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Sample records for chandra suzaku glast

  1. GLAST and Suzaku: Study on Cosmic-Ray Acceleration And Interaction in the Cosmos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamae, T.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2008-05-23

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multiagency mission scheduled for launch in the fall 2007. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary instrument of the mission, will survey the high energy sky found to be very dynamic and surprisingly diverse by its predecessor the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). GLAST-LAT will have a much improved sensitivity when compared with EGRET and extend the higher energy coverage to {approx} 300 GeV. The instrument is now mounted on the spacecraft and undergoing a suite of pre-flight tests. Data analysis software has been tried out by collaborators in two rounds of 'Data Challenges' using simulated observations including backgrounds. The instrument performance and observational data on selected sources presented here have been obtained through the Data Challenges in the collaborative efforts. There are features in the GLAST-LAT observation possibly unfamiliar to X-ray astronomers: (1) GLAST will operate mostly in the survey mode; (2) the foreground objects (gas, dust, and star-light) become gamma-ray sources; (3) multiple sources will be 'confused' because of the wide point-spread-function. The last two features will pose a challenge for analysis on extended Galactic sources such as supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae: multi-wavelength study with X-ray instruments like Suzaku and atmospheric Chrenkov telescopes will become essential to dig out the underlying physics.

  2. Contemporaneous Chandra HETG and Suzaku X-ray observations of NGC 4051

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobban, A. P.; Reeves, J. N.; Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Braito, V.; Kraemer, S. B.; Crenshaw, D. M.

    2011-07-01

    We present the results of a deep 300 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the highly variable narrow-line Seyfert Type 1 galaxy NGC 4051. The HETG spectrum reveals 28 significant soft X-ray ionized lines in either emission or absorption; primarily originating from H-like and He-like K-shell transitions of O, Ne, Mg and Si (including higher order lines and strong forbidden emission lines from O VII and Ne IX) plus high-ionization L-shell transitions from Fe XVII to Fe XXII and lower ionization inner-shell lines (e.g. O VI). Modelling the data with XSTAR requires four distinct ionization zones for the gas, all outflowing with velocities log ξ= 4.1+0.2-0.1; vout˜-0.02c) which potentially may have a significant effect on the host galaxy environment via feedback. Finally, we also simultaneously model the broad-band 2008 XIS+HXD (Hard X-ray Detector) Suzaku data with archival Suzaku data from 2005 when the source was observed to have entered an extended period of low flux in an attempt to analyse the cause of the long-term spectral variability. We find that we can account for this by allowing for large variations in the normalization of the intrinsic power-law component which may be interpreted as being due to significant changes in the covering fraction of a Compton-thick partial-coverer obscuring the central continuum emission.

  3. Contemporaneous Chandra HETG and Suzaku X-ray Observations of NGC 4051

    CERN Document Server

    Lobban, A P; Miller, L; Turner, T J; Braito, V; Kraemer, S B; Crenshaw, D M

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a deep 300 ks Chandra HETG observation of the highly variable narrow-line Seyfert Type 1 galaxy NGC 4051. The HETG spectrum reveals 28 significant soft X-ray ionised lines in either emission or absorption; primarily originating from H-like and He-like K-shell transitions of O, Ne, Mg and Si (including higher order lines and strong forbidden emission lines from O VII and Ne IX) plus high ionisation L-shell transitions from Fe XVII to Fe XXII and lower ionisation inner-shell lines (e.g. O VI). Modelling the data with XSTAR requires four distinct ionisation zones for the gas, all outflowing with velocities < 1000 km/s. A selection of the strongest emission/absorption lines appear to be resolved with FWHM of ~600 km/s. We also present the results from a quasi-simultaneous 350 ks Suzaku observation of NGC 4051 where the XIS spectrum reveals strong evidence for blueshifted absorption lines at ~6.8 and ~7.1 keV, consistent with previous findings. Modelling with XSTAR suggests that this i...

  4. Suzaku and Chandra Observations of CIZA J1700.8$-$3144, a Cluster of Galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Hideyuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Tawara, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    We present the Chandra and Suzaku observations of 1RXS J170047.8$-$314442, located towards the Galactic bulge, to reveal a wide-band ($0.3$-$10$ keV) X-ray morphology and spectrum of this source. With the Chandra observation, no point source was found at the position of 1RXS J170047.8$-$314442. Alternatively, we revealed the presence of diffuse X-ray emission by the wide-band X-ray image obtained from the Suzaku XIS. Although the X-ray emission had a nearly circular shape with a spatial extent of $\\sim 3.5'$, the surface brightness profile was not axisymmetric; a bright spot-like emission was found at $\\sim 1'$ away in the north-western direction from the center. The radial profile of the surface brightness, except for this spot-like emission, was reproduced with a single $\\beta$-model; $\\beta$ and the core radius were found to be $1.02$ and $1.51'$, respectively. The X-ray spectrum of the diffuse emission showed an emission line at $\\sim 6$ keV, indicating an origin of a thermal plasma. The spectrum was well...

  5. Suzaku and Chandra observations of CIZA J1700.8-3144, a cluster of galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hideyuki; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Tawara, Yuzuru

    2017-02-01

    We present the Chandra and Suzaku observations of 1RXS J170047.8-314442, located towards the Galactic bulge, to reveal a wide-band (0.3-10 keV) X-ray morphology and spectrum of this source. With the Chandra observation, no point source was found at the position of 1RXS J170047.8-314442. Instead, we revealed the presence of diffuse X-ray emission, via the wide-band X-ray image obtained from the Suzaku XIS. Although the X-ray emission had a nearly circular shape with a spatial extent of ˜3{^'.}5, the surface brightness profile was not axisymmetric; a bright spot-like emission was found at ˜ 1' away in the northwestern direction from the center. The radial profile of the surface brightness, except for this spot-like emission, was reproduced with a single β-model; β and the core radius were found to be 1.02 and 1{^'.}51, respectively. The X-ray spectrum of the diffuse emission showed an emission line at ˜6 keV, indicating an origin of a thermal plasma. The spectrum was well explained with an absorbed, optically-thin thermal plasma model with a temperature of 6.2 keV and a redshift parameter of z = 0.14 ± 0.01. Hence, the X-ray emission was considered to arise from the hot gas associated with a cluster of galaxies. Our spectroscopic result confirmed the optical identification of 1RXS J170047.8-314442 by Kocevski et al. (2007, ApJ, 662, 224): CIZA J1700.8-3144, a member of the cluster catalogue in the Zone of Avoidance. The estimated bolometric X-ray luminosity of 5.9 × 1044 erg s-1 was among the lowest with this temperature, suggesting that this cluster is far from relaxed.

  6. The Outer Limits of Galaxy Clusters: Observations to the Virial Radius with Suzaku, XMM,and Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eric D.; Bautz, Marshall; George, Jithin; Mushotzky, Richard; Davis, David; Henry, J. Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The outskirts of galaxy clusters, near the virial radius, remain relatively unexplored territory and yet are vital to our understanding of cluster growth, structure, and mass. In this presentation, we show the first results from a program to constrain the sate of the outer intra-cluster medium (ICM) in a large sample of galaxy clusters, exploiting the strengths of three complementary X-ray observatories: Suzaku (low, stable background), XMM-Newton (high sensitivity),and Chandra (good spatial resolution). By carefully combining observations from the cluster core to beyond r200, we are able to identify and reduce systematic uncertainties that would impede our spatial and spectral analysis using a single telescope. Our sample comprises nine clusters at z is approximately 0.1-0.2 fully covered in azimuth to beyond r200, and our analysis indicates that the ICM is not in hydrostatic equilibrium in the cluster outskirts, where we see clear azimuthal variations in temperature and surface brightness. In one of the clusters, we are able to measure the diffuse X-ray emission well beyond r200, and we find that the entropy profile and the gas fraction are consistent with expectations from theory and numerical simulations. These results stand in contrast to recent studies which point to gas clumping in the outskirts; the extent to which differences of cluster environment or instrumental effects factor in this difference remains unclear. From a broader perspective, this project will produce a sizeable fiducial data set for detailed comparison with high-resolution numerical simulations.

  7. Corona, Jet, and Relativistic Line Models for Suzaku/RXTE/Chandra-HETG Observations of the Cygnus X-1 Hard State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Hanke, Manfred; Trowbridge, Sarah N.; Markoff, Sera B.; Wilms, Joern; Pottschmidt, Katja; Coppi, Paolo; Maitra, Dipankar; Davis, Jhn E.; Tramper, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Using Suzaku and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we have conducted a series of four simultaneous observations of the galactic black hole candidate Cyg X-1 in what were historically faint and spectrally hard "low states". Additionally, all of these observations occurred near superior conjunction with our line of sight to the X-ray source passing through the dense phases of the "focused wind" from the mass donating secondary. One of our observations was also simultaneous with observations by the Chandra-High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). These latter spectra are crucial for revealing the ionized absorption due to the secondary s focused wind. Such absorption is present and must be accounted for in all four spectra. These simultaneous data give an unprecedented view of the 0.8-300 keV spectrum of Cyg X-1, and hence bear upon both corona and X-ray emitting jet models of black hole hard states. Three models fit the spectra well: coronae with thermal or mixed thermal/non-thermal electron populations, and jets. All three models require a soft component that we fit with a low temperature disk spectrum with an inner radius of only a few tens of GM/c2. All three models also agree that the known spectral break at 10 keV is not solely due to the presence of reflection, but each gives a different underlying explanation for the augmentation of this break. Thus whereas all three models require that there is a relativistically broadened Fe line, the strength and inner radius of such a line is dependent upon the specific model, thus making premature line-based estimates of the black hole spin in the Cyg X-1 system. We look at the relativistic line in detail, accounting for the narrow Fe emission and ionized absorption detected by HETG. Although the specific relativistic parameters of the line are continuum-dependent, none of the broad line fits allow for an inner disk radius that is > 40 GM/c(sup 2).

  8. IACHEC Cross-Calibration of Chandra, NuSTAR, Swift, Suzaku, and XMM-Newton with 3C 273 and PKS 2155-304

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, Kristin K; Forster, Karl; Guainazzi, Matteo; Marshall, Herman L; Miller, Eric D; Page, Kim L; Stuhlinge, Martin

    2016-01-01

    On behalf of the International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC), we present results from the cross-calibration campaigns in 2012 on 3C 273 and in 2013 on PKS 2155-304 between the then active X-ray observatories Chandra, NuSTAR, Suzaku, Swift and XMM-Newton. We compare measured fluxes between instrument pairs in two energy bands, 1-5 keV and 3-7 keV and calculate an average cross-normalization constant for each energy range. We review known cross-calibration features and provide a series of tables and figures to be used for evaluating cross-normalization constants obtained from other observations with the above mentioned observatories.

  9. Cross-calibration of the X-ray instruments onboard the Chandra, INTEGRAL, RXTE, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton observatories using G21.5-0.9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, M.; Guainazzi, M.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Beardmore, A. P.; Ishida, M.; Natalucci, L.; Posson-Brown, J. L. L.; Read, A. M.; Saxton, R. D.; Shaposhnikov, N. V.

    2011-01-01

    Context. For many years, X-ray astronomy missions have used the Crab nebula as a celestial calibration source for the X-ray flux and spectral shape. However, the object is often too bright for current and future missions equipped with instruments with improved sensitivity. Aims: We use G21.5-0.9, a pulsar-wind nebula with a time-constant power-law spectrum and a flux of a few milli-Crab in the X-ray band, as a viable, fainter substitute to the Crab. Using this source, we conduct a cross-calibration study of the instruments onboard currently active observatories: Chandra ACIS, Suzaku XIS, Swift XRT, and XMM-Newton EPIC (MOS and pn) for the soft-band, and INTEGRAL IBIS-ISGRI, RXTE PCA, and Suzaku HXD-PIN for the hard band. Methods: We extract spectra from all instruments and fit under the same astrophysical assumptions. We compare the spectral parameters of the G21.5-0.9 model: power-law photon index, H-equivalent column density of the interstellar photoelectric absorption, and flux in the soft (2-8 keV) or hard (15-50 keV) energy band. Results: We identify systematic differences in the best-fit parameter values unattributable to statistical scatter of the data alone. We interpret these differences as due to residual cross-calibration problems. The differences can be as large as 20% and 9% for the soft-band flux and power-law index, respectively, and 46% for the hard-band flux. The results are plotted and tabulated as a useful reference for future calibration and scientific studies using multiple missions. This work is based on the activity of the International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC).

  10. GLAST User Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.; Science Support Center, GLAST

    2006-12-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission will provide the user community with many scientific opportunities. The mission's interface with the user community is the GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC). Yearly guest investigator (GI) cycles will support research related to GLAST. After the first year GIs may propose pointed observations; however, as a consequence of the large field-of-view of GLAST's instruments, pointed observations will rarely have an advantage over the default survey mode. Data, analysis software and documentation will be provided through the GSSC website (http://glast.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/); the website also includes a library of scientific results, and a helpdesk.

  11. SNR 1E 0102.2-7219 as an X-ray Calibration Standard in the 0.5-1.0 keV Bandpass and Its Application to the CCD Instruments aboard Chandra, Suzaku, Swift and XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Plucinsky, Paul P; Foster, Adam; Haberl, Frank; Miller, Eric D; Pollock, A M T; Sembay, Steve

    2016-01-01

    We desire a simple comparison of the absolute effective areas of the current generation of CCD instruments onboard the following observatories: Chandra ACIS-S3, XMM-Newton (EPIC-MOS and EPIC-pn), Suzaku XIS, and Swift XRT and a straightforward comparison of the time-dependent response of these instruments across their respective mission lifetimes. We have been using 1E 0102.2-7219, the brightest supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud, to evaluate and modify the response models of these instruments. 1E 0102.2-7219 has strong lines of O, Ne, and Mg below 1.5 keV and little or no Fe emission to complicate the spectrum. As part of the activities of the International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC), we have developed a standard spectral model for 1E 0102.2-7219. The model is empirical in that it includes Gaussians for the identified lines, an absorption component in the Galaxy, another absorption component in the SMC, and two thermal continuum components. In our fits, the mode...

  12. SNR 1E 0102.2-7219 as an X-ray calibration standard in the 0.5-1.0 keV bandpass and its application to the CCD instruments aboard Chandra, Suzaku, Swift and XMM-Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucinsky, Paul P.; Beardmore, Andrew P.; Foster, Adam; Haberl, Frank; Miller, Eric D.; Pollock, Andrew M. T.; Sembay, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Context. The flight calibration of the spectral response of charge-coupled device (CCD) instruments below 1.5 keV is difficult in general because of the lack of strong lines in the on-board calibration sources typically available. This calibration is also a function of time due to the effects of radiation damage on the CCDs and/or the accumulation of a contamination layer on the filters or CCDs. Aims: We desire a simple comparison of the absolute effective areas of the current generation of CCD instruments onboard the following observatories: Chandra ACIS-S3, XMM-Newton (EPIC-MOS and EPIC-pn), Suzaku XIS, and Swift XRT and a straightforward comparison of the time-dependent response of these instruments across their respective mission lifetimes. Methods: We have been using 1E 0102.2-7219, the brightest supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud, to evaluate and modify the response models of these instruments. 1E 0102.2-7219 has strong lines of O, Ne, and Mg below 1.5 keV and little or no Fe emission to complicate the spectrum. The spectrum of 1E 0102.2-7219 has been well-characterized using the RGS gratings instrument on XMM-Newton and the HETG gratings instrument on Chandra. As part of the activities of the International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC), we have developed a standard spectral model for 1E 0102.2-7219 and fit this model to the spectra extracted from the CCD instruments. The model is empirical in that it includes Gaussians for the identified lines, an absorption component in the Galaxy, another absorption component in the SMC, and two thermal continuum components with different temperatures. In our fits, the model is highly constrained in that only the normalizations of the four brightest lines/line complexes (the O vii Heα triplet, O viii Lyα line, the Ne ix Heα triplet, and the Ne x Lyα line) and an overall normalization are allowed to vary, while all other components are fixed. We adopted this approach to

  13. GLAST LAT Full Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, Luca [INFN Pisa (Italy); Bastieri, Denis [Universita di Padova and INFN Padova (Italy); Boinee, Praveen [Universita di Udine (Italy); INFN Trieste (Italy); Brigida, Monica [Universita di Bari and INFN Bari (Italy); Cabras, Giuseppe [Universita di Udine (Italy); INFN Trieste (Italy); Cecchi, Claudia [Universita di Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); De Angelis, Alessandro [Universita di Udine (Italy); INFN Trieste (Italy); Favretto, Dario [Universita di Udine (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Fiorucci, Massimo [Universita di Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Frailis, Marco [Universita di Udine (Italy); INFN Trieste (Italy); Gargano, Fabio [Universita di Bari and INFN Bari (Italy); Giannitrapani, Riccardo [Universita di Udine (Italy); INFN Trieste (Italy); Giglietto, Nicola [Universita di Bari and INFN Bari (Italy); Kuss, Michael [INFN Pisa (Italy); Latronico, Luca [INFN Pisa (Italy); Lionetto, Andrea [Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' and INFN Roma-2 (Italy); Longo, Francesco [INFN Trieste (Italy); Universita di Trieste (Italy); Loparco, Francesco [Universita di Bari and INFN Bari (Italy); Lubrano, Pasquale [Universita di Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Marcucci, Francesca [Universita di Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Mazziotta, Mario Nicola [Universita di Bari and INFN Bari (Italy); Milotti, Edoardo [Universita di Udine (Italy); INFN Trieste (Italy); Morselli, Aldo [Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' and INFN Roma-2 (Italy); Omodei, Nicola [INFN Pisa (Italy) and Universita di Siena (Italy)]. E-mail: nicola.omodei@pi.infn.it; Pepe, Monica [Universita di Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy); Rando, Riccardo [Universita di Padova and INFN Padova (Italy); Razzano, Massimiliano [INFN Pisa (Italy); Spandre, Gloria [INFN Pisa (Italy); Tosti, Gino [Universita di Perugia and INFN Perugia (Italy)

    2006-01-15

    This paper presents the simulation of the GLAST high energy gamma-ray telescope. The simulation package, written in C++, is based on the Geant4 toolkit, and it is integrated into a general framework used to process events. A detailed simulation of the electronic signals inside Silicon detectors has been provided and it is used for the particle tracking, which is handled by a dedicated software. A unique repository for the geometrical description of the detector has been realized using the XML language and a C++ library to access this information has been designed and implemented. As first application of the GLAST LAT software, one day of simulated data has been produced. This paper outlines the contribution developed by the Italian GLAST software group.

