Busi; Diego F.Gomez-Casati

    2012-01-01

    AtNfs1 is the Arabidopsis thaliana mitochondrial homolog of the bacterial cysteine desulfurases NifS and lscS,having an essential role in cellular Fe-S cluster assembly.Homology modeling of AtNfs1m predicts a high global similarity with E.coli IscS showing a full conservation of residues involved in the catalytic site,whereas the chloroplastic AtNfs2 is more similar to the Synechocystis sp.SufS.Pull-down assays showed that the recombinant mature form,AtNfs1m,specifically binds to Arabidopsis frataxin (AtFH).A hysteretic behavior,with a lag phase of several minutes,was observed and hysteretic parameters were affected by pre-incubation with AtFH.Moreover,AtFH modulates AtNfs1m kinetics,increasing Vmax and decreasing the S0.5 value for cysteine.Results suggest that AtFH plays an important role in the early steps of Fe-S cluster formation by regulating AtNfs1 activity in olant mitochondria.

  19. Origins and functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Young Seok; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Gerstung, Moritz; Martincorena, Inigo; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Davies, Helen R; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Gundem, Gunes; Shlien, Adam; Bolli, Niccolo; Behjati, Sam; Tarpey, Patrick S; Nangalia, Jyoti; Massie, Charles E; Butler, Adam P; Teague, Jon W; Vassiliou, George S; Green, Anthony R; Du, Ming-Qing; Unnikrishnan, Ashwin; Pimanda, John E; Teh, Bin Tean; Munshi, Nikhil; Greaves, Mel; Vyas, Paresh; El-Naggar, Adel K; Santarius, Tom; Collins, V Peter; Grundy, Richard; Taylor, Jack A; Hayes, D Neil; Malkin, David; Foster, Christopher S; Warren, Anne Y; Whitaker, Hayley C; Brewer, Daniel; Eeles, Rosalind; Cooper, Colin; Neal, David; Visakorpi, Tapio; Isaacs, William B; Bova, G Steven; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Futreal, P Andrew; Lynch, Andy G; Chinnery, Patrick F; McDermott, Ultan; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Recent sequencing studies have extensively explored the somatic alterations present in the nuclear genomes of cancers. Although mitochondria control energy metabolism and apoptosis, the origins and impact of cancer-associated mutations in mtDNA are unclear. In this study, we analyzed somatic alterations in mtDNA from 1675 tumors. We identified 1907 somatic substitutions, which exhibited dramatic replicative strand bias, predominantly C > T and A > G on the mitochondrial heavy strand. This strand-asymmetric signature differs from those found in nuclear cancer genomes but matches the inferred germline process shaping primate mtDNA sequence content. A number of mtDNA mutations showed considerable heterogeneity across tumor types. Missense mutations were selectively neutral and often gradually drifted towards homoplasmy over time. In contrast, mutations resulting in protein truncation undergo negative selection and were almost exclusively heteroplasmic. Our findings indicate that the endogenous mutational mechanism has far greater impact than any other external mutagens in mitochondria and is fundamentally linked to mtDNA replication. PMID:25271376

  20. Mitochondrial function and tissue vitality: bench-to-bedside real-time optical monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayevsky, Avraham; Walden, Raphael; Pewzner, Eliyahu; Deutsch, Assaf; Heldenberg, Eitan; Lavee, Jacob; Tager, Salis; Kachel, Erez; Raanani, Ehud; Preisman, Sergey; Glauber, Violete; Segal, Eran

    2011-06-01

    Background: The involvement of mitochondria in pathological states, such as neurodegenerative diseases, sepsis, stroke, and cancer, are well documented. Monitoring of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence in vivo as an intracellular oxygen indicator was established in 1950 to 1970 by Britton Chance and collaborators. We use a multiparametric monitoring system enabling assessment of tissue vitality. In order to use this technology in clinical practice, the commercial developed device, the CritiView (CRV), is tested in animal models as well as in patients. Methods and Results: The new CRV enables the optical monitoring of four different parameters, representing the energy balance of various tissues in vivo. Mitochondrial NADH is measured by surface fluorometry/reflectometry. In addition, tissue microcirculatory blood flow, tissue reflectance and oxygenation are measured as well. The device is tested both in vitro and in vivo in a small animal model and in preliminary clinical trials in patients undergoing vascular or open heart surgery. In patients, the monitoring is started immediately after the insertion of a three-way Foley catheter (urine collection) to the patient and is stopped when the patient is discharged from the operating room. The results show that monitoring the urethral wall vitality provides information in correlation to the surgical procedure performed.

  1. Alpha-lipoic acid attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced insulin resistance by improving mitochondrial function in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lin; Zhu, Yiwei; Gao, Wenwen; Du, Xiliang; Zhang, Min; Peng, Zhicheng; Fu, Shoupeng; Li, Xiaobing; Zhe, Wang; Li, Xinwei; Liu, Guowen

    2016-10-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) has been reported to have beneficial effects for improving insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of the beneficial effects remains poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are considered causal factors that induce insulin resistance. In this study, we investigated the effect of ALA on the modulation of insulin resistance in ER-stressed HepG2 cells, and we explored the potential mechanism of this effect. HepG2 cells were incubated with tunicamycin (Tun) for 6h to establish an ER stress cell model. Tun treatment induced ER stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Interestingly, ALA had no significant effect on ER stress signals. Pretreatment of the ER stress cell model with ALA for 24h improved insulin sensitivity, restored the expression levels of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes and increased intracellular ATP production. Moreover, ALA augmented the β-oxidation capacity of the mitochondria. Importantly, ALA treatment could decrease oligomycin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and then improved insulin resistance. Taken together, our data suggest that ALA prevents ER stress-induced insulin resistance by enhancing mitochondrial function. PMID:27377964

  2. Changes in base composition bias of nuclear and mitochondrial genes in lice (Insecta: Psocodea).

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshizawa, Kazunori; Johnson, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    While it is well known that changes in the general processes of molecular evolution have occurred on a variety of timescales, the mechanisms underlying these changes are less well understood. Parasitic lice ("Phthiraptera") and their close relatives (infraorder Nanopsocetae of the insect order Psocodea) are a group of insects well known for their unusual features of molecular evolution. We examined changes in base composition across parasitic lice and bark lice. We identified substantial diff...

  3. Exercise induces mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q; Wu, Y; Zhang, P; Sha, H; Jia, J; Hu, Y; Zhu, J

    2012-03-15

    Stroke is a major cause of death worldwide. Previous studies have suggested both exercise and mitochondrial biogenesis contribute to improved post-ischemic recovery of brain function. However, the exact mechanism underlying this effect is unclear. On the other hand, the benefit of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in brain has been confirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine whether treadmill exercise induces functional improvement through regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia. We subjected adult male rats to ischemia, followed by either treadmill exercise or non-exercise and analyzed the effect of exercise on the amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors, and mitochondrial protein. In the ischemia-exercise group, only peroxisome proliferator activated receptor coactivator-1 (PGC-1) expression was increased significantly after 3 days of treadmill training. However, after 7 days of training, the levels of mtDNA, nuclear respiratory factor 1, NRF-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, and the mitochondrial protein cytochrome C oxidase subunit IV (COXIV) and heat shock protein-60 (HSP60) also increased above levels observed in non-exercised ischemic animals. These changes followed with significant changes in behavioral scores and cerebral infarct volume. The results indicate that exercise can promote mitochondrial biogenesis after ischemic injury, which may serve as a novel component of exercise-induced repair mechanisms of the brain. Understanding the molecular basis for exercise-induced neuroprotection may be beneficial in the development of therapeutic approaches for brain recovery from the ischemic injury. Based upon our findings, stimulation or enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis may prove a novel neuroprotective strategy in the future. PMID:22266265

  4. Mitochondrial haplogroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Schwartz, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G;

    2008-01-01

    Rare mutations in the mitochondrial genome may cause disease. Mitochondrial haplogroups defined by common polymorphisms have been associated with risk of disease and longevity. We tested the hypothesis that common haplogroups predict risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease, morbidity from other...

