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  1. Climate change influences on marine infectious diseases: implications for management and society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, Colleen A.; Eakin, C. Mark; Friedman, Carolyn S.; Froelich, Brett; Hershberger, Paul K.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Petes, Laura E.; Prager, Katherine C.; Weil, Ernesto; Willis, Bette L.; Ford, Susan E.; Harvell, C. Drew

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are common in marine environments, but the effects of a changing climate on marine pathogens are not well understood. Here, we focus on reviewing current knowledge about how the climate drives hostpathogen interactions and infectious disease outbreaks. Climate-related impacts on marine diseases are being documented in corals, shellfish, finfish, and humans; these impacts are less clearly linked to other organisms. Oceans and people are inextricably linked, and marine diseases can both directly and indirectly affect human health, livelihoods, and well-being. We recommend an adaptive management approach to better increase the resilience of ocean systems vulnerable to marine diseases in a changing climate. Land-based management methods of quarantining, culling, and vaccinating are not successful in the ocean; therefore, forecasting conditions that lead to outbreaks and designing tools/approaches to influence these conditions may be the best way to manage marine disease.

  2. Global Climate Change and Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EK Shuman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is occurring as a result of warming of the earth’s atmosphere due to human activity generating excess amounts of greenhouse gases. Because of its potential impact on the hydrologic cycle and severe weather events, climate change is expected to have an enormous effect on human health, including on the burden and distribution of many infectious diseases. The infectious diseases that will be most affected by climate change include those that are spread by insect vectors and by contaminated water. The burden of adverse health effects due to these infectious diseases will fall primarily on developing countries, while it is the developed countries that are primarily responsible for climate change. It is up to governments and individuals to take the lead in halting climate change, and we must increase our understanding of the ecology of infectious diseases in order to protect vulnerable populations.

  3. A method for screening climate change-sensitive infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunjing; Rao, Yuhan; Wu, Xiaoxu; Zhao, Hainan; Chen, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is a significant and emerging threat to human health, especially where infectious diseases are involved. Because of the complex interactions between climate variables and infectious disease components (i.e., pathogen, host and transmission environment), systematically and quantitatively screening for infectious diseases that are sensitive to climate change is still a challenge. To address this challenge, we propose a new statistical indicator, Relative Sensitivity, to identify the difference between the sensitivity of the infectious disease to climate variables for two different climate statuses (i.e., historical climate and present climate) in non-exposure and exposure groups. The case study in Anhui Province, China has demonstrated the effectiveness of this Relative Sensitivity indicator. The application results indicate significant sensitivity of many epidemic infectious diseases to climate change in the form of changing climatic variables, such as temperature, precipitation and absolute humidity. As novel evidence, this research shows that absolute humidity has a critical influence on many observed infectious diseases in Anhui Province, including dysentery, hand, foot and mouth disease, hepatitis A, hemorrhagic fever, typhoid fever, malaria, meningitis, influenza and schistosomiasis. Moreover, some infectious diseases are more sensitive to climate change in rural areas than in urban areas. This insight provides guidance for future health inputs that consider spatial variability in response to climate change. PMID:25594780

  4. A Method for Screening Climate Change-Sensitive Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is a significant and emerging threat to human health, especially where infectious diseases are involved. Because of the complex interactions between climate variables and infectious disease components (i.e., pathogen, host and transmission environment, systematically and quantitatively screening for infectious diseases that are sensitive to climate change is still a challenge. To address this challenge, we propose a new statistical indicator, Relative Sensitivity, to identify the difference between the sensitivity of the infectious disease to climate variables for two different climate statuses (i.e., historical climate and present climate in non-exposure and exposure groups. The case study in Anhui Province, China has demonstrated the effectiveness of this Relative Sensitivity indicator. The application results indicate significant sensitivity of many epidemic infectious diseases to climate change in the form of changing climatic variables, such as temperature, precipitation and absolute humidity. As novel evidence, this research shows that absolute humidity has a critical influence on many observed infectious diseases in Anhui Province, including dysentery, hand, foot and mouth disease, hepatitis A, hemorrhagic fever, typhoid fever, malaria, meningitis, influenza and schistosomiasis. Moreover, some infectious diseases are more sensitive to climate change in rural areas than in urban areas. This insight provides guidance for future health inputs that consider spatial variability in response to climate change.

  5. Climate change and infectious diseases in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkinson, Alan J; Evengard, Birgitta; Semenza, Jan C;

    2014-01-01

    The Arctic, even more so than other parts of the world, has warmed substantially over the past few decades. Temperature and humidity influence the rate of development, survival and reproduction of pathogens and thus the incidence and prevalence of many infectious diseases. Higher temperatures may...... distribution of a range of infectious diseases. Many infectious diseases are climate sensitive, where their emergence in a region is dependent on climate-related ecological changes. Most are zoonotic diseases, and can be spread between humans and animals by arthropod vectors, water, soil, wild or domestic...

  6. Global climate change and infectious diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    EK Shuman

    1991-01-01

    The effects of global climate change on infectious diseases are hypothetical until more is known about the degree of change in temperature and humidity that will occur. Diseases most likely to increase in their distribution and severity have three-factor (agent, vector, and human being) and four-factor (plus vertebrate reservoir host) ecology. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes may move northward and have more rapid metamorphosis with global warming. These mosquitoes transmit dengu...

  7. A Method for Screening Climate Change-Sensitive Infectious Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yunjing Wang; Yuhan Rao; Xiaoxu Wu; Hainan Zhao; Jin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is a significant and emerging threat to human health, especially where infectious diseases are involved. Because of the complex interactions between climate variables and infectious disease components (i.e., pathogen, host and transmission environment), systematically and quantitatively screening for infectious diseases that are sensitive to climate change is still a challenge. To address this challenge, we propose a new statistical indicator, Relative Sensitivity, to identify ...

  8. Infectious disease, development, and climate change, A scenario analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tol, R.S.J.; Ebi, K L; Yohe, G. W.

    2007-01-01

    We study the effects of development and climate change on infectious disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. Infant mortality and infectious disease are close related, but there are better data for the former. In an international cross-section, per capita income, literacy, and absolute poverty significantly affect infant mortality. We use scenarios of these three determinants, and of climate change to project the future incidence of malaria, assuming it to change proportionally to infant mortality. Ma...

  9. Climate change and infectious diseases of wildlife: Altered interactions between pathogens, vectors and hosts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milena GALLANA; Marie-Pierre RYSER-DEGIORGIS; Thomas WAHLI; Helmut SEGNER

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases result from the interactions of host,pathogens,and,in the case of vector-borne diseases,also vectors.The interactions involve physiological and ecological mechanisms and they have evolved under a given set of environmental conditions.Environmental change,therefore,will alter host-pathogen-vector interactions and,consequently,the distribution,intensity,and dynamics of infectious diseases.Here,we review how climate change may impact infectious diseases of aquatic and terrestrial wildlife.Climate change can have direct impacts on distribution,life cycle,and physiological status of hosts,pathogens and vectors.While a change in either host,pathogen or vector does not necessarily translate into an alteration of the disease,it is the impact of climate change on the interactions between the disease components which is particularly critical for altered disease risks.Finally,climate factors can modulate disease through modifying the ecological networks host-pathogen-vector systems are belonging to,and climate change can combine with other environmental stressors to induce cumulative effects on infectious diseases.Overall,the influence of climate change on infectious diseases involves different mechanisms,it can be modulated by phenotypic acclimation and/or genotypic adaptation,it depends on the ecological context of the host-pathogen-vector interactions,and it can be modulated by impacts of other stressors.As a consequence of this complexity,non-linear responses of disease systems under climate change are to be expected.To improve predictions on climate change impacts on infectious disease,we suggest that more emphasis should be given to the integration of biomedical and ecological research for studying both the physiological and ecological mechanisms which mediate climate change impacts on disease,and to the development of harmonized methods and approaches to obtain more comparable results,as this would support the discrimination of case-specific versus

  10. Climate change and infectious diseases of wildlife: Altered interactions between pathogens, vectors and hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena GALLANA, Marie-Pierre RYSER-DEGIORGIS, Thomas WAHLI, Helmut SEGNER

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases result from the interactions of host, pathogens, and, in the case of vector-borne diseases, also vectors. The interactions involve physiological and ecological mechanisms and they have evolved under a given set of environmental conditions. Environmental change, therefore, will alter host-pathogen-vector interactions and, consequently, the distribution, intensity, and dynamics of infectious diseases. Here, we review how climate change may impact infectious diseases of aquatic and terrestrial wildlife. Climate change can have direct impacts on distribution, life cycle, and physiological status of hosts, pathogens and vectors. While a change in either host, pathogen or vector does not necessarily translate into an alteration of the disease, it is the impact of climate change on the interactions between the disease components which is particularly critical for altered disease risks. Finally, climate factors can modulate disease through modifying the ecological networks host-pathogen-vector systems are belonging to, and climate change can combine with other environmental stressors to induce cumulative effects on infectious diseases. Overall, the influence of climate change on infectious diseases involves different mechanisms, it can be modulated by phenotypic acclimation and/or genotypic adaptation, it depends on the ecological context of the host-pathogen-vector interactions, and it can be modulated by impacts of other stressors. As a consequence of this complexity, non-linear responses of disease systems under climate change are to be expected. To improve predictions on climate change impacts on infectious disease, we suggest that more emphasis should be given to the integration of biomedical and ecological research for studying both the physiological and ecological mechanisms which mediate climate change impacts on disease, and to the development of harmonized methods and approaches to obtain more comparable results, as this

  11. Climate change & infectious diseases in India: Implications for health care providers

    OpenAIRE

    Dhara, V. Ramana; Schramm, Paul J.; Luber, George

    2013-01-01

    Climate change has the potential to influence the earth's biological systems, however, its effects on human health are not well defined. Developing nations with limited resources are expected to face a host of health effects due to climate change, including vector-borne and water-borne diseases such as malaria, cholera, and dengue. This article reviews common and prevalent infectious diseases in India, their links to climate change, and how health care providers might discuss preventive healt...

  12. Potential impacts of climate change on infectious diseases in the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Alan J; Butler, Jay C

    2005-12-01

    Climate change could cause changes in the incidence of infectious diseases in Arctic regions. Higher ambient temperatures in the Arctic may result in an increase in some temperature sensitive foodborne diseases such as gastroenteritis, paralytic shellfish poisoning and botulism. An increase in mean temperature may also influence the incidence of infectious diseases of animals that are spread to humans (zoonoses) by changing the population and range of animal hosts and insect vectors. An increase in flooding events may result in outbreaks of waterborne infection, such as Giardia lamblia or Cryptospordium parvum. A change in rodent and fox populations may result in an increase in rabies or echinococcosis. Temperature and humidity influence the distribution and density of many arthropod vectors which in turn may influence the incidence and northern range of vectorborne diseases such as West Nile virus. Recommendations include: the strenghtening of public health systems, disease surveillance coordinated with climate monitoring, and research into the detection, prevention, control and treatment of temperature-sensitive infectious diseases. PMID:16440610

  13. Climate change and infectious disease risk management: a localised health security perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic risks in relation to climate change are not fully understood and to a large extent have to be regarded as unpredictable. It is therefore important to focus attention on human vulnerability and coping for which more certain influences on disease risk can be assessed. Despite commonplace environmental conditions for infectious diseases around the world, only some people are affected. This is because the larger proportions of disease risks are regularly a function of human socio-econo...

  14. Influence of diabetes and hyperglycaemia on infectious disease hospitalisation and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas; Jensen, J S; Nordestgaard, B G

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Diabetes mellitus is believed to increase susceptibility to infectious diseases. The effects of hyperglycaemia per se on infectious disease risk are unknown and the influence of diabetes on infectious disease outcome is controversial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied 10......,063 individuals from the Danish general population, who were participants in The Copenhagen City Heart Study, over a follow-up period of 7 years. Risk of hospitalisation caused by any infectious disease, and subsequent risk of disease progression to death were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression...

  15. Climate change and infectious diseases in the Arctic: establishment of a circumpolar working group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J. Parkinson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic, even more so than other parts of the world, has warmed substantially over the past few decades. Temperature and humidity influence the rate of development, survival and reproduction of pathogens and thus the incidence and prevalence of many infectious diseases. Higher temperatures may also allow infected host species to survive winters in larger numbers, increase the population size and expand their habitat range. The impact of these changes on human disease in the Arctic has not been fully evaluated. There is concern that climate change may shift the geographic and temporal distribution of a range of infectious diseases. Many infectious diseases are climate sensitive, where their emergence in a region is dependent on climate-related ecological changes. Most are zoonotic diseases, and can be spread between humans and animals by arthropod vectors, water, soil, wild or domestic animals. Potentially climate-sensitive zoonotic pathogens of circumpolar concern include Brucella spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella spp., Clostridium botulinum, Francisella tularensis, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bacillus anthracis, Echinococcus spp., Leptospira spp., Giardia spp., Cryptosporida spp., Coxiella burnetti, rabies virus, West Nile virus, Hantaviruses, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses.

  16. Climate change and infectious diseases in the Arctic: establishment of a circumpolar working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Alan J; Evengard, Birgitta; Semenza, Jan C; Ogden, Nicholas; Børresen, Malene L; Berner, Jim; Brubaker, Michael; Sjöstedt, Anders; Evander, Magnus; Hondula, David M; Menne, Bettina; Pshenichnaya, Natalia; Gounder, Prabhu; Larose, Tricia; Revich, Boris; Hueffer, Karsten; Albihn, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The Arctic, even more so than other parts of the world, has warmed substantially over the past few decades. Temperature and humidity influence the rate of development, survival and reproduction of pathogens and thus the incidence and prevalence of many infectious diseases. Higher temperatures may also allow infected host species to survive winters in larger numbers, increase the population size and expand their habitat range. The impact of these changes on human disease in the Arctic has not been fully evaluated. There is concern that climate change may shift the geographic and temporal distribution of a range of infectious diseases. Many infectious diseases are climate sensitive, where their emergence in a region is dependent on climate-related ecological changes. Most are zoonotic diseases, and can be spread between humans and animals by arthropod vectors, water, soil, wild or domestic animals. Potentially climate-sensitive zoonotic pathogens of circumpolar concern include Brucella spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella spp., Clostridium botulinum, Francisella tularensis, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bacillus anthracis, Echinococcus spp., Leptospira spp., Giardia spp., Cryptosporida spp., Coxiella burnetti, rabies virus, West Nile virus, Hantaviruses, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. PMID:25317383

  17. Factors influencing the seasonal patterns of infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auda Fares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of seasonal patterns in infectious disease occurrence dates back at least as far as the hippocratic era, but the mechanisms underlying these fluctuations remain poorly understood. Many classes of mechanistic hypotheses have been proposed to explain seasonality of various directly transmitted diseases, including at least the following; human activity, seasonal variability in human immune system function, seasonal variations in vitamin D levels, seasonality of melatonin, and pathogen infectivity. In this short paper will briefly discuss the role of these factors in the seasonal patterns of infectious diseases.

  18. Unhealthy Landscapes: Policy Recommendations on Land Use Change and Infectious Disease Emergence

    OpenAIRE

    Patz, Jonathan A.; Daszak, Peter; Tabor, Gary M.; Aguirre, A Alonso; Pearl, Mary; Epstein, Jon; Wolfe, Nathan D.; Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Foufopoulos, Johannes; Molyneux, David; Bradley, David J; ,

    2004-01-01

    Anthropogenic land use changes drive a range of infectious disease outbreaks and emergence events and modify the transmission of endemic infections. These drivers include agricultural encroachment, deforestation, road construction, dam building, irrigation, wetland modification, mining, the concentration or expansion of urban environments, coastal zone degradation, and other activities. These changes in turn cause a cascade of factors that exacerbate infectious disease emergence, such as fore...

  19. Genetic influences on incidence and case-fatality of infectious disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Liselotte; Andersen, Per Kragh; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2010-01-01

    Family, twin and adoption studies suggest that genetic susceptibility contributes to familial aggregation of infectious diseases or to death from infections. We estimated genetic and shared environmental influences separately on the risk of acquiring an infection (incidence) and on dying from...

  20. Impact of climate change on human infectious diseases: Empirical evidence and human adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoxu; Lu, Yongmei; Zhou, Sen; Chen, Lifan; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Climate change refers to long-term shifts in weather conditions and patterns of extreme weather events. It may lead to changes in health threat to human beings, multiplying existing health problems. This review examines the scientific evidences on the impact of climate change on human infectious diseases. It identifies research progress and gaps on how human society may respond to, adapt to, and prepare for the related changes. Based on a survey of related publications between 1990 and 2015, the terms used for literature selection reflect three aspects--the components of infectious diseases, climate variables, and selected infectious diseases. Humans' vulnerability to the potential health impacts by climate change is evident in literature. As an active agent, human beings may control the related health effects that may be effectively controlled through adopting proactive measures, including better understanding of the climate change patterns and of the compound disease-specific health effects, and effective allocation of technologies and resources to promote healthy lifestyles and public awareness. The following adaptation measures are recommended: 1) to go beyond empirical observations of the association between climate change and infectious diseases and develop more scientific explanations, 2) to improve the prediction of spatial-temporal process of climate change and the associated shifts in infectious diseases at various spatial and temporal scales, and 3) to establish locally effective early warning systems for the health effects of predicated climate change. PMID:26479830

  1. The influence of infectious factors on dendritic cell apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kubicka-Sierszen, Agata; Grzegorczyk, Janina Ł.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens can have a negative influence on dendritic cells (DCs), causing their apoptosis, which prevents active presentation of foreign antigens. It results in a state of immunosuppression which makes the body susceptible to secondary infections. Infected immature DCs have lower expression of co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules, reduced ability to secrete cytokines and an inhibited maturation process and are incapable of effective antigen presentation and activation of T-lymphocytes. In so...

  2. Climatic changes, seasonality and the dynamics of infectious diseases in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the last few years the potential impact of climate change on infectious and parasitic diseases has drawn an increasing attention although the issue is still quite controversial. Many infectious diseases, especially of wildlife, have a remarkable meteo-climatic footprint. In some cases, outbreaks are clearly synchronized with seasonal fluctuations in temperature, humidity and rainfall patterns. Seasonal changes are ubiquitous in ecology and affect the timing of both outbreak and wildlife demography on a yearly basis but more subtly, can contribute to generate more complex, inter-annual dynamics on a longer time scale. Meteo-climatic fluctuations can affect the infective agent directly by modifying the life expectancy of the free-living stages or, indirectly, through changes in immune response, behaviour, demography (timing of reproduction, mortality, etc.), abundance (birth pulses, resources availability) of the host and vectors. This may result in turn in a change of probability of transmission between susceptible and infected animals or between susceptible hosts and infective stages/propagules with remarkable effects on the epidemiological patterns at the population or community level. Changes in the statistical properties of climate, especially in the combination of temperature and rainfall patterns, can thus ultimately affect the geographical distribution and the dynamics of pathogens and vectors. In the present work, I briefly illustrate two specific examples of how seasonality in meteo-climatic variables can affect the dynamics of infectious diseases caused by micro and macroparasites. In the first case, I investigate how seasonal fluctuations in demography of the host affect the dynamics of rabies epidemics and show how short-living, fast-reproducing host species may respond to seasonality differently than long-living, slowly reproducing ones. The second example is about the effect of seasonality in the development of hypobiosis (arrested stage

  3. Infectious bursal disease virus changes the potassium current properties of chicken embryo fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repp, H; Nieper, H; Draheim, H J; Koschinski, A; Müller, H; Dreyer, F

    1998-07-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is the causative agent of an economically significant poultry disease. IBDV infection leads to apoptosis in chicken embryos and cell cultures. Since changes in cellular ion fluxes during apoptosis have been reported, we investigated the membrane ion currents of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) inoculated with the Cu-1 strain of IBDV using the patch-clamp recording technique. Incubation of CEFs with IBDV led to marked changes in their K+ outward current properties, with respect to both the kinetics of activation and inactivation and the Ca2+ dependence of the activation. The changes occurred in a time-dependent manner and were complete after 8 h. UV-treated noninfectious virions induced the same K+ current changes as live IBDV. When CEFs were inoculated with IBDV after pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody, about 30% of the cells showed a normal K+ current, whereas the rest exhibited K+ current properties identical to or closely resembling those of IBDV-infected cells. Incubation of CEFs with culture supernatant from IBDV-infected cells from which the virus particles were removed had no influence on the K+ current. Our data strongly suggest that the K+ current changes induced by IBDV are not due to virus replication, but are the result of attachment and/or membrane penetration. Possibly, the altered K+ current may delay the apoptotic process in CEFs after IBDV infection. PMID:9657954

  4. Land-Use Change and Emerging Infectious Disease on an Island Continent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary A. McFarlane

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A more rigorous and nuanced understanding of land-use change (LUC as a driver of emerging infectious disease (EID is required. Here we examine post hunter-gatherer LUC as a driver of infectious disease in one biogeographical region with a compressed and documented history—continental Australia. We do this by examining land-use and native vegetation change (LUCC associations with infectious disease emergence identified through a systematic (1973–2010 and historical (1788–1973 review of infectious disease literature of humans and animals. We find that 22% (20 of the systematically reviewed EIDs are associated with LUCC, most frequently where natural landscapes have been removed or replaced with agriculture, plantations, livestock or urban development. Historical clustering of vector-borne, zoonotic and environmental disease emergence also follows major periods of extensive land clearing. These advanced stages of LUCC are accompanied by changes in the distribution and density of hosts and vectors, at varying scales and chronology. This review of infectious disease emergence in one continent provides valuable insight into the association between accelerated global LUC and concurrent accelerated infectious disease emergence.

  5. The influence of infectious factors on dendritic cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicka-Sierszen, Agata; Grzegorczyk, Janina Ł

    2015-10-12

    Pathogens can have a negative influence on dendritic cells (DCs), causing their apoptosis, which prevents active presentation of foreign antigens. It results in a state of immunosuppression which makes the body susceptible to secondary infections. Infected immature DCs have lower expression of co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules, reduced ability to secrete cytokines and an inhibited maturation process and are incapable of effective antigen presentation and activation of T-lymphocytes. In some cases, the ability of DCs to undergo rapid apoptosis is important for the body defense, which is probably because of DCs' ability to cross-present and cooperate with other cells. Apoptotic bodies released from the infected DCs are phagocytosed by other DCs, which then stimulate the effector cells and present antigens more efficiently than infected cells. The aim of this article is to review how the DCs respond to viral and bacterial factors and which biochemical mechanisms are responsible for their apoptosis. PMID:26528349

  6. Unhealthy landscapes: Policy recommendations on land use change and infectious disease emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patz, Jonathan A; Daszak, Peter; Tabor, Gary M; Aguirre, A Alonso; Pearl, Mary; Epstein, Jon; Wolfe, Nathan D; Kilpatrick, A Marm; Foufopoulos, Johannes; Molyneux, David; Bradley, David J

    2004-07-01

    Anthropogenic land use changes drive a range of infectious disease outbreaks and emergence events and modify the transmission of endemic infections. These drivers include agricultural encroachment, deforestation, road construction, dam building, irrigation, wetland modification, mining, the concentration or expansion of urban environments, coastal zone degradation, and other activities. These changes in turn cause a cascade of factors that exacerbate infectious disease emergence, such as forest fragmentation, disease introduction, pollution, poverty, and human migration. The Working Group on Land Use Change and Disease Emergence grew out of a special colloquium that convened international experts in infectious diseases, ecology, and environmental health to assess the current state of knowledge and to develop recommendations for addressing these environmental health challenges. The group established a systems model approach and priority lists of infectious diseases affected by ecologic degradation. Policy-relevant levels of the model include specific health risk factors, landscape or habitat change, and institutional (economic and behavioral) levels. The group recommended creating Centers of Excellence in Ecology and Health Research and Training, based at regional universities and/or research institutes with close links to the surrounding communities. The centers' objectives would be 3-fold: a) to provide information to local communities about the links between environmental change and public health; b) to facilitate fully interdisciplinary research from a variety of natural, social, and health sciences and train professionals who can conduct interdisciplinary research; and c) to engage in science-based communication and assessment for policy making toward sustainable health and ecosystems. PMID:15238283

  7. Delays in Reducing Waterborne and Water-related Infectious Diseases in China under Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, Maggie; Belle, Jessica; Carlton, Elizabeth; Liang, Song; Li, Huazhong; Luo, Wei; Freeman, Matthew C.; Liu, Yang; Gao, Yang; Hess, Jeremy; Remais, Justin V.

    2014-12-01

    Despite China’s rapid progress improving water, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) infrastructure and access, in 2011, 471 million people lacked access to improved sanitation, and 401 million people lacked access to household piped water. Infectious diseases are sensitive to changes in climate, particularly temperature, and WSH conditions. To explore possible impacts of climate change on these diseases in China in 2020 and 2030, we coupled estimates of the temperature sensitivity of diarrheal disease and three vector-borne diseases, temperature projections from global climate models using four emissions pathways, WSH-infrastructure development scenarios and projected demographic changes. By 2030, the projected impacts would delay China’s historically rapid progress toward reducing the burden of WSH-attributable infectious disease by 8-85 months. This developmental delay provides a key summary measure of the impact of climate change in China, and in other societies undergoing rapid social, economic, and environmental change.

  8. Changing perspectives of infectious causes of maternal mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Ajay; Vijayselvi, Reeta; Jose, Ruby

    2015-01-01

    Objective Infections significantly contribute to maternal mortality. There is a perceived change in the spectrum of such infections. This study aims to estimate the contribution of various types of infections to maternal mortality. Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed records of maternal death cases that took place between 2003 and 2012 in the Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. The International Classification of Diseases-Maternal Mortality was used to classify the causes of deaths and World Health Organization near-miss criteria were used to identify organ dysfunction that occurred before death. Infections during pregnancy were divided into three groups, i.e., pregnancy-related infections, pregnancy-unrelated infections, and nosocomial infections. Results In this study, 32.53% of maternal deaths were because of some type of infection as the primary cause. The contribution of pregnancy-related infections was comparable with that of pregnancy-unrelated infections (16.03% vs. 16.50%). Metritis with pelvic cellulitis, septic abortions, tuberculosis, malaria, scrub typhus, and H1N1 influenza (influenza A virus subtype) were among the most commonly encountered causes of maternal death due to infections. Another 7.07% of cases developed severe systemic infection during the course of illness as nosocomial infection. A significant majority of mothers were below 30 years of age, were primiparae, had advanced gestational age, and had operative delivery. Cardiovascular and respiratory system dysfunctions were the most common organ dysfunctions encountered. Conclusion The contribution of pregnancy-unrelated infections to maternal deaths is significant. Control of these diverse community-acquired infections holds the key to a reduction in maternal mortality along with the promotion of clean birthing practices. Nosocomial infections should not be underestimated as a contributor to maternal mortality. PMID:26692770

  9. Delays reducing waterborne and water-related infectious diseases in China under climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Hodges, Maggie; Belle, Jessica H.; Carlton, Elizabeth J; Liang, Song; Li, Huazhong; Luo, Wei; Freeman, Matthew C.; Liu, Yang; Gao, Yang; Hess, Jeremy J.; Justin V. Remais

    2014-01-01

    Despite China’s rapid progress improving water, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) access, in 2011, 471 million people lacked access to improved sanitation and 401 million to household piped water. Because certain infectious diseases are sensitive to changes in both climate and WSH conditions, we projected impacts of climate change on WSH-attributable diseases in China in 2020 and 2030 by coupling estimates of the temperature sensitivity of diarrheal diseases and three vector-borne diseases, temper...

  10. Delays in reducing waterborne and water-related infectious diseases in China under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Maggie; Belle, Jessica H.; Carlton, Elizabeth J.; Liang, Song; Li, Huazhong; Luo, Wei; Freeman, Matthew C.; Liu, Yang; Gao, Yang; Hess, Jeremy J.; Remais, Justin V.

    2014-12-01

    Despite China's rapid progress in improving water, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) access, in 2011, 471 million people lacked access to improved sanitation and 401 million to household piped water. As certain infectious diseases are sensitive to changes in both climate and WSH conditions, we projected impacts of climate change on WSH-attributable diseases in China in 2020 and 2030 by coupling estimates of the temperature sensitivity of diarrhoeal diseases and three vector-borne diseases, temperature projections from global climate models, WSH-infrastructure development scenarios, and projected demographic changes. By 2030, climate change is projected to delay China's rapid progress towards reducing WSH-attributable infectious disease burden by 8-85 months. This development delay summarizes the adverse impact of climate change on WSH-attributable infectious diseases in China, and can be used in other settings where a significant health burden may accompany future changes in climate even as the total burden of disease falls owing to non-climate reasons.

  11. Global health impacts due to infectious diseases and climate change: A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera Karnik

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization (WHO, environment is explained in terms of human health, such as physical, chemical and biological factors that are external to a person and all the related behavioral changes that affect population health. Quality of life and health is generally affected by people’s interaction with the environment.The purpose of this narrative review was to address various global health impacts such as heat wave impact, impact of floods and droughts, impact of allergens and impact of air pollution. A major emphasis of this review was on climatic impact on a variety of infectious diseases, particularly the interplay between ‘global warming’ and its effects on transmission of infectious diseases across the world. An analysis of vector borne disease transmission, infectious disease transmission modeling, in the backdrop of global warming, the concept of ‘one health’ and the effects of rising sea levels, which are purported to be due to global warming, were some of the highlighted issues addressed in this review. Towards the end, attention was drawn towards the limitations of addressing vector disease transmission related insufficient studies particularly studies which conduct predictive modeling of infectious disease transmission, which were marred by lack of innovation.

  12. Influence of the factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas L; Dahl, Mortens; Nordestgaard, Borge G;

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the coagulation factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome is controversial.......The effect of the coagulation factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome is controversial....

  13. Indicators for tracking European vulnerabilities to the risks of infectious disease transmission due to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Jonathan E; Ebi, Kristie L; Vose, David; Wint, Willy; Alexander, Neil; Mintiens, Koen; Semenza, Jan C

    2014-02-01

    A wide range of infectious diseases may change their geographic range, seasonality and incidence due to climate change, but there is limited research exploring health vulnerabilities to climate change. In order to address this gap, pan-European vulnerability indices were developed for 2035 and 2055, based upon the definition vulnerability = impact/adaptive capacity. Future impacts were projected based upon changes in temperature and precipitation patterns, whilst adaptive capacity was developed from the results of a previous pan-European study. The results were plotted via ArcGISTM to EU regional (NUTS2) levels for 2035 and 2055 and ranked according to quintiles. The models demonstrate regional variations with respect to projected climate-related infectious disease challenges that they will face, and with respect to projected vulnerabilities after accounting for regional adaptive capacities. Regions with higher adaptive capacities, such as in Scandinavia and central Europe, will likely be better able to offset any climate change impacts and are thus generally less vulnerable than areas with lower adaptive capacities. The indices developed here provide public health planners with information to guide prioritisation of activities aimed at strengthening regional preparedness for the health impacts of climate change. There are, however, many limitations and uncertainties when modeling health vulnerabilities. To further advance the field, the importance of variables such as coping capacity and governance should be better accounted for, and there is the need to systematically collect and analyse the interlinkages between the numerous and ever-expanding environmental, socioeconomic, demographic and epidemiologic datasets so as to promote the public health capacity to detect, forecast, and prepare for the health threats due to climate change. PMID:24566049

  14. Indicators for Tracking European Vulnerabilities to the Risks of Infectious Disease Transmission due to Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Suk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of infectious diseases may change their geographic range, seasonality and incidence due to climate change, but there is limited research exploring health vulnerabilities to climate change. In order to address this gap, pan-European vulnerability indices were developed for 2035 and 2055, based upon the definition vulnerability = impact/adaptive capacity. Future impacts were projected based upon changes in temperature and precipitation patterns, whilst adaptive capacity was developed from the results of a previous pan-European study. The results were plotted via ArcGISTM to EU regional (NUTS2 levels for 2035 and 2055 and ranked according to quintiles. The models demonstrate regional variations with respect to projected climate-related infectious disease challenges that they will face, and with respect to projected vulnerabilities after accounting for regional adaptive capacities. Regions with higher adaptive capacities, such as in Scandinavia and central Europe, will likely be better able to offset any climate change impacts and are thus generally less vulnerable than areas with lower adaptive capacities. The indices developed here provide public health planners with information to guide prioritisation of activities aimed at strengthening regional preparedness for the health impacts of climate change. There are, however, many limitations and uncertainties when modeling health vulnerabilities. To further advance the field, the importance of variables such as coping capacity and governance should be better accounted for, and there is the need to systematically collect and analyse the interlinkages between the numerous and ever-expanding environmental, socioeconomic, demographic and epidemiologic datasets so as to promote the public health capacity to detect, forecast, and prepare for the health threats due to climate change.

  15. Reliability of diffusion weighted MR imaging in differentiating degenerative and infectious end plate changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to investigate the value of diffusion weighted MR imaging in the diagnosis of Modic type 1 change, which may be confused with the acute infectious spondylodiscitis on conventional MR imaging. Twenty-seven patients with erosive intervertebral osteochondrosis, Modic type 1 and 18 patients with spondylodiscitis were included in this retrospective study. All images were acquired using on 1.5 Tesla MR units. Lumbar spinal MR imaging of 45 patients were retrieved from a digital database of a radiology record system and evaluated by one experienced radiologist. Patients with Modic type 1 change had CT slices obtained from the diseased disc space and the affected vertebrae. Bone marrow adjacent to the vertebral end plate in both Modic type 1 change and acute spondylodiscitis were hypointense on T1-weighted images. On T2-weighted images corresponding levels of vertebral end-plates showed hyperintense signal intensity in both group. All the patients with spondylodiscitis and Modic type 1 change were hyperintense and hypointense on diffusion-weighted MR images, respectively. Our findings suggest that diffusion weighted MR imaging is an useful method in differentiating Modic type 1 changes from acute spondylodiscitis, both of which may mimic each other, either on clinical or conventional MRI findings

  16. Extreme weather events and infectious disease outbreaks

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony J McMichael

    2015-01-01

    Human-driven climatic changes will fundamentally influence patterns of human health, including infectious disease clusters and epidemics following extreme weather events. Extreme weather events are projected to increase further with the advance of human-driven climate change. Both recent and historical experiences indicate that infectious disease outbreaks very often follow extreme weather events, as microbes, vectors and reservoir animal hosts exploit the disrupted social and environmental c...

  17. Genetic and infectious profiles influence cerebrospinal fluid IgG abnormality in Japanese multiple sclerosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Yoshimura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abnormal intrathecal synthesis of IgG, reflected by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF oligoclonal IgG bands (OBs and increased IgG index, is much less frequently observed in Japanese multiple sclerosis (MS cohorts compared with Western cohorts. We aimed to clarify whether genetic and common infectious backgrounds influence CSF IgG abnormality in Japanese MS patients. METHODOLOGY: We analyzed HLA-DRB1 alleles, and IgG antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA, and varicella zoster virus (VZV in 94 patients with MS and 367 unrelated healthy controls (HCs. We defined CSF IgG abnormality as the presence of CSF OBs and/or increased IgG index (>0.658. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CSF IgG abnormality was found in 59 of 94 (62.8% MS patients. CSF IgG abnormality-positive patients had a significantly higher frequency of brain MRI lesions meeting the Barkhof criteria compared with abnormality-negative patients. Compared with HCs, CSF IgG abnormality-positive MS patients showed a significantly higher frequency of DRB1 1501, whereas CSF IgG abnormality-negative patients had a significantly higher frequency of DRB1 0405. CSF IgG abnormality-positive MS patients had a significantly higher frequency of anti-C. pneumoniae IgG antibodies compared with CSF IgG abnormality-negative MS patients, although there was no difference in the frequency of anti-C. pneumoniae IgG antibodies between HCs and total MS patients. Compared with HCs, anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies were detected significantly less frequently in the total MS patients, especially in CSF IgG abnormality-negative MS patients. The frequencies of antibodies against EBNA and VZV did not differ significantly among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: CSF IgG abnormality is associated with Western MS-like brain MRI features. DRB1 1501 and C. pneumoniae infection confer CSF IgG abnormality, while DRB1 0405 and H. pylori infection are positively and negatively

  18. Influence of ultrasonic adsorption lithotripsy by percutaneous nephroscope on inflammation mediators and stress hormones of patients with infectious renal calculi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Lu; Xiao-Lei Jiang; Ming-Hui Wu; Yun-Jun Wu; Qiang Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the influence of ultrasonic adsorption lithotripsy by percutaneous nephroscope on inflammation mediators and stress hormones of the patients with infectious renal calculi. Methods:A total of 62 patients with infectious renal calculi in our hospital from January 2014 to June 2015 were selected as the study object,and they were randomly divided into control group(pneumatic ballistic lithotripsy by percutaneous nephroscope group) 31 cases and observation group(ultrasonic adsorption lithotripsy by percutaneous nephroscope group) 31 cases,then the serum expression levels of inflammation mediators and stress hormones of two groups before the treatment and at 12 h-24 h and 48 h after the treatment were compared. Results:The serum expression levels of inflammation mediators and stress hormones of two groups before the treatment were compared,all P>0.05,and the serum expression levels of observation group at 12 h-24 h and 48 h after the treatment were significantly lower than those of control group,while the expression levels of two groups after the treatment were all significantly higher than those before the treatment,all P<0.05. Conclusions:The inflammation mediators and stress hormones of patients with infectious renal calculi who are treated with pneumatic ballistic lithotripsy by percutaneous nephroscope are relatively lower,and it shows that the trauma and bad stress for the body are better controlled, so its clinical application value are relatively higher.

  19. Factors influencing performance of internet-based biosurveillance systems used in epidemic intelligence for early detection of infectious diseases outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Barboza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Internet-based biosurveillance systems have been developed to detect health threats using information available on the Internet, but system performance has not been assessed relative to end-user needs and perspectives. METHOD AND FINDINGS: Infectious disease events from the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance (InVS weekly international epidemiological bulletin published in 2010 were used to construct the gold-standard official dataset. Data from six biosurveillance systems were used to detect raw signals (infectious disease events from informal Internet sources: Argus, BioCaster, GPHIN, HealthMap, MedISys and ProMED-mail. Crude detection rates (C-DR, crude sensitivity rates (C-Se and intrinsic sensitivity rates (I-Se were calculated from multivariable regressions to evaluate the systems' performance (events detected compared to the gold-standard 472 raw signals (Internet disease reports related to the 86 events included in the gold-standard data set were retrieved from the six systems. 84 events were detected before their publication in the gold-standard. The type of sources utilised by the systems varied significantly (p<0001. I-Se varied significantly from 43% to 71% (p=0001 whereas other indicators were similar (C-DR: p=020; C-Se, p=013. I-Se was significantly associated with individual systems, types of system, languages, regions of occurrence, and types of infectious disease. Conversely, no statistical difference of C-DR was observed after adjustment for other variables. CONCLUSION: Although differences could result from a biosurveillance system's conceptual design, findings suggest that the combined expertise amongst systems enhances early detection performance for detection of infectious diseases. While all systems showed similar early detection performance, systems including human moderation were found to have a 53% higher I-Se (p=00001 after adjustment for other variables. Overall, the use of moderation, sources

  20. Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living ... to live NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  1. Strategic alliance between the infectious diseases specialist and intensive care unit physician for change in antibiotic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, D; Belloni, R

    2005-02-01

    There is a general consensus that antimicrobial use in intensive care units (ICU) is greater than that in general wards. By implementing a strategy of systematic infectious disease consultations in agreement with the ICU chief, we have modified the antibiotic prescription habits of the ICU physician. A reduction was observed in the use of selected antibiotics (third-generation cephalosporins, vancomycin, carbapenems and piperacillin-tazobactam), with a significant reduction in the length of hospital stay for ICU patients and lower antibiotic costs without negative impact on patient mortality. Leadership by the infectious diseases consultant in combination with commitment by ICU physicians is a simple and effective method to change antibiotic prescription habits in the ICU. PMID:15828447

  2. [Globalization and infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirski, Tomasz; Bartoszcze, Michał; Bielawska-Drózd, Agata

    2011-01-01

    Globalization is a phenomenon characteristic of present times. It can be considered in various aspects: economic, environmental changes, demographic changes, as well as the development of new technologies. All these aspects of globalization have a definite influence on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases. Economic aspects ofglobalization are mainly the trade development, including food trade, which has an impact on the spread of food-borne diseases. The environmental changes caused by intensive development of industry, as a result of globalization, which in turn affects human health. The demographic changes are mainly people migration between countries and rural and urban areas, which essentially favors the global spread of many infectious diseases. While technological advances prevents the spread of infections, for example through better access to information, it may also increase the risk, for example through to create opportunities to travel into more world regions, including the endemic regions for various diseases. The phenomenon ofglobalization is also closely associated with the threat of terrorism, including bioterrorism. It forces the governments of many countries to develop effective programs to protect and fight against this threat. PMID:22390054

  3. [Biological factors influencing infectious diseases transmitted by invasive species of mosquitoes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boštíková, Vanda; Pasdiorová, Markéta; Marek, Jan; Prášil, Petr; Salavec, Miloslav; Sleha, Radek; Střtítecká, Hana; Blažek, Pavel; Hanovcová, Irena; Šošovičková, Renáta; Špliňo, Milan; Smetana, Jan; Chlíbek, Roman; Hytych, Václav; Kuča, Kamil; Boštík, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Studies focused on arbovirus diseases transmitted by invasive species of mosquitoes have become increasingly significant in recent years, due to the fact that these vectors have successfully migrated to Europe and become established in the region. Mosquitoes, represented by more than 3 200 species, occur naturally worldwide, except in Antarctica. They feed on the blood of warm-blooded animals and by this route, they are capable of transmitting dangerous diseases. Some species can travel a distance of 10 km per night and can fly continuously for up to 4 hours at a speed of 1-2 km/h. Most species are active at night, in the evening or morning. It usually takes a mosquito female about 50 seconds to penetrate the skin of mammals and the subsequent blood meal usually takes about 2.5 minutes. Mosquitoes live for several weeks or months, depending on the environmental conditions. The VectorNet project is a European network of information exchange and sharing of data relating to the geographical distribution of arthropod vectors and transmission of infectious agents between human populations and animals. It aims at the development of strategic plans and vaccination policies which are the main tasks of this time, as well as the development and application of new disinfectants to control vector populations. PMID:27450526

  4. THE INFLUENCES OF CHANGES IN TAX LEGISLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MORAR IOAN DAN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Taxation is a fairly important field in the relationship between taxpayers and tax authorities, especially given the frequent changes in specific legislation. Legislative changes affect the patrimonial position of the taxpayers, but also their behavior, therefore this phenomenon is important to advise those interested and also to analyze the changes resulting from changes in tax legislation. This paper aims to meaningfully present the latest legislative changes and to analyze their influences on taxpayers and on budget revenues from taxes subject to change. The research methodology is based on comparison and inference, based on previous analyzes for such studies on the tax system. In the literature there are known ways and methods of increasing the tax burden and, based on these variables, in the present paper we will highlight the particular influences on the taxpayer’s , loaded by weight imposed by the official distribution of the tax burden. The implications of legislative changes in tax matters should be sought in the innermost chord of taxpayers and also in the increasingly large and patched pockets of the modern state. In the first place, we will point out the implications on changing tax procedures, in terms of the workload for the taxpayer and the tax collectors. By accurately and relevantly analyzing the influences generated by such changes, the author aims to demonstrate the harmful influences of some changes in terms of discouraging investments and honest labor.

  5. The influence of age and genetics on natural resistance to experimentally induced feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Niels C; Liu, Hongwei; Gandolfi, Barbara; Lyons, Leslie A

    2014-11-15

    Naturally occurring feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is usually fatal, giving the impression that immunity to the FIP virus (FIPV) is extremely poor. This impression may be incorrect, because not all cats experimentally exposed to FIPV develop FIP. There is also a belief that the incidence of FIP may be affected by a number of host, virus, and environmental cofactors. However, the contribution of these cofactors to immunity and disease incidence has not been determined. The present study followed 111 random-bred specific pathogen free (SPF) cats that were obtained from a single research breeding colony and experimentally infected with FIPV. The cats were from several studies conducted over the past 5 years, and as a result, some of them had prior exposure to feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) or avirulent FIPVs. The cats were housed under optimized conditions of nutrition, husbandry, and quarantine to eliminate most of the cofactors implicated in FIPV infection outcome and were uniformly challenge exposed to the same field strain of serotype 1 FIPV. Forty of the 111 (36%) cats survived their initial challenge exposure to a Type I cat-passaged field strains of FIPV. Six of these 40 survivors succumbed to FIP to a second or third challenge exposure, suggesting that immunity was not always sustained. Exposure to non-FIP-inducing feline coronaviruses prior to challenge with virulent FIPV did not significantly affect FIP incidence but did accelerate the disease course in some cats. There were no significant differences in FIP incidence between males and females, but resistance increased significantly between 6 months and 1 or more years of age. Genetic testing was done on 107 of the 111 infected cats. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) segregated the 107 cats into three distinct families based primarily on a common sire(s), and resistant and susceptible cats were equally distributed within each family. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on 73 cats that died of FIP

  6. Correlation of hematological changes and serum and monocyte inhibition with the early suppression of phytohemagglutinin stimulation of lymphocytes in experimental infectious bursal disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Confer, A W; MacWilliams, P S

    1982-01-01

    Several experiments were conducted to study the mechanism of infectious bursal disease virus induced suppression of phytohemagglutinin stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Infectious bursal disease virus inoculation of one week old chicks resulted in significant suppression of phytohemagglutinin stimulation during the first three days after inoculation as demonstrated by a whole blood assay. Mild thymic necrosis was seen on day 3. Hematological changes during this time consisted of in...

  7. Factors influencing auditor change: evidence from Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Sharifah Nazatul Faiza Syed Mustapha Nazri; Malcolm Smith; Zubaidah Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine two factors which influence auditor change: audit and client firms’ characteristics, for Malaysian listed companies. Given the costs involved, it is important to understand the reasons why companies change their auditor and choose a particular level of audit assurance. Design/methodology/approach – This study evaluates the effects of various independent variables on auditor change behaviour and the sensitivity of results to alternative period ...

  8. Multi-taxa integrated landscape genetics for zoonotic infectious diseases: deciphering variables influencing disease emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Sarah S T; Gonzalez, Andrew; Millien, Virginie

    2016-05-01

    Zoonotic disease transmission systems involve sets of species interacting with each other and their environment. This complexity impedes development of disease monitoring and control programs that require reliable identification of spatial and biotic variables and mechanisms facilitating disease emergence. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a framework that simultaneously examines all species involved in disease emergence by integrating concepts and methods from population genetics, landscape ecology, and spatial statistics. Multi-taxa integrated landscape genetics (MTILG) can reveal how interspecific interactions and landscape variables influence disease emergence patterns. We test the potential of our MTILG-based framework by modelling the emergence of a disease system across multiple species dispersal, interspecific interaction, and landscape scenarios. Our simulations showed that both interspecific-dependent dispersal patterns and landscape characteristics significantly influenced disease spread. Using our framework, we were able to detect statistically similar inter-population genetic differences and highly correlated spatial genetic patterns that imply species-dependent dispersal. Additionally, species that were assigned coupled-dispersal patterns were affected to the same degree by similar landscape variables. This study underlines the importance of an integrated approach to investigating emergence of disease systems. MTILG is a robust approach for such studies and can identify potential avenues for targeted disease management strategies. PMID:27074898

  9. Enterotypes influence temporal changes in gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Licht, Tine Rask; Kellebjerg Poulsen, Sanne;

    The human gut microbiota plays an important role for the health of the host. The question is whether we can modulate the gut microbiota by changing diet. During a 6-month, randomised, controlled dietary intervention, the effect of a moderate diet shift from Average Danish Diet to New Nordic Diet on...... the gut microbiota in humans (n=62) was investigated. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that the microbiota did not change significantly by the intervention. Nevertheless, by stratifying subjects into two enterotypes, distinguished by the Prevotella/Bacteroides ratio (P/B), we were able to detect...... significant changes in the gut microbiota composition resulting from the interventions. Subjects with a high-P/B experienced more pronounced changes in the gut microbiota composition than subjects with a low-P/B. The study is the first to indicate that enterotypes influence microbiota response to a dietary...

  10. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  11. Extreme weather events and infectious disease outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Human-driven climatic changes will fundamentally influence patterns of human health, including infectious disease clusters and epidemics following extreme weather events. Extreme weather events are projected to increase further with the advance of human-driven climate change. Both recent and historical experiences indicate that infectious disease outbreaks very often follow extreme weather events, as microbes, vectors and reservoir animal hosts exploit the disrupted social and environmental conditions of extreme weather events. This review article examines infectious disease risks associated with extreme weather events; it draws on recent experiences including Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the 2010 Pakistan mega-floods, and historical examples from previous centuries of epidemics and 'pestilence' associated with extreme weather disasters and climatic changes. A fuller understanding of climatic change, the precursors and triggers of extreme weather events and health consequences is needed in order to anticipate and respond to the infectious disease risks associated with human-driven climate change. Post-event risks to human health can be constrained, nonetheless, by reducing background rates of persistent infection, preparatory action such as coordinated disease surveillance and vaccination coverage, and strengthened disaster response. In the face of changing climate and weather conditions, it is critically important to think in ecological terms about the determinants of health, disease and death in human populations. PMID:26168924

  12. Global health impacts due to infectious diseases and climate change: A narrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Sameera Karnik; Amar Kanekar

    2013-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), environment is explained in terms of human health, such as physical, chemical and biological factors that are external to a person and all the related behavioral changes that affect population health. Quality of life and health is generally affected by people’s interaction with the environment.The purpose of this narrative review was to address various global health impacts such as heat wave impact, impact of floods and droughts, impact of all...

  13. Influence of degenerative changes of intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To investigate the material properties of normal and degenerated intervertebral discs (IVDs and examine the effect of degenerative changes on IVD pathology. Methods: A computer-based online search was under-taken to identify English articles about material properties of IVDs published from January 1950 to 2011 in PubMed database. The retrieved keywords included material properties, intervertebral disc and degeneration. Based on the principles of reliability, advancement and efficiency, the obtained data were primarily examined, and the original source was retrieved to read the full-text. Repetitive articles were excluded. The data of material properties of normal and degenerated IVDs were summarized and analyzed by meta-analysis. Results: The data of Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, shear modulus, hydraulic permeability and intradiscal pres-sure of normal and degenerated IVDs were obtained. Com-pared with normal IVDs, the Young's modulus and shear modulus of annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus were higher in degenerated IVDs, the Poisson's ratio was lower while the hydraulic permeability and intradiscal pressure were higher. Besides, the degeneration-related alterations in IVDs had an influence both on itself and other spinal structures, leading to diseases such as bulging disc, discogenic pain and spinal stenosis. Meanwhile, the heavy mechanical loading and injury indicated important pathways to IVD degeneration. Conclusions: To a certain extent, the degenerative changes of IVD influence its material properties. And the degeneration-related alterations of composition can cause structural failure of IVDs, leading to injuries and diseases. Key words: Intervertebral disc; Mechanical phenomena; Degeneration; Elastic modulus; Permeability; Pathology

  14. A Survey of Dutch Expert Opinion on Climatic Drivers of Infectious Disease Risk in Western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Mia Akin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is considered to be a significant influence for infectious disease risk in Western Europe. Climatic and non-climatic developments act together resulting in current and future infectious disease risk. This study uses a survey to explore Dutch expert perspectives on climate change induced infectious disease risk. The results show that the experts consider temperature change, precipitation change, humidity change, and climate change induced habitat change to be relatively important for water-related infectious disease risk, vector-borne disease risk excluding zoonoses, and the risk of zoonoses. The climatic drivers are seen as relatively less important for food-related infectious disease risk. The experts rate many non-climatic drivers to be highly important for infectious disease risk. Comparatively, the majority of the non-climatic drivers assessed are seen as more important than climate change drivers. The degree of uncertainty in the future development of climatic drivers is viewed as moderate to high, and for non-climatic drivers mostly as moderate. An analysis of subsamples based on professional backgrounds reveals differences in experts’ opinions for e.g., socio-cultural drivers, and similarities. Diversity and consensus amongst expert perspectives on climate change and infectious diseases can have implications for policy. Further research to uncover and compare prevailing perspectives is necessary.

  15. Changes of four common non-infectious liver diseases for the hospitalized patients in Beijing 302 hospital from 2002 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Binxia; Li, Baosen; Huang, Ang; Sun, Ying; Teng, Guangju; Wang, Xiaoxia; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Li, Jin; Zou, Zhengsheng

    2016-08-01

    The implementation of a hepatitis B vaccination program in China has led to a significant decline in the prevalence and incidence of liver diseases secondary to hepatitis B virus over the past two decades. With recent changes in the economy and increases in average incomes in China during the same period, there has been a rapid rise in per capita alcohol consumption and an epidemic of obesity. We hypothesized that the burden of liver diseases in China has shifted from infectious to non-infectious etiologies. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 20,378 patients who were hospitalized in Beijing 302 hospital between 2002 and 2013. We found that the total admission rate secondary to alcoholic liver disease (ALD), non-alcoholic liver disease (NAFLD), autoimmune liver disease (AILD), and drug-induced liver injury (DILI) was 10.7%. ALD was the leading cause of inpatient hospitalization (3.9% of total admissions). The rate of inpatient admission for ALD, AILD, and DILI increased by 170%, 111%, and 107%, respectively during the study period. Chinese herbal medicine was the primary cause of DILI in our subjects. The burden of non-infectious liver diseases has increased over the last decade among hospitalized patients in a large tertiary hospital in China. The increase in the rate of admission for ALD and DILI from Chinese herbal medicine suggests that strategies to reduce harmful use of alcohol and increase awareness and education on the use of herbal medicine are needed. PMID:27519542

  16. Viral competition and maternal immunity influence the clinical disease caused by very virulent infectious bursal disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackwood, Daral J

    2011-09-01

    The very virulent form of infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) causes an immunosuppressive disease that is further characterized by the rapid onset of morbidity and high mortality in susceptible chickens. In 2009, vvIBDV was first reported in California, U. S. A., and since that time only a few cases of acute infectious bursal disease attributed to vvIBDV have been recognized in California. In other countries where vvIBDV has become established, it rapidly spreads to most poultry-producing regions. Two factors that may be involved in limiting the spread or reducing the severity of the clinical disease caused by vvIBDV in the U. S. A. are maternal immunity and competition with endemic variant strains of the virus. In this study, the ability of vvIBDV to infect and cause disease in maternally immune layer chickens was examined at weekly intervals over a 5-wk period during which their neutralizing maternal antibodies waned. Birds inoculated with vvIBDV at 2, 3, and 4 wk of age seemed healthy throughout the duration of the experiment, but macroscopic and microscopic lesions were observed in their bursa tissues. A real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay also confirmed the presence of vvIBDV RNA in their bursa tissues, indicating this virus was infecting the birds even at 2 wk of age when neutralizing maternal antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus were still relatively high (> 2000 geometric mean antibody titer). No mortality was observed in any birds when inoculated at 2, 3, or 4 wk of age; however, inoculation at 5 and 6 wk of age resulted in 10% and 20% mortality, respectively. Three experiments on the competition between vvIBDV and the two variant viruses T1 and FF6 were conducted. In all three experiments, specific-pathogen-free (SPF) birds that were inoculated with only the vvIBDV became acutely moribund, and except for Experiment 1 (62% mortality) all succumbed to the infection within 4 days of being exposed. When the

  17. Climate Change Influences on Antarctic Bird Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczak-Abshire, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    Rapid changes in the major environmental variables like: temperature, wind and precipitation have occurred in the Antarctic region during the last 50 years. In this very sensitive region, even small changes can potentially lead to major environmental perturbations. Then the climate change poses a new challenge to the survival of Antarctic wildlife. As important bioindicators of changes in the ecosystem seabirds and their response to the climate perturbations have been recorded. Atmospheric warming and consequent changes in sea ice conditions have been hypothesized to differentially affect predator populations due to different predator life-history strategies and substantially altered krill recruitment dynamics.