  14. The Glast Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will include a secondary instrument to augment the observatory's capabilities for GRB studies. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBK is a collaboration between Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Huntsville, Alabama, and the Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. The purpose of the GBM is to extend energy coverage below the main instrument's lower limit of about 20 MeV, and to provide an on-board burst trigger and approximate location. The instrument consists of twelve NaI detectors and two BGO detectors. This combination provides energy coverage from a few keV up to about 30 MeV.

  15. GRB Simulations in GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omodei, Nicola; /INFN, Pisa; Battelino, Milan; /Stockholm Observ.; Komin, Nukri; /Montpellier U.; Longo, Francesco; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; McEnery, Julie; /NASA, Goddard; Ryde, Felix; /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled to be launched in fall of 2007, is the next generation satellite for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair conversion telescope built with a high precision silicon tracker, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter and a plastic anticoincidence shield. The LAT will survey the sky in the energy range between 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its highly successful predecessor EGRET. LAT will observe Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in an energy range never explored before; to tie these frontier observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We briefly present the instruments onboard the GLAST satellite, their synergy in the GRB observations and the work done so far by the collaboration in simulation, analysis, and GRB sensitivity estimation.

  16. The Synergy of Gamma-Ray Burst Detectors in the GLAST Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous observations by the large number of gamma-ray burst detectors that will operate in the GLAST era will provide the spectra, lightcurves and locations necessary for studying burst physics and testing the putative relations between intrinsic burst properties. I review the burst detection sensitivities, spectral bands, and localization capabilities of the GLAST (GBM and LAT), Swift (BAT), INTEGRAL (ISGRI), Suzaku (wAM), AGILE (Super-AGILE) and wind (Konus) detectors; the detectors' energy band and the accumulation timescale of their trigger system affect their sensitivity to hard vs. soft and long vs. short bursts. In addition, I estimate the rate of simultaneous burst observations. In particular, coordination of the Swift observing plan consistent with Swift's other science objectives could increase the rate of GLAST bursts with redshifts

  17. Suzaku observation of the LINER NGC 4102

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Martin, O; Braito, V; Masegosa, J; Marquez, I; Mateos, S; Acosta-Pulido, J A; Martinez, M A; Ebrero, J; Esquej, P; O'Brien, P; Tueller, J; Warwick, R S; Watson, M G

    2010-01-01

    Low ionisation nuclear emission-line region (LINER) nuclei have been claimed to be different than other active galactic nuclei (AGN) due to the presence of complex absorbing structures along the line-of-sight and/or an inefficient mode of accretion onto the supermassive black hole. However, this issue is still open. We have investigated the broad band X-ray spectrum of NGC 4102, one of the most luminous LINERs in the Swift/BAT survey. We studied a 80 ksec Suzaku spectrum of NGC 4102, together with archival Chandra and Swift/BAT observations. We also studied the optical (3.5m/TWIN at Calar Alto observatory) and near-infrared (WHT/LIRIS at Observatorio Roque los Muchachos) spectra that were taken contemporaneous to the Suzaku data. There is strong evidence that NGC 4102 is a Compton-thick AGN, as suggested by the Swift/BAT detected intrinsic continuum and the presence of a strong narrow, neutral FeKa emission line. We have also detected ionised FeXXV emission lines in the Suzaku spectrum of the source. NGC 4102...

  18. GLAST 239 Days till Launch

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST mission will open a new era in High Energy Astrophysics. GLAST will increase the available data over its predecessor, EGRET, by 2 orders of magnitude along with greatly improved image reconstruction, dead-time, and energy resolution. Vast improvements to known science and the large discovery potential are eagerly anticipated by the Astrophysics community. The current status of the mission will be detailed as well as the preparation by the GLAST Collaboration for the first observations. A few science topics as relates to fundamental physics questions will also be discussed.

  19. The GLAST-AGILE Support Program (GASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Webt Collaboration

    2008-10-01

    The GLAST-AGILE Support Program (GASP) was organized within the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope to provide optical-to-radio long-term continuous monitoring of a list of selected gamma-ray-loud blazars during the operation of the AGILE and GLAST satellites. We present some results obtained since its birth, in September 2007.

  20. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM)

    OpenAIRE

    Lichti, G. G.; Briggs, M.S.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G.; Georgii, R.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W.; Preece, R.; Schoenfelder, V.; von Kienlin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The selection of the GLAST burst monitor (GBM) by NASA will allow the investigation of the relation between the keV and the MeV-GeV emission from gamma-ray bursts. The GBM consists of 12 NaI and 2 BGO crystals allowing a continuous measurement of the energy spectra of gamma-ray bursts from ~5 keV to \\~30 MeV. One feature of the GBM is its high time resolution for time-resolved gamma-ray spectroscopy. Moreover the arrangement of the NaI crystals allows a rapid on-board location (

  1. The First Suzaku Observation of 4U 1532-522

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Richard

    Observations of neutron star pulsars in binary systems with a massive main sequence star provide us with important information about the physical processes in the wind of the massive star, the coupling between the wind material and the strong magnetic field of the neutron star, and the physics present in the region just above the magnetic poles. The goal of this proposal is to better understand the physical processes and geometry of the 4U1538-522/QV Nor system through precision spectroscopy with the Japanese X-ray satellite Suzaku on several timescales, comparison to earlier results, and in-depth analysis of RXTE observations. The analysis of the Suzaku observation is of prime importance due to the excellent performance of the instruments aboard. While reanalysis of the RXTE data is a secondary goal, it remains important for placing the Suzaku observation in context of the orbital phase and history of the binary system. Similarly, comparison to the low energy results from XMM-Newton, Chandra, and BeppoSAX X-ray missions is a secondary goal that can yield significant insight into the system. We request funding to analyze our successful Suzaku proposal, since no funding is available from the project. This investigation addresses the Astrophysics Strategic Science Goal To discover how the universe works and to explore how the universe evolves, the Science Question How do matter, energy, space, and time behave under the extraordinarily diverse conditions of the cosmos, and the Science Objective to understand the origin and destiny of the universe and the nature of black holes, dark energy, dark matter, and gravity.

  2. GLAST Burst Monitor Trigger Classification Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, D. J.; Sidman, E. D.; Meegan, C. A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), currently set for launch in the first quarter of 2007, will consist of two instruments, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and the Large Area Telescope (LAT). One of the goals of the GBM is to identify and locate gamma-ray bursts using on-board software. The GLAST observatory can then be re-oriented to allow observations by the LAT. A Bayesian analysis will be used to distinguish gamma-ray bursts from other triggering events, such as solar flares, magnetospheric particle precipitation, soft gamma repeaters (SGRs), and Cygnus X-1 flaring. The trigger parameters used in the analysis are the burst celestial coordinates, angle from the Earth's horizon, spectral hardness, and the spacecraft geomagnetic latitude. The algorithm will be described and the results of testing will be presented.

  3. XML for Detector Description at GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogart, Joanne

    2002-04-30

    The problem of representing a detector in a form which is accessible to a variety of applications, allows retrieval of information in ways which are natural to those applications, and is maintainable has been vexing physicists for some time. Although invented to address an entirely different problem domain, the document markup meta-language XML is well-suited to detector description. This paper describes its use for a GLAST detector.

  4. XML for Detector Description at GLAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Bogart; D.Favretto; 等

    2001-01-01

    The problem of representing a detector in a form which is accessible to a variety of applications,allows retrieval of information in ways which are natural to those applications,and is maintainable has been vexing physicists for some time,Although invented to address an entirely different problem domain,the document markup metalanguage XML is well-suited to detector description.This paper describes its use for a GLAST detector.[7

  5. The First Chandra Field

    OpenAIRE

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Cameron, Robert A.; Gandhi, Poshak; Foellmi, Cédric; Elsner, Ronald F.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Wu, Kinwah; O'Dell, Stephen L.

    2005-01-01

    Before the official first-light images, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory obtained an X-ray image of the field to which its focal plane was first exposed. We describe this historic observation and report our study of the first Chandra field. Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detected 15 X-ray sources, the brightest being dubbed ``Leon X-1'' to honor the Chandra Telescope Scientist, Leon Van Speybroeck. Based upon our analysis of the X-ray data and spectroscopy at the European Sou...

  6. GLAST Prospects for Swift-Era Afterglows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, L.J.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Meszaros, P.; /Penn State U.

    2011-11-23

    We calculate the GeV spectra of gamma-ray burst afterglows produced by inverse Compton scattering of these objects sub-MeV emission. We improve on earlier treatments by using refined afterglow parameters and new model developments motivated by recent Swift observations. We present time-dependent GeV spectra for standard, constant-parameter models, as well as for models with energy injection and with time-varying parameters, for a range of burst parameters. We evaluate the limiting redshift to which such afterglows can be detected by the GLAST Large Area Telescope, as well as by AGILE.

  7. Blazar Demographics with MOJAVE and GLAST

    CERN Document Server

    Lister, Matthew L

    2007-01-01

    MOJAVE is a long term VLBA program to investigate the kinematics and polarization evolution of a complete sample of 133 active galactic nuclei selected on the basis of compact, relativistically beamed jet emission at 15 GHz. By fitting to the apparent distributions of superluminal speed and jet luminosity, we can constrain the Lorentz factor distribution and intrinsic luminosity function of the radio-selected blazar parent population. These low-energy peaked blazars formed a significant fraction of all EGRET detections, and should figure prominently in the GLAST source catalog. Using simple models, we investigate the predicted distribution of GLAST blazars in the gamma-ray/radio flux density plane, and describe an extension of the MOJAVE survey that will provide extensive parsec-scale jet information in complete regions of this plane. We find that if a population of intrinsically radio bright yet gamma-ray weak blazars exists, its signal will be largely wiped out by the large gamma-ray flux scatter associated...

  8. Environmental Tests of the Flight GLAST LAT Tracker Towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagagli, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Belli, F.; Borden, T.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cecchi, C.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Angelis, A.De; Drell, P.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Goodman, J.; Himel, T.

    2008-03-12

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space telescope (GLAST) is a gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in 2008. Before the assembly of the Tracker subsystem of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) science instrument of GLAST, every component (tray) and module (tower) has been subjected to extensive ground testing required to ensure successful launch and on-orbit operation. This paper describes the sequence and results of the environmental tests performed on an engineering model and all the flight hardware of the GLAST LAT Tracker. Environmental tests include vibration testing, thermal cycles and thermal-vacuum cycles of every tray and tower as well as the verification of their electrical performance.

  9. Solar system planets observed with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ohashi, Takaya; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Terada, Naoki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Futaana, Yoshifumi

    2011-02-01

    Recent results of solar system planets observed with the Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku are reviewed. Thanks to the low instrumental background and good energy resolution, X-ray CCDs onboard Suzaku are one of the best probes to study diffuse X-ray emission. An overview of the Suzaku data of Jupiter and Earth is presented, along with preliminary results of Mars. Firstly, diffuse hard X-ray emission is discovered in 1-5 keV at Jovian radiation belts. Its spectrum is represented by a power-law continuum with a photon index of ˜1.4. This emission could originate from inverse-Compton scattering of solar photons by tens MeV electrons. Secondly, variable diffuse soft X-rays are serendipitously found during observations in the directions of the north ecliptic pole and galactic ridge. Good time correlations with the solar wind and emission lines found in the X-ray spectra are firm evidences of a solar wind charge exchange emission with Earth’s exosphere. Thirdly, diffuse X-ray emission from Martian exosphere via the solar wind charge exchange is investigated for the first time at solar minimum. A stringent upper limit on the density of the Martian exosphere is placed from the Suzaku data.

  10. Expected Performance of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Charles; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Briggs, Michael; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Greiner, Jochen; vonKienlin, Andreas; Diehl, Roland; Steinle, Helmut; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage from the LAT threshold down to approx. 8 kev, and will provide a trigger for re-orienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from selected bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM consists of twelve NaI scintillation detectors operating in the 8 kev to 1 MeV energy range and two BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 150 keV to 30 MeV energy range. Detector resolution, effective area, and angular response have been determined by calibrations. Analyses indicate that the on-board burst threshold will be approx. 0.7 photon/cm2/s and the on-board burst localization accuracy will typically be better than 8 degrees.

  11. Detection of Galactic Dark Matter by GLAST

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseev, A; Arrighi, H; Bloom, Elliott D; Chaput, C; Digel, S W; Engovatov, D; Norris, J; Silvis, J

    1999-01-01

    The mysterious dark matter has been a subject of special interest to high energy physicists, astrophysicists and cosmologists for many years. According to theoretical models, it can make up a significant fraction of the mass of the Universe. One possible form of galactic dark matter, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), could be detected by their annihilation into monoenergetic gamma-ray line(s). This paper will demonstrate that the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled for launch in 2005 by NASA, will be capable of searching for these gamma-ray lines in the energy range from 20 GeV to ~500 GeV and will be sufficiently sensitive to test a number of models. The required instrument performance and its capability to reject backgrounds to the required levels are explicitly discussed.

  12. Cosmic Ray Electron Science with GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormes, J.F.; /Denver U.; Moiseev, Alexander; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-17

    Cosmic ray electrons at high energy carry information about their sources, their diffusion in local magnetic fields and their interactions with the photon fields through which they travel. The spectrum of the particles is affected by inverse Compton losses and synchrotron losses, the rates of which are proportional to the square of the particle's energy making the spectra very steep. However, GLAST will be able to make unique and very high statistics measurements of electrons from {approx}20 to {approx}700 GeV that will allow us to search for anisotropies in arrival direction and spectral features associated with some dark matter candidates. Complementary information on electrons of still higher energy will be required to see effects of possible individual cosmic ray sources.

  13. X-ray analysis of the galaxy group UGC03957 beyond R200 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Thölken, S; Reiprich, T H; Hasenbusch, J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the gas properties of the galaxy group UGC03957 up to $1.4R_{200} \\approx 1.4$Mpc in four azimuthal directions with the Suzaku satellite and performed a spectral analysis of five Suzaku observations with 138ks good exposure time in total as well as five Chandra snapshot observations for point source detection. We found a temperature drop of a factor of ${\\sim} 3$ from the center to the outskirts which is consistent with previous results for galaxy clusters. The metal abundance profile shows a flat behavior towards large radii which is a hint for galactic winds as the primary ICM enrichment process. The entropy profile is consistent with numerical simulations after applying a gas mass fraction correction. Previous analyses for clusters and groups often showed an entropy flattening or even a drop around ${\\sim} R_{200}$ which can be an indicator for clumping or non-equilibrium states in the outskirts. Such entropy behaviour is absent in UGC03957. The gas mass fraction is well below the cosmic me...