  5. Far-infrared radiation protects viability in a cell model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia by preventing polyQ protein accumulation and improving mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Hoel, Fredrik; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liu, Ko-Hung; Hsieh, Mingli; Hoel, August; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Yan, Kuo-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Wei-Yong; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Su, Shih-Li; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-01-01

    Far infrared radiation (FIR) is currently investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy in various diseases though the mechanism is unknown. Presently, we tested if FIR mediates beneficial effects in a cell model of the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). SCA3 is caused by a mutation leading to an abnormal polyglutamine expansion (PolyQ) in ataxin-3 protein. The consequent aggregation of mutant ataxin-3 results in disruption of vital cell functions. In this study, neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) was transduced to express either non-pathogenic ataxin-3-26Q or pathogenic ataxin-3-78Q proteins. The cells expressing ataxin-3-78Q demonstrated decreased viability, and increased sensitivity to metabolic stress in the presence rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. FIR exposure was found to protect against these effects. Moreover, FIR improved mitochondrial respiratory function, which was significantly compromised in ataxin-3-78Q and ataxin-3-26Q expressing cells. This was accompanied by decreased levels of mitochondrial fragmentation in FIR treated cells, as observed by fluorescence microscopy and protein expression analysis. Finally, the expression profile LC3-II, Beclin-1 and p62 suggested that FIR prevent the autophagy inhibiting effects observed in ataxin-3-78Q expressing cells. In summary, our results suggest that FIR have rescuing effects in cells expressing mutated pathogenic ataxin-3, through recovery of mitochondrial function and autophagy. PMID:27469193

  6. Far-infrared radiation protects viability in a cell model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia by preventing polyQ protein accumulation and improving mitochondrial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Hoel, Fredrik; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liu, Ko-Hung; Hsieh, Mingli; Hoel, August; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Yan, Kuo-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Wei-Yong; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Su, Shih-Li; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-01-01

    Far infrared radiation (FIR) is currently investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy in various diseases though the mechanism is unknown. Presently, we tested if FIR mediates beneficial effects in a cell model of the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). SCA3 is caused by a mutation leading to an abnormal polyglutamine expansion (PolyQ) in ataxin-3 protein. The consequent aggregation of mutant ataxin-3 results in disruption of vital cell functions. In this study, neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) was transduced to express either non-pathogenic ataxin-3-26Q or pathogenic ataxin-3-78Q proteins. The cells expressing ataxin-3-78Q demonstrated decreased viability, and increased sensitivity to metabolic stress in the presence rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. FIR exposure was found to protect against these effects. Moreover, FIR improved mitochondrial respiratory function, which was significantly compromised in ataxin-3-78Q and ataxin-3-26Q expressing cells. This was accompanied by decreased levels of mitochondrial fragmentation in FIR treated cells, as observed by fluorescence microscopy and protein expression analysis. Finally, the expression profile LC3-II, Beclin-1 and p62 suggested that FIR prevent the autophagy inhibiting effects observed in ataxin-3-78Q expressing cells. In summary, our results suggest that FIR have rescuing effects in cells expressing mutated pathogenic ataxin-3, through recovery of mitochondrial function and autophagy. PMID:27469193

  7. The profound effects of microcystin on cardiac antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial function and cardiac toxicity in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deaths from microcystin toxication have widely been attributed to hypovolemic shock due to hepatic interstitial hemorrhage, while some recent studies suggest that cardiogenic complication is also involved. So far, information on cardiotoxic effects of MC has been rare and the underlying mechanism is still puzzling. The present study examined toxic effects of microcystins on heart muscle of rats intravenously injected with extracted MC at two doses, 0.16LD50 (14 μg MC-LReq kg-1 body weight) and 1LD50 (87 μg MC-LReq kg-1 body weight). In the dead rats, both TTC staining and maximum elevations of troponin I levels confirmed myocardial infarction after MC exposure, besides a serious interstitial hemorrhage in liver. In the 1LD50 dose group, the coincident falls in heart rate and blood pressure were related to mitochondria dysfunction in heart, while increases in creatine kinase and troponin I levels indicated cardiac cell injury. The corresponding pathological alterations were mainly characterized as loss of adherence between cardiac myocytes and swollen or ruptured mitochondria at the ultrastructural level. MC administration at a dose of 1LD50 not only enhanced activities and up-regulated mRNA transcription levels of antioxidant enzymes, but also increased GSH content. At both doses, level of lipid peroxides increased obviously, suggesting serious oxidative stress in mitochondria. Simultaneously, complex I and III were significantly inhibited, indicating blocks in electron flow along the mitochondrial respiratory chain in heart. In conclusion, the findings of this study implicate a role for MC-induced cardiotoxicity as a potential factor that should be considered when evaluating the mechanisms of death associated with microcystin intoxication in Brazil

  8. Reference change values and power functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias Canadell, Natàlia; Hyltoft Petersen, Per; Jensen, Esther;

    2004-01-01

    Repeated samplings and measurements in the monitoring of patients to look for changes are common clinical problems. The "reference change value", calculated as zp x [2 x (CVI2 + CVA2)](1/2), where zp is the z-statistic and CVI and CVA are within-subject and analytical coefficients of variation...

  9. Real-time monitoring of metabolic function in liver-on-chip microdevices tracks the dynamics of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavli, Danny; Prill, Sebastian; Ezra, Elishai; Levy, Gahl; Cohen, Merav; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanfleteren, Jan; Jaeger, Magnus; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2016-04-19

    Microfluidic organ-on-a-chip technology aims to replace animal toxicity testing, but thus far has demonstrated few advantages over traditional methods. Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of chemical and pharmaceutical toxicity, as well as pluripotency and disease processes. However, current methods to evaluate mitochondrial activity still rely on end-point assays, resulting in limited kinetic and prognostic information. Here, we present a liver-on-chip device capable of maintaining human tissue for over a month in vitro under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiration was monitored in real time using two-frequency phase modulation of tissue-embedded phosphorescent microprobes. A computer-controlled microfluidic switchboard allowed contiguous electrochemical measurements of glucose and lactate, providing real-time analysis of minute shifts from oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolysis, an early indication of mitochondrial stress. We quantify the dynamics of cellular adaptation to mitochondrial damage and the resulting redistribution of ATP production during rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and troglitazone (Rezulin)-induced mitochondrial stress. We show troglitazone shifts metabolic fluxes at concentrations previously regarded as safe, suggesting a mechanism for its observed idiosyncratic effect. Our microfluidic platform reveals the dynamics and strategies of cellular adaptation to mitochondrial damage, a unique advantage of organ-on-chip technology. PMID:27044092

  10. Metformin impairs mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of both lean and diabetic rats in a dose-dependent manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, Bart; Ciapaite, Jolita; van den Broek, Nicole M. A.; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J.

    2014-01-01

    Metformin is a widely prescribed drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have demonstrated in vitro that metformin specifically inhibits Complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This seems contraindicative since muscle mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pat

  11. Mitochondrial DNA indicates late pleistocene divergence of populations of Heteronympha merope, an emerging model in environmental change biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Norgate

    Full Text Available Knowledge of historical changes in species range distribution provides context for investigating adaptive potential and dispersal ability. This is valuable for predicting the potential impact of environmental change on species of interest. Butterflies are one of the most important taxa for studying such impacts, and Heteronympha merope has the potential to provide a particularly valuable model, in part due to the existence of historical data on morphological traits and glycolytic enzyme variation. This study investigates the population genetic structure and phylogeography of H. merope, comparing the relative resolution achieved through partial DNA sequences of two mitochondrial loci, COI and ND5. These data are used to define the relationship between subspecies, showing that the subspecies are reciprocally monophyletic. On this basis, the Western Australian subspecies H. m. duboulayi is genetically distinct from the two eastern subspecies. Throughout the eastern part of the range, levels of migration and the timing of key population splits of potential relevance to climatic adaptation are estimated and indicate Late Pleistocene divergence both of the Tasmanian subspecies and of an isolated northern population from the eastern mainland subspecies H. m. merope. This information is then used to revisit historical data and provides support for the importance of clinal variation in wing characters, as well as evidence for selective pressure acting on allozyme loci phosphoglucose isomerase and phosphoglucomutase in H. merope. The study has thus confirmed the value of H. merope as a model organism for measuring responses to environmental change, offering the opportunity to focus on isolated populations, as well as a latitudinal gradient, and to use historical changes to test the accuracy of predictions for the future.

  12. Functional innovation from changes in protein domains and their combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    Domains are the functional building blocks of proteins. In this work we discuss how domains can contribute to the evolution of new functions. Domains themselves can evolve through various mechanisms, altering their intrinsic function. Domains can also facilitate functional innovations by combining with other domains to make novel proteins. We discuss the mechanisms by which domain and domain combinations support functional innovations. We highlight interesting examples where changes in domain combination promote changes at the domain level. PMID:27309309

  13. Gene expression changes of single skeletal muscle fibers in response to modulation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chemello

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU gene codifies for the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM channel responsible for mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Cytosolic Ca2+ transients are involved in sarcomere contraction through cycles of release and storage in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition cytosolic Ca2+ regulates various signaling cascades that eventually lead to gene expression reprogramming. Mitochondria are strategically placed in close contact with the ER/SR, thus cytosolic Ca2+ transients elicit large increases in the [Ca2+] of the mitochondrial matrix ([Ca2+]mt. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake regulates energy production and cell survival. In addition, we recently showed that MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake controls skeletal muscle trophism. In the same report, we dissected the effects of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake on gene expression through microarray gene expression analysis upon modulation of MCU expression by in vivo AAV infection. Analyses were performed on single skeletal muscle fibers at two time points (7 and 14 days post-AAV injection. Raw and normalized data are available on the GEO database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (GSE60931.