  18. Networks for change: How networks influence organizational change

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Portugal Ferreira

    2008-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature on organizational change by examining organizations as social entities embedded in inter-organizational networks. In contrast to extant research that focuses on macro environment and internal factors to explain organizational change we put forth the social network surrounding the firm as a major driver of any change process. In specific we examine organization change as driven by the organizations? positions and relations in an interorganizational netw...

  19. Amino acid changes in the spike protein of feline coronavirus correlate with systemic spread of virus from the intestine and not with feline infectious peritonitis

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, Emily L; Tasker, Séverine; Day, Michael J; Harley, Ross; Kipar, Anja; Siddell, Stuart G.; Helps, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a mutation in the spike protein gene of feline coronavirus (FCoV), which results in an amino acid change from methionine to leucine at position 1058, may be associated with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Tissue and faecal samples collected post mortem from cats diagnosed with or without FIP were subjected to RNA extraction and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to detect FCoV RNA. In cats with FIP, 95% of tissue, and 81% ...

  20. Nine challenges in incorporating the dynamics of behaviour in infectious diseases models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Funk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the spread of infectious diseases in human populations has been modelled with static parameters. These parameters, however, can change when individuals change their behaviour. If these changes are themselves influenced by the disease dynamics, there is scope for mechanistic models of behaviour to improve our understanding of this interaction. Here, we present challenges in modelling changes in behaviour relating to disease dynamics, specifically: how to incorporate behavioural changes in models of infectious disease dynamics, how to inform measurement of relevant behaviour to parameterise such models, and how to determine the impact of behavioural changes on observed disease dynamics.

  1. Modeling Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Background Information > Modeling Infectious Diseases Fact Sheet Modeling Infectious Diseases Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Using computers to prepare ... Content Area Predicting the potential spread of an infectious disease requires much more than simply connecting cities on ...

  2. About Infectious Mononucleosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthcare Providers Laboratory Testing References & Resources About Infectious Mononucleosis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... may cause the spleen to rupture. Diagnosing Infectious Mononucleosis Healthcare providers typically diagnose infectious mononucleosis based on ...

  3. Enterotypes influence temporal changes in gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Licht, Tine Rask; Kellebjerg Poulsen, Sanne;

    The human gut microbiota plays an important role for human health. The question is whether we can modulate the gut microbiota by changing diet. During a 6-month, randomised, controlled dietary intervention, the effect of consuming a diet following the New Nordic Diet recommendations (NND) as...... opposed to Average Danish Diet (ADD) on the gut microbiota in humans (n=62) was investigated. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that the microbiota did not change significantly by the intervention. Nevertheless, by stratifying subjects into two enterotypes, distinguished by the Prevotella/Bacteroides ratio...... (P/B), we were able to detect significant changes in the gut microbiota composition resulting from the interventions. Subjects with a high-P/B experienced more pronounced changes in the gut microbiota composition than subjects with a low-P/B. The study is the first to indicate that enterotypes...

  4. Enterotypes influence temporal changes in gut microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Licht, Tine Rask; Kellebjerg Poulsen, Sanne; Meinert Larsen, Thomas; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2013-01-01

    The human gut microbiota plays an important role for human health. The question is whether we can modulate the gut microbiota by changing diet. During a 6-month, randomised, controlled dietary intervention, the effect of consuming a diet following the New Nordic Diet recommendations (NND) as opposed to Average Danish Diet (ADD) on the gut microbiota in humans (n=62) was investigated. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that the microbiota did not change significantly by the intervention. Neverth...

  5. Institutional investor influence on global climate change disclosure practices

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Cotter; Muftah M Najah

    2012-01-01

    Using a stakeholder engagement perspective, we investigate the collective influence of institutional investors on a comprehensive set of climate change disclosures for a global sample of large companies. The proposition tested in this paper is that the influence of these powerful stakeholders is positively associated with climate change disclosure via corporate communications channels. We find the extent and quality of climate change disclosures to be associated with three indicators of corpo...

  6. Pathophysiology of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus disease in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri): early changes in blood and aspects of the immune Response after Injection of IHN Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Donald F.; Smith, Lynnwood

    1974-01-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were injected with infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus and various hematological and blood chemical changes were monitored over 9 days. The packed cell volume, hemoglobin, red blood cell count, and plasma bicarbonate were significantly depressed by day 4. Plasma chloride, calcium, phosphorus, total protein, and blood cell types did not change during the 9 days. Furthermore, plasma  LDH isozyme was significantly increased by the fourth day, and fish infected with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus, Vibrio anguillarum, Aeromonas salmonicida, and redmouth bacterium did not show specific LDH isozyme alterations. Acid-base alterations occurred at 10 C but not at 18 C. The acid-base imbalance and elevation of the  LDH isozyme were consistently associated with the early development of the disease.The immune response after injection of IHN virus was determined and protection from disease was tested by passive immunization. Actively immunized fish developed IHN-neutralizing antibodies within 54 days after injection of virus, and the antibodies were protective when juvenile fish were passively immunized and experimentally challenged with IHN virus.

  7. Are Rorschach Responses Influenced by Society's Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Louise Bates

    1975-01-01

    Based on the general belief that people "normally" see male figures on Rorschach Card III and females on Card VII; to see the opposite, according to some, would indicate a confusing of sex roles. This study makes two comparisons: age and time changes of individual responses to these cards in different decades. (DEP)

  8. Influence of degenerative changes of intervertebral disc

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi; Chen, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Ling; ZHANG Li-ying; Liu, Jing-cheng; WANG Zheng-guo

    2012-01-01

    【Abstract】Objective: To investigate the material properties of normal and degenerated intervertebral discs (IVDs) and examine the effect of degenerative changes on IVD pathology. Methods: A computer-based online search was under-taken to identify English articles about material properties of IVDs published from January 1950 to 2011 in PubMed database. The retrieved keywords included material properties, intervertebral disc and degeneration. Based on the principle...

  9. NOx Change over China and Its Influences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yu(刘煜); I. S. A. ISAKSEN; J. K. SUNDET; HE Jinhai(何金海); YAN Peng(颜鹏)

    2004-01-01

    A 3-D chemical transport model (OSLO CTM2) is used to investigate the impact of the increase of NOx emission over China.The model is capable to reproduce basically the seasonal variation of surface NOx and ozone over eastern China.NOx emission data and observations reveal that NOx over easternChina increases quite quickly with the economic development of China.Model results indicate that NOxconcentration over eastern China increasingly rises with the increase of NOx emission over China,and accelerates to increase in winter.When the NOx emission increases from 1995 to its double,the ratio of NO2/NOx abruptly drops in winter over northern China.Ozone at the surface decreases in winter with the continual enhancement of the NOx level over eastern China,but increases over southern China in summertime.It is noticeable that peak ozone over northern China increases in summer although mean ozone changes little.In summer,ozone increases in the free troposphere dominantly below 500 hPa.Moreover,the increases of total ozone over eastern China are proportional to the increases of NOx emission.In a word,the model results suggest that the relationship between NOx and ozone at the surface would change with NOx increase.

  10. The influence of greenhouse gases on global climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to influence of greenhouse gases on global climate change. Thus, the impacts associated with increasing of CO2 concentration are considered. The impacts associated with decreasing of ozone layer are considered as well. The influence of air temperature on agriculture is studied.

  11. Climate and climate change and infectious disease risk in Thailand: A spatial study of dengue hemorrhagic fever using GIS and remotely-sensed imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzera, Kristopher

    The scientific community has widely accepted that climate plays a key role in the sustainability and transmission of many infectious diseases. Global climate change can potentially trigger the spread of disease into new regions and increase the intensity of disease in regions where it is endemic. This study explores the association between monthly conditions of climate change to changes in disease risk, emphasizing the potential spread of dengue fever due to climate change in Thailand. This study also develops techniques new to GIS and remote sensing that generate surfaces of daily minimum temperature toward identifying areas at greater transmission risk. Dengue fever expansion due to global warming is a serious concern for Thailand where warming temperatures may increase the size of the habitat of the disease-spreading vector, Aedes aegypti, particularly during cooler months when transmission is limited by environmental conditions. In this study, first, the association between past dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and climate in Thailand is determined. Second, evidence of recent climate change is related to changes in DHF rates. Third, daily minimum temperature is derived from remote sensing toward identifying the spatial and temporal limitations of potential transmission risk. The results indicate that minimum temperature has recently experienced a rapid increase, particularly in the winter months when transmission is low. This is associated with a recent rise in winter DHF cases. As increasing minimum temperatures in these regions are anticipated to continue, we can expect dengue transmission rates to also increase throughout the year.

  12. Structural changes in plasma membrane under influence of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects ionizing radiation on membranes was studied. Changes arising in the oligosaccharide layer of the surface of the cell membrane, in the protein and lipid phases of membranes under the influence of radiation, as well as possible schemes of formation of structural changes in the membrane are discussed. Molecular bases of structural membrane changes induced by radiation, and determination of their role in development of cell pathology were investigated. The influence of the state of irradiated cell membranes on their radiosensitivity are also studied

  13. Best practice influence on project changes during the construction phase.

    OpenAIRE

    Ciaravino, Brian Douglas.

    1998-01-01

    CIVINS This thesis analyzes the influence of team building, constructability, and project change management best practices on the reduction of project changes during the construction phase. Construction Industry Institute Owner, Naval Facilities Command, and Construction Industry Institute Contractor data are separately evaluated to determine if a statistically significance relationship between best practice use and a reduction in the project change rate during construction exists. Conclus...

  14. Infectious Disease, Endangerment, and Extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross D. E. MacPhee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious disease, especially virulent infectious disease, is commonly regarded as a cause of fluctuation or decline in biological populations. However, it is not generally considered as a primary factor in causing the actual endangerment or extinction of species. We review here the known historical examples in which disease has, or has been assumed to have had, a major deleterious impact on animal species, including extinction, and highlight some recent cases in which disease is the chief suspect in causing the outright endangerment of particular species. We conclude that the role of disease in historical extinctions at the population or species level may have been underestimated. Recent methodological breakthroughs may lead to a better understanding of the past and present roles of infectious disease in influencing population fitness and other parameters.

  15. Factors of influence and changes in the tourism consumer behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Fratu, D.

    2011-01-01

    Consumer behaviour is a very important aspect to be studied in every marketing activity, therefore in tourism marketing as well. Defining and identifying the factors that influence consumers help in understanding individual needs and buying processes in their whole complexity. Consumers have changed their behaviour over the last two years due to the instability of the economic environment. The author describes in this article the factors which influence consumer behaviour and also presents ho...

  16. The apparent influence of climatic change on recent changes of range by European insects (Lepidoptera, Orthoptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burton, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    The apparent influence of climatic change on recent changes of range by European insects (Lepidoptera, Orthoptera) For several years I have been collecting data concerning changes in the ranges of European insects, especially Lepidoptera and Orthoptera. The vast majority of those species which have

  17. Communicating change: the influence of information, communication, uncertainty and cynicism on readiness for change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.L. Elving

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In previous studies we have shown the influence of information and communication on the success of organizational change. We extended that research with the inclusion of cynical responses to top management about the change, change fatigue and turnover intentions. Methodology: This study was

  18. Factors of influence and changes in the tourism consumer behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fratu, D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumer behaviour is a very important aspect to be studied in every marketing activity, therefore in tourism marketing as well. Defining and identifying the factors that influence consumers help in understanding individual needs and buying processes in their whole complexity. Consumers have changed their behaviour over the last two years due to the instability of the economic environment. The author describes in this article the factors which influence consumer behaviour and also presents how it has changed over the past two years.

  19. Infectious mononucleosis #3 (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious mononucleosis is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. It is a viral infection causing high temperature, sore throat, and swollen lymph glands. Infectious mononucleosis can be contagious if the infected person comes ...

  20. Infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central nervous system infections represents a group of life-threatening diseases that present a formidable challenge to physicians. Despite the development of effective antimicrobial agents and modern surgical techniques, significant mortality and morbidity with CNS infections persist. Since the introduction of computed tomography, there is evidence of a marked decrease in mortality among patients with brain abscesses, although the morbidity has not changed significantly. CT correlation with pathology of the various CNS infections may aid in earlier diagnosis and bring about further disease in morbidity and mortality. Infections reach the brain or meninges mainly by two routes: (1) hematogenous dissemination from a distant infective focus to the meninges, corticomedullary junction, and choroid plexus; (2) direct extension by bony erosion for an adjacent focus of suppuration (otitis, mastoidits, sinusitis), by transmission along anaostomotic veins from the face, scalp, and orbits, and by transmission along cranial nerves following neurosurgery or traumatic craniocerebral wounds. Certain external factors serve to enhance the risk of intracranial infections, such as radiation; immunosuppressive or steroid therapy; cyanotic congenital heart disease; systemic illness such as diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, or cirrhosis; leukemia, lymphoma, or agammaglobulinemia; severe body stress; midline bony fusion defects; surgical or traumatic craniocerebral injury; and pulmonary or other systemic infections

  1. Modeling of preventive maintenance changes influence upon flight safety indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.В. Гончаренко

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available  It is considered a simplified model of connection between the catastrophic events flow frequency and both preventive maintenance changes periodicity and diagnosis depth of aviation equipment. It is deduced specific formulas for computing the changes and diagnostics parameters influence upon the values of both the catastrophic events flow frequency and technical-economical control factor criterion of flight safety levels.

  2. [Infectious diseases (beside AIDS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, C; Senn, L; Zanetti, G

    2008-01-01

    A simplified version of the US guidelines for prophylaxis of infectious endocarditis was published in 2007. Changes are expected in Switzerland as well. Posaconsole is a new antifungal agent available mostly for prophylaxis in immunocompromised patients. Epidemiology of sexually transmitted infections warrants screening in young adults and after one episode. A meta-analysis clarified the impact of antibiotic therapy in patients with Campylobacter spp. infection. In the field of emerging diseases, we discuss Norovirus epidemics, community-acquired bacteria producing extended-spectrum betalactamases, extensively resistant tuberculosis, and new respiratory viruses. Finally, we address a basic research topic that may change practice in the future: the relationship between individual susceptibility to infection and innate immunity. PMID:18251213

  3. Differential effects of pretraining influences on readiness to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Anupama; Steele-Johnson, Debra; Delgado, Kristin M; Cole, Phillis A

    2007-01-01

    Training and development are integral to organizational change but are difficult to accomplish effectively in dynamic and complex work environments. Such environments can lead to nonoptimal training conditions that reduce individuals' readiness to change and training effectiveness. On the basis of the transtheoretical model of change (J. O. Prochaska, C. C. DiClemente, & J. C. Norcross, 1992), the authors examined pretraining influences (choice, social support, and motivation to learn) on readiness to change under nonoptimal training conditions. They examined specific dimensions of readiness to change rather than a global readiness to change construct. Participants were 183 driving under the influence (DUI) offenders participating in a court-mandated, alcohol-related Weekend Intervention Program. Perceived choice to attend training, social support, and motivation to learn affected readiness to change when individuals were resisting, considering, acting on, or maintaining behavior or attitude change. These effects were also dependent on age. Results suggest how training effectiveness could be improved when trainees are least likely to learn. PMID:17312686

  4. Human migration and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, S M

    2009-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases (EID) are defined as diseases that have appeared recently or that have recently increased in their frequency, geographical distribution or both. Commercial globalisation, population movements and environmental changes are the main factors favouring the international spread of microorganisms. Transport and communication development constitutes also a remarkable factor in the worldwide dispersion of microorganisms. The mass movement of large numbers of people creates new opportunities for the spread and establishment of common or novel infectious diseases. A surveillance system to detect emergent and re-emergent infections, a rapid responsiveness of healthcare systems and laboratories, vector control, and the provision of healthcare education programmes to inform the population of how to avoid infections are needed in order to stop the spread of infectious diseases. PMID:19220349

  5. What Influences Climate and Glacier Change in the Southwestern China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of climate change in the areas of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and the Himalayas has taken on increasing importance because of available water resources from their mountain glaciers. Many of these glaciers over the region have been retreating, while some are advancing and stable. Other studies report that some glaciers in the Himalayas show acceleration on their shrinkage. However, the causes of the glacier meltings are still difficult to grasp because of the complexity of climatic change and its influence on glacier issues. However, it is vital that we pursue further study to enable the future prediction on glacier changes.

  6. Influencing behavioral change by customer engagement amongst youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sonal SinghMarketing and Management Department, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, AustraliaAbstract: It is widely accepted that many social and health problems have underlying behavioral causes. Because these problems are rooted in human behavior, solutions to deal with them also lie in human behavior. This paper examines ways of integrating customer engagement in social programs to influence and initiate behavior change effectively with a special focus on youth. This work followed a theoretical deduction by use of a literature review. Social marketing places emphasis on behavior change, and one of the key challenges for social marketers is to ensure a perceived value for customers in taking up and maintaining positive behavior. If perceptions, beliefs, attitudes, and values influence behavior, then the central focus should be on the youth. Integrating youth is a prerequisite for effective social marketing programs and ultimately behavioral change. This approach will pave the way for effective brand positioning and brand loyalty in social marketing which has been lacking and requires more attention from researchers and policymakers. This paper outlines theoretical developments in social marketing that will increase the effectiveness of social marketing programs overall. Existing social marketing literature typically focuses on social marketing interventions and behavioral change. This paper uses customer engagement within a social marketing context so that social marketing programs are perceived as brands to which youth can relate.Keywords: social marketing, customer engagement, behavioral influence, change, youth

  7. Simulating infectious disease risk based on climatic drivers: from numerical weather prediction to long term climate change scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminade, C.; Ndione, J. A.; Diallo, M.; MacLeod, D.; Faye, O.; Ba, Y.; Dia, I.; Medlock, J. M.; Leach, S.; McIntyre, K. M.; Baylis, M.; Morse, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    Climate variability is an important component in determining the incidence of a number of diseases with significant health and socioeconomic impacts. In particular, vector born diseases are the most likely to be affected by climate; directly via the development rates and survival of both the pathogen and the vector, and indirectly through changes in the surrounding environmental conditions. Disease risk models of various complexities using different streams of climate forecasts as inputs have been developed within the QWeCI EU and ENHanCE ERA-NET project frameworks. This work will present two application examples, one for Africa and one for Europe. First, we focus on Rift Valley fever over sub-Saharan Africa, a zoonosis that affects domestic animals and humans by causing an acute fever. We show that the Rift Valley fever outbreak that occurred in late 2010 in the northern Sahelian region of Mauritania might have been anticipated ten days in advance using the GFS numerical weather prediction system. Then, an ensemble of regional climate projections is employed to model the climatic suitability of the Asian tiger mosquito for the future over Europe. The Asian tiger mosquito is an invasive species originally from Asia which is able to transmit West Nile and Chikungunya Fever among others. This species has spread worldwide during the last decades, mainly through the shipments of goods from Asia. Different disease models are employed and inter-compared to achieve such a task. Results show that the climatic conditions over southern England, central Western Europe and the Balkans might become more suitable for the mosquito (including the proviso that the mosquito has already been introduced) to establish itself in the future.

  8. INFLUENCE OF CLIMATE CHANGES ON WATER RESOURCES IN MOLDOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Ivanov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to analyze the current state of affairs with water resources in Moldova, the challenges it faces for its national human and economic development, having in mind that the water resources are quite limited in Moldova, which encounters pollution, degradation influenced by climate change and unwise human activity to their biodiversity and ecosystems, availability and accessibility. It also attempts to highlight the relationship between climate change and water resources in Moldova, which has adverse effects on both environment and people’s health, and raise significant hurdles to the international, regional and sectoral development.

  9. E-commerce influence on changes in logistics processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga Żurek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available   Background: The aim of this publication is to address the changes in retail trade, which have a direct influence on the development of e-commerce which in turn causes modifications to logistics chain management strategies and methods of flow control. Materials: The article has been written on the basis of an analysis of subject literature together with determining the influence of e-commerce to changes in logistics processes. The publications included in this study have been selected in order to present the subject of e-commerce development as well as evaluate changes in methods of flow control. The analysis has been prepared based on the author's experience and available reports and publications. Results: As a result of the conducted analysis, an assessment of the proficiency level of the changes in logistics processes on the local and international market as well as of the trends for these changes has been made. Conclusions: With the development of e-commerce, a new logistics chain management strategy began to appear, which covered both the process of handling the online and offline sales channel. Therefore, it can be concluded that properly adapted flow control methods will be the means for achieving the goal. Tasks will include: streamlining flow processes, improving the efficiency of logistic processes as well as adjusting them to market requirements.    

  10. Reference evapotranspiration changes in China: natural processes or human influences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Xu, Chong-Yu; Chen, Xiaohong

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we systematically analyze the changing properties of reference evapotranspiration (ETref) across China using Penman-Monteith (P-M) method, exploring the major sensitive meteorological variables for ETref, and investigating influences of human activities, mainly urbanization in this study, on ETref changes in both space and time. We obtain some important conclusions: (1) decreasing annual and seasonal ETref is observed in the east, south and northwest China. However, a long strip lying between these regions is identified to be characterized by increasing ETref; (2) in the regions east to 100°E, the net total solar radiation is the main cause behind the decreasing ETref. In northwest China, however, relative humidity is recognized as the most sensitive variable for the ETref; (3) in the east and south China, urbanization greatly influences the ETref by directly decreasing net solar radiation. The increased air pollution and aerosols in the highly urbanized regions are the main driving factors causing decreasing net radiation; and (4) this study reveals accelerating hydrological cycle from south to north China. Besides, increasing ETref in the source regions of large rivers in China may pose new challenges for the basin-scale water resource management. The results of this study highlight the integrated effects of climate changes and human activities on ETref changes in different regions of China, which will be of great scientific and practical merits in in-depth understanding of hydrological cycle alterations under the changing environment in China.

  11. Firms dealing with regulatory change: innovation and political influence strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Wesseling, Joeri; Farla, Jacco; Hekkert, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Firm-level strategies, particularly political strategies, are overlooked in transition studies. Therefore, we study how car manufacturers combine and change their innovation and political influence strategies in response to a technology-forcing regulation that attempts to drive transition. We use Oliver and Holzinger?s (2008) conceptual framework on the case of the zero emission vehicle mandate over the period 1990-2013. We use patent and sales data to operationalize the R&D and commercializa...

  12. Rearing Temperature Influences Adult Response to Changes in Mating Status

    OpenAIRE

    Westerman, Erica; Monteiro, Antónia

    2016-01-01

    Rearing environment can have an impact on adult behavior, but it is less clear how rearing environment influences adult behavior plasticity. Here we explore the effect of rearing temperature on adult mating behavior plasticity in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, a species that has evolved two seasonal forms in response to seasonal changes in temperature. These seasonal forms differ in both morphology and behavior. Females are the choosy sex in cohorts reared at warm temperatures (WS butterflie...

  13. Influencing behavioral change by customer engagement amongst youth

    OpenAIRE

    Singh S

    2011-01-01

    Sonal SinghMarketing and Management Department, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, AustraliaAbstract: It is widely accepted that many social and health problems have underlying behavioral causes. Because these problems are rooted in human behavior, solutions to deal with them also lie in human behavior. This paper examines ways of integrating customer engagement in social programs to influence and initiate behavior change effectively with a special focus on youth. This work follow...

  14. Emerging infectious diseases in southeast Asia: regional challenges to control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Richard J; Hunter, Benjamin M; Rudge, James W; Liverani, Marco; Hanvoravongchai, Piya

    2011-02-12

    Southeast Asia is a hotspot for emerging infectious diseases, including those with pandemic potential. Emerging infectious diseases have exacted heavy public health and economic tolls. Severe acute respiratory syndrome rapidly decimated the region's tourist industry. Influenza A H5N1 has had a profound effect on the poultry industry. The reasons why southeast Asia is at risk from emerging infectious diseases are complex. The region is home to dynamic systems in which biological, social, ecological, and technological processes interconnect in ways that enable microbes to exploit new ecological niches. These processes include population growth and movement, urbanisation, changes in food production, agriculture and land use, water and sanitation, and the effect of health systems through generation of drug resistance. Southeast Asia is home to about 600 million people residing in countries as diverse as Singapore, a city state with a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$37,500 per head, and Laos, until recently an overwhelmingly rural economy, with a GDP of US$890 per head. The regional challenges in control of emerging infectious diseases are formidable and range from influencing the factors that drive disease emergence, to making surveillance systems fit for purpose, and ensuring that regional governance mechanisms work effectively to improve control interventions. PMID:21269678

  15. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Ji Yoon [Dept. of Pathology, National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis.

  16. Influencing behavioral change by customer engagement amongst youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sonal

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that many social and health problems have underlying behavioral causes. Because these problems are rooted in human behavior, solutions to deal with them also lie in human behavior. This paper examines ways of integrating customer engagement in social programs to influence and initiate behavior change effectively with a special focus on youth. This work followed a theoretical deduction by use of a literature review. Social marketing places emphasis on behavior change, and one of the key challenges for social marketers is to ensure a perceived value for customers in taking up and maintaining positive behavior. If perceptions, beliefs, attitudes, and values influence behavior, then the central focus should be on the youth. Integrating youth is a prerequisite for effective social marketing programs and ultimately behavioral change. This approach will pave the way for effective brand positioning and brand loyalty in social marketing which has been lacking and requires more attention from researchers and policymakers. This paper outlines theoretical developments in social marketing that will increase the effectiveness of social marketing programs overall. Existing social marketing literature typically focuses on social marketing interventions and behavioral change. This paper uses customer engagement within a social marketing context so that social marketing programs are perceived as brands to which youth can relate. PMID:24600281

  17. Rearing Temperature Influences Adult Response to Changes in Mating Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, Erica; Monteiro, Antónia

    2016-01-01

    Rearing environment can have an impact on adult behavior, but it is less clear how rearing environment influences adult behavior plasticity. Here we explore the effect of rearing temperature on adult mating behavior plasticity in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, a species that has evolved two seasonal forms in response to seasonal changes in temperature. These seasonal forms differ in both morphology and behavior. Females are the choosy sex in cohorts reared at warm temperatures (WS butterflies), and males are the choosy sex in cohorts reared at cooler temperatures (DS butterflies). Rearing temperature also influences mating benefits and costs. In DS butterflies, mated females live longer than virgin females, and mated males live shorter than virgin males. No such benefits or costs to mating are present in WS butterflies. Given that choosiness and mating costs are rearing temperature dependent in B. anynana, we hypothesized that temperature may also impact male and female incentives to remate in the event that benefits and costs of second matings are similar to those of first matings. We first examined whether lifespan was affected by number of matings. We found that two matings did not significantly increase lifespan for either WS or DS butterflies relative to single matings. However, both sexes of WS but not DS butterflies experienced decreased longevity when mated to a non-virgin relative to a virgin. We next observed pairs of WS and DS butterflies and documented changes in mating behavior in response to changes in the mating status of their partner. WS but not DS butterflies changed their mating behavior in response to the mating status of their partner. These results suggest that rearing temperature influences adult mating behavior plasticity in B. anynana. This developmentally controlled behavioral plasticity may be adaptive, as lifespan depends on the partner's mating status in one seasonal form, but not in the other. PMID:26863319

  18. Amino acid changes in the spike protein of feline coronavirus correlate with systemic spread of virus from the intestine and not with feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Emily; Tasker, Séverine; Day, Michael J; Harley, Ross; Kipar, Anja; Siddell, Stuart G; Helps, Christopher R

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a mutation in the spike protein gene of feline coronavirus (FCoV), which results in an amino acid change from methionine to leucine at position 1058, may be associated with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Tissue and faecal samples collected post mortem from cats diagnosed with or without FIP were subjected to RNA extraction and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to detect FCoV RNA. In cats with FIP, 95% of tissue, and 81% of faecal samples were PCR-positive, as opposed to 22% of tissue, and 60% of faecal samples in cats without FIP. Relative FCoV copy numbers were significantly higher in the cats with FIP, both in tissues (P < 0.001) and faeces (P = 0.02). PCR-positive samples underwent pyrosequencing encompassing position 1058 of the FCoV spike protein. This identified a methionine codon at position 1058, consistent with the shedding of an enteric form of FCoV, in 77% of the faecal samples from cats with FIP, and in 100% of the samples from cats without FIP. In contrast, 91% of the tissue samples from cats with FIP and 89% from cats without FIP had a leucine codon at position 1058, consistent with a systemic form of FCoV. These results suggest that the methionine to leucine substitution at position 1058 in the FCoV spike protein is indicative of systemic spread of FCoV from the intestine, rather than a virus with the potential to cause FIP. PMID:24767677

  19. The influence of vegetation dynamics on anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Port

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, vegetation-climate and vegetation-carbon cycle interactions during anthropogenic climate change are assessed by using the Earth System Model MPI ESM including a module for vegetation dynamics. We assume anthropogenic CO2 emissions according to the RCP 8.5 scenario in the period from 1850 to 2120 and shut them down afterwards to evaluate the equilibrium response of the Earth System by 2300.

    Our results suggest that vegetation dynamics have a considerable influence on the changing global and regional climate. In the simulations, global mean tree cover extends by 2300 due to increased atmospheric CO2 concentration and global warming. Thus, land carbon uptake is higher and atmospheric CO2 concentration is lower by about 40 ppm when considering dynamic vegetation compared to a static pre-industrial vegetation cover. The reduced atmospheric CO2 concentration is equivalent to a lower global mean temperature. Moreover, biogeophysical effects of vegetation cover shifts influence the climate on a regional scale. Expanded tree cover in the northern high latitudes results in a reduced albedo and additional warming. In the Amazon region, declined tree cover causes a higher temperature as evapotranspiration is reduced. In total, we find that vegetation dynamics have a slight attenuating effect on global climate change as the global climate cools by 0.22 K in 2300 due to natural vegetation cover shifts.

  20. Overview of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Overview of Infectious Diseases Page Content Article Body I nfectious diseases are ... worms Last Updated 11/21/2015 Source Immunizations & Infectious Diseases: An Informed Parent's Guide (Copyright © 2006 American Academy ...

  1. [Infectious diseases research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carratalà, Jordi; Alcamí, José; Cordero, Elisa; Miró, José M; Ramos, José Manuel

    2008-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in research activity into infectious diseases in Spain in the last few years. The Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) currently has ten study groups, with the cooperation of infectious diseases specialists and microbiologists from different centres, with significant research activity. The program of Redes Temáticas de Investigación Cooperativa en Salud (Special Topics Cooperative Health Research Networks) is an appropriate framework for the strategic coordination of research groups from the Spanish autonomous communities. The Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) and the Network for Research in AIDS (RIS) integrate investigators in Infectious Diseases from multiple groups, which continuously perform important research projects. Research using different experimental models in infectious diseases, in numerous institutions, is an important activity in our country. The analysis of the recent scientific production in Infectious Diseases shows that Spain has a good position in the context of the European Union. The research activity in Infectious Diseases carried out in our country is a great opportunity for the training of specialists in this area of knowledge. PMID:19195467

  2. FastStats: Infectious Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Infectious Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Health, United States trend tables with data on infectious disease Seroprevalence of six infectious diseases among adults in ...

  3. National review of maternity services 2008: women influencing change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Karen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2009 the Australian government announced a major program of reform with the move to primary maternity care. The reform agenda represents a dramatic change to maternity care provision in a society that has embraced technology across all aspects of life including childbirth. Methods A critical discourse analysis of selected submissions in the consultation process to the national review of maternity services 2008 was undertaken to identify the contributions of individual women, consumer groups and organisations representing the interests of women. Results Findings from this critical discourse analysis revealed extensive similarities between the discourses identified in the submissions with the direction of the 2009 proposed primary maternity care reform agenda. The rise of consumer influence in maternity care policy reflects a changing of the guard as doctors' traditional authority is questioned by strong consumer organisations and informed consumers. Conclusions Unified consumer influence advocating a move away from obstetric -led maternity care for all pregnant women appears to be synergistic with the ethos of corporate governance and a neoliberal approach to maternity service policy. The silent voice of one consumer group (women happy with their obstetric-led care in the consultation process has inadvertently contributed to a consensus of opinion in support of the reforms in the absence of the counter viewpoint.

  4. Global climate change and tree nutrition: influence of water availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Gessler, Arthur

    2010-09-01

    The effects of global climate change will regionally be very different, mainly causing considerable changes in temperature and water availability. For Central Europe, for example, increased temperatures are predicted, which will cause increased frequencies and durations of summer drought events. On the other hand, the predicted changes in precipitation patterns will lead to enhanced rainfall during winter and spring, thereby increasing the risk of flooding in Central and Northern Europe. Depending on the sensitivity to reduced water availability on the one hand and oxygen depletion due to waterlogging on the other, physiological performance, growth and competitive ability of trees may be adversely affected. Both drought and excess water availability impair the mineral nutrition of trees by influencing on the one hand the nutrient availability in the soil and on the other hand the physiology of the uptake systems mainly of the mycorrhizal tree roots. Extreme water regimes also change interaction patterns among plants and between plants and microorganisms, and alter the carbon balance of trees and ecosystems. Here we summarize and discuss the present knowledge on tree nutrition under altered water availability as expected to be more common in the future. The focus is on tree mineral nutrient uptake and metabolism as well as on the interaction between carbon allocation and the mineral nutrient balance as affected by reduced and excess water availability. PMID:20581013

  5. 1950-2009年乐山市传染病疾病谱变迁趋势分析%Changing Trend of Infectious Diseases Spectrum in Leshan, 1950-2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈昆; 江正斌; 徐蓉芳; 黄林; 郭志洪

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand the changing trend of infectious diseases spectrum in Leshan and provide scientific evidence for government working out strategies for prevention and control. Methods Data of the infectious diseases epidemic in Chengdu was analyzed by using the methods of descriptive epidemiology to get the changing trend of infectious diseases spectrum. Results From 1950's to 1980's, the top one incidence of infectious diseases was natural focal and insect - borne diseases, it changed to intestinal diseases in 1990's and to respiratory diseases from 2000 to 2009. The top one mortality of infectious diseases was respiratory diseases of children from 1950's to 1970's, it changed to natural focal and insect -borne diseases from 1980's to 1990's, and to blood and sexually transmitted diseases from 2000 to 2009. Infectious diseases of children were well - controlled since 1980's, but the incidence of tuberculosis, hepatitis B, gonorrhea, syphilis, HIV / AIDS, etc. increased significantly. Conclusion The situation of infectious diseases controlling is still urgent in Leshan. It is important for government to perform its functions effectively, increase the financial input of infectious diseases prevention and control, and improve the level of epidemic forecast and public health emergency response capabilities of professional bodies.%目的 了解乐山市传染病的疾病谱变迁趋势,为政府制订防制对策提供科学依据.方法 利用乐山市1950-2009年的传染病疫情资料,采用描述性流行病学方法分析传染病的疾病谱变迁趋势.结果 传染病发病率20世纪50~80年代自然疫源性及虫媒居首位,90年代变迁为肠道占第1位,2000-2009年再变迁为呼吸道居首位;死亡率50~ 70年代儿童呼吸道占第1位,80~90年代变迁为自然疫源性及虫媒居首位,2000-2009年再变迁为血源及性传播占第1位.80年代以后儿童传染病得到有效控制,而肺结核、乙型肝炎、

  6. The Influence and the Countermeasures about Water Resources in Northwest of Climate Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the influences and countermeasures of climate changes on the water resources in northwest.[Method] The influences of climate changes on water resources in northwest part were discussed.Considering to the demand of water,corresponding countermeasures were proposed.[Result] Though there were distinct regional differences about the influences of climate changes on water resources in northwest part,the positive influences were larger than negative influences in general;because o...

  7. Cardiac imaging in infectious endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Niels Eske; Habib, Gilbert; Thuny, Franck;

    2014-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis remains both a diagnostic and a treatment challenge. A positive outcome depends on a rapid diagnosis, accurate risk stratification, and a thorough follow-up. Imaging plays a key role in each of these steps and echocardiography remains the cornerstone of the methods in use...... structural changes and abnormalities in the heart, but it does not uncover the underlying pathophysiological processes at the cellular or molecular level. This problem is addressed with introduction of new molecular imaging methods as (18)F-fluorodesoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET-CT and single photon emission...... the search for extra cardial infectious foci. A flowchart for the use of imaging in both left-sided and right-sided endocarditis is suggested....

  8. Infectious endocarditis: rlieumatologic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G M Tarasova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess rheumatologic aspects of modern infectious endocarditis (IE and to determine role of anti-inflammatory therapy in complex treatment of the disease. Material and methods. 50 pts with IE (24 female, 26 male aged 16 to 60 years were included. Primary IE was diagnosed in 15, secondary - in 35 cases. 7 pts had acute and 43 — subacute course. 40 pts had definite and 10 — probable IE. Results. Mean period till correct diagnosis establishment was 112± 116,5 days. Diagnostic difficulties were more frequent in subacute variant of IE (p=0,03. Heart diseases prevailed among cardiac risk factors (p=0,0l. Clinical picture of IE was very polymorphous. Glucocorticoids (GC were administered to 21 pts in addition to antibiotics due to signs of organ immunopatology and high laboratory measures of immune activity. Positive effect of glucocorticoids was achieved in 64% of pts. Conclusion. Development of immunological changes complicates timely diagnosis of IE and requires exclusion of different diseases including rheumatic pathology. IE treatment strategy does not exclude administration of GC low doses for prominent immunopathological signs in addition to massive antibacterial therapy.

  9. [Proteomics in infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, Sara; Párraga-Niño, Noemí; García-Núñez, Marian; Sabrià, Miquel

    2016-04-01

    Infectious diseases have a high incidence in the population, causing a major impact on global health. In vitro culture of microorganisms is the first technique applied for infection diagnosis which is laborious and time consuming. In recent decades, efforts have been focused on the applicability of «Omics» sciences, highlighting the progress provided by proteomic techniques in the field of infectious diseases. This review describes the management, processing and analysis of biological samples for proteomic research. PMID:25583331

  10. Infectious optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Karl C

    2002-03-01

    A wide variety of infectious agents are known to cause optic neuropathy. This article will consider the bacteria, spirochetes, fungi, and viruses that most commonly affect the optic nerve. Clinical presentation is variable, but some pathogens often produce a characteristic funduscopic pattern. Diagnosis is usually made on the basis of clinical suspicion and serologic testing. Polymerase chain reaction is also increasingly utilized. Most infectious agents can be effectively treated but visual recovery is highly variable. PMID:15513450

  11. Fight against infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, K; Kamakura, M; Kitamura, K

    1996-08-01

    During early Meiji era in Japan, there were frequent epidemics of fatal acute communicable diseases such as cholera, dysentery and smallpox, and preventive measures and preparations for acute infectious diseases were urgently needed. Together with improvement of scientific preparations, the Communicable Disease Prevention Law was promulgated in 1897. Then gradually until 1940's, the focus of preventive measures have been shifted from acute infectious diseases to chronic ones, particularly tuberculosis. After the World War II, except the short period of social confusion, major legally-defined communicable diseases had been decreasing rapidly mainly due to the use of antibiotics and improvement of environmental sanitation. At the same time, the introduction of preventive vaccination marked a new era for the prevention of infectious diseases and was largely responsible for the remarkable decrease of infant mortality in Japan. Recently the concept of defense by vaccination against infectious diseases has evolved from group-oriented to individual-oriented, so that the Preventive Vaccination Law was drastically revised in 1994. Currently, effective counter-measures against newly emerged infectious diseases, as viral hepatitis, institution-acquired infection, viral hemorrhagic fever etc., have been implemented. For the future, improvement of infections disease surveillance, vaccine development and expansion of vaccination coverage along with monitoring side-effects, preventive health education on AIDS/STDs, addressing the special needs of foreigners living in Japan and international collaboration for disease control abroad are all vital to the success of protection of the public's health from infectious diseases in Japan. PMID:8800275

  12. Sibship structure and risk of infectious mononucleosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Trine Rasmussen; Wohlfahrt, Jan;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Present understanding of increased risk of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related infectious mononucleosis among children of low birth order or small sibships is mainly based on old and indirect evidence. Societal changes and methodological limitations of previous studies call for new data....... METHODS: We used data from the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register to study incidence rates of inpatient hospitalizations for infectious mononucleosis before the age of 20 years in a cohort of 2,543,225 Danes born between 1971 and 2008, taking individual...... sibship structure into account. RESULTS: A total of 12,872 cases of infectious mononucleosis were observed during 35.3 million person-years of follow-up. Statistical modelling showed that increasing sibship size was associated with a reduced risk of infectious mononucleosis and that younger siblings...

  13. Infectious spondylitis in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In adults, infectious spondylitis is a rare but sever disease, caused by a bacterial thrombus in tissue of reduced resistance. In conventional radiographs initial findings are a narrowing of the intervertebral space, local osteoporosis and poorly defined erosive borders of the vertebral endplates. These changings can be found at least three to six weeks after the onset of disease. However, in Szintigraphy and MRT pathologic alterations are evident after ten to twelve days. Thus, early diagnosis and treatment becomes possible. In early stages of the disease of localized lysis surrounded by a reactive sclerosis appears in predisposed areas of the vertebral body (subchondral, anterobasal, ventral, central). Apparently, a soft tissue tumor is associated. Sclerosis and reduction of the soft tissue tumor are the first signs of repair processes. After at least 12 weeks, computed tomography can reveal typical sintering of the vertebral body and occasionally the development of a bony sequester. In addition, MRT as well as CT can be helpful in the detection and localization of complications as abscesses or affection of the vertebral canal. The tuberculous spondylitis can sometimes cause difficulties in differential diagnosis. Clinical findings, affection of several vertebral bodies, large soft tissue tumors with appearance of calcification as well as not typical locations are strongly suggestive of tuberculous spondylitis, but these findings are not specific of the disease. Degenerative disorders such as erosive osteochondrosis or changings due ot chronic dialysis (e.g amyloid or crystal arthropathies) may cause even more problems in differential diagnosis. Typical for a blastomatous process is the integrity of the interverebral disc space, which is a rare finding in spondylitis. (orig.)

  14. Information Supply Chain System for Managing Rare Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishna-Remani, Venugopal

    2012-01-01

    Timely identification and reporting of rare infectious diseases has important economic, social and health implications. In this study, we investigate how different stakeholders in the existing reporting system influence the timeliness in identification and reporting of rare infectious diseases. Building on the vision of the information supply…

  15. Infectious disease agents mediate interaction in food webs and ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selakovic, S.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents are part of food webs and ecosystems via the relationship with their host species that, in turn, interact with both hosts and non-hosts. Through these interactions, infectious agents influence food webs in terms of structure, functioning and stability. The present literature shows

  16. Infectious disease agents mediate interaction in food webs and ecosystems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selakovic, Sanja; de Ruiter, P.C.; Heesterbeek, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents are part of food webs and ecosystems via the relationship with their host species that, in turn, interact with both hosts and non-hosts. Through these interactions, infectious agents influence food webs in terms of structure, functioning and stability. The present literature shows

  17. Emergent infectious uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairallah Moncef

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious causes should always be considered in all patients with uveitis and it should be ruled out first. The differential diagnosis includes multiple well-known diseases including herpes, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, tuberculosis, bartonellosis, Lyme disease, and others. However, clinicians should be aware of emerging infectious agents as potential causes of systemic illness and also intraocular inflammation. Air travel, immigration, and globalization of business have overturned traditional pattern of geographic distribution of infectious diseases, and therefore one should work locally but think globally, though it is not possible always. This review recapitulates the systemic and ocular mainfestations of several emergent infectious diseases relevant to the ophthalmologist including Rickettsioses, West Nile virus infection, Rift valley fever, dengue fever, and chikungunya. Retinitis, chorioretinitis, retinal vasculitis, and optic nerve involvement have been associated with these emergent infectious diseases. The diagnosis of any of these infections is usually based on pattern of uveitis, systemic symptoms and signs, and specific epidemiological data and confirmed by detection of specific antibody in serum. A systematic ocular examination, showing fairly typical fundus findings, may help in establishing an early clinical diagnosis, which allows prompt, appropriate management.

  18. Eight challenges in modelling infectious livestock diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooks-Pollock, E; de Jong, M C M; Keeling, M J; Klinkenberg, D; Wood, J L N

    2015-01-01

    The transmission of infectious diseases of livestock does not differ in principle from disease transmission in any other animals, apart from that the aim of control is ultimately economic, with the influence of social, political and welfare constraints often poorly defined. Modelling of livestock di

  19. What influences climate and glacier change in southwestern China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.

    2011-12-01

    The subject of climate change in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and Himalayas has taken on increasing importance because of the availability of water resources from their mountain glaciers (Immerzeel et al 2010). Many of the glaciers over these regions have been retreating, while some are advancing and stable (Yao et al 2004, Scherler et al 2011). Other studies report that some glaciers in the Himalayas show acceleration of their shrinkage (e.g., Fujita and Nuimura 2011). However, the causes of glacier melting are still difficult to grasp because of the complexity of climatic change and its influence on glacier issues. Despite this, it is vital that we pursue further study to enable future predictions of glacier changes. The paper entitled 'Climate and glacier change in southwestern China during the past several decades' by Li et al (2011) provided carefully analyzed, quality controlled, long-term data on atmospheric temperature and precipitation during the period 1961-2008. The data were obtained from 111 Chinese stations. The researchers performed systematic analyses of temperature and precipitation over the whole southwestern Chinese domain. They discussed those changes in terms of other meteorological components such as atmospheric circulation patterns, radiation and altitude difference, and then showed how these factors could contribute to climate and glacier changes in the region. Air temperature and precipitation are strongly associated with glacier mass balance because of heat balance and the addition of mass when it snows. Temperature warming trends over many places in southwestern China were unequivocally dominant in all seasons and at higher altitudes. This indicates that the heat contribution to the glaciers has been increasing. On the other hand, precipitation has a wider variability in time and space. It is more difficult to clearly understand the effect of precipitation on the climate and glacier melting characteristics in the whole of southwestern China

  20. Infectious diseases -- new and ancient threats to world health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, S J; Carnes, B; Rogers, R G; Smith, L

    1997-07-01

    Infectious and parasitic diseases remain a leading cause of death and disability in developing countries and are re-emerging as a serious health problem in developed countries. Outbreaks of Ebola, dengue hemorrhagic fever, cholera, and bubonic plague have occurred in low-income countries and multidrug-resistant organisms have surfaced throughout the world. Since 1973, over 28 new disease-causing microbes have been identified. This issue of "Population Bulletin" analyzes the impact of factors such as population growth, urbanization, migration, poverty, travel, agricultural practices, climate changes, natural disasters, and medical technology on the resurgence of infectious and parasitic diseases as well as the influence of diseases such as AIDS on population dynamics and socioeconomic development. Most of these diseases could be prevented, cured, or eradicated with known public health measures. National governments can help reduce poverty, step up immunization programs, and lessen the chances of introducing new diseases. Nongovernmental organizations can disseminate preventive knowledge and monitor disease outbreaks. The medical profession can strengthen infection control precautions and institute surveillance of the use of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents. Since the geographic isolation that used to contain disease outbreaks has been replaced by permeable international borders, the campaign against infectious and parasitic diseases must be global. PMID:12292663

  1. Forecasting Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic models of infectious disease systems abound and are used to study the epidemiological characteristics of disease outbreaks, the ecological mechanisms affecting transmission, and the suitability of various control and intervention strategies. The dynamics of disease transmission are non-linear and consequently difficult to forecast. Here, we describe combined model-inference frameworks developed for the prediction of infectious diseases. We show that accurate and reliable predictions of seasonal influenza outbreaks can be made using a mathematical model representing population-level influenza transmission dynamics that has been recursively optimized using ensemble data assimilation techniques and real-time estimates of influenza incidence. Operational real-time forecasts of influenza and other infectious diseases have been and are currently being generated.

  2. Infectious Haematopoietic Necrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Institute, Marine

    2011-01-01

    This leaflet gives information on infectious haematopoietic necrosis. This disease is caused by a single stranded RNA virus of the family Rhabdoviridae, genus Novirhabdoviridae. IHN is listed as a non-exotic disease under EU Directive 2006/88/EC, and is notifiable in Ireland, according to S.I. No. 261 of 2008.

  3. Infectious Salmon Anaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Institute, Marine

    2011-01-01

    This leaflet gives information on infectious salmon anaemia (ISA). ISA is caused by a single stranded RNA virus of the family Orthomyxoviridae. ISA is listed as a non-exotic disease under EU Directive 2006/88/EC, and is notifiable in Ireland, according to S.I. No. 261 of 2008.

  4. Infectious uveitis in Virginia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelhard SB

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie B Engelhard,1 Zeina Haddad,1 Asima Bajwa,1 James Patrie,2 Wenjun Xin,2 Ashvini K Reddy1 1Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Purpose: To report the causes, clinical features, and outcomes of infectious uveitis in patients managed in a mid-Atlantic tertiary care center.Methods: Retrospective, observational study of infectious uveitis patients seen at the University of Virginia from 1984 to 2014.Results: Seventy-seven of 491 patients (15.7% were diagnosed with infectious uveitis (mean age 58 years, 71.4% female, 76.6% Caucasian. The mean follow-up was 5 years. Anterior uveitis was the most common anatomic classification (39 patients, 50.6% followed by panuveitis (20 patients, 26.0% and posterior uveitis (18 patients, 23.4%. The most common infectious etiology was herpetic anterior uveitis (37 patients, 48.1% followed by toxoplasma uveitis (14 patients, 18.2%. The most prevalent viral pathogen was varicella-zoster virus (21 patients, 27.3% followed by herpes simplex virus (20 patients, 26.0%. Acute retinal necrosis (ARN was diagnosed in 14 patients (18.2%. Aqueous humor yielded an etiologic diagnosis in seven (50% of ARN patients, four of whom tested positive for cytomegalovirus and three for varicella-zoster virus. On presentation, 43 patients (55.8% had a visual acuity (VA better than 20/40 and 17 (22.1% had a VA worse than 20/200. VA at the final follow-up was better than 20/40 in 39 patients (50.6% and worse than 20/200 in 22 patients (28.6%. In all, 16 (20.8% and 10 (13.0% patients required cataract and vitrectomy surgery, respectively. A total of 14 patients (18.2% were on glaucoma topical treatment and four (5.2% required glaucoma surgery.Conclusion: The most common type of infectious uveitis seen over the study period was herpetic anterior uveitis secondary to varicella-zoster virus or herpes simplex virus, found to be most prevalent in patients

  5. National Foundation for Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    About NFID Contact Us NFID Store Home Infectious Disease Information Infectious Disease Information Chickenpox (Varicella) Diphtheria Ebola Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hib Disease HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) MRSA Measles ...

  6. 75 FR 24835 - Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... included in this RFI. The primary routes of infectious disease transmission in US healthcare settings are... reducing the risk of infectious disease transmission to patients and HCWs, the guidelines are non-mandatory... patients or clients who may have an infectious disease, please explain how your workplace...

  7. Acute cerebellar ataxia and infectious mononucleosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wadhwa, N. K.; Ghose, R R

    1983-01-01

    A 28-year-old man, who presented with acute cerebellar ataxia, was found to have haematological features of infectious mononucleosis. There was serological evidence of recent infection with Epstein-Barr virus. It is speculated that cerebellar dysfunction results from virus-induced inflammatory changes within the central nervous system.

  8. Infectious laryngotracheitis: a review

    OpenAIRE

    H Hidalgo

    2003-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) herpesvirus continues to cause outbreaks of respiratory disease in chickens world-wide. Sporadic cases of ILT occur in all classes of birds, including hobby/show/game chickens, broilers, heavy breeders, and commercial laying hens. These epornitics of ILT tend to occur where there are large populations of naïve, unvaccinated birds, i.e., in concentrated areas of broiler production. ILT virus can be transmitted through (a) chickens with acute upper respiratory...

  9. Avian infectious laryngotracheitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagust, T J; Jones, R C; Guy, J S

    2000-08-01

    Avian infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) herpesvirus continues to cause sporadic cases of respiratory disease in chickens world-wide. Sources of transmission of ILT infection are three-fold, namely: chickens with acute upper respiratory tract disease, latently infected 'carrier' fowls which excrete infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) when stressed, and all fomites (inanimate articles as well as the personnel in contact with infected chickens). Infectious laryngotracheitis virus infectivity can persist for weeks to months in tracheal mucus or carcasses. Rigorous site biosecurity is therefore critical in ILT disease control. Furthermore, while current (modified live) ILT vaccines can offer good protection, the strains of ILTV used in vaccines can also produce latent infections, as well as ILT disease following bird-to-bird spread. The regional nature of reservoirs of ILTV-infected flocks will tend to interact unfavourably with widely varying ILT control practices in the poultry industry, so as to periodically result in sporadic and unexpected outbreaks of ILT in intensive poultry industry populations. Precautions for trade-related movements of chickens of all ages must therefore include an accurate knowledge of the ILT infection status, both of the donor and recipient flocks. PMID:10935275

  10. Influence of urban land cover changes and climate change for the exposure of European cities to flooding during extreme precipitation

    OpenAIRE

    Kaspersen, Per Skougaard; Høegh Ravn, N.; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten; Madsen, H.; Drews, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology suitable for investigating the relative and combined influence of urban land cover changes and climate change for the exposure of cities to pluvial flooding. A combined hydrological-hydrodynamic modelling and remote sensing approach enables the quantification of the flood risk relative to changes in imperviousness and climate change. The methodology is evaluated for the Danish city of Odense, but is easily applicable for the majority of cities within Eur...