  14. Suzaku Observation of HCG 62: Temperature, Abundance, and Extended Hard X-ray Emission Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Tokoi, Kazuyo; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Ohashi, Takaya; Yamasaki, Noriko Y; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Matsushita, Kyoko; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Hoshino, Akio; Tamura, Takayuki; Egawa, Chihiro; Kawano, Naomi; Ota, Naomi; Isobe, Naoki; Kawaharada, Madoka; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Hughes, John P

    2007-01-01

    We present results of 120 ks observation of a compact group of galaxies HCG~62 ($z=0.0145$) with Suzaku XIS and HXD-PIN\\@. The XIS spectra for four annular regions were fitted with two temperature {\\it vapec} model with variable abundance, combined with the foreground Galactic component. The Galactic component was constrained to have a common surface brightness among the four annuli, and two temperature {\\it apec} model was preferred to single temperature model. We confirmed the multi-temperature nature of the intra-group medium reported with Chandra and XMM-Newton, with a doughnut-like high temperature ring at radii 3.3--6.5$'$ in a hardness image. We found Mg, Si, S, and Fe abundances to be fairly robust. We examined the possible ``high-abundance arc'' at $\\sim 2'$ southwest from the center, however Suzaku data did not confirm it. We suspect that it is a misidentification of an excess hot component in this region as the Fe line. Careful background study showed no positive detection of the extended hard X-ra...

  15. The Suzaku Hard X-ray Survey on the Galactic Center Region

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuru, T G; Nobukawa, M; Sawada, M; Ryu, S G; Fukuoka, R; Koyama, K

    2010-01-01

    Diffuse X-rays from the Galactic center (GC) region were found to exhibit many K-shell lines from iron and nickel atoms in the 6--9 keV band. The strong emission lines seen in the spectrum are neutral iron K$\\alpha$ at 6.4~keV, He-like iron K$\\alpha$ at 6.7~keV, H-like iron Ly$\\alpha$ at 6.9~keV, and He-like iron K$\\beta$ at 7.8~keV. Among them, the 6.4~keV emission line is a probe of non-thermal phenomena. We have detected strong 6.4~keV emission in several giant molecular clouds, some of which were newly discovered by Suzaku. All the spectra exhibit large equivalent widths of 1-2~keV and absorption columns of $2-10\\times 10^{23}\\{\\rm H\\ cm}^{-2}$. We found time variability of diffuse 6.4~keV emission in the Sgr B2 region comparing the maps and spectra obtained from 1994 to 2005 with ASCA, Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku. We also report discovery of K$\\alpha$ lines of neutral argon, calcium, chrome, and manganese atoms in the Sgr~A region. We show that the equivalent width of the 6.4~keV emission line detecte...

  16. Searching for intermediate groups of galaxies with Suzaku in Bootes field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawara, Yuzuru; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki

    2016-07-01

    To investigate redshift evolution of groups of galaxies is significant also in terms of galaxy evolution. Recent observational studies show that an AGN fraction and a magnitude gap between the first and the second brightest group galaxies increase in group environments at lower redshifts (Oh et al. 2014 & Gozaliasl et al. 2014). Thus, comprehension for the evolution of the systems will bring us to hints on both morphological evolution of galaxies and galaxy-galaxy interactions. However, observational samples of groups of galaxies at higher redshifts are limited due to its low flux and surface brightness. Thus, we aimed at searching for new samples using both X-ray and optical data. To identify the group systems at higher redshifts, deep optical imaging and spectroscopic data are needed. Bootes field is one of the best regions for this purpose because there are up to 17 bands of data available per source from infrared, optical, UV, and X-ray (e.g., Kenter et al. 2005, Chung et al. 2014). XBootes survey was conducted in 2003 using Chandra (Murray et al. 2005) and X-ray extended sources were detected around intermediate optically-identified groups of galaxies even though Chandra could not reveal their origins due to poor photon statistics. Thus, we conducted X-ray follow-up observations using Suzaku which has low and stable background and thus is optimum for such low surface brightness sources for brightest 6 group candidates with redshifts of 0.15-0.42. Consequently, Suzaku detected excess emissions from all the targets in their images and spectral analysis reveals that 6 sources are originated from group- or poor-cluster-scale halos with temperatures, abundances and luminosities of 1.6-3.0 keV, conference, we will report on the details of our analysis and results using multiwavelength data such as radio, optical and X-ray to examine the AGN fractions and magnitude gaps in our samples and discuss the redshift evolution.

  17. Detecting the EBL attenuation of blazars with GLAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Luis C.

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board GLAST (Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope) due for launch in late 2007 will study the gamma-ray sky in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV. GLAST-LAT's improved sensitivity with respect to previous missions will increase the number of known gamma-ray blazars from about 100 to thousands, with redshifts up to z~3-5. Since g-rays with energy above 10 GeV interact via pair-production with photons from the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL), the systematic attenuation of GLAST-detected blazars as a function of redshift would constitute and effective and unique probe of the optical-UV EBL density and its evolution over cosmic history. Analysis techniques introduced in this dissertation make use of the large number of blazars detected by GLAST to study the collective behavior of their spectra as a function of redshift. These techniques are shown to offer powerful ways to help separate the common level of attenuation due to the EBL from the intrinsic peculiarities of individual blazars. The capability of GLAST to perform these measurements depends in great measure on the acceptance of the instrument to high energy g-rays ( E > 10 GeV), which in previous space-experiments has been drastically reduced due to backsplash self-veto. This dissertation includes a study of the backsplash effect as measured with flight-like detectors during a beam test of the LAT calibration unit. This analysis was used to verify the capabilities of the GLAST simulations tools to reproduce backsplash effects.

  18. The First Chandra Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; /NASA, Marshall; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Cameron, Robert A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /SLAC; Gandhi,; Foellmi, Cedric; /European Southern Obs., Chile; Elsner, Ronald F.; /NASA, Marshall; Patel, Sandeep K.; /USRA, Huntsville; Wu, Kinwah; /Mullard Space Sci. Lab.; O' Dell, Stephen; /NASA, Marshall

    2005-09-09

    Before the official first-light images, the Chandra X-ray Observatory obtained an X-ray image of the field to which its focal plane was first exposed. We describe this historic observation and report our study of the first Chandra field. Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detected 15 X-ray sources, the brightest being dubbed ''Leon X-1'' to honor the Chandra Telescope Scientist, Leon Van Speybroeck. Based upon our analysis of the X-ray data and spectroscopy at the European Southern Observatory (ESO; La Silla, Chile), we find that Leon X-1 is a Type-1 (unobscured) active galactic nucleus (AGN) at a redshift z = 0.3207. Leon X-1 exhibits strong Fe II emission and a broad-line Balmer decrement that is unusually flat for an AGN. Within the context of the Eigenvector-1 correlation space, these properties suggest that Leon X-1 may be a massive ({ge} 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}}) black hole, accreting at a rate approaching its Eddington limit.

  19. A Chandra Study of Temperature Distributions of the Intracluster Medium in 50 Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenghao; Xu, Haiguang; Wang, Jingying; Gu, Junhua; Li, Weitian; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Chenhao; Gu, Liyi; An, Tao; Liu, Chengze; Zhang, Zhongli; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the spatial distribution of the intracluster medium temperature in galaxy clusters in a quantitative way and probe the physics behind it, we analyze the X-ray spectra from a sample of 50 clusters that were observed with the Chandra ACIS instrument over the past 15 years and measure the radial temperature profiles out to 0.45r500. We construct a physical model that takes into consideration the effects of gravitational heating, thermal history (such as radiative cooling, active galactic nucleus feedback, and thermal conduction), and work done via gas compression, and use it to fit the observed temperature profiles by running Bayesian regressions. The results show that in all cases our model provides an acceptable fit at the 68% confidence level. For further validation, we select nine clusters that have been observed with both Chandra (out to ≳0.3r500) and Suzaku (out to ≳1.5r500) and fit their Chandra spectra with our model. We then compare the extrapolation of the best fits with the Suzaku measurements and find that the model profiles agree with the Suzaku results very well in seven clusters. In the remaining two clusters the difference between the model and the observation is possibly caused by local thermal substructures. Our study also implies that for most of the clusters the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium is safe out to at least 0.5r500 and the non-gravitational interactions between dark matter and its luminous counterparts is consistent with zero.

  20. The GLAST burst monitor instrument response simulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, A. S.; Kippen, R. M.; Meegan, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson, R. B.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Lichti, G. G.; von Kienlin, A.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Schoenfelder, V.; Steinle, H.; Preece, R. D.; Briggs, M. S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Bhat, P. N.; Connaughton, V.

    2005-07-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to provide wide field of view observations of gamma-ray bursts from 10keV to 25MeV. The GBM is composed of twelve NaI and two BGO detectors that are widely dispersed about the GLAST spacecraft. Reconstructing burst locations and energy spectra from these separated detectors requires detailed knowledge of the response to direct and scattered burst radiation. A simulation software package based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolset is being developed to fulfill this requirement. We will discuss the architecture of our simulation system and evaluate the scientific capabilities of the GBM.

  1. Chandra Publication Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Rots, Arnold H; Becker, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    In this study we develop and propose publication metrics, based on an analysis of data from the Chandra bibliographic database, that are more meaningful and less sensitive to observatory-specific characteristics than the traditional metrics. They fall in three main categories: speed of publication; fraction of observing time published; and archival usage. Citation of results is a fourth category, but lends itself less well to definite statements. For Chandra, the median time from observation to publication is 2.36 years; after about 7 years 90% of the observing time is published; and the total annual publication output of the mission is 60-70% of the cumulative observing time available, assuming a two year lag between data retrieval and publication.

  2. Ten Years of Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    We celebrated the 10-th anniversary of the Launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory on July 13, 2009. During these 10 years data from this Great Observatory have had a profound impact on 21st century astrophysics. With its unrivaled capability to produce sub-arcsecond images, the Observatory has enabled astronomers to make new discoveries in topics as diverse as comets and cosmology. We shall review some of the highlights, discuss the current status, and future plans.

  3. The Chandra Bibliography Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots, A. H.; Winkelman, S. L.; Paltani, S.; Blecksmith, S. E.; Bright, J. D.

    2004-07-01

    Early in the mission, the Chandra Data Archive started the development of a bibliography database, tracking publications in refereed journals and on-line conference proceedings that are based on Chandra observations, allowing our users to link directly to articles in the ADS from our archive, and to link to the relevant data in the archive from the ADS entries. Subsequently, we have been working closely with the ADS and other data centers, in the context of the ADEC-ITWG, on standardizing the literature-data linking. We have also extended our bibliography database to include all Chandra-related articles and we are also keeping track of the number of citations of each paper. Obviously, in addition to providing valuable services to our users, this database allows us to extract a wide variety of statistical information. The project comprises five components: the bibliography database-proper, a maintenance database, an interactive maintenance tool, a user browsing interface, and a web services component for exchanging information with the ADS. All of these elements are nearly mission-independent and we intend make the package as a whole available for use by other data centers. The capabilities thus provided represent support for an essential component of the Virtual Observatory.

  4. Mining the Suzaku Archive for Elliptical Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, Michael

    Despite significant progress, our understanding of the formation and evolution of giant elliptical galaxies is incomplete. Many unresolved details about the star formation and assembly history, dissipation and feedback processes, and how these are connected in space and time relate to complex gasdynamical processes that are not directly observable, but that leave clues in the form of the level and pattern of heavy element enrichment in the hot ISM. The low background and relatively sharp spectral resolution of the Suzaku X-ray Observatory XIS CCD detectors enable one to derive a particularly extensive abundance pattern in the hot ISM out to large galactic radii for bright elliptical galaxies. These encode important clues to the chemical and dynamical history of elliptical galaxies. The Suzaku archive now includes data on many of the most suitable galaxies for these purposes. To date, these have been analyzed in a very heterogeneous manner -- some at an early stage in the mission using instrument calibration and analysis tools that have greatly evolved in the interim. Given the level of maturity of the data archive, analysis software, and calibration, the time is right to undertake a uniform analysis of this sample and interpret the results in the context of a coherent theoretical framework for the first time. We propose to (1) carefully and thoroughly analyze the available X-ray luminous elliptical galaxies in the Suzaku database, employing the techniques we have established in our previous work to measure hot ISM abundance patterns. Their interpretation requires careful deconstruction within the context of physical gasdynamical and chemical evolutionary models. Since we have developed models for elliptical galaxy chemical evolution specifically constructed to place constraints on the history and development of these systems based on hot ISM abundances, we are uniquely positioned to interpret -- as well as to analyze -- X-ray spectra of these objects. (2) We will

  5. Chandra Discovers Cosmic Cannonball

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    One of the fastest moving stars ever seen has been discovered with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This cosmic cannonball is challenging theories to explain its blistering speed. Astronomers used Chandra to observe a neutron star, known as RX J0822-4300, over a period of about five years. During that span, three Chandra observations clearly show the neutron star moving away from the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. This remnant is the stellar debris field created during the same explosion in which the neutron star was created about 3700 years ago. Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A By combining how far it has moved across the sky with its distance from Earth, astronomers determined the neutron star is moving at over 3 million miles per hour. At this rate, RX J0822-4300 is destined to escape from the Milky Way after millions of years, even though it has only traveled about 20 light years so far. "This star is moving at 3 million miles an hour, but it's so far away that the apparent motion we see in five years is less than the height of the numerals in the date on a penny, seen from the length of a football field," said Frank Winkler of Middlebury College in Vermont. "It's remarkable, and a real testament to the power of Chandra, that such a tiny motion can be measured." Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A "Just after it was born, this neutron star got a one-way ticket out of the Galaxy," said co-author Robert Petre of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Astronomers have seen other stars being flung out of the Milky Way, but few as fast as this." So-called hypervelocity stars have been previously discovered shooting out of the Milky Way with speeds around one million miles per hour. One key difference between RX J0822-4300 and these other reported galactic escapees is the source of their speed. The hypervelocity stars are

  6. Galaxy Clusters with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Forman, W; Markevitch, M L; Vikhlinin, A A; Churazov, E

    2002-01-01

    We discuss Chandra results related to 1) cluster mergers and cold fronts and 2) interactions between relativistic plasma and hot cluster atmospheres. We describe the properties of cold fronts using NGC1404 in the Fornax cluster and A3667 as examples. We discuss multiple surface brightness discontinuities in the cooling flow cluster ZW3146. We review the supersonic merger underway in CL0657. Finally, we summarize the interaction between plasma bubbles produced by AGN and hot gas using M87 and NGC507 as examples.

  7. Lunar Prospecting With Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Observations of the bright side of the Moon with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have detected oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon over a large area of the lunar surface. The abundance and distribution of those elements will help to determine how the Moon was formed. "We see X-rays from these elements directly, independent of assumptions about the mineralogy and other complications," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., at a press conference at the "Four Years with Chandra" symposium in Huntsville, Alabama. "We have Moon samples from the six widely-space Apollo landing sites, but remote sensing with Chandra can cover a much wider area," continued Drake. "It's the next best thing to being there, and it's very fast and cost-effective." The lunar X-rays are caused by fluorescence, a process similar to the way that light is produced in fluorescent lamps. Solar X-rays bombard the surface of the Moon, knock electrons out of the inner parts of the atoms, putting them in a highly unstable state. Almost immediately, other electrons rush to fill the gaps, and in the process convert their energy into the fluorescent X-rays seen by Chandra. According to the currently popular "giant impact" theory for the formation of the Moon, a body about the size of Mars collided with the Earth about 4.5 billion years ago. This impact flung molten debris from the mantle of both the Earth and the impactor into orbit around the Earth. Over the course of tens of millions of years, the debris stuck together to form the Moon. By measuring the amounts of aluminum and other elements over a wide area of the Moon and comparing them to the Earth's mantle, Drake and his colleagues plan to help test the giant impact hypothesis. "One early result," quipped Drake, "is that there is no evidence for large amounts of calcium, so cheese is not a major constituent of the Moon." Illustration of Earth's Geocorona Illustration of Earth's Geocorona The same

  8. A Chandra Study of Radial Temperature Profiles of the Intra-Cluster Medium in 50 Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhenghao; Wang, Jingying; Gu, Junhua; Li, Weitian; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Chenhao; Gu, Liyi; An, Tao; Liu, Chengze; Zhang, Zhongli; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the spatial distribution of the ICM temperature in galaxy clusters in a quantitative way and probe the physics behind, we analyze the X-ray spectra of a sample of 50 galaxy clusters, which were observed with the Chandra ACIS instrument in the past 15 years, and measure the radial temperature profiles out to $0.45r_{500}$. We construct a physical model that takes into account the effects of gravitational heating, thermal history (such as radiative cooling, AGN feedback, and thermal conduction) and work done via gas compression, and use it to fit the observed temperature profiles by running Bayesian regressions. The results show that in all cases our model provides an acceptable fit at the 68% confidence level. To further validate this model we select nine clusters that have been observed with both Chandra (out to $\\gtrsim 0.3r_{500}$) and Suzaku (out to $\\gtrsim 1.5r_{500}$), fit their Chandra spectra with our model, and compare the extrapolation of the best-fits with the Suzaku measure...