  14. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    OpenAIRE

    Richter-Dennerlein, R.; Dennerlein Sven, S.; Rehling, P

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial- encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisin...

  15. A mitochondrially targeted compound delays aging in yeast through a mechanism linking mitochondrial membrane lipid metabolism to mitochondrial redox biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle T. Burstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study revealed a mechanism of delaying aging in yeast by a natural compound which specifically impacts mitochondrial redox processes. In this mechanism, exogenously added lithocholic bile acid enters yeast cells, accumulates mainly in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and elicits an age-related remodeling of phospholipid synthesis and movement within both mitochondrial membranes. Such remodeling of mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics progresses with the chronological age of a yeast cell and ultimately causes significant changes in mitochondrial membrane lipidome. These changes in the composition of membrane phospholipids alter mitochondrial abundance and morphology, thereby triggering changes in the age-related chronology of such longevity-defining redox processes as mitochondrial respiration, the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, the preservation of cellular homeostasis of mitochondrially produced reactive oxygen species, and the coupling of electron transport to ATP synthesis.

  16. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter-Dennerlein, Ricarda; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial-encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisingly, found to act as regulators of mitochondrial translation. In turn, translation in mitochondria controls cellular proliferation, and mitochondrial ribosomal subunits contribute to the cytoplasmic stress response. Thus, translation in mitochondria is apparently integrated into cellular processes. PMID:26535422

  17. Mitochondrial membranes with mono- and divalent salt: changes induced by salt ions on structure and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pöyry, Sanja; Róg, Tomasz; Karttunen, Mikko;

    2009-01-01

    membrane electrostatic potential. The changes induced by salt are more prominent in dynamical properties related to ion binding and formation of ion-lipid complexes and lipid aggregates, as rotational diffusion of lipids is slowed down by ions, especially in the case of CaCl(2). In the same spirit, lateral...... diffusion of lipids is slowed down rather considerably for increasing concentration of CaCl(2). Both findings for dynamic properties can be traced to the binding of ions with lipid head groups and the related changes in interaction patterns in the headgroup region, where the binding of Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions...

  18. Pervasive survival of expressed mitochondrial rps14 pseudogenes in grasses and their relatives for 80 million years following three functional transfers to the nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer Jeffrey D

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many mitochondrial genes, especially ribosomal protein genes, have been frequently transferred as functional entities to the nucleus during plant evolution, often by an RNA-mediated process. A notable case of transfer involves the rps14 gene of three grasses (rice, maize, and wheat, which has been relocated to the intron of the nuclear sdh2 gene and which is expressed and targeted to the mitochondrion via alternative splicing and usage of the sdh2 targeting peptide. Although this transfer occurred at least 50 million years ago, i.e., in a common ancestor of these three grasses, it is striking that expressed, nearly intact pseudogenes of rps14 are retained in the mitochondrial genomes of both rice and wheat. To determine how ancient this transfer is, the extent to which mitochondrial rps14 has been retained and is expressed in grasses, and whether other transfers of rps14 have occurred in grasses and their relatives, we investigated the structure, expression, and phylogeny of mitochondrial and nuclear rps14 genes from 32 additional genera of grasses and from 9 other members of the Poales. Results Filter hybridization experiments showed that rps14 sequences are present in the mitochondrial genomes of all examined Poales except for members of the grass subfamily Panicoideae (to which maize belongs. However, PCR amplification and sequencing revealed that the mitochondrial rps14 genes of all examined grasses (Poaceae, Cyperaceae, and Joinvilleaceae are pseudogenes, with all those from the Poaceae sharing two 4-NT frameshift deletions and all those from the Cyperaceae sharing a 5-NT insertion (only one member of the Joinvilleaceae was examined. cDNA analysis showed that all mitochondrial pseudogenes examined (from all three families are transcribed, that most are RNA edited, and that surprisingly many of the edits are reverse (U→C edits. Putatively nuclear copies of rps14 were isolated from one to several members of each of these

  19. Understanding the cost of change Function: A basis for using an effective small step change strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Peter A.; Basheer M. Khumawala

    2005-01-01

    This paper develops the cost of change function under the Continuous Improvement (CI) paradigm advocated by quality gurus such as Deming, Taguchi, and Shingo. CI is considered to be focusing on "frame bending" or minor changes while Organizational Change (OC) is considered to be focusing on "frame breaking " or major changes. The cost of change function is modified to be a discrete function incorporating a "monitoring" cost component and a "doing" cost element, which leads to a better underst...

  20. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Diabetes: From Molecular Mechanisms to Functional Significance and Therapeutic Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    William I Sivitz; Yorek, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Given their essential function in aerobic metabolism, mitochondria are intuitively of interest in regard to the pathophysiology of diabetes. Qualitative, quantitative, and functional perturbations in mitochondria have been identified and affect the cause and complications of diabetes. Moreover, as a consequence of fuel oxidation, mitochondria generate considerable reactive oxygen species (ROS). Evidence is accumulating that these radicals per se are important in the pathophysiology of diabete...

  1. A unique horizontal gene transfer event has provided the octocoral mitochondrial genome with an active mismatch repair gene that has potential for an unusual self-contained function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilewitch Jaret P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitochondrial genome of the Octocorallia has several characteristics atypical for metazoans, including a novel gene suggested to function in DNA repair. This mtMutS gene is favored for octocoral molecular systematics, due to its high information content. Several hypotheses concerning the origins of mtMutS have been proposed, and remain equivocal, although current weight of support is for a horizontal gene transfer from either an epsilonproteobacterium or a large DNA virus. Here we present new and compelling evidence on the evolutionary origin of mtMutS, and provide the very first data on its activity, functional capacity and stability within the octocoral mitochondrial genome. Results The mtMutS gene has the expected conserved amino acids, protein domains and predicted tertiary protein structure. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that mtMutS is not a member of the MSH family and therefore not of eukaryotic origin. MtMutS clusters closely with representatives of the MutS7 lineage; further support for this relationship derives from the sharing of a C-terminal endonuclease domain that confers a self-contained mismatch repair function. Gene expression analyses confirm that mtMutS is actively transcribed in octocorals. Rates of mitochondrial gene evolution in mtMutS-containing octocorals are lower than in their hexacoral sister-group, which lacks the gene, although paradoxically the mtMutS gene itself has higher rates of mutation than other octocoral mitochondrial genes. Conclusions The octocoral mtMutS gene is active and codes for a protein with all the necessary components for DNA mismatch repair. A lower rate of mitochondrial evolution, and the presence of a nicking endonuclease domain, both indirectly support a theory of self-sufficient DNA mismatch repair within the octocoral mitochondrion. The ancestral affinity of mtMutS to non-eukaryotic MutS7 provides compelling support for an origin by horizontal gene transfer. The

  2. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in human hepatoma cells exposed to stavudine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxicity of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) is linked to altered mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and subsequent disruption of cellular energetics. This manifests clinically as elevated concentrations of lactate in plasma. The mechanism(s) underlying how the changes in mtDNA replication lead to lactic acidosis remains unclear. It is hypothesized that mitochondrial oxidative stress links the changes in mtDNA replication to mitochondrial dysfunction and ensuing NRTIs toxicity. To test this hypothesis, changes in mitochondrial function, mtDNA amplification efficiency, and oxidative stress were assessed in HepG2-cultured human hepatoblasts treated with the NRTI stavudine (2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-deoxythymidine or d4T) for 48 h. d4T produced significant mitochondrial dysfunction with a 1.5-fold increase in cellular lactate to pyruvate ratios. In addition, d4T caused a dose-dependent decrease in mtDNA amplification and a correlative increase in abundance of markers of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Manganese (III) meso-tetrakis (4-benzoic acid) porphyrin, MnTBAP, a catalytic antioxidant, ameliorated or reversed d4T-induced changes in cell injury, energetics, mtDNA amplification, and mitochondrial oxidative stress. In conclusion, d4T treatment elevates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhances mitochondrial oxidative stress, and contributes mechanistically to NRTI-induced toxicity. These deleterious events may be potentiated in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection itself, coinfection (e.g., viral hepatitis), aging, substance, and alcohol use

  3. Human functional neuroimaging of brain changes associated with practice

    OpenAIRE

    GARAVAN, HUGH PATRICK

    2005-01-01

    PUBLISHED The discovery that experience-driven changes in the human brain can occur from a neural to a cortical level throughout the lifespan has stimulated a proliferation of research into how neural function changes in response to experience, enabled by neuroimaging methods such as positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Studies attempt to characterize these changes by examining how practice on a task affects the functional anatomy underlying performance. ...