  11. Anticipating the Emerging of Some Strategical Infectious Animal Diseases in Indonesia Related to The Effect of Global Warming and Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Sjamsul Bahri; T Syafriati

    2011-01-01

    The effect of global warming and climate change is changing the season, included flooding in one area and very dry in other area, changing the temperature and humidity. These changes will trigger changing of the life of biological agent (virus, bacteria, parasites and so on), variety of animal species, variety of vectors as reservoir host of animal with the role of transmitting the disease to other animal species, This condition will trigger the new animal disease (emerging disease) or old di...

  12. Possible impact of rising sea levels on vector-borne infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendran Sinnathamby N

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vector-borne infectious diseases are a significant cause of human and animal mortality and morbidity. Modeling studies predict that changes in climate that accompany global warming will alter the transmission risk of many vector-borne infectious diseases in different parts of the world. Global warming will also raise sea levels, which will lead to an increase in saline and brackish water bodies in coastal areas. The potential impact of rising sea levels, as opposed to climate change, on the prevalence of vector-borne infectious diseases has hitherto been unrecognised. Presentation of the hypothesis Mosquito species possessing salinity-tolerant larvae and pupae, and capable of transmitting arboviruses and parasites are found in many parts of the world. An expansion of brackish and saline water bodies in coastal areas, associated with rising sea levels, can increase densities of salinity-tolerant vector mosquitoes and lead to the adaptation of freshwater vectors to breed in brackish and saline waters. The breeding of non-mosquito vectors may also be influenced by salinity changes in coastal habitats. Higher vector densities can increase transmission of vector-borne infectious diseases in coastal localities, which can then spread to other areas. Testing the hypothesis The demonstration of increases in vector populations and disease prevalence that is related to an expansion of brackish/saline water bodies in coastal areas will provide the necessary supportive evidence. However the implementation of specific vector and disease control measures to counter the threat will confound the expected findings. Implications of the hypothesis Rising sea levels can act synergistically with climate change and then interact in a complex manner with other environmental and socio-economic factors to generate a greater potential for the transmission of vector-borne infectious diseases. The resulting health impacts are likely to be particularly

  13. Relationship between Principal Change and Influence Styles: Is There an Impact on Teacher Retention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howder, Leslie Johnson

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between principal leadership styles, specifically change and influence styles, and teacher retention in the Low-Country region of South Carolina. Utilizing the Change Style Indicator and Influence Style Indicator, the researcher surveyed 25 principals from Berkeley, Charleston,…

  14. 山西省太原市传染病医院2001-2011年疾病谱变迁及常见传染病流行趋势分析%2001-2011 annual changes of disease spectrum and trends analysis of common infectious diseases of the infectious diseases hospital of Taiyuan in Shanxi province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯亦农; 刘宝芳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the inpatients species changes of infectious disease hospital from 2001 to 2011 years in Taiyuan,and make relevant recommendations to the trends and prevention strategies for common infectious diseases.Methods The diseases species of the hospital from 2001 to 2011 years and the number of hospitalized patients were retrospectively counted and analyzed.Results The proportion of liver disease hospitalized was always more than 60% in the ten years;The bacillary dysentery decreased from 4.23% in 2006 to 0.96% in 2011 ;The hospitalized patients with measles decreased significantly since 2009,and only 0.26% in 2011 ;In 2008,hand-foot-mouth disease accounted for 3.42% of the hospitalized patients,and it peaked in 2010,accounting for 7.51% ; The number of hospitalized patients with rabies disease rised in 2011,accounting for 0.27%.Conclusion Liver disease is still the major infectious diseases of the hospital;The mumps,chicken pox,scarlet fever and other respiratory diseases as well as hand-foot-mouth disease is a common infectious disease threats to the health of infants and young children,and for the increasing trend of the number of patients with brucellosis hairtetracycline,the tetracycline and brucellosis drugs for children should be promoted to product and sale.The rabies vaccination knowledge should be popularized,and the incidence of rabies should be reduced.%目的 分析2001-2011年太原市传染病医院住院病种的变化,对常见传染病的流行趋势及防治策略提出相关建议.方法 对2001-2011年该院各种疾病病种及住院例数进行回顾性统计分析.结果 肝病的住院比例在十年间始终在60%以上;细菌性痢疾从2006年的4.23%下降至2011年的0.96%;自2009年以后麻疹住院患者明显减少,2011年仅占0.26%;2008年手足口病占住院患者的3.42%,2010年达到高峰,占7.51%;2011年狂犬病住院例数攀升,达到0.27%.结论 肝病仍是该院的主

  15. Biodiversity loss, emerging infectious diseases and impact on human and crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are losing biodiversity through several factors ranging from global warming, climatic change, unsustainable use of natural resources, human settlements, demand for food, medicine etc. Consequently, the biodiversity losses are causing emergence of infectious diseases (EIDs) which are making them more virulent than the past. Both biodiversity loss and emergence of diseases significantly impact the human derived benefits in-terms of economy and food. Ecological stability, productivity and food-web interactions are indirectly correlated with biodiversity and any change in these will cause losses in biodiversity that would certainly influence the human derived benefits and crops. The current article reviews the biodiversity losses and emerging infectious diseases at various levels reported by recent literature which will help in current status of EIDs and future recommendations. (author)

  16. Influence of a temperature change on in-reactor creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a series of pressurized tube creep experiments were evaluated to determine the effect of a temperature change on the in-reactor creep of AISI 316 stainless steel. In contrast to prior experiments where a temperature change was imposed and only a short interval of additional fluence accumulated prior to examination, this experiment examines the long term effects of a temperature change. Data are reported from three separate experiments in which the temperature history was altered by a linear reduction with fluence, a step increase and a step decrease. Analysis of the data indicated that the long term creep rate adjusts to the new temperature. However, evidence of swelling and stress affected swelling resulting from the temperature change were found

  17. Influence of temperature changes on migraine occurrence in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidt, Jörg; Koppe, Christina; Rill, Sven; Reinel, Dirk; Wogenstein, Florian; Drescher, Johannes

    2013-07-01

    Many factors trigger migraine attacks. Weather is often reported to be one of the most common migraine triggers. However, there is little scientific evidence about the underlying mechanisms and causes. In our pilot study, we used smartphone apps and a web form to collect around 4,700 migraine messages in Germany between June 2011 and February 2012. Taking interdiurnal temperature changes as an indicator for changes in the prevailing meteorological conditions, our analyses were focused on the relationship between temperature changes and the frequency of occurrence of migraine attacks. Linear trends were fitted to the total number of migraine messages with respect to temperature changes. Statistical and systematic errors were estimated. Both increases and decreases in temperature lead to a significant increase in the number of migraine messages. A temperature increase (decrease) of 5 °C resulted in an increase of 19 ± 7 % (24 ± 8 %) in the number of migraine messages. PMID:22895651

  18. Do climate changes influence dispersal and population dynamics of dragonflies in the western Peruvian Andes?

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim Hoffmann

    2010-01-01

    For nine dragonfly species (five aeshnids and four libellulids) all previous and verifiable data are related to the vertical climate zones and nature regions of the western Peruvian Andes and the Peruvian Pacific coast. Climate changes due to the El Niño and La Niña phenomena, as well as the global climate change have an influence on the different natural regions and also restrict aquatic biotopes. These changes influence the dispersal and behavior of some dragonflies and concer...

  19. Infectious abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infectious disease is a common cause of acute abdomen. The diagnosis is based on clinical examination and basic laboratory tests. However, medical imaging routinely performed according to the clinical findings is frequently useful. Hepatic and splenic abscesses are correctly demonstrated by ultrasonography and computed tomography. Ultrasonography is the reference standard for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. The US examination is also performed for the diagnosis of appendicitis and its complications. Ultrasonography and barium enema are commonly performed for the evaluation of sigmoid diverticulitis. Computed tomography is the reference standard to determine medical or surgical procedures. (authors). 20 refs., 15 figs

  20. REASONS OF CURRENCY FLUCTUATIONS AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON ECONOMIC CHANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimova N. V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The exchange rate has direct impact on economy of any state. Without competent management, it is impossible to achieve successful functioning of national economy, which causes the need of studying of the matter. Fluctuations of an exchange rate depend on market condition. Therefore, the exchange rate is under influence of a condition of the balance of payments, a difference of interest rates in various countries, extent of use of currency in international payments, speculative currency transactions and activity of the currency markets, inflation and many others, considered in this article. Possible consequences of their influence on exchange rate are specified, examples are given. Dependence of growth of the money supply, the monetary base and inflation in Russia is reflected. The analysis of economic aspects on which exchange rate renders direct influence, namely, foreign trade, capital streams, interest rates, business development, purchasing power of the population, growth of economy is carried out. The assessment of an exchange rate of the Russian Federation is carried out. The following factors have the greatest impact on it: floating rate of ruble, increase of a rate of refinancing, oil depreciation, and lack of possibility of refinancing of external debts. Measures for stabilization of ruble, among which fixation of currency positions of banks, increase of control of target use of earlier issued credits, differentiation of speculative operations from the others, introduction of a tax of Tobin and introduction of indispensable conditions of sale of a certain part of revenue are offered. Realization of these measures will have positive impact on stabilization of ruble exchange rate and an economic situation of Russia in general

  1. Influence of pre-existing invasive aspergillosis on allo-HSCT outcome: a retrospective EBMT analysis by the Infectious Diseases and Acute Leukemia Working Parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penack, O; Tridello, G; Hoek, J; Socié, G; Blaise, D; Passweg, J; Chevallier, P; Craddock, C; Milpied, N; Veelken, H; Maertens, J; Ljungman, P; Cornelissen, J; Thiebaut-Bertrand, A; Lioure, B; Michallet, M; Iacobelli, S; Nagler, A; Mohty, M; Cesaro, S

    2016-03-01

    Historically, invasive aspergillosis (IA) has been a major barrier for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The influence of invasive IA on long-term survival and on transplant-related complications has not been investigated in a larger patient cohort under current conditions. Our aim was to analyze the long-term outcome of patients undergoing allo-HSCT with a history of prior IA. We used European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation database data of first allo-HSCTs performed between 2005 and 2010 in patients with acute leukemia. One thousand one hundred and fifty patients with data on IA before allo-HSCT were included in the analysis. The median follow-up time was 52.1 months. We found no significant impact of IA on major transplant outcome variables such as overall survival, relapse-free survival, non-relapse mortality, cumulative incidence of acute GvHD grade II-IV, chronic GvHD, pulmonary complications and leukemia relapse. However, we found a trend toward lower overall survival (P=0.078, hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval (CI)): 1.16 (0.98, 1.36)) and higher non-relapse mortality (P=0.150, HR (95% CI): 1.19 (0.94, 1.50)) in allo-HSCT recipients with pre-existing IA. Our data suggest that a history of IA should not generally be a contraindication when considering the performance of allo-HSCT in patients with acute leukemia. PMID:26501769

  2. Influence of Climatic Change on Rice Production in Anqing Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The research aimed to study the influence of climatic variation on rice production in Anqing zone.[Method] Based on temperature and precipitation data in rice growth period (May-November) during 1980-2009,by using five-year sliding average method,the moving average charts of temperature and rainfall were made.The variation characteristics of main factors (temperature and precipitation) which affected rice growth were analyzed.By using line moving average simulation method,the climatic yield was ...

  3. Anthropogenic influence on multidecadal changes in reconstructed global evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douville, H.; Ribes, A.; Decharme, B.; Alkama, R.; Sheffield, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global warming is expected to intensify the global hydrological cycle, with an increase of both evapotranspiration (EVT) and precipitation. Yet, the magnitude and spatial distribution of this global and annual mean response remains highly uncertain. Better constraining land EVT in twenty-first-century climate scenarios is critical for predicting changes in surface climate, including heatwaves and droughts, evaluating impacts on ecosystems and water resources, and designing adaptation policies. Continental scale EVT changes may already be underway, but have never been attributed to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols. Here we provide global gridded estimates of annual EVT and demonstrate that the latitudinal and decadal differentiation of recent EVT variations cannot be understood without invoking the anthropogenic radiative forcings. In the mid-latitudes, the emerging picture of enhanced EVT confirms the end of the dimming decades and highlights the possible threat posed by increasing drought frequency to managing water resources and achieving food security in a changing climate.

  4. 76 FR 24031 - Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Infectious Diseases (BSC, OID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... Infectious Diseases (BSC, OID) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub... Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, and the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral... focused discussion on ``Transitioning Infectious Disease Prevention Programs in an Era of Change.''...

  5. Does the weather influence public opinion about climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, S. D.; McDaniel, J.

    2010-12-01

    Public opinion in North America about the science of anthropogenic climate change and the motivation for policy action has been variable over the past twenty years. The trends in public opinion over time have been attributed the general lack of pressing public concern about climate change to a range of political, economic and psychological factors. One driving force behind the variability in polling data from year to year may be the weather itself. The difference between what we “expect” - the climate - and what we “get” - the weather - can be a major source of confusion and obfuscation in the public discourse about climate change. For example, reaction to moderate global temperatures in 2007 and 2008 may have helped prompt the spread of a “global cooling” meme in the public and the news media. At the same time, a decrease in the belief in the science of climate change and the need for action has been noted in opinion polls. This study analyzes the relationship between public opinion about climate change and the weather in the U.S. since the mid-1980s using historical polling data from several major organizations (e.g. Gallup, Pew, Harris Interactive, ABC News), historical monthly air temperature (NCDC) and a survey of opinion articles from major U.S. newspapers (Washington Post, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Houston Chronicle, USA Today). Seasonal and annual monthly temperature anomalies for the northeastern U.S and the continental U.S are compared with available national opinion data for three general categories of questions: i) Is the climate warming?, ii) Is the observed warming due to human activity?, and iii) Are you concerned about climate change? The variability in temperature and public opinion over time is also compared with the variability in the fraction of opinion articles in the newspapers (n ~ 7000) which express general agreement or disagreement with IPCC Summary for Policymakers consensus statements on climate change (“most of

  6. Influence of Heat Treatment on Color Change of Poplar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, Populus tomentosa was used as samples for heat treatment in order to find the initial effect rule of color change, when the temperature rose to180, 200 and 220 oC and the time was kept for 1, 2 and 3 h, respectively. The results are shown as follows: The color of treated wood can be changed obviously by the heat treatment. Under the same temperature, the color saturation becomes smaller and the difference of color becomes more obvious with the increase of the keeping time. Lightness and color...

  7. Influence of seasonal changes and vigor on appearance of trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seasonal changes in trees are highly dependant on their health and growth rate. Monitoring the vigor of trees at every season provides basic data which can be used at trees planting to predict the physiological characteristics of their seasonal change. In this study, 3 kinds of trees ; zelkova, camphor and metasequoia were monthly observed from April to December, using an infrared television camera. The vigor of the trees was evaluated in each season and the relationship between their image and the evaluation in each season was investigated. The data shows that there is a high correlation between the vigor and the seasonal evaluations

  8. Changing Economic and Social Influences on Family Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Lisbeth J.; Salisbury, Christine L.

    1988-01-01

    The implications of such societal changes as increased incidences of single parenthood, divorce, and out-of-home childcare for achieving the family focus in early intervention services as required by Public Law 99-457 are addressed. (Author/DB)

  9. Mitigating Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Victoria

    The emergence of new, transmissible infections poses a significant threat to human populations. As the 2009 novel influenza A/H1N1 pandemic and the 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic demonstrate, we have observed the effects of rapid spread of illness in non-immune populations and experienced disturbing uncertainty about future potential for human suffering and societal disruption. Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of a newly emerged infectious organism are usually gathered in retrospect as the outbreak evolves and affects populations. Knowledge of potential effects of outbreaks and epidemics and most importantly, mitigation at community, regional, national and global levels is needed to inform policy that will prepare and protect people. Study of possible outcomes of evolving epidemics and application of mitigation strategies is not possible in observational or experimental research designs, but computational modeling allows conduct of `virtual' experiments. Results of well-designed computer simulations can aid in the selection and implementation of strategies that limit illness and death, and maintain systems of healthcare and other critical resources that are vital to public protection. Mitigating Infectious Disease Outbreaks.

  10. The Cambridge Infectious Diseases Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, James

    2010-01-01

    The Cambridge Infectious Diseases Consortium (CIDC) was established to provide a multi-institutional, world class quality environment for infectious disease research addressing important questions and for the recruitment and training of high quality veterinarians into careers in infectious disease research. The programme has been a demonstrable success in achieving these overall aims. The institutions that have played a key role in the consortium include the Department of Veterinary Medic...

  11. 49 CFR 173.199 - Category B infectious substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in paragraph (a)(9) of this section, a Category B infectious substance meeting the definition of a... maximum temperatures, changes in humidity and pressure, and shocks, loadings and vibrations...

  12. The influence of climate change on Tanzania's hydropower sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperna Weiland, Frederiek; Boehlert, Brent; Meijer, Karen; Schellekens, Jaap; Magnell, Jan-Petter; Helbrink, Jakob; Kassana, Leonard; Liden, Rikard

    2015-04-01

    Economic costs induced by current climate variability are large for Tanzania and may further increase due to future climate change. The Tanzanian National Climate Change Strategy addressed the need for stabilization of hydropower generation and strengthening of water resources management. Increased hydropower generation can contribute to sustainable use of energy resources and stabilization of the national electricity grid. To support Tanzania the World Bank financed this study in which the impact of climate change on the water resources and related hydropower generation capacity of Tanzania is assessed. To this end an ensemble of 78 GCM projections from both the CMIP3 and CMIP5 datasets was bias-corrected and down-scaled to 0.5 degrees resolution following the BCSD technique using the Princeton Global Meteorological Forcing Dataset as a reference. To quantify the hydrological impacts of climate change by 2035 the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB was set-up for Tanzania at a resolution of 3 minutes and run with all 78 GCM datasets. From the full set of projections a probable (median) and worst case scenario (95th percentile) were selected based upon (1) the country average Climate Moisture Index and (2) discharge statistics of relevance to hydropower generation. Although precipitation from the Princeton dataset shows deviations from local station measurements and the global hydrological model does not perfectly reproduce local scale hydrographs, the main discharge characteristics and precipitation patterns are represented well. The modeled natural river flows were adjusted for water demand and irrigation within the water resources model RIBASIM (both historical values and future scenarios). Potential hydropower capacity was assessed with the power market simulation model PoMo-C that considers both reservoir inflows obtained from RIBASIM and overall electricity generation costs. Results of the study show that climate change is unlikely to negatively affect the

  13. Anticipating the Emerging of Some Strategical Infectious Animal Diseases in Indonesia Related to The Effect of Global Warming and Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjamsul Bahri

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of global warming and climate change is changing the season, included flooding in one area and very dry in other area, changing the temperature and humidity. These changes will trigger changing of the life of biological agent (virus, bacteria, parasites and so on, variety of animal species, variety of vectors as reservoir host of animal with the role of transmitting the disease to other animal species, This condition will trigger the new animal disease (emerging disease or old disease will be re-emerged (re-emerging diseases. This paper will discuss the effect of global warming and climate change on animal diseases in Indonesia such as Bluetongue (BT, Nipah, Japanese encephalitis (JE, West Nile (WN, and Rift Valley fever (RVF. The climate changes such as increasing the earth temperature and rainfall will cause extremely increase of vector population for BT, JE, WN and RVF. In addition, animal transportation and bird migration from one country to others or region will cause changing of ecological system and will open the chance to distribute the diseases. Hence, anticipation on those disease outbreaks should be taken by conducting the surveilance and early detection to those diseases. The possibility of entering Nipah disease in Indonesia should be anticipated because the avaibility of Nipah virus and the reservoir host (Pteropus spp and also pigs as amplifier host in the surrounding area. Other diseases such as, leptospirosis, anthrax and avian influenza (H5N1 are also have a wider potential to distributing the disease related to the climate change in Indonesia.

  14. [Ultrastructural changes in transverse striated muscles under the influence of space flight factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdniakov, O M; Babakova, L L; Demorzhi, M S

    1988-12-01

    The influence of space flight (on the biosatellite "Kosmos-1667") on muscles (diaphragmatic, soleus, gastrocnemius) was studied by electron microscope. Muscles had destructive and atrophic changes. The rate of changes was maximal in m. soleus, minimal in the diaphragmatic m. However, some regeneration was found demonstrating the reversibility of changes. PMID:2974735

  15. Are gait variability and stability measures influenced by directional changes?

    OpenAIRE

    Riva, F; Grimpampi, E.; Mazza, C; Stagni, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many gait variability and stability measures have been proposed in the literature, with the aim to quantify gait impairment, degree of neuro-motor control and balance disorders in healthy and pathological subjects. These measures are often obtained from lower trunk acceleration data, typically acquired during rectilinear gait, but relevant experimental protocols and data processing techniques lack in standardization. Since directional changes represent an essential aspect of gai...

  16. PREFERRED MODALITY INFLUENCES ON EXERCISE-INDUCED MOOD CHANGES

    OpenAIRE

    Lane, Andrew M.; Andrew Jackson; Terry, Peter C.

    2005-01-01

    The present study tested, both retrospectively and prospectively, exercise-induced mood changes among regular exercisers. Specifically, it examined the extent to which preferred exercise modality promoted greater mood benefits. A group of 25 exercise participants (M = 35.5 yr., SD = 10.5 yr.) took part in the study. All participants had exercised at least three times a week (M = 3.5, SD = 2.3) during the previous year. Participants completed a 14-item Exercise Preference Questionnaire to prov...

  17. Djibouti: changing influence in the Horn's strategic hub

    OpenAIRE

    Styan, David

    2013-01-01

    Change in Djibouti’s economic and strategic options has been driven by four factors: the Ethiopian–Eritrean war of 1998–2000, the impact of Ethiopia's economic transformation and growth upon trade; shifts in US strategy since 9/11, and the upsurge in piracy along the Gulf of Aden and Somali coasts. With the expansion of the US AFRICOM base, the reconfiguration of France's military presence and the establishment of Japanese and other military facilities, Djibouti has become an internat...

  18. Influence of vegetation changes on soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørnberg, Per

    In a heath region at Hjelm Hede in Denmark oak trees are invading a Calluna/Empetrum vegetation. In less than a century the oak invasion has caused considerable changes in the soil: what was once an O-horizon under Calluna has changed to an A-horizon under oak; the Calluna E-horizon has lost its distinct appearance; and the sharp boundary between E and Bh has been obliterated. The directly visible changes are associated with a rise in pH of about one unit in the top horizon under the oaks, an increasing content of organic matter in the E-horizon, a decreasing content of organic matter in the Bh-horizon, and a fall in the C/N ratio. In order to estimate the total microbiological activity, cotton strips were placed in the upper soil horizons. The loss in tensile strength during two summer months was 10-15% under Calluna, but more than 50% under oaks. Initial attempts to find differences in the type and content of organic matter showed that the most abundant low-molecular organic acids extracted from the Of-horizons were 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (protocatechuic acid), 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid (vanillic acid). The extraction was done in 0.1 M sodium pyrophosphate at pH 10.2. The organic compounds were determined by HPLC. The 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid was relatively the most important compound under the Calluna heath, whereas 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid was most important under oaks. Extractions were performed on water samples from field lysimeter experiments to determine whether the substituted benzoic acids in the soil water arose under transport. These extractions exposed a ppm concentration of 2,4-dichlorobenzoic acid, a compound believed to originate from microbial decomposition of lysimeter material.

  19. A global assessment of market accessibility and market influence for global environmental change studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verburg, Peter H.; Ellis, Erle C.; Letourneau, Aurelien

    2011-07-01

    Markets influence the global patterns of urbanization, deforestation, agriculture and other land use systems. Yet market influence is rarely incorporated into spatially explicit global studies of environmental change, largely because consistent global data are lacking below the national level. Here we present the first high spatial resolution gridded data depicting market influence globally. The data jointly represent variations in both market strength and accessibility based on three market influence indices derived from an index of accessibility to market locations and national level gross domestic product (purchasing power parity). These indices show strong correspondence with human population density while also revealing several distinct and useful relationships with other global environmental patterns. As market influence grows, the need for high resolution global data on market influence and its dynamics will become increasingly important to understanding and forecasting global environmental change.

  20. A global assessment of market accessibility and market influence for global environmental change studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, Peter H [Institute for Environmental Studies, Amsterdam Global Change Institute, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1087, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ellis, Erle C [Department of Geography and Environmental Systems, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Letourneau, Aurelien, E-mail: Peter.Verburg@ivm.vu.nl [UMR 5175 Centre d' Ecologie Fonctionnelle and Evolutive, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1919 Route de Mende, 34293 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2011-07-15

    Markets influence the global patterns of urbanization, deforestation, agriculture and other land use systems. Yet market influence is rarely incorporated into spatially explicit global studies of environmental change, largely because consistent global data are lacking below the national level. Here we present the first high spatial resolution gridded data depicting market influence globally. The data jointly represent variations in both market strength and accessibility based on three market influence indices derived from an index of accessibility to market locations and national level gross domestic product (purchasing power parity). These indices show strong correspondence with human population density while also revealing several distinct and useful relationships with other global environmental patterns. As market influence grows, the need for high resolution global data on market influence and its dynamics will become increasingly important to understanding and forecasting global environmental change.

  1. A global assessment of market accessibility and market influence for global environmental change studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markets influence the global patterns of urbanization, deforestation, agriculture and other land use systems. Yet market influence is rarely incorporated into spatially explicit global studies of environmental change, largely because consistent global data are lacking below the national level. Here we present the first high spatial resolution gridded data depicting market influence globally. The data jointly represent variations in both market strength and accessibility based on three market influence indices derived from an index of accessibility to market locations and national level gross domestic product (purchasing power parity). These indices show strong correspondence with human population density while also revealing several distinct and useful relationships with other global environmental patterns. As market influence grows, the need for high resolution global data on market influence and its dynamics will become increasingly important to understanding and forecasting global environmental change.

  2. Influence of GAMMA radiation on morphological changes of Poecilia reticulata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our experiment were followed histological changes after gamma-irradiation with dose of 30 Gy in Poecilia reticulata. After radiation shyness and lethargy were observed. The most prominent clinical symptoms observed were emaciation, hampered breathing, ex ophthalmia and hemorrhages. The histological picture found were adequate to these symptoms. The enteritic villi compared with controls were relatively low. Enterocytes taking part on resorption processes were damaged and desquamated on some sites, and the number of microvilli was reduced on their surface. As our earlier findings on rats revealed, the decrease in number of microvilli designates malfunctioning intestinal resorption, which can lead to emaciation. (authors)

  3. How will changes in global climate influence California?

    OpenAIRE

    Weare, B C

    2009-01-01

    California is the leading dairy state in the United States, producing 21% of the nation’s milk supply. The state’s highest concentration of dairies is in the San Joaquin Valley, a region that violates federal limits for ozone and particulate matter in the air. Volatile organic compounds and greenhouse-gas emissions from dairies contribute to regional air-quality challenges and also play a role in climate change. We used an environmentally controlled chamber to monitor greenhouse-gas emissions...

  4. Sociocultural influences on body image and body changes among adolescent boys and girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P; Ricciardelli, Lina A

    2003-02-01

    In 2 studies, the authors evaluated the role of parents, peers, and the media in body image and body-change strategies among adolescent boys and girls. The respondents for Study 1 (423 boys and 377 girls) completed the Body Image and Body Change Inventory (L. A. Ricciardelli & M. P. McCabe, 2002) and the Perceived Sociocultural Influences on Body Image and Body Change Questionnaire (M. P. McCabe & L. A. Ricciardelli, 2001b). Body mass index and age were also included in the analyses. Regression analyses demonstrated that sociocultural influences and feedback from the participant's best male friend were important predictors for all body-change strategies among boys. For girls, sociocultural influences and feedback from the participant's best female friend and mother were important predictors for body-change strategies. The most consistent predictor of weight loss, weight gain, and strategies to increase muscles was body-image importance. In Study 2, the authors examined the influence of the same sociocultural variables, as well as negative affect and puberty on body image and body-change strategies among a second group of 199 boys and 267 girls. The results demonstrated that a broad range of sociocultural influences predicted body-change strategies for boys and girls, with negative affect also having a unique influence for boys but not for girls. Puberty played a minor role, once other sociocultural variables were entered into the regression equation. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:12617344

  5. An Influence of Changes of Heliogeophysical Conditions on Influenza Epidemics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elchin S. Babayev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available For purposes of studying of possible influence of the solar and geomagnetic activity on influenza diseases and epidemic, the data covering the time period of 1976-2004 is studied for the Absheron Peninsula area including the capital city Baku (the Republic of Azerbaijan with several millions of inhabitants. Period, duration, intensity and seasonal behavior of the influenza epidemic, tendency of its beginning within a solar cycle are determined. Investigations reveal that influenza epidemic usually begins 2-3 years before and / or 2-3 years after the 11-years sunspot cycle maximum. We suppose that solar activity affects the influenza epidemic mainly through geomagnetic activity (magnetic storms. The comparative analysis of years of high solar activity and both periods of originating of epidemics and pandemics on the base of antigenic formulas of influenza viruses described with the help of characters of structure of a virus (hemagglutinin and neuraminidase has revealed definite regularity in the circulation of influenza infections. Forecast method for prophylactic measures is developed for considered region. Obtained results are interpreted and compared with similar ones.

  6. Influence of diseases and metabolic disorders on cow weight changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Podlahová

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Requirements on increasing economic efficiency of cattle breeding force farmers to use the latest up-to-datetechnology for monitoring and management of farming quality. Regular weighing and data processing can forinstance discover mistakes that can indicate defects, e.g. nutrition deficiencies, incorrect embryonic development,health problems, demanding nursing intervention. The aim of the research was to monitor manifestations of diseasesand metabolic disorders in the course of weight curve based on data from an automated system for weighing the liveweight of dairy cows. There was used in the weighing unit for milking robots Astronaut A3 (Lely company to obtainweight data of individual cows. There were selected dairy cows with the longest period of lactation or already dryingoff, and especially dairy cows with various health problems for study. Limiting values of weight changes wereestablished after assembling a general equation of mass curve. In the sphere of the diseases there was manifestedonly ketosis in the weight curves with a loss of 10.2 kg / day (38% weight loss. The results of the study will beapplied for compiling algorithm that will be implemented in the complete management system of cattle breeding,monitoring the dairy cows every day and highlight possible deviations exceeding of physiological changes in weight.

  7. Influence of Climate Change on Extreme Weather Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. L.; Wehner, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    The increasing frequency of extreme weather events raises the question of to what extent such events can be attributed to human causes. Within the climate literature, an approach has been developed based on a quantity known as the fraction of attributable risk, or FAR. The essence of this approach is to estimate the probability of the extreme event of interest from parallel runs of climate models under either anthropogenic or natural conditions; the two probabilities are then combined to produce the FAR. However, a number of existing approaches either make questionable assumptions about estimating extreme event probabilites (e.g. inappropriate assumption of the normal distribution) or ignore the differences between climate models and observational data. Here, we propose an approach based on extreme value theory, incorporated into a hierarchical model to account for differences among climate models. A related technique, based on the same modeling approach, leads to quantitative estimates of how the probability of an extreme event will change under future projected climate change. We illustrate the method with examples related to the European heatwave of 2003, the Russian heatwave of 2010, and the Texas/Oklahoma heatwave and drought of 2011.

  8. Infectious Disease Risk Associated with Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation opens with views of the shuttle in various stages of preparation for launch, a few moments after launch prior to external fuel tank separation, a few pictures of the earth,and several pictures of astronomical interest. The presentation reviews the factors effecting the risks of infectious disease during space flight, such as the crew, water, food, air, surfaces and payloads and the factors that increase disease risk, the factors affecting the risk of infectious disease during spaceflight, and the environmental factors affecting immunity, such as stress. One factor in space infectious disease is latent viral reactivation, such as herpes. There are comparisons of the incidence of viral reactivation in space, and in other analogous situations (such as bed rest, or isolation). There is discussion of shingles, and the pain and results of treatment. There is a further discussion of the changes in microbial pathogen characteristics, using salmonella as an example of the increased virulence of microbes during spaceflight. A factor involved in the risk of infectious disease is stress.

  9. Wetlands and infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmerman Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a historical association between wetlands and infectious disease that has led to the modification of wetlands to prevent disease. At the same time there has been the development of water resources projects that increase the risk of disease. The demand for more water development projects and the increased pressure to make natural wetlands economically beneficial creates the need for an ecological approach to wetland management and health assessment. The environmental and health interactions are many. There is a need to take into account the landscape, spatial boundaries, and cross-boundary interactions in water development projects as well as alternative methods to provide water for human needs. The research challenges that need to be addressed are discussed.

  10. The impacts of influence strategies on organizational subgroup members' evaluations of management accounting change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.H.M. Verbeeten

    2014-01-01

    This research project investigates how different influence strategies affect business unit managers’ and controllers’ evaluations of the success of a management accounting change (MAC). Using survey data on paired observations from managers and controllers in 68 business units, I find that influence

  11. Genetically Influenced Change in Sensation Seeking Drives the Rise of Delinquent Behavior during Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Harden, K. Paige; Quinn, Patrick D.; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.

    2011-01-01

    Sensation seeking is associated with an increased propensity for delinquency, and emerging research on personality change suggests that mean-levels of sensation seeking increase substantially from childhood to adolescence. The current study tested whether individual differences in the rate of change of sensation seeking predicted within-person change in delinquent behavior and whether genetically influenced differences in rate of personality change accounted for this association. Sensation se...

  12. 76 FR 39041 - Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ...OSHA invites interested parties to participate in informal stakeholder meetings concerning occupational exposure to infectious diseases. OSHA plans to use the information gathered at these meetings to explore the possible development of a proposed rule to protect workers from occupational exposure to infectious agents in settings, either where workers provide direct patient care or where......

  13. Infectious Diseases in Day Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleator, Esther K.

    Discussed in this publication are infectious illnesses for which children attending day care appear to be at special risk. Also covered are the common cold, some infectious disease problems receiving media attention, and some other annoying but not serious diseases, such as head lice, pinworms, and contagious skin conditions. Causes,…

  14. Influence of urban land cover changes and climate change for the exposure of European cities to flooding during extreme precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Per Skougaard; Høegh Ravn, N.; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten;

    In this paper we present a methodology suitable for investigating the relative and combined influence of urban land cover changes and climate change for the exposure of cities to pluvial flooding. A combined hydrological-hydrodynamic modelling and remote sensing approach enables the quantificatio...... development during the past 30 years caused an increase in flood exposure that is comparable to what is expected in the RCP4.5 (+2°C) climate scenario....

  15. Influence of particle flux on morphology changes of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten is currently considered as the main candidate material for high heat flux components of future fusion devices. Bombardment of tungsten surfaces by large fluences of low energy particles such as hydrogen isotopes and helium can lead to strong microstructural changes which are mechanically unstable. The occurrence of those effects is strongly dependent on the surface temperature and particle flux. In this contribution we present the experiments done at PSI-2 linear plasma device in order to generate surface modifications on tungsten. The power flux density delivered to the target at PSI-2 is up to 2 MWm-2 and the ion flux density is of the order of 1022-1023 m-2s-1. A dedicated actively heated sample holder was designed and tested in order to provide the required temperature range from 300 K to 1800 K. We present here the first measurements performed at PSI-2 whereas subsequent experiments are foreseen at Pilot-PSI and MAGNUM-PSI linear plasma devices with higher flux densities up to 1025 m-2s-1.

  16. Influence of particle flux on morphology changes of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzi, Luxherta; Schweer, Bernd; Terra, Alexis; Unterberg, Bernhard [Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Juelich (Germany); Temmerman, Greg de [FOM-DIFFER, Association EURATOM-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Oost, Guido van [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    Tungsten is currently considered as the main candidate material for high heat flux components of future fusion devices. Bombardment of tungsten surfaces by large fluences of low energy particles such as hydrogen isotopes and helium can lead to strong microstructural changes which are mechanically unstable. The occurrence of those effects is strongly dependent on the surface temperature and particle flux. In this contribution we present the experiments done at PSI-2 linear plasma device in order to generate surface modifications on tungsten. The power flux density delivered to the target at PSI-2 is up to 2 MWm{sup -2} and the ion flux density is of the order of 10{sup 22}-10{sup 23} m{sup -2}s{sup -1}. A dedicated actively heated sample holder was designed and tested in order to provide the required temperature range from 300 K to 1800 K. We present here the first measurements performed at PSI-2 whereas subsequent experiments are foreseen at Pilot-PSI and MAGNUM-PSI linear plasma devices with higher flux densities up to 10{sup 25} m{sup -2}s{sup -1}.

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF INNOVATIVE CHANGES ON ACTIVITIES OF RESTAURANT TRADE ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Piatnytska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the research it was found that the innovative changes in the management of restaurant business in the current economic conditions take features of cyclic process. It was defined that in the restaurant sphere any enterprise is substantially influenced by three types of innovative changes: product, process, tools of labor, between which there is a close relationship, which is aimed at ensuring stable and long-term competitive enterprise advantages. The economic and mathematical approaches to evaluating the influence of these kinds of innovative changes considering their factors-saving, quality and degree of novelty have been developed.In determining the influence of product changes on activities of restaurants it is proposed to use the changes in total sales and / or number of servings sold per one consumer; attractiveness of innovative services – the change in the number of consumers, who have used these services per time unit. During complex evaluation of processes innovation changes influence it is recommended to divide them initially into those involving consumers and contactless and analyze in terms of their suitability for restaurant's particular type, class, affordability for consumers and others. It is proposed to apply the change in the number of servings or in volume of raw materials or precooked processing per one employee of a restaurant, the number of consumers served per one employee for quantitative evaluation of innovation changes attractiveness in processes.It is concluded that innovative changes in means of production should be primarily evaluated from the perspective of process improvement opportunities, for which they are used. Taking the fact that in most cases the innovation of means of production in restaurant trade is aimed at saving time and labor, it is recommended to consider only their factors-saving and degree of novelty in evaluation of their influence on restaurant activities.Developing the ideas of E

  18. Current outlook of infectious diseases in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, M

    1998-06-01

    The "emerging" infectious diseases have received global attention. Taiwan is a country which is going through the process of becoming "developed" from being "developing". If we compare five leading causes of death in 1952 and in 1993, three were infectious diseases in 1952 and there was none in 1993. And yet today, infectious diseases remain a major problem in this country as well in every country in the world, whether developing or developed. Some of the problems Taiwan faces are old problems with old faces. They have never been adequately solved because the societal and environmental sanitary infrastructure does not ensure proper sewage disposal, safe potable water and freedom from dangerous vectors. Examples are the diarrheal diseases, parasitic diseases, scrub typhus and Japanese encephalitis. Some of the Taiwan's problems are caused by old agents which present a new face. Mortality from tuberculosis took a dramatic and gratifying plunge in the last fifty years. Yet tuberculosis is ever present and a constant public health threat. Dengue has become a problem again because of a world breakdown in the control of the mosquito, Aedes egypti, and it is partly contributed to by increased urbanization and world travel. The problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria causing hospital acquired and community acquired infections is probably the most serious "new" problem. The most important cause is excessive and indiscriminate use of antibiotics in the community and in hospitals. We propose the establishment of "Bacterial Infections Reference Laboratory" at the National Health Research Institutes to be a national facility to study the epidemiology and control of antibiotic resistance. All infectious diseases require a rigorous system of surveillance, and precise etiological diagnosis before they can be treated or prevented. This should be kept clearly in mind when one considers the changing role of the infectious disease physician in Taiwan in the face of unsolved disease

  19. Factors Influencing Smallholder Farmers' Climate Change Perceptions: A Study from Farmers in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtemariam, Lemlem Teklegiorgis; Gandorfer, Markus; Kassa, Getachew Abate; Heissenhuber, Alois

    2016-08-01

    Factors influencing climate change perceptions have vital roles in designing strategies to enrich climate change understanding. Despite this, factors that influence smallholder farmers' climate change perceptions have not yet been adequately studied. As many of the smallholder farmers live in regions where climate change is predicted to have the most negative impact, their climate change perception is of particular interest. In this study, based on data collected from Ethiopian smallholder farmers, we assessed farmers' perceptions and anticipations of past and future climate change. Furthermore, the factors influencing farmers' climate change perceptions and the relation between farmers' perceptions and available public climate information were assessed. Our findings revealed that a majority of respondents perceive warming temperatures and decreasing rainfall trends that correspond with the local meteorological record. Farmers' perceptions about the past climate did not always reflect their anticipations about the future. A substantial number of farmers' anticipations of future climate were less consistent with climate model projections. The recursive bivariate probit models employed to explore factors affecting different categories of climate change perceptions illustrate statistical significance for explanatory variables including location, gender, age, education, soil fertility status, climate change information, and access to credit services. The findings contribute to the literature by providing evidence not just on farmers' past climate perceptions but also on future climate anticipations. The identified factors help policy makers to provide targeted extension and advisory services to enrich climate change understanding and support appropriate farm-level climate change adaptations. PMID:27179801

  20. Factors Influencing Smallholder Farmers' Climate Change Perceptions: A Study from Farmers in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtemariam, Lemlem Teklegiorgis; Gandorfer, Markus; Kassa, Getachew Abate; Heissenhuber, Alois

    2016-08-01

    Factors influencing climate change perceptions have vital roles in designing strategies to enrich climate change understanding. Despite this, factors that influence smallholder farmers' climate change perceptions have not yet been adequately studied. As many of the smallholder farmers live in regions where climate change is predicted to have the most negative impact, their climate change perception is of particular interest. In this study, based on data collected from Ethiopian smallholder farmers, we assessed farmers' perceptions and anticipations of past and future climate change. Furthermore, the factors influencing farmers' climate change perceptions and the relation between farmers' perceptions and available public climate information were assessed. Our findings revealed that a majority of respondents perceive warming temperatures and decreasing rainfall trends that correspond with the local meteorological record. Farmers' perceptions about the past climate did not always reflect their anticipations about the future. A substantial number of farmers' anticipations of future climate were less consistent with climate model projections. The recursive bivariate probit models employed to explore factors affecting different categories of climate change perceptions illustrate statistical significance for explanatory variables including location, gender, age, education, soil fertility status, climate change information, and access to credit services. The findings contribute to the literature by providing evidence not just on farmers' past climate perceptions but also on future climate anticipations. The identified factors help policy makers to provide targeted extension and advisory services to enrich climate change understanding and support appropriate farm-level climate change adaptations.

  1. Monthly Changes in the Influence of the Arctic Oscillation on Surface Air Temperature over China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jiayou; TAN Benkui; SUO Lingling; HU Yongyun

    2007-01-01

    Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) is used to study monthly changes in the influence of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) on spring, summer and autumn air temperature over China with the January 500 hPa geopotential height data from 1951 to 2004 and monthly temperature data from January to November at 160 stations in China. Several AO indices have been defined with the 500-hPa geopotential data and the index defined as the first principal component of the normalized geopotential data is best to be used to study the influence of the AO on SAT (surface air temperature) in China. There are three modes through which the AO in winter influences SAT in China. The influence of the AO on SAT in China changes monthly and is stronger in spring and summer than in autumn. The main influenced regions are Northeast China and the Changjiang River drainage area.

  2. Ethological Model for Diagnosis of Infectious Encephalomyelitis in Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasimira Uzunova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to establish the specific symptomatic ethological pathognomonic complex of infectious encephalomyelitis in poultry. The behavioural changes were monitored in 2-week-old broiler chickens  (total number 10,500 housed in three premises. The typical pathoethological manifestations of infectious encephalomyelitis were investigated in broiler chickens through six behavioural activities – locomotion, appetite, water drinking, pareses, paralyses, posture. As a result of the survey, the specific ethological pathognomonic complex for infectious encephalomyelitis in chickens was identified. These clinical manifestations of a pathoethological complex and specific behavioural activities could be used to support the diagnosis.

  3. What Is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... teen years. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialists Have? Pediatric infectious diseases specialists are medical ...

  4. The Influence of British Social Changes on the Origin and Development of English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莹

    2009-01-01

    Social changes are one of the main factors of the orion and development of a language.This author mainly analyzes the influence of British social changes on the origin and development of English from three periods in the history of English language.

  5. A dynamic model for infectious diseases: The role of vaccination and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja Sekhara Rao, P.; Naresh Kumar, M.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding dynamics of an infectious disease helps in designing appropriate strategies for containing its spread in a population. Recent mathematical models are aimed at studying dynamics of some specific types of infectious diseases. In this paper we propose a new model for infectious diseases spread having susceptible, infected, and recovered populations and study its dynamics in presence of incubation delays and relapse of the disease. The influence of treatment and vaccination efforts on the spread of infection in presence of time delays are studied. Sufficient conditions for local stability of the equilibria and change of stability are derived in various cases. The problem of global stability is studied for an important special case of the model. Simulations carried out in this study brought out the importance of treatment rate in controlling the disease spread. It is observed that incubation delays have influence on the system even under enhanced vaccination. The present study has clearly brought out the fact that treatment rate in presence of time delays would contain the disease as compared to popular belief that eradication can only be done through vaccination.

  6. Infectious laryngotracheitis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidalgo H

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT herpesvirus continues to cause outbreaks of respiratory disease in chickens world-wide. Sporadic cases of ILT occur in all classes of birds, including hobby/show/game chickens, broilers, heavy breeders, and commercial laying hens. These epornitics of ILT tend to occur where there are large populations of naïve, unvaccinated birds, i.e., in concentrated areas of broiler production. ILT virus can be transmitted through (a chickens with acute upper respiratory tract disease, (b latently infected "carrier" fowls, and (c fomites and contaminated persons. Chicken flocks which are endemic infected with ILT virus occur only in some regions of countries or even in particular multiple-age production farms. In these cases modified live vaccines are actually used, even though these biological products, as well as wild ILTV strains, can establish latent infections. In the case of heavy breeders and laying hens, which are typically vaccinated against ILT, sporadic cases are often related to errors in vaccine application and to biosecurity failures.

  7. Infectious Diseases in the Homeless

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-26

    In this podcast, Ted Pestorius speaks with Dr. Marian McDonald, Associate Director for Minority and Women’s Health at CDC about an article in September 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases on infectious diseases in the homeless. There are an estimated 100 million homeless people worldwide today, and this number is likely to grow. The homeless population is vulnerable to many diseases, including HIV, hepatitis, and tuberculosis. Dr. McDonald discusses why this population is so vulnerable.  Created: 8/26/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/27/2008.

  8. Herpesvirus infection and infectious mononucleosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Sharipova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review we present current information on various aspects of infectious mononucleosis in children. Based on the analysis of scientific literature highlights the major etiological factors that lead to the development of this disease. The paper describes the clinical and laboratory features of infectious mononucleosis caused by Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpes virus type VI. Presents literature data on the impact of herpes infection on the development of mononucleosis. Showing modern aspects of an integrated diagnosis of herpesvirus infection in infectious mononucleosis in children.

  9. The Influence of the Leadership Style on the Resistance to Change Phenomenon in Romanian Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Braduţanu

    2014-01-01

    In this article we examine the influence of the leadership style on the resistance to change phenomenon, as well as how the degree of resistance to change differs in private organizations versus public ones. After analyzing the literature and conducting a survey in Romanian organizations we have concluded that the leadership style adopted by a top manager has an important impact on employees resistance to change. The research was designed to inform practitioners, researchers, m...

  10. Influence of temperature on autogenous deformation and relative humidity change in hardening cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change (RH change) in hardening cement paste. Theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented, which elucidate the influence of temperature on these properties. This is an important subject in the control...... of early age cracking of concrete. It is demonstrated that the traditional maturity concept generally is not applicable to autogenous deformation and autogenous RH change. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  11. Changes in Climatic Factors Influencing the Growth Period of Corn in Fengjie County

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Xiaozhen; Mou, Xinli; Ma, Chen; Huang, Jiang; Yuan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Under the background of global climate change, we analyze the change tendency of average temperature and amount of precipitation influencing the corn's growth period. The results show that from March to August, the monthly temperatures show an upward trend, but the rise is different in different months, and the maximum temperature rise is in May. Precipitation in different months has different trends. Climate change brings about favorable conditions at high altitudes in Fengjie, reduces produ...

  12. [Infectious diseases in the genomic era].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Switt, Andrea I; Toledo, Viviana

    2015-10-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have arrived, changing research and infectious disease research into a new era, the "genomic era". Currently, the developed world is introducing NGS in a number of applications, including clinical diagnostics, epidemiology, and microbiology. In developing countries NGS is being progressively introduced. Technologies currently available allow to sequence the whole genome of bacterial and viral strains for an approximate cost of $100 USD, which is highly cost savings compared to old-technologies for genome sequencing. Here we review recent publication of whole genome sequencing used for, (i) tracking of foodborne outbreaks, with emphasis in Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes, (ii) building genomic databases for Governments, (iii) investigating nosocomial infections, and (iv) clinical diagnosis. The genomic era is here to stay and researchers should use these "massive databases" generated by this technology to decrease infectious diseases and thus improve health of humans and animals. PMID:26633116

  13. Infectious disease burden in Gujarat (2005–2011: comparison of selected infectious disease rates with India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Iyer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is known to be endemic to numerous infectious diseases. The infectious disease profile of India is changing due to increased human environmental interactions, urbanisation and climate change. There are also predictions of explosive growth in infectious and zoonotic diseases. The Integrated Disease Surveillance Project (IDSP was implemented in Gujarat in 2004. Methods: We analysed IDSP data on seven laboratory confirmed infectious diseases from 2005–2011 on temporal and spatial trends and compared this to the National Health Profile (NHP data for the same period and with other literature. We chose laboratory cases data for Enteric fever, Cholera, Hepatitis, Dengue, Chikungunya, Measles and Diphtheria in the state since well designed vertical programs do not exist for these diseases. Statistical and GIS analysis was done using appropriate software. Results: Our analysis shows that the existing surveillance system in the state is predominantly reporting urban cases. There are wide variations among reported cases within the state with reports of Enteric fever and Measles being less than half of the national average, while Cholera, Viral Hepatitis and Dengue being nearly double. Conclusions: We found some limitations in the IDSP system with regard to the number of reporting units and cases in the background of a mixed health system with multiplicity of treatment providers and payment mechanisms. Despite these limitations, IDSP can be strengthened into a comprehensive surveillance system capable of tackling the challenge of reversing the endemicity of these diseases and preventing the emergence of others.

  14. Re-emergence of Chikungunya and other scourges: the role of globalization and climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezza, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Globalization and climate change are important phenomena in a changing world. To date, only the effect of globalisation on infectious diseases, from vector-borne to respiratory infections, has been well established. The influence of cyclic natural climatic events and local variations in temperature and precipitation has also been recognised; however, there is still no conclusive evidence of an effect of global warming on infectious disease patterns. PMID:19351987

  15. Reasons for Journal Impact Factor Changes: Influence of Changing Source Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Both the concept and the application of the impact factor (IF) have been subject to widespread critique, including concerns over its potential manipulation. This study provides a systematic analysis of significant journal Impact Factor changes, based on the relative contribution of either one or both variables of the IF equation (i.e. citations / articles as the numerator / denominator of the quotient). A cohort of JCR-listed journals which faced the most dramatic absolute IF changes between 2013 and 2014 (ΔIF ≥ 3.0, n = 49) was analyzed for the causes resulting in IF changes that theses journals have experienced in the last five years. Along with the variation by number of articles and citations, this analysis includes the relative change of both variables compared to each other and offers a classification of `valid`and `invalid`scenarios of IF variation in terms of the intended goal of the IF to measure journal quality. The sample cohort features a considerable incidence of IF increases (18%) which are qualified as `invalid`according to this classification because the IF increase is merely based on a favorably changing number of articles (denominator). The results of this analysis point out the potentially delusive effect of IF increases gained through effective shrinkage of publication output. Therefore, careful consideration of the details of the IF equation and possible implementation of control mechanisms versus the volatile factor of number of articles may help to improve the expressiveness of this metric. PMID:27105434

  16. Reasons for Journal Impact Factor Changes: Influence of Changing Source Items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesslich, Tobias; Weineck, Silke B; Koelblinger, Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Both the concept and the application of the impact factor (IF) have been subject to widespread critique, including concerns over its potential manipulation. This study provides a systematic analysis of significant journal Impact Factor changes, based on the relative contribution of either one or both variables of the IF equation (i.e. citations / articles as the numerator / denominator of the quotient). A cohort of JCR-listed journals which faced the most dramatic absolute IF changes between 2013 and 2014 (ΔIF ≥ 3.0, n = 49) was analyzed for the causes resulting in IF changes that theses journals have experienced in the last five years. Along with the variation by number of articles and citations, this analysis includes the relative change of both variables compared to each other and offers a classification of `valid`and `invalid`scenarios of IF variation in terms of the intended goal of the IF to measure journal quality. The sample cohort features a considerable incidence of IF increases (18%) which are qualified as `invalid`according to this classification because the IF increase is merely based on a favorably changing number of articles (denominator). The results of this analysis point out the potentially delusive effect of IF increases gained through effective shrinkage of publication output. Therefore, careful consideration of the details of the IF equation and possible implementation of control mechanisms versus the volatile factor of number of articles may help to improve the expressiveness of this metric. PMID:27105434

  17. Multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Rasmussen; Rostgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Haahr, Sven; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Hjalgrim, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious mononucleosis caused by the Epstein-Barr virus has been associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis. However, little is known about the characteristics of this association. OBJECTIVE: To assess the significance of sex, age at and time since infectious mononucleosis......, and attained age to the risk of developing multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis. DESIGN: Cohort study using persons tested serologically for infectious mononucleosis at Statens Serum Institut, the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register, and the...... Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry. SETTING: Statens Serum Institut. PATIENTS: A cohort of 25 234 Danish patients with mononucleosis was followed up for the occurrence of multiple sclerosis beginning on April 1, 1968, or January 1 of the year after the diagnosis of mononucleosis or after a negative Paul...

  18. The Influence of the Leadership Style on the Resistance to Change Phenomenon in Romanian Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Braduţanu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we examine the influence of the leadership style on the resistance to change phenomenon, as well as how the degree of resistance to change differs in private organizations versus public ones. After analyzing the literature and conducting a survey in Romanian organizations we have concluded that the leadership style adopted by a top manager has an important impact on employees resistance to change. The research was designed to inform practitioners, researchers, managers and other interested persons about the influence of the leadership style on the resistance to change phenomenon, as well as how the phenomenon is manifested in different types of organizations. The main contribution of this paper is that in order to benefit of a lower degree of resistance to change from employees, the participative leadership style is recommended to be applied.