  9. AGN Spectral Energy Distributions of GLAST Telescope Network Program Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Jeff; Lacy, Mark; Daou, Doris; Rapp, Steve; Stefaniak, Linda

    2005-03-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has a proposed observing list that includes AGNs and Polars bright enough to be observed optically by amateurs and students. This observing list is maintained by the "GLAST Telescope Network" (GTN) and includes a number of objects that have yet to be observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our project will observe one of these objects with the Spitzer MIPS and the IRAC instruments to determine their Spectral Energy Distribution (SED), which will be compared to a computer model of disk emission in order to determine what component of the SED is due to the disk and what component is due to synchrotron radiation induced by the jets. In addition we will observe our program objects prior to, simultaneously with, and after Spitzer observes them. This gives a direct connection from Spitzer research to student activities in the classroom.

  10. New Results from Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Forman, W; Jones, C; Vikhlinin, A A; Churazov, E

    2001-01-01

    We discuss two themes from Chandra observations of galaxies and clusters. First, we describe the effects of radio-emitting plasmas or ``bubbles'', inflated by active galactic nuclei, on the hot X-ray emitting gaseous atmospheres in galaxies and clusters. We describe the interaction of the ``bubbles'' and the X-ray emitting gas as the buoyant bubbles rise through the hot gas. Second, we describe sharp, edge-like surface brightness structures in clusters. Chandra observations show that these features are not shock fronts as was originally thought, but ``cold fronts'', most likely the boundaries of the remaining cores of merger components. Finally, we present recent observations of M86 and NGC507 which show similar sharp features around galaxies. For M86, the sharp edge is the boundary between the galaxy's X-ray corona and the Virgo cluster gas. The structures around NGC507, the central galaxy in a group, could be relics of galaxy formation or may reflect the motion of NGC507 in the larger potential of the group...

  11. The Chandra Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Ian N; Glotfelty, Kenny J; Anderson, Craig S; Bonaventura, Nina R; Chen, Judy C; Davis, John E; Doe, Stephen M; Evans, Janet D; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C; Gibbs, Danny G; Grier, John D; Hain, Roger M; Hall, Diane M; Harbo, Peter N; Xiangqun,; He,; Houck, John C; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L; McDowell, Jonathan C; Miller, Joseph B; Mitschang, Arik W; Morgan, Douglas L; Mossman, Amy E; Nichols, Joy S; Nowak, Michael A; Plummer, David A; Refsdal, Brian L; Rots, Arnold H; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Sundheim, Beth A; Tibbetts, Michael S; Van Stone, David W; Winkelman, Sherry L; Zografou, Panagoula

    2010-01-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. The first release of the CSC includes information about 94,676 distinct X-ray sources detected in a subset of public ACIS imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents <~ 30''. The catalog (1) provides access to the best estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources, with good scientific fidelity, and directly supports scientific analysis using the individual source data; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; and (3) provides efficient access to ...

  12. Processing GPS Receiver Data for Improved Fermi GLAST Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Fermi GLAST s 5-year mission objectives: a) Explore the most extreme environments in the Universe. b) Search for signs of new laws of physics and what composes the mysterious Dark Matter. c) Explain how black holes accelerate immense jets of material to nearly light speed. d) Help crack the mysteries of gamma-ray bursts. e) Answer long-standing questions across a broad range of topics, including solar flares, pulsars and the origin of cosmic rays.

  13. GLAST And Dark Matter Substructure in the Milky Way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlen, Michael; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study; Diemand, Jurg; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys.; Madau, Piero; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys. /Garching, Max Planck Inst.

    2011-11-29

    We discuss the possibility of GLAST detecting gamma-rays from the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the Galactic halo. We have used 'Via Lactea', currently the highest resolution simulation of cold dark matter substructure, to quantify the contribution of subhalos to the annihilation signal. We present a simulated allsky map of the expected gamma-ray counts from dark matter annihilation, assuming standard values of particle mass and cross section. In this case GLAST should be able to detect the Galactic center and several individual subhalos. One of the most exciting discoveries that the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) could make, is the detection of gamma-rays from the annihilation of dark matter (DM). Such a measurement would directly address one of the major physics problems of our time: the nature of the DM particle. Whether or not GLAST will actually detect a DM annihilation signal depends on both unknown particle physics and unknown astrophysics theory. Particle physics uncertainties include the type of particle (axion, neutralino, Kaluza-Klein particle, etc.), its mass, and its interaction cross section. From the astrophysical side it appears that DM is not smoothly distributed throughout the Galaxy halo, but instead exhibits abundant clumpy substructure, in the form of thousands of so-called subhalos. The observability of DM annihilation radiation originating in Galactic DM subhalos depends on their abundance, distribution, and internal properties. Numerical simulations have been used in the past to estimate the annihilation flux from DM substructure, but since the subhalo properties, especially their central density profile, which determines their annihilation luminosity, are very sensitive to numerical resolution, it makes sense to re-examine their contribution with higher resolution simulations.

  14. The Spectral Index Distribution of EGRET Blazars: Prospects for GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venters, Tonia M.; Pavlidou, Vasiliki; /SLAC

    2011-11-29

    The intrinsic distribution of spectral indices in GeV energies of gamma-ray-loud blazars is a critical input in determining the spectral shape of the unresolved blazar contribution to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background, as well as an important test of blazar emission theories. We present a maximum-likelihood method of determining the intrinsic spectral index distribution (ISID) of a population of {gamma}-ray emitters which accounts for error in measurement of individual spectral indices, and we apply it to EGRET blazars. We find that the most likely Gaussian ISID for EGRET blazars has a mean of 2.27 and a standard deviation of 0.20. We additionally find some indication that FSRQs and BL Lacs may have different ISIDs (with BL Lacs being harder). We also test for spectral index hardening associated with blazar variability for which we find no evidence. Finally, we produce simulated GLAST spectral index datasets and perform the same analyses. With improved statistics due to the much larger number of resolvable blazars, GLAST data will help us determine the ISIDs with much improved accuracy. Should any difference exist between the ISIDs of BL Lacs and FSRQs or between the ISIDs of blazars in the quiescent and flaring states, GLAST data will be adequate to separate these ISIDs at a significance better than 3{sigma}.

  15. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  16. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  17. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in November 2007, will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class; pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  18. The Properties of the Diffuse X-ray Background from the DXL sounding rocket mission (plus ROSAT, XMM-Newton and Suzaku data)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Massimiliano

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the properties of the different components of the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXB) is made particularly difficult by their similar spectral signature.The University of Miami has been working on disentangling the different DXB components for many years, using a combination of proprietary and archival data from XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Chandra, and a sounding rocket mission (DXL) specifically designed to study the properties of Local Hot Bubble (LHB) and Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) using their spatial signature. In this talk we will present:(a) Results from the DXL mission, specifically launch #2, to study the properties of the SWCX and LHB (and GH) and their contribution to the ROSAT All Sky Survey Bands(b) Results from a Suzaku key project to characterize the SWCX and build a semi-empirical model to predict the SWCX line emission for any time, any direction. A publicly available web portal for the model will go online by the end of the year(c) Results from XMM-Newton deep surveys to study the angular correlation of the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) in the direction of the Chandra Deep Field South.DXL launch #3, schedule for January 2018 and the development of the DXG sounding rocket mission to characterize the GH-CGM emission using newly developed micropore optics will also be discussed.

  19. Radio-Loud AGN: The Suzaku View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambruna, Rita

    2009-01-01

    We review our Suzaku observations of Broad-Line Radio Galaxies (BLRGs). The continuum above 2 approx.keV in BLRGs is dominated by emission from an accretion flow, with little or no trace of a jet, which is instead expected to emerge at GeV energies and be detected by Fermi. Concerning the physical conditions of the accretion disk, BLRGs are a mixed bag. In some sources the data suggest relatively high disk ionization, in others obscuration of the innermost regions, perhaps by the jet base. While at hard X-rays the distinction between BLRGs and Seyferts appears blurry, one of the cleanest observational differences between the two classes is at soft X-rays, where Seyferts exhibit warm absorbers related to disk winds while BLRGs do not. We discuss the possibility that jet formation inhibits disk winds, and thus is related to the remarkable dearth of absorption features at soft X-rays in BLRGs and other radio-loud AGN.

  20. The Chandra HelpDesk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, Elizabeth C.

    2008-03-01

    The Chandra X-ray Center (CXC) HelpDesk has answered hundreds of user questions over the course of the Chandra mission, ranging from basic syntax errors to advanced analysis questions. This talk gives an introduction to the HelpDesk system and staff, presents a sample of recent HelpDesk requests, and discusses how user-submitted questions improve the software and documentation.

  1. Suzaku observations of X-ray excess emission in the cluster of galaxies A3112

    CERN Document Server

    Lehto, T; Bonamente, M; Ota, N; Kaastra, J

    2010-01-01

    We analysed the Suzaku XIS1 data of the A3112 cluster of galaxies in order to examine the X-ray excess emission in this cluster reported earlier with the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites. The best-fit temperature of the intracluster gas depends strongly on the choice of the energy band used for the spectral analysis. This proves the existence of excess emission component in addition to the single-temperature MEKAL in A3112. We showed that this effect is not an artifact due to uncertainties of the background modeling, instrument calibration or the amount of Galactic absorption. Neither does the PSF scatter of the emission from the cool core nor the projection of the cool gas in the cluster outskirts produce the effect. Finally we modeled the excess emission either by using an additional MEKAL or powerlaw component. Due to the small differencies between thermal and non-thermal model we can not rule out the non-thermal origin of the excess emission based on the goodness of the fit. Assuming that it has a therma...

  2. Suzaku Observations of Chemical Enrcihment History of Galaxy Cluster A3112

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezer, Cemile; Nihal Ercan, Enise; Bulbul, Esra

    2016-07-01

    Galaxy clusters are known as grand reservoir of metals as their intracluster medium (ICM) are gradually enriched by supernova (SN) explosions. The azimuthal and spatial distributions of these metals from cluster's centre out to the virial radius are of vital importance since they record all the information on nucleosynthesis and chemical enrichment history of the formation. In this study, we present results from Suzaku observations of an archetypal cluster A3112 out to ˜1470 kpc. We additionally used overlapping Chandra observations to detect unresolved point sources. We studied the total number of SN explosions and the ratio of type Ia (SN Ia) to core-collapse (SNcc) integrated over the cluster lifetime by directly fitting the X-ray spectra. We investigated almost flat radial distribution of the relative contribution of SN Ia to SNcc and the percentage of SN Ia contributing to ICM is found to be 10%-25%. We also studied the α element (Mg, Si and S) abundances. Ultimate results will be presented and they are expected to unravel the enrichment type of the evolution.

  3. Suzaku observations of the type 2 QSO in the central galaxy of the Phoenix cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Ueda, Shutaro; Anabuki, Naohisa; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We report the \\Suzaku/XIS and HXD and \\Chandra/ACIS-I results on the X-ray spectra of the Phoenix cluster at the redshift $z=0.596$. The spectrum of the intracluster medium (ICM) is well-reproduced with the emissions from a low temperature ($\\sim3.0$\\,keV and $\\sim0.76$\\,solar) and a high temperature ($\\sim11$\\,keV and $\\sim0.33$\\,solar) plasmas; the former is localized at the cluster core, while the latter distributes over the cluster. In addition to these ICM emissions, a strongly absorbed power-law component is found, which is due to an active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the cluster center. The absorption column density and unobscured luminosity of the AGN are $\\sim3.2\\times10^{23}$\\,cm$^{-2}$ and $\\sim4.7\\times10^{45}$\\,ergs\\,s$^{-1}$ (2-10\\,keV), respectively. Furthermore, a neutral iron (\\ion{Fe}{1}) K-shell line is discovered for the first time with the equivalent width (EW) of $\\sim150$\\,eV at the rest frame. The column density and the EW of the \\ion{Fe}{1} line are exceptionally large for such a high l...

  4. Suzaku Spectroscopy Study of Hard X-Ray Emission in the Arches Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Tsujimoto, M; Koyama, K

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of a Suzaku study of the Arches cluster. A high S/N spectrum in the 3-12 keV band was obtained with the XIS. We found that the spectrum consists of a thermal plasma, a hard power-law tail, and two Gaussian lines. The plasma component (kT~2.2 keV) is established from the presence of CaXIX and FeXXV K alpha lines as well as the absence of FeXXVI K alpha line. The two Gaussian lines represent the K alpha and beta lines from iron at lower ionization stages. Both the line centers and the intensity ratio of these two lines are consistent with the neutral iron. The hard power-law tail (index~0.7) was found to have no pronounced iron K edge feature. In comparison with the published Chandra spectra, we conclude that the thermal component is from the ensemble of point-like sources plus thermal diffuse emission concentrated at the cluster center, while the Gaussian and the hard tail components are from the non-thermal diffuse emission extended in a larger scale. In the band-limited XIS images, the...

  5. Suzaku Observations of the Centaurus Cluster: Absence of Bulk Motions in the Intracluster Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, N; Fabian, A C; Kanemaru, T; Kawaharada, M; Kawano, N; Kelley, R L; Kitaguchi, T; Makishima, K; Matsushita, K; Murase, K; Nakazawa, K; Ohashi, T; Sanders, J S; Tamura, T; Urata, Y; Ota, Naomi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Fabian, Andrew C.; Kanemaru, Takehiro; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawano, Naomi; Kelley, Richard L.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Makishima, Kazuo; Matsushita, Kyoko; Murase, Kouichi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ohashi, Takaya; Sanders, Jeremy S.; Tamura, Takayuki; Urata, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    The Centaurus cluster (z=0.0104) was observed with the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) onboard the Suzaku X-ray satellite in three pointings, one centered on the cluster core and the other two offset by +-8' in declination. To search for possible bulk motions of the intracluster medium, the central energy of He-like Fe-K line (at a rest-frame energy of 6.7 keV) was examined to look for a positional dependence. Over spatial scales of 50 kpc to 140 kpc around the cluster core, the central line energy was found to be constant within the calibration error of 15 eV. The 90% upper limit on the line-of-sight velocity difference is |Delta_v|< 1400 km/s, giving a tighter constraint than previous measurements. The significant velocity gradients inferred from a previous Chandra study were not detected between two pairs of rectangular regions near the cluster core. These results suggest that the bulk velocity does not largely exceed the thermal velocity of the gas in the central region of the Centaurus cluster. The m...

  6. GBM: a gamma-ray burst monitor for GLAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichti, Giselher G.; Briggs, Michael S.; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kippen, Richard M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert S.; Schoenfelder, Volker; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2003-03-01

    One of the scientific objectives of the GLAST mission is the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which will be measured by the Large-Area Telescope, the main instrument of GLAST, in the energy range from ~20 MeV to ~300 GeV. In order to extend the energy measurement towards lower energies a secondary instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will measure GRBs from ~10 keV to ~25 MeV and will thus allow the investigation of the relation between the keV and the MeV-GeV emission from GRBs. The GBM consists of 12 circular NaI crystal discs and 2 cylindrical BGO crystals. The NaI crystals are optimized for gamma radiation from ~10 keV to ~1 MeV and the BGO crystals from ~150 keV to ~25 MeV. The NaI crystals are oriented in such a way that the measured relative counting rates allow a rapid determination of the position of a gamma-ray burst within a wide FoV of ~8.6 sr. This position will be communicated within seconds to the LAT which may then be reoriented to observe the long-lasting high-energy gamma-ray emission from GRBs. This will allow the exploration of the unknown aspects of the high-energy burst emission and their connection with the well-known low-energy emission. Another important feature of the GBM is its high time resolution of ~10 microseconds for time-resolved gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  7. Gleam: the GLAST Large Area Telescope Simulation Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Boinee, P; De Angelis, Alessandro; Favretto, Dario; Frailis, Marco; Giannitrapani, Riccardo; Milotti, Edoardo; Longo, Francesco; Brigida, Monica; Gargano, Fabio; Giglietto, Nicola; Loparco, Francesco; Mazziotta, Mario Nicola; Cecchi, Claudia; Lubrano, Pasquale; Pepe, Monica; Baldini, Luca; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Kuss, Michael; Latronico, Luca; Omodei, Nicola; Spandre, Gloria; Bogart, Joanne R.; Dubois, Richard; Kamae, Tune; Rochester, Leon; Usher, Tracy; Burnett, Thompson H.; Robinson, Sean M.; Bastieri, Denis; Rando, Riccardo

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the simulation of the GLAST high energy gamma-ray telescope. The simulation package, written in C++, is based on the Geant4 toolkit, and it is integrated into a general framework used to process events. A detailed simulation of the electronic signals inside Silicon detectors has been provided and it is used for the particle tracking, which is handled by a dedicated software. A unique repository for the geometrical description of the detector has been realized using the XML language and a C++ library to access this information has been designed and implemented.