  4. Induction of Mitochondrial Changes Associated with Oxidative Stress on Very Long Chain Fatty Acids (C22:0, C24:0, or C26:0-Treated Human Neuronal Cells (SK-NB-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Zarrouk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease, lipid alterations point towards peroxisomal dysfunctions. Indeed, a cortical accumulation of saturated very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs: C22:0, C24:0, C26:0, substrates for peroxisomal β-oxidation, has been found in Alzheimer patients. This study was realized to investigate the effects of VLCFAs at the mitochondrial level since mitochondrial dysfunctions play crucial roles in neurodegeneration. On human neuronal SK-NB-E cells treated with C22:0, C24:0, or C26:0 (0.1–20 μM; 48 h, an inhibition of cell growth and mitochondrial dysfunctions were observed by cell counting with trypan blue, MTT assay, and measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm with DiOC6(3. A stimulation of oxidative stress was observed with DHE and MitoSOX used to quantify superoxide anion production on whole cells and at the mitochondrial level, respectively. With C24:0 and C26:0, by Western blotting, lower levels of mitochondrial complexes III and IV were detected. After staining with MitoTracker and by transmission electron microscopy used to study mitochondrial topography, mass and morphology, major changes were detected in VLCFAs treated-cells: modification of the cytoplasmic distribution of mitochondria, presence of large mitochondria, enhancement of the mitochondrial mass. Thus, VLCFAs can be potential risk factors contributing to neurodegeneration by inducing neuronal damages via mitochondrial dysfunctions.

  5. Genomic and Proteomic Profiling Reveals Reduced Mitochondrial Function and Disruption of the Neuromuscular Junction Driving Rat Sarcopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Chick, Joel M.; Kendall, Tracee; Eash, John K.; Li, Christine; Zhang, Yunyu; Vickers, Chad; Wu, Zhidan; Clarke, Brian A; Shi, Jun; Cruz, Joseph; FOURNIER, Brigitte; Brachat, Sophie; Gutzwiller, Sabine; Ma, Qicheng

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, remain unclear. To identify molecular changes that correlated best with sarcopenia and might contribute to its pathogenesis, we determined global gene expression profiles in muscles of rats aged 6, 12, 18, 21, 24, and 27 months. These rats exhibit sarcopenia beginning at 21 months. Correlation of the gene expression versus muscle mass or age changes, and functional annotation analysis identi...

  6. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-κB activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-κB in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: ► Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. ► mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear genes associated with tumorigenesis. ► MMP-9 is up-regulated and

  7. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); Sligh, James E, E-mail: jsligh@azcc.arizona.edu [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  8. 1,4-Dihydropyridines Active on the SIRT1/AMPK Pathway Ameliorate Skin Repair and Mitochondrial Function and Exhibit Inhibition of Proliferation in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Sergio; Mellini, Paolo; Spallotta, Francesco; Carafa, Vincenzo; Nebbioso, Angela; Polletta, Lucia; Carnevale, Ilaria; Saladini, Serena; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Gabellini, Chiara; Tardugno, Maria; Zwergel, Clemens; Cencioni, Chiara; Atlante, Sandra; Moniot, Sébastien; Steegborn, Clemens; Budriesi, Roberta; Tafani, Marco; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Altucci, Lucia; Gaetano, Carlo; Mai, Antonello

    2016-02-25

    Modulators of sirtuins are considered promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of cancer, cardiovascular, metabolic, inflammatory, and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we prepared new 1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs) bearing changes at the C2/C6, C3/C5, C4, or N1 position. Tested with the SIRTainty procedure, some of them displayed increased SIRT1 activation with respect to the prototype 3a, high NO release in HaCat cells, and ameliorated skin repair in a mouse model of wound healing. In C2C12 myoblasts, two of them improved mitochondrial density and functions. All the effects were reverted by coadministration of compound C (9), an AMPK inhibitor, or of EX-527 (10), a SIRT1 inhibitor, highlighting the involvement of the SIRT1/AMPK pathway in the action of DHPs. Finally, tested in a panel of cancer cells, the water-soluble form of 3a, compound 8, displayed antiproliferative effects in the range of 8-35 μM and increased H4K16 deacetylation, suggesting a possible role for SIRT1 activators in cancer therapy. PMID:26689352

  9. Mitochondrial metabolism and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Soo Heon; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Ki‐Up; Lee, Hong Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The oversupply of calories and sedentary lifestyle has resulted in a rapid increase of diabetes prevalence worldwide. During the past two decades, lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Mitochondria are vital to most of the eukaryotic cells as they provide energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate by oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, mitochondrial function is an integral part of glucose‐stimulated insulin...

  10. Elucidating the molecular function of CLUH in mammalian system

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial proteome is composed of both mitochondrial and nuclear encoded proteins. Restructuration of mitochondrial proteome is often required upon on change in nutrient availabilities and stress conditions. To facilitate this process, the nuclear and mitochondrial genome must coordinate their protein expression in a well-concerted manner. Additional factors are present to mediate the coordination. These factors are diverse in function ranging from energy sensing to translation of the...

  11. Mitochondrial vasculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are usually multisystem disorders (mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome) either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course. Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system, the muscle, endocrine glands, or the myocardium. Recently, it has been shown that rarely also the arteries may be affected (mitochondrial arteriopathy). This review focuses on the type, diagnosis, and treatment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients. A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out. Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy. Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy, migraine-like headache, stroke-like episodes, or peripheral retinopathy. Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis, ectasia of arteries, aneurysm formation, dissection, or spontaneous rupture of arteries. The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes. Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes. Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro- or macroangiopathy. Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications. PMID:27231520

  12. A properly configured ring structure is critical for the function of the mitochondrial DNA recombination protein, Mgm101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardozzi, Jonathan D; Wang, Xiaowen; Mbantenkhu, MacMillan; Wilkens, Stephan; Chen, Xin Jie

    2012-10-26

    Mgm101 is a Rad52-type recombination protein of bacteriophage origin required for the repair and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It forms large oligomeric rings of ∼14-fold symmetry that catalyze the annealing of single-stranded DNAs in vitro. In this study, we investigated the structural elements that contribute to this distinctive higher order structural organization and examined its functional implications. A pair of vicinal cysteines, Cys-216 and Cys-217, was found to be essential for mtDNA maintenance. Mutations to the polar serine, the negatively charged aspartic and glutamic acids, and the hydrophobic amino acid alanine all destabilize mtDNA in vivo. The alanine mutants have an increased propensity of forming macroscopic filaments. In contrast, mutations to aspartic acid drastically destabilize the protein and result in unstructured aggregates with severely reduced DNA binding activity. Interestingly, the serine mutants partially disassemble the Mgm101 rings into smaller oligomers. In the case of the C216S mutant, a moderate increase in DNA binding activity was observed. By using small angle x-ray scattering analysis, we found that Mgm101 forms rings of ∼200 Å diameter in solution, consistent with the structure previously established by transmission electron microscopy. We also found that the C216A/C217A double mutant tends to form broken rings, which likely provide free ends for seeding the growth of the super-stable but functionally defective filaments. Taken together, our data underscore the importance of a delicately maintained ring structure critical for Mgm101 activity. We discuss a potential role of Cys-216 and Cys-217 in regulating Mgm101 function and the repair of damaged mtDNA under stress conditions. PMID:22948312

  13. Polyphenol-Rich Strawberry Extract Protects Human Dermal Fibroblasts against Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidative Damage and Improves Mitochondrial Functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Giampieri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Strawberry bioactive compounds are widely known to be powerful antioxidants. In this study, the antioxidant and anti-aging activities of a polyphenol-rich strawberry extract were evaluated using human dermal fibroblasts exposed to H2O2. Firstly, the phenol and flavonoid contents of strawberry extract were studied, as well as the antioxidant capacity. HPLC-DAD analysis was performed to determine the vitamin C and β-carotene concentration, while HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS analysis was used for anthocyanin identification. Strawberry extract presented a high antioxidant capacity, and a relevant concentration of vitamins and phenolics. Pelargonidin- and cyanidin-glycosides were the most representative anthocyanin components of the fruits. Fibroblasts incubated with strawberry extract and stressed with H2O2 showed an increase in cell viability, a smaller intracellular amount of ROS, and a reduction of membrane lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. Strawberry extract was also able to improve mitochondrial functionality, increasing the basal respiration of mitochondria and to promote a regenerative capacity of cells after exposure to pro-oxidant stimuli. These findings confirm that strawberries possess antioxidant properties and provide new insights into the beneficial role of strawberry bioactive compounds on protecting skin from oxidative stress and aging.