  19. Effect of non-stationary climate on infectious gastroenteritis transmission in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Daisuke Onozuka

    2014-01-01

    Local weather factors are widely considered to influence the transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. Few studies, however, have examined the non-stationary relationships between global climatic factors and transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. We analyzed monthly data for cases of infectious gastroenteritis in Fukuoka, Japan from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the pattern of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Sou...

  20. Numerical assessment of the influence of long-term topographic change on deep groundwater flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to understand how long-term geological phenomena such as uplift and erosion influence deep hydrogeological and hydrochemical environments, and to predict the influence of such long-term geological phenomena in the future for the geological disposal of nuclear wastes. From the viewpoint of groundwater flow, it is necessary to estimate long-term topographic changes, and to evaluate their influence on deep groundwater flow conditions. In this study, the influence of long-term topographic change on deep groundwater flow conditions was numerically assessed. The general paleotopographic features of a wide area were estimated and groundwater flow simulations were carried out around the Tono area. As a result, the effects of long-term topographic changes and hydraulic features of faults on groundwater flow conditions, such as hydraulic gradient, velocity distribution, flow paths, and lengths, were confirmed. In general, if topographic characteristics such as locations of major mountains and valleys around the site have not changed, the groundwater flow paths will not significantly change. The methodology, which is proposed in this study, used to understand groundwater flow evolutions due to long-term topographic changes is efficient for identifying detailed assessment areas and is recommended based on the results of this study. (author)

  1. Farmers' Perceived Risks of Climate Change and Influencing Factors: A Study in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Dang, Hoa; Li, Elton; Nuberg, Ian; Bruwer, Johan

    2014-08-01

    Many countries are confronting climate change that threatens agricultural production and farmers' lives. Farmers' perceived risks of climate change and factors influencing those perceived risks are critical to their adaptive behavior and well-planned adaptation strategies. However, there is limited understanding of these issues. In this paper, we attempt to quantitatively measure farmers' perceived risks of climate change and explore the influences of risk experience, information, belief in climate change, and trust in public adaptation to those perceived risks. Data are from structured interviews with 598 farmers in the Mekong Delta. The study shows that perceived risks to production, physical health, and income dimensions receive greater priority while farmers pay less attention to risks to happiness and social relationships. Experiences of the events that can be attributed to climate change increase farmers' perceived risks. Information variables can increase or decrease perceived risks, depending on the sources of information. Farmers who believe that climate change is actually happening and influencing their family's lives, perceive higher risks in most dimensions. Farmers who think that climate change is not their concern but the government's, perceive lower risks to physical health, finance, and production. As to trust in public adaptation, farmers who believe that public adaptive measures are well co-ordinated, perceive lower risks to production and psychology. Interestingly, those who believe that the disaster warning system is working well, perceive higher risks to finance, production, and social relationships. Further attention is suggested for the quality, timing, and channels of information about climate change and adaptation.

  2. Infectious Disease, Endangerment, and Extinction

    OpenAIRE

    MacPhee, Ross D. E.; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious disease, especially virulent infectious disease, is commonly regarded as a cause of fluctuation or decline in biological populations. However, it is not generally considered as a primary factor in causing the actual endangerment or extinction of species. We review here the known historical examples in which disease has, or has been assumed to have had, a major deleterious impact on animal species, including extinction, and highlight some recent cases in which disease is the chief s...

  3. Investigative modalities in infectious keratitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta Noopur; Tandon Radhika

    2008-01-01

    Standard recommended guidelines for diagnosis of infectious keratitis do exist. Based on an extensive Medline literature search, the various investigative modalities available for aiding the diagnosis of microbial keratitis have been reviewed and described briefly. Preferred practice patterns have been outlined and the importance of routine pre-treatment cultures in the primary management of infectious keratitis has been highlighted. Corneal scraping, tear samples and corneal biopsy are few o...

  4. Herpesvirus infection and infectious mononucleosis

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Sharipova; I. V. Babachenko

    2014-01-01

    In this review we present current information on various aspects of infectious mononucleosis in children. Based on the analysis of scientific literature highlights the major etiological factors that lead to the development of this disease. The paper describes the clinical and laboratory features of infectious mononucleosis caused by Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpes virus type VI. Presents literature data on the impact of herpes infection on the development of mononucleosis. S...

  5. Global mapping of infectious disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hay, SI; Battle, KE; Pigott, DM; Smith, DL; Moyes, CL; S. Bhatt; Brownstein, JS; Collier, N.; Myers, MF; George, DB; Gething, PW

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this review was to evaluate the state of knowledge of the geographical distribution of all infectious diseases of clinical significance to humans. A systematic review was conducted to enumerate cartographic progress, with respect to the data available for mapping and the methods currently applied. The results helped define the minimum information requirements for mapping infectious disease occurrence, and a quantitative framework for assessing the mapping opportunities for ...

  6. Non-infectious orbital vasculitides

    OpenAIRE

    Perumal, B; Black, E H; Levin, F; Servat, J J

    2012-01-01

    Non-infectious vasculitides comprise a large number of diseases. Many of these diseases can cause inflammation within the orbit and a clinical presentation, which mimics numerous other processes. Orbital disease can often be the initial presentation of a systemic process and early diagnosis can help prevent long-term, potentially fatal consequences. The evaluation and treatment of non-infectious orbital vasculitides are often complicated and require a thorough understanding of the disease and...

  7. CHANGES OF CRUDE PROTEIN CONTENT IN MALTING BARLEY INFLUENCED BY POSTHARVEST RIPENING

    OpenAIRE

    M. LÍŠKOVÁ; H FRANČÁKOVÁ; J. MAREČEK

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this experiment was to investigate to what extent post-harvest ripening and growing locality influenced changes of crude protein content in malting barley and values of Kolbach index in malt. Results revealed that already in the sixth week after harvest, amount of crude protein decreased and amount of Kolbach index increased, due to post-harvest ripening. Moreover climatic conditions during vegetation and harvest as well as the growing locality significantly influenced (P<0.001) the...

  8. Some proves of integrated influence of geomagnetic activity and weather changes on human health

    OpenAIRE

    Khabarova, O. V.; Dimitrova, S.

    2008-01-01

    Our environment includes many factors, and each person on the Earth is permanently influenced by two of them: weather and magnetic field. It was found in the works of many investigators that the weather changes correlate with human health state. In the same time, disturbances of geomagnetic field (as one of the space weather manifestations) may influence bioobjects, including people. In this work we demonstrate the cumulative effect of different external factors (space weather and meteorologi...

  9. Strategic change communication : The influence of top managers' sensegiving over middle managers' sensemaking

    OpenAIRE

    Rosén, Carl; Aljuburi, Dhabia; Beaussant, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to explore factors that influence the sensemaking of middle managers during strategic change, and how top managers may influence those factors by making sense of them prior to the formation of the strategy. Methodology: In this paper, a qualitative research method with an abductive approach is used to explore individuals’ understanding and perspectives regarding the phenomenon under study. The data collection is based on interviewing six managers and two...

  10. Influence of climate change on the water resources in an alpine region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toffol, S; Engelhard, C; Rauch, W

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the global warming will impact on water resources. This study investigates the possible influence of climate change on the water resources in an alpine region. A description of the actual situation with emphasis on the water resources from the one side and on the water consuming factors, here called stressors, is given. The probable effects of climate change in the region and their influence on its water resources are then described. The main outcome is that in the analysed region the climate change will rather have positive influence on the water balance by inducing higher precipitations during the rivers' natural low flow period (winter). This outcome contradicts many common predictions, however, this due to the specifics induced by the alpine nature of the catchment. PMID:18776619

  11. Can a policy program influence policy change? The case of the Swiss EnergieSchweiz program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the interrelation of policy implementation and policy change by addressing the question of whether and how the Swiss energy program “EnergieSchweiz” influenced policy decisions. We discuss different ways in which a policy program may influence policy change: by negative and positive learning, by coalition building and by policy community building. Respective assumptions are tested in two case studies from the “EnergieSchweiz” program, which was in place from 2000 to 2010. We find that, while the policy program was not critical for the policy change itself, it nevertheless played a role as an agenda setter, as an initiator of learning processes as well as through its policy community. - Highlights: • We investigate how energy policy implementation impacts policy change. • We analyse the Swiss energy program “EnergieSchweiz” in place from 2000 to 2010. • Policy programs alone do not deliver policy change. • But they can influence it by agenda setting and by negative learning. • Expert networks have an influence if there are shared goals

  12. Joining forces:investigating the influence of design for behavior change on sustainable innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Niedderer, Kristina; MacKrill, James; Clune, Stephen; Evans, Martyn; Lockton, Dan; Ludden, Geke; Morris, Andrew; Gutteridge, Robin; Gardiner, Edward; Cain, Rebecca; Hekkert, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Design is a significant driver of behaviour change, enabling, encouraging or discouraging particular practices from taking place. Despite design’s clear influence on behaviours, no overarching framework exists for the effective implementation of Design for Behaviour Change (DfBC) in professional and public contexts. This paper takes a first step to synthesizing current models and approaches of DfBC, covering the thematics of ecological sustainability, safety, health and well-being, and social...

  13. The Influences of the Chinese Modern Family Changes on the Socialization of Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chenggang; Liu Dan

    2006-01-01

    This article mainly introduces the contemporary changes in Chinese family and especially analyses the transformation of family structure and type,family housing conditions,family relationship network.the relationship between husband and wife and parenthood.In addition,it discusses the influence of family changes in the soeialization of children.Then it expounds the new transformation in children's socialization because of family,school,mass media,etc.Finally,it discusses its challenge and reflection to family and pedagogue.

  14. Shared and Unique Genetic and Environmental Influences on Aging-Related Changes in Multiple Cognitive Abilities

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.; Reynolds, Chandra A.; Finkel, Deborah; Pedersen, Nancy L

    2013-01-01

    Aging-related declines occur in many different domains of cognitive function during later adulthood. However, whether a global dimension underlies individual differences in changes in different domains of cognition, and whether global genetic influences on cognitive changes exist, is less clear. We addressed these issues by applying multivariate growth curve models to longitudinal data from 857 individuals from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging, who had been measured on 11 cognitive va...

  15. The Influence of Shaolin Teaching to Houjie`s Personality Change in Shaolin Film (2011)

    OpenAIRE

    Agustinus Sufianto; Jemmy Tantra; Fenny Gunadi

    2015-01-01

    New Shaolin is a famous film from China. The story tells about Houjies life and his personality change. Shaolins positive influence in Houjies life is the main purpose of this research. Research used references and the theory of Sigmund Freud of ID, Ego and Superego to analyze Houjies personality change. Result shows that after receiving Shaolins teaching, he became a better man. In Shaolin, Houjie was forgiven. Shaolins teaching such as chanting a scripture can help improve his thoughts. Ref...

  16. CFD-based simulation of operational point influences on product changing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szöke, L.; Wortberg, J.

    2014-05-01

    In the means of production, saving resources is becoming more and more a priority optimizing plastics extrusion processes. The analysis of color and material changes has become very interesting to prevent unnecessary material loss. This interest is justified especially due to increasing numbers of changing processes as a reaction of more individual product specifications and thus decreasing lot sizes in the last decades. It can be shown that commercial numerical tools are capable of plausible calculations of changing processes, enabling process observations and giving the possibility of predicting different influences. Due to the highly dynamical character of the flow behavior in the control volume, a transient approach is necessary to show the effects of different operational points on product changes. To determine the progress of the product change the volume of fluid model (VOF) as multiphase approach is used. The analysis of influences from operational points on the changing process is achieved by separate observations of two important input parameters. On one hand the effects of varied mass flow rates as inlet boundary conditions and on the other hand different mass temperatures are observed. To check the plausibility of the calculation method the results are discussed referring to exemplary experimental data in qualitative comparison. The experimental data is obtained using special laboratory equipment neglecting influences from the extruder and taking only the die as control volume into consideration.

  17. Do weather changes influence pain levels in women with fibromyalgia, and can psychosocial variables moderate these influences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedslund, Geir; Eide, Hilde; Kristjansdottir, Ólöf Birna; Nes, Andrea Aparecida Gonçalves; Sexton, Harold; Fors, Egil A.

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between fibromyalgia pain and weather, and to investigate whether psychosocial factors influence this relationship. Women with chronic widespread pain/fibromyalgia ( N = 50) enrolled in a larger study, were recruited from a 4-week inpatient rehabilitation program in Norway ( 2009-2010), and reported their pain and psychological factors up to three times per day (morning, afternoon, evening) for 5 weeks. These ratings were then related to the official local weather parameters. Barometric pressure recorded simultaneously impacted pain significantly while temperature, relative humidity, and solar flux did not. No psychological variables influenced the weather-pain interaction. No weather parameter predicted change in the subsequent pain measures. The magnitude of the inverse association between pain and barometric pressure was very small, and none of the psychological variables studied influenced the association between pain and barometric pressure. All in all, the evidence for a strong weather-pain association in fibromyalgia seems limited at best.

  18. Changes in dynamics processes of the muscles’ traction under influence of stress-factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Nozdrenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Change of fibers’ dynamic parameters of the frog Rana temporaria skeletal muscle m. tibialis traction under influence of modulated stimulation and aluminium chloride solutions was studied. At 10-4,5·10-4 and 10‑3 M·l-1 concentrations of aluminium chloride the nonlinear decrease of the muscle fibers’ traction parameters was observed.

  19. Limitations on Change: Current Conditions Influencing Academic Intransigence in Educational Administration Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Connie Stokes; Pounder, Diana G.

    An analysis of academic intransigence (resistance to change) in educational administrative preparation programs is presented in this paper. Drawing upon two conceptual frameworks, the stakeholder perspective and Porter's (1980) five-force model of industry structure and competitive influence, two factors contributing to academic intransigence are…

  20. Social and Linguistic Factors' Influences on Semantic Change in English Vocabulary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂宇明

    2009-01-01

    this paper aims to analyze the social and linguistic factors' influence on semantic change in Eng~a vocabulary. Mainly speaking, the social factors include social development, social context, social class, national feeling, racial feeling, gender different, and social value, and lin-guistic factors consist of generalization, specialization, amelioration. pejoration, metaphor and metonymy.

  1. Situational Changes in Self-Awareness Influence 3- and 4-Year-Olds' Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J.; Anderson, J. R.; Campbell, R. N.

    2011-01-01

    In adults, heightened self-awareness leads to adherence to socially valued norms, whereas lowered self-awareness is associated with antinormative behavior. Levels of self-awareness are influenced by environmental cues such as mirrors. Do situational changes in self-awareness also have an impact on preschoolers' self-regulation? Adherence to a…

  2. Innovation in South African Science Education (Part 2): Factors Influencing the Introduction of Instructional Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, M. Allyson; Rogan, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Described are some of the factors that have influenced the introduction of instructional change into Black South African classrooms. The Science Education Project of the 1980s, teacher uncertainty, pupil expectations, the epistemology of science education, resources, and the image of innovation are discussed. (CW)

  3. Influence of loading and ultraviolet irradiation on change of molecular weight of polyethylene terephthalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to influence of loading and ultraviolet irradiation on change of molecular weight of polyethylene terephthalate. The dependence of molecular weight of polyethylene terephthalate on duration of ultraviolet irradiation was studied. The dependence of number of ruptures of macromolecule on duration of ultraviolet irradiation at room temperature was considered.

  4. Understanding the Influence of Organizational Culture and Group Dynamics on Organizational Change and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Colleen; Kline, Theresa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between organizational culture, group dynamics, and organizational learning in the context of organizational change. Design/methodology/approach: A case study was used to examine cultural and group level factors that potentially influence groups' learning in the context of…

  5. Geophysical features influence the climate change sensitivity of northern Wisconsin pine and oak forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweiten, Michael A; Calcote, Randy R; Lynch, Elizabeth A; Hotchkiss, Sara C; Schuurman, Gregor W

    2015-10-01

    Landscape-scale vulnerability assessment from multiple sources, including paleoecological site histories, can inform climate change adaptation. We used an array of lake sediment pollen and charcoal records to determine how soils and landscape factors influenced the variability of forest composition change over the past 2000 years. The forests in this study are located in northwestern Wisconsin on a sandy glacial outwash plain. Soils and local climate vary across the study area. We used the Natural Resource Conservation Service's Soil Survey Geographic soil database and published fire histories to characterize differences in soils and fire history around each lake site. Individual site histories differed in two metrics of past vegetation dynamics: the extent to which white pine (Pinus strobus) increased during the Little Ice Age (LIA) climate period and the volatility in the rate of change between samples at 50-120 yr intervals. Greater increases of white pine during the LIA occurred on sites with less sandy soils (R² = 0.45, P forest compositional change and rate-of-change volatility were associated with higher fire frequency. Over longer (multi-centennial) time frames, forest composition change, especially increased white pine, shifted most in sites with more soil moisture. Our results show that responsiveness of forest composition to climate change was influenced by soils, local climate, and fire. The anticipated climatic changes in the next century will not produce the same community dynamics on the same soil types as in the past, but understanding past dynamics and relationships can help us assess how novel factors and combinations of factors in the future may influence various site types. Our results support climate change adaptation efforts to monitor and conserve the landscape's full range of geophysical features. PMID:26591463

  6. Changes in Climatic Factors Influencing the Growth Period of Corn in Fengjie County

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaozhen; MAO; Xinli; MOU; Chen; MA; Jiang; HUANG; Lin; YUAN

    2014-01-01

    Under the background of global climate change,we analyze the change tendency of average temperature and amount of precipitation influencing the corn’s growth period. The results show that from March to August,the monthly temperatures show an upward trend,but the rise is different in different months,and the maximum temperature rise is in May. Precipitation in different months has different trends. Climate change brings about favorable conditions at high altitudes in Fengjie,reduces production due to the temperature drop after the beginning of autumn,and increases the pressure on the corn supply.

  7. Individual influences on lifestyle change to reduce vascular risk: a qualitative literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jenni; Honey, Stephanie; Hill, Kate; Craigs, Cheryl; House, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Background Management of cardiovascular risk includes adoption of healthy lifestyles. Uptake and completion rates for lifestyle programmes are low and many barriers and facilitators to lifestyle behaviour change have been reported in the literature. Clarity on which barriers and facilitators to target during consultations in primary care may support a more systematic approach to lifestyle behaviour change in those at high risk of cardiovascular events. Aim To identify the main barriers and facilitators to lifestyle behaviour change in individuals at high risk of cardiovascular events. Design A content synthesis of the qualitative literature reporting patient-level influences on lifestyle change. Method Qualitative studies involving patients at high risk of cardiovascular events were identified through electronic searching and screening against predefined selection criteria. Factors (reported influences) were extracted and, using a clustering technique, organised into categories that were then linked to key themes through relationship mapping. Results A total of 348 factors were extracted from 33 studies. Factors were organised into 20 categories and from these categories five key themes were identified: emotions, beliefs, information and communication, friends and family support, and cost/transport. Conclusion It is possible to organise the large number of self-reported individual influences on lifestyle behaviours into a small number of themes. Further research is needed to clarify which of these patient-level barriers and facilitators are the best predictors of uptake and participation in programmes aimed at helping people to change lifestyle. PMID:22687232

  8. Regime change thresholds in flute-like instruments: influence of the mouth pressure dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Terrien, Soizic; Vergez, Christophe; Fabre, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    Since they correspond to a jump from a given note to another one, the mouth pressure thresholds leading to regime changes are particularly important quantities in flute-like instruments. In this paper, a comparison of such thresholds between an artificial mouth, an experienced flutist and a non player is provided. It highlights the ability of the experienced player to considerabily shift regime change thresholds, and thus to enlarge its control in terms of nuances and spectrum. Based on recent works on other wind instruments and on the theory of dynamic bifurcations, the hypothe- sis is tested experimentally and numerically that the dynamics of the blowing pressure influences regime change thresholds. The results highlight the strong influence of this parameter on thresholds, suggesting its wide use by experienced musicians. Starting from these observations and from an analysis of a physical model of flute-like instruments, involving numerical continuation methods and Floquet stability analysis, a phenomenolo...

  9. What Is New in Infectious Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Paul P

    2016-01-01

    The practice of infectious diseases is an ever-changing discipline. Diseases such as syphilis and tuberculosis have been with mankind for millennia, whereas conditions such as AIDS and Zika virus are relatively new maladies. A working knowledge of clinical presentations associated with Zika virus infection, syphilis, and common parasitic infections will help the primary care provider determine whom to treat and whom to refer to a specialist. Increasing the use of vaccination for influenza and pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV infection should reduce the burden of these common diseases. PMID:27621340

  10. Immunochemical studies of infectious mononucleosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coated-tube method of solid-phase radioimmunoassay has been adapted to the detection of heterophile antibodies and antigens of infectious mononucleosis. Disposable plastic hemagglutination trays were coated with purified glycoprotein from horse erythrocytes and the subsequent uptake of antibody from test sera was detected by radio-iodinated horse erythrocyte glycoprotein. In a preliminary survey of sera from patients with infectious mononucleosis and sera from controls, the assay proved highly sensitive and specific. The test system was also useful in a competitive binding assay for immunochemical studies of glycoproteins from other heterophile antigen-positive species

  11. Infectious Disease Specialist: What Is an Infectious Disease Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hospitalized. An ID specialist may also recommend a vaccination regimen for you and your children. One of ... 1300 Wilson Boulevard Suite 300 Arlington, VA 22209 | Phone: (703) 299-0200 | Fax: (703) 299-0204 For ... | HIVMA | Contact Us © Copyright IDSA 2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America Full Site Mobile Site

  12. Factors Influencing Changes in Eating Patterns Among Hong Kong Young Adults Transitioning to Tertiary Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Sin Tung; Capra, Sandra; Leveritt, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Transitioning to tertiary education is a significant life course event that has the potential to influence lifelong eating patterns. This study used a theoretic model developed from a life course perspective to examine factors influencing the change of food choices among 31 young adults in Hong Kong after they moved on to tertiary education. Qualitative analysis of transcripts based on the constant comparative method revealed that present life course experiences, especially increased autonomy, and social-environmental factors strongly influenced young adults' present food choices. A model was developed from life course theory and social-ecological theory to reflect the factors that led to change of food choices among participants. The model provides unique insights on food choices of the future adult population. It could also be used as a reference for the development of nutrition education interventions targeting tertiary students as they experience increased autonomy. In conclusion, food choices of young adults on transitioning to tertiary education are strongly influenced by increased autonomy and change of social and environmental factors. PMID:27052300

  13. Economic Crises and the Changing Influence of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions on Public Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, John

    2010-01-01

    This chapter examines the dramatic changes in the Irish Congress of Trade Unions’ (ICTU) influence over public policy during the latter half of the twentieth century. The chapter focuses upon the impact economic crises have had on the ICTU’s role in policy-making. The chapter concentrates, in particular, upon four periods, the late 1950s, 1970, the early 1980s and 1987, when the ICTU found its influence over public policy radically transformed. By the late 1950s the trade union movement was i...

  14. Normal Modes of Prion Proteins: From Native to Infectious particle◊

    OpenAIRE

    Samson, Abraham O.; Levitt, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Prion proteins (PrP) are the infectious agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (i.e. mad cow disease). To be infectious, prion proteins must undergo a conformational change involving a decrease of α-helical content along with an increase of β-strand structure. This conformational change was evaluated by means of elastic normal modes. Elastic normal modes show a diminution of two α-helices by one and two residues, as well as an extension of two β-strands by three residues each whic...

  15. Emerging infectious diseases: vulnerabilities, contributing factors and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashley, Felissa R

    2004-04-01

    We live in an ever more connected global village linked through international travel, politics, economics, culture and human-human and human-animal interactions. The realization that the concept of globalization includes global exposure to disease-causing agents that were formerly confined to small, remote areas and that infectious disease outbreaks can have political, economic and social roots and effects is becoming more apparent. Novel infectious disease microbes continue to be discovered because they are new or newly recognized, have expanded their geographic range, have been shown to cause a new disease spectrum, have jumped the species barrier from animals to humans, have become resistant to antimicrobial agents, have increased in incidence or have become more virulent. These emerging infectious disease microbes may have the potential for use as agents of bioterrorism. Factors involved in the emergence of infectious diseases are complex and interrelated and involve all classifications of organisms transmitted in a variety of ways. In 2003, outbreaks of interest included severe acute respiratory syndrome, monkeypox and avian influenza. Information from the human genome project applied to microbial organisms and their hosts will provide new opportunities for detection, diagnosis, treatment, prevention, control and prognosis. New technology related not only to genetics but also to satellite and monitoring systems will play a role in weather, climate and the approach to environmental manipulations that influence factors contributing to infectious disease emergence and control. Approaches to combating emerging infectious diseases include many disciplines, such as animal studies, epidemiology, immunology, ecology, environmental studies, microbiology, pharmacology, other sciences, health, medicine, public health, nursing, cultural, political and social studies, all of which must work together. Appropriate financial support of the public health infrastructure

  16. The effects of radioactive pollution on the dynamics of infectious diseases in wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interactions between infectious diseases and chemical pollution are well known and recognised as important factors in regulating the way wild animals respond to contaminant exposure. However, the impact of ionising radiation and radionuclides has often been overlooked when assessing host–pathogen interactions in polluted habitats, despite often occurring together with chemical contamination. Nevertheless, a comprehensive body of literature exists from laboratory and field studies on host–pathogen relationships under radiation exposure, and with a renewed interest in radioecology developing; an evaluation of infectious disease dynamics under these conditions would be timely. The present study assesses the impact of external ionising radiation and radionuclides on animal hosts and pathogens (viruses, bacteria, protozoans, helminths, arthropods) in laboratory studies and collates the data from field studies, including the large number of investigations undertaken after the Chernobyl accident. It is apparent that radiation exposure has substantial effects on host–pathogen relationships. Although damage to the host immune system is a major factor other variables, such as damage to host tissue barriers and inhibition of pathogen viability are also important in affecting the prevalence and intensity of parasitic diseases. Field studies indicate that the occurrence of host–pathogen associations in radioactively contaminated sites is complex with a variety of biotic and abiotic factors influencing both pathogen and host(s), resulting in changes to the dynamics of infectious diseases. - Highlights: ► Infectious diseases are important regulating factors in the way wildlife respond to contaminants. ► An assessment of the effects of radioactive exposure to host–pathogen relationships in animals is given. ► Radioactive exposure has a profound effect on host–pathogen interactions. ► Both hosts and pathogens may be either negatively or positively affected

  17. Infectious Risks of Air Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangili, Alexandra; Vindenes, Tine; Gendreau, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Infectious diseases are still among the leading causes of death worldwide due to their persistence, emergence, and reemergence. As the recent Ebola virus disease and MERS-CoV outbreaks demonstrate, the modern epidemics and large-scale infectious outbreaks emerge and spread quickly. Air transportation is a major vehicle for the rapid spread and dissemination of communicable diseases, and there have been a number of reported outbreaks of serious airborne diseases aboard commercial flights including tuberculosis, severe acute respiratory syndrome, influenza, smallpox, and measles, to name a few. In 2014 alone, over 3.3 billion passengers (a number equivalent to 42% of the world population) and 50 million metric tons of cargo traveled by air from 41,000 airports and 50,000 routes worldwide, and significant growth is anticipated, with passenger numbers expected to reach 5.9 billion by 2030. Given the increasing numbers of travelers, the risk of infectious disease transmission during air travel is a significant concern, and this chapter focuses on the current knowledge about transmission of infectious diseases in the context of both transmissions within the aircraft passenger cabin and commercial aircraft serving as vehicles of worldwide infection spread. PMID:26542037

  18. Facts about Infectious Diseases (ID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and influenza. Travelers to foreign countries may require vaccinations against yellow fever, cholera, typhoid fever or hepatitis ... 1300 Wilson Boulevard Suite 300 Arlington, VA 22209 | Phone: (703) 299-0200 | Fax: (703) 299-0204 For ... | HIVMA | Contact Us © Copyright IDSA 2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America Full Site Mobile Site

  19. Global Spread of Infectious Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S.; Zee, A.

    2003-01-01

    We develop simple models for the global spread of infectious diseases, emphasizing human mobility via air travel and the variation of public health infrastructure from region to region. We derive formulas relating the total and peak number of infections in two countries to the rate of travel between them and their respective epidemiological parameters.

  20. [Effect of Trichoderma species fungi on soil micromycetes, causing infectious conifer seedling lodging in Siberian tree nurseries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakimenko, E E; Grodinitskaia, I D

    2000-01-01

    Soils in the tree nurseries studied were characterized by a lower species diversity of fungi than adjacent virgin soils. In particular, the relative abundances of representatives of the genera Mucor, Chaetomium, and Trichoderma in the nursery soil were two times lower than in adjacent virgin soils. On the other hand, the nursery soil exhibited greater abundances of fungi of the genus Fusarium, which are causative agents of many diseases of conifer seedlings. To appreciate the efficiency of biocontrol of the infectious diseases of conifer seedlings, we introduced several indigenous Trichoderma strains into the nursery soil and found that this affected the species composition of soil microflora considerably. Changes in the species composition of mycobiota beneficially influenced the phytosanitary state of soils and reduced the infectious lodging of conifer seedlings. PMID:11195586

  1. Climate Change Influences on Species Interrelationships and Distributions in High-Arctic Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D. R., Klein; Bruun, H. H.; Lundgren, R.;

    2008-01-01

    and North Greenland coastal routes, and the majority of the plants have North American affinities. Climatic change, bringing about reduction in the extent sea ice adjacent to the coast and changes in seasonality and associated precipitation and air movements, influences patterns of activity, growth......, reproduction, and dispersal of all life forms present. Climate-associated changes in the biotic communities of the region are altering inter-species interactions, notably pollination, seed dispersal and plant-herbivore relations. Sexual reproduction and dispersal of propagules, primarily seeds, are essential...... will also be tied to the relationship of specific plant species to their insect pollinators. Those plants that are self-pollinated may have an initial advantage in an environment where insects and their plant relationships are being altered by the changing climate. An increase in growth and dispersal...

  2. Influence of stimulus frequency, amplitude and blood pressure on signal change in fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the influence of frequency and amplitude of a stimulus and the effect of blood pressure on signal intensity changes in functional MRI. Methods: Somatosensory stimulation of five (normotonic/hypotonic) anesthetized rats was performed with different stimulus frequencies and amplitudes. Measurements were performed with a 2.4 Tesla experimental scanner using a gradient-echo (GE) echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence. Results: The highest signal change was found at a frequency of 3 Hz and a stimulation amplitude of ten times the threshold value. A decrease of blood pressure to half the normotonic value gave rise to a decrease of the neuronal response of about 17%. Conclusion: Optimization of the stimulation frequency and stimulation amplitude maximizes signal changes in functional MRI of the somatosensory cortex. Even with a standardized paradigm, variations in measured neuronal activity may occur when blood pressure changes cannot be compensated by autoregulation. (orig.)

  3. The influence of drawing speed on structure changes in high carbon steel wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Suliga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the influence of the drawing speed on structure changes has been assessed. The Scanning Electron Microscope investigation confirmed that for wires drawn with high total draft, exceeding 80 %, makes it impossible to clearly assess the impact of drawing technology on structural changes in the drawn wires. Thus, to assess the structural changes necessary to apply quantitative methods. On the basis of examination of the wire structure by measuring of electrical resistance, the structure changes in drawn wires has been determined. It has been shown that the increase of drawing speed, especially above 15 m/s, causes an increase in structure defect, with a decline in platelet orientation of cementite in drawn wires.

  4. The influence of land use change on karst water quality of Shuicheng Basin in Guizhou Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAYanan; YUANDaoxian

    2004-01-01

    The influence of land use and land cover on ecological environment is a focus of global change research. The paper chooses an industrial city-Shuicheng in Guizhou Province-as a study area because the karst water quality around the city is deteriorating with land use and land cover change.The natural susceptibility of karst water system is an important factor leading to karst water pollution.But land use and land cover change is also a main factor according to the chemical analysis of karst water quality and land use change. So it is a good way to protect karst water through rational planning and managing of land use and land cover.

  5. Changes in social relations in old age. Are they influenced by functional ability?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Kirsten; Due, Pernille; Holstein, Bjorn E;

    2002-01-01

    The aims of this article were to describe changes in social relations from ages 75 to 80, and analyze whether changes in social relations are influenced by functional ability at age 75. The study includes data from the NORA follow-up study of 75-80 year-old men and women in Jyväskylä (Finland......, close friends, acquaintances, and neighbors; 2) diversity of social relations (number of types of social contacts); 3) telephone contacts; and 4) social participation. The function of social relations was measured by instrumental social support. Functional ability was measured by tiredness and need for...

  6. Sensitivity of worst-case strom surge considering influence of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayabu, Izuru; Hibino, Kenshi; Sasaki, Hidetaka; Shiogama, Hideo; Mori, Nobuhito; Shibutani, Yoko; Takemi, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    There are two standpoints when assessing risk caused by climate change. One is how to prevent disaster. For this purpose, we get probabilistic information of meteorological elements, from enough number of ensemble simulations. Another one is to consider disaster mitigation. For this purpose, we have to use very high resolution sophisticated model to represent a worst case event in detail. If we could use enough computer resources to drive many ensemble runs with very high resolution model, we can handle these all themes in one time. However resources are unfortunately limited in most cases, and we have to select the resolution or the number of simulations if we design the experiment. Applying PGWD (Pseudo Global Warming Downscaling) method is one solution to analyze a worst case event in detail. Here we introduce an example to find climate change influence on the worst case storm-surge, by applying PGWD to a super typhoon Haiyan (Takayabu et al, 2015). 1 km grid WRF model could represent both the intensity and structure of a super typhoon. By adopting PGWD method, we can only estimate the influence of climate change on the development process of the Typhoon. Instead, the changes in genesis could not be estimated. Finally, we drove SU-WAT model (which includes shallow water equation model) to get the signal of storm surge height. The result indicates that the height of the storm surge increased up to 20% owing to these 150 years climate change.

  7. ANALYSIS OF THE INFLUENCE OF HELICOPTER DESCENT VELOCITY CHANGES ON THE PHENOMENON OF VORTEX RING STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Grzegorczyk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a numerical aerodynamic analysis whose purpose was to determine the influence of the rate of descent on the vortex ring state (VRS. This phenomenon occurs for an appropriate combination of induced velocity and the velocity of the incoming airstream from the bottom. The rates of change of velocities delimit dangerous areas of flight. The simulations were performed using FLUENT software and the geometry of helicopter W-3 „Sokół”.

  8. ANALYSIS OF THE INFLUENCE OF HELICOPTER DESCENT VELOCITY CHANGES ON THE PHENOMENON OF VORTEX RING STATE

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Grzegorczyk

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a numerical aerodynamic analysis whose purpose was to determine the influence of the rate of descent on the vortex ring state (VRS). This phenomenon occurs for an appropriate combination of induced velocity and the velocity of the incoming airstream from the bottom. The rates of change of velocities delimit dangerous areas of flight. The simulations were performed using FLUENT software and the geometry of helicopter W-3 „Sokół”.

  9. German Farmers' Perception of Climate Change Effects and Determinants Influencing Their Climate Awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Jänecke, Aileen; Eisele, Marius; Reinmuth, Evelyn; Steinbach, Jennifer; Aurbacher, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the attitude of German farmers towards climate change effects and aims to identify determinants affecting their perception of weather conditions. For this purpose, descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression approaches were applied. Data was collected using a questionnaire survey, which was conducted in spring 2013 among 173 German farmers in the two regions Swabian Alb and Kraichgau. The analyses revealed that four main factors influence the perception of weat...

  10. Cage Change Influences Serum Corticosterone and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in the Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Skye; Miller, Melinda M.; Filipski, Sarah B.; Tolwani, Ravi J.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental variables and husbandry practices can influence physiology and alter behavior in mice. Our study evaluated the effects of cage change on serum corticosterone levels and anxiety-like behaviors in C57BL/6 male mice. We examined the effects of 3 different methods of performing cage transfer and of transferring mice to a clean or a dirty familiar cage microenvironment. The 3 different handling methods were forceps transfer, gentle transfer with gloved hands, and a passive transfer t...

  11. Climate Change and Watershed Hydrology—Heavier Precipitation Influence on Stormwater Runoff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Blair

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stormwater runoff in the USA is a main driver of non-point source pollution and other major problems for urbanizing areas, and runoff effects will be exacerbated by the increased frequency and intensity of heavier storm events that are projected as climate changes. The purpose of this paper is to consider how increased rainfall from storms could influence direct stormwater runoff in urbanizing watersheds. As part of a recent research project in coastal Beaufort County, South Carolina, USA, we applied the Stormwater Runoff Modeling System (SWARM to model various combinations of development levels and climate change scenarios. SWARM single-event output showed dramatic increases in runoff volume and rate, in some cases almost doubling under moderate climate change scenario and tripling under severe climate change scenario. In all cases, modeled impacts from climate change exceeded those of development. By quantifying stormwater runoff based on climate change scenarios within the context of development, the findings add to the recognition that they must be considered together when projecting changes in watershed hydrology and that climate change effects potentially exceed those of development.

  12. Detecting an external influence on recent changes in oceanic oxygen using an optimal fingerprinting method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Andrews

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean deoxygenation has been observed in all major ocean basins over the past 50 yr. Although this signal is largely consistent with oxygen changes expected from anthropogenic climate change, the contribution of external forcing to recent deoxygenation trends relative to natural internal variability is yet to be established. Here we conduct a formal optimal fingerprinting analysis to investigate if external forcing has had a detectable influence on observed dissolved oxygen concentration ([O2] changes between ~ 1970 and ~ 1992 using simulations from two Earth System Models (MPI-ESM-LR and HadGEM2-ES. We detect a response to external forcing at a 90% confidence level and find that observed [O2] changes are inconsistent with internal variability as simulated by models. This result is robust in the global ocean for depth-averaged (1-D zonal mean patterns of [O2] change in both models. Further analysis with the MPI-ESM-LR model shows similar positive detection results for depth-resolved (2-D zonal mean [O2] changes globally and for the Pacific Ocean individually. Observed oxygen changes in the Atlantic Ocean are indistinguishable from natural internal variability. Simulations from both models consistently underestimate the amplitude of historical [O2] changes in response to external forcing, suggesting that model projections for future ocean deoxygenation may also be underestimated.

  13. Abiotic vs. biotic influences on habitat selection of coexisting species: Climate change impacts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T.E.

    2001-01-01

    Species are commonly segregated along gradients of microclimate and vegetation. I explore the question of whether segregation is the result of microhabitat partitioning (biotic effects) or choice of differing microclimates (abiotic effects). I explored this question for four ground-nesting bird species that are segregated along a microclimate and vegetation gradient in Arizona. Birds shifted position of their nests on the microhabitat and microclimate gradient in response to changing precipitation over nine years. Similarly, annual bird abundance varied with precipitation across 12 yr. Those shifts in abundance and nesting microhabitat with changing precipitation demonstrate the importance of abiotic influences on bird distributions and habitat choice. However, nest-site shifts and microhabitat use also appear to be influenced by interactions among coexisting species. Moreover, shifts in habitat use by all species caused nest predation (i.e., biotic) costs that increased with increasing distance along the microclimate gradient. These results indicate that abiotic and biotic costs can strongly interact to influence microhabitat choice and abundances of coexisting species. Global climate change impacts have been considered largely in terms of simple distributional shifts, but these results indicate that shifts can also increase biotic costs when species move into habitat types for which they are poorly adapted or that create new biotic interactions.

  14. Impulsive sounds change European seabass swimming patterns: Influence of pulse repetition interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We exposed impulsive sounds of different repetition intervals to European seabass. • Immediate behavioural changes mirrored previous indoor & outdoor studies. • Repetition intervals influenced the impacts differentially but not the recovery. • Sound temporal patterns may be more important than some standard metrics. - Abstract: Seismic shootings and offshore pile-driving are regularly performed, emitting significant amounts of noise that may negatively affect fish behaviour. The pulse repetition interval (PRI) of these impulsive sounds may vary considerably and influence the behavioural impact and recovery. Here, we tested the effect of four PRIs (0.5–4.0 s) on European seabass swimming patterns in an outdoor basin. At the onset of the sound exposures, the fish swam faster and dived deeper in tighter shoals. PRI affected the immediate and delayed behavioural changes but not the recovery time. Our study highlights that (1) the behavioural changes of captive European seabass were consistent with previous indoor and outdoor studies; (2) PRI could influence behavioural impact differentially, which may have management implications; (3) some acoustic metrics, e.g. SELcum, may have limited predictive power to assess the strength of behavioural impacts of noise. Noise impact assessments need to consider the contribution of sound temporal structure

  15. Do climate changes influence dispersal and population dynamics of dragonflies in the western Peruvian Andes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Hoffmann

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For nine dragonfly species (five aeshnids and four libellulids all previous and verifiable data are related to the vertical climate zones and nature regions of the western Peruvian Andes and the Peruvian Pacific coast. Climate changes due to the El Niño and La Niña phenomena, as well as the global climate change have an influence on the different natural regions and also restrict aquatic biotopes. These changes influence the dispersal and behavior of some dragonflies and concern also loss of habitats as well as alterations of biotic and abiotic factors at and in water. However new waters and habitats also are formed in most nature regions. Specialists like Rhionaeschna peralta, a species of high mountain regions and the Puna, are not able to react to habitat losses by adaptation, while other species such as R. maita and R. marchali do colonize new habitats also in higher altitudes. While the here represented aeshnids change their distribution ranges within the vertical nature regions of the west Andes, this is suspected for three of the four libellulids (Orthemis ferruginea, O. discolor and Pantala flavescens as latitudinally respectively longitudinally immigrations and expansions of their areals. For all species discussed, a seasonally earlier flight beginning is detectable, but for no species an extension of their flight time. Altogether, the above named three libellulid do react more flexibly and faster to the alterations by climate changes than the majority of the five aeshnid species. The influence of increased UV-B and UV-A radiation possibly affects also the site occurrence of some species in high altitudes of the Andes.

  16. Influence of attention on bimodal integration during emotional change decoding: ERP evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuhai; Han, Lingzi; Pan, Zhihui; Luo, Yangmei; Wang, Ping

    2016-08-01

    Recent findings on audiovisual emotional interactions suggest that selective attention affects cross-sensory interaction from an early processing stage. However, the influence of attention manipulation on facial-vocal integration during emotional change perception is still elusive at this point. To address this issue, we asked participants to detect emotional changes conveyed by prosodies (vocal task) or facial expressions (facial task) while facial, vocal, and facial-vocal expressions were presented. At the same time, behavioral responses and electroencephalogram (EEG) were recorded. Behavioral results showed that bimodal emotional changes were detected with shorter response latencies compared to each unimodal condition, suggesting that bimodal emotional cues facilitated emotional change detection. Moreover, while the P3 amplitudes were larger for the bimodal change condition than for the sum of the two unimodal conditions regardless of attention direction, the N1 amplitudes were larger for the bimodal emotional change condition than for the sum of the two unimodal conditions under the attend-voice condition, but not under the attend-face condition. These findings suggest that selective attention modulates facial-vocal integration during emotional change perception in early sensory processing, but not in late cognitive processing stages. PMID:27238075

  17. 血清载脂蛋白E在儿童感染性疾病中的变化%The changes of serum apolipoprotein E in pediatric infectious diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付盼; 王传清; 王爱敏; 谢文华; 冯志敏

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨血清载脂蛋白E(ApoE)在儿童感染性疾病中的变化.方法 279例感染性疾病患儿中,脓毒症65例,化脓性脑膜炎47例,细菌性肺炎67例,无菌性脑膜炎47例,支原体肺炎53例.采用透射免疫比浊法(IA)检测感染性疾病患儿的血清ApoE水平.构建B组鼠伤寒沙门菌诱导的脓毒症小鼠模型,采用IA检测小鼠血清ApoE水平,实时荧光定量PCR和Western印迹法检测小鼠肝脏ApoE mRNA和蛋白的表达.两组间均数比较采用独立样本t检验.结果 血清ApoE在细菌性感染性疾病患儿中明显升高,在脓毒症患儿中高达(59.8±23.5) mg/L(t=-5.118,P<0.01),在无菌性脑膜炎和支原体肺炎患儿中无明显变化.脓毒症小鼠模型血清ApoE水平明显升高,但肝脏ApoE mRNA和蛋白的表达下降,mRNA的相对值在造模后3h下降了71%(t=5.022,P<0.01),在造模后24 h下降了73%(t=4.181,P<0.01).结论 血清ApoE水平在细菌性感染性疾病中显著升高,而肝脏中ApoE表达下降,说明ApoE血清升高机制与肝脏表达不相关.%Objective To investigate the changes of serum apolipoprotein E (ApoE) in children with infectious diseases.Methods A total of 279 pediatric patients with infectious diseases were enrolled in this study,including 65 patients with sepsis,47 patients with bacterial meningitis,67 patients with bacterial pneumonia, 47 patients with aseptic meningitis and 53 patients with mycoplasma pneumonia. The serum ApoE collected from all patients was detected by immunoturbidimetric assay (IA).The septic mouse model was established by intraperitoneal injection of group B Salmonella typhimurium.Mouse serum ApoE levels were detected by IA,and the hepatic ApoE mRNA and protein expressions of mice were detected by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot,respectively.Data in two groups were compared by independent-sample t test.Results Serum ApoE levels in patients with bacterial

  18. Influence of climate changes on the migration ability of technogenic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Global warming and climatic changes in the last decade focus the attention of scientists worldwide. Changes in climate variables (winds, precipitation, currents, temperature, etc.) affect the transport, transfer, and deposition of contaminants in the environment. Numerous investigations show the strong impact of climatic parameters like temperature and precipitations on soil characteristics, and especially on soil organic matter, which plays a significant role in the migration behaviour of the contaminants in the environment. This defines the need of special attention on elucidation of the impact of temperature and precipitations on the chemical behaviour of the radionuclides. This work presents initial results of a research project aiming to elucidate the influence of climate changes on the migration and bioaccumulation of natural and technogenic radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems. Different types of soils were contaminated by technogenic radionuclides (241Am, 137Cs, and 60Co) and conditioned under different temperatures and soil humidity, simulating sharp climatic variations. Chemical fractionation of the radionuclides was studied by using two different procedures for sequential extractions, followed by radiation detection by gamma-spectrometry. Evaluation of the chemical behaviour of the investigated radionuclides with respect to soil characteristics, temperature and humidity variations and duration of conditioning was performed. Initial conclusions on the influence of the climate changes on the migration ability of radionuclides of different oxidation states were made

  19. Factors influencing liver and spleen volume changes after donor hepatectomy for living donor liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ji Hee; Ryeom, Hunku; Song, Jung Hup [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    To define the changes in liver and spleen volumes in the early postoperative period after partial liver donation for living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to determine factors that influence liver and spleen volume changes. 27 donors who underwent partial hepatectomy for LDLT were included in this study. The rates of liver and spleen volume change, measured with CT volumetry, were correlated with several factors. The analyzed factors included the indocyanine green (ICG) retention rate at 15 minutes after ICG administration, preoperative platelet count, preoperative liver and splenic volumes, resected liver volume, resected-to-whole liver volume ratio (LV{sub R}/LV{sub W}), resected liver volume to the sum of whole liver and spleen volume ratio [LV{sub R}/(LV{sub W} + SV{sub 0})], and pre and post hepatectomy portal venous pressures. In all hepatectomy donors, the volumes of the remnant liver and spleen were increased (increased rates, 59.5 ± 50.5%, 47.9 ± 22.6%). The increment rate of the remnant liver volume revealed a positive correlation with LV{sub R}/LV{sub W} (r = 0.759, p < 0.01). The other analyzed factors showed no correlation with changes in liver and spleen volumes. The spleen and remnant liver volumes were increased at CT volumetry performed 2 weeks after partial liver donation. Among the various analyzed factors, LV{sub R}/LV{sub W} influences the increment rate of the remnant liver volume.

  20. Interannual variability of tropospheric composition: the influence of changes in emissions, meteorology and clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Voulgarakis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We have run a chemistry transport model (CTM to systematically examine the drivers of interannual variability of tropospheric composition. On a global scale, changing meteorology (winds, temperatures, humidity and clouds is found to be the most important factor driving interannual variability of NO2 and ozone on the timescales considered. The strong influence of emissions is largely confined to areas where intense biomass burning events occur. For CO, interannual variability is almost solely driven by emission changes, while for OH meteorology dominates, with the radiative influence of clouds being a very strong contributor. Through a simple attribution analysis we conclude that changing cloudiness drives 25% of the interannual variability of OH over Europe by affecting shortwave radiation. Over Indonesia this figure is as high as 71%. Changes in cloudiness contribute a small but non-negligible amount (up to 6% to the interannual variability of ozone over Europe and Indonesia. This suggests that future assessments of trends in tropospheric oxidizing capacity should account for interannual variability in cloudiness, a factor neglected in many previous studies. The approach followed in the current study can help explain observed tropospheric variability, such as the increases in ozone concentrations over Europe in 1998.

  1. The influence of GDL concentration on milk pH change during acid coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fetahagić Safet

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Skim milk powder was reconstituted to obtain milk A (with 8.01% TS. Milk A was standardized with 3% of skim milk powder and 3% of demineralized whey powder (DWP, respectively, to obtain milk B (with 11.15% TS and milk C (with 11.10% TS. Milk samples were heat treated at 85ºC/10 min, 90ºC/10 min and 95ºC/10 min, respectively. Untreated milk was used as control. Acidification was carried out at 25ºC, 35ºC and 45ºC during 240 min with GDL (glucono-d-lactone, namely with the amount of 0.5%, 0.75%, 1.0%, 1.25% 1.5%, 1.75%, 2.0% and 3.0% of GDL, respectively. The results showed that all investigated factors, explicitly GDL concentration, acidification temperature and applied heat treatment of milk as well as added DWP influence the change of pH during acidification. Milk samples standardized with DWP had smaller buffer capacity and faster change of pH than samples standardized with skim milk powder. Only at acidification temperature of 25ºC, added DWP did not influence the change of milk buffer capacity regardless of the change of casein:whey protein ratio. Under this acidification condition, both milk samples standardized with skim milk powder and DWP had similar final pH values.

  2. 78 FR 65343 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special...

  3. 76 FR 10384 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Advisory Allergy and Infectious Diseases Council,...

  4. Emerging Vector-borne Diseases in a Changing Environment

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZER, Nurdan

    2005-01-01

    Vector-borne infectious diseases are emerging or resurging as a result of changes in public health policy, demographic and societal changes, insecticide and drug resistance, shift in emphasis from prevention to emergency response, genetic changes in pathogens in the last two decades of the twentieth century. Climate changes also can influence the emergence and reemergence of these diseases which are malaria, dengue, yellow fever, plague, filariasis, louse-borne typhus, lyme disease, trypanoso...

  5. Eight challenges in modelling infectious livestock diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Brooks-Pollock

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of infectious diseases of livestock does not differ in principle from disease transmission in any other animals, apart from that the aim of control is ultimately economic, with the influence of social, political and welfare constraints often poorly defined. Modelling of livestock diseases suffers simultaneously from a wealth and a lack of data. On the one hand, the ability to conduct transmission experiments, detailed within-host studies and track individual animals between geocoded locations make livestock diseases a particularly rich potential source of realistic data for illuminating biological mechanisms of transmission and conducting explicit analyses of contact networks. On the other hand, scarcity of funding, as compared to human diseases, often results in incomplete and partial data for many livestock diseases and regions of the world. In this overview of challenges in livestock disease modelling, we highlight eight areas unique to livestock that, if addressed, would mark major progress in the area.

  6. Escaping the poverty trap: modeling the interplay between economic growth and the ecology of infectious disease

    CERN Document Server

    Goerg, Georg M; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Althouse, Benjamin M

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of economies and infectious disease are inexorably linked: economic well-being influences health (sanitation, nutrition, treatment capacity, etc.) and health influences economic well-being (labor productivity lost to sickness and disease). Often societies are locked into ``poverty traps'' of poor health and poor economy. Here, using a simplified coupled disease-economic model with endogenous capital growth we demonstrate the formation of poverty traps, as well as ways to escape them. We suggest two possible mechanisms of escape both motivated by empirical data: one, through an influx of capital (development aid), and another through changing the percentage of GDP spent on healthcare. We find that a large influx of capital is successful in escaping the poverty trap, but increasing health spending alone is not. Our results demonstrate that escape from a poverty trap may be possible, and carry important policy implications in the world-wide distribution of aid and within-country healthcare spending.

  7. The Pluto debate: Influence of emotions on belief, attitude, and knowledge change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Suzanne H.

    In line with the "warming trend" (Sinatra, 2005), this study examined the influence of emotions during controversial conceptual change. Issues in science may trigger highly emotional responses (e.g., evolutionary theory). However, it is unclear whether these emotions facilitate or inhibit change. I investigated the nature of emotions engendered when learning about a controversial science topic, Pluto's reclassification, including the valence (positive/negative) and activation (activating/deactivating) of emotions (Pekrun et al., 2002). I also investigated whether belief, attitude, and/or conceptual change could be facilitated through rereading a refutation text and/or rereading during small group discussions. Refutation texts directly state a common misconception, refute it, and provide the scientific explanation as a plausible alternative (Hynd, 2001). Participants were randomly assigned to a group (reread text; reread text plus small group discussions). Participants in both groups read the same refutational text regarding the recent change in the definition of planet and Pluto's reclassification. The findings show that students' experienced a range of emotions towards Pluto's reclassification. Students reported experiencing more negative than positive emotions. Both positive and negative emotions were shown to be predictive of student's attitudes and attitude change. Emotions were also predictive of students' knowledge of planets and conceptual change. This suggests that emotions may have promoted deep engagement and critical thinking. Negative emotions may also be linked with resistance to attitude and conceptual change. The refutation text was effective in promoting belief change, attitude change, and conceptual change across both conditions. Students in both conditions reported more constructivist nature of science beliefs after rereading the text. Students also reported a greater level of acceptance about Pluto's reclassification. Conceptual change was

  8. SPATIAL DYNAMICS OF LAND COVER AND INFECTIOUS DISEASE RISK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate changes may allow for vector-transmitted tropical diseases to spread into temperate areas. Areas of low ecological diversity are at higher risk of infectious disease transmission due to decreased zooprophylaxis, the diversion of disease carrying insects from humans to...