  8. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. The very large field of view will make it possible to observe 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its upcoming launch, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations and Lorentz invariance violation. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the opportunities for guest investigators, and the mission status.

  9. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P.G.; Bassa, C. G.; Dieball, A.; Greiss, S.; Maccarone, T. J.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Britt, C. T.; Clem, J. L.; Gossen, L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Groot, P.J.; Kuiper, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Mendez, M.; Mikles, V. J.; Ratti, E. M.; Rea, N.; van Haaften, L.; Wijnands, R.; in't Zand, J. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (CGBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to de

  10. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Greiss, S.; Clem, J.; Dieball, A.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Gossen, L.; Collazzi, A. C.; Wijnands, R.; In't Zand, J. J. M.; Mendez, M.; Rea, N.; Kuulkers, E.; Ratti, E. M.; van Haaften, L. M.; Heinke, C.; Ozel, F.; Groot, P. J.; Verbunt, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to det

  11. Massive Stars in Colliding Wind Systems: the GLAST Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-29

    Colliding winds of massive stars in binary systems are considered as candidate sites of high-energy non-thermal photon emission. They are already among the suggested counterparts for a few individual unidentified EGRET sources, but may constitute a detectable source population for the GLAST observatory. The present work investigates such population study of massive colliding wind systems at high-energy gamma-rays. Based on the recent detailed model (Reimer et al. 2006) for non-thermal photon production in prime candidate systems, we unveil the expected characteristics of this source class in the observables accessible at LAT energies. Combining the broadband emission model with the presently cataloged distribution of such systems and their individual parameters allows us to conclude on the expected maximum number of LAT-detections among massive stars in colliding wind binary systems.

  12. Suzaku observations of X-ray excess emission in the cluster of galaxies A 3112

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, T.; Nevalainen, J.; Bonamente, M.; Ota, N.; Kaastra, J.

    2010-12-01

    Aims: We analysed the Suzaku XIS1 data of the A 3112 cluster of galaxies in order to examine the X-ray excess emission in this cluster reported earlier with the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites. Methods: We performed X-ray spectroscopy on the data of a single large region. We carried out simulations to estimate the systematic uncertainties affecting the X-ray excess signal. Results: The best-fit temperature of the intracluster gas depends strongly on the choice of the energy band used for the spectral analysis. This proves the existence of excess emission component in addition to the single-temperature MEKAL in A 3112. We showed that this effect is not an artifact due to uncertainties of the background modeling, instrument calibration or the amount of Galactic absorption. Neither does the PSF scatter of the emission from the cool core nor the projection of the cool gas in the cluster outskirts produce the effect. Finally we modeled the excess emission either by using an additional MEKAL or powerlaw component. Due to the small differencies between thermal and non-thermal model we can not rule out the non-thermal origin of the excess emission based on the goodness of the fit. Assuming that it has a thermal origin, we further examined the differential emission measure (DEM) models. We utilised two different DEM models, a Gaussian differential emission measure distribution (GDEM) and WDEM model, where the emission measure of a number of thermal components is distributed as a truncated power law. The best-fit XIS1 MEKAL temperature for the 0.4-7.0 keV band is 4.7 ± 0.1 keV, consistent with that obtained using GDEM and WDEM models.

  13. Matched-filtering Line Search Methods Applied to Suzaku Data

    CERN Document Server

    Miyazaki, Naoto; Enoto, Teruaki; Axelsson, Magnus; Ohashi, Takaya

    2016-01-01

    A detailed search for emission and absorption lines and assessing their upper limits are performed for Suzaku data. The method utilizes a matched-filtering approach to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio for a given energy resolution, which could be applicable to many types of line search. We first applied it to well-known AGN spectra that have been reported to have ultra-fast outflows, and find that our results are consistent with previous findings at the ~3{\\sigma} level. We proceeded to search for emission and absorption features in the two bright magnetars 4U 0142+61 and 1RXS J1708-4009, applying the filtering method to Suzaku data. We found that neither source showed any significant indication of line features, even using long Suzaku observations and dividing their spectra into spin phases. The upper limits on the equivalent width of emission/absorption lines are constrained to be a few eV at ~1 keV, and a few hundreds of eV at ~10 keV. This strengthens previous reports that persistently bright magnetars ...

  14. Chandra Early Type Galaxy Atals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Anderson, Craig; Burke, Douglas J.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Fruscione, Antonella; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael; Morgan, Douglas; Mossman, Amy; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Paggi, Alessandro; Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil; Trinchieri, Ginevra

    2017-08-01

    The hot gas in early type galaxies (ETGs) plays a crucial role in understanding their formation and evolution. As the hot gas is often extended to the outskirts beyond the optical size, the large scale structural features identified by Chandra (including jets, cavities, cold fronts, filaments and tails) point to key evolutionary mechanisms, e.g., AGN feedback, merging history, accretion, stripping and star formation and its quenching. We have systematically analyzed the archival Chandra data of ~100 ETGs to study the hot ISM. We produce the uniformly derived data products with spatially resolved spectral information and will make them accessible via a public web site. With 2D spectral infomation, we further discuss gas morphology, scaling relations, X-ray based mass profiles and their implications related to various physical mechanisms (e.g., stellar and AGN feedback).

  15. CIAO: Chandra's data analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruscione, Antonella; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Allen, Glenn E.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Burke, Douglas J.; Davis, John E.; Durham, Nick; Elvis, Martin; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Harris, Daniel E.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Houck, John C.; Ishibashi, Bish; Karovska, Margarita; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Noble, Michael S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Primini, Frank A.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Smith, Randall K.; Wise, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The CIAO (Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations) software package was first released in 1999 following the launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and is used by astronomers across the world to analyze Chandra data as well as data from other telescopes. From the earliest design discussions, CIAO was planned as a general-purpose scientific data analysis system optimized for X-ray astronomy, and consists mainly of command line tools (allowing easy pipelining and scripting) with a parameter-based interface layered on a flexible data manipulation I/O library. The same code is used for the standard Chandra archive pipeline, allowing users to recalibrate their data in a consistent way. We will discuss the lessons learned from the first six years of the software's evolution. Our initial approach to documentation evolved to concentrate on recipe-based "threads" which have proved very successful. A multi-dimensional abstract approach to data analysis has allowed new capabilities to be added while retaining existing interfaces. A key requirement for our community was interoperability with other data analysis systems, leading us to adopt standard file formats and an architecture which was as robust as possible to the input of foreign data files, as well as re-using a number of external libraries. We support users who are comfortable with coding themselves via a flexible user scripting paradigm, while the availability of tightly constrained pipeline programs are of benefit to less computationally-advanced users. As with other analysis systems, we have found that infrastructure maintenance and re-engineering is a necessary and significant ongoing effort and needs to be planned in to any long-lived astronomy software.

  16. Digging for the Truth Photon Archeology with GLAST

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    2007-01-01

    Stecker, Malkan and Scully, have shown how ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities for energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for redshifts out to 6 (called here the intergalactic background light or IBL). From these calculations of the IBL at various redshifts, they predict the present and past optical depth of the universe to high energy gamma-rays owing to interactions with photons of the IBL and the 2.7 K CMB. We discuss here how this proceedure can be reversed by looking for sharp cutoffs in the spectra of extragalactic gamma-ray sources such as blazars at high redshifts in the multi-GeV energy range with GLAST. By determining the cutoff energies of sources with known redshifts, we can refine our determination of the IBL photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archeo-IBL", and therefore get a better measure of the p...

  17. Future GLAST observations of Supernova remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Funk, S

    2007-01-01

    Shell-type Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been known to harbour a population of ultra-relativistic particles, accelerated in the Supernova shock wave by the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration. Experimental evidence for the existence of electrons up to energies of ~100 TeV was first provided by the detection of hard X-ray synchrotron emission as e.g. in the shell of the young SNR SN1006. Furthermore using theoretical arguments shell-type Supernova remnants have long been considered as the main accelerator of protons - Cosmic rays - in the Galaxy; definite proof of this process is however still missing. Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN) - diffuse structures surrounding young pulsars - are another class of objects known to be a site of particle acceleration in the Galaxy, again through the detection of hard synchrotron X-rays such as in the Crab Nebula. Gamma-rays above 100 MeV provide a direct access to acceleration processes. The GLAST Large Area telescope (LAT) will be operating in the energy range betwee...

  18. Simulation of Prompt Emission from GRBs with a Photospheric Component and its Detectability By GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battelino, Milan; Ryde, Felix; /Stockholm Observ.; Omodei, Nicola; /INFN, Pisa; Longo, Francesco; /U. Trieste /INFN, Trieste

    2011-11-29

    The prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) still requires a physical explanation. Studies of time-resolved GRB spectra, observed in the keV-MeV range, show that a hybrid model consisting of two components, a photospheric and a non-thermal component, in many cases fits bright, single-pulsed bursts as well as, and in some instances even better than, the Band function. With an energy coverage from 8 keV up to 300 GeV, GLAST will give us an unprecedented opportunity to further investigate the nature of the prompt emission. In particular, it will give us the possibility to determine whether a photospheric component is the determining feature of the spectrum or not. Here we present a short study of the ability of GLAST to detect such a photospheric component in the sub-MeV range for typical bursts, using simulation tools developed within the GLAST science collaboration.

  19. Metallicity of the Fossil Group NGC 1550 Observed with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kosuke; Kawaharada, Madoka; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Matsushita, Kyoko; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Ohashi, Takaya

    2010-12-01

    We studied the temperature and metal abundance distributions of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in a group of galaxies, NGC 1550, observed with Suzaku. NGC 1550 is classified as a fossil group, which has few bright member galaxies, except for the central galaxy. Thus, such a type of galaxy is important to investigate how metals are enriched to the ICM. With the Suzaku XIS instrument, we directly measured not only the Si, S, and Fe lines, but also the O and Mg lines, and obtained those abundances to an outer region of ˜0.5r180 for the first time, and confirmed that the metals in the ICM of such a fossil group are indeed extending to a large radius. We found steeper gradients for the Mg, Si, S, and Fe abundances, while O showed an almost flat abundance distribution. Abundance ratios of α-elements to Fe were similar to those of the other groups and poor clusters. We calculated the number ratio of type II to type Ia supernovae for the ICM enrichment to be 2.9±0.5 within 0.1r180; the value is consistent with those for the other groups and poor clusters observed with Suzaku. We also calculated the metal mass-to-light ratios (MLRs) for Fe, O, and Mg with the B-band and K-band luminosities of the member galaxies of NGC 1550. The derived MLRs are comparable to those of the NGC 5044 group in the r region, while those of NGC 1550 are slightly higher than those of NGC 5044 in the outer region.

  20. Maximising the mileage from the Chandra podcasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcand, K. K.; Watzke, M.

    2008-06-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory captures X-ray images and measures spectra of many highenergy cosmic phenomena. There is a constant challenge to devise new and appropriate means to bring these potentially esoteric science results and concepts in a digestible way to the public. One of the ideas to address this challenge became the Chandra podcast.

  1. Definition of a Twelve-Point Polygonal SAA Boundaryfor the GLAST Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; /UC, Santa Cruz /SLAC

    2007-08-29

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), set to launch in early 2008, detects gamma rays within a huge energy range of 100 MeV - 300 GeV. Background cosmic radiation interferes with such detection resulting in confusion over distinguishing cosmic from gamma rays encountered. This quandary is resolved by encasing GLAST's Large Area Telescope (LAT) with an Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD), a device which identifies and vetoes charged particles. The ACD accomplishes this through plastic scintillator tiles; when cosmic rays strike, photons produced induce currents in Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) attached to these tiles. However, as GLAST orbits Earth at altitudes {approx}550km and latitudes between -26 degree and 26 degree, it will confront the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), a region of high particle flux caused by trapped radiation in the geomagnetic field. Since the SAA flux would degrade the sensitivity of the ACD's PMTs over time, a determined boundary enclosing this region need be attained, signaling when to lower the voltage on the PMTs as a protective measure. The operational constraints on such a boundary require a convex SAA polygon with twelve edges, whose area is minimal ensuring GLAST has maximum observation time. The AP8 and PSB97 models describing the behavior of trapped radiation were used in analyzing the SAA and defining a convex SAA boundary of twelve sides. The smallest possible boundary was found to cover 14.58% of GLAST's observation time. Further analysis of defining a boundary safety margin to account for inaccuracies in the models reveals if the total SAA hull area is increased by {approx}20%, the loss of total observational area is < 5%. These twelve coordinates defining the SAA flux region are ready for implementation by the GLAST satellite.

  2. Conceptual Design Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Tower Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Chad

    2002-07-18

    The main objective of this work was to develop a conceptual design and engineering prototype for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) tower structure. This thesis describes the conceptual design of a GLAST tower and the fabrication and testing of a prototype tower tray. The requirements were that the structure had to support GLAST's delicate silicon strip detector array through ground handling, launch and in orbit operations as well as provide for thermal and electrical pathways. From the desired function and the given launch vehicle for the spacecraft that carries the GLAST detector, an efficient structure was designed which met the requirements. This thesis developed in three stages: design, fabrication, and testing. During the first stage, a general set of specifications was used to develop the initial design, which was then analyzed and shown to meet or exceed the requirements. The second stage called for the fabrication of prototypes to prove manufacturability and gauge cost and time estimates for the total project. The last step called for testing the prototypes to show that they performed as the analysis had shown and prove that the design met the requirements. As a spacecraft engineering exercise, this project required formulating a solution based on engineering judgment, analyzing the solution using advanced engineering techniques, then proving the validity of the design and analysis by the manufacturing and testing of prototypes. The design described here met all the requirements set out by the needs of the experiment and operating concerns. This strawman design is not intended to be the complete or final design for the GLAST instrument structure, but instead examines some of the main challenges involved and demonstrates that there are solutions to them. The purpose of these tests was to prove that there are solutions to the basic mechanical, electrical and thermal problems presented with the GLAST project.

  3. Chandra Observations of Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Andrea; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present early X-ray results from Chandra for two starburst galaxies, M82 and NGC3256, obtained using AXAF CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-I) and the HRC. For M82 the arcsecond spatial resolution enables us to separate the point source component from the extended emission for the first time. Astrometry reveals that most of the X-ray sources are not coincident with the family of compact radio sources believed to be Super Nova Remnants (SNRs). In addition, based on three epoch Chandra observations, several of the X-ray sources are clearly variable indicating that they are binaries. When we deconvolve the extended and point source components detected in the hard X-ray band, we find that 50 percent arises from the extended component. This fact, together with its morphology, constrains the various models proposed to explain the hard X-ray emission. For NGC3256 we resolve two closely separated nuclei. These new data support a pure starburst origin for the total X-ray emission rather than a composite AGN/starburst, thereby making NGC3256 one of the most X-ray luminous starburst galaxies known.

  4. Real-Time Visualization of Spacecraft Telemetry for the GLAST and LRO Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, Eric T.; Shah, Neerav; Chai, Dean J.