  14. Roles of Pyruvate, NADH, and Mitochondrial Complex I in Redox Balance and Imbalance in β Cell Function and Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoting Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β cells not only use glucose as an energy source, but also sense blood glucose levels for insulin secretion. While pyruvate and NADH metabolic pathways are known to be involved in regulating insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation, the roles of many other components along the metabolic pathways remain poorly understood. Such is the case for mitochondrial complex I (NADH/ubiquinone oxidoreductase. It is known that normal complex I function is absolutely required for episodic insulin secretion after a meal, but the role of complex I in β cells in the diabetic pancreas remains to be investigated. In this paper, we review the roles of pyruvate, NADH, and complex I in insulin secretion and hypothesize that complex I plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of β cell dysfunction in the diabetic pancreas. This hypothesis is based on the establishment that chronic hyperglycemia overloads complex I with NADH leading to enhanced complex I production of reactive oxygen species. As nearly all metabolic pathways are impaired in diabetes, understanding how complex I in the β cells copes with elevated levels of NADH in the diabetic pancreas may provide potential therapeutic strategies for diabetes.

  15. Mitochondrial localization, ELK-1 transcriptional regulation and Growth inhibitory functions of BRCA1, BRCA1a and BRCA1b proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniccia, Anna W; Lewis, Catherine; Begum, Nurjahan; Xu, Jingyao; Cui, Jianqi; Chipitsyna, Galina; Aysola, Kartik; Reddy, Vaishali; Bhat, Ganapathy; Fujimura, Yasuo; Henderson, Beric; Reddy, E. Shyam P.; Rao, Veena N.

    2009-01-01

    BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor gene that is mutated in families with breast and ovarian cancer. Several BRCA1 splice variants are found in different tissues, but their subcellular localization and functions are poorly understood at the moment. We previously described BRCA1 splice variant BRCA1a to induce apoptosis and function as a tumor suppressor of triple negative breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. In this study we have analyzed the function of BRCA1 isoforms (BRCA1a and BRCA1b) and compared them to the wild type BRCA1 protein using several criteria like studying expression in normal and tumor cells by RNase protection assays, sub cellular localization/fractionation by immunofluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis, transcription regulation of biological relevant proteins and growth suppression in breast cancer cells. We are demonstrating for the first time that ectopically expressed GFP-tagged BRCA1, BRCA1a, and BRCA1b proteins are localized to the mitochondria, repress ELK-1 transcriptional activity and possess antiproliferative activity on breast cancer cells. These results suggest that the exon 9,10 and 11 sequences (aa 263 – 1365) which contain two nuclear localization signals, p53, Rb, c-Myc, γ- tubulin, Stat, Rad 51, Rad 50 binding domains, angiopoietin-1 repression domain are not absolutely required for mitochondrial localization and growth suppressor function of these proteins. Since mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of cancer, we can speculate that the mitochondrial localization of BRCA1 proteins may be functionally significant in regulating both the mitochondrial DNA damage as well as apoptotic activity of BRCA1 proteins and mislocalization causes cancer. PMID:19170108

  16. In vivo mitochondrial function in HIV-infected persons treated with contemporary anti-retroviral therapy: a magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan A I Payne

    Full Text Available Modern anti-retroviral therapy is highly effective at suppressing viral replication and restoring immune function in HIV-infected persons. However, such individuals show reduced physiological performance and increased frailty compared with age-matched uninfected persons. Contemporary anti-retroviral therapy is thought to be largely free from neuromuscular complications, whereas several anti-retroviral drugs previously in common usage have been associated with mitochondrial toxicity. It has recently been established that patients with prior exposure to such drugs exhibit irreversible cellular and molecular mitochondrial defects. However the functional significance of such damage remains unknown. Here we use phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31P-MRS to measure in vivo muscle mitochondrial oxidative function, in patients treated with contemporary anti-retroviral therapy, and compare with biopsy findings (cytochrome c oxidase (COX histochemistry. We show that dynamic oxidative function (post-exertional ATP (adenosine triphosphate resynthesis was largely maintained in the face of mild to moderate COX defects (affecting up to ∼10% of fibers: τ½ ADP (half-life of adenosine diphosphate clearance, HIV-infected 22.1±9.9 s, HIV-uninfected 18.8±4.4 s, p = 0.09. In contrast, HIV-infected patients had a significant derangement of resting state ATP metabolism compared with controls: ADP/ATP ratio, HIV-infected 1.24±0.08×10(-3, HIV-uninfected 1.16±0.05×10(-3, p = 0.001. These observations are broadly reassuring in that they suggest that in vivo mitochondrial function in patients on contemporary anti-retroviral therapy is largely maintained at the whole organ level, despite histochemical (COX defects within individual cells. Basal energy requirements may nevertheless be increased.

  17. Effect of Dietary Bioactive Compounds on Mitochondrial and Metabolic Flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose C. E. Serrano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic flexibility is the capacity of an organism to adequately respond to changes in the environment, such as nutritional input, energetic demand, etc. An important player in the capacity of adaptation through different stages of metabolic demands is the mitochondrion. In this context, mitochondrial dysfunction has been attributed to be the onset and center of many chronic diseases, which are denoted by an inability to adapt fuel preferences and induce mitochondrial morphological changes to respond to metabolic demands, such as mitochondrial number, structure and function. Several nutritional interventions have shown the capacity to induce changes in mitochondrial biogenesis/degradation, oxidative phosphorylation efficiency, mitochondrial membrane composition, electron transfer chain capacity, etc., in metabolic inflexibility states that may open new target options and mechanisms of action of bioactive compounds for the treatment of metabolic diseases. This review is focused in three well-recognized food bioactive compounds that modulate insulin sensitivity, polyphenols, ω-3 fatty acids and dietary fiber, by several mechanism of action, like caloric restriction properties and inflammatory environment modulation, both closely related to mitochondrial function and dynamics.

  18. Mitochondrial network in glioma's invadopodia displays an activated state both in situ and in vitro: potential functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arismendi-Morillo, Gabriel; Hoa, Neil T; Ge, Lisheng; Jadus, Martin R

    2012-12-01

    glioblastoma multiforme cells has been reported [ 3 , 4 ]. Because of the significant impact of invadopodia in oncological events such as cell invasion and matrix degradation, more insight into structural and molecular aspects is needed [ 2 ]. The dynamic assembly of invadopodia is still not well understood [ 2 ], and little is known of the alterations in mitochondrial structure and function that contribute to cell mobility [ 5 ]. This paper describes two prominent structural features of the mitochondrial network present within the glioma´s invadopodia that we have recently observed. We believe these two features (activated mitochondria and smooth ER, along with mitochondria contained within the filopodia) might provide researchers with possible targets for future therapies that can control glioma invasiveness. PMID:23216239

  19. Changes in cardiopulmonary function induced by nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Erin E; Thompson, Leslie C; Shannahan, Jonathan H; Wingard, Christopher J

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) are highly applicable in a variety of technological and biomedical fields because of their unique physicochemical properties. The increased development and utilization of NP has amplified human exposure and raised concerns regarding their potential to generate toxicity. The biological impacts of NP exposures have been shown to be dependent on aerodynamic size, chemical composition, and the route of exposure (oral, dermal, intravenous, and inhalation), while recent research has demonstrated the cardiovascular (CV) system as an important site of toxicity. Proposed mechanisms responsible for these effects include inflammation, oxidative stress, autonomic dysregulation, and direct interactions of NP with CV cells. Specifically, NP have been shown to impact vascular endothelial cell (EC) integrity, which may disrupt the dynamic endothelial regulation of vascular tone, possibly altering systemic vascular resistance and impairing the appropriate distribution of blood flow throughout the circulation. Cardiac consequences of NP-induced toxicity include disruption of heart rate and electrical activity via catecholamine release, increased susceptibility to ischemia/reperfusion injury, and modified baroreceptor control of cardiac function. These and other CV outcomes likely contribute to adverse health effects promoting myocardial infarction, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, and thrombosis. This review will assess the current knowledge regarding the principle sites of CV toxicity following NP exposure. Furthermore, we will propose mechanisms contributing to altered CV function and hypothesize possible outcomes resulting in decrements in human health. PMID:22915448