  9. [Infectious agents and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeling-Navarro, C; Madrid-Marina, V; Camarena-Medellín, B E; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Barrera, R

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the molecular aspects of the relationships between infectious agents and autoimmune diseases, the mechanisms of immune response to infectious agents, and the more recent hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases are discussed. The antigens are processed and selected by their immunogenicity, and presented by HLA molecules to the T cell receptor. These events initiate the immune response with the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes. Although there are several hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases and too many findings against and in favor of them, there is still no conclusive data. All these hypothesis and findings are discussed in the context of the more recent advances. PMID:1615352

  10. Infectious Diseases and the Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Pichler, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes the interactions between infectious diseases and the economy. The different chapters theoretically and empirically examine different channels of interaction. Within each chapter we initially provide a theoretical foundation which builds upon extensions and adaptations of existing models and partly new models. In a second step we present the empirical analyses and the corresponding results using modern empirical methods. We analyze HIV/AIDS, the Spanish Flu and infec...

  11. Multifractal signatures of infectious diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Holdsworth, Amber M.; Kevlahan, Nicholas K.-R.; Earn, David J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Incidence of infection time-series data for the childhood diseases measles, chicken pox, rubella and whooping cough are described in the language of multifractals. We explore the potential of using the wavelet transform maximum modulus (WTMM) method to characterize the multiscale structure of the observed time series and of simulated data generated by the stochastic susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered (SEIR) epidemic model. The singularity spectra of the observed time series suggest that...

  12. Antibiotic associated diarrhoea: Infectious causes

    OpenAIRE

    Ayyagari A; Agarwal J; Garg A

    2003-01-01

    Nearly 25% of antibiotic associated diarrhoeas (AAD) is caused by Clostridium difficile, making it the commonest identified and treatable pathogen. Other pathogens implicated infrequently include Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Candida spp. and Salmonella spp. Most mild cases of AAD are due to non-infectious causes which include reduced break down of primary bile acids and decrease metabolism of carbohydrates, allergic or toxic effects of antibiotic ...

  13. Infectious and coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Tohidi, Mohammad; Amin SABOURI; Ramezani-Binabaj, Mahdi; Sadeghi-Ghahrodi, Mohsen; Einollahi, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atherosclerotic event is one of the most causes of death in the world. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one manifestation of atherosclerosis. It is well-known that several risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus (DM), smoking, hypertension (HTN), have effects on it. It is proposed that infection can lead to atherosclerosis or even make its process faster. Here, we discuss about the effect of some of infectious agents on the atherosclerosis and CAD. METHODS In this study, first we d...

  14. Infectious laryngotracheitis virus in chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Shan-Chia; Giambrone, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an important respiratory disease of chickens and annually causes significant economic losses in the poultry industry world-wide. ILT virus (ILTV) belongs to alphaherpesvirinae and the Gallid herpesvirus 1 species. The transmission of ILTV is via respiratory and ocular routes. Clinical and post-mortem signs of ILT can be separated into two forms according to its virulence. The characteristic of the severe form is bloody mucus in the trachea with high morta...

  15. Thermal physical properties and key influence factors of phase change emulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hui; YANG Rui; ZHANG Yinping; HUANG Zhe; LIN Jia; WANG Xin

    2005-01-01

    Latent functionally thermal fluids (LFTF) are a novel kind of heat storage and heat transfer fluids that include phase change microcapsule slurry and phase change emulsion (PCE). They have much greater apparent specific heats and higher heat transfer abilities in the phase change temperature range than conventional single-phase heat transfer fluids such as water. Thus they are advantageous in the field of the convective heat transfer enhancement and energy transport. In this paper, some thermal physical properties such as viscosity, fusion heat and apparent specific heat (cp) are measured, and the influences of some factors (such as selection of surfactants, preparation method, temperature, mixing ratio of surfactants and mass concentration of phase change material) on them are discussed. The study shows that: 1) the viscosity of the PCE prepared in the present work is lower than that reported in the literature; 2) its apparent specific heat value for the phase change temperature region is high and proportionally increases with the concentration of phase change material.

  16. Human Impacts and Climate Change Influence Nestedness and Modularity in Food-Web and Mutualistic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Kajihara, Kosuke

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical studies have indicated that nestedness and modularity—non-random structural patterns of ecological networks—influence the stability of ecosystems against perturbations; as such, climate change and human activity, as well as other sources of environmental perturbations, affect the nestedness and modularity of ecological networks. However, the effects of climate change and human activities on ecological networks are poorly understood. Here, we used a spatial analysis approach to examine the effects of climate change and human activities on the structural patterns of food webs and mutualistic networks, and found that ecological network structure is globally affected by climate change and human impacts, in addition to current climate. In pollination networks, for instance, nestedness increased and modularity decreased in response to increased human impacts. Modularity in seed-dispersal networks decreased with temperature change (i.e., warming), whereas food web nestedness increased and modularity declined in response to global warming. Although our findings are preliminary owing to data-analysis limitations, they enhance our understanding of the effects of environmental change on ecological communities. PMID:27322185

  17. Human Impacts and Climate Change Influence Nestedness and Modularity in Food-Web and Mutualistic Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Takemoto

    Full Text Available Theoretical studies have indicated that nestedness and modularity-non-random structural patterns of ecological networks-influence the stability of ecosystems against perturbations; as such, climate change and human activity, as well as other sources of environmental perturbations, affect the nestedness and modularity of ecological networks. However, the effects of climate change and human activities on ecological networks are poorly understood. Here, we used a spatial analysis approach to examine the effects of climate change and human activities on the structural patterns of food webs and mutualistic networks, and found that ecological network structure is globally affected by climate change and human impacts, in addition to current climate. In pollination networks, for instance, nestedness increased and modularity decreased in response to increased human impacts. Modularity in seed-dispersal networks decreased with temperature change (i.e., warming, whereas food web nestedness increased and modularity declined in response to global warming. Although our findings are preliminary owing to data-analysis limitations, they enhance our understanding of the effects of environmental change on ecological communities.

  18. Changes of Urban Boundary Layer Thermodynamic Stability Induced by Heat Island Effect and Their Influences on Precipitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the characteristics of the changes of the urban boundary layer thermodynamic stability induced by heat island effect and their influences on precipitation.[Method] Proceeding from the thermodynamic equation,the changes of urban boundary layer thermodynamic stability caused by the urban heat disturbance and the mean state of heat island effect were discussed.The influence of the changes of urban boundary layer thermodynamic stability on the precipitation was expounded.Combini...

  19. CT evaluation of infectious colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) is useful for evaluating the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease, such as infectious colitis, in patients with severe pain and bloody diarrhea. During the 7 years between November 1993 and October 2000, 34 patients with infectious colitis (18 male, 16 female; mean age 42±19 yrs), received emergency CT and colonoscopy because of severe abdominal pain and dysentery. The following organisms were isolated: pathogenic Escherichia coli (12), 6 of which were O157: H7 (O-157), Salmonella species (11), Campylobacter species (5), Vibrio parahaemolyticus (3), Yersinia enterocolotica (2) and Shigella species (1). Thickening of the intestinal wall greater than 10 mm was seen in the ascending colon in the 6 cases with E. coli O157, in 5/11 cases with Salmonella, 4/5 with Campylobacter and 1/6 with non-O157 pathogenic E. Coli. marked intestinal wall thickening, greater than 20 mm, was seen in the ascending colon of the 4 of the patients with an O-157 infection. In all patients with O-157 colitis, slight ascites was noted in the pelvic space. In additions, ascites was also seen in 3/13 patients with Salmonella and 1/5 patients with Campylobacter colitis. The CT findings, in the patients with infectious colitis, are non-specific but knowledge and recognition of the findings will help in patient evaluation and proper treatment. (author)

  20. Acute tonsillitis at infectious patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Finogeev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined 1824 patients with diphtheria treated in Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital Botkin (St. Petersburg in 1993 – 1994, and more than 500 patients referred to the clinic with a diagnosis of «angina». Based on published data and our own research observations investigated the etiology of acute tonsillitis. Bacterial tonsillitis should be treated with antibiotics, and this is important aetiological interpretation of these diseases. Streptococcal tonsillitis should always be a sore throat syndrome as a diagnostic sign of support. For other forms of lymphoma lesion of the tonsils should not be defined as «angina», and called «tonsillitis». Аngina as β-hemolytic streptococcus group A infection is recognized as the leader in the development of rheumatic fever. On the basis of a large clinical material briefly analyzed the clinical manifestations of various forms of diphtheria with membranous tonsillitis. Also presented with a syndrome of infectious diseases as tonsillitis, therapeutic and surgical «mask» of infectious diseases.

  1. Non-infectious orbital vasculitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, B; Black, E H; Levin, F; Servat, J J

    2012-05-01

    Non-infectious vasculitides comprise a large number of diseases. Many of these diseases can cause inflammation within the orbit and a clinical presentation, which mimics numerous other processes. Orbital disease can often be the initial presentation of a systemic process and early diagnosis can help prevent long-term, potentially fatal consequences. The evaluation and treatment of non-infectious orbital vasculitides are often complicated and require a thorough understanding of the disease and underlying systemic associations. The long-term prognosis visually and systemically must be weighed against the risks and benefits of the treatment regimen. A large variety of corticosteroid formulations currently exist and are the mainstay of initial treatment. Traditional steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents are also an important arsenal against these vasculitides. Recently, a new class of drugs called biologics, which target the various mediators of the inflammation cascade, may potentially provide more effective and less toxic treatment. This review aims to synthesize the current literature on non-infectious orbital vasculitides. PMID:22361845

  2. Normal modes of prion proteins: from native to infectious particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Abraham O; Levitt, Michael

    2011-03-29

    Prion proteins (PrP) are the infectious agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (i.e., mad cow disease). To be infectious, prion proteins must undergo a conformational change involving a decrease in α-helical content along with an increase in β-strand content. This conformational change was evaluated by means of elastic normal modes. Elastic normal modes show a diminution of two α-helices by one and two residues, as well as an extension of two β-strands by three residues each, which could instigate the conformational change. The conformational change occurs in a region that is compatible with immunological studies, and it is observed more frequently in mutant prions that are prone to conversion than in wild-type prions because of differences in their starting structures, which are amplified through normal modes. These findings are valuable for our comprehension of the conversion mechanism associated with the conformational change in prion proteins. PMID:21338080

  3. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnaMaria Nosari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Infectious complications have been known to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CLL patients who are predisposed to infections because of both the humoral immunodepression inherent to hematologic disease, which is related to stage and duration of CLL, and to further immunosuppression related to therapy. The majority of infections in CLL patients treated with alkilating agents is of bacterial origin. The immunodeficiency and natural infectious history of alkylator-resistant, corticosteroid-treated patients appears to have changed with the administration of purine analogs, which has been complicated by very severe and unusual infections and also more viral infections due to sustained reduction of CD4-positive T lymphocytes. The following introduction of monoclonal antibody therapies, in particular alemtuzumab, further increased the immunodepression, increasing also infections which appeared more often in patients with recurrent neutropenia due to chemotherapy cycles. Epidemiological data regarding fungal infections in lymphoproliferative disorders are scarce. Italian SEIFEM group in a retrospective multicentre study regarding CLL patients reported an incidence of mycoses 0.5%; however, chronic lymphoproliferative disorders emerged as second haematological underlying disease after acute leukemia in a French study on aspergillosis; in particular CLL with aspergillosis accounted for a third of these chronic lymphoproliferative diseases presenting mould infection.

  4. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnaMaria Nosari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Infectious complications have been known to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CLL patients who are predisposed to infections because of both the humoral immunodepression inherent to hematologic disease, which is related to stage and duration of CLL, and to further immunosuppression related to therapy. The majority of infections in CLL patients treated with alkilating agents is of bacterial origin. The immunodeficiency and natural infectious history of alkylator-resistant, corticosteroid-treated patients appears to have changed with the administration of purine analogs, which has been complicated by very severe and unusual infections and also more viral infections due to sustained reduction of CD4-positive T lymphocytes. The following introduction of monoclonal antibody therapies, in particular alemtuzumab, further increased the immunodepression, increasing also infections which appeared more often in patients with recurrent neutropenia due to chemotherapy cycles.

    Epidemiological data regarding fungal infections in lymphoproliferative disorders are scarce. Italian SEIFEM group in a retrospective multicentre study regarding CLL patients reported an incidence of mycoses 0.5%; however, chronic lymphoproliferative disorders emerged as second haematological underlying disease after acute leukemia in a French study on aspergillosis; in particular CLL with aspergillosis accounted for a third of these chronic lymphoproliferative diseases presenting mould infection.

  5. Influence of material composition on thermal expansion of graphitic materials and changes under fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the binder coke content and graphitization temperature on thermal expansion of graphite were investigated. Property correlations such as of anisotropy with real density or coefficient of volume thermal expansion have been found. An important part of this paper deals with the irradiation induced changes of thermal expansion. Interpretations of the irradiation behaviour base on the influence of material composition and heat treatment procedure. Measurements of lattice spacings were performed using high temperature X-ray diffractometer equipment in order to calculate the lattice expansion in c-direction for an estimation of its contribution to the expansion of the bulk material. Corresponding measurements were also performed on neutron irradiated graphite specimens. (orig./GSC)

  6. Some proves of integrated influence of geomagnetic activity and weather changes on human health

    CERN Document Server

    Khabarova, O V

    2008-01-01

    Our environment includes many factors, and each person on the Earth is permanently influenced by two of them: weather and magnetic field. It was found in the works of many investigators that the weather changes correlate with human health state. In the same time, disturbances of geomagnetic field (as one of the space weather manifestations) may influence bioobjects, including people. In this work we demonstrate the cumulative effect of different external factors (space weather and meteorological weather parameters) on human health on the base of medical experimental data (blood pressure and heart rate data rows for 86 people). It is shown that inclusion both solar-geomagnetic and weather parameters in simulation process give adjusting mixed parameter, which correlates with health state significantly better, than separated environmental parameters do.

  7. Factors influencing liver and spleen volume changes after donor hepatectomy for living donor liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To define the changes in liver and spleen volumes in the early postoperative period after partial liver donation for living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to determine factors that influence liver and spleen volume changes. 27 donors who underwent partial hepatectomy for LDLT were included in this study. The rates of liver and spleen volume change, measured with CT volumetry, were correlated with several factors. The analyzed factors included the indocyanine green (ICG) retention rate at 15 minutes after ICG administration, preoperative platelet count, preoperative liver and splenic volumes, resected liver volume, resected-to-whole liver volume ratio (LVR/LVW), resected liver volume to the sum of whole liver and spleen volume ratio [LVR/(LVW + SV0)], and pre and post hepatectomy portal venous pressures. In all hepatectomy donors, the volumes of the remnant liver and spleen were increased (increased rates, 59.5 ± 50.5%, 47.9 ± 22.6%). The increment rate of the remnant liver volume revealed a positive correlation with LVR/LVW (r = 0.759, p R/LVW influences the increment rate of the remnant liver volume.

  8. Changing glacial coverage influences stream dissolved organic matter signatures in coastal watersheds of southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellman, J. B.; Hood, E. W.; Stubbins, A.; Spencer, R. G.; Raymond, P.

    2012-12-01

    Glacier runoff is a major source of freshwater to Arctic and sub-Arctic streams and coastal marine zones. However, relatively little is known about how glacier runoff influences stream biogeochemical signatures, especially with regard to dissolved organic matter (DOM). We collected streamwater weekly to fortnightly during the glacial runoff season of 2012 from four coastal watersheds in southeast Alaska that ranged in glacier coverage from 0 to 63% and a glacier outflow stream. This allowed us to determine how changing glacier coverage influences the chemical signature of DOM. We also used δ18O of streamwater, snow/glacial icemelt, and rainfall to elucidate how the origin of streamwater influences stream DOM signatures. All streams showed a decrease in δ18O in early May coincident with snowmelt. By the end of May, δ18O in the non-glacial stream increased reflecting the increasing contribution of rainfall and groundwater to streamflow. However, δ18O in the glacial-fed streams remained depleted well into the summer months of July and August. This seasonal shift in δ18O was reflected in the DOM signatures for all streams. Glacier-fed streams showed an overall decrease in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration from May through July, but concentrations increased in the non-glacial stream during the same period. Similarly, stream specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA254) and fluorescence index (FI) values decreased during the glacial meltwater season reflecting the decreasing contribution of plant derived, aromatic carbon to the bulk DOM pool. Overall, δ18O was significantly related to DOC concentration, SUVA254, and FI (all precession and subsequent changes in freshwater input to streamflow could substantially influence the biogeochemistry of freshwater and coastal marine ecosystems by altering the timing, magnitude and chemical signature of DOM delivered to streams.

  9. Influence of changing carbonate chemistry on morphology and weight of coccoliths formed by Emiliania huxleyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Schulz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi is a marine phytoplankton species capable of forming small calcium carbonate scales (coccoliths which cover the organic part of the cell. Calcification rates of E. huxleyi are known to be sensitive to changes in seawater carbonate chemistry. It has, however, not yet been clearly determined how these changes are reflected in size and weight of individual coccoliths and which specific parameter(s of the carbonate system drive morphological modifications. Here, we compare data on coccolith size, weight, and malformation from a set of five experiments with a large diversity of carbonate chemistry conditions. This diversity allows distinguishing the influence of individual carbonate chemistry parameters such as carbon dioxide (CO2, bicarbonate (HCO3−, carbonate ion (CO32−, and protons (H+ on the measured parameters. Measurements of fine-scale morphological structures reveal an increase of coccolith malformation with decreasing pH suggesting that H+ is the major factor causing malformations. Coccolith distal shield area varies from about 5 to 11 μm2. Changes in size seem to be mainly induced by varying [HCO3−] and [H+] although influence of [CO32−] cannot be entirely ruled out. Changes in coccolith weight were proportional to changes in size. Increasing CaCO3 production rates are reflected in an increase in coccolith weight and an increase of the number of coccoliths formed per unit time. The combined investigation of morphological features and coccolith production rates presented in this study may help to interpret data derived from sediment cores, where coccolith morphology is used to reconstruct calcification rates in the water column.

  10. Influence of changing carbonate chemistry on morphology and weight of coccoliths formed by Emiliania huxleyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Schulz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi is a marine phytoplankton species capable of forming small calcium carbonate scales (coccoliths which cover the organic part of the cell. Calcification rates of E. huxleyi are known to be sensitive to changes in seawater carbonate chemistry. It is, however, not yet understood how these changes are reflected in the morphology of coccoliths. Here, we compare data on coccolith size, weight, and malformation from a~set of five experiments with a large diversity of carbonate chemistry conditions. This diversity allows distinguishing the influence of individual carbonate chemistry parameters such as carbon dioxide (CO2, bicarbonate (HCO3−, carbonate (CO32−, and protons (H+ on the measured parameters. Measurements of fine-scale morphological structures reveal an increase of coccolith malformation with decreasing pH suggesting that H+ is the major factor causing malformations. Coccolith distal shield area varies from about 5 to 11 μm2. Changes in size seem to be mainly induced by varying [HCO3−] and [H+] although influence of [CO32−] cannot be entirely ruled out. Changes in coccolith weight were proportional to changes in size. Increasing CaCO3 production rates are reflected in an increase in coccolith weight and an increase of the number of coccoliths formed per unit time. The combined investigation of morphological features and coccolith production rates presented in this study may help to interpret data derived from sediment cores, where coccolith morphology is used to reconstruct calcification rates in the water column.

  11. Influence of Environmental Factors on the Volume Change of Blended Cement Containing Steel Slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In the condition of 20 ℃, 5% sulfate liquor curing, standard tap water curing and 50% RH curing-three different curing environments, the volume change of steel slag blended cement influenced by environmental factors was studied. With steel slag addition 10%, 30%, 50%, from 90 days to 356 days, the relationship of shrinkage and three different curing environments is: dry curing environment>tap water curing environment>sulfate curing environment. But, the sample shrinkage in 28 days has much difference with the curing environment, which has no obvious orderliness. The different effects on blended cement containing steel slag in different environmental factors were analyzed using SEM.

  12. Morphofunctional changes and mechanisms of their realization in developing lungs under influence of paracetamol and nimesulid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharchenko S.V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actuality of organs and tissues normality development studying is conditioned on continuous growth of conge-nital abnormalies оn the base of greater drugs distribution. The anomalie s of lungs development unde r influence of paraceta-mol and nimesulide are examined and the possible mechanisms of their appearance are analysed. It is determined that lungs develop more slowly under action of paracetamol than in norm and paracetamol lead to development of bronchial asthma during postnatal period of life. Small in numbers researches of nimesulide influen ce demonstrate changes of lungs histogene-sis, which show up in thei r development deceleration.

  13. Influence of climatic changes on pollution levels in the Balkan Peninsula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatev, Z.; Georgiev, K.; Dimov, I.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to study the influence of future climatic changes on some high pollution levels that can cause damages on plants, animals and human beings. The particular area of interest is the Balkan Peninsula. Four important quantities have been selected: (a) annual concentrations, (b...... these scenarios, are carefully studied. The major conclusion is that the increase of the temperature, alone or in combination with some other factors, leads to rather considerable increases of some pollution levels, which might become dangerous for the environment. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights...

  14. The Influence of Leadership Behavior and Organizational Commitment on Organizational Readiness for Change in a Higher Learning Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Norshidah

    2012-01-01

    Many factors contribute to the effectiveness in implementing organizational change. However, many change effort fail due to several factors such as lack of commitment, style of leadership, and emotional distress of the employees who have to implement the change. This study was intended to determine the influence of leadership behavior and…

  15. Changes in social relations in old age. Are they influenced by functional ability?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Kirsten; Due, Pernille; Holstein, Bjørn Evald; Heikkinen, Riitta-Liisa; Berg, Stig

    The aims of this article were to describe changes in social relations from ages 75 to 80, and analyze whether changes in social relations are influenced by functional ability at age 75. The study includes data from the NORA follow-up study of 75-80 year-old men and women in Jyväskylä (Finland......, close friends, acquaintances, and neighbors; 2) diversity of social relations (number of types of social contacts); 3) telephone contacts; and 4) social participation. The function of social relations was measured by instrumental social support. Functional ability was measured by tiredness and need for...... the well-functioning persons [men: OR=4.4 (1.3-15.0); women: OR=3.0 (0.93-9.6)]....

  16. Pharmacology in space. Part 1. Influence of adaptive changes on pharmacokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.

    1989-01-01

    The topic of pharmacology in space, i.e. the administration of drugs during space flight and the subsequent pharmacokinetic handling of the pharmaceuticals, is a new field about which little is known. In a two-part series, Claire Lathers and colleagues highlight some of the current questions in this field. In this first article the physiological and biochemical changes associated with weightlessness in space are discussed. These changes induce adaptive alterations which may influence the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs. The cardiovascular system is of particular relevance here. Also discussed are the classes of pharmacological agent that are most likely to be used during space flight for medical problems and thus, by necessity, will become drugs to be examined in space to determine whether their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties are altered. Therapy of the most common spaceflight ailment-motion sickness-will be considered next month in Part 2.

  17. Habitat change influences mate search behaviour in three-spined sticklebacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuschele, Jan; Salminen, Tiina; Candolin, Ulrika

    2012-01-01

    is a global problem that alters habitat structure and visibility in aquatic ecosystems. We investigated whether changes in habitat complexity and male cue modality, visual or olfactory, influence mate search behaviour of female three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus. We allowed gravid females...... to search for mates in experimental pools that contained two nesting males and one social female, under low and high structural complexity (created from green Plexiglas sheets), with access to either visual or olfactory cues of the individuals. We found increased habitat complexity reduced the number...... evaluation in the absence of visual stimulation. This reduced the rate of mate encounters and probably also the opportunity for choice. Our results show that changes in habitat structure and visibility can alter female mate searching, with potential consequences for the opportunity for sexual selection....

  18. The Influence of Shaolin Teaching to Houjie`s Personality Change in Shaolin Film (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustinus Sufianto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available New Shaolin is a famous film from China. The story tells about Houjies life and his personality change. Shaolins positive influence in Houjies life is the main purpose of this research. Research used references and the theory of Sigmund Freud of ID, Ego and Superego to analyze Houjies personality change. Result shows that after receiving Shaolins teaching, he became a better man. In Shaolin, Houjie was forgiven. Shaolins teaching such as chanting a scripture can help improve his thoughts. Reflection and Kungfu brought Houjie out of his revenge and bad emotion, also bring harmony to his thoughts and heart. Houjies pre-character was dominated by his ID, but after he had entered Shaolin and learned Shaolins teaching, Houjie studied how to reach balance in 3 factors mentioned in the theory of personality.

  19. The changing trend and influencing factors of energy efficiency: The case of nine countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy shortage is exacerbated by energy wastage and low efficiency, so energy efficiency has become a popular research topic. However, in most studies, the inputs and outputs of energy efficiency are selected through qualitative analysis and literature review, the rationality is not convincing. In this paper, the inputs and outputs of energy efficiency are calculated by EVA (Economic Value Added method). Number of employees in energy industry, energy consumption amount and energy services amount are chosen as the inputs while CO2 emissions per capita and industrial profit amount are chosen as the outputs. DEA (Data Envelopment Analysis) and Malmquist index are applied to calculate the energy efficiencies of nine countries during 2008–2012. Each country has different reasons to explain the change of energy efficiency index and more flexible energy development plans should be implemented according to the changing reasons. Then the important influencing factors of energy efficiency are analyzed by Panel Regression Model. The results indicate that technology indices and management indices are the main factors of energy efficiency. Management indices' effect on energy efficiency index is occurred mainly through pure technical efficiency change index. Technology indices' effect on energy efficiency index is occurred mainly through technical progress change index. - Highlights: • The inputs and outputs of energy efficiency are calculated by Economic Value Added method. • Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and Malmquist index are used to calculate energy efficiency. • Panel Regression Model is used to identify the important influencing factors of energy efficiency. • Most important task is to upgrade energy technology and enhance management

  20. The Influence of North Atlantic Valves and Gateways on Neogene Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Our current proxies for pCO2 suggest Neogene levels were relatively constant (~300 ± 100 ppm) except for the middle Miocene Climatic Optimum with estimates approaching 400 ± 100 ppm. Yet, the East Antarctic Ice Sheet became a polar ice sheet and permanent feature on Earth while large-scale Northern Hemisphere ice sheets waxed and waned with scant differences in pCO2. Three possibilities to explain these observations are: 1) our pCO2 proxies are incorrect; 2) Earth's climate is far more sensitive than our current model simulations suggest; or 3) tectonic differences overprinted accepted climate sensitivity to pCO2. Two marine gateways that influenced Neogene deep-water circulation are the Greenland-Scotland Ridge and the Central American Isthmus (CAI). Driven by mantle plume variations under Iceland, the GSR acted as a regulator of Northern Component Water (NCW, analogous to NADW) by controlling access to the dense polar waters to the north. During the latest Miocene and early Pliocene, mean depths along the GSR and NCW production were at their greatest. By the late Pliocene (~3 Ma), mantle plume activity increased and NCW production waned. Most researchers have focused on surface water changes (e.g., salinity) in relating closure of the CAI to Pliocene climate change. However, I propose that its primary influence came with the elimination of low-latitude, deep-water connection between the Atlantic and Pacific. Combined with vigorous NCW production, closure of the CAI re-distributed nutrients between the oceans. Carbon isotope and Cd/Ca profiles indicate that "modern" basin-to-basin differences started during the latest Miocene and were fully developed in the Pliocene. The South Atlantic path for NCW also delivered heat to the Southern Ocean, facilitating sea ice changes, as indicated by biosiliceous patterns. These tectonic boundary changes and their affects on surface and deep water circulation contributed to the Pliocene pause in global cooling that began in

  1. Genetic Susceptibility to Feline Infectious Peritonitis in Birman Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Golovko, Lyudmila; Lyons, Leslie A.; Liu, Hongwei; Sorensen, Anne; Wehnert, Suzanne; Pedersen, Niels C.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors are presumed to influence the incidence of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), especially among pedigreed cats. However, proof for the existence of such factors has been limited and mainly anecdotal. Therefore, we sought evidence for genetic susceptibility to FIP using feline high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays in a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Birman cats were chosen for GWAS because they are highly inbred and suffer a high incidence of FIP. DNA...

  2. Spatio-Temporal Changes and Their Reasons to the Geopolitical Influence of China and the US in South Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current international society has entered an era of large-scale power transfer. Government interests have gradually transferred from national strength to national influence. As such, how to quantitatively present the fuzzy geopolitical influence (i.e., geo-influence has attracted greater attention from scholars. The proposed concept of geo-influence conforms to this trend of power structure change in international relations, and provides a reference for national sustainable development on the international stage. This study sets up an index system and a mathematical model of geopolitical influence, and explores the spatio-temporal changes of the geo-influence of China and the United States (US in South Asia over the past decade. Three primary results are found as follows: (1 In general, the geo-influence of China and the US in South Asia increased between 2003 and 2012. In terms of growth rate, the geo-influence of China in South Asia grew much faster than that of the US; (2 The overall strength and geo-influence show non-linear relationships. Strong national overall strength does not necessarily mean that one country has the strongest geo-influence; (3 National geo-influence is inversely proportional to the friction of distance. The larger the friction of distance is, the smaller national geo-potential is, and vice versa.

  3. [Changes in Spatial Organization of Cortical Rhythm Vibrations in Children uner the Influence of Music].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepovalnikov, A N; Egorov, M V

    2015-01-01

    Changes is systemic brain activity under influence of classical music (minor and major music) were studied at two groups of healthy children aged 5-6 years (n = 53). In 25 of studied children the Luscher test showed increased level of anxiety which significantly decreased after music therapy sessions. Bioelectrical cortical activity registered from 20 unipolar leads was subjected to correlation, coherence and factor analysis. Also the dynamics of the power spectrum for each of the EEG was studied. According to EEG all children after listening to both minor and major tones showed reorganization of brain rhythm structure accompanied by a decrease in the level of coherence and correlation of EEG; also was found significant and almost universal decrease in the EEG power spectrum. Registered EEG changes under the influence of classical music seems to reflect a decrease in excess of "internal tension" and weakening degree of "stiffness" to ensure the activity of cerebral structures responsible for mechanisms of "basic integration" which maintain constant readiness of brain to rapid and complete inclusion in action. PMID:26859984

  4. BENDING VIBRATION AND STABILITY OF A MULTIPLE-NANOBEAM SYSTEM INFLUENCED BY TEMPERATURE CHANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Karličić

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyzed the bending vibration and stability of a multiple-nanobeam system (MNBS coupled in elastic medium and influenced by temperature change and compressive axial load. The MNBS is modeled as the system consisting of a set of m identical and simply supported nanobeams mutually connected by Winkler’s type elastic layers. According to the Euler - Bernoulli beam and nonlocal thermo-elasticity theory, the system of m coupled partial differential equations is derived and solved by means of the method of separation of variables as well as the trigonometric one. Analytical solutions for natural frequencies and critical buckling loads of elastic MNBS are obtained. The effects of nonlocal parameter, temperature change and the number of nanobeams on the natural frequencies and the buckling loads are investigated through numerical examples. Thus, this work can represent a starting point to examine dynamical behavior and design of complex nanobeam structures, nanocomposites and nanodevices under the influence of various physical fields.

  5. Duodenogastral reflux and its influence on manifestation of morphological changes of gastric mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanov Yu.M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the diseases of the gastroduodenal zone chronic gastritis (CG occupies one of the leading positions. One of the main forms of CG is reflux gastritis (RG based on long-term location of duodenal content in the gastric antrum, so-called duodenal reflux (DR. It is well known that stable inflammatory response of the gastric mucosa (GM appears under the influence of bile acid and gastric juice, leading to chronic antral gastritis followed by gradual development of atrophy, metaplasia and dysplasia appearance. Therefore the aim of our work was to investigate the influence of the DR on the course of chronic hepatitis and morphological changes in the gastric mucosa. We observed 70 patients with chronic RG, aged from 22 to 59 years, average age – 43,5±1,2 years. The control group consisted of 25 healthy individuals of both sexes aged from 19 to 39 years. As a result it was found out that pain and dyspeptic syndromes caused problems most of all. While studying the content of bile acids in gastric juice of all patients examined it was higher (1,42±0,05 g/L in comparison with the control group (0,65±0,04 g/L. Content of bile acids in groups of RG patients with atrophy and without it was analyzed. The role of DR as an independent factor of recomposing changes in GM in chronic RG was proved.

  6. Distributional impacts of climate change mitigation in Indian electricity: The influence of governance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies that examine the distributional impacts of climate change mitigation policies often neglect the influence of institutions that implement these policies. This study examines the short-term consumption-side distributional impacts of expanding low-carbon electric supply in the state of Maharashtra, India with a focus on the influence of regulatory discretion in pricing. Households' welfare impacts from economy-wide electricity price shocks are simulated against a baseline that is calibrated to actual household economic and electricity service conditions, including actual electricity budgets, block tier prices and supply rationing. Industrial price impacts are propagated to households using a Leontief input–output analysis. Regulatory pricing decisions are evaluated based on social welfare metrics for economic efficiency and income inequality. The analysis reveals new linkages between climate change mitigation, electricity policy and income distribution. Low-income households can be shielded from mitigation impacts without losses in aggregate welfare to the extent that regulators can recover mitigation costs through industrial price increases. Regulators' flexibility to distribute costs across households is constrained by industrial customers' migration off the grid. Reduced supply interruptions to the rural poor from the resulting demand contraction are a potential co-benefit of mitigation. Distributional impacts, therefore, depend on other electricity policies that are driven by the political economy of the sector. - Highlights: • Indirect price increases harm most households less than residential price increases. • Regulators have flexibility to distribute mitigation costs across income groups. • Reduced supply interruptions are a potential co-benefit of mitigation

  7. Change of Energy of the Cubic Subnanocluster of Iron Under Influence of Interstitial and Substitutional Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedolya, Anatoliy V; Bondarenko, Natalya V

    2016-12-01

    Energy change of an iron face-centred cubic subnanocluster was evaluated using molecular mechanics method depending on the position of a carbon interstitial atom and substitutional atoms of nickel. Calculations of all possible positions of impurity atoms show that the energy change of the system are discrete and at certain positions of the atoms are close to continuous.In terms of energy, when all impurity atoms are on the same edge of an atomic cluster, their positions are more advantageous. The presence of nickel atoms on the edge of a cubic cluster resulted in decrease of potential barrier for a carbon atom and decrease in energy in the whole cluster. A similar drift of a carbon atom from central octahedral interstitial site to the surface in the direction occurred under the influence of surface factors.Such configuration corresponds to decreasing symmetry and increasing the number of possible energy states of a subnanocluster, and it corresponds to the condition of spontaneous crystallization process in an isolated system.Taking into account accidental positions of the nickel atom in the iron cluster, such behaviour of the carbon atom can explain the mechanism of growth of a new phase and formation of new clusters in the presence of other kind of atoms because of surface influence. PMID:26754941

  8. DYNAMIC CHANGES OF BRAIN ASYMMETRY UNDER INFLUENCE OF THE CONFLICT- INDUCING FACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoryn V.G

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic changes of brain asymmetry under influence of the conflict-inducing factor at male and female teenagers with different level of a potential conflictness were investigated. 4 groups of examinees by gender and conflictness level were described: I – “conflict” boys, II – “conflict” girls, III – “non-conflict” boys, IV – “non-conflict” girls. Gender differences in hemispheres domination under influence the conflict- inducing factor were revealed. Dependence of brain asymmetry changes on the level of a potential conflictness for female examinees was revealed. Left hemisphere domination for male examinees (group I and III, independently of conflictness level, as for the beginning, as to the end of a game, is determined. Right hemisphere mainly domination in researched cortex areas for “conflict” girls (II prior to beginning of experiment is shown, however by the end of experiment difference between hemispheres activity level is decreasing. Right hemisphere mainly domination in investigated cortex areas was detected prior to the beginning of experiment for “non conflict” girls (IV. Switch of hemispheres domination from right to the left in frontal lobe at the end of experiment was observed. In temporal cortex difference between hemispheres activity level is leveling.

  9. Investigative modalities in infectious keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Noopur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard recommended guidelines for diagnosis of infectious keratitis do exist. Based on an extensive Medline literature search, the various investigative modalities available for aiding the diagnosis of microbial keratitis have been reviewed and described briefly. Preferred practice patterns have been outlined and the importance of routine pre-treatment cultures in the primary management of infectious keratitis has been highlighted. Corneal scraping, tear samples and corneal biopsy are few of the specimens needed to carry out the investigative procedures for diagnosis and for initiating therapy in cases of microbial keratitis. In bacterial, fungal and amoebic keratitis, microscopic examination of smears is essential for rapid diagnosis. Potassium hydroxide (KOH wet mount, Gram′s stain and Giemsa stain are widely used and are important for clinicians to start empirical therapy before microbial culture results are available. The usefulness of performing corneal cultures in all cases of suspected infectious keratitis has been well established. In cases of suspected viral keratitis, therapy can be initiated on clinical judgment alone. If a viral culture is needed, scrapings should directly be inoculated into the viral transport media. In vivo confocal microscopy is a useful adjunct to slit lamp bio-microscopy for supplementing diagnosis in most cases and establishing early diagnosis in many cases of non-responding fungal and amoebic keratitis. This is a non-invasive, high resolution technique which allows rapid detection of Acanthamoeba cysts and trophozoites and fungal hyphae in the cornea long before laboratory cultures give conclusive results. Other new modalities for detection of microbial keratitis include molecular diagnostic techniques like polymerase chain reaction, and genetic finger printing by pulsed field gel electrophoresis.

  10. Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marroon Thabane; John K Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) is a common disorder wherein symptoms of IBS begin after an episode of acute gastroenteritis. Published studies have reported incidence of PI-IBS to range between 5% and 32%. The mechanisms underlying the development of PI-IBS are not fully understood, but are believed to include persistent sub-clinical inflammation, changes in intestinal permeability and alteration of gut flora. Individual studies have suggested that risk factors for PI-IBS include patients' demographics, psychological disorders and the severity of enteric illness. However, PI-IBS remains a diagnosis of exclusion with no specific disease markers and, to date, no definitive therapy exists. The prognosis of PIIBS appears favorable with spontaneous and gradual resolution of symptoms in most patients.

  11. Factors influencing smoking behaviour changes during Ramadan among Malay male students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriani Ismail

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fasting during Ramadan provides an opportunistic setting for smoking cessation intervention. Smokers find it easy to cease smoking during Ramadan due to the religion, cultural and environmental influences. This study aims to determine the changes in smoking behaviour during Ramadan among Malay Muslim male students who were current smokers. Methods: This is cross sectional study using self-administered questionnaire to evaluate the socio demographic characteristics and two main relevant religious perceptions on smoking (i.e. ‘Is smoking ‘haram’ and ‘Does smoking invalidate your fasting’. Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND questionnaire was used to evaluate smoking behaviour before and during Ramadan. The total FTND scores and the percentages according to FTDN items, before Ramadan and during Ramadan were compared to determine good or poor smoking behaviour changes. Results: The overall FTND scores and the percentage according to its items were significantly reduced. There were significant association between smoking behaviour changes during Ramadan and household income, nicotine dependence and perception that smoking is ‘haram’. The percentage of good smoking behaviour changes was higher among those with higher income, high nicotine dependence and those who are not aware that smoking is ‘haram’. Conclusion: There is a great potential in taking advantage of the Ramadan environment to encourage smoking cessation among Muslim smokers.

  12. Influencing organisational change in the NHS: lessons learned from workplace wellness initiatives in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Holly; Lloyd, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a discussion of the key issues in influencing organisational change in NHS settings, in the development of workplace wellness interventions to improve employee health and wellbeing. To tackle poor public health and associated rising healthcare costs, there must be a focus on the root cause of many preventable diseases - unhealthy lifestyle choices. Workplace wellness initiatives are now an important prevention strategy adopted by socially responsible organisations to target the health and wellbeing of working age adults. Lessons learned from initiatives in secondary care suggest that effective implementation requires change in organisational 'health culture', through a combination of education, behaviour change intervention, needs-based facilities, and services and strategies for developing supportive and health-promoting work environments. Most of all, employers must demonstrate a commitment to health and wellness that is fully integrated with their mission, values and long-term vision, paving the way for sustainable lifestyle changes. Evaluation systems must be in place to measure the impact and outcomes of wellness schemes. PMID:19094421

  13. [Update in Infectious Diseases 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candel, Francisco Javier; López González, Laura; García-García, Ana Belén; Chiarella, Flavia; Picazo, Juan José

    2015-09-01

    Infectious disease remains current worldwide. During the second half of 2014 an outbreak of ebolavirus hit West Africa with implications in the rest of the world. In fact, Spain declared the first imported case of this infection. Multiresistant enterobacteria outbreaks are emerging all around the world in a moment on which WHO draws attention to the limited resources, coining the term "post antibiotic era". On the other hand, 2014 went down in history as one in which hepatitis C is cured. Are also current HIV epidemiological control or strategies for antiviral and antifungal prophylaxis in immunocompromised hosts. PMID:26365724

  14. Asthma: a chronic infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramori, Gaetano; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Contoli, Marco; Marku, Brunilda; Forini, Giacomo; Pauletti, Alessia; Johnston, Sebastian L; Papi, Alberto

    2012-09-01

    There are increasing data to support the "hygiene" and "microbiota" hypotheses of a protective role of infections in modulating the risk of subsequent development of asthma. There is less evidence that respiratory infections can actually cause the development of asthma. There is some evidence that rhinovirus respiratory infections are associated with the development of asthma, particularly in childhood, whereas these infections in later life seem to have a weaker association with the development of asthma. The role of bacterial infections in chronic asthma remains unclear. This article reviews the available evidence indicating that asthma may be considered as a chronic infectious disease. PMID:22929096

  15. Social, demographic, and environmental influences on perceptions and memories of weather, climate, and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, Julie Suzanne

    This research seeks to understand how people in the Denver metropolitan area perceive and remember weather, climate, and climate change and how social, demographic, and environmental factors might influence these perceptions and memories. To do this, an online survey was completed in 2006 and in-person interviews were conducted in 2010 and 2011. The online survey and the in-person interviews both asked questions about recent weather, seasonal climate for specific years, beliefs about climate change and human impact on climate change, and social and demographic information. During the 2010--2011 in-person interviews, ambient meteorological conditions were recorded. For climate recollections, overall accuracy was about 20%. In general, women who were politically liberal, majored in a science field, believed in climate change, and were in a good mood were the most accurate for past climates. However, this accuracy was still only about 30%. For recent weather memories, the accuracy was about 50%. Time was the biggest indicator of accuracy, with the most recent weather being remembered the most accurately. When asked to rate the weather from positive to negative for specific events, respondents reported the weather with a negative bias for extremely negative flashbulb memory events. For perceptions about climate change, over 80% of the respondents in the Denver metropolitan area believed global warming was occurring and that humans had an impact on global warming. Over 80% of respondents believed that global warming will impact the Denver metropolitan area, however not all of these people knew how climate change would impact them personally.

  16. A probabilistic analysis of human influence on recent record global mean temperature changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Kokic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available December 2013 was the 346th consecutive month where global land and ocean average surface temperature exceeded the 20th century monthly average, with February 1985 the last time mean temperature fell below this value. Even given these and other extraordinary statistics, public acceptance of human induced climate change and confidence in the supporting science has declined since 2007. The degree of uncertainty as to whether observed climate changes are due to human activity or are part of natural systems fluctuations remains a major stumbling block to effective adaptation action and risk management. Previous approaches to attribute change include qualitative expert-assessment approaches such as used in IPCC reports and use of ‘fingerprinting’ methods based on global climate models. Here we develop an alternative approach which provides a rigorous probabilistic statistical assessment of the link between observed climate changes and human activities in a way that can inform formal climate risk assessment. We construct and validate a time series model of anomalous global temperatures to June 2010, using rates of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions, as well as other causal factors including solar radiation, volcanic forcing and the El Niño Southern Oscillation. When the effect of GHGs is removed, bootstrap simulation of the model reveals that there is less than a one in one hundred thousand chance of observing an unbroken sequence of 304 months (our analysis extends to June 2010 with mean surface temperature exceeding the 20th century average. We also show that one would expect a far greater number of short periods of falling global temperatures (as observed since 1998 if climate change was not occurring. This approach to assessing probabilities of human influence on global temperature could be transferred to other climate variables and extremes allowing enhanced formal risk assessment of climate change.

  17. Mesoscale Morphological Change, Beach Rotation and Storm Climate Influences along a Macrotidal Embayed Beach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cross-shore profiles and environmental forcing were used to analyse morphological change of a headland bay beach: Tenby, West Wales (51.66 N; −4.71 W over a mesoscale timeframe (1996–2013. Beach profile variations were attuned with longer term shoreline change identified by previous research showing southern erosion and northern accretion within the subaerial zone and were statistically significant in both sectors although centrally there was little or no significance. Conversely a statistically significant volume loss was shown at all profile locations within the intertidal zone. There were negative phase relationships between volume changes at the beach extremities, indicative of beach rotation and results were statistically significant (p < 0.01 within both subaerial (R2 = 0.59 and intertidal (R2 = 0.70 zones. This was confirmed qualitatively by time-series analysis and further cross correlation analysis showed trend reversal time-lagged associations between sediment exchanges at either end of the beach. Wave height and storm events displayed summer/winter trends which explained longer term one directional rotation at this location. In line with previous regional research, environmental forcing suggests that imposed changes are influenced by variations in southwesterly wind regimes. Winter storms are generated by Atlantic southwesterly winds and cause a south toward north sediment exchange, while southeasterly conditions that cause a trend reversal are generally limited to the summer period when waves are less energetic. Natural and man-made embayed beaches are a common coastal feature and many experience shoreline changes, jeopardising protective and recreational beach functions. In order to facilitate effective and sustainable coastal zone management strategies, an understanding of the morphological variability of these systems is needed. Therefore, this macrotidal research dealing with rotational processes across the entire intertidal

  18. Infection of Broilers with Two Virulent Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus: Criteria for Evaluation of Experimental Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnozzi, Ariel; Riblet, Sylva M; Williams, Susan M; Zavala, Guillermo; García, Maricarmen

    2015-09-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious disease of chickens and is responsible for significant economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide; it is caused by Gallid herpesvirus-1 (GaHV-1), commonly known as infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Experimental evaluation of ILTV strains is fundamental to identify changes in virulence that can contribute to the severity and spread of outbreaks and consequently influence the efficacy of vaccination. Several criteria had been utilized to determine the degree of virulence associated with ILTV strains. The objectives of this study were to compare the levels of virulence of the standard United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) challenge strain with a contemporary outbreak-related strain (63140) and to evaluate the efficacy of individual criteria to identify changes in virulence. Broilers were inoculated with increasing infectious doses of each strain. The criteria utilized to evaluate virulence were clinical signs of the disease, mortality, microscopic tracheal lesions, trachea genome viral loads, and antibody titers. Clinical signs scores were a useful parameter to define the peak of clinical disease but did not reveal differences in virulence between strains. Similarly, trachea microscopic lesion scores or levels of serum antibody titers were parameters that did not reveal obvious differences in virulence between strains. However, mortalities and increased viral genome loads in trachea of chickens inoculated with lower (log10 1 to 2) infectious doses clearly differentiated 63140 as a more-virulent ILTV strain. This study provides the framework to compare the virulence level of emerging ILTV isolates to the now-characterized USDA and 63140 strains. PMID:26478158

  19. Influence of Geometrical Parameters of Fluorescent Lamps on Their Electrical and Lighting Characteristics at Gradual Change of Voltage Supply Frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Tarasenko, N; K. Kozak

    2014-01-01

    The paper considers an influence of geometrical parameters of discharge tubes (diameter and length) on electrical and lighting characteristics of fluorescent lamps at a gradual continuous change in voltage supply frequency.

  20. The influence of climate change on meteorological drought characteristic in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global climate change and its influence on water resource are the worldwide issues. This study aims at investigating the impacts of climate change on drought characteristic in western Taiwan. This analysis on local climate change, may provide the reference for climate change study on Asia region. Thirty-one rainfall stations with at least 80 years records over western Taiwan provide the data set to analysis trend and change in the long term rainfall series. As the area of Taiwan is too small, the GCM is not suitable for our investigation on climate change. Therefore, the statistical methods of Cumulative Deviations test, Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney-Pettitt test were applied to detect the change points of annual rainfall depth and detect whether the long-term rainfall series exist variation and tendency in the historical records. The analytical results reveal that a significant change point occurs during about 1960s for annual rainfall series. Two samples in the long- tern rainfall series are further divided based on this change point. Yearly rainfall depth increases in northern Taiwan and decreases in middle and southern Taiwan. Average values and standard deviation of monthly rainfall depth in these two samples are compared. A stable reducing tendency of average rainfall in the wet seasons (May to October) is found in middle and southern Taiwan and increasing tendency in northern Taiwan. We further investigate whether drought characteristic is difference before and after 1960. Nine irrigation areas in Taiwan are divided based on its irrigation system. Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) is estimated and compared with historical agriculture drought. It is found that 3-month SPI has better characteristic than 1-month SPI to respond the agriculture drought characteristic. Therefore, 3-month SPI for each irrigation area is estimated both before and after 1960. It is found that the frequency and duration of moderate dry (3-month SPI<-1.0) and severely dry

  1. Infectious Risks of Traveling Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H; Blair, Barbra M

    2015-08-01

    A popular leisure activity, international travel can be associated with some infections. The most common travel-related illnesses appear to be gastrointestinal, dermatologic, respiratory, and systemic febrile syndromes. The pretravel medical consultation includes immunizations, malaria chemoprophylaxis, self-treatment for traveler's diarrhea, and advice on the prevention of a myriad of other infectious causes including dengue, chikungunya, rickettsiosis, leptospirosis, schistosomiasis, and strongyloidiasis. Travel to locations experiencing outbreaks such as Ebola virus disease, Middle East respiratory syndrome, avian influenza, and chikungunya call for specific alerts on preventive strategies. After travel, evaluation of an ill traveler must explore details of exposure, including destinations visited; activities; ingestion of contaminated food or drinks; contact with vectors, animals, fresh water, or blood and body fluids; and other potential exposures. Knowledge of the geographic distribution of infectious diseases is important in generating the differential diagnoses and testing accordingly. Empiric treatment is sometimes necessary when suspicion of a certain diagnosis is strong and confirmatory tests are delayed or lacking, particularly for infections that are rapidly progressive (for example, malaria) or for which timing of testing is prolonged (such as leptospirosis). PMID:26350325

  2. Return to Play After Infectious Mononucleosis

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Jonathan A.; Smith, Julie Anne

    2014-01-01

    Context: Infectious mononucleosis is a disease primarily of adolescence and early adulthood. The risk of splenic injury and chronic fatigue make return-to-play decisions a challenge for the clinician caring for athletes with infectious mononucleosis. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from the PubMed and MEDLINE databases through December 2012 by searching for epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical manifestations, management, and the role of the spleen in infectious mononucleosis. Study Desi...

  3. Impact of laparoscopic surgery on stress responses, immunofunction, and risk of infectious complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    Open laparotomy is followed by profound changes in endocrine metabolic function and various host defense mechanisms, impaired pulmonary function, and hypoxemia, all of which may be important for the development of postoperative infectious complications. Laparoscopic surgery, however, leads to a...

  4. Analysis of status and influence factors of health literacy of infectious diseases prevention of the urban and ru-ral residents in China%中国居民传染病防治素养水平及其影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄相刚; 李长宁; 李英华; 李莉; 聂雪琼

    2015-01-01

    目的:了解我国居民传染病防治素养水平及其影响因素,为制定和评价健康素养政策和干预措施提供依据。方法采用分层多阶段与人口规模成比例抽样(PPS 抽样)方法,对全国31个省(自治区、直辖市)336个监测点非集体居住的15~69岁常住人口进行问卷调查。结果2012年健康素养监测共调查102985人,收回有效问卷98448份,有效率为95.59%。2012年我国居民健康传染病防治素养水平为17.53%。城市居民为21.24%,农村居民为15.45%;东部地区居民为18.76%,中部地区居民为17.59%,西部地区居民为15.69%;25~34岁年龄组为20.36%,65~69岁年龄组为13.80%。多因素 Logistic 回归分析结果显示:性别、年龄、文化程度、职业是影响居民传染病健康素养高低的重要因素。女性传染病防治素养水平高于男性(OR =1.077,95%CI:1.023~1.134);文化程度越高,传染病防治素养水平越高,大专/本科及以上文化程度者 OR 值为4.238(95%CI:3.384~5.307);公务员/事业单位人员传染病防治素养水平高于其他职业人群。结论我国居民传染病防治素养水平较低,应根据性别、年龄、文化程度、职业的不同特点,开展有针对性的健康素养教育活动。%Objective To understand the status and its influencing factors of health literacy of infectious diseases prevention in China,to explore the method for improving the health information literacy.Methods Using stratified multi-stage and PPS sampling method,the permanent resident population aged 15 -69 years old,from 336 monitor districts of 31 provinces,were investigated with questionnaire about health information literacy.Results In 2012 Chinese residents health literacy monitoring,102 985 permanent resident population aged 15 -69 years old were investigated.98 448 valid questionnaires were analyzed

  5. Assessing Morphological Changes due to Hydrometeorologic Influences in Mehendiganj Island, Meghna Estuary, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, A.; Ahmed, K. M.; Overeem, I.; Rogers, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    The Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna river system is the largest river system in the world with massive discharge rates and sediment loads (annually over one billion tons). Sediment from these rivers has formed one of the largest and most densely populated deltas in the world. The combined rivers discharge through the Meghna estuary into the Bay of Bengal. The study area, Mehendiganj Island, is located in the morphologically dynamic Meghna estuary region of the delta and is characterized by rapid accretion and erosion. The net effect of erosion-accretion processes between the years 1987-2012 was analyzed using Landsat satellite imagery. Time-lapse series were generated over consecutive monsoon periods to estimate net erosion, and reveal that morphological changes are influenced by hydrological conditions (e.g. areal extent of flooding surface, hydrometeorology) driven by high river and sediment discharge, mainly during the seasonal monsoon (wet) period. The hydrological conditions and, consequently, the morphological changes exhibit a skewed pattern in annual distribution on account of high-energy condition prevailing during the monsoon. Total erosion and accretion within the study area was estimated to be about 5997 hectares and 2922 hectares, respectively. The measured annual erosion rates were as high as 1493 hectares, which were about 15% of the existing land surface within the study area. Discharge rates and sediment loads over the course of the study period were calculated using a numerical model (WBMsed) and was validated by comparisons with field-measured values. Moreover, hydrological parameters were analyzed in the context of statistical hydrology in order to obtain trends and were correlated with annual accretion and erosion rates attained from the satellite image analysis. Anomalies in the patterns of annual accretion and erosion rates were detected during extreme hydrometeorological events such as high floodwater years and cyclones. The morphological changes

  6. The predicted influence of climate change on lesser prairie-chicken reproductive parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisham, Blake A.; Boal, Clint W.; Haukos, David A.; Davis, Dawn M.; Boydston, Kathy K.; Dixon, Charles; Heck, Willard R.