    2010-01-01

    GlastCam and LROCam are closely-related tools developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for real-time visualization of spacecraft telemetry, developed for the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) missions, respectively. Derived from a common simulation tool, they use related but different architectures to ingest real-time spacecraft telemetry and ground predicted ephemerides, and to compute and display features of special interest to each mission in its operational environment. We describe the architectures of GlastCam and LROCam, the customizations required to fit into the mission operations environment, and the features that were found to be especially useful in early operations for their respective missions. Both tools have a primary window depicting a three-dimensional Cam view of the spacecraft that may be freely manipulated by the user. The scene is augmented with fields of view, pointing constraints, and other features which enhance situational awareness. Each tool also has another "Map" window showing the spacecraft's groundtrack projected onto a map of the Earth or Moon, along with useful features such as the Sun, eclipse regions, and TDRS satellite locations. Additional windows support specialized checkout tasks. One such window shows the star tracker fields of view, with tracking window locations and the mission star catalog. This view was instrumental for GLAST in quickly resolving a star tracker mounting polarity issue; visualization made the 180-deg mismatch immediately obvious. Full access to GlastCam's source code also made possible a rapid coarse star tracker mounting calibration with some on the fly code adjustments; adding a fine grid to measure alignment offsets, and introducing a calibration quaternion which could be adjusted within GlastCam without perturbing the flight parameters. This calibration, from concept to completion, took less than half an hour. Both GlastCam and LROCam were

  5. Suzaku observations of the low surface brightness cluster A76

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, N; Ibaraki, Y; Boehringer, H; Chon, G

    2013-01-01

    Context: We present results of Suzaku observations of a nearby galaxy cluster A76 at z=0.0395. This cluster is characterized by extremely low X-ray surface brightness and is hereafter referred to as the LSB cluster. Aims: To understand the nature and thermodynamic evolution of the LSB cluster by studying the physical properties of the hot intracluster medium in A76. Methods: We conducted two-pointed Suzaku observations of A76 and examined the global gas properties of the cluster by XIS spectral analysis. We also performed deprojection analysis of annular spectra and derived radial profiles of gas temperature, density and entropy out to approximately 850 kpc (~ 0.6 r_200) and 560 kpc (~0.4 r_200) in A76 East and A76 West, respectively. Results: The measured global temperature and metal abundance are approximately 3.3 keV and 0.24 solar, respectively. From the deprojection analysis, the entropy profile is found to be flat with respect to radius. The entropy within the central region (r < 0.2r_200) is excepti...

  6. Symbiotic stars in X-rays III: Suzaku observations

    CERN Document Server

    Nuñez, N E; Mukai, K; Sokoloski, J L; Luna, G J M

    2016-01-01

    We describe the X-ray emission as observed with Suzaku from five symbiotic stars that we selected for deep Suzaku observations after their initial detection with ROSAT, ASCA and Swift. We find that the X-ray spectra of all five sources can be adequately fit with absorbed, optically thin thermal plasma models, with either single- or multi-temperature plasmas. These models are compatible with the X-ray emission originating in the boundary layer between an accretion disk and a white dwarf. The high plasma temperatures of kT$~>3$ keV for all five targets were greater than expected for colliding winds. Based on these high temperatures, as well as previous measurements of UV variability and UV luminosity, and the large amplitude of X-ray flickering in 4 Dra, we conclude that all five sources are accretion-powered through predominantly optically thick boundary layers. Our X-ray data allow us to observe a small, optically thin portion of the emission from these boundary layers. Given the time between previous observa...

  7. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, C. T.; Hynes, R. I.; Jonker, P. G.; Maccarone, T.; Torres, M. A. P.; Steeghs, D.; Nelemans, G.; Johnson, C.; Greiss, S.

    2015-05-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a multi-wavelength survey of two 6×1 degree strips above and below the Galactic plane, including deep r' and i' imaging and time domain photometry from CTIO and shallow, wide-field X-ray imaging with Chandra. Targeting fields above |b|=1 avoids most of the copious extinction along the Galactic plane while maintaining high source density. This results in targets that are accessible to follow up in optical and NIR wavelengths. The X-ray observations are shallow to maximize the number of quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs) relative to Cataclysmic Variables (CVs). The goals of the GBS are to conduct a census of Low Mass X-ray Binaries in the Milky Way in order to constrain models of binary evolution, the common envelope phase in particular, and to expand the number of known LMXBs for optical follow up. Mass measurements in particular will help constrain the black hole (BH) mass distribution and the equation of state for neutron stars (NS). Constraining the BH mass distribution will constrain models of their formation in supernovae. The current population of Galactic BHs suffers from selection effects, which the GBS avoids by finding new objects while still in quiescence. We expect to find qLMXBs, magnetic CVs, RS CVn stars, and smaller numbers of other types of sources. After removing duplicates, there are 1640 unique X-ray sources in the 12 square degree survey area, which closely matches the predicted number of 1648. We are currently matching X-ray sources to counterparts in other wavelengths using new photometric and spectroscopic observations as well as in archival data where it exists, and searching for variability and periodicity in the counterparts in photometric data. So far, we have spectroscopically identified 27 interacting binaries including promising candidates for quiescent black holes.

  8. Jets, Blazars and the EBL in the GLAST-EXIST Era

    CERN Document Server

    Grindlay, Jonathan E

    2007-01-01

    The synergy of GLAST and the proposed EXIST mission as the Black Hole Finder Probe in the Beyond Einstein Program is remarkable. With its full-sky per orbit hard X-ray imaging (3-600 keV) and "nuFnu" sensitivity comparable to GLAST, EXIST could measure variability and spectra of Blazars in the hard X-ray synchrotron component simultaneous with GLAST (~10-100GeV) measures of the inverse Compton component, thereby uniquely constraining intrinsic source spectra and allowing measured high energy spectral breaks to measure the cosmic diffuse extra-galactic background light (EBL) by determining the intervening diffuse IR photon field required to yield the observed break from photon-photon absorption. Such studies also constrain the physics of jets (and parameters and indeed the validity of SSC models) and the origin of the >100 MeV gamma-ray diffuse background likely arising from Blazars and jet-dominated sources. An overview of the EXIST mission, which could fly in the GLAST era, is given together with a synopsis ...

  9. Correlative Spectral Analysis of Gamma-Ray Bursts using Swift-BAT and GLAST-GBM

    CERN Document Server

    Stamatikos, Michael; Band, David L

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the preliminary results of spectral analysis simulations involving anticipated correlated multi-wavelength observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope's (GLAST) Burst Monitor (GLAST-GBM), resulting in joint spectral fits, including characteristic photon energy (Epeak) values, for a conservative annual estimate of ~30 GRBs. The addition of BAT's spectral response will (i) complement in-orbit calibration efforts of GBM's detector response matrices, (ii) augment GLAST's low energy sensitivity by increasing the ~20-100 keV effective area, (iii) facilitate ground-based follow-up efforts of GLAST GRBs by increasing GBM's source localization precision, and (iv) help identify a subset of non-triggered GRBs discovered via off-line GBM data analysis. Such multi-wavelength correlative analyses, which have been demonstrated by successful joint-spectral fits of Swift-BAT GRBs with other higher energy detectors such as Konus-WIND ...

  10. Results from the beam test of the engineering model of the GLAST large area telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto e Silva, E. do E-mail: eduardo@slac.stanford.edu; Anthony, P.; Arnold, R.; Arrighi, H.; Bloom, E.; Baughman, B.; Bogart, J.; Bosted, P.; Bumala, B.; Chekhtman, A.; Cotton, N.; Crider, A.; Dobbs-Dixon, I.; Djannati-Atai, A.; Dubois, R.; Engovatov, D.; Espigat, P.; Evans, J.L.; Fieguth, T.; Flath, D.; Frigaard, M.; Giebels, B.; Gillespie, S.; Godfrey, G.; Grove, J.E.; Handa, T.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hernando, J.; Hicks, M.; Hirayama, M.; Johnson, W.N.; Johnson, R.; Kamae, T.; Kroeger, W.; Lauben, D.; Lin, Y.C.; Lindner, T.; Michelson, P.; Moiseev, A.; Nikolaou, M.; Nolan, P.; Odian, A.; Ohsugi, T.; Ormes, J.; Paliaga, G.; Parkinson, P. Saz; Phlips, B.; Ritz, S.; Rock, S.; Russel, J.J.; Sadrozinski, H.; Schalk, T.; Silvis, J.; Szalata, Z.; Terrier, R.; Thompson, D.J.; Tournear, D.M.; Waite, A.P.; Wallace, J.; Williams, S.; Williamson, R.; Winker, G

    2001-11-21

    This paper describes the results of a beam test using the Engineering Model of the GLAST Large Area Telescope, which was installed in a beam of positrons, hadrons and tagged photons at SLAC. The performance of the four subsystems, Anti Coincidence Detector, Silicon Tracker, Calorimeter and Data Acquisition will be described.

  11. Optimization of magnetic field system for glass spherical tokamak GLAST-III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zahoor; Ahmad, S.; Naveed, M. A.; Deeba, F.; Aqib Javeed, M.; Batool, S.; Hussain, S.; Vorobyov, G. M.

    2017-04-01

    GLAST-III (Glass Spherical Tokamak) is a spherical tokamak with aspect ratio A = 2. The mapping of its magnetic system is performed to optimize the GLAST-III tokamak for plasma initiation using a Hall probe. Magnetic field from toroidal coils shows 1/R dependence which is typical with spherical tokamaks. Toroidal field (TF) coils can produce 875 Gauss field, an essential requirement for electron cyclotron resonance assisted discharge. The central solenoid (CS) of GLAST-III is an air core solenoid and requires compensation coils to reduce unnecessary magnetic flux inside the vessel region. The vertical component of magnetic field from the CS in the vacuum vessel region is reduced to 1.15 Gauss kA-1 with the help of a differential loop. The CS of GLAST can produce flux change up to 68 mVs. Theoretical and experimental results are compared for the current waveform of TF coils using a combination of fast and slow capacitor banks. Also the magnetic field produced by poloidal field (PF) coils is compared with theoretically predicted values. It is found that calculated results are in good agreement with experimental measurement. Consequently magnetic field measurements are validated. A tokamak discharge with 2 kA plasma current and pulse length 1 ms is successfully produced using different sets of coils.

  12. Reduced alcohol intake and reward associated with impaired endocannabinoid signaling in mice with a deletion of the glutamate transporter GLAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Rose-Marie; Adermark, Louise; Molander, Anna

    2012-01-01

    mice with a deletion of GLAST to test this prediction. WT and GLAST KO mice were tested for alcohol consumption using two-bottle free-choice drinking. Alcohol reward was evaluated using conditioned place preference (CPP). Sensitivity to depressant alcohol effects was tested using the accelerating...... rotarod, alcohol-induced hypothermia, and loss of righting reflex. Extracellular glutamate was measured using microdialysis, and striatal slice electrophysiology was carried out to examine plasticity of the cortico-striatal pathway as a model system in which adaptations to the constitutive GLAST deletion...

  13. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTIONS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Sato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM of galaxy clusters to outer regions observed with Suzaku. The observed temperature dropped by about ~30% from the central region to the virial radius of the clusters. The derived entropy profile agreed with the expectation from simulations within r500, while the entropy profile in r > r500 indicated a flatter slope than the simulations. This would suggest that the cluster outskirts were out of hydrostatic equilibrium. As for the metallicity, we studied the metal abundances from O to Fe up to ~0.5 times the virial radius of galaxy groups and clusters. Comparing the results with supernova nucleosynthesis models, the number ratio of type II to Ia supernovae is estimated to be ~3.5. We also calculated not only Fe, but also O and Mg mass-to-light ratios (MLRs with K-band luminosity. The MLRs in the clusters had a similar feature.

  14. X-Ray Observations of the Galactic Center with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K; Inui, T; Nobukawa, M; Mori, H

    2007-01-01

    We report on the diffuse X-ray emissions from the Galactic center (GCDX) observed with the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) on board the Suzaku satellite. The highly accurate energy calibrations and extremely low background of the XIS provide many new facts on the GCDX. These are (1) the origin of the 6.7/7.0keV lines is collisional excitation in hot plasma, (2) new SNR and super-bubble candidates are found, (3) most of the 6.4keV line is fluorescence by X-rays, and (4) time variability of the 6.4keV line is found from the SgrB2 complex.

  15. Suzaku Observation of HESS J1507-622

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, H; Bamba, A; Sakai, M; Tibolla, O; Kaufmann, S

    2014-01-01

    HESS J1507-622 is one of the bright unidentified TeV objects. HESS J1507-622 is unique, since the location of the object is off the Galactic disk. We observed the HESS J1507-622 region with the Suzaku XIS, and found no obvious counterpart although there is no severe interstellar extinction. However, there are two interesting X-ray objects; SRC1 is a bright extended source, and SRC2 is a faint diffuse object. If either of them is a counterpart, the flux ratio between TeV and X-ray is large, and HESS J1507-622 is a real dark particle accelerator.

  16. Performance of the Anti-Coincidence Detector on the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard; Charles, E.; /SLAC; Hartman, R.C.; /NASA, Goddard; Moiseev, A.A.; /NASA, Goddard; Ormes, J.F.; /NASA, Goddard /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD), the outermost detector layer in the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT), is designed to detect and veto incident cosmic ray charged particles, which outnumber cosmic gamma rays by 3-4 orders of magnitude. The challenge in ACD design is that it must have high (0.9997) detection efficiency for singly-charged relativistic particles, but must also have a low probability for self-veto of high-energy gammas by backsplash radiation from interactions in the LAT calorimeter. Simulations and tests demonstrate that the ACD meets its design requirements. The performance of the ACD has remained stable through stand-alone environmental testing, shipment across the U.S., installation onto the LAT, shipment back across the U.S., LAT environmental testing, and shipment to Arizona. As part of the fully-assembled GLAST observatory, the ACD is being readied for final testing before launch.

  17. Searching for distant blazars with GLAST and the Large Millimeter Telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Carramiñana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El Gran Telescopio Milimétrico estudiará el universo a altos corrimientos al rojo, incluyendo la formación de las primeras galaxias masivas y sus núcleos activos. El GTM puede ser usado en conjunto con GLAST en la búsqueda de los blazares más distantes para explorar la época de formación de los primeros hoyos negros.

  18. 15 Years of Chandra Observations of Capella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Vinay

    2014-11-01

    Capella is the strongest coronal line source accessible to Chandra. It has been cumulatively observed with gratings for over 1.2 Ms. The accumulated spectrum represents astrophysical ground truth for atomic physics calculations that is unprecedented in quality. We analyze co-added spectra to generate a comprehensive list of detectable lines and their locations, spanning two orders of magnitude in photon energy. We compare the locations of identifiable lines with locations from atomic databases ATOMDB and Chianti and characterize the uncertainties in the databases. The full line lists and comparisons will be made available at the Dataverse at http://dx.doi.org/10.7910/DVN/27084 This work is supported by Chandra grant AR0-11001X and NASA Contract NAS8-03060 to the Chandra X-Ray Center.

  19. NASA's Chandra Finds Black Holes Are "Green"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    Black holes are the most fuel efficient engines in the Universe, according to a new study using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. By making the first direct estimate of how efficient or "green" black holes are, this work gives insight into how black holes generate energy and affect their environment. The new Chandra finding shows that most of the energy released by matter falling toward a supermassive black hole is in the form of high-energy jets traveling at near the speed of light away from the black hole. This is an important step in understanding how such jets can be launched from magnetized disks of gas near the event horizon of a black hole. Illustration of Fuel for a Black Hole Engine Illustration of Fuel for a Black Hole Engine "Just as with cars, it's critical to know the fuel efficiency of black holes," said lead author Steve Allen of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University, and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. "Without this information, we cannot figure out what is going on under the hood, so to speak, or what the engine can do." Allen and his team used Chandra to study nine supermassive black holes at the centers of elliptical galaxies. These black holes are relatively old and generate much less radiation than quasars, rapidly growing supermassive black holes seen in the early Universe. The surprise came when the Chandra results showed that these "quiet" black holes are all producing much more energy in jets of high-energy particles than in visible light or X-rays. These jets create huge bubbles, or cavities, in the hot gas in the galaxies. Animation of Black Hole in Elliptical Galaxy Animation of Black Hole in Elliptical Galaxy The efficiency of the black hole energy-production was calculated in two steps: first Chandra images of the inner regions of the galaxies were used to estimate how much fuel is available for the black hole; then Chandra images were used to estimate the power required to produce

  20. Beyond Chandra - the X-ray Surveyor

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Martin C; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 16 years, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided an unparalleled means for exploring the universe with its half-arcsecond angular resolution. Chandra studies have deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, supernova remnants, planets, and solar system objects addressing almost all areas of current interest in astronomy and astrophysics. As we look beyond Chandra, it is clear that comparable or even better angular resolution with greatly increased photon throughput is essential to address even more demanding science questions, such as the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift; the emergence of the first galaxy groups; and details of feedback over a large range of scales from galaxies to galaxy clusters. Recently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, has initiated a concept study for such a mission named the X-ray Surveyor. This study starts with a baseline payloa...