  20. Platelet functional and transcriptional changes induced by intralipid infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Lea M; Vitseva, Olga; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Kucukural, Alper; Mick, Eric; Hamburg, Naomi; Vita, Joseph; Freedman, Jane E

    2016-06-01

    Multiple studies have shown the effects of long-term exposure to high-fat or western diets on the vascular system. There is limited knowledge on the acute effects of high circulating fat levels, specifically on platelets, which have a role in many processes, including thrombosis and inflammation. This study investigated the effects of acute, high-fat exposure on platelet function and transcript profile. Twenty healthy participants were given an intravenous infusion of 20% Intralipid emulsion and heparin over 6 hours. Blood samples were taken prior to and the day after infusion to measure platelet function and transcript expression levels. Platelet aggregation was not significantly affected by Intralipid infusion, but, when mitochondria function was inhibited by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or oligomycin, platelet aggregation was higher in the post-infusion state compared to baseline. Through RNA sequencing, and verified by RT-qPCR, 902 miRNAs and 617 mRNAs were affected by Intralipid infusion. MicroRNAs increased include miR-4259 and miR-346, while miR-517b and miR-517c are both decreased. Pathway analysis identified two clusters significantly enriched, including cell motility. In conclusion, acute exposure to high fat affects mitochondrial-dependent platelet function, as well as the transcript profile. PMID:26940969

  1. The transcriptional coregulator PGC-1β controls mitochondrial function and anti-oxidant defence in skeletal muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Gali Ramamoorthy, Thanuja; Laverny, Gilles; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Zoll, Joffrey; Messaddeq, Nadia; Bornert, Jean-Marc; Panza, Salvatore; Ferry, Arnaud; Geny, Bernard; Metzger, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional coregulators PGC-1α and PGC-1β modulate the expression of numerous partially overlapping genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and energetic metabolism. The physiological role of PGC-1β is poorly understood in skeletal muscle, a tissue of high mitochondrial content to produce ATP levels required for sustained contractions. Here we determine the physiological role of PGC-1β in skeletal muscle using mice, in which PGC-1β is selectively ablated in skeletal myofibres at a...

  2. Trimetazidine prevents palmitate-induced mitochondrial fission and dysfunction in cultured cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmicic, Jovan; Parra, Valentina; Verdejo, Hugo E; López-Crisosto, Camila; Chiong, Mario; García, Lorena; Jensen, Michael D; Bernlohr, David A; Castro, Pablo F; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-10-01

    Metabolic and cardiovascular disease patients have increased plasma levels of lipids and, specifically, of palmitate, which can be toxic for several tissues. Trimetazidine (TMZ), a partial inhibitor of lipid oxidation, has been proposed as a metabolic modulator for several cardiovascular pathologies. However, its mechanism of action is controversial. Given the fact that TMZ is able to alter mitochondrial metabolism, we evaluated the protective role of TMZ on mitochondrial morphology and function in an in vitro model of lipotoxicity induced by palmitate. We treated cultured rat cardiomyocytes with BSA-conjugated palmitate (25 nM free), TMZ (0.1-100 μM), or a combination of both. We evaluated mitochondrial morphology and lipid accumulation by confocal fluorescence microscopy, parameters of mitochondrial metabolism (mitochondrial membrane potential, oxygen consumption rate [OCR], and ATP levels), and ceramide production by mass spectrometry and indirect immunofluorescence. Palmitate promoted mitochondrial fission evidenced by a decrease in mitochondrial volume (50%) and an increase in the number of mitochondria per cell (80%), whereas TMZ increased mitochondrial volume (39%), and decreased mitochondrial number (56%), suggesting mitochondrial fusion. Palmitate also decreased mitochondrial metabolism (ATP levels and OCR), while TMZ potentiated all the metabolic parameters assessed. Moreover, pretreatment with TMZ protected the cardiomyocytes from palmitate-induced mitochondrial fission and dysfunction. TMZ also increased lipid accumulation in cardiomyocytes, and prevented palmitate-induced ceramide production. Our data show that TMZ protects cardiomyocytes by changing intracellular lipid management. Thus, the beneficial effects of TMZ on patients with different cardiovascular pathologies can be related to modulation of the mitochondrial morphology and function. PMID:25091560

  3. Pleiotropic regulation of mitochondrial function by adipose triglyceride lipase-mediated lipolysis ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Kratky, Dagmar; Obrowsky, Sascha; Kolb, Dagmar; Radovic, Branislav

    2014-01-01

    Lipolysis is defined as the catabolism of triacylglycerols (TGs) stored in cellular lipid droplets. Recent discoveries of essential lipolytic enzymes and characterization of numerous regulatory proteins and mechanisms have fundamentally changed our perception of lipolysis and its impact on cellular metabolism. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme for TG catabolism in most cells and tissues. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding the (patho)physiologi...

  4. Mitochondrial (dys)function in adipocyte (de)differentiation and systemic metabolic alterations.

    OpenAIRE

    De Pauw, Aurélia; Tejerina, Silvia; Raes, Martine; Keijer, Jaap; Arnould, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, adipose tissue, composed of BAT and WAT, collaborates in energy partitioning and performs metabolic regulatory functions. It is the most flexible tissue in the body, because it is remodeled in size and shape by modifications in adipocyte cell size and/or number, depending on developmental status and energy fluxes. Although numerous reviews have focused on the differentiation program of both brown and white adipocytes as well as on the pathophysiological role of white adipose tissu...

  5. Researches of repairing function of mitochondrial DNA in aging process%衰老过程中线粒体DNA修复功能的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易军

    2011-01-01

    With the research method of literature study, the paper discusses the current researches of repairing function of mitochondrial DNA and its development. The paper analyses the repairing function of mitochondrial DNA in the aging process and its possible m%对衰老过程中线粒体DNA修复功能的研究现状及进展进行探讨,分析了线粒体DNA修复在衰老过程中的作用和可能机制,包括衰老过程中活性氧生成及线粒体抗氧化体系的变化,线粒体DNA修复酶OGGl的可能作用机制。

  6. Iron insufficiency compromises motor neurons and their mitochondrial function in Irp2-null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suh Young Jeong

    Full Text Available Genetic ablation of Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2, which post-transcriptionally regulates iron metabolism genes, causes a gait disorder in mice that progresses to hind-limb paralysis. Here we have demonstrated that misregulation of iron metabolism from loss of Irp2 causes lower motor neuronal degeneration with significant spinal cord axonopathy. Mitochondria in the lumbar spinal cord showed significantly decreased Complex I and II activities, and abnormal morphology. Lower motor neurons appeared to be the most adversely affected neurons, and we show that functional iron starvation due to misregulation of iron import and storage proteins, including transferrin receptor 1 and ferritin, may have a causal role in disease. We demonstrated that two therapeutic approaches were beneficial for motor neuron survival. First, we activated a homologous protein, IRP1, by oral Tempol treatment and found that axons were partially spared from degeneration. Secondly, we genetically decreased expression of the iron storage protein, ferritin, to diminish functional iron starvation. These data suggest that functional iron deficiency may constitute a previously unrecognized molecular basis for degeneration of motor neurons in mice.

  7. Iron insufficiency compromises motor neurons and their mitochondrial function in Irp2-null mice

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Suh Young

    2011-10-07

    Genetic ablation of Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2), which post-transcriptionally regulates iron metabolism genes, causes a gait disorder in mice that progresses to hind-limb paralysis. Here we have demonstrated that misregulation of iron metabolism from loss of Irp2 causes lower motor neuronal degeneration with significant spinal cord axonopathy. Mitochondria in the lumbar spinal cord showed significantly decreased Complex I and II activities, and abnormal morphology. Lower motor neurons appeared to be the most adversely affected neurons, and we show that functional iron starvation due to misregulation of iron import and storage proteins, including transferrin receptor 1 and ferritin, may have a causal role in disease. We demonstrated that two therapeutic approaches were beneficial for motor neuron survival. First, we activated a homologous protein, IRP1, by oral Tempol treatment and found that axons were partially spared from degeneration. Secondly, we genetically decreased expression of the iron storage protein, ferritin, to diminish functional iron starvation. These data suggest that functional iron deficiency may constitute a previously unrecognized molecular basis for degeneration of motor neurons in mice.