    2013-01-01

    The Southern High Plains is anticipated to experience significant changes in temperature and precipitation due to climate change. These changes may influence the lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) in positive or negative ways. We assessed the potential changes in clutch size, incubation start date, and nest survival for lesser prairie-chickens for the years 2050 and 2080 based on modeled predictions of climate change and reproductive data for lesser prairie-chickens from 2001–2011 on the Southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico. We developed 9 a priori models to assess the relationship between reproductive parameters and biologically relevant weather conditions. We selected weather variable(s) with the most model support and then obtained future predicted values from climatewizard.org. We conducted 1,000 simulations using each reproductive parameter’s linear equation obtained from regression calculations, and the future predicted value for each weather variable to predict future reproductive parameter values for lesser prairie-chickens. There was a high degree of model uncertainty for each reproductive value. Winter temperature had the greatest effect size for all three parameters, suggesting a negative relationship between above-average winter temperature and reproductive output. The above-average winter temperatures are correlated to La Niña events, which negatively affect lesser prairie-chickens through resulting drought conditions. By 2050 and 2080, nest survival was predicted to be below levels considered viable for population persistence; however, our assessment did not consider annual survival of adults, chick survival, or the positive benefit of habitat management and conservation, which may ultimately offset the potentially negative effect of drought on nest survival.

  7. Estimation of the possible influence of future climate changes on biodiversity in terrestrial ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, H. M.; Nishina, K.; Ito, A.

    2015-12-01

    In recent decades, climate change has progressed worldwide and their influences on ecosystem structure and function that provide various goods and services to humans' well-being are of the greatest concerns. The ecosystem function and services are tightly coupled with the biodiversity, particularly via food web and biogeochemical cycles and here carbon is one of the central elements. The photosynthetic carbon fixation by plants, which forms the basis of the food web, is known to be highly sensitive to meteorological changes including radiation, temperature, precipitation and CO2 concentration. Thus an analysis of the effect of future climate change on the carbon cycle processes including photosynthetic production in a biogeographical region, which is important from the viewpoint of the biodiversity conservation, such as "biodiversity hotspot", might enable us to discuss the relevance between climate change and biodiversity.In ISI-MIP (Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project) phase 1, we have estimated NPP (net primary production), plant biomass and soil organic carbon by seven global biome models under climate conditions from 1901 to 2100 based on four RCPs (Representative Concentration Pathways for 2.6, 4.5, 6.0, and 8.5 W m-2 stabilization targets) and five global climate models. In the present study, we analyzed these outputs to reveal the effects of changes on NPP, plant biomass and soil organic carbon in 20 biodiversity hotspots in various climatic regions. Although NPP of whole world tended to increase under RCP 8.5 W m-2 scenario, some biome models have shown that NPP of the hotspots in tropical regions decrease.

  8. Policy shifts influence the functional changes of the CNH systems on the Mongolian plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiquan; John, Ranjeet; Shao, Changliang; Fan, Yi; Zhang, Yaoqi; Amarjargal, Amartuvshin; Brown, Daniel G.; Qi, Jiaguo; Han, Juanjuan; Lafortezza, Raffaele; Dong, Gang

    2015-08-01

    By applying the concept of the coupled natural and human system (CNH), we compared spatiotemporal changes in livestock (LSK), land cover, and ecosystem production to understand the relative roles that natural and social driving forces have on CNH dynamics on the Mongolia plateau. We used socioeconomic and physical data at prefecture level for Inner Mongolia and Mongolia from 1981 through 2010 to represent changes in net primary productivity (NPP), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), precipitation, annual average temperature, LSK, livestock density (LSKD), land cover change (LCC), gross domestic production (GDP), and population (POP). The ratios such as LSK:NPP, LSKD: EVI, LSKD:albedo, LSK:POP, and LSK:GDP were examined and compared between Inner Mongolia and Mongolia, and structural equation modeling (SEM) was applied to quantify the complex interactions. Substantial differences in LSK, POP, and economic development were found among the biomes and between Inner Mongolia and Mongolia. When various indicators for policy shifts—such as the World Trade Organization (WTO) for China, the Third Campaign to Reclaim Abandoned Agriculture Lands (ATAR-3), and the Grain for Green Program for China (GFG)—were added into our SEM, the results showed significant change in the strength of the above relationships. After China joined the WTO, the relationships in Inner Mongolia between LSKD:LCC and LSKD:NPP were immensely strengthened, whereas relationships in NPP:LCC were weakened. In Mongolia, the ATAR-3 program first appeared to be an insignificant policy, but the Collapse of the Soviet Union enhanced the correlation between LSKD:LCC, weakened the connection of LCC:NPP, and did not affect LSKD:NPP. We conclude that human influences on the Mongolian CNH system exceeded those of the biophysical changes, but that the significance varies in time and per biome, as well as between Inner Mongolia and Mongolia.

  9. Coastal erosion's influencing factors include development, dams, wells, and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demographic flight to the coast, begun in early civilization, continues unabated worldwide according to latest studies. The percentage of population living on the coast is expected to remain relatively constant over the next few decades, but the total numbers will increase as the population increases. Recent coastal battering by hurricanes and extratropical storms poses questions about coastal habitability and the real economics of coastal development. Repair costs are borne by private individuals as well as the public in various direct and indirect ways. As these costs escalate, it is fitting to ask what the future portends for storm and coastal-flood damage. It is known that development pressures will continue to increase along the coast, but what will happen concurrently to natural-hazard threats to this infrastructure? Though much emphasis has been placed on sea-level rise, the broader issue is climate change in general. Here, the author considers climate change in both its natural and anthropogenic perspectives. Without becoming mired in the debate about the greenhouse effect and human influence on climatic shifts, some of the broad classes of natural hazards that might accompany climate change are examined. There are several categories of possible global-change effects on coastal erosion. In the early 1980's, an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report postulated increases in global sea level up to 4 meters during the next 100 years. Though balanced somewhat by other, lower estimates of sea-level rise, this higher extreme grabbed public attention. During the next decade, scientists attempted to concur on a more reasonable estimate of global sea-level rise due to climate change. Recent credible estimates suggest that approximately 10 to 20 percent of EPA's earlier maximum estimate is most reasonable

  10. The Influence of Climate Change Considerations on Energy Policy. The Case of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To those working on climate change it is obvious that energy policy should be influenced by climate change considerations. The question that this paper seeks to answer is, to what extent do they influence policy and what contribution can a careful analysis of the costs and benefits of climate change options have on the formulation of that policy. We seek to understand this by looking in some detail at energy policy formulation in Russia. To do so it is necessary to look at the whole set of issues that determine energy policy. These include energy security, macroeconomic and uncertainty factors, local environmental issues and social issues. The analysis has been carried out for a specific case - that of the RF, where energy policy is currently under formulation to 2010. Two options have been looked at: a 'High Coal' option, where there would be a substantial change in fuel mix away from gas to coal; and a 'High Gas' option where the current fuel mix is retained and the increase in demand is met from all sources in proportion to current use. The analysis shows that, at international prices for fuels, the 'High Coal' option is attractive. However, when we include the potential decline of price for natural gas in the European market, the relative preference for this option drops dramatically but it still remains the preferred option. When, account is also taken of the carbon benefits of the High Gas option, using plausible values for carbon, the attraction of the High Coal option is further reduced but not altered. When finally account is taken of the health associated with the lower use of coal in the High Gas option, the preference can be reversed but it requires a critical value for the health benefits. This critical value - at around USD 3,000 for a life year lost - is plausible for the RF, if anything the actual value is probably higher. What the analysis shows is the need for a careful evaluation of the different factors determining energy policy. Among these is

  11. Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program (IDCRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Our mission is to conduct infectious disease clinical research of importance to the military through a unique, adaptive, and collaborative network, to inform health...

  12. How does epistemological knowledge on modelling influence students' engagement in the issue of climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasquier, Giulia

    2016-05-01

    Involvement in climate change has been proven to be hindered by emotional and social barriers, as well as by conceptual difficulties that students may encounter in dealing with scientific content related to particular issues such as the greenhouse effect. In this study, we start from the conjecture that behind many conceptual difficulties and emotional barriers lie particular epistemological obstacles related to a naive and stereotypical view of science. These include, in particular, the belief that science still has the role and power to provide a unique, unquestionable, and certain explanation of events and processes. Such a naive idea clashes strongly with the intrinsic complexity of climate science. This paper sets out to investigate if and how the improvement of epistemological knowledge can influence behavioural habits and foster students' engagement in climate change. In order to explore such an issue, we focus on five interviews collected at the end of a teaching experience on climate change, carried out with secondary school students (grade 11; 16-year olds). This study is a follow-up of other two analytical studies aimed at investigating, respectively, the impact of the experience on students' epistemological knowledge and on their behavioural habits.

  13. Influence of climate change on the flowering of temperate fruit trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, D.; Ruiz-Ramos, M.; Sánchez-Sánchez, E.; Centeno, A.; Prieto-Egido, I.; Lopez-de-la-Franca, N.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that winter chilling is necessary for the flowering of temperate trees. The chilling requirement is a criterion for choosing a species or variety at a given location. Also chemistry products can be used for reducing the chilling-hours needs but make our production more expensive. This study first analysed the observed values of chilling hours for some representative agricultural locations in Spain for the last three decades and their projected changes under climate change scenarios. Usually the chilling is measured and calculated as chilling-hours, and different methods have been used to calculate them (e.g. Richarson et al., 1974 among others) according to the species considered. For our objective North Carolina method (Shaltout and Unrath, 1983) was applied for apples, Utah method (Richardson et al. 1974) for peach and grapevine and the approach used by De Melo-Abreu et al. (2004) for olive trees. The influence of climate change in temperate trees was studied by calculating projections of chilling-hours with climate data from Regional Climate Models (RCMs) at high resolution (25 km) from the European Project ENSEMBLES (http://www.ensembles-eu.org/). These projections will allow for analysing the modelled variations of chill-hours between 2nd half of 20C and 1st half of 21C at the study locations.

  14. Influence of climate change predictions on snow in Sierra Nevada Mountains (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Pérez-Palazón, María; Pimentel, Rafael; Herrero, Javier; María Perales, José; José Polo, María

    2015-04-01

    Snow is a basic component in Earth's surface energy balance. Its importance is greater in mountainous areas and therefore, its study is crucial to obtain conclusion about water resources over these areas. Moreover these regions are more vulnerable to climate variations. Sierra Nevada National Park (Southern Spain), with altitudes range from 2000 to 3500 m.a.s.l., is part of the global climate change observatories network and a clear example of snow regions in a semiarid environment. This work estimates the impact of climate change on snow dynamics and its influence on mountain hydrology in this area. Precipitation and temperature datasets from three different scenarios (A1B, A2, B1) proposed by the Fifth Assessment Report of IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) were used as forcing meteorological sequences to simulate selected snow variables (snow water equivalent, daily snow cover area, annual number of days with snow and annual snowmelt and evaporation volumes). The associated results were compared for each scenario, and the snow behavior and evolution over the 2046-2100 periods were assessed. The results point to a higher decrease on snow cover extension, than those estimated for other snow variables. As expected, this variation is greater from the worst of the scenarios analyzed (A2). Furthermore, the comparison of the driving meteorological datasets throughout the reference period (1960-2000) with the real observations has allowed the introduction of another term of uncertainty in the estimations, not considered in a simple scenario analysis.

  15. The influence of model structure on groundwater recharge rates in climate-change impact studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeck, Christian; Brunner, Philip; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Numerous modeling approaches are available to provide insight into the relationship between climate change and groundwater recharge. However, several aspects of how hydrological model choice and structure affect recharge predictions have not been fully explored, unlike the well-established variability of climate model chains—combination of global climate models (GCM) and regional climate models (RCM). Furthermore, the influence on predictions related to subsoil parameterization and the variability of observation data employed during calibration remain unclear. This paper compares and quantifies these different sources of uncertainty in a systematic way. The described numerical experiment is based on a heterogeneous two-dimensional reference model. Four simpler models were calibrated against the output of the reference model, and recharge predictions of both reference and simpler models were compared to evaluate the effect of model structure on climate-change impact studies. The results highlight that model simplification leads to different recharge rates under climate change, especially under extreme conditions, although the different models performed similarly under historical climate conditions. Extreme weather conditions lead to model bias in the predictions and therefore must be considered. Consequently, the chosen calibration strategy is important and, if possible, the calibration data set should include climatic extremes in order to minimise model bias introduced by the calibration. The results strongly suggest that ensembles of climate projections should be coupled with ensembles of hydrogeological models to produce credible predictions of future recharge and with the associated uncertainties.

  16. Evaluation of the influence of change in heart rate on left ventricular diastolic function indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess the influence of change in heart rate on left ventricular diastolic function indices, ECG gated cardiac pool study was performed in 6 patients with implanted programmable AAI pacemakers. Heart rate was changed by atrial pacing from 50 to 120 beats/min, every 10 beats/min. The filling fraction during first third of diastole (1/3FF), the peak filling rate (PFR), mean first third filling rate (1/3FR-mean) and early filling volume ratio (%EFV), being used as the indices of left ventricular diastolic performance, were assessed. In accordance with increase in heart rate, 1/3FF decreased significantly. PFR were fairly stable from 50 to 80 beats/min, but increased significantly from 90 to 120 beats/min. 1/3FR-mean and %EFV did not change significantly, but 1/3FR-mean showed decreasing tendency and %EFV showed increasing tendency as the heart rate was increased. %EFV was more changeable index than other indices among clinical cases. These results indicate that PFR and 1/3FR-mean were appropriate diastolic phase indices at rest. (author)

  17. Scaling the Problem: How Commercial Interests Have Influenced the U.S. Dialogue on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, G. T.; Rogerson, P.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, corporations and their affiliates have played an increasing role in the national conversation on climate change, with companies weighing in not only on policy debates but also participating in discussions around climate science. A few of these companies in particular have been tremendously influential in dictating how the public understands, or misunderstands, climate science and how the national discourse on climate policy has progressed, or not progressed. To better understand this corporate involvement, we explored the roles that major corporate actors have played during a key time period in 2009 and 2010 when several important climate change policy proposals were being actively debated in the United States. Analyzing multiple venues in which companies engaged in discussion of climate change with different audiences—including the government, shareholders, and the public—we assess the degree to which commercial interests have helped or hindered a science-based public discourse on climate policy in the past decade. Discussion will focus especially on corporations' use of third party organizations, including industry trade groups, think tanks, and others, to exert influence on climate-related policy without accountability.

  18. Network structure and influence of the climate change counter-movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Justin

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic climate change represents a global threat to human well-being and ecosystem functioning. Yet despite its importance for science and policy, our understanding of the causes of widespread uncertainty and doubt found among the general public remains limited. The political and social processes driving such doubt and uncertainty are difficult to rigorously analyse, and research has tended to focus on the individual-level, rather than the larger institutions and social networks that produce and disseminate contrarian information. This study presents a new approach by using network science to uncover the institutional and corporate structure of the climate change counter-movement, and machine-learning text analysis to show its influence in the news media and bureaucratic politics. The data include a new social network of all known organizations and individuals promoting contrarian viewpoints, as well as the entirety of all written and verbal texts about climate change from 1993-2013 from every organization, three major news outlets, all US presidents, and every occurrence on the floor of the US Congress. Using network and computational text analysis, I find that the organizational power within the contrarian network, and the magnitude of semantic similarity, are both predicted by ties to elite corporate benefactors.

  19. CT evaluation of sacroiliitis: Differentiation of infectious sacroiliitis versus ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ga Young; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Yoon, Yup; Lee, Sang Un [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    To determine the characteristic CT findings of infectious sacroiliitis and ankylosing spondylitis. We retrospectively reviewed CT findings in 10 patients with infectious sacroiliitis confirmed by culture and clinical follow ups and in 5 patients with ankylosing spondylitis by HLA-B27 typing. Mean age were 30 years in ankylosing spondylitis and 29 years in infectious sacroiliitis. CT scans were obtained with GE 9800 or Toshiba 900-S Scanner. We analyzed CT findings in regard to the morphology and degree of bone erosion, and the adjacent soft tissue change. All cases of ankylosing spondylitis had bilateral and asymmetric bone erosion, predominantly in ilium, showing subchondral sclerosis on ilium. Infectious sacroiliitis showed unilateral involvement and soft tissue swelling in 10 cases and abscess in 5 cases. We concluded that CT was useful in the differentiation between infectious sacroiliitis and ankylosing spondylitis.

  20. Investigating the Influence of Employee Attitude toward Change and Leadership Style on Change Readiness by SEM (Case Study: Isfahan Municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Faghihi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Change has become a normal occurrence within organizations and especially municipalities, due to the rapid society and economic changes. In a competitive global economy, organizations are forced to stay abreast with environmental changes in order to survive. Employee readiness for change can be a determining factor of successful change. To recognize antecedents of change readiness, the present study has conducted two variables of employee's attitude toward change as individual aspect and leadership style as organizational aspect of change readiness. The hypotheses have been tested by SEM on sample case of Isfahan municipality as a powerful organization which deals with change. The results have indicated that there are positive significant relationships between employee's attitude toward change and employee readiness and also change-oriented leadership style and employee readiness.

  1. Community reintegration of ex-prisoners: type and degree of change in variables influencing successful reintegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkfield, Alison J; Graffam, Joseph

    2009-02-01

    Community reintegration of ex-prisoners is an important issue in efforts to reduce recidivism. The present study examined the multiple, complex, and dynamic nature of variables influencing successful reintegration by assessing the type and degree of change in reintegration variables over time. Participants were 79 adult prisoners (54 male, 25 female) who completed a prerelease questionnaire 1 month before their release, which focused on prison-related variables, participant background, and anticipated conditions upon release. A postrelease questionnaire was administered to the same participants at 1-4 weeks and 3-4 months postrelease, focusing on the quality of life conditions experienced following release. Results indicate that current health ratings and several indicators of drug use were significantly different over the three measurement phases. Ratings of employment and housing stability, finance, and social support were unchanged over the postrelease period. Theoretical implications of the present investigation for reintegration theory are discussed, together with practical applications. PMID:18063748

  2. Computational procedure to analyse the parameters change influence on rotor speed estimation of the induction motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nica, E.; Brad, P.; Stoiciu, D.; Borza, I.; Dughir, C. [' Politehnica' University of Timisoara, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Timisoara (Romania)

    2000-08-01

    The main purpose of this paper, which considers the drive with squirrel-cage induction motor fed from a voltage source inverter, is to study by simulation, during the design process of the motor, the effect that changes of motor parameters produces on rotor speed estimation. The speed estimation method is developed from the space vector model of the induction motor and requires only the easily measurable stator voltage and current. All electrical parameters of the model can be accurately established with an original design program. The simulation result is similar to those obtained with a laboratory induction motor drive. Identifying, by simulation, the influence of the machine parameters on the speed estimator, it is possible, even at the design stage, to improve performance of the sensorless drive. (orig.)

  3. Influence of Migrant Workers Returning to Hometown on the Changes of Village Social Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wei; ZHANG Hong

    2012-01-01

    Based on field survey data of Village Z in Henan Province and from the perspective of the end of villages,we studied the influence of migrant workers returning to hometown on the changes of village social structure from village social interaction and village right reconstruction.Survey results show that social interaction centers of migrant workers returning to hometown for starting an undertaking move outside,which has exceeded the range of rural society of acquaintances and promoted the breaking of the traditional social relationship network " Differential Model of Association".In addition,migrant workers returning to hometown actively participate in building village rights and show more passionate political enthusiasm and practice of modern democratic concept.Furthermore,it not only speeds up disintegration of China’s small peasant economy and division of traditional farmers,but also is an important opportunity for realizing farmers’ self-ending and village ending,as well as urban and rural integration.

  4. Maternal weight change from prepregnancy to 7 years postpartum-the influence of behavioral factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Helene; Støvring, Henrik; Rasmussen, Kathleen M;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We studied the influence of maternal behavior on weight change from prepregnancy to 7 years postpartum. METHODS: We used linear regression to study the independent and combined associations between self-reported behavior in pregnancy (dietary intake, leisure-time exercise, sedentary...... activity, smoking) and postpartum (breastfeeding duration and smoking) on weights at 6 months, 18 months, and 7 years postpartum. RESULTS: Women's average 7-year weight gain was 2.07 kg, with 23% gaining >5 kg. Multivariable analyses suggested that women with healthier dietary intake, more leisure...... behaviors [mean gain 3.03 kg (95% CI: 2.68; 3.39)]. Women who ceased smoking had higher long-term weight gain than nonsmokers, but not smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to healthy behaviors during pregnancy lowered long-term weight gain considerably by lowering postpartum weight retention and subsequent...

  5. Structural changes in fine-grained high-temperature steels under the influence of temperature stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine-grained high-temperature steels have gained great importance as materials for reactor pressure vessels. Alloying with small additions of carbide-forming elements does not only preserve the fine grain but also helps to achieve a certain retention of hardness which improves the high-temperature strength of these steels. During welding, a narrow zone of the basic material is heated over the transition temperature. The result is a coarse-grained, austenitic structure. In order to find out whether such structural changes caused by welding may damage the material during heat treatment or operation, the mechanical properties of some types of structures were tested with regard to their strength, their notched bar impact strength, and their creep rupture strength, and the findings were interpreted with the aid of scans of the surfaces of fracture and electron microscope pictures of the microstructure. The results show that the toughness of the structure of a heat influence region of the steels investigated would decrease further at operating temperatures above 2000C and below the appropriate tempering temperature if the additional heat treatment in the tempering temperature region after welding were omitted. The toughness of the heat influence region is increased by annealing to such a degree that it almost reaches that of the basic material. (GSCH)

  6. Does the influence of risk factors on accident occurrence change over time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvik, Rune

    2016-06-01

    A large number of studies have been made to assess the relationship between risk factors and accident occurrence. A risk factor is any factor that makes an accident more likely to occur. Very many risk factors have been identified, for example, being under the influence of alcohol while driving, driving on slippery roads, entering complex junctions, or driving in hours of darkness. Few studies have been made to determine whether the associations between risk factors and accident occurrence remain stable over time. This paper presents examples of studies that have replicated estimates of risk. All these studies were made within a given country, using the same method, to ensure that estimates of risk are comparable. The risk factors included in the paper are: daylight, horizontal curves, junctions, road surface conditions, precipitation, drinking and driving and driver age. For all these risk factors, their association with accidents has changed over time, mostly becoming weaker. A protective factor, snow depth, is also included. Its protective effect has become smaller over time. Possible reasons for the weakening influence of risk factors are discussed. PMID:26974026

  7. Influence of stress path change on the resistance to plastic deformation of cold rolled sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zonghai Ding; Pavel Huml

    2005-01-01

    Flat workpieces have been tested in order to investigate the influence of stress path change (loading mode) while keeping strain path unchanged. These investigations are pertinent to the testing of cold rolled strips and to subsequent forming. The workpieces which first compressed by plane strain compression in thickness direction were then tested in perpendicular direction in order to measure the influence of strain and stress path. The tension workpieces came from flat die compression test at different deformation histories. Two different materials were investigated: 18/8 Ti stainless steel and AW-1050 aluminium. The results show that the plastic flow by tension in lengthwise direction after pre-strain by compression in thickness direction will begin at an appreciably lower stress than that of the workpieces unloaded after pre-compression. Comparing with two materials, it can be seen that both 18/8Ti stainless steel and AW-1050 aluminium behave similarly. The drop in yield stress is lower for AW-1050 aluminium than that for 18/8 Ti stainless steel. However, reloading in different directions than in the precious step results in significantly higher strain hardening.

  8. Host life history strategy, species diversity, and habitat influence Trypanosoma cruzi vector infection in Changing landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Gottdenker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anthropogenic land use may influence transmission of multi-host vector-borne pathogens by changing diversity, relative abundance, and community composition of reservoir hosts. These reservoir hosts may have varying competence for vector-borne pathogens depending on species-specific characteristics, such as life history strategy. The objective of this study is to evaluate how anthropogenic land use change influences blood meal species composition and the effects of changing blood meal species composition on the parasite infection rate of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius pallescens in Panama. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: R. pallescens vectors (N = 643 were collected in different habitat types across a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance. Blood meal species in DNA extracted from these vectors was identified in 243 (40.3% vectors by amplification and sequencing of a vertebrate-specific fragment of the 12SrRNA gene, and T. cruzi vector infection was determined by pcr. Vector infection rate was significantly greater in deforested habitats as compared to contiguous forests. Forty-two different species of blood meal were identified in R. pallescens, and species composition of blood meals varied across habitat types. Mammals (88.3% dominated R. pallescens blood meals. Xenarthrans (sloths and tamanduas were the most frequently identified species in blood meals across all habitat types. A regression tree analysis indicated that blood meal species diversity, host life history strategy (measured as r(max, the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase, and habitat type (forest fragments and peridomiciliary sites were important determinants of vector infection with T. cruzi. The mean intrinsic rate of increase and the skewness and variability of r(max were positively associated with higher vector infection rate at a site. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, anthropogenic landscape disturbance increased vector infection with T

  9. Global capacity for emerging infectious disease detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Emily H; Brewer, Timothy F; Madoff, Lawrence C; Pollack, Marjorie P; Sonricker, Amy L; Keller, Mikaela; Freifeld, Clark C; Blench, Michael; Mawudeku, Abla; Brownstein, John S

    2010-12-14

    The increasing number of emerging infectious disease events that have spread internationally, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the 2009 pandemic A/H1N1, highlight the need for improvements in global outbreak surveillance. It is expected that the proliferation of Internet-based reports has resulted in greater communication and improved surveillance and reporting frameworks, especially with the revision of the World Health Organization's (WHO) International Health Regulations (IHR 2005), which went into force in 2007. However, there has been no global quantitative assessment of whether and how outbreak detection and communication processes have actually changed over time. In this study, we analyzed the entire WHO public record of Disease Outbreak News reports from 1996 to 2009 to characterize spatial-temporal trends in the timeliness of outbreak discovery and public communication about the outbreak relative to the estimated outbreak start date. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses show that overall, the timeliness of outbreak discovery improved by 7.3% [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.073, 95% CI (1.038; 1.110)] per year, and public communication improved by 6.2% [HR = 1.062, 95% CI (1.028; 1.096)] per year. However, the degree of improvement varied by geographic region; the only WHO region with statistically significant (α = 0.05) improvement in outbreak discovery was the Western Pacific region [HR = 1.102 per year, 95% CI (1.008; 1.205)], whereas the Eastern Mediterranean [HR = 1.201 per year, 95% CI (1.066; 1.353)] and Western Pacific regions [HR = 1.119 per year, 95% CI (1.025; 1.221)] showed improvement in public communication. These findings provide quantitative historical assessment of timeliness in infectious disease detection and public reporting of outbreaks. PMID:21115835

  10. Analysis of structural changes influence on radiation crosslinking of unsaturated polyester resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. DC-electrical conductivity has shown high sensitivity toward structural changes, especially to some low intensity transitions such as liquid-liquid transitions that are difficult to observe. It also showed favorable properties for monitoring of crosslinking of unsaturated polyester resins. However, when the rates were calculated using commonly applied formula: klnσ=ln[(ln σt - ln σo)/(ln σ∞ - ln σo)] the sensitivity decreased. The extents of the reaction were shifted on time axis compared to non-logarithmic conductivity data and extraction analysis results. The logarithmic data had pronounced scattering at the end of the reaction so it was very difficult to determine end point of reaction and almost impossible to detect vitrification point. Some other features that can be seen on conductivity plot were lost. Therefore the results of DC-electrical conductivity monitoring of radiation and thermally initiated crosslinking of unsaturated polyester resins were interpreted in the same manner as the data collected by other non-electrical methods, using 'raw' data instead of its logarithmic form: kσ = ln [(σt - σo)/(σ∞ - σo)]. By this modification of data analysis the full sensitivity of electrical conductivity method to structural changes in reacting system was proven. Lower data scattering allowed observation of dose rate influences. The apparent rate constants calculated from conductivity itself showed the influence of upper liquid-liquid transition on the rate of radiation induced reaction that could not be seen if the logarithm of conductivity was used

  11. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-06-01

    Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

  12. Change of antibiotic susceptibility testing guidelines from CLSI to EUCAST: influence on cumulative hospital antibiograms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Wolfensberger

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We studied whether the change in antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST guidelines from CLSI to EUCAST influenced cumulative antibiograms in a tertiary care hospital in Switzerland. METHODS: Antibiotic susceptibilities of non-duplicate isolates collected within a one-year period before (period A and after (period B changing AST interpretation from CLSI 2009 to EUCAST 1.3 (2011 guidelines were analysed. In addition, period B isolates were reinterpreted according to the CLSI 2009, CLSI 2013 and EUCAST 3.1 (2013 guidelines. RESULTS: The majority of species/drug combinations showed no differences in susceptibility rates comparing periods A and B. However, in some gram-negative bacilli, decreased susceptibility rates were observed when comparing CLSI 2009 with EUCAST 1.3 within period B: Escherichia coli / cefepime, 95.8% (CLSI 2009 vs. 93.1% (EUCAST 1.3, P=0.005; Enterobacter cloacae / cefepime, 97.0 (CLSI 2009 vs. 90.5% (EUCAST 1.3, P=0.012; Pseudomonas aeruginosa / meropenem, 88.1% (CLSI 2009 vs. 78.3% (EUCAST 1.3, P=0.002. These differences were still evident when comparing susceptibility rates according to the CLSI 2013 guideline with EUCAST 3.1 guideline. For P. aeruginosa and imipenem, a trend towards a lower antibiotic susceptibility rate in ICUs compared to general wards turned into a significant difference after the change to EUCAST: 87.9% vs. 79.8%, P=0.08 (CLSI 2009 and 86.3% vs. 76.8%, P=0.048 (EUCAST 1.3. CONCLUSIONS: The change of AST guidelines from CLSI to EUCAST led to a clinically relevant decrease of susceptibility rates in cumulative antibiograms for defined species/drug combinations, particularly in those with considerable differences in clinical susceptibility breakpoints between the two guidelines.

  13. Alterations of hydraulic soil properties influenced by land-use changes and agricultural management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weninger, Thomas; Kreiselmeier, Janis; Chandrasekhar, Parvathy; Jülich, Stefan; Schwärzel, Kai; Schwen, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Estimation and modeling of soil water movement and the hydrologic balance of soils requires sound knowledge about hydraulic soil properties (HSP). The soil water characteristics, the hydraulic conductivity function and the pore size distribution (PSD) are commonly used instruments for the mathematical representation of HSP. Recent research highlighted the temporal variability of these functions caused by meteorological or land-use influences. State of the art modeling software for the continuous simulation of soil water movement uses a stationary approach for the HSP which means that their time dependent alterations and the subsequent effects on soil water balance is not considered. Mathematical approaches to describe the evolution of PSD are nevertheless known, but there is a lack of sound data basis for parameter estimation. Based on extensive field and laboratory measurements at 5 locations along a climatic gradient across Austria and Germany, this study will quantify short-term changes in HSP, detect driving forces and introduce a method to predict the effects of soil and land management actions on the soil water balance. Amongst several soil properties, field-saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities will be determined using a hood infiltration experiments in the field as well as by evaporation and dewpoint potentiometer method in the lab. All measurements will be carried out multiple times over a span of 2 years which will allow a detailed monitoring of changes in HSP. Experimental sites where we expect significant inter-seasonal changes will be equipped with sensors for soil moisture and matric potential. The choice of experimental field sites follows the intention to involve especially the effects of tillage operations, different cultivation strategies, microclimatically effective structures and land-use changes. The international project enables the coverage of a broad range of soil types as well as climate conditions and hence will have broad

  14. On study of global warming influence on natural resources and Kazakstan economy and adaption activity under possible climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of study of anthropogenic climate changes and its potential influence on economics and natural resources of Kazakhstan are generalized. Possible measures on adaptation and weakening of greenhouse effect impact in power engineering, agriculture and water recourses management are discussed. Further actions related with fulfillment of Republic of Kazakhstan obligations within Framework Convention of United Nations on Climate Change are proposed. (author)

  15. Predicting global variation in infectious disease severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Per M.; De Fine Licht, Henrik H.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Understanding the underlying causes for the variation in case-fatality-ratios (CFR) is important for assessing the mechanism governing global disparity in the burden of infectious diseases. Variation in CFR is likely to be driven by factors such as population genetics, demography, transmission patterns and general health status. We present data here that support the hypothsis that changes in CFRs for specific diseases may be the result of serial passage through different hosts. For example passage through adults may lead to lower CFR, whereas passage through children may have the opposite effect. Accordingly changes in CFR may occur in parallel with demographic transitions. Methodology: We explored the predictability of CFR using data obtained from the World Health Organization (WHO) disease databases for four human diseases: mumps, malaria, tuberculosis and leptospirosis and assessed these for association with a range of population characteristics, such as crude birth and death rates, median age of the population, mean body mass index, proportion living in urban areas and tuberculosis vaccine coverage. We then tested this predictive model on Danish historical demographic and population data. Results: Birth rates were the best predictor for mumps and malaria CFR. For tuberculosis CFR death rates were the best predictor and for leptospirosis population density was a significant predictor. Conclusions and implications: CFR predictors differed among diseases according to their biology. We suggest that the overall result reflects an interaction between the forces driving demographic change and the virulence of human-to-human transmitted diseases. PMID:26884415

  16. Influence of humic acid imposed changes of ferrihydrite aggregation on microbial Fe(III) reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstaetter, Katja; Borch, Thomas; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) minerals at neutral pH is faced by the problem of electron transfer from the cells to the solid-phase electron acceptor and is thought to require either direct cell-mineral contact, the presence of Fe(III)-chelators or the presence of electron shuttles, e.g. dissolved or solid-phase humic substances (HS). In this study we investigated to which extent the ratio of Pahokee Peat Humic Acids (HA) to ferrihydrite in the presence and absence of phosphate influences rates of Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the identity of the minerals formed. We found that phosphate generally decreased reduction rates by sorption to the ferrihydrite and surface site blocking. In the presence of low ferrihydrite concentrations (5 mM), the addition of HA helped to overcome this inhibiting effect by functioning as electron shuttle between cells and the ferrihydrite. In contrast, at high ferrihydrite concentrations (30 mM), the addition of HA did not lead to an increase but rather to a decrease in reduction rates. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images and ferrihydrite sedimentation behaviour suggest that the extent of ferrihydrite surface coating by HA influences the aggregation of the ferrihydrite particles and thereby their accessibility for Fe(III)-reducing bacteria. We further conclude that in presence of dissolved HA, iron reduction is stimulated through electron shuttling while in the presence of only sorbed HA, no stimulation by electron shuttling takes place. In presence of phosphate the stimulation effect did not occur until a minimum concentration of 10 mg/l of dissolved HA was reached followed by increasing Fe(III) reduction rates up to dissolved HA concentrations of approximately 240 mg/l above which the electron shuttling effect ceased. Not only Fe(III) reduction rates but also the mineral products changed in the presence of HA. Sequential extraction, XRD and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that crystallinity and grain

  17. Infectious diseases of Pacific salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1954-01-01

    Investigations on infectious diseases of Pacific salmon due to micro-organisms other than viruses are reviewed. The etiological agents include trematodes, fungi, protozoa and bacteria. Bacteria have been found to be the most important agents of disease in the several species of Pacific salmon. Kidney disease, due to a small, unnamed Gram-positive diplobacillus, causes serious mortalities in young salmon reared in hatcheries. The disease has also been found in wild fish. Aquatic myxobacteria are important agents of disease both in the hatchery and in the natural habitat. One of the myxobacteria, Chondrococcus columnaris, causes disease at relatively high water temperatures. The problem of the taxonomy of this organism is discussed. Another myxobacterium, Cytophaga psychrophila, has been found responsible for epizootics in coho salmon at lower water temperatures, i.e., in the range of 40° to 55° F. In outbreaks of gill disease in young salmon, myxobacteria of several kinds have been implicated.

  18. [Frequent infectious diseases in migrants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, A

    2016-05-01

    The current influx of refugees and the high rate of immigration increase the rate and impact of infectious diseases in Europe. Infections can be detected at the initial examination of arriving refugees as a result of systematic screening or within the framework of general medical care. Diagnosis and treatment require special expertise and in some cases special precautions. The spectrum of infections is determined by the country of origin of migrants and the conditions experienced on fleeing to Germany. In this article the diagnostics and treatment of the most important infections are presented. As far as infections are concerned refugees and migrants do not represent a threat to the general population but instead have to be perceived as a highly vulnerable group. PMID:27142435

  19. Identity, influence, and change: rediscovering John Turner's vision for social psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, S Alexander; Reicher, Stephen D; Reynolds, Katherine J

    2012-06-01

    John Turner, whose pioneering work on social identity and self-categorization theories changed the face of modern social psychology, died in July 2011. This unique virtual special issue celebrates Turner's life and work by reproducing a number of key articles that were published in the British Journal of Social Psychology and the European Journal of Social Psychology over the course of his career. These articles are of three types: first, key position papers, on which Turner was the leading or sole author; second, papers that he published with collaborators (typically PhD students) that explored key theoretical propositions; third, short commentary papers, in which Turner engaged in debate around key issues within social psychology. Together, these papers map out a clear and compelling vision. This seeks to explain the distinctly social nature of the human mind by showing how all important forms of social behaviour - and in particular, the propensity for social influence and social change -are grounded in the sense of social identity that people derive from their group memberships. As we discuss in this editorial, Turner's great contribution was to formalize this understanding in terms of testable hypotheses and generative theory and then to work intensively but imaginatively with others to take this vision forward. PMID:22390752

  20. Anthropogenic Influence on Multi-Decadal Changes in Hydrology of Western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, M. R.; Kumar, S.; Zwiers, F. W.; Gillett, N. P.; Schnorbus, M.; Cannon, A. J.; Shrestha, R.; Werner, A. T.

    2014-12-01

    In this study observed and simulated changes in the hydrology of four western Canadian watersheds are investigated for a possible anthropogenic influence. This analysis was performed over the period of 1950-2012 and for the Fraser, Peace, upper Columbia and Campbell River basins, which represent a range of distinct hydrologic characteristics. Four indicators are used to assess hydrologic change in this region, including minimum temperature, maximum snow water equivalent normalized by total annual runoff, total June-July-August (JJA) runoff normalized by mean annual precipitation, and river flow center of timing. The Coupled Model Intercomparison project Phase 5 (CMIP5) climate simulations are used to quantify climate internal variability as well as climatic responses to different forcing agents, including solar variation, volcanic eruptions, greenhouse gases, sulfate aerosols and other anthropogenic forcings. In order to estimate the hydrologic responses to these forcings the process based, semi-distributed Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model is calibrated based on observational records and then driven by downscaled CMIP5 data. Analysis of the trends of the hydro-climatic indicators showed that during recent decades, temperature has significantly increased in western Canada, while the normalized maximum SWE as well as normalized JJA runoff have significantly decreased, indicating a decreasing snow contribution to runoff and increasing evapotranspiration. River flow center of timing also shows a declining trend.

  1. Differentiating Climate Change and Emissions Influence on Future Ozone and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, J.; Kim, Y. M.; Gao, Y.; Fu, J. S.; Chang, H. H.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    From the advent of coal burning and the subsequent industrial revolution to the present, human activities continue to influence ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations. Besides the obvious environmental and climate implications, studies have shown convincing links between O3 exposure and health. These adverse health outcomes range from impaired lung function and cardiovascular stress to premature death. However, little is known concerning the potential impacts of future mitigation policies on O3 and health. Applying novel modeling strategies, we provide evidence of the impact of mitigation on O3 attributable to both climate change and anthropogenic emissions. We employ the latest emission scenarios for both low and high emissions (Representative Concentration Pathways or RCPs) and include population projections to estimate excess mortality associated with each source separate from one another. We found that, by the mid-21st century, U.S. O3 could increase by 0.9% per year under a low emission future and by 1.6% under high emission settings. We predict excess mortality from high emission-induced O3 to increase annually by over 1,200 deaths. Conversely, excess deaths from lower emissions may decrease by over 1,600 annually. Taken together, these results indicate that mitigation efforts may significantly offset the effect of climate change on O3-related mortality.

  2. INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELD ON ACCURACY OF ECM BY CHANGING THE CONDUCTIVITY OF ANODE FILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Zhijian; ZHANG Lixin; TANG lin

    2008-01-01

    The change of conductivity, thickness and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) appearance of the anode film of CrWMn in 10( NaNO3 at different anode potential either with or without the magnetic field applied are investigated by testing film resistance, galvanostatic transient and using SEM to design magnetic circuit in magnetic assisted electrochemical machining (MAECM). The experiments show that the anode film has semi-conducting property. Compared with the situation without magnetic field applied, the resistance of the film formed at 1.8V (anode potential) increased and decreased at 4.0V while B=0.4T and the magnetic north pole points toward anode. The SEM photo demonstrates that the magnetic field will densify the film in the passivation area and quicken dissolution of the anode metal in over-passivation area. Based on the influence of magnetic field on electrochemical machining(ECM) due to the changes of the anode film conductivity behavior, the magnetic north pole should be designed to point towards the workpiece surface that has been machined. Process experiments agree with the results of test analysis.

  3. Functional decline from age 80 to 85: influence of preceding changes in tiredness in daily activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Kirsten; Pedersen, Agnes N; Schroll, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    tiredness from age 75 to 80 were at significantly larger risk of functional decline and mortality from age 80 to 85. These results were not attenuated when adjusted by the covariates. CONCLUSION: The results in the present study indicate that it is important to take continuous complaints about tiredness in......OBJECTIVE: To analyze whether functional decline from age 80 to 85 is influenced by changes in self-reported tiredness in daily activities in the preceding 5-year period. METHOD: A prospective study of 226 75-year-old men and women with 5- and 10-year follow-up in the Western part of Copenhagen...... County. Tiredness in daily activities was measured at age 75 and 80 by a validated scale. Changes in tiredness from age 75 to 80: 1) Sustained no tiredness, 2) not tired-tired, 3) tired-not tired, 4) sustained tiredness. Functional decline from age 80 to 85:1) Sustained no need of help; 2) need of help...

  4. Functional decline from age 80 to 85: Influence of preceding changes in tiredness in daily activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, K.; Pedersen, Agnes Nadelmann; Schroll, M.

    2003-01-01

    tiredness from age 75 to 80 were at significantly larger risk of functional decline and mortality from age 80 to 85. These results were not attenuated when adjusted by the covariates. Conclusion: The results in the present study indicate that it is important to take continuous complaints about tiredness in......Objective: To analyze whether functional decline from age 80 to 85 is influenced by changes in self-reported tiredness in daily activities in the preceding 5-year period. Method: A prospective study of 226 75-year-old men and women with 5- and 10-year follow-up in the Western part of Copenhagen...... County. Tiredness in daily activities was measured at age 75 and 80 by a validated scale. Changes in tiredness from age 75 to 80: 1) Sustained no tiredness, 2) not tired-tired, 3) tired-not tired, 4) sustained tiredness. Functional decline from age 80 to 85:1) Sustained no need of help; 2) need of help...

  5. Soil Phosphorus Dynamics as Influenced by Land Use Changes in Humid Tropical, Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jing-Cheng; HUANG Jian-Hui; PAN Qing-Min; TANG Jian-Wei; HAN Xing-Guo

    2005-01-01

    Land use changes can greatly influence soil phosphorus (P) dynamics, especially when converting native forests to agricultural land. Soils in Xishuangbanna, which is one of southwest China's tropical areas that maintain fragments of primary forests, were studied to a) evaluate the effect of two common land use changes, conversion of forests to agricultural land or rubber tree plantation, on the dynamics of available P and total P in bulk soils as well as total P in particle size fractions; b) assess the relationship between soil P dynamics and soil organic carbon (SOC); and c)elucidate the relationship between soil P content and soil properties such as pH and texture. Clearing secondary forests with subsequent shifting cultivation and establishment of rubber tree plantation caused significant decreases (P < 0.05)in available P at 0-20 cm soil depths, whereas for total P there was a significant decrease (P < 0.05) when converting to shifting cultivation, rubber tree plantation, or fallow field at both 0-20 and 20-40 cm depths. Abandonment of fields used for shifting cultivation led to significant increases (P < 0.05) in available P at 20-40 cm depth. In addition, there was a significant positive relationship between soil organic carbon and soil P content. Compared to secondary forests, the ratio of organic carbon to total P in surface soils (0-20 cm) of shifting cultivation and rubber tree plantation was significantly lower (P < 0.05).

  6. Changing Livelihoods and Landscapes in the Rural Eastern Cape, South Africa: Past Influences and Future Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheona Shackleton

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to understand the drivers and pathways of local livelihood change and the prospects for transformation towards a more sustainable future. Data are used from several studies, and a participatory social learning process, which formed part of a larger project in two sites in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Secondary information from a wealth of related work is used to place our results within the historic context and more general trends in the country. Findings indicate that livelihoods in the rural Eastern Cape are on new trajectories. Agricultural production has declined markedly, at a time when the need for diversification of livelihoods and food security seems to be at a premium. This decline is driven by a suite of drivers that interact with, and are influenced by, other changes and stresses affecting local livelihoods. We distil out the factors, ranging from historical processes to national policies and local dynamics, that hamper peoples’ motivation and ability to respond to locally identified vulnerabilities and, which, when taken together, could drive households into a trap. We end by considering the transformations required to help local people evade traps and progress towards a more promising future in a context of increasing uncertainty.

  7. Changes in ganglion cell physiology during retinal degeneration influence excitability by prosthetic electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Alice; Ratliff, Charles; Sampath, Alapakkam; Weiland, James

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Here we investigate ganglion cell physiology in healthy and degenerating retina to test its influence on threshold to electrical stimulation. Approach. Age-related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa cause blindness via outer retinal degeneration. Inner retinal pathways that transmit visual information to the central brain remain intact, so direct electrical stimulation from prosthetic devices offers the possibility for visual restoration. Since inner retinal physiology changes during degeneration, we characterize physiological properties and responses to electrical stimulation in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of both wild type mice and the rd10 mouse model of retinal degeneration. Main results. Our aggregate results support previous observations that elevated thresholds characterize diseased retinas. However, a physiology-driven classification scheme reveals distinct sub-populations of ganglion cells with thresholds either normal or strongly elevated compared to wild-type. When these populations are combined, only a weakly elevated threshold with large variance is observed. The cells with normal threshold are more depolarized at rest and exhibit periodic oscillations. Significance. During degeneration, physiological changes in RGCs affect the threshold stimulation currents required to evoke action potentials.

  8. Discrete stochastic metapopulation model with arbitrarily distributed infectious period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Ceron, Nancy; Chavez-Casillas, Jonathan A; Feng, Zhilan

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a stochastic discrete-time model is developed to study the spread of an infectious disease in an n-patch environment. The model includes an arbitrary distribution of the (random) infectious period T, and the results are used to investigate how the distribution of T may influence the model outcomes. General results are applied to specific distributions including Geometric, Negative Binomial, Poisson and Uniform. The model outcomes are contrasted both numerically and analytically by comparing the corresponding basic reproduction numbers R0 and probability of a minor epidemic (or probability of disease extinction) P0. It is shown analytically that for n = 2 the reproduction numbers corresponding to different distributions of T can be ordered based on the probability generating function ϕT of T. In addition, numerical simulations are carried out to examine the final epidemic size F and duration of the epidemic D of a two-patch model. PMID:25550286

  9. Emerging Infectious Disease Journal Cover Art

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-04

    Polyxeni Potter discusses the art used on the covers of the Emerging Infectious Diseases journal.  Created: 4/4/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/5/2012.

  10. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking an infectious process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. PMID:25024856

  11. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG, which involved the patient’s arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  12. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    OpenAIRE

    Derek To; Aaron Wong; Valentina Montessori

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  13. Microbiological and therapeutic challenges in infectious spondylodiscitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Theis; Roed-Petersen, Casper; Dragsted, Casper;

    2013-01-01

    The microbiological diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis is often difficult to establish and the disease requires prolonged antibiotic treatment. We analyzed the medical records of 100 patients admitted for infectious spondylodiscitis from 2006 to 2011 with an emphasis on (1) the diagnostic...

  14. 25 CFR 140.26 - Infectious plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infectious plants. 140.26 Section 140.26 Indians BUREAU... Infectious plants. Traders shall not introduce into, sell, or spread within Indian reservations any plant, plant product, seed, or any type of vegetation, which is infested, or infected or which might act as...

  15. Socio-economic factors influencing climate change adaptation among crop farmers in Umuahia South Area of Abia State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    N. O. Anyoha; F. N. Nnadi; J. Chikaire; J. A. Echetama; C. O. Utazi; R. A. Ihenacho

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the socioeconomic factors influencing climate change adaptation among crop farmers in Umuahia South Area of Abia State, Nigeria. The specific objectives of the study were to determine socioeconomic characteristics of crop farmers in the area, determine farmers level of awareness of climate change in the area, ascertain effects of climate change in crop production, identify adaptation strategies adopted by the farmers in the area and determine socioeconomi...

  16. Stability and Change in Genetic and Environmental Influences on Well-Being in Response to an Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Nelson, S. Katherine; Layous, Kristin; Carter, Kathryn; Jacobs Bao, Katherine; Lyubomirsky, Sonja; Plomin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and environmental influences on complex traits can change in response to developmental and environmental contexts. Here we explore the impact of a positive activity intervention on the genetic and environmental influences on well-being and mental health in a sample of 750 adolescent twins. Twins completed a 10-week online well-being intervention, consisting of kindness and gratitude tasks and matched control activities. The results showed significant improvements both in well-being and in internalizing symptoms in response to the intervention activities. We used multivariate twin analyses of repeated measures, tracking stability and change in genetic and environmental influences, to assess the impact of this environmental intervention on these variance components. The heritability of well-being remained high both before and after the intervention, and the same genetic effects were important at each stage, even as well-being increased. The overall magnitude of environmental influences was also stable across the intervention; however, different non-shared environmental influences emerged during the intervention. Our study highlights the value of exploring the innovations in non-shared environmental influences that could provide clues to the mechanisms behind improvements in well-being. The findings also emphasize that even traits strongly influenced by genetics, like well-being, are subject to change in response to environmental interventions. PMID:27227410

  17. Stability and Change in Genetic and Environmental Influences on Well-Being in Response to an Intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M A Haworth

    Full Text Available Genetic and environmental influences on complex traits can change in response to developmental and environmental contexts. Here we explore the impact of a positive activity intervention on the genetic and environmental influences on well-being and mental health in a sample of 750 adolescent twins. Twins completed a 10-week online well-being intervention, consisting of kindness and gratitude tasks and matched control activities. The results showed significant improvements both in well-being and in internalizing symptoms in response to the intervention activities. We used multivariate twin analyses of repeated measures, tracking stability and change in genetic and environmental influences, to assess the impact of this environmental intervention on these variance components. The heritability of well-being remained high both before and after the intervention, and the same genetic effects were important at each stage, even as well-being increased. The overall magnitude of environmental influences was also stable across the intervention; however, different non-shared environmental influences emerged during the intervention. Our study highlights the value of exploring the innovations in non-shared environmental influences that could provide clues to the mechanisms behind improvements in well-being. The findings also emphasize that even traits strongly influenced by genetics, like well-being, are subject to change in response to environmental interventions.

  18. Ontogeny influences sensitivity to climate change stressors in an endangered fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoroske, L M; Connon, R E; Lindberg, J; Cheng, B S; Castillo, G; Hasenbein, M; Fangue, N A

    2014-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are among the most human-impacted habitats globally, and their management is often critically linked to recovery of declining native species. In the San Francisco Estuary, the Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) is an endemic, endangered fish strongly tied to Californian conservation planning. The complex life history of Delta Smelt combined with dynamic seasonal and spatial abiotic conditions result in dissimilar environments experienced among ontogenetic stages, which may yield stage-specific susceptibility to abiotic stressors. Climate change is forecasted to increase San Francisco Estuary water temperature and salinity; therefore, understanding the influences of ontogeny and phenotypic plasticity on tolerance to these critical environmental parameters is particularly important for Delta Smelt and other San Francisco Estuary fishes. We assessed thermal and salinity limits in several ontogenetic stages and acclimation states of Delta Smelt, and paired these data with environmental data to evaluate sensitivity to climate-change stressors. Thermal tolerance decreased among successive stages, with larval fish exhibiting the highest tolerance and post-spawning adults having the lowest. Delta Smelt had limited capacity to increase tolerance through thermal acclimation, and comparisons with field temperature data revealed that juvenile tolerance limits are the closest to current environmental conditions, which may make this stage especially susceptible to future climate warming. Maximal water temperatures observed in situ exceeded tolerance limits of juveniles and adults. Although these temperature events are currently rare, if they increase in frequency as predicted, it could result in habitat loss at these locations despite other favourable conditions for Delta Smelt. In contrast, Delta Smelt tolerated salinities spanning the range of expected environmental conditions for each ontogenetic stage, but salinity did impact survival in juvenile and

  19. Investigation of fuel lattice pitch changes influence on reactor performance through evaluate the neutronic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • One of the most complex issues that Nu-engineers deal with is the design of NR core. • Numerous factors in nuclear core design depend on Fuel-to-Moderator volume ratio. • Aim of this research is to investigate RX performance for different lattice pitches. - Abstract: Nuclear reactor core design is one of the most complex issues that nuclear engineers deal with. The number and complexity of effective parameters and their impact on reactor design, which makes the problem difficult to solve, require precise knowledge of these parameters and their influence on the reactor operation. Numerous factors in a nuclear reactor core design depend on the Fuel-to-Moderator volume ratio, VF/VM, in a fuel cell. This ratio can be modified by changing the lattice pitch which is the thickness of water channels between fuels plates while keeping fuel slab dimensions fixed. Cooling and moderating properties of water are affected by such a change in a reactor core, and hence some parameters related to these properties might be changed. The aim of this research is to provide the suitable knowledge for nuclear core designing. To reach this goal, the first operating core of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) with different lattice pitches is simulated, and the effect of different lattice pitches on some parameters such as effective multiplication factor (Keff), reactor life time, distribution of neutron flux and power density in the core, as well as moderator temperature and density coefficient of reactivity are evaluated. The nuclear reactor analysis code, MTR-PC package is employed to carry out the considered calculation. Finally, the results are presented in some tables and graphs that provide useful information for nuclear engineers in the nuclear reactor core design

  20. Influence of Changing Rainfall Patterns on the Yield of Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) and Selection of Genotypes in Known Drought-tolerant Fruit Species for Climate Change Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Pablito M. Magdalita; Ronaldo B. Saludes

    2015-01-01

    In fruit crop production, rainfall, water stress, temperature, and wind are key variables for success, and the present changes in rainfall patterns could affect the flowering and yield of the rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L). Other fruit species like macopa (Syzygium samarangense), siniguelas (Spondias purpurea), and native santol or cotton fruit (Sandoricum koetjape) remain productive despite extreme climatic changes. This study assessed the influence of rainfall on rambutan yield and evalua...