  1. GLAST deficiency in mice exacerbates gap detection deficits in a model of salicylate-induced tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gap detection or gap pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle (GPIAS has been successfully used in rat and guinea pig models of tinnitus, yet this system has proven to have low efficacy in CBA mice, with low basal GPIAS and subtle tinnitus like effects. Here, we tested five mouse strains (CBA, BalbC, CD-1, C57BL/6 and sv129 for pre-pulse inhibition and gap detection with varying interstimulus intervals (ISI and found the that mice from a CBA genetic background had the poorest capacities of suppressing the startle response in presence of a pre-pulse or a gap. CD-1 mice displayed variable responses throughout all ISI. Interestingly, C57BL/6, sv129 and BalbC showed efficient suppression with either pre-pulses or gaps with shorter ISI. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST is expressed in support cells from the cochlea and buffers the excess of glutamate. We hypothesized that loss of GLAST function could sensitize the ear to tinnitus-inducing agents, such as salicylate. Using shorter ISI to obtain a greater dynamic range to assess tinnitus-like effects, we found that disruption of gap detection by salicylate was exacerbated across various intensities of a 32 kHz narrow band noise gap carrier in GLAST KO mice when compared to their wild-type littermates. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR and distortion products of otoacoustic emission (DPOAE were performed to evaluate the effects on hearing functions. Salicylate caused greater auditory threshold shifts (near 15 dB in GLAST KO mice than in wild-type mice across all tested frequencies, despite similarly reduced DPOAE. Despite these changes, inhibition using broad-band gap carriers and 32 kHz pre-pulses were not affected. Our study suggests that GLAST deficiency could become a useful experimental model to decipher the mechanisms underlying drug-induced tinnitus. Future studies addressing the neurological correlates of tinnitus in this model could provide additional insights into the mechanisms

  2. Broad-Band Spectroscopy of Hercules X-1 with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Fumi; Enoto, Teruaki; Iwakiri, Wataru; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Nagase, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    Hercules X-1 was observed with Suzaku in the main-on state from 2005 to 2010. The 0.4- 100 keV wide-band spectra obtained in four observations showed a broad hump around 4-9 keV in addition to narrow Fe lines at 6.4 and 6.7 keV. The hump was seen in all the four observations regardless of the selection of the continuum models. Thus it is considered a stable and intrinsic spectral feature in Her X-1. The broad hump lacked a sharp structure like an absorption edge. Thus it was represented by two different spectral models: an ionized partial covering or an additional broad line at 6.5 keV. The former required a persistently existing ionized absorber, whose origin was unclear. In the latter case, the Gaussian fitting of the 6.5-keV line needs a large width of sigma = 1.0-1.5 keV and a large equivalent width of 400-900 eV. If the broad line originates from Fe fluorescence of accreting matter, its large width may be explained by the Doppler broadening in the accretion flow. However, the large equivalent width may be inconsistent with a simple accretion geometry.

  3. Suzaku spectra of a Type II Supernova Remnant Kes 79

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Tamotsu; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports results of a Suzaku observation of the supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 79 (G33.6+0.1). The X-ray spectrum is best fitted by a two-temperature model: a non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) plasma and a collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) plasma. The NEI plasma is spatially confined within the inner radio shell with kT~0.8 keV, while the CIE plasma is found in more spatially extended regions associated with the outer radio shell with kT~0.2 keV and solar abundance. Therefore, the NEI plasma is attributable to the SN ejecta and the CIE plasma is forward shocked interstellar medium. In the NEI plasma, we discovered K-shell line of Al, Ar and Ca for the first time. The abundance pattern and estimated mass of the ejecta are consistent with the core-collapse supernova explosion of a ~30-40 solar mass progenitor star. An Fe line with center energy of ~6.4 keV is also found in the southeast (SE) portion of the SNR, a close peripheral region around dense molecular clouds. One possibility is that the lin...

  4. Broad-Band Spectroscopy of Hercules X-1 with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Fumi; Enoto, Teruaki; Iwakiri, Wataru; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Nagase, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    Hercules X-1 was observed with Suzaku in the main-on state from 2005 to 2010. The 0.4- 100 keV wide-band spectra obtained in four observations showed a broad hump around 4-9 keV in addition to narrow Fe lines at 6.4 and 6.7 keV. The hump was seen in all the four observations regardless of the selection of the continuum models. Thus it is considered a stable and intrinsic spectral feature in Her X-1. The broad hump lacked a sharp structure like an absorption edge. Thus it was represented by two different spectral models: an ionized partial covering or an additional broad line at 6.5 keV. The former required a persistently existing ionized absorber, whose origin was unclear. In the latter case, the Gaussian fitting of the 6.5-keV line needs a large width of sigma = 1.0-1.5 keV and a large equivalent width of 400-900 eV. If the broad line originates from Fe fluorescence of accreting matter, its large width may be explained by the Doppler broadening in the accretion flow. However, the large equivalent width may be inconsistent with a simple accretion geometry.

  5. Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on Board Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, T; Endo, M; Endo, Y; Ezoe, Y; Fukazawa, Y; Hamaya, M; Hirakuri, S; Hong, S; Horii, M; Inoue, H; Isobe, N; Itoh, T; Iyomoto, N; Kamae, T; Kasama, D; Kataoka, J; Kato, H; Kawaharada, M; Kawano, N; Kawashima, K; Kawasoe, S; Kishishita, T; Kitaguchi, T; Kobayashi, Y; Kokubun, M; Kotoku, J; Kouda, M; Kubota, A; Kuroda, Y; Madejski, G; Makishima, K; Masukawa, K; Matsumoto, Y; Mitani, T; Miyawaki, R; Mizuno, T; Mori, K; Mori, M; Murashima, M; Murakami, T; Nakazawa, K; Niko, H; Nomachi, M; Okada, Y; Ohno, M; Oonuki, K; Ota, N; Ozawa, H; Sato, G; Shinoda, S; Sugiho, M; Suzuki, M; Taguchi, K; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, I; Takeda, S; Tamura, K; Tamura, T; Tanaka, T; Tanihata, C; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Tominaga, S; Uchiyama, Y; Watanabe, S; Yamaoka, K; Yanagida, T; Yonetoku, D

    2006-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board Suzaku covers a wide energy range from 10 keV to 600 keV by combination of silicon PIN diodes and GSO scintillators. The HXD is designed to achieve an extremely low in-orbit back ground based on a combination of new techniques, including the concept of well-type active shield counter. With an effective area of 142 cm^2 at 20 keV and 273 cm2 at 150 keV, the background level at the sea level reached ~1x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 30 keV for the PI N diodes, and ~2x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 100 keV, and ~7x10^{-6} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 200 keV for the phoswich counter. Tight active shielding of the HXD results in a large array of guard counters surrounding the main detector parts. These anti-coincidence counters, made of ~4 cm thick BGO crystals, have a large effective area for sub-MeV to MeV gamma-rays. They work as an excellent gamma-ray burst monitor with limited angular resolution (~5 degree). The on-board signal-processing system and th...

  6. Broad-band study with Suzaku of the magnetar class

    CERN Document Server

    Enoto, Teruaki; Makishima, Kazuo; Rea, Nanda; Hurley, Kevein; Shibata, Shinpei

    2010-01-01

    Broad-band (0.8-70 keV) spectra of the persistent X-ray emission from 9 magnetars were obtained with Suzaku, including 3 objects in apparent outburst. The soft X-ray component was detected from all of them, with a typical blackbody temperature of kT ~ 0.5 keV, while the hard-tail component, dominating above ~10 keV, was detected at ~1 mCrab intensity from 7 of them. Therefore, the spectrum composed of a soft emission and a hard-tail component may be considered to be a common property of magnetars, both in their active and quiescent states. Wide-band spectral analyses revealed that the hard-tail component has a 1-60 keV flux, Fh, comparable to or even higher than that carried by the 1-60 keV soft component, Fs. The hardness ratio of these objects, defined as xi=Fh/Fs, was found to be tightly anti-correlated with their characteristic age tau as xi=(3.3+/-0.3)x(tau/1 kyr)^(-0.67+/-0.04) with a correlation coefficient of -0.989, over the range from xi~10 to xi~0.1. Magnetars in outburst states were found to lie o...

  7. Suzaku observation of the giant radio galaxy 3C 326

    CERN Document Server

    Isobe, Naoki; Gandhi, Poshak; Hayato, Asami; Nagai, Hiroshi; Hada, Kazuhiro; Seta, Hiromi; Matsuta, Keiko

    2009-01-01

    A Suzaku observation of a giant radio galaxy, 3C 326, which has a physical size of about 2 Mpc, was conducted on 2008 January 19 -- 21. In addition to several X-ray sources, diffuse emission was significantly detected associated with its west lobe, but the east lobe was contaminated by an unidentified X-ray source WARP J1552.4+2007. After careful evaluation of the X-ray and Non X-ray background, the 0.4 -- 7 keV X-ray spectrum of the west lobe is described by a power-law model. The photon index and 1 keV flux density was derived as $1.82_{-0.24}^{+0.26}\\pm0.04$ and $19.4_{-3.2}^{+3.3}\\pm 3.0$ nJy, respectively, where the first and second errors represent the statistical and systematic ones. The diffuse X-rays were attributed to be inverse Compton radiation by the synchrotron radio electrons scattering off the cosmic microwave background photons. This radio galaxy is the largest among those with lobes detected through inverse Compton X-ray emission. A comparison of the radio to X-ray fluxes yields the energy d...

  8. A Suzaku view of IGR J16393-4643

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Nazma; Pradhan, Pragati; Paul, Biswajit

    2014-01-01

    The pulsar IGR J16393-4643 belongs to a class of highly absorbed supergiant HMXBs, characterised by very high column density of absorbing matter. We present the results of the simultaneous broad-band pulsation and spectrum analysis, from a 44 kilosec Suzaku observation of the source. The orbital intensity profile created with the SWIFT-BAT light-curve shows an indication of IGR J16393-4643 being an eclipsing system with a short eclipse semi-angle $\\theta_{E} \\sim$ 17$^{\\circ}$. For a supergiant companion star with a 20 R$_{\\odot}$ radius, this implies an inclination of the orbital plane in the range of 39$^{\\circ}$-57$^{\\circ}$, whereas for a main sequence B star as the companion with a 10 R$_{\\odot}$ radius, the inclination of the orbital plane is in the range of 60$^{\\circ}$-77$^{\\circ}$. Pulse profiles created for different energy bands, have complex morphology which shows some energy dependence and increases in pulse fraction with energy. We have also investigated broad-band spectral characteristics, for ...

  9. Performance of the Charge Injection Capability of Suzaku XIS

    CERN Document Server

    Nakajima, H; Matsumoto, H; Tsuru, T G; Koyama, K; Tsunemi, H; Hayashida, K; Torii, K; Namiki, M; Katsuda, S; Shoji, M; Matsuura, D; Miyauchi, T; Dotani, T; Ozaki, M; Murakami, H; Bautz, M W; Kissel, S E; LaMarr, B; Prigozhin, G Y

    2007-01-01

    A charge injection technique is applied to the X-ray CCD camera, XIS (X-ray Imaging Spectrometer) onboard Suzaku. The charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) in each CCD column (vertical transfer channel) is measured by the injection of charge packets into a transfer channel and subsequent readout. This paper reports the performances of the charge injection capability based on the ground experiments using a radiation damaged device, and in-orbit measurements of the XIS. The ground experiments show that charges are stably injected with the dispersion of 91eV in FWHM in a specific column for the charges equivalent to the X-ray energy of 5.1keV. This dispersion width is significantly smaller than that of the X-ray events of 113eV (FWHM) at approximately the same energy. The amount of charge loss during transfer in a specific column, which is measured with the charge injection capability, is consistent with that measured with the calibration source. These results indicate that the charge injection technique can accura...

  10. Suzaku Confirms NGC~3660 is an Unabsorbed Seyfert 2

    CERN Document Server

    Rivers, E; Bianchi, S; Matt, G; Nandra, K; Ueda, Y

    2016-01-01

    An enigmatic group of objects, unabsorbed Seyfert 2s may have intrinsically weak broad line regions, obscuration in the line of sight to the BLR but not to the X-ray corona, or so much obscuration that the X-ray continuum is completely suppressed and the observed spectrum is actually scattered into the line of sight from nearby material. NGC 3660 has been shown to have weak broad optical/near infrared lines, no obscuration in the soft X-ray band, and no indication of "changing look" behavior. The only previous hard X-ray detection of this source by Beppo-SAX seemed to indicate that the source might harbor a heavily obscured nucleus. However, our analysis of a long-look Suzaku observation of this source shows that this is not the case, and that this source has a typical power law X-ray continuum with normal reflection and no obscuration. We conclude that NGC 3660 is confirmed to have no unidentified obscuration and that the anomolously high Beppo-SAX measurement must be due to source confusion or similar, bein...

  11. Suzaku X-ray Observations of the Fermi Bubbles' Edges

    CERN Document Server

    Kataoka, J; Totani, T; Sofue, Y; Stawarz, L; Takahashi, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Tsunemi, H; Kimura, M; Takei, Y; Cheung, C C; Inoue, Y; Nakamori, T

    2013-01-01

    We present Suzaku X-ray observations along two edge regions of the Fermi Bubbles, with eight ~20 ksec pointings across the northern part of the North Polar Spur (NPS) surrounding the north bubble and six across the southernmost edge of the south bubble. After removing compact X-ray features, diffuse X-ray emission is clearly detected and is well reproduced by a three-component spectral model consisting of unabsorbed thermal emission (temperature kT ~0.1 keV from the Local Bubble (LB), absorbed kT ~0.3 keV thermal emission related to the NPS and/or Galactic Halo (GH), and a power-law component at a level consistent with the cosmic X-ray background. The emission measure (EM) of the 0.3 keV plasma decreases by ~50% toward the inner regions of the north-east bubble, with no accompanying temperature change. However, such a jump in the EM is not clearly seen in the south bubble data. While it is unclear if the NPS originates from a nearby supernova remnant or is related to previous activity within/around the Galact...

  12. GK Per 2015 dwarf nova covered by Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Yuasa, Takayuki; Ishida, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    The intermediate polar GK Per exhibited a dwarf nova outburst in March-April 2015. Suzaku X-ray telescope serendipitously captured the onset of the outburst during its pre-scheduled pointing observation spanning four days. In this paper, we present temporal and spectral analysis results of this outburst, together with those from archival data of quiescent obtained in 2009 and 2014. Our temporal analysis confirmed previously reported spin modulation of X-ray count rates in outburst with a WD spin period of P_WD=351.4+/-0.5 s. The modulation is also detected in the hard X-ray band (16-60 keV), and spectral modeling of the absorption suggests obscuration by a dense absorption with a line-of-sight column density of N_H>10^23 cm^-2. A complex time evolution of spin modulation profiles is seen; the spin minimum phase shifts from phase ~0.25 in the first half of the observation to ~0.65 in the second one, and the pulse shape significantly changes epoch by epoch. Spectral fitting in the Fe Kalpha band revealed an inc...

  13. Iron line profiles in Suzaku spectra of bare Seyfert galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Patrick, A R; Porquet, D; Markowitz, A G; Lobban, A P; Terashima, Y

    2010-01-01

    We methodically model the broad-band Suzaku spectra of a small sample of six 'bare' Seyfert galaxies: Ark 120, Fairall 9, MCG-02-14-009, Mrk 335, NGC 7469 and SWIFT J2127.4+5654. The analysis of bare Seyferts allows a consistent and physical modelling of AGN due to a weak amount of any intrinsic warm absorption, removing the degeneracy between the spectral curvature due to warm absorption and the red-wing of the Fe K region. Through effective modelling of the broad-band spectrum and investigating the presence of narrow neutral or ionized emission lines and reflection from distant material, we obtain an accurate and detailed description of the Fe K line region using models such as laor, kerrdisk and kerrconv. Results suggest that ionized emission lines at 6.7 keV and 6.97 keV (particularly Fe XXVI) are relatively common and the inclusion of these lines can greatly affect the parameters obtained with relativistic models i.e. spin, emissivity, inner radius of emission and inclination. Moderately broad components...