  8. Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy in an STXBP1 Patient with Lactic Acidemia and Normal Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of clinical findings have been associated with mutations in Syntaxin Binding Protein 1 (STXBP1, including multiple forms of epilepsy, nonsyndromic intellectual disability, and movement disorders. STXBP1 mutations have recently been associated with mitochondrial pathology, although it remains unclear if this phenotype is a part of the core feature for this gene disorder. We report a 7-year-old boy who presented for diagnostic evaluation of intractable epilepsy, episodic ataxia, resting tremor, and speech regression following a period of apparently normal early development. Mild lactic acidemia was detected on one occasion at the time of an intercurrent illness. Due to the concern for mitochondrial disease, ophthalmologic evaluation was performed that revealed bilateral midperiphery pigmentary mottling. Optical coherence tomography (OCT testing demonstrated a bilaterally thickened ganglion cell layer in the perifovea. Skeletal muscle biopsy analysis showed no mitochondrial abnormalities or respiratory chain dysfunction. Exome sequencing identified a de novo c.1651C>T (p.R551C mutation in STXBP1. Although mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported in some individuals, our proband had only mild lactic acidemia and no skeletal muscle tissue evidence of mitochondrial disease pathology. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction is not an obligate feature of STXBP1 disease.

  9. PGC-1α plays a functional role in exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis but not fiber-type transformation in mouse skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Geng, Tuoyu; Li, Ping; Okutsu, Mitsuharu; Yin, Xinhe; Kwek, Jyeyi; ZHANG, MEI; Yan, Zhen

    2009-01-01

    Endurance exercise stimulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) expression in skeletal muscle, and forced expression of PGC-1α changes muscle metabolism and exercise capacity in mice. However, it is unclear if PGC-1α is indispensible for endurance exercise-induced metabolic and contractile adaptations in skeletal muscle. In this study, we showed that endurance exercise-induced expression of mitochondrial enzymes (cytochrome oxidase IV and cytochrome c) and i...

  10. Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on mitochondrial function of neuronal cells in the cortex of neonatal rats after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, L.; Hei, M.Y.; Dai, J.J.; Hu, N.; Xiang, X.Y.

    2016-01-01

    The timing and mechanisms of protection by hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) have only been partially elucidated. We monitored the effect of HBO on the mitochondrial function of neuronal cells in the cerebral cortex of neonatal rats after HIBD. Neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats (total of 360 of both genders) were randomly divided into normal control, HIBD, and HIBD+HBO groups. The HBO treatment began immediately after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and continued once a da...

  11. Beneficial Effects of Ethanolic and Hexanic Rice Bran Extract on Mitochondrial Function in PC12 Cells and the Search for Bioactive Components

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Hagl; Dirk Berressem; Bastian Bruns; Nadine Sus; Jan Frank; Eckert, Gunter P.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in the aging processes that ultimately lead to neurodegeneration and the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A healthy lifestyle, including a diet rich in antioxidants and polyphenols, represents one strategy to protect the brain and to prevent neurodegeneration. We recently reported that a stabilized hexanic rice bran extract (RBE) rich in vitamin E and polyphenols (but unsuitable for human consumption) has beneficial effects on mitochondrial function in vitro ...

  12. A unique horizontal gene transfer event has provided the octocoral mitochondrial genome with an active mismatch repair gene that has potential for an unusual self-contained function

    OpenAIRE

    Bilewitch Jaret P; Degnan Sandie M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The mitochondrial genome of the Octocorallia has several characteristics atypical for metazoans, including a novel gene suggested to function in DNA repair. This mtMutS gene is favored for octocoral molecular systematics, due to its high information content. Several hypotheses concerning the origins of mtMutS have been proposed, and remain equivocal, although current weight of support is for a horizontal gene transfer from either an epsilonproteobacterium or a large DNA vi...

  13. G Proteins and their regulators in EGF receptor trafficking and mitochondrial functions

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Tingdong

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms involving heterotrimeric G proteins in the regulation of membrane trafficking are not well understood. Here, we reported G\\[alpha\\]s overexpression promotes ligand-dependent degradation of EGFR and G\\[alpha\\]s knockdown delays receptor degradation through interaction with RGS-PX1 and Hrs on early endosomes. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the function of G\\[alpha\\]s, RGS-PX1 and Hrs in endocytic sorting. To further understand RGS-PX1's role in EGFR trafficking ...

  14. Loss of mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG affects mitochondrial respiration and induces ROS mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tigchelaar, Wardit; Yu, Hongjuan; De Jong, Anne Margreet; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; Westenbrink, B Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A; Sillje, Herman H W

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a genetic variant in the mitochondrial exo/endo nuclease EXOG, which has been implicated in mitochondrial DNA repair, was associated with cardiac function. The function of EXOG in cardiomyocytes is still elusive. Here we investigated the role of EXOG in mitochondrial function and hypertrop

  15. Effects of dietary fatty acids on mitochondrial phospholipid compositions, oxidative status and mitochondrial gene expression of zebrafish at different ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancor, M B; Almaida-Pagán, P F; Hernández, A; Tocher, D R

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial decay is generally associated with impairment in the organelle bioenergetics function and increased oxidative stress, and it appears that deterioration of mitochondrial inner membrane phospholipids (PL) and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are among the main mechanisms involved in this process. In the present study, mitochondrial membrane PL compositions, oxidative status (TBARS content and SOD activity) and mtDNA gene expression of muscle and liver were analyzed in zebrafish fed two diets with lipid supplied either by rapeseed oil (RO) or a blend 60:40 of RO and DHA500 TG oil (DHA). Two feeding trials were performed using zebrafish from the same population of two ages (8 and 21 months). Dietary FA composition affected fish growth in 8-month-old animals, which could be related to an increase in stress promoted by diet composition. Lipid peroxidation was considerably higher in mitochondria of 8-month-old zebrafish fed the DHA diet than in animals fed the RO diet. This could indicate higher oxidative damage to mitochondrial lipids, very likely due to increased incorporation of DHA in PL of mitochondrial membranes. Lipids would be among the first molecules affected by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation could propagate oxidative reactions that would damage other molecules, including mtDNA. Mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and gene expression of 21-month-old fish showed lower responsiveness to diet composition than those of younger fish. Differences found in the effect of diet composition on mitochondrial lipids between the two age groups could be indicating age-related changes in the ability to maintain structural homeostasis of mitochondrial membranes. PMID:26156499

  16. Roles of interstitial fluid pH in diabetes mellitus: Glycolysisand mitochondrial function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshinori Marunaka

    2015-01-01

    The pH of body fluids is one the most important keyfactors regulating various cell function such as enzymeactivity and protein-protein interaction via modificationof its binding affinity. Therefore, to keep cell functionnormal, the pH of body fluids is maintained constant byvarious systems. Insulin resistance is one of the mostimportant, serious factors making the body conditionworse in diabetes mellitus. I have recently found thatthe pH of body (interstitial) fluids is lower in diabetesmellitus than that in non-diabetic control, and thatthe lowered pH is one of the causes producing insulinresistance. In this review article, I introduce importanceof body (interstitial) fluid pH in regulation of bodyfunction, evidence on abnormal regulation of bodyfluid pH in diabetes mellitus, and relationship betweenthe body fluid pH and insulin resistance. Further, thisreview proposes perspective therapies on the basis ofregulation of body fluid pH including propolis (honeybeeproduct) diet.

  17. Effects of a Sublethal and Transient Stress of the Endoplasmic Reticulum on the Mitochondrial Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannuvel, Kayleen; Van Steenbrugge, Martine; Demazy, Catherine; Ninane, Noëlle; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Fransolet, Maude; Renard, Patricia; Raes, Martine; Arnould, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria are not discrete intracellular organelles but establish close physical and functional interactions involved in several biological processes including mitochondrial bioenergetics, calcium homeostasis, lipid synthesis, and the regulation of apoptotic cell death pathways. As many cell types might face a transient and sublethal ER stress during their lifetime, it is thus likely that the adaptive UPR response might affect the mitochondrial population. The aim of this work was to study the putative effects of a non-lethal and transient endoplasmic reticulum stress on the mitochondrial population in HepG2 cells. The results show that thapsigargin and brefeldin A, used to induce a transient and sublethal ER stress, rapidly lead to the fragmentation of the mitochondrial network associated with a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, O2 (•-) production and less efficient respiration. These changes in mitochondrial function are transient and preceded by the phosphorylation of JNK. Inhibition of JNK activation by SP600125 prevents the decrease in O2 (•-) production and the mitochondrial network fragmentation observed in cells exposed to the ER stress but has no impact on the reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, our data show that a non-lethal and transient ER stress triggers a rapid activation of JNK without inducing apoptosis, leading to the fragmentation of the mitochondrial network and a reduction of O2 (•-) production. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1913-1931, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26680008

  18. Phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitor (cilostazol) attenuates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siriporn C.Chattipakorn; Savitree Thummasorn; Jantira Sanit; Nipon Chattipakorn

    2014-01-01

    Background Cilostazol is a type 3 phosphodiesterase inhibitor which has been previously demonstrated to prevent the occurrence of tachyarrhythmia and improve defibrillation efficacy. However, the mechanism for this beneficial effect is still unclear. Since cardiac mito-chondria have been shown to play a crucial role in fatal cardiac arrhythmias and that oxidative stress is one of the main contributors to arr-hythmia generation, we tested the effects of cilostazol on cardiac mitochondria under severe oxidative stress. Methods Mitochondria were isolated from rat hearts and treated with H2O2 to induce oxidative stress. Cilostazol, at various concentrations, was used to study its protective effects. Pharmacological interventions, including a mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) blocker, cyclosporine A (CsA), and an inner membrane anion channel (IMAC) blocker, 4’-chlorodiazepam (CDP), were used to investigate the mechanistic role of cilostazol on cardiac mitochondria. Cardiac mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential change and mi-tochondrial swelling were determined as indicators of cardiac mitochondrial function. Results Cilostazol preserved cardiac mitochondrial function when exposed to oxidative stress by preventing mitochondrial depolarization, mitochondrial swelling, and decreasing ROS produc-tion. Conclusions Our findings suggest that cardioprotective effects of cilostazol reported previously could be due to its prevention of car-diac mitochondrial dysfunction caused by severe oxidative stress.