  1. Generation of an infectious clone of VR-2332, a highly virulent North American type isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H.S.; Liu, G.; Nielsen, Jens; Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Bøtner, Anette; Storgaard, T.; Faaberg, K.S.

    2003-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone of the prototypical North American porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolate VR-2332 was assembled in the plasmid vector pOK(12). To rescue infectious virus, capped RNA was transcribed in vitro from the pOK(12) clone and transfected into BHK-21C...... cells. The supernatant from transfected monolayers were serially passaged on Marc-145 cells and porcine pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Infectious PRRSV was recovered on Marc-145 cells as well as porcine pulmonary macrophages; thus, the cloned virus exhibited the same cell tropism as the parental VR...... transcribed RNA had an extra G at the 5' end. To examine whether these changes influenced viral replication, we examined the growth kinetics of the cloned virus in vitro. In Marc-145 cells, the growth kinetics of the cloned virus reflected those of the parental isolate, even though the titers of the cloned...

  2. Shoreline sandwaves along the Aquitanian Coast (France): influence of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idier, D.; Falquès, A.; Mallet, C.; Castelle, B.; Parisot, J. P.; Le Cozannet, G.; Delvallée, E.

    2009-04-01

    1. CONTEXT Climate change induced vulnerability is defined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as the combination of sensitivity to climatic variations, probability of adverse climate change, and adaptive capacity. As stated by the IPCC (Watson et al., 1997), the "coastal systems should be considered vulnerable to changes in climate". Within the French ANR VULSACO project (VULnerability of SAndy COast to climate change and anthropic pressure), the present day erosion tendencies as well as the potentially future erosion trends are investigated. In the present work, shoreline sandwaves are considered. These morphologic features are shoreline undulations with typical wavelengths of several kilometers (Ashton et al., 2001). They generally appear under high angle incidence waves (Ashton et al, 2001; Falques and Calvete, 2005). These types of rhythmic feature is found for instance along most of the Dutch coast (Falques, 2006). The French Aquitanian Coast is mainly composed of sandy beaches, along more than 230 km. This area is characterized meso-macrotidal semi-diurnal tides and exposed to energetic waves (Hsmean~1.5 m). Furthermore, this area is characterised by the presence of an outer crescentic bar and an inner bar exhibiting rather regularly spaced rip channel with a mean wavelength of 700 m and 400 m, respectively. These nearshore rhythmic patterns are likely to be mirrored at the shoreline. Here we present the shoreline stability of the French Aquitanian coast under present day wave climate. In addition, the influence of a change in the wave regime under climate change on the shoreline undulations is investigated. 2. DATA ANLYSIS The presence of shoreline sandwaves on the Aquitanian coast has never been investigated so far. Several sets of shoreline data have been used. One set was based on vegetation limits detected by remote sensing (data from OCA Aquitaine Coast Observatory , covering several decades). The other one was based on Digital

  3. The Influence of Global Climate Changes on Storm-Tracks of Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynova, Y.; Krupchatnikov, V. N.

    2012-12-01

    Non-stationary eddies in mid-latitude storm-tracks are an important mechanism of energy, moment and moisture transfer in climate system [1]. Baroclinic eddies bring heavy rains and other hazard weather phenomena in the middle latitudes, play an important role in the global energy and the hydrological cycle. Recently, the increase of a cyclones rate at high latitudes with their frequency decrease in the second half of the 20th century was discovered using reanalysis data [2,3]. However, there is still no common point of view about how storm-track's distribution and intensity will be changed under the climate change influence [4,5]. In our work we investigate a variation of transient eddies general propagation tracks as a result of the global climate change effect. Using global large-scale intermediate complexity model of climate system [6] the numerical experiment was provided for the time period from 850 to 3000 year with a scenario of greenhouse gases influence on climate. From 850 to 2005 this impact was set according to the protocol "Historical simulations" of CMIP5 [7]. For 21th century anthropogenic effects were set according to the most aggressive scenario RCP 8.5 [8]. For the period 22-23 centuries CO2 concentration was on the level of 2100 year, and for 24-30 centuries it returned to pre-industrial value linearly in time of 100 years. Using a filter [9] we defined three variation intervals: low-frequency, medium-frequency and high-frequency. In our work we paid attention to medium-scale waves (i.e. 2-8 days). Two seasons were chosen: winter and summer. For each season we considered average fields of parameters characterizing poleward heat flux at 700 mb and transient eddies variance at 250 mb. Besides of the sensitivity of storm-track dynamic we considered some other features of "warm" climate. The work is partially supported by The Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation #(#07.514.11.4044), RFBR grants #10-07-00547, #11-05-01190, and SB

  4. Molecular epidemiology of infectious laryngotracheitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Kimberly R; García, Maricarmen; Spatz, Stephen; Tablante, Nathaniel L

    2014-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an economically important respiratory disease of poultry that affects the poultry industry worldwide. The disease is caused by gallid herpesvirus I (GaHV-1), a member of the genus Iltovirus, family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae. The current incidence of the disease is heavily influenced by live attenuated vaccines, which have been used extensively since their introduction in the mid-twentieth century. The capability of current live attenuated vaccine viruses to revert to virulence and spread from bird to bird has shaped the molecular epidemiology of ILT. Because of the antigenic homogeneity among GaHV-1 strains, differentiation of strains has been achieved by targeting genomic differences between outbreak-related isolates and vaccine strains. Numerous genes and genomic regions have been utilized in the development of DNA-based diagnostic assays to differentiate outbreak-related isolates from vaccine strains in countries where ILT outbreaks have occurred. More recently, full genome sequences have allowed determination of the origin of some of the outbreak-related isolates circulating in some poultry production countries. Overall, molecular typing data collected worldwide have identified live attenuated vaccine-related isolates as the primary source for outbreaks of the disease. PMID:24460399

  5. Time series regression model for infectious disease and weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Chisato; Armstrong, Ben; Chalabi, Zaid; Mangtani, Punam; Hashizume, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    Time series regression has been developed and long used to evaluate the short-term associations of air pollution and weather with mortality or morbidity of non-infectious diseases. The application of the regression approaches from this tradition to infectious diseases, however, is less well explored and raises some new issues. We discuss and present potential solutions for five issues often arising in such analyses: changes in immune population, strong autocorrelations, a wide range of plausible lag structures and association patterns, seasonality adjustments, and large overdispersion. The potential approaches are illustrated with datasets of cholera cases and rainfall from Bangladesh and influenza and temperature in Tokyo. Though this article focuses on the application of the traditional time series regression to infectious diseases and weather factors, we also briefly introduce alternative approaches, including mathematical modeling, wavelet analysis, and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models. Modifications proposed to standard time series regression practice include using sums of past cases as proxies for the immune population, and using the logarithm of lagged disease counts to control autocorrelation due to true contagion, both of which are motivated from "susceptible-infectious-recovered" (SIR) models. The complexity of lag structures and association patterns can often be informed by biological mechanisms and explored by using distributed lag non-linear models. For overdispersed models, alternative distribution models such as quasi-Poisson and negative binomial should be considered. Time series regression can be used to investigate dependence of infectious diseases on weather, but may need modifying to allow for features specific to this context. PMID:26188633

  6. Fiber Bragg gratings in the radiation environment: Change under the influence of radiolytic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The change of the transmission spectra of fiber Bragg gratings written in the optical fibers, whose silica cores are doped with either germanium or nitrogen, is studied experimentally under the influence of gamma-radiation. The transmission spectra in the neighborhood of the resonance (Bragg) wavelengths were regularly recorded “in-situ” in the course of irradiation during 24 days. For this purpose, uncoated gratings were placed in a pool near the spent fuel rods of a nuclear reactor. The fibers with the gratings written in them were in immediate contact with water. The estimated total absorbed radiation dose of the fibers is approximately 5 MGy. Molecular hydrogen, which is produced by radiolysis of water and penetrates into the core of silica fiber, is found to interact with the defects of Ge-doped silica induced by gamma-radiation, thereby causing a strong impact on the parameters of the spectrum of the Bragg gratings. On the contrary, in the case of gratings inscribed in N-doped silica fibers, the hydrogen molecules interact with defects induced in the course of laser UV exposure during the grating writing only. The possible subsequent formation of additional defects in N-doped silica under the influence of gamma-radiation has no substantial impact on the transmission spectra of Bragg gratings, which remained stable. The obtained results suggest that a small amount of molecular hydrogen resided in the fiber core is the main source of radiation instability of Ge-doped fiber Bragg grating sensors in radiation environments. These hydrogen molecules can remain in the Bragg gratings, in particular, after the inscription process in the hydrogen-loaded fibers

  7. [Influence of Marine Aquaculture Around Coal Power Plant on Mercury Species Change in Auuatic Ecological Environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Peng; Wang, Yuan-na; You, Qiong-zhi; Gao, Xue-fei; He, Shan-shan

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the influence of marine aquaculture around coal power plant on Hg species change in aquatic ecological environment, the fish farming area in Xiangshan Harbor, Zhejiang province, was studied. The concentrations of different Hg species in sea water collected from marine aquaculture sites (MS) and references sites (RS) were measured. The result showed that the total mercury (THg) concentration in the surface water reached 83.0 pmol x L(-1) +/- 97.1 pmol x L(-1). Dissolved Hg (DHg) in pore water of core sediment decreased with the increasing depth. Meanwhile, the DHg content in pore water above 10 cm was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than that below 10 cm, which confirmed the influence of coal-fired power plants on the surrounding areas. THg concentration in MS (96.5 pmol x L(-1) +/- 133 pmol x L(-1)) was higher than that in RS (69.5 pmol x L(-1) +/- 39.4 pmol x L(-1)), which was mainly resulted from the accumulation of sewage discharge by the employees and fish feed material in sediments during breeding that were further released to the overlying water. Methylmercury concentration in pore water of MS (24.0 pmol x L(-1) +/- 16.7 pmol x L(-1)) was also significantly higher than that in RS (6.60 pmol x L(-1) +/- 5.11 pmol x L(-1)), which demonstrated that marine aquaculture activities promoted the methylmercury production by increasing the accumulation of organic matter in sediment. PMID:26592015

  8. How do changes in dissolved oxygen concentration influence microbially-controlled phosphorus cycling in stream biofilms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saia, S. M.; Locke, N. A.; Regan, J. M.; Carrick, H. J.; Buda, A. R.; Walter, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Advances in molecular microbiology techniques (e.g. epi-fluorescent microscopy and PCR) are making it easier to study the influence of specific microorganisms on nutrient transport. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) are commonly used in wastewater treatment plants to remove excess phosphorus (P) from effluent water. PAOs have also been identified in natural settings but their ecological function is not well known. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that PAOs in natural environments would release and accumulate P during anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. We placed stream biofilms in sealed, covered tubs and subjected them to alternating air (aerobic conditions) and N2 gas (anaerobic condition) bubbling for 12 hours each. Four treatments investigated the influence of changing dissolved oxygen on micribially-controlled P cycling: (1) biofilms bubbled continuously with air, (2) biofilms bubbled alternatively with air and N2, (3) biocide treated biofilms bubbled continuously with air, and (4) biocide treated biofilms bubbled alternatively with air and N2. Treatments 3 and 4 serve as abiotic controls to treatments 1 and 2. We analyzed samples every 12 hours for soluble reactive P (SRP), temperature, dissolved oxygen, and pH. We also used fluorescent microscopy (i.e. DAPI staining) and PCR to verify the presence of PAOs in the stream biofilms. SRP results over the course of the experiment support our hypothesis that anaerobic and aerobic stream conditions may impact PAO mediated P release and uptake, respectively in natural environments. The results of these experiments draw attention to the importance of microbiological controls on P mobility in freshwater ecosystems.

  9. Fiber Bragg gratings in the radiation environment: Change under the influence of radiolytic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butov, Oleg V., E-mail: obutov@mail.ru; Golant, Konstantin M. [Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio-Engineering and Electronics of RAS, 11-7 Mokhovaya Str., Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation); Shevtsov, Igor' A.; Fedorov, Artem N. [Prolog LLC, PO Box 3007, Obninsk, the Kaluga Region 249033 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-21

    The change of the transmission spectra of fiber Bragg gratings written in the optical fibers, whose silica cores are doped with either germanium or nitrogen, is studied experimentally under the influence of gamma-radiation. The transmission spectra in the neighborhood of the resonance (Bragg) wavelengths were regularly recorded “in-situ” in the course of irradiation during 24 days. For this purpose, uncoated gratings were placed in a pool near the spent fuel rods of a nuclear reactor. The fibers with the gratings written in them were in immediate contact with water. The estimated total absorbed radiation dose of the fibers is approximately 5 MGy. Molecular hydrogen, which is produced by radiolysis of water and penetrates into the core of silica fiber, is found to interact with the defects of Ge-doped silica induced by gamma-radiation, thereby causing a strong impact on the parameters of the spectrum of the Bragg gratings. On the contrary, in the case of gratings inscribed in N-doped silica fibers, the hydrogen molecules interact with defects induced in the course of laser UV exposure during the grating writing only. The possible subsequent formation of additional defects in N-doped silica under the influence of gamma-radiation has no substantial impact on the transmission spectra of Bragg gratings, which remained stable. The obtained results suggest that a small amount of molecular hydrogen resided in the fiber core is the main source of radiation instability of Ge-doped fiber Bragg grating sensors in radiation environments. These hydrogen molecules can remain in the Bragg gratings, in particular, after the inscription process in the hydrogen-loaded fibers.

  10. Does the location of a company’s global headquarters have an influence on its climate change awareness?

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Zao

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies whether the location of a company’s global headquarters has an influence on its climate change awareness. The global headquarters hosting business elites from multinational companies are the surrogate indicators of the opinion leaders in the business world. At different locations, these opinion leaders receive different information from their interaction with their surroundings. The political influence, the market pressure, and the peer pressure a company receives are compa...

  11. The influence of water and glycerol addition on thermal processing, rheology and microstructure changes of potato starch

    OpenAIRE

    Wójtowicz, A.; Goot, van der, L.R.T.

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper the influence of glycerol and water addition to potato starch during thermo-mechanical treatment was observed. The shearing-heating treatment was realised on the new designed equipment ¿ Shear Cell ¿ based on the cone and plate rheometer device. The measurement of rheological changes during processing showed that water and glycerol addition lowered the shear stress and the shear rate values. Also the influence on intrinsic viscosity was observed: higher level of water and...

  12. 76 FR 27070 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis Panel,...

  13. Influence of hydrothermal processes on changes of volcanic rocks (data of physical modelling)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanina, V. V.; Bychkov, A. Y.

    2009-04-01

    Due to active development of geothermal energy, in middle of the last century have begun papers devoted to experiments, directed on study of transformations of minerals [4] and rocks [1, 2, 5] under action of geothermal processes. But any researcher did not estimate thus change of their physical and physico-mechanical properties. The purpose of job - to study character and dynamics changes of volcanic rocks (to simulate conditions of geothermal transformations). Tasks: creation of the whole series of experiments in autoclavs at various temperatures, pressure and composition of solutions, preparation of samples, study of chemical and mineral composition, structure and properties of rocks and solutions before and after experiments. In 2006 the first similar experiments were begun [3]. Researched rocks basalts, hyaloclasites and obsidian, selected from Iceland and tuffs Payzhetka Geothermal Field, Southern Kamchatka, Russia. Were used autoclavs, consisting from titanic of an alloy ВТ-8, volume 116-119 мл, in each of which was located from 2 up to 4 samples of rocks of the investigated structure and properties. The heating was made in OVEN ТРМ-10 with accuracy + 1 °С, the constancy of temperature was supervised by thermocouples. 15 experiences (temperature 200, 300 and 450 °С; pressure 16, 86 and 1000 bars accordingly now are carried out; 4 solutions (1 alkaline and 3 acid); duration 14, 15, 30 and 60 days). All four groups of the investigated rocks appreciablly react under geothermal influence. The changes are observed in colour of samples (brighten in acid solutions), their microstructure, that for basalts is visible only in raster electronic microscope, and in education of new mineral phases, is especially active in a acid solution, the X-Ray analysis (has executed by Dr. Krupskaya V.V., apparatuses - DRON- UM1) has shown, that 94,2 % is smectite, 3,5 % - kaolinite, 1,2 % - crisrobalite, 1,1 % - diopside (?), in others pores fills chlorite, and in an

  14. The influence of global sea level changes on European shale distribution and gas exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, P.; Cornelius, C.T.; Clarke, H. [Cuadrilla Resources Ltd., Staffordshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Technological advances in directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing technology have unlocked new supplies of shale gas from reservoirs that were previously considered to be uneconomic. Several companies, both experienced majors and small independents, are currently evaluating the unconventional resource potential of mainland Europe. This paper demonstrated that global sea level changes govern the distribution of marine black shales. The Hallam Curve was used in this study to identify periods of prospective gas shale deposition. In general, these correspond to post-glacial periods of relatively high sea level. Under-filled marginal sedimentary basins are key exploration targets. The geochemical and petrophysical characteristics of the shales deposited under these conditions are often comparable to North American shales, particularly the Barnett Shale which is currently in production. Many orogenic events influence European shales in terms of organic maturity, hydrocarbon generation and fracture generation. The main prospective horizons in ascending stratigraphic sequence are the Alum Shale, Llandovery Shale, Fammenian/Frasnian Shale, Serpukhovian Shale, Toarcian Shale, Kimmeridge Clay and the Tertiary Eocene and Oligocene shales common to central Europe. This paper presented the authors initial exploration strategy, with particular focus on the Lower Palaeozoic of central Europe, the Namurian of northwest England and the Jurassic Posidonia Formation of the Roer Valley Graben in Holland. The potential obstacles to unconventional exploration in Europe include restricted access to surface locations, high water usage, a lack of convenient pipeline infrastructure, strict environmental regulations, a high population density and lack of suitable drilling rigs and well completion equipment. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Influence of Procyanidin Contained Foods on Changes of Antioxidant Indexes and Endogenous Substances of Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Jiang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the influence of procyanidin contained foods on changes of antioxidant indexes and endogenous substances of athletes, this study selected 16 athletes and divides them into the control group (A and the experiment group (B. Having taken procyanidin contained medicines for two weeks; athletes in B took centrifugal exercise with heavy intensity to establish the model of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS. Pain threshold with subject feelings and blood IL-6, T-AOC, SOD and MDA were measured at different time points. The measurement showed that after exercise, pain thresholds in A, B at different time points decreased remarkably; while at a same time point, pain threshold in A was lower than that in B. In both groups, post-exercise blood IL-6 increased first and then decreased and reached its peak immediately after exercise; SOD activity also increased first and decreased later and MDA rose up to its apex and then went down. As for the same time point comparison, IL-6 in A was significantly higher than in B, so did MDA; but SOD in A was notably lower than in B. Thus the conclusion is that procyanidin controls IL-6 to relieve DOMS after centrifugal exercise with heavy intensity, which effectively enhances oxidation resistance of organism.

  16. Carbon nanotube grafted with polyalcohol and its influence on the thermal conductivity of phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CNTs are grafted with polyhydric alcohols. • The grafted CNTs are well dispersed. • The graft ratio of CNTs-C8, CNTs-C14 and CNTs-C18 is 11%, 32% and 38%. • The thermal conductivities of CNTs/paraffin are increased through graft treatment. • The carbon number of polyalcohol has influence on thermal conductivity. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grafted with polyhydric alcohols (octanol, tetradecyl alchohol and stearyl alcohol) after acidification. The composite phase change materials (PCMs) were prepared with grafted CNTs and paraffin. The grafted CNTs were characterized with Transmission Electron Micrograph (TEM), X-ray Diffractometer (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Thermogravimetric analyzer (TG). Hot disk method was employed to measure the thermal conductivity of composite PCMs. The results showed that polyhydric alcohols were grafted onto CNTs. The graft ratio was 38% for the CNTs grafted with stearyl alcohol. The grafted CNTs were shorter than CNTs and the dispersibility of grafted CNTs was better than that of CNTs. The thermal conductivity of grafted CNTs/paraffin composite PCMs was higher than that of pristine CNTs/paraffin composite PCMs

  17. Modeling the Influence of Vegetation Root Distribution for a Changed Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J.; Hatzis, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate modeling of the carbon and water budget requires a dynamic vegetation module that can link carbon and water belowground. Root distribution determines the capacity for water uptake and nutrient absorption. Vegetation development belowground in semi-arid regions can be especially sensitive to climate change due to its important role in vegetation survival. The authors have developed a fine root allocation scheme in response to the relative availabilities of soil water and nutrients. A global soil nitrogen and phosphorus data set has been interpolated spatially at each grid point and incorporated into the Community Land Model (CLM). For each plant functional type, its fine root carbon in each soil layer is updated with input from photosynthesis and output to respiration and turnover. The results show that the simulated root distribution is reasonable in comparison with the observed carbon distribution. Simulated fine root carbon will be shifted to the moist lower soil layers as climate becomes drier. Further,influences of the dynamic root distribution scheme to net primary productivity (NPP) and air temperature are evaluated for different climate periods (1990-2004 vs. 1950-1964), and are compared with the results using current static root schemes.

  18. Do changing moisture levels during incubation influence phenotypic traits of hatchling snakes (Tropidonophis mairii, Colubridae)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory P; Shine, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Phenotypic traits (e.g., size, strength, speed) of hatchlings in many reptile species are influenced by hydric conditions in the nest. Previous experiments have focused on comparisons between eggs maintained under constant (but different) conditions, but eggs in natural nests frequently experience strong temporal shifts in soil water content during incubation. Keelback snakes (Tropidonophis mairii) in the Australian wet-dry tropics nest over most of the year, so early nests experience decreasing water availability during development, late nests experience increases, and others (midyear) remain stable in this respect. We mimicked these three conditions and incubated 54 eggs (nine from each of six clutches) in a split-clutch design to maintain the same average water content but with differing trajectories through incubation. The experimental treatments significantly affected the total amount of water taken up by the eggs (and thus final egg mass), but incubation periods were unaffected. Hatchling size but not strength showed minor but statistically significant effects of incubation regimes. The ability of keelback eggs to take up excess water whenever it becomes available (either early or late in development) and to retain it even when conditions change buffers embryogenesis effectively (but not completely) against fluctuations in soil water conditions. PMID:15957107

  19. PRODUCTIVITY OF OKRA VARIETIES AS INFLUENCED BY SEASONAL CHANGES IN NORTHERN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. KATUNG

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In northern Nigeria, two distinct season are noticeable and these are the wet (April to October and the dry (November to March seasons. Due to little or no documented work conducted to investigate the influence of climatic changes on the performance of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L. Moench, this study is therefore undertaken to compare the performance of okra during the wet and the dry seasons of northern Nigeria. Two okra varieties ('White velvet' and 'Ex-Borno' were evaluated during the 1997 and 1999 wet seasons and 1997/98 and 1999/2000 dry seasons at Samaru in northern Nigeria, in order to determine their productivity. The variables measured at the reproductive stage were plant height, number of leaves/plant, leaf area, days to first flower, fruit weight/plant and fruit yield (t/ha. Significant differences were observed for all variables among seasons and among varieties. The wet season conditions were most favourable for increased growth, leaf formation and fruit yield, as compared with the dry season environment which resulted in less vegetative and reproductive growth. The interaction of season x variety was highly significant for plant height, fruit weight/plant, fruit yield and significant for leaf area and number of fruits/plant. The variety 'White velvet' produced more fruits than 'Ex-Borno'.

  20. Early ischemic CT changes before thrombolysis: The influence of age and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Thomassen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Lars Thomassen, Ulrike Waje-Andreassen, Halvor NaessDepartment of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, NorwayObjectives: The significance of early ischemic changes (EIC on computed tomography (CT within 3 hours after stroke onset remains controversial. The semi-quantitative Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS is found to have prognostic value in early stroke. This study assesses factors associated with the presence of EIC and the relation between EIC and clinical outcome.Materials and methods: CT scans from 61 consecutive patients receiving thrombolytic therapy were reviewed by 3 experienced stroke neurologists, assessing EIC (ASPECTS and vascular signs (hyperdense middle cerebral artery stem and/or branches. Short-term outcome was assessed with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale at 24 hours and long-term outcome with the modified Rankin Scale score after 3 months.Results: The prevalence of EIC was 54% and the agreement between assessors was good (kappa 0.52–0.67. EIC was independently associated with younger age and absence of diabetes mellitus. Neither EIC nor vascular signs were associated with 3-months outcome.Conclusions: ASPECTS is as simple, systematic approach to assessing EIC, and the interobserver agreement is good. Patient age and diabetes mellitus influence the presence of EIC.Keywords: acute stroke, computed tomography, ischemia, thrombolysis

  1. Multifractal signatures of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Amber M; Kevlahan, Nicholas K-R; Earn, David J D

    2012-09-01

    Incidence of infection time-series data for the childhood diseases measles, chicken pox, rubella and whooping cough are described in the language of multifractals. We explore the potential of using the wavelet transform maximum modulus (WTMM) method to characterize the multiscale structure of the observed time series and of simulated data generated by the stochastic susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered (SEIR) epidemic model. The singularity spectra of the observed time series suggest that each disease is characterized by a unique multifractal signature, which distinguishes that particular disease from the others. The wavelet scaling functions confirm that the time series of measles, rubella and whooping cough are clearly multifractal, while chicken pox has a more monofractal structure in time. The stochastic SEIR epidemic model is unable to reproduce the qualitative singularity structure of the reported incidence data: it is too smooth and does not appear to have a multifractal singularity structure. The precise reasons for the failure of the SEIR epidemic model to reproduce the correct multiscale structure of the reported incidence data remain unclear. PMID:22442094

  2. Clinical characteristics of infectious spondylodiscitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Aleksandar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Spondylodiscitis represents an inflammatory process, localized in the vertebrae body and in the intervertebral discs. The goals of this research were to identify subjective complaints, clinical findings, and laboratory characteristics in patients with spondylodiscitis, as well as to establish the importance of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing this disease. The data of 40 patients treated at the Clinic for Infectious diseases of the Clinical Center of Vojvodina from 2003 till 2007 were reviewed. Majority of the patients had low back pain (90%. Fever was present in 37.5% of patients (X2= 2,5; p>0,05. Laboratory parameters of inflammation were higher than normal in most of the patients before the treatment. Diagnosis of spondylodiscitis was made using MRI in 97,5% of the patients. Keeping in mind unspecific subjective complaints and clinical findings in patients with spondylodiscitis, a health professional should always suspect spondylodiscitis when back pain occurs, in order to diagnose and treat this severe disease as early as possible. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most advantageous method in diagnosing spondylodiscitis.

  3. Antibiotic associated diarrhoea: Infectious causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyagari A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 25% of antibiotic associated diarrhoeas (AAD is caused by Clostridium difficile, making it the commonest identified and treatable pathogen. Other pathogens implicated infrequently include Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Candida spp. and Salmonella spp. Most mild cases of AAD are due to non-infectious causes which include reduced break down of primary bile acids and decrease metabolism of carbohydrates, allergic or toxic effects of antibiotic on intestinal mucosa and pharmacological effect on gut motility. The antibiotics most frequently associated with C. difficile associated diarrhoea are clindamycin, cephalosporin, ampicillin and amoxicillin. Clinical presentation may vary from mild diarrhoea to severe colitis and pseudomembranous colitis associated with high morbidity and mortality. The most sensitive and specific diagnostic test for C. difficile infection is tissue culture assay for cytotoxicity of toxin B. Commercial ELISA kits are available. Though less sensitive, they are easy to perform and are rapid. Withdrawal of precipitating antibiotic is all that is needed for control of mild to moderate cases. For severe cases of AAD, oral metronidazole is the first line of treatment, and oral vancomycin is the second choice. Probiotics have been used for recurrent cases.

  4. Infectious laryngotracheitis virus in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Shan-Chia; Giambrone, Joseph J

    2012-10-12

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an important respiratory disease of chickens and annually causes significant economic losses in the poultry industry world-wide. ILT virus (ILTV) belongs to alphaherpesvirinae and the Gallid herpesvirus 1 species. The transmission of ILTV is via respiratory and ocular routes. Clinical and post-mortem signs of ILT can be separated into two forms according to its virulence. The characteristic of the severe form is bloody mucus in the trachea with high mortality. The mild form causes nasal discharge, conjunctivitis, and reduced weight gain and egg production. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nested PCR, real-time PCR, and loop-mediated isothermal amplification were developed to detect ILTV samples from natural or experimentally infected birds. The PCR combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) can separate ILTVs into several genetic groups. These groups can separate vaccine from wild type field viruses. Vaccination is a common method to prevent ILT. However, field isolates and vaccine viruses can establish latent infected carriers. According to PCR-RFLP results, virulent field ILTVs can be derived from modified-live vaccines. Therefore, modified-live vaccine reversion provides a source for ILT outbreaks on chicken farms. Two recently licensed commercial recombinant ILT vaccines are also in use. Other recombinant and gene-deficient vaccine candidates are in the developmental stages. They offer additional hope for the control of this disease. However, in ILT endemic regions, improved biosecurity and management practices are critical for improved ILT control. PMID:24175219

  5. Imaging procedures in spinal infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A targeted successful treatment of spinal infectious diseases requires clinical and laboratory data that are completed by the contribution of imaging procedures. Neuroimaging only provides essential informations on the correct topography, localisation, acuity and differential diagnosis of spinal infectious lesions. MRI with its sensitivity concerning soft tissue lesions is a useful tool in detecting infectious alterations of spinal bone marrow, intervertebral disks, leptomeninges and the spinal cord itself. Crucial imaging patterns of typical spinal infections are displayed and illustrated by clinical case studies. We present pyogenic, granulomatous and postoperative variants of spondylodicitis, spinal epidural abscess, spinal meningitis and spinal cord infections. The importance of intravenous contrastmedia application is pointed out. (orig.)

  6. A branching model for the spread of infectious animal diseases in varying environments

    OpenAIRE

    Trapman, Pieter; Meester, R; Heesterbeek, J A P

    2004-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a stochastic model, describing outbreaks of infectious diseases that have potentially great animal or human health consequences, and which can result in such severe economic losses that immediate sets of measures need to be taken to curb the spread. During an outbreak of such a disease, the environment that the infectious agent experiences is therefore changing due to the subsequent control measures taken. In our model, we introduce a general branching process in ...

  7. Possible impact of rising sea levels on vector-borne infectious diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Surendran Sinnathamby N; Ramasamy Ranjan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Vector-borne infectious diseases are a significant cause of human and animal mortality and morbidity. Modeling studies predict that changes in climate that accompany global warming will alter the transmission risk of many vector-borne infectious diseases in different parts of the world. Global warming will also raise sea levels, which will lead to an increase in saline and brackish water bodies in coastal areas. The potential impact of rising sea levels, as opposed to clim...

  8. Trains of Thought in Treating Infectious Atypical Pneumonia with Integrative Chinese and Western Medicine Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林琳

    2003-01-01

    @@ Infectious atypical pneumonia (also called severe acute respiratory syndrome, SARS by WHO) is a new type of infectious disease, whose disease condition is fierce and ferocious, rapid in changing, seriously threatened human health and life. The author has treated around 200 SARS patients in Guangzhou and Hong Kong with integrative Chinese and western medicine (ICWM) approach from January 2003till present. Now I would like to make a comment on ICWM in treating SARS.

  9. Neutron fluence influence upon electrical resistivity change and microstructure of Ti-Al alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of neutron fluence at an interval of 1.2·1020 / 1·1024 m-2 on electrical resistivity and microstructure of Ti+50at.%Al and Ti+50at.%Al+2at.%Zr alloys is investigated. Is established that in the studied interval of neutron fluence the linear dependence of electrical resistivity increase is observed. Its significance achieves for both alloys 123% at maximal fluence. However the rate of electrical resistivity change in 1.2 times is higher for an Ti+50at.%Al+2at.%Zr alloy, than for an Ti+50at.%Al alloy. Also it has been revealed that irradiation of the alloy composed of Ti+50at.%Al in the WWR-K reactor results in formation of depleted zones near dislocations and fine conglomerations of the radiation-induced defects, distributed homogeneously over the grain body. The main portion of the conglomerations represents fine dislocation loops of the size/density increasing with the neutron fluence increase. Contribution of radiation defects, visible by TEM, on electrical resistivity change of an Ti+50at.%Al alloy does not exceed 0.2%. Complete set of all obtained results allows to conclude that basic contribution to of electrical resistivity change of Ti+50at.%Al and Ti+50at.%Al+2at.%Zr alloys at a neutron irradiation is caused by formation of point defects, clusters and their complexes with impurities; doping the alloy Ti+50at.%Al by zirconium provides larger survivability for the defects of this type. The performed investigation has shown to sufficiently high phase-structure stability of the Ti-Al alloy subject to irradiation. In addition to a low residual radioactivity and fortune combination of the thermal, physical and mechanical properties that provide a low value of the thermal stress as well as a high value of the fatigue strength and the disruption viscosity, this circumstances makes it possible to consider titanium aluminides and the alloys on a base of titanium aluminides as reliable, novel constructional materials for nuclear/thermonuclear power

  10. Is the thymus a target organ in infectious diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Savino

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The thymus is a central lymphoid organ, in wich T cell precursors differentiale and generate most of the so-called T cell reprtoire. Along with a variety of acute infectious diseases, we and others determined important changes in both microenvironmental and lymphoid compartments of the organ. For example, one major and common feature observed in acute viral, bacterial and parasitic diseases, is a depletion of cortical thymocytes, mostly those bearing the CD4-CD8 double positive phenotype. This occurs simmultaneously to the relative enrichment in medullary CD4 or CD8 single positive cells, expressing high densities of the CD3 complex. Additionally we noticed a variety of changes in the thymic microenvironment (and particularly is epithelial component, comprising abnormal location of thymic epithelial cell subsets as well has a denser Ia-bearing cellular network. Moreover, the extracellular matrix network was altered with an intralobular increase of basement membrane proteins that positively correlated with the degree of thymocyte death. Lastly, anti-thymic cell antibodies were detected in both human and animal models of infectious diseases, and in some of them a phenomenon of molecular mimicry could be evidenced. Taken together, the data receiwed herein clearly show that the thymus should be regarded as a target in infectious diseases.

  11. Socio-economic factors influencing climate change adaptation among crop farmers in Umuahia South Area of Abia State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O. Anyoha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the socioeconomic factors influencing climate change adaptation among crop farmers in Umuahia South Area of Abia State, Nigeria. The specific objectives of the study were to determine socioeconomic characteristics of crop farmers in the area, determine farmers level of awareness of climate change in the area, ascertain effects of climate change in crop production, identify adaptation strategies adopted by the farmers in the area and determine socioeconomic factors influencing adaptation to climate change. Data were collected through a questionnaire distributed to 120 farmers. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistical tools such as tables, likert type scale and multiple regression analysis. Results of data collected shows that the strategies adopted to combat the effects of climate change by farmers in the area include tree planting, cultivation of early maturing crops, mixed farming, use of improved crop varieties, increased use of family labour, engagement in complementary/diverse livelihoods, cover cropping, changes in planting and harvesting dates, irrigation practices, crop rotation, riverside/bank cultivation, increased frequency of weeding etc, Results reveal that farm size, farming experience, household size, and social organization (MEM COP were significant at 5%, sex was significant at 1% . Extension educational campaign should be intensified to increase the knowledge about climate change. Government should collaborate with meteorologists in forecasting about climate change and also in bringing about measures to control the adverse effect of climate change especially in agriculture.

  12. 北京市2886名服务业从业人员传染病预防素养水平及其影响因素分析%Analysis on status and influencing factors of health literacy on infectious diseases prevention among 2886 em-ployees in service industry of Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申洋; 赵芳红; 常春; 蒋莹

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the health literacy level on infectious diseases prevention among the services em-ployees in Beijing and identify the influencing factors.Methods 2886 services employees who were handling the health cer-tificates in Beijing CDC were investigated by questionnaires about health literacy.Accuracy was used to describe the aware-ness on knowledge of infectious diseases,Chi-square tests were used to analyze health literacy on infectious diseases preven-tion of the subgroup subjects,and logistic regression was employed to determine the influencing factors.Results In our study,11.4% (329 /2886)of the subjects were classified as enough health literacy on infectious diseases prevention,and the low level of health literacy was observed among the subjects who were aged≥45 years (5.0%,14 /281),middle school and below (5.1%,40 /779),food related industries (9.9%,80 /809),average monthly income of 3000 -3999 RMB (8.8%,51 /579),and no internet-literate (2.8%,4 /142).Multivariable logistic analysis showed that education and in-come were the major influencing factors,among which the OR for junior college and above was 3.476 (95% CI:2.355 -5.130);for average monthly income of 3000 -3999 RMB was 0.514 (95% CI:0.280 -0.944).Conclusion The serv-ices employees in Beijing were considered as low level of health literacy on infectious diseases prevention and tailored inter-vention measures are urgently needed.%目的:分析北京市服务业从业人员传染病预防素养水平现状并探讨其影响因素。方法采用《公共卫生从业相关素养调查问卷》及《2013年中国居民健康素养调查问卷》,对2886位到北京市疾病预防控制中心办理健康证的服务业从业人员进行问卷调查。用χ2检验分析不同特征人群传染病预防素养水平,用 Logistic 回归分析传染病预防素养的影响因素。结果北京市服务业从业人员具备传染病预防素养的比例为11.4%(329/2886),≥45

  13. The influence of river training on mountain channel changes (Polish Carpathian Mountains)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpak, Joanna

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explain the influence of river training on channel changes in mountain rivers. Also considered are the causes of failure of different training schemes. The research was conducted on the regulated Mszanka and Porębianka Rivers, belonging to the Raba River drainage basin in the Polish Flysh Carpathian Mountains. Channel mapping carried out in 2004 drew attention to the contemporary morphology of the channels and the development of their dynamic typology. General changes in channel morphometry and land cover were identified by comparing cartographic sources from various years. Archive material from Cracow's Regional Water Management Authority (RZGW) was used to analyse the detailed channel changes caused by each regulation structure. The material consisted of technical designs of individual training works, as well as plans, longitudinal profiles and cross-sections of trained channel reaches. A series of minimum annual water stages at the Mszana Dolna gauging station was used to determine the tendency of channel bed degradation over 53 years. During the first half of the 20th century, the middle and lower courses of the Mszanka and Porębianka Rivers had braided patterns. The slopes, mostly covered with crops, were an important source of sediment delivery to the river channels. Today, both channels are single-threaded, narrow and sinuous. Downcutting is the leading process transforming the channels. They cut down to bedrock along about 60% of their lengths. The main type of channel is an erosion channel, which occurs also in the middle and lower courses of the rivers. The channel sediment deficit is an important cause for river incision. Sediment supply to the channels was reduced after a replacement of crops on the slopes by meadows or forests. Gravel mining has also caused channel downcutting. The rapid channel changes began after 1959, as systematic training was introduced. Channel regulation seems therefore to be a major factor

  14. CHANGE OF MORPHOLOGY OF THE CARBON CHROME-MOLYBDENUM STEEL STRUCTURE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF THERMAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Lutsenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of temperature-temporal parameters of thermal treatment on changing of structure and characteristics of carbon chrome-molybdenum steel is studied. It is shown that there are considerable areas with granular morphology of cementite in metal structure after high-temperature tempering, what provides lowering of microhardness of steel by 25%, and after medium-temperature tempering there are no essential structural changes.

  15. CHANGE OF MORPHOLOGY OF THE CARBON CHROME-MOLYBDENUM STEEL STRUCTURE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF THERMAL TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    V. A. Lutsenko; N. I. Anelkin; T. N. Golubenko; Shcherbakov, V. I.; O. V. Lutsenko; L. A. Drobyshevskij

    2016-01-01

    Influence of temperature-temporal parameters of thermal treatment on changing of structure and characteristics of carbon chrome-molybdenum steel is studied. It is shown that there are considerable areas with granular morphology of cementite in metal structure after high-temperature tempering, what provides lowering of microhardness of steel by 25%, and after medium-temperature tempering there are no essential structural changes.

  16. Influence of heat treatment on changes on structure and magnetic properties of CoSiB alloy

    OpenAIRE

    R. Nowosielski; A. Zajdel; S. Lesz; B. Kostrubiec; Z. Stokłosa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper describes influence of heat treatment on changes on structure and magnetic properties of the amorphous Co77Si11.5B11.5 alloy.Design/methodology/approach: The following experimental techniques were used: X-ray diffraction (XRD), static and dynamic measurements of magnetic properties (magnetic balance, fluxmeter, Maxwell-Wien bridge).Findings: The crystallization process involved by heat treatment leads to significant changes of structure and magnetic properties of amorphous...

  17. Changes in the influence of board characterisitcs on corporate results due to the recent global financial crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrero Ferrero, Idoya; Muñoz Torres, María Jesús; Fernández Izquierdo, María Ángeles

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to analyse the changes caused by the global financial crisis on the influence of board characteristics on corporate results, in terms of corporate performance, corporate risk-taking, and earnings management. Sample comprises S&P 500 listed firms during 2002-2008. This study reveals that the environmental conditions call for different behaviour from directors to fulfil their responsibilities and suggests changes in normative and voluntary guidelines for improv...

  18. The Influence of life history and sexual dimorphism on entheseal changes in modern humans and African great apes

    OpenAIRE

    Milella, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Entheseal changes have been widely studied with regard to their correlation to biomechanical stress and their usefulness for biocultural reconstructions. However, anthropological and medical studies have demonstrated the marked influence of both age and sex on the development of these features. Studies of entheseal changes are mostly aimed in testing functional hypotheses and are mostly focused on modern humans, with few data available for non-human primates. The lack of comparative studies o...

  19. New infectious etiologies for posterior uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairallah, Moncef; Kahloun, Rim; Ben Yahia, Salim; Jelliti, Bechir; Messaoud, Riadh

    2013-01-01

    Emergent and resurgent arthropod vector-borne diseases are major causes of systemic morbidity and death and expanding worldwide. Among them, viral and bacterial agents including West Nile virus, Dengue fever, Chikungunya, Rift Valley fever, and rickettsioses have been recently associated with an array of ocular manifestations. These include anterior uveitis, retinitis, chorioretinitis, retinal vasculitis and optic nerve involvement. Proper clinical diagnosis of any of these infectious diseases is based on epidemiological data, history, systemic symptoms and signs, and the pattern of ocular involvement. The diagnosis is usually confirmed by the detection of a specific antibody in serum. Ocular involvement associated with emergent infections usually has a self-limited course, but it can result in persistent visual impairment. There is currently no proven specific treatment for arboviral diseases, and therapy is mostly supportive. Vaccination for humans against these viruses is still in the research phase. Doxycycline is the treatment of choice for rickettsial diseases. Prevention, including public measures to reduce the number of mosquitoes and personal protection, remains the mainstay for arthropod vector disease control. Influenza A (H1N1) virus was responsible for a pandemic human influenza in 2009, and was recently associated with various posterior segment changes. PMID:23258387

  20. 太原市传染病医院近二十年疾病谱变迁分析及防治策略的建议%Disease patterns changes and suggestions of control strategy in the Infectious Diseases Hospital of Taiyuan in recent twenty years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宝芳; 顾伟玲; 王霞

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the change of diseases patterns in our hospital in recent twenty years and to provide suggestions on the control strategy of infectious diseases. Methods The types of the diseases and the number of corresponding patients in the hospital in the last two decades were statistically analyzed, retrospectively. Results The number of patients with hepatitis and liver cirrhosis always rank as the top of all the diseases; bacterial dysentery ranked to the second from the 1990s to early and medium of 21st century, but cases with bacterial dysentery declined significantly since 2007. Measles, mumps, chicken pox, scarlet fever which belong to respiratory infectious diseases were the main kinds of diseases; patients with brucellosis increased during the recent 12 years ( 1999-2010 ); Since 2008 hand-foot-and-mouth disease became one of the main kinds; Influenza A ( H1N1 ) became a new infectious disease since 2009. Conclusions Viral hepatitis and liver cirrhosis are the main infectious diseases which threaten to people' s health. Patients with bacterial dysentery declined significantly since 2007. Measles, mumps, chicken pox, scarlet fever threatened the children' s health during the recent 20 years, so the immunization measures and immune adjustment strategies should be taken. Since 2008 hand-foot-and-mouth disease is an immerging common infectious disease triggering some public health emergencies. The number of patients with brucellosis is rising year by year which should be paid more attention to.%目的 分析近20年太原市传染病医院住院病种的变化,对常见传染病的防治策略提出相关建议.方法 对近20年来该院各种疾病病种及住院人数进行回顾性分析.结果 各种肝炎及肝硬化的住院人数始终高居所有住院病种的首位;细菌性痢疾从上世纪90年代至21世纪初、中期一直居住院病种的第2位,但2007年以后该病种住院人数明显下降;麻疹、流行性腮腺炎、猩红

  1. Advances in microfluidics in combating infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Andy; Pavesi, Andrea; Yazdi, Saeed Rismani; Lim, Chwee Teck; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi

    2016-01-01

    One of the important pursuits in science and engineering research today is to develop low-cost and user-friendly technologies to improve the health of people. Over the past decade, research efforts in microfluidics have been made to develop methods that can facilitate low-cost diagnosis of infectious diseases, especially in resource-poor settings. Here, we provide an overview of the recent advances in microfluidic devices for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics for infectious diseases and emphasis is placed on malaria, sepsis and AIDS/HIV. Other infectious diseases such as SARS, tuberculosis, and dengue are also briefly discussed. These infectious diseases are chosen as they contribute the most to disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) lost according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The current state of research in this area is evaluated and projection toward future applications and accompanying challenges are also discussed. PMID:26854743

  2. Infectious mononucleosis presenting as bilateral acute dacryocystitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, P L; Ansons, A M; Patterson, A.

    1990-01-01

    A case of infectious mononucleosis presenting as bilateral acute dacryocystitis in a 7-year-old girl is reported. Acute dacryocystitis is uncommon in this age group, and an underlying systemic illness should be suspected particularly when it is bilateral.

  3. Infectious Mononucleosis: Recognition and Management in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis strikes many young athletes. Considered here are its epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, natural course, complications, and management. The focus is on concerns of athletes with a perspective on personality, convalescence, and chronic fatigue. (Author/MT)

  4. Infectious optic neuropathies: a clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahloun R

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rim Kahloun, Nesrine Abroug, Imen Ksiaa, Anis Mahmoud, Hatem Zeghidi, Sonia Zaouali, Moncef KhairallahDepartment of Ophthalmology, Fattouma Bourguiba University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Monastir, Monastir, TunisiaAbstract: Different forms of optic neuropathy causing visual impairment of varying severity have been reported in association with a wide variety of infectious agents. Proper clinical diagnosis of any of these infectious conditions is based on epidemiological data, history, systemic symptoms and signs, and the pattern of ocular findings. Diagnosis is confirmed by serologic testing and polymerase chain reaction in selected cases. Treatment of infectious optic neuropathies involves the use of specific anti-infectious drugs and corticosteroids to suppress the associated inflammatory reaction. The visual prognosis is generally good, but persistent severe vision loss with optic atrophy can occur. This review presents optic neuropathies caused by specific viral, bacterial, parasitic, and fungal diseases.Keywords: optic neuropathy, viruses, bacteria, parasites, fungi, vaccination

  5. What's the Difference Between Infectious and Contagious?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse Healthy School Lunch Planner How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? What's the Difference Between Infectious and Contagious? KidsHealth > For Teens > What's ...

  6. Characteristics of Hodgkin's lymphoma after infectious mononucleosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalgrim, Henrik; Askling, Johan; Rostgaard, Klaus;

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious mononucleosis-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection has been associated with an increased risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma in young adults. Whether the association is causal remains unclear. METHODS: We compared the incidence rates of Hodgkin's lymphoma in two population......-based Danish cohorts of patients who were tested for infectious mononucleosis: 17,045 with serologic evidence of having had acute EBV infection, and 24,614 with no such evidence. We combined the cohort of patients who had serologically verified infectious mononucleosis with a cohort of 21,510 Swedish patients...... with infectious mononucleosis (combined total, 38,555). Biopsy specimens of Hodgkin's lymphomas occurring during follow-up in this combined cohort were tested serologically for the presence of EBV. Using this information, we modeled the relative risk of EBV-negative and EBV-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma...

  7. A Holistic View of Emerging Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himgauri K. Kulkarni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Emerging Infectious Diseases: A Guide to Diseases, Causative Agents, and Surveillance; Lisa A. Beltz; (2011. Jossey-Bass, John Wiley and Sons, Inc. San Francisco, CA. 700 pages.

  8. Infectious Disease Management: Lessons from Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noni E Macdonald

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade in Canada, infectious disease outbreaks have repeatedly been in the public spotlight. The Escherichia coli outbreak in Walkerton, Ontario (1, the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak in Toronto, Ontario (2 and the Clostridium difficile hospital outbreak in Montreal, Quebec (3, have cost lives, grabbed headlines and stressed local health care systems. Each outbreak raised questions about our ability to prevent outbreaks, detect outbreaks early, and respond efficiently and effectively to infectious disease crises; these outbreaks also highlighted gaps in Canada's preparedness for managing major infectious disease problems when multiple jurisdictions are involved (4. Canada's poor track record of tuberculosis control in the north (5 raises the concern that this problem is not limited to crisis situations, but rather has deeper implications for the management of infectious diseases in Canada.

  9. Infectious Diseases and Immunizations. Matrix No. 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, John L.

    This paper summarizes the major advances achieved by research in the fields of infectious diseases and immunizations during the 1970s, and delineates directions for future research in these fields. (Author/MP)

  10. Organization changes of the university’s corporate culture under the influence of the social Internet communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selyutin Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article the definition of the term "corporate culture of the university" is refined and supplemented. It is noted that the traditional understanding does not reflect the fundamental changes taking place in the education system and interpersonal relationships of teachers and students of the university, and that undoubtedly have a significant influence on the corporate culture of the university formation

  11. Organization changes of the university’s corporate culture under the influence of the social Internet communications

    OpenAIRE

    Selyutin Andrey; Kalashnikova Tatyana; Chasovskiy Pavel; Frolova Natalia

    2016-01-01

    In the article the definition of the term "corporate culture of the university" is refined and supplemented. It is noted that the traditional understanding does not reflect the fundamental changes taking place in the education system and interpersonal relationships of teachers and students of the university, and that undoubtedly have a significant influence on the corporate culture of the university formation

  12. The Control of Infectious Coryza in Chicken

    OpenAIRE

    Tati Ariyanti; Supar

    2007-01-01

    Infectious coryza or infectious snot is a disease caused by Haemophilus paragallinarum (HPG), that infects upper respiratory tract of either layer or broiler chickens or other poultry raised under small and large farm conditions. Infection on growing chicken caused reduction of weight gain, whereas in adult layer chicken caused decreasing egg productions, and hence significantly caused economic losses in poultry industries. Coryza cases in the farms are difficult to control by antibiotic trea...

  13. Diagnosing Infectious Mononucleosis: Avoiding the Pitfalls

    OpenAIRE

    McSherry, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis may be diagnosed with confidence only when Hoagland's diagnostic criteria have been met. The illness must be compatible with the known clinical features of infectious mononucleosis; there should be absolute and relative lymphocytosis on differential white cell count; there should be more than 20% atypical lymphocytes and serological tests should be positive—either a Paul-Bunnell Davidsohn or a rapid slide test for heterophil antibody. Failure to diagnose this common v...

  14. Infectious optic neuropathies: a clinical update

    OpenAIRE

    Kahloun R; Abroug N; Ksiaa I; Mahmoud A; Zeghidi H; Zaouali S; Khairallah M

    2015-01-01

    Rim Kahloun, Nesrine Abroug, Imen Ksiaa, Anis Mahmoud, Hatem Zeghidi, Sonia Zaouali, Moncef KhairallahDepartment of Ophthalmology, Fattouma Bourguiba University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Monastir, Monastir, TunisiaAbstract: Different forms of optic neuropathy causing visual impairment of varying severity have been reported in association with a wide variety of infectious agents. Proper clinical diagnosis of any of these infectious conditions is based on epidemiological data...

  15. Paediatric infectious diseases: the last 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Many advances and challenges have occurred in the field of paediatric infectious diseases during the past 50 years. It is impossible to cover all of these in a short review, but a few highlights and lowlights will be covered. These include virtual disappearance of some infectious diseases, emergence of new ones, infections in the immunocompromised, antimicrobial resistance, development of new and improved antimicrobials, improved diagnostic tests and the Human Microbiome Project. PMID:25557805

  16. Factors influencing growth of Acanthopagrus butcheri (Sparidae) in a eutrophic estuary have changed over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottingham, Alan; Hall, Norman G.; Potter, Ian C.