  14. Chandra Looks Back At The Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    In an unusual observation, a team of scientists has scanned the northern polar region of Earth with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The results show that the aurora borealis, or "northern lights," also dance in X-ray light, creating changing bright arcs of X-ray energy above the Earth's surface. While other satellite observations had previously detected high-energy X-rays from the Earth auroras, the latest Chandra observations reveal low-energy X-rays generated during auroral activity for the first time. The researchers, led by Dr. Ron Elsner of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., used Chandra to observe the Earth 10 times over a four-month period in 2004. The images were created from approximately 20-minute scans during which Chandra was aimed at a fixed point in the sky and the Earth's motion carried the auroral regions through Chandra's field of view. From the ground, the aurora are well known to change dramatically over time and this is the case in X-ray light as well. The X-rays in this sample of the Chandra observations, which have been superimposed on a simulated image of the Earth, are seen here at four different epochs. Illlustration of Earth's Magnetosphere and Auroras Illlustration of Earth's Magnetosphere and Auroras Auroras are produced by solar storms that eject clouds of energetic charged particles. These particles are deflected when they encounter the Earth�s magnetic field, but in the process large electric voltages are created. Electrons trapped in the Earth�s magnetic field are accelerated by these voltages and spiral along the magnetic field into the polar regions. There they collide with atoms high in the atmosphere and emit X-rays. Chandra has also observed dramatic auroral activity on Jupiter. Dr. Anil Bhardwaj of Vikram Sarabhai Space Center in Trivandrum, India, is the lead author on a paper describing these results in the Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics. Dr. Bhardwaj was a co

  15. The Chandra Source Catalog: Processing and Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Janet; Evans, Ian N.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Hain, Roger; Hall, Diane M.; Miller, Joseph B.; Plummer, David A.; Zografou, Panagoula; Primini, Francis A.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Davis, John E.; Doe, Stephen M.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G., II; Grier, John D.; Harbo, Peter N.; He, Xiang Qun (Helen); Houck, John C.; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L.; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Mitschang, Arik W.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Mossman, Amy E.; Nichols, Joy S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Refsdal, Brian L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Siemiginowska, Aneta L.; Sundheim, Beth A.; Tibbetts, Michael S.; van Stone, David W.; Winkelman, Sherry L.

    2009-09-01

    Chandra Source Catalog processing recalibrates each observation using the latest available calibration data, and employs a wavelet-based source detection algorithm to identify all the X-ray sources in the field of view. Source properties are then extracted from each detected source that is a candidate for inclusion in the catalog. Catalog processing is completed by matching sources across multiple observations, merging common detections, and applying quality assurance checks. The Chandra Source Catalog processing system shares a common processing infrastructure and utilizes much of the functionality that is built into the Standard Data Processing (SDP) pipeline system that provides calibrated Chandra data to end-users. Other key components of the catalog processing system have been assembled from the portable CIAO data analysis package. Minimal new software tool development has been required to support the science algorithms needed for catalog production. Since processing pipelines must be instantiated for each detected source, the number of pipelines that are run during catalog construction is a factor of order 100 times larger than for SDP. The increased computational load, and inherent parallel nature of the processing, is handled by distributing the workload across a multi-node Beowulf cluster. Modifications to the SDP automated processing application to support catalog processing, and extensions to Chandra Data Archive software to ingest and retrieve catalog products, complete the upgrades to the infrastructure to support catalog processing.

  16. Chandra Imaging of Gamma-Ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Hare, Jeremy; Pavlov, George G

    2013-01-01

    We review the multiwavelength properties of the few known gamma-ray binaries, focusing on extended emission recently resolved with Chandra. We discuss the implications of these findings for the nature of compact objects and for physical processes operating in these systems.

  17. Spectral analysis of the Chandra comet survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, D.; Christian, D. J.; Torney, M.; Dryer, M.; Lisse, C. M.; Dennerl, K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Wolk, S. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Hoekstra, R.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. We present results of the analysis of cometary X-ray spectra with an extended version of our charge exchange emission model (Bodewits et al. 2006). We have applied this model to the sample of 8 comets thus far observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory and acis spectrometer in the 300 - 1000

  18. Alteration of sensory-evoked metabolic and oscillatory activities in the olfactory bulb of GLAST-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire eMartin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are key cellular elements in both the tripartite synapse and the neuro-vascular unit. To fulfill this dual role in synaptic activity and metabolism, they express a panel of receptors and transporters that sense glutamate. Among them, the GLT-1 and GLAST transporters are known to regulate extracellular glutamate concentrations at excitatory synapses and consequently modulate glutamate receptor signaling. These major uptake systems are also involved in energy supply to neurons. However, the functional role of GLAST in concurrent regulation of metabolic and neuronal activity is currently unknown. We took advantage of the attractive structural and functional features of the main olfactory bulb to explore the impact of GLAST on sensory information processing while probing both glutamate uptake and neuronal activity in glomeruli and deeper cellular layers respectively. Using odor-evoked 2-deoxyglucose imaging and local field potential recordings in GLAST knock-out mice, we show in vivo that deletion of GLAST alters both glucose uptake and neuronal oscillations in olfactory bulb networks.

  19. Chandra Catches Early Phase of Cosmic Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    A NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory image has revealed a complex of several intergalactic hot gas clouds in the process of merging. The superb Chandra spatial resolution made it possible to distinguish individual galaxies from the massive clouds of hot gas. One of the clouds, which that envelops hundreds of galaxies, has an extraordinarily low concentration of iron atoms, indicating that it is in the very early stages of cluster evolution. "We may be seeing hot intergalactic gas in a relatively pristine state before it has been polluted by gas from galaxies," said Q. Daniel Wang of the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, and lead author on an upcoming Astrophysical Journal article describing the study. "This discovery should provide valuable insight into how the most massive structures in the universe are assembled." 3-Panel Image of Abell 2125, Its Core & Galaxy C153 3-Panel Image of Abell 2125, Its Core & Galaxy C153 The complex, known as Abell 2125,is about 3 billion light years from Earth, and is seen at a time about 11 billion years after the Big Bang, when many galaxy clusters are believed to have formed. The Chandra Abell 2125 image shows several huge elongated clouds of multimillion degree gas coming together from different directions. These hot gas clouds, each of which contains hundreds of galaxies, appear to be in the process of merging to form a single massive galaxy cluster. Chandra, Hubble Space Telescope, and Very Large Array radio telescope data show that several galaxies in the Abell 2125 core cluster are being stripped of their gas as they fall through surrounding high-pressure hot gas. This stripping process has enriched the core cluster's gas in heavy elements such as iron. Abell 2125's Core & Galaxy C153 Abell 2125's Core & Galaxy C153 The gas in the pristine cloud, which is still several million light years away from the core cluster, is conspicuous for its lack of iron atoms. This anemic cloud must be in a very early evolutionary stage. The

  20. Chandra Examines a Quadrillion-Volt Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    The high-voltage environment of one of the most energetic and strongly magnetized pulsars known has been surveyed by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. A team of astronomers found a powerful jet of high-energy particles extending over a distance of 20 light years and bright arcs believed to be due to particles of matter and anti-matter generated by the pulsar. The team of US, Canadian, and Japanese scientists pointed Chandra at the rapidly spinning neutron star B1509-58, located 19,000 light years away in the constellation of Circinus, for over five hours. These results were announced at the "Two Years of Science with Chandra" symposium in Washington, DC. "Jets and arcs on this vast scale have never been seen in any other pulsar," said Bryan Gaensler of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. "The spectacular images we have obtained of this source are letting us test theories as to how pulsars unleash so much energy." The features seen with Chandra give the scientists insight into the process by which voltages of more than 7000 trillion volts are created around rotating neutron stars (the dense remnants of supernova explosions) and how these extreme voltages affect their environment. B1509-58 is of particular interest because it has a much stronger magnetic field than the Crab Nebula pulsar, which exhibits similar features on a much smaller scale. The general picture emerging from these results is that high-energy particles of matter and antimatter are streaming away from the neutron star along its poles and near its equator. The particles leaving the poles produce the jets; astronomers speculate that only one side of the jet is apparent in B1509-58, indicating that this one side is beamed in our direction, while the other is rushing away. "Until this observation, no one knew for sure whether such tremendous voltages and energy outputs were a trademark of all pulsars, or if the Crab was an oddball," said Vicky Kaspi of McGill University in Montreal. "Now thanks

  1. Chandra X-ray Observatory Optical Axis and Aimpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Chandra X-ray Observatory revolutionized the X-ray astronomy as being the first, and so far the only, X-ray telescope achieving sub-arcsecond resolution. Chandra comprises of three principal elements: the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA), Pointing Control and Aspect Determination (PCAD) system, and the Science Instrument Module (SIM). To achieve and retain the unprecedented imaging quality, it is critical that these three principal elements stay rigid and stable for the entire life time of the Chandra operation. Tracking the Chandra optical axis and aimpoint with respect to detector positions is the most relevant measurement for understanding telescope stability. The study shows that both the optical axis and the aimpoint has been drifting since Chandra launch. I will discuss the telescope focal-point, optical axis, aimpoint, their positiondrifts during the mission, the impact to Chandra operations, and the permanent default aimpoint, to be implemented in Chandra cycle 18.

  2. Statistical Issues in High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy for GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digel, S

    2004-04-06

    This paper describes the statistical issues involved in analyzing data from high-energy gamma-ray telescopes, at levels from event reconstruction to correlations of populations of astrophysical sources. Some motivation for attempting to do astronomy with high-energy gamma rays is also given, along with some of the constraints implied by operating the instrument in orbit. Specific attention is given to the Large Area Telescope (LAT) under development for launch in late 2006 on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission.

  3. X-ray View of Four High-Luminosity Swift-BAT AGN: Unveiling Obscuration and Reflection with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorettil, V.; Angelini, L.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Koss, M.; Malaguti, G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. A complete census of obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is necessary to reveal the history of the super massive black hole (SMBH) growth and galaxy evolution in the Universe given the complex feedback processes and the fact that much of this growth occurs in an obscured phase. In this context, hard X-ray surveys and dedicated follow-up observations represent a unique tool for selecting highly absorbed AGN and for characterizing the obscuring matter surrounding the SMBH. Here we focus on the absorption and reflection occurring in highly luminous, quasar-like AGN, to study the relation between the geometry of the absorbing matter and the AGN nature (e.g. X-ray, optical, and radio properties), and to help to determine the column density dependency on the AGN luminosity. Methods. The Swift/BAT nine-month survey observed 153 AGN, all with ultra-hard X-ray BAT fluxes in excess of 10(exp -11) erg per square centimeter and an average redshift of 0.03. Among them, four of the most luminous BAT AGN (44.73 less than LogLBAT less than 45.31) were selected as targets of Suzaku follow-up observations: J2246.0+3941 (3C 452), J0407.4+0339 (3C 105), J0318.7+6828, and J0918.5+0425. The column density, scattered/reflected emission, the properties of the Fe K line, and a possible variability are fully analyzed. For the latter, the spectral properties from Chandra, XMM-Newton and Swift/XRT public observations were compared with the present Suzaku analysis, adding an original spectral analysis when non was available from the literature. Results. Of our sample, 3C 452 is the only certain Compton-thick AGN candidate because of i) the high absorption (N(sub H) approximately 4 × 10(exp 23) per square centimeter) and strong Compton reflection; ii) the lack of variability; iii) the "buried" nature, i.e. the low scattering fraction (less than 0.5%) and the extremely low relative [OIII] luminosity. In contrast 3C 105 is not reflection-dominated, despite the comparable column density

  4. Hard X-Ray Properties of the Merging Cluster Abell 3667 as Observed with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    3667 as Observed with Suzaku Kazuhiro NAKAZAWA Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo , Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 nakazawa...of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo , Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 Kazuo MAKISHIMA Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo , Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113

  5. Suzaku observations of the Hydra A cluster out to the virial radius

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Takuya; Matsushita, Kyoko; Sakuma, Eri; Sato, Kosuke; Fujita, Yutaka; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Ichikawa, Kazuya; Kawaharada, Madoka; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ohashi, Takaya; Ota, Naomi; Takizawa, Motokazu; Tamura, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    We report Suzaku observations of the northern half of the Hydra A cluster out to ~1.4 Mpc, reaching the virial radius. This is the first Suzaku observations of a medium size (kT ~3 keV) cluster out to the virial radius. Two observations were conducted, north-west and north-east offsets, which continue into a filament and a void of the large-scale structure of the Universe, respectively. The X-ray emission and distribution of galaxies elongate towards the filament. The temperature profiles toward the two directions are mostly consistent within error bars and drop to 1.5 keV at 1.5r_500. As observed by Suzaku in hot clusters, the entropy profile becomes flatter beyond r_500 and disagrees with the r^1.1 relation that is expected from accretion shock-heating models. When scaled with average intracluster medium (ICM) temperature, the entropy profiles of clusters observed with Suzaku are universal without dependence on system mass. The hydrostatic mass values toward the void and the filament agree well, and the Nav...

  6. Suzaku observation of the new Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 0501+4516 in outburst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Enoto; Y.E. Nakagawa; N. Rea; P. Esposito; D. Götz; K. Hurley; G.L. Israel; M. Kokubun; K. Makishima; S. Mereghetti; H. Murakami; K. Nakazawa; T. Sakamoto; L. Stella; A. Tiengo; R. Turolla; S. Yamada; K. Yamaoka; A. Yoshida; S. Zane

    2009-01-01

    We present the first Suzaku observation of the new Soft Gamma Repeater, SGR 0501+4516, performed on 2008 August 26, four days after the onset of bursting activity of this new member of the magnetar family. The soft X-ray persistent emission was detected with the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) at a

  7. NuSTAR and SUZAKU observations of the hard state in Cygnus X-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, M. L.; Tomsick, J. A.; Miller, J. M.;

    2015-01-01

    We present simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR ) and Suzaku observations of the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 in the hard state. This is the first time this state has been observed in Cyg X-1 with NuSTAR, which enables us to study the reflection and broadband spectra in unprecede...

  8. X-ray observations of the Sagittarius D HII region toward the Galactic center with Suzaku

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawada, M.; Tsujimoto, M.; Koyama, K.; Law, C.J.; Tsuru, T.G.; Hyodo, Y.

    2009-01-01

    We present a Suzaku X-ray study of the Sagittarius D (Sgr D) HII region in the Galactic center region. Two 18' × 18' images by the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) encompass the entire Sgr D complex. Thanks to the low background, XIS discovered two diffuse sources with low surface brightness and obt

  9. APC implementation in Chandra Asri - ethylene plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiq, Mochamad; Mustofa, Ali

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, the modern process plants are continuously improved for maximizing production, Optimization of the energy and raw material and reducing the risk. Due to many disturbances appearance between the process units, hence, the failure of one unit might have a bad effect on the overall productivity. Ethylene Plant have significant opportunities for using Advanced Process Control (APC) technologies to improve operation stability, push closer to quality or equipment limit, and improve the capability of process units to handle disturbances. APC implementation had considered a best answer for solving multivariable control problem. PT. Chandra Asri Petrochemical, Tbk (CAP) operates a large naphtha cracker complex at Cilegon, Indonesia. To optimize the plant operation and to enhance the benefit, Chandra Asri has been decided to implement Advance Process Control (APC) for ethylene plant. The APC implementation technology scopes at CAP are as follows: 1. Hot Section : Furnaces, Quench Tower 2. Cold Section : Demethanizer, Deethanizer, Acetylene Converter, Ethylene Fractionator, Depropanizer, Propylene Fractionator, Debutanizer

  10. Chandra hardware and systems: keeping things running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Lisa

    2006-06-01

    System management for any organization can be a challenge, but satellite projects present their own issues. I will be presenting the network and system architecture chosen to support the scientists in the Chandra X-ray Center. My group provides the infrastructure for science data processing, mission planning, user support, archive support and software development. Our challenge is to create a stable environment with enough flexibility to roll with the changes during the mission. I'll discuss system and network choices, web service, backups, security and systems monitoring. Also, how to build infrastructure that's flexible, how to support a large group of scientists with a relatively small staff, what challenges we faced (anticipated and unanticipated) and what lessons we learned over the past 6 years since the launch of Chandra. Finally I'll outline our plans for the future including beowulf cluster support, an improved helpdesk system, methods for dealing with the explosive amount of data that needs to be managed.

  11. Statistical Characterization of the Chandra Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Primini, Francis A; Davis, John E; Nowak, Michael A; Evans, Ian N; Glotfelty, Kenny J; Anderson, Craig S; Bonaventura, Nina R; Chen, Judy C; Doe, Stephen M; Evans, Janet D; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C; Gibbs, Danny G; Grier, John D; Hain, Roger M; Hall, Diane M; Harbo, Peter N; Xiangqun,; He,; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L; McDowell, Jonathan C; Miller