  19. Mitochondrial energy metabolism changes during aging-mouse cranial nerve cells treated with various doses and forms of Fructus schizandrae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Guo; Jinhe Li

    2008-01-01

    the nape of the neck with physiological saline and administered intragastrically with sterile, warm water.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Respiratory chain complex I and H+-ATP enzyme activities, as well as Mn-SOD and MDA levels, were determined by the Coomassie brilliant blue method.RESULTS: All fifty mice were included in the final analysis. In mitochondria from cranial nerve cells of the aging mouse group MDA levels were significantly increased, compared with young control group (P < 0.01); however, Mn-SOD levels, as well as respiratory chain complex 1 and H+-ATP enzyme activity, were remarkably decreased (P < 0.01). In each Fructus schizandrae group, Mn-SOD levels, as well as respiratory chain complex I and H+-ATP enzyme activity was enhanced to various extents (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), and MDA levels were decreased (P < 0.01), compared with the aging model group.CONCLUSION: Aqueous and spirituous Fructus schizandrae extracts, as well as Fructus schizandrae polysaccharides delayed changes in mitochondrial energy metabolism, increased Mn-SOD levels, and decreased MDA levels in cranial nerve cell mitochondria of an aging mouse model. Fructus schizandrae polysaccharides were particularly capable of protecting mitochondria from oxidative injury.

  20. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NINDS supports research focused on effective treatments and cures for mitochondrial myopathies and other mitochondrial diseases. Scientists are investigating the possible benefits of exercise programs and nutritional supplements, primarily natural and synthetic versions of CoQ10. While CoQ10 has ...

  1. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease. PMID:27161368

  2. Mitochondrial and Cell Death Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J. Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal cell death are unresolved. Morphological, biochemical, genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations, triggering neurodegeneration according to a cell death matrix theory. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This review summarizes how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to neuronal death in AD, PD, and ALS and could serve as a target for drug therapy.

  3. Lung function changes in wildland firefighters working at prescribed burns.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adetona, Olorunfemi; Hall, Daniel, B.; Naeher, L,P.

    2011-10-01

    Although decline in lung function across workshift has been observed in wildland firefighters, measurements have been restricted to days when they worked at fires. Consequently, such results could have been confounded by normal circadian variation associated with lung function. We investigated the across-shift changes in lung function of wildland firefighters, and the effect of cumulative exposure on lung function during the burn season.

  4. PINK1 loss-of-function mutations affect mitochondrial complex I activity via NdufA10 ubiquinone uncoupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Vanessa A; Haddad, Dominik; Craessaerts, Katleen; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Swerts, Jef; Vilain, Sven; Aerts, Liesbeth; Overbergh, Lut; Grünewald, Anne; Seibler, Philip; Klein, Christine; Gevaert, Kris; Verstreken, Patrik; De Strooper, Bart

    2014-04-11

    Under resting conditions, Pink1 knockout cells and cells derived from patients with PINK1 mutations display a loss of mitochondrial complex I reductive activity, causing a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Analyzing the phosphoproteome of complex I in liver and brain from Pink1(-/-) mice, we found specific loss of phosphorylation of serine-250 in complex I subunit NdufA10. Phosphorylation of serine-250 was needed for ubiquinone reduction by complex I. Phosphomimetic NdufA10 reversed Pink1 deficits in mouse knockout cells and rescued mitochondrial depolarization and synaptic transmission defects in pink(B9)-null mutant Drosophila. Complex I deficits and adenosine triphosphate synthesis were also rescued in cells derived from PINK1 patients. Thus, this evolutionary conserved pathway may contribute to the pathogenic cascade that eventually leads to Parkinson's disease in patients with PINK1 mutations. PMID:24652937

  5. Novel, high-intensity exercise prescription improves muscle mass, mitochondrial function, and physical capacity in individuals with Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Neil A.; Ford, Matthew P.; Standaert, David G.; Watts, Ray L.; Bickel, C. Scott; Moellering, Douglas R.; Tuggle, S. Craig; Williams, Jeri Y.; Lieb, Laura; Windham, Samuel T.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted, in persons with Parkinson's disease (PD), a thorough assessment of neuromotor function and performance in conjunction with phenotypic analyses of skeletal muscle tissue, and further tested the adaptability of PD muscle to high-intensity exercise training. Fifteen participants with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage 2–3) completed 16 wk of high-intensity exercise training designed to simultaneously challenge strength, power, endurance, balance, and mobility function. Skeletal muscle adaptations (P changes in skeletal muscle at the cellular and subcellular levels that are associated with improvements in motor function, physical capacity, and fatigue perception. PMID:24408997

  6. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Cigana Schenkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases.

  7. Functional roles of the N- and C-terminal regions of the human mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos T Oliveira

    Full Text Available Biochemical studies of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replisome demonstrate that the mtDNA polymerase and the mtDNA helicase are stimulated by the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (mtSSB. Unlike Escherichia coli SSB, bacteriophage T7 gp2.5 and bacteriophage T4 gp32, mtSSBs lack a long, negatively charged C-terminal tail. Furthermore, additional residues at the N-terminus (notwithstanding the mitochondrial presequence are present in the sequence of species across the animal kingdom. We sought to analyze the functional importance of the N- and C-terminal regions of the human mtSSB in the context of mtDNA replication. We produced the mature wild-type human mtSSB and three terminal deletion variants, and examined their physical and biochemical properties. We demonstrate that the recombinant proteins adopt a tetrameric form, and bind single-stranded DNA with similar affinities. They also stimulate similarly the DNA unwinding activity of the human mtDNA helicase (up to 8-fold. Notably, we find that unlike the high level of stimulation that we observed previously in the Drosophila system, stimulation of DNA synthesis catalyzed by human mtDNA polymerase is only moderate, and occurs over a narrow range of salt concentrations. Interestingly, each of the deletion variants of human mtSSB stimulates DNA synthesis at a higher level than the wild-type protein, indicating that the termini modulate negatively functional interactions with the mitochondrial replicase. We discuss our findings in the context of species-specific components of the mtDNA replisome, and in comparison with various prokaryotic DNA replication machineries.

  8. How do changes in the mtDNA and mitochondrial dysfunction influence cancer and cancer therapy? Challenges, opportunities and models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gisbergen, M. W.; Voets, A. M.; Starmans, M. H. W.; de Coo, I. F. M.; Yadak, R.; Hoffmann, R. F.; Boutros, P. C.; Smeets, H. J. M.; Dubois, L.; Lambin, P.

    2015-01-01

    Several mutations in nuclear genes encoding for mitochondrial components have been associated with an increased cancer risk or are even causative, e.g. succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB, SDHC and SDHD genes) and iso-citrate dehydrogenase (IDH1 and IDH2 genes). Recently, studies have suggested an eminent

  9. Dichloroacetate stimulates changes in the mitochondrial network morphology via partial mitophagy in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pajuelo-Reguera, David; Alán, Lukáš; Olejár, Tomáš; Ježek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 6 (2015), s. 2409-2418. ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : dichloroacetate * mitochondria * mitophagy * neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells * mitochondrial network Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.025, year: 2014

  10. Substrate binding changes conformation of the alpha, but not the beta-subunit of mitochondrial processing peptidase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gakh, O.; Obšil, Tomáš; Adamec, J.; Spížek, Jaroslav; Amler, Evžen; Janata, Jiří; Kalousek, František

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 385, č. 2 (2001), s. 392-396. ISSN 0003-9861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/98/0416 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : mitochondrial processing peptidase Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.476, year: 2001

  11. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Teresa