    2016-01-01

    The overall growth of Acanthopagrus butcheri in the eutrophic Swan River Estuary has previously been shown to decline between 1993-95 and 2007-11. This was attributed to the effects of an increase in hypoxia on A. butcheri in deeper water, brought about by reductions in freshwater flushing, and to density-dependent effects as this species became concentrated in the better-oxygenated, nearshore shallow waters. In the present study, a year-effect model was developed that provided a good fit to the lengths at age and could thus be used to explore the following: 1) The extent to which somatic growth of A. butcheri differed between years in the above two periods and within the later period, which was extended to include data for 2012 to 2014, and 2) whether annual growth in 2007-14 was related to temperature and/or freshwater discharge. Annual length increments for females and males during the second year of life, predicted from the model and when using a common initial length, were almost invariably less in each year in 2007-14 than in 1993-95. In 2007-14, these predicted increments varied by ˜2 times for both females and males and were positively correlated with average temperature during the main growth phase of A. butcheri. They were not significantly correlated, however, with freshwater discharge in the preceding cool wet 'winter' months, when the vast majority of rainfall occurs. The demonstration that the growth of A. butcheri was positively correlated with temperature for years in the latter period is consistent with the metabolic theory of ecology and contrasts with growth declining between 1993-95 and 2007-14 when temperatures were increasing. Thus, any influence of temperature on growth between those periods was overridden by the effects of other factors, i.e. hypoxia and related changes in density. As A. butcheri completes its life cycle within its natal estuary and has plastic biological characteristics, it is an ideal candidate for use as an indicator of

  17. The Influence of a Record Heat Wave on Environmental Change in Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanitski, Diane; Cox, Christopher; Stone, Robert; Divoky, George

    2016-04-01

    The May 2015 average temperature at the NOAA Global Monitoring Division's Barrow Observatory (BRW), Alaska, set a 90+ year record high, averaging -2.2°C (28°F), nearly 5°C (9°F) above average. The 2015 spring transition in Barrow was notable with the second earliest date of snow melt on record (JD148, May 28) and earliest ice free conditions on a local lagoon (JD178, June 27). Anomalous early snowmelt was also observed at nearby Cooper Island where a colony of sea birds, the Black Guillemot, nests each year once snow disappears. The appearance of "first egg" is well correlated with the date of snowmelt at BRW (Fig. 1), as is the ice-out date at the Isaktoak Lagoon (ISK). In 2015, the first egg was observed on JD159 (June 8), the earliest in the 40-year record (source: Friends of Cooper Island, http://cooperisland.org/). The 2015 melt at BRW was very early due mainly to an unusually intense heat wave affecting all of Alaska. Each day of advance in the melt date at BRW results in an annual net radiation increase at the surface of about 1%. The documented changes can influence biogeochemical cycles, permafrost temperatures, and potentially the release of stored carbon. BRW permafrost temperatures were warmer than the three previous years; the active layer depth (ALD) was ~6 cm deeper in 2015 than in 2014; and the temperature at 120 cm was ~0.5°C warmer. The anomalous warmth that prevailed during spring 2015 can be primarily attributed to atmospheric circulation. Abnormal warmth of the North Pacific and a perturbed jet stream underlie the heat wave and advection of warm air into the Arctic. Warming was likely amplified locally as the early melting of snow increased absorption of solar radiation. Key factors contributing to the anomalous 2015 spring at BRW and the impact early melt had on the 2015 summer surface radiation budget will be discussed. The role of circulation anomalies reported by reanalysis data over the course of the Barrow observational record will

  18. The Influence of the Climate Change on Landslide Disasters in Western Japan -Hiroshima's case-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tetsuya; Aditian, Aril

    2015-04-01

    In last year 2014 and 2012, tremendous landslides due to heavy rainfalls occurred in western Japan. Especially in August 2014, serious landslide disasters induced by the extremely heavy rainfall caused over 70 people's death in Hiroshima. Most of them were caused by debris flows from shallow landslides on granite forest slopes on August 20. In Hiroshima, long-term increase in rainfalls was not obvious, while this trend was found in other area such as Kyushu district. However, in western Japan, the influence of climate change emerged in the increase of vapor concentration caused by rising water surface temperature in East China Sea and that brought the extreme rainfall. The landslide (debris flow) disasters in Hiroshima have distinctive characteristics in terms of followings: (1) the source of debris flows (directly flowing down from mostly shallow landslides), (2) their usual equivalent friction coefficient "Mf" i.e. relative travel distance for Granite (values between 0.174 and 0.554). (3) the peculiar meteorological condition of frontogenesis with vapor convergence on the stationary front and around the Pacific high pressure that can generate the heavy precipitation (above 101 mm/hr, total 256 mm). (4) Contrary to Mf values above, they caused heavy disaster at downstream area with the urban development on hillside slopes. We found that the Mf becomes bigger (relatively short travel distance) as the return period of disasters"Tr"becomes shorter as evaluating in the next formula: Mf = 0.278 Tr^(-3.32). If the return period becomes shorter due to climate change (it is possible), Mf may become bigger. However, the cities such as Hiroshima, Kobe or Nagasaki in western Japan which have the urban area at hillside will be more prone to severe debris flow disasters. (5) Also, theoretically, we may have more slope failures and debris flows per area "N/A" if the rainfall increment "dR" increases. The "increasing ratio in N/A" is given by next equation: (N/A)/(N0/A)=((R0 + d

  19. Influence of Climatic Changes and Human Activities on the Salinization Process of Coastal Aquifer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Rapti-Caputo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, two arid coastal zones of the Mediterranean region (mean annual precipitation about 440 mm/a, have been investigated for evaluating the qualitative and quantitative impact of both human activities and climatic changes on the groundwater resources and the hydrological cycle in general. In particular, the hydrographic network of the Akrotiri (Cyprus coastal aquifer system is strongly controlled by engineering handicrafts that have induced a quality worsening of the groundwater resources. Due to over-pumping in the central sector of the area, a lowering of the piezometric level of about 15 m has been observed. As a consequence, a salinization process has occurred in the coastal sector with a mean annual salinization velocity of the salty water front varying between 47 and 97 cm/a (period 1964-1996. Due to the high salinity values, the water is at present unsuitable for irrigation use. The second case study is represented by the alluvial plain of Licata (southern Sicily, Italy, where the evolution of the Salso River (in Italian the name means ’Salty River’ and the coastal dynamics, characterised by repeated marine transgressions and regressions, qualitatively and quantitatively influenced the underground water resources. Also the anthropogenic activities played a crucial role, especially the farming activity as it is largely documented by the occurrence of numerous greenhouses covering most of the plain. The water depth of the unconfined, mainly sandy, aquifer developed in the Quaternary deposits is between 0.3 m and locally 5 m from the surface, while the principal alimentation occurs via infiltration from precipitations and lateral outflow from the Salso River.

  20. Clinical oxygen enhancement ratio of tumors in carbon ion radiotherapy. The influence of local oxygenation changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of carbon ion radiotherapy on hypoxic tumors has recently been questioned because of low linear energy transfer (LET) values in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of hypoxia and local oxygenation changes (LOCs) in fractionated carbon ion radiotherapy. Three-dimensional tumors with hypoxic subvolumes were simulated assuming interfraction LOCs. Different fractionations were applied using a clinically relevant treatment plan with a known LET distribution. The surviving fraction was calculated, taking oxygen tension, dose and LET into account, using the repairable-conditionally repairable (RCR) damage model with parameters for human salivary gland tumor cells. The clinical oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was defined as the ratio of doses required for a tumor control probability of 50% for hypoxic and well-oxygenated tumors. The resulting OER was well above unity for all fractionations. For the hypoxic tumor, the tumor control probability was considerably higher if LOCs were assumed, rather than static oxygenation. The beneficial effect of LOCs increased with the number of fractions. However, for very low fraction doses, the improvement related to LOCs did not compensate for the increase in total dose required for tumor control. In conclusion, our results suggest that hypoxia can influence the outcome of carbon ion radiotherapy because of the non-negligible oxygen effect at the low LETs in the SOBP. However, if LOCs occur, a relatively high level of tumor control probability is achievable with a large range of fractionation schedules for tumors with hypoxic subvolumes, but both hyperfractionation and hypofractionation should be pursued with caution. (author)

  1. Pathology influences blood pressure change following vagal stimulation in an animal intubation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jones

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The haemodynamic response to critical care intubation is influenced by the use of sedation and relaxant drugs and the activation of the vagal reflex. It has been hypothesized that different disease states may have a contrasting effect on the cardiovascular response to vagal stimulation. Our objective was to determine whether the blood pressure response to vagal stimulation was modified by endotoxaemia or hypovolaemia. METHODS: New Zealand White rabbits were anaesthetised with urethane before tracheotomy. The exposed left Vagus nerve of randomised groups of control (n = 11, endotoxin (n = 11, 1 mg/kg, hypovolaemia 40% (n = 8 and hypovolaemia 20% (n = 8 rabbits were subjected to 10 Hz pulsed electrical stimulations of 25 s duration every 15 min. Haemodynamic parameters were recorded from a catheter in the right carotid artery connected to an iWorx monitor. Serum catecholamines were measured every 30 min using reverse-phase ion-pairing liquid chromatography. The change in blood pressure after vagal stimulation was compared to controls for one hour after the first death in the experimental groups. RESULTS: 29% of the rabbits died in the hypovolaemia 40% group and 27% in the endotoxin group. One rabbit died in the hypovolaemia 40% group before vagal stimulation and was excluded. Following electrical stimulation of the Vagus nerve there was a fall in blood pressure in control rabbits. Blood pressure was conserved in the hypovolaemic rabbits compared to controls (p<0.01. For the endotoxaemic rabbits, there was a non-significant trend for the mean blood pressure to decrease more than the controls. Serum catecholamines were significantly raised in both the hypovolaemic and endotoxaemic rabbits. CONCLUSIONS: Pathology may contribute to modifications in blood pressure when vagal activation occurs. Patients who are either already vasoconstricted, or not vasoplegic, may be less at risk from intubation-related vagally mediated

  2. NCAR activities related to translating climate and weather information into infectious-disease and other public-health early warnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, T.; Monaghan, A.; Hopson, T.

    2010-09-01

    The atmosphere can influence the spread of human and agricultural infectious diseases through a number of different mechanisms, including the effect of the atmosphere on the health of the pathogen itself, the health and number of disease vectors, human behavior, wind transport, and flooding. Through knowledge of the statistical or physical relationships between disease incidence, for example outbreaks, and weather or climate conditions, it is possible to translate predictions of the atmosphere into predictions of disease spread or incidence. Medium range forecasts of weeks can allow redistribution of vaccines and medical personnel to locations that will be in greatest need. Inter-seasonal forecasts, e.g. based on the ENSO cycle, can provide long-lead-time information for disease early-warning systems, which can guide the manufacture of vaccines and inform aid agencies about future requirements. And knowledge of longer-term trends in climate conditions, associated, for example, with increases in green-house gases, can be used for development of infectious-disease mitigation and prevention policies. Because of the existence of complex physical, biological, and societal aspects to the links between atmospheric conditions and disease, prediction systems must be constructed based on knowledge of multiple disciplines. To be described in the presentation are activities at the National Center for Atmospheric Research that involve the coupling of atmospheric models with infectious-disease models and decision-support systems. These include 1) the use of operational multi-week weather forecasts to estimate the spatial and temporal variability of the threat of bacterial meningitis in West Africa, 2) climate and spatial risk modeling of human plague in Uganda, 3) a study of how climate variability and human landscape modification interact to influence key aspects of both mosquito vector ecology and human behavior, and how they influence the increased incidence of dengue fever

  3. Changes of the inner structures in Brno under the influence of the demographic changes in the period after 1989

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klusáček, Petr; Martinát, Stanislav

    Brno: Masarykova univerzita, 2008, s. 341-345 ISBN 978-80-210-4600-9. [Geografické aspekty středoevropského prostoru. Brno (CZ), 13.09.2007-13.09.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Demographic change * inner-city * re-urbanisation * suburbanisation * Brno Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  4. Influence of geometry change on creep failure life of 90 deg. pressurised pipe bends with no initial ovality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the geometry change during creep on the failure life of 90 deg. pipe bends, subjected to internal pressure, was investigated using finite element creep damage analyses. The bends were considered to be circular in shape with no initial ovality. The failure lives obtained using the material properties for a CrMoV pipe steel at 640 deg. C clearly show a significant life reduction when the geometry change is included. In the range of the pipe bend dimension ratios investigated, it was found that the failure lives could be reduced to between 65 and 78% of those obtained from constant geometry cases, indicating that the influence of geometry change may need to be appraised for detailed numerical analysis. The results were compared with those of the corresponding straight pipes and their relevance considered. It has been shown that under constant geometry conditions, the failure life for pipe bends is about 30% lower than that for the straight pipes

  5. Soil management and carbon calculation methods influence changes in soil carbon estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throughout the years, many studies have evaluated changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) mass on a fixed-depth (FD) basis without considering changes in soil mass caused by changing in bulk density. In two study sites, we investigated the effect of different management practices on SOC changes calcul...

  6. Node discovery in meta-population network behind infectious disease outbreak

    CERN Document Server

    Maeno, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    Stochasticity and spatial heterogeneity are of great interest recently in studying the spread of an infectious disease. Populations in a combination of epidemiological compartment models and a meta-population network model are described by stochastic differential equations. The presented method solves a node discovery problem to identify the nodes within a given dataset which are directly influenced by an unknown neighboring node during the spread. The dataset is either the time sequence data on the number of infectious persons or new cases in the early growth phase of an infectious disease outbreak. The network topology and transmission parameters are revealed by the maximal likelihood estimation. The degree of influence on individual nodes from an unknown origin is calculated with the technique of the extreme sequence detection given the revealed topology and parameters. The method is tested with computationally synthesized datasets and the WHO dataset on SARS outbreak.

  7. The climate influence of anthropogenic land-use changes on near-surface wind energy potential in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; WANG Yuan; CHU HuiYun; TANG JianPing

    2008-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the potential impact of climate change on wind energy in China. The climate change of near-surface wind energy potential in China under the background of global warming and its association with anthropogenic land-use changes are investigated by calculating the difference in surface wind speeds between the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and the observations since the re-analysis dataset contains the influence of large-scale climate changes due to greenhouse gases, it is less sensitive to regional surface processes associated with land types. The surface wind data in this study consist of long-tarm observations from 604 Chinese Roution Meteorological Stations and theNCEP/NCAR reanalysis data from 1960-1999. The results suggest that the observed mean wind speeds significantly weakened and the near-surface wind power trended downward due to urbanization and other land-use changes in the last 40 years. The mean wind energy weakened by -3.84 W·m-2 per decade due to the influence of anthropogenic land-use change, which is close to the observed climate change (-4.51 W·m-2/10 a).

  8. A statistical modelling study of the abrupt millennial-scale climate changes focusing on the influence of external forcings

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsui, Takahito

    2015-01-01

    Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events are abrupt millennial-scale climate changes mainly detected in the North Atlantic region during the last glacial cycle. The frequency of the DO events varied in time, supposedly because of changes in background climate conditions. Here, we investigate the influences of external forcings on DO events with statistical modelling. We assume two types of generic stochastic dynamical systems models (double-well potential-type and oscillator-type), forced by the northern hemisphere summer insolation change and/or the global ice volume change. The models are calibrated by maximizing their likelihood and compared using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). Among the models, the stochastic oscillator model forced by both insolation and ice volume changes is favored by the NGRIP calcium ion data. The BIC scores provide positive evidence for the ice volume forcing in the presence of the insolation forcing but weak evidence for the insolation forcing in the presence of the ice volume for...

  9. Influence of atmospheric ice nucleus concentrations on cold cloud radiant properties and cold cloud reflectivity changes in past years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    PAL satellite dataset which have long temporal span is used in the study. Relationship between cold cloud reflectivity and aerosol concentration in Beijing is analyzed as an example. From analysis, cold cloud reflectivity is found to be well correlated with aerosol optical depth. Meanwhile, it is retro-correlated with surface visibility. The results mean that cold cloud reflectivity is possibly influenced by ice nucleus concentration changes. Analysis about cold cloud reflectivity changes during the period 1982-1999 in Beijing shows that reflectivity increases in earlier years and decreases in later years. The data of cold cloud reflectivity in China show that reflectivity in some regions has changed. For the reason that cold cloud is very important in global climate system, those changes of cold cloud reflectivity can lead to climate changes finally.

  10. Earth Sciences Changed Influence on the Public Policy Process, or How Congress Stopped Communicating with Geologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, K. M.

    2005-12-01

    Measured in political capital, the latter third of the twentieth century was tough for geoscientists. Federal funding for geoscience research and development decreased between 1960 and 2000. Furthermore, although funds devoted to natural resources remained stable as a proportion of total federal expenditures over the same time, they declined by a factor of ten in proportion to the GDP in constant dollars. The size of the natural resource industry sector of the economy declined, as did the number of employed geologists. Geologists even disappeared as a separate category in federal statistical reports by 2000. Each of these indicators tells a portion of the story of how and why Congress stopped communicating with geologists as well as other physical scientists. Changes within the institution of Congress (e.g., lengthened careers, candidate centered politics, and the rise of conservatism) in the 1970s and 1980s resulted in economic expertise replacing the scientific. At the same time, while research and development in the geosciences required larger budgets, the practical application of the discoveries became less obvious to the public. When this was added to the rise of environmental protection in public policy geology was rendered politically vulnerable. Geologists were easily perceived by political actors as the old guard, which made them part of the problem. The hard won favored position held by geology at mid-twentieth century, built by leaders such as Powell, Nolan, and Peck evaporated as national policy shifted from resource exploitation to preservation. The language of the policy debate also shifted, with geologists moving quickly from insiders to outsiders in the policy game. Further compounding the situation, and possibly catalyzing it was the politicization of scientific expertise written into environmental preservation legislation in the 1970s. The high-level nuclear waste site selection process at Yucca Mountain is but one example of Congress passing the

  11. The Effect of Global Warming on Infectious Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Kurane, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Global warming has various effects on human health. The main indirect effects are on infectious diseases. Although the effects on infectious diseases will be detected worldwide, the degree and types of the effect are different, depending on the location of the respective countries and socioeconomical situations. Among infectious diseases, water- and foodborne infectious diseases and vector-borne infectious diseases are two main categories that are forecasted to be most affected. The effect on...

  12. Larval size in acanthocephalan parasites: Influence of intraspecific competition and effects on intermediate host behavioural changes

    OpenAIRE

    Dianne Lucile; Bollache Loïc; Lagrue Clément; Franceschi Nathalie; Rigaud Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Parasites often face a trade-off between exploitation of host resources and transmission probabilities to the next host. In helminths, larval growth, a major component of adult parasite fitness, is linked to exploitation of intermediate host resources and is influenced by the presence of co-infecting conspecifics. In manipulative parasites, larval growth strategy could also interact with their ability to alter intermediate host phenotype and influence parasite transmission...

  13. Influence of changes in humidity on dry temperature in GPS RO climatologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Danzer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Radio Occultation (RO data are increasingly used in climate research. Accurate phase (change measurements of Global Positioning System (GPS signals are the basis for the retrieval of near vertical profiles of bending angle, microwave refractivity, density, pressure, and temperature. If temperature is calculated from observed refractivity with the assumption that water vapor is zero, the product is called "dry temperature", which is commonly used to study the Earth's atmosphere, e.g., when analyzing temperature trends due to global warming. Dry temperature is a useful quantity, since it does not need additional background information in its retrieval. However, it can only be safely used as proxy for physical temperature, where moisture is negligible. The altitude region above which water vapor does not play a dominant role anymore, depends primarily on latitude and season. In this study we first investigated the influence of water vapor on dry temperature RO profiles. Hence, we analyzed the maximum altitude down to which monthly mean dry temperature profiles can be regarded as being equivalent to physical temperature. This was done by examining dry temperature to physical temperature differences of monthly mean analysis fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF, studied from 2006 until 2010. We introduced cutoff criteria, where maximum temperature differences of −0.1, −0.05, and −0.02 K were allowed (dry temperature is always lower than physical temperature, and computed the corresponding altitudes. As an example, a temperature difference of −0.05 K in the tropics was found at an altitude of about 14 km, while at higher northern latitudes in winter it was found at an altitude of about 9 to 10 km, in summer at about 11 km. Furthermore, regarding climate change, we expect an increase of absolute humidity in the atmosphere. This possible trend in water vapor could yield a wrongly interpreted dry temperature

  14. Influence of changes in humidity on dry temperature in GPS RO climatologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Danzer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Radio occultation (RO data are increasingly used in climate research. Accurate phase (change measurements of Global Positioning System (GPS signals are the basis for the retrieval of near-vertical profiles of bending angle, microwave refractivity, density, pressure, and temperature. If temperature is calculated from observed refractivity with the assumption that water vapor is zero, the product is called "dry temperature", which is commonly used to study earth's atmosphere, e.g., when analyzing temperature trends due to global warming. Dry temperature is a useful quantity, since it does not need additional background information in its retrieval. However, it can only be safely used as proxy for physical temperature, where moisture is negligible. The altitude region above which water vapor does not play a dominant role anymore, depends primarily on latitude and season. In this study we first investigated the influence of water vapor on dry temperature RO profiles. Hence, we analyzed the maximum altitude down to which monthly mean dry temperature profiles can be regarded as being equivalent to physical temperature. This was done by examining dry temperature to physical temperature differences of monthly mean analysis fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF, studied from 2006 until 2010. We introduced cutoff criteria, where maximum temperature differences of −0.1, −0.05, and −0.02 K were allowed (dry temperature is always lower than physical temperature, and computed the corresponding altitudes. As an example, a temperature difference of −0.05 K in the tropics was found at an altitude of about 14 km, while at higher northern latitudes in winter it was found at an altitude of about 9–10 km, in summer at about 11 km. Furthermore, regarding climate change, we expect an increase of absolute humidity in the atmosphere. This possible trend in water vapor could yield a wrongly interpreted dry temperature trend

  15. The Potential Impact of Climate Change on Soil Properties and Processes and Corresponding Influence on Food Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Brevik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available According to the IPCC, global temperatures are expected to increase between 1.1 and 6.4 °C during the 21st century and precipitation patterns will be altered. Soils are intricately linked to the atmospheric/climate system through the carbon, nitrogen, and hydrologic cycles. Because of this, altered climate will have an effect on soil processes and properties. Recent studies indicate at least some soils may become net sources of atmospheric C, lowering soil organic matter levels. Soil erosion by wind and water is also likely to increase. However, there are many things we need to know more about. How climate change will affect the N cycle and, in turn, how that will affect C storage in soils is a major research need, as is a better understanding of how erosion processes will be influenced by changes in climate. The response of plants to elevated atmospheric CO2 given limitations in nutrients like N and P, and how that will influence soil organic matter levels, is another critical research need. How soil organic matter levels react to changes in the C and N cycles will influence the ability of soils to support crop growth, which has significant ramifications for food security. Therefore, further study of soil-climate interactions in a changing world is critical to addressing future food security concerns.

  16. Do Subjective Memory Complaints Lead or Follow Objective Cognitive Change? A Five-Year Population Study of Temporal Influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snitz, Beth E; Small, Brent J; Wang, Tianxiu; Chang, Chung-Chou H; Hughes, Tiffany F; Ganguli, Mary

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between subjective memory complaints (SM) and objective memory (OM) performance in aging has been variably characterized in a substantial literature, to date. In particular, cross-sectional studies often observe weak or no associations. We investigated whether subjective memory complaints and objectively measured cognition influence each other over time, and if so, which is the stronger pathway of change-objective to subjective, or subjective to objective-or whether they are both important. Using bivariate latent change score modeling in data from a population study (N=1980) over 5 annual assessment cycles, we tested four corresponding hypotheses: (1) no coupling between SM and OM over time; (2) SM as leading indicator of change in OM; (3) OM as leading indicator of change in SM; (4) dual coupling over time, with both SM and OM leading subsequent change in the other. We also extended objective cognition to two other domains, language and executive functions. The dual-coupling models best fit the data for all three objective cognitive domains. The SM-OM temporal dynamics differ qualitatively compared to other domains, potentially reflecting changes in insight and self-awareness specific to memory impairment. Subjective memory and objective cognition reciprocally influence each other over time. The temporal dynamics between subjective and objective cognition in aging are nuanced, and must be carefully disentangled to shed light on the underlying processes. PMID:26477680

  17. Influence of the Changes Brought by INCOTERMS 2010 to International Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Dugan; Iuliana Talmaciu

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the changes that have occurred in international trade terms – INCOTERMS 2010. The authors make an analysis of the changes and the new clauses in international trade and divide these into two broad categories: structural changes and conceptual changes. In this analysis we present an exhaustive approach, taking into account developments of International Commercial Terms from its first edition in 1936 to the latest revision in 2010.

  18. General knowledge about climate change, factors influencing risk perception and willingness to insure

    OpenAIRE

    Menny, Claas; Osberghaus, Daniel; Pohl, Max; Werner, Ute

    2011-01-01

    In two empirical surveys in Germany the link between the information respondents have about climate change and their risk perception of the phenomenon was analysed. We found that a better understanding of the effects of climate change might lead to a decrease of the perceived hazard. In contrast, a high self-declared knowledge about climate change might correspond with higher risk perception. Further factors affecting the risk perception of climate change are gender, experience of extreme wea...

  19. The influence of changes in glacier extent and surface elevation on modeled mass balance

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, F.

    2010-01-01

    Glaciers are widely recognized as unique demonstration objects for climate change impacts, mostly due to the strong change of glacier length in response to small climatic changes. However, glacier mass balance as the direct response to the annual atmospheric conditions can be better interpreted in meteorological terms. When the climatic signal is deduced from long-term mass balance data, changes in glacier geometry (i.e. surface extent and elevation) must be considered as such adjustments ...

  20. The Influence of Subcultures on Planned Change in a Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Mary G.; Guglielmino, Lucy

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative case study focusing on a collegewide change initiative was conducted to provide community college leaders with a more comprehensive and nuanced understanding of the role of subcultures in planned change. Research indicates that institutional culture is a primary factor in the success of change programs; however, little research…

  1. Global Dynamics of Infectious Disease with Arbitrary Distributed Infectious Period on Complex Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the current epidemic models assume that the infectious period follows an exponential distribution. However, due to individual heterogeneity and epidemic diversity, these models fail to describe the distribution of infectious periods precisely. We establish a SIS epidemic model with multistaged progression of infectious periods on complex networks, which can be used to characterize arbitrary distributions of infectious periods of the individuals. By using mathematical analysis, the basic reproduction number R0 for the model is derived. We verify that the R0 depends on the average distributions of infection periods for different types of infective individuals, which extend the general theory obtained from the single infectious period epidemic models. It is proved that if R0<1, then the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable; otherwise the unique endemic equilibrium exists such that it is globally asymptotically attractive. Finally numerical simulations hold for the validity of our theoretical results is given.

  2. Health systems perspectives - infectious diseases of poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Dale

    2012-01-01

    The right to health as a fundamental human right is enshrined in the World Health Organization's charter and has been reaffirmed in international agreements spanning decades. This new journal reminds us of the essential characteristic of poverty as a violent abuse of human rights. The context of poverty - its social, political and economic dimensions - remain in the reader's mind as evidence is provided on technical solutions to managing the infectious diseases that afflict poor populations world-wide. Applying a health systems framework to a discussion on infectious diseases of poverty emerges from the papers in this journal's first edition. Many of the articles discuss treatments, indicating the importance of pharmaceuticals for neglected diseases. Delivery strategies to reach impoverished populations also figure within this first round of papers. Innovative programs that provide diagnostics and treatment for infectious diseases to hard-to-reach rural and urban communities are needed clearly needed, and some good examples are discussed here. Future editions will explore other health system components, broadening the evidence base to increase understanding of effective and sustainable interventions to reduce the burden of infectious disease among the poor. The editors are to be congratulated on the release of this inaugural issue of the journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty. We look forward to reading subsequent editions. PMID:23848993

  3. Irradiation induced dimensional changes in graphite: The influence of sample size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Dimensional changes in irradiated anisotropic polycrystalline GR-280 graphite. ► We propose the model of anisotropic domains changing their shape under irradiation. ► Disorientation of domain structure explains observed dimensional changes. ► Macro-graphite deformation is related to shape-changes in finite size samples. - Abstract: Dimensional changes in irradiated anisotropic polycrystalline GR-280 graphite samples as measured in the parallel and perpendicular directions of extrusion revealed a mismatch between volume changes measured directly and those calculated using the generally accepted methodology based on length change measurements only. To explain this observation a model is proposed based on polycrystalline substructural elements – domains. Those domains are anisotropic, have different amplitudes of shape-changes with respect to the sample as a whole and are randomly orientated relative to the sample axes of symmetry. This domain model can explain the mismatch observed in experimental data. It is shown that the disoriented domain structure leads to the development of irradiation-induced stresses and to the dependence of the dimensional changes on the sizes of graphite samples chosen for the irradiation experiment. The authors derive the relationship between shape-changes in the finite size samples and the actual shape-changes observable on the macro-scale in irradiated graphite.

  4. Procalcitonin for the differential diagnosis of infectious and non-infectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome after cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Dong; Zhou, Jianxin; Haraguchi, Go; Arai, Hirokuni; Mitaka, Chieko

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was performed to assess the value of procalcitonin (PCT) for the differential diagnosis between infectious and non-infectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after cardiac surgery. Methods Patients diagnosed with SIRS after cardiac surgery between April 1, 2011 and March 31, 2013 were retrospectively studied. A total of 142 patients with SIRS, infectious (n = 47) or non-infectious (n = 95), were included. The patients with infectious SIRS included 11 with ...

  5. The influence of climate changes on carbon cycle in the russian forests. Data inventory and long-scale model prognoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokorin, A.O.; Nazarov, I.M.; Lelakin, A.L. [Inst. Global Climate and Ecology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The growing up climate changes arise the question about reaction of forests. Forests cover 770 Mha in Russia and are giant carbon reservoir. Climate changes cause disbalance in carbon budget that give additional CO{sub 2} exchange between forests and the atmosphere. The aim of the work is estimation of these fluxes. This problem is directly connected with an GHG inventory, vulnerability and mitigation assessment, which are necessary for future Russian Reports to UN FCCC. The work includes the following steps: (1) Collection of literature data as well as processing of the experimental data on influence of climate changes on forests, (2) Calculation of carbon budget as base for calculations of CO{sub 2} fluxes, (3) Developing of new version of CCBF (Carbon and Climate in Boreal Forests) model, (4) Model estimations of current and future CO{sub 2} fluxes caused by climate changes, forest cuttings, fires and reforestation

  6. The influence of organizational and national culture on the acceptance of organizational change: Empirical study in Serbian enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Šapić Srđan; Erić Jelena; Stojanović-Aleksić Vesna

    2009-01-01

    Organizational culture is one of the most important factors influencing the process of organizational change. As such it is the object of research and analysis in this paper. Key values held by the employees that impact the formation of organizational culture, as well as the feedback organizational culture has in determining organizational processes are explored. Different relevant classifications of organizational cultures are described depending on research focus. Special consideration is g...

  7. Influence of extraction type on the total phenolics, total flavonoids and total colour change of different varieties of fig extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Jokić, Stela; MUJIĆ, Ibrahim; Bucić-Kojić, Ana; Velić, Darko; Bilić, Mate; Planinić, Mirela; Lukinac, Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the influence of ultrasound-assisted extraction and solid-liquid extraction with 80% of aqueous ethanol solution on the total phenolics, total flavonoids and total colour change of extracts from five different varieties of figs (Bjelica, Termenjača, Crnica, Bružetka bijela and Šaraguja). The total phenolic content was determined by using Folin Ciocalteau assay. The content of total flavonoids was measured spectrophotometrically by using the aluminium chloride colourimetric ...

  8. Influence of the myocardial bridging phenomenon on the myocardial structure and the coronary arteries wall structure changes

    OpenAIRE

    Tomanović-Koković Jelena; Teofilovski-Parapid Gordana; Oklobdžija Mirjana; Kanjuh Vladimir; Kovačević Slobodan; Parapid Biljana; Koković Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Background/Aim. Our research was performed to evaluate the influences of the myocardial bridging of coronary arteries on the myocardial and coronary arteries wall structure changes, that could be a reason for multiple heart malfunctions. Methods. We analyzed the autopsy material, collected during a five-years period, and especially the group of 575 cases with the major aim to diagnose mors naturalis. In all cases with the presence of myocardial bridge over the arterial coronary wall revealed ...

  9. The morphological changes in liver and small intestine of rats under the chronic influence of ionizing radiation and cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphometric studies of a state of small intestine mucosa and liver of rats are realized under the chronic influence of γ-radiation (0.72 cGy/day) and cadmium with drinking water (0.01 mg Cd2+/l). The detected substantial changes of the liver histostructure in comparison with small intestine mucosa are possibly connected with the cadmium accumulation in cells and the enhancement of its toxic properties

  10. Changes and recovery of soil bacterial communities influenced by biological soil disinfestation as compared with chloropicrin-treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Mowlick, Subrata; Inoue, Takashi; Takehara, Toshiaki; Kaku, Nobuo; Ueki, Katsuji; Ueki, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    Soil bacterial composition, as influenced by biological soil disinfestation (BSD) associated with biomass incorporation was investigated to observe the effects of the treatment on the changes and recovery of the microbial community in a commercial greenhouse setting. Chloropicrin (CP) was also used for soil disinfestation to compare with the effects of BSD. The fusarium wilt disease incidence of spinach cultivated in the BSD- and CP-treated plots was reduced as compared with that in the untre...

  11. Wearing a safety harness during treadmill walking influences lower extremity kinematics mainly through changes in ankle regularity and local stability

    OpenAIRE

    Decker Leslie M; Cignetti Fabien; Stergiou Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Wearing a harness during treadmill walking ensures the subject's safety and is common practice in biomedical engineering research. However, the extent to which such practice influences gait is unknown. This study investigated harness-related changes in gait patterns, as evaluated from lower extremity kinematics during treadmill walking. Findings Healthy subjects (n = 10) walked on a treadmill at their preferred speed for 3 minutes with and without wearing a harness (LiteGa...

  12. A Study on In-Line Tablet Coating—the Influence of Compaction and Coating on Tablet Dimensional Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Cahyadi, C.; Tan, B. X.; Chan, L. W.; Heng, P. W. S.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to coating, tablets are usually stored for a definite period to enable complete strain recovery and prevent subsequent volumetric expansion-related coating defects. In-line coating is defined as the coating of tablets immediately after compaction. In-line coating will be expected to improve manufacturing efficiencies. In this study, the possibility of in-line coating was studied by evaluating the influence of compaction and coating on tablet dimensional changes. The use of tapered dies ...

  13. Have geographical influences and changing abundance led to sub-population structure in the Ahiak caribou herd, Nunavut, Canada?

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Gunn; Kim G. Poole; Jack Wierzchowski; Nishi, John S.; Jan Adamczewski; Don Russell; Adrian D'Hont

    2013-01-01

    We examined the premise that changing abundance and environmental conditions influence the seasonal dispersion and distribution of migratory tundra caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus). The Ahiak herd’s (north-central Nunavut Territory, Canada) calving shifted from dispersed on islands to gregarious calving on the mainland coast. As abundance further increased, the calving ground elongated east and west such that we proposed a longitudinal climate gradient. As well, the calving ground’s ...

  14. EXAMINATION OF FACTORS INFLUENCING THE VARIABILITY OF YEAST AMOUNT IN THE CONTEXT OF PH CHANGES IN BOTTLED WINES

    OpenAIRE

    Ladislav Mura; Ľubomír Lopašovský; Dagmar Kozelová; Lucia Zeleňáková; Eva Matejková

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this paper was to examine of factors (manufacturer, temperature and storage time) influencing the variability of yeast amount and pH changes in bottled white wines. It was confirmed that wine coming from the business network was better quality in contract to domestic wine. We have assumed that domestic wine was contaminated during the manufacturing process, while the most probable reason was imperfect filtration of wine, or its contamination during the bottling. The results showed that...

  15. The influence of refractive index change and initial bending of cantilevers on the optical lever readout method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Søren; Greve, Anders; Svendsen, Winnie Edith;

    2010-01-01

    It has been speculated that the initial bending of cantilevers has a major influence on the detector signal in a cantilever-based sensor using the optical lever readout method. We have investigated theoretically as well as experimentally the changes induced in the detector signal when the optical...... experimentally using an environmental chamber and varying the pressure. We sketch routes to circumvent the problem and formulas suitable for data treatment are given....

  16. Conceptual Model for Automatic Early Warning Information System of Infectious Diseases Based on Internet Reporting Surveillance System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA-QI MA; LI-PING WANG; XUAO-PENG QI; XIAO-MING SHI; GONG-HUAN YANG

    2007-01-01

    Objective To establish a conceptual model of automatic early warning of infectious diseases based on internet reporting surveillance system,with a view to realizing an automated warning system on a daily basis and timely identifying potential outbreaks of infectious diseases. Methods The statistic conceptual model was established using historic surveillance data with movable percentile method.Results Based on the infectious disease surveillance information platform,the conceptualmodelfor early warning was established.The parameter,threshold,and revised sensitivity and specificity of early warning value were changed to realize dynamic alert of infectious diseases on a daily basis.Conclusion The instructive conceptual model of dynamic alert can be used as a validating tool in institutions of infectious disease surveillance in different districts.

  17. Laboratory simulation of temperature changes by insolation and fire and their influence on physical properties of travertines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Kompaníková

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of insolation and fire represents important factor for study of historical object destruction. The results have shown that temperature changes by insolation (60°C and fire (200, 400, 600, and 800°C significantly contributed to the change of physical properties of Slovak travertine from Spišské Podhradie and Ludrová. Research was oriented not only on a visual change of rocks (colour change, brightness and surface roughness, but also on the quantitative and qualitative analyses of mineral composition, connected with structural changes as well as study of selected physical properties. The micropetrographic study indicated that increasing of temperature was followed by expand of fractures as reflected even change of true and specific bulk density. Significant increase of microcracks was determined at 600°C by optical microscopy. The macroscopic observation of microcracks was visible at 800°C subsequently followed by destruction of samples. By spectrophotometry was visible colour change by increasing of temperature. The brightness of travertine samples was decreasing till 600°C, but after 600°C it became markedly increasing. With increasing of temperature travertine surface samples had also change from a few hundred nanometres to several microns. The investigation of thermal decay by insolation and fire may lead to an improved assessment of natural building stones that have been used as building and decorative stone on ancient monument.

  18. Biodiversity loss and infectious diseases: chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    When conservation biologists think about infectious diseases, their thoughts are mostly negative. Infectious diseases have been associated with the extinction and endangerment of some species, though this is rare, and other factors like habitat loss and poorly regulated harvest still are the overwhelming drivers of endangerment. Parasites are pervasive and play important roles as natural enemies on par with top predators, from regulating population abundances to maintaining species diversity. Sometimes, parasites themselves can be endangered. However, it seems unlikely that humans will miss extinct parasites. Parasites are often sensitive to habitat loss and degradation, making them positive indicators of ecosystem “health”. Conservation biologists need to carefully consider infectious diseases when planning conservation actions. This can include minimizing the movement of domestic and invasive species, vaccination, and culling.

  19. Spatial dynamics of airborne infectious diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, M; Drossinos, Y

    2011-01-01

    Disease outbreaks, such as those of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome in 2003 and the 2009 pandemic A(H1N1) influenza, have highlighted the potential for airborne transmission in indoor environments. Respirable pathogen-carrying droplets provide a vector for the spatial spread of infection with droplet transport determined by diffusive and convective processes. An epidemiological model describing the spatial dynamics of disease transmission is presented. The effects of an ambient airflow, as an infection control, are incorporated leading to a delay equation, with droplet density dependent on the infectious density at a previous time. It is found that small droplets ($\\sim 0.4\\ \\mu$m) generate a negligible infectious force due to the small viral load and the associated duration they require to transmit infection. In contrast, larger droplets ($\\sim 4\\ \\mu$m) can lead to an infectious wave propagating through a fully susceptible population or a secondary infection outbreak for a localised susceptible population...

  20. Infectious Discitis and Spondylodiscitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    In children, infectious discitis (D) and infectious spondylodiscitis (SD) are rare diseases that can cause significant clinical problems, including spinal deformities and segmental instabilities. Moreover, when the infection spreads into the spinal channel, D and SD can cause devastating neurologic complications. Early diagnosis and treatment may reduce these risks. The main aim of this paper is to discuss recent concepts regarding the epidemiology, microbiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric D and SD. It is highlighted that particular attention must be paid to the identification of the causative infectious agent and its sensitivity to antibiotics, remembering that traditional culture frequently leads to negative results and modern molecular methods can significantly increase the detection rate. Several different bacterial pathogens can cause D and SD, and, in some cases, particularly those due to Staphylococcus aureus, Kingella kingae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Brucella spp., the appropriate choice of drug is critical to achieve cure. PMID:27070599

  1. Infectious diseases and securitization: WHO's dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiyong; Karackattu, Joe Thomas

    2011-06-01

    The threat posed by infectious diseases has been increasingly framed as a security issue. The UN Security Council's Resolution 1308, which designated HIV/AIDS as a threat to international security, evidenced the securitization process. Using securitization theory as a theoretical tool, this article explores the securitization of infectious diseases in the World Health Organization (WHO). While WHO has tended to securitize infectious diseases since 2000, it has encountered a dilemma in the process because of the inherent asymmetry of interest between developed and developing countries. The act of securitization in WHO currently remains mostly a rhetorical device, since WHO's norms emblematic of securitization have not been backed by operational measures for verification or enforcement due to these asymmetric interests. PMID:21612367

  2. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-12-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  3. Influence of pectin on radiation changes in free radical and antioxidant system in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the influence of apple and orange pectin on the metabolic processes, free radical oxidation and antioxidant systems state in rats exposed to the dose of 1 Gy of external gamma-irradiation. Favourable effect of the investigated pectins on the proteins, enzyme activity, peroxide-resistant erythrocytes as well as induced activity of blood serum peroxidation processes in the blood serum and liver of the exposed animals was established. Apple pectin influenced more effectively the blood globulins whereas orange one-enzyme activity, anti peroxide and antioxidant state of the organism

  4. Influence of higher sodium substitutions on magnetic entropy change and transition temperature in lanthanum manganites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Sethulakshmi; I A Al Omari; M R Anantharaman

    2015-10-01

    Present investigation focuses on the variation of magnetic entropy change for higher sodium substitution above 50% in lanthanum manganites. Magnetic measurements indicated that all samples exhibit a ferromagnetic ordering near room temperature. Magnetic isotherms for different temperatures above and below 300 K were recorded and the magnetic entropy change for compositions belonging to La1−Na MnO3 for = 0.6 to 0.9 in steps of 0.1 was estimated for different applied magnetic fields. It has been found that the compositions having a Na substitution of 0.6 are having the largest entropy change, and the entropy change increases with applied magnetic field for all compositions. The change in entropy also decreases with increase in substitution of sodium. A notable change in transition temperature with Na concentration is also found in this sample series.

  5. How changes in nutrition have influenced the development of allergic diseases in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peroni Diego G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The increasing prevalence of allergic diseases in childhood in the last decades could be linked to concomitant dietary changes, especially with the modified and lower consumption of fruit, vegetables and minerals. The consumption of these foods by pregnant women and children in the first years of life seems to be associated with a reduced risk of asthma and related symptoms. Foods that can prevent the development of wheezing through their antioxidant effects contain vitamin C and selenium; blood levels of these elements correlate negatively with the risk of wheezing. Intake of vitamin E during pregnancy also appears to be correlated with a reduced risk of wheezing for the unborn child. Similarly, low intake of zinc and carotenoids by pregnant women is associated with an increased risk of wheezing and asthma in childhood. Fiber also has anti-inflammatory properties and protective effects against allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis and asthma. The consumption of fat influences the development of the airways. Populations in Western countries have increased their consumption of n-6 PUFAs and, in parallel, reduced n-3 PUFAs. This has led to decreased production of PGE2, which is believed to have a protective effect against inflammation of the airways. Conflicting hypotheses also concern vitamin D; both an excess and a deficiency of vitamin D, in fact, have been associated with an increased risk of asthma. Further studies on the role of these substances are necessary before any conclusions can be drawn on a clinical level. Astratto La crescente prevalenza negli ultimi decenni delle malattie allergiche in età pediatrica potrebbe essere legata a concomitanti cambiamenti nella dieta, in particolare alla minore e modificata introduzione di frutta, verdura e minerali. Il consumo di questi alimenti da parte delle donne in gravidanza e dei bambini nei primi anni di vita sembra essere associato ad un ridotto rischio di asma e di sintomi

  6. How changes in nutrition have influenced the development of allergic diseases in childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of allergic diseases in childhood in the last decades could be linked to concomitant dietary changes, especially with the modified and lower consumption of fruit, vegetables and minerals. The consumption of these foods by pregnant women and children in the first years of life seems to be associated with a reduced risk of asthma and related symptoms. Foods that can prevent the development of wheezing through their antioxidant effects contain vitamin C and selenium; blood levels of these elements correlate negatively with the risk of wheezing. Intake of vitamin E during pregnancy also appears to be correlated with a reduced risk of wheezing for the unborn child. Similarly, low intake of zinc and carotenoids by pregnant women is associated with an increased risk of wheezing and asthma in childhood. Fiber also has anti-inflammatory properties and protective effects against allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis and asthma. The consumption of fat influences the development of the airways. Populations in Western countries have increased their consumption of n-6 PUFAs and, in parallel, reduced n-3 PUFAs. This has led to decreased production of PGE2, which is believed to have a protective effect against inflammation of the airways. Conflicting hypotheses also concern vitamin D; both an excess and a deficiency of vitamin D, in fact, have been associated with an increased risk of asthma. Further studies on the role of these substances are necessary before any conclusions can be drawn on a clinical level. Astratto La crescente prevalenza negli ultimi decenni delle malattie allergiche in età pediatrica potrebbe essere legata a concomitanti cambiamenti nella dieta, in particolare alla minore e modificata introduzione di frutta, verdura e minerali. Il consumo di questi alimenti da parte delle donne in gravidanza e dei bambini nei primi anni di vita sembra essere associato ad un ridotto rischio di asma e di sintomi correlati. Gli alimenti che

  7. Evaluation of factors influencing root-induced changes of copper fractionation in rhizosphere of a calcareous soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major factors influencing the root-induced copper fractionation changes within the rhizosphere of maize, wheat, pea, and soybean seedlings were evaluated using a contaminated calcareous soil. The effects of acidification, alkalization, and introduction of root exudates were investigated by addition of acid, alkaline and root exudates from solution cultures, prior to incubation and copper fractionation. Raw and sterilized soils were compared for changes of copper fractionation in the rhizosphere using rhizoboxes with maize, wheat, pea and soybean seedlings. The results indicated that the general trend in considerable changes was similar among the plant species studied. The rhizosphere experienced a depletion of carbonate associated and organic bound copper along with an accumulation of exchangeable and Fe-Mn oxide bound copper. The resulting significant influence of root exudates on copper fractionation appears to have been produced through complexation rather than acidification or alkalization. The increase in exchangeable copper in rhizosphere was strengthened by microorganisms. - Influence of root exudates on copper fractionation appeared to be due to complexation, rather than acidification or alkalisation

  8. Indicators for the 'Convention on biodiversity 2010". Influence of climate change on biodiversity

    OpenAIRE

    Nijhof, B.S.J.; Vos, C.C.; Strien, van, R.T.

    2007-01-01

    This report takes the first steps for the development of a climate change indicator system, based on the different responses of species to climate change. The usefulness of several climate change indicators is tested, by analyzing the relation between indicators and population trends of target species. The study is restricted to terrestrial ecosystems. Also a reference list for cold, warmth and neutral preferent indicator groups is provided. An inventory of CBS and Alterra

  9. The influence of organizational culture on organizational preferences towards the choice of organizational change strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Janićijević Nebojša

    2012-01-01

    Organizational culture, through its assumptions, values, norms and symbols, determines the way in which the members of an organization perceive and interpret the reality within and around their organization, as well as the way they behave in that reality. For this reason we may assume that organizational culture has an impact on the way in which an organization changes, and that matching of organizational culture and change strategy will improve the efficiency of the change process. In ...

  10. Changes in the Factors Influencing Public Acceptance of Nuclear Power Generation in Japan Since the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, Norifumi; Tsuchida, Shoji; Shiotani, Takamasa

    2016-01-01

    Public support for nuclear power generation has decreased in Japan since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in March 2011. This study examines how the factors influencing public acceptance of nuclear power changed after this event. The influence factors examined are perceived benefit, perceived risk, trust in the managing bodies, and pro-environmental orientation (i.e., new ecological paradigm). This study is based on cross-sectional data collected from two online nationwide surveys: one conducted in November 2009, before the nuclear accident, and the other in October 2011, after the accident. This study's target respondents were residents of Aomori, Miyagi, and Fukushima prefectures in the Tohoku region of Japan, as these areas were the epicenters of the Great East Japan Earthquake and the locations of nuclear power stations. After the accident, trust in the managing bodies was found to have a stronger influence on perceived risk, and pro-environmental orientation was found to have a stronger influence on trust in the managing bodies; however, perceived benefit had a weaker positive influence on public acceptance. We also discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings. PMID:26224041

  11. Non-infectious endophthalmitis after vitrectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yao; CHEUNG Ning; TIAN Bei; WEI Wen-bin

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-infectious endophthalmitis was reported to occur after cataract surgery or intravitreal injections.This study reported a series of patients having non-infectious endophthalmitis after pars plana vitrectomy in the same two operation rooms during the same period to estimate the risk factors for non-infectious endophthalmitis after vitrectomy.Methods Medical records of patients who presented with severe non-infectious endophthalmitis following vitrectomy between May 13 and June 8,2011,were reviewed.The presenting symptoms and signs were collected,including visual acuity,intraocular pressure,cornea and anterior chamber activity.The treatments and results of microbiology examination were also recorded and analyzed.Results Ten patients were identified with severe non-infectious endophthalmitis,presenting 1 day after pars plana vitrectomy.Three eyes (30%) had previous intraocular surgeries,four (40%) had proliferative diabetic retinopathy,and one (10%) got pars plana vitrectomy combinded with phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation.All the patients were initially treated with topical and/or oral steroids.Only two patients had intravenous antibiotics because of the atypical presentation.One eye had paracentesis because of high intraocular pressure and the aqueous sample was sent for microbiological examination.The culture of the aqueous,air in the operation room,the swab from hand of surgeons,infusion fluid,and vitrectomy effluent were all negative for bacteria and fungi.The inflammation regressed rapidly after the initial treatment.Conclusions Intraocular surgery history,poor general health status,longer operation time,and more surgical procedures are the risk factors for non-infectious endophthalmitis after vitrectomy.It responds well to steroids.

  12. Bone scan in diagnosis of infectious osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scan with Technetium 99m is harmless method of evaluation of skeletal lesions. It is safe in pediatrics age group and it can be used in early diagnosis of infectious osteoarthritis. Bone scan differentiate osteomyelitis from cellulitis, and also it may help in diagnosis of subclinical involvement of rheumatoid arthritis, benign and malignant bone tumors, stress fractures and periostitis. We report results of bone scan in 30 pediatrics patients as follow: osteomyelitis 9 cases, cellulitis 4 cases, infectious arthritis 7 cases, tuberculous osteoarthritis 2 cases, rheumatoid arthritis 2 cases, and other different diseases 9 cases

  13. Bone scan in diagnosis of infectious osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scan with Technetium 99m is harmless method of evaluation of skeletal lesions. It is safe in pediatrics age group and it can be used in early diagnosis of infectious osteo-arthritis. Bone scan differentiate osteomyelitis from cellulitis, and also it may help in diagnosis of subclinical involvement of rheumatoid arthritis, benign and malignant bone tumors, stress fractures and periostitis. We report results of bone scan in 30 pediatric patients as follows: osteomyelitis 9 cases, cellulitis 4 cases, infectious arthritis 4 cases, tuberculous osteoarthritis 2 cases, rheumatoid arthritis 2 cases and other different diseases 9 cases

  14. Method for early detection of infectious mononucleosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, K.E.

    1982-08-10

    Early detection of infectious mononucleosis is carried out using a sample of human blood by isolating and identifying the presence of Inmono proteins in the sample from a two-dimensional protein map with the proteins being characterized by having isoelectric banding as measured in urea of about -16 to -17 with respect to certain isoelectric point standards and molecular mass of about 70 to 75 K daltons as measured in the presence of sodium dodecylsulfate containing polyacrylamide gels, the presence of the Inmono proteins being correlated with the existence of infectious mononucleosis.

  15. Drinking water vaccination against infectious laryngotracheitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hilbink, F; Smit, T.; Yadin, H.

    1981-01-01

    Chickens varying in age from ten days to five years were vaccinated with 10(1.3), 10(2.3) and 10(3.3) EID50 per bird of a commercial infectious laryngotracheitis drinking water vaccine. The vaccine gave no adverse reaction in the dose range tested. Five weeks after administration of 10(3.3) EID50 per bird 70% were protected against the intratracheal challenge with virulent infectious laryngotracheitis virus. Doses of 10(1.3) and 10(2.3) EID50 per bird did not give protection. No serological r...

  16. Non-infectious inflammatory genital lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassi, Lucio; Bilenchi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    The genitalia may be the site of non-infectious inflammatory lesions that are generally manifested as balanoposthitis and vulvovaginitis. In men, these forms constitute 50% of all balanoposthitis forms, and in women, vulvovaginitis frequency is even higher. They consist of genital locations of general skin diseases, such as psoriasis, lichen planus, lichen sclerosus, and other clinical entities with their own physiognomy, such as Zoon's balanitis-vulvitis. Diagnosis of genital non-infectious inflammatory lesions is usually made on clinical criteria. A biopsy is only necessary for the identification of clinical conditions that may simulate inflammatory form but are actually premalignant processes. PMID:24559568

  17. Changing Times in England: The Influence on Geography Teachers' Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Clare

    2012-01-01

    School geography in England has been characterised as a pendulum swinging between policies that emphasise curriculum and pedagogy alternately. In this paper, I illustrate the influence of these shifts on geography teacher's professional practice, by drawing on three "moments" from my experience as a student, teacher and teacher educator. Barnett's…

  18. Corporate influence and conflicts of interest: assessment of veterinary medical curricular changes and student perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowers, Kristy L; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina M; Hellyer, Peter W; Kogan, Lori R

    2015-01-01

    The ethics document of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges provides guiding principles for veterinary schools to develop conflict of interest policies. These policies regulate faculty and student interactions with industry, potentially reducing the influence companies have on students' perceptions and future prescribing practices. This paper examines the implementation of a conflict of interest policy and related instructional activities at one veterinary college in the US. To inform policy and curricular development, survey data were collected regarding veterinary students' attitudes toward pharmaceutical marketing, including their perceptions of their own susceptibility to bias in therapeutic decisions. Responses from this group of students later served as control data for assessing the effectiveness of educational programs in the content area. A conflict of interest policy was then implemented and presented to subsequent classes of entering students. Classroom instruction and relevant readings were provided on ethics, ethical decision making, corporate influences, and the issue of corporate influence in medical student training. Within seven days of completing a learning program on conflict of interest issues, another cohort of veterinary students (the treatment group) were administered the same survey that had been administered to the control group. When compared with the control group who received no instruction, survey results for the treatment group showed moderate shifts in opinion, with more students questioning the practice of industry-sponsored events and use of corporate funds to reduce tuition. However, many veterinary students in the treatment group still reported they would not be personally influenced by corporate gifts. PMID:25526761

  19. Changing the conversation: the influence of emotions on conversational valence and alcohol consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Hendriks; B. van den Putte; G.J. de Bruijn

    2014-01-01

    Health campaign effects may be improved by taking interpersonal communication processes into account. The current study, which employed an experimental, pretest-posttest, randomized exposure design (N = 208), investigated whether the emotions induced by anti-alcohol messages influence conversational

  20. Genetically Influenced Change in Sensation Seeking Drives the Rise of Delinquent Behavior during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, K. Paige; Quinn, Patrick D.; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.

    2012-01-01

    Sensation seeking is associated with an increased propensity for delinquency, and emerging research on personality change suggests that mean levels of sensation seeking increase substantially from childhood to adolescence. The current study tested whether individual differences in the rate of change of sensation seeking predicted within-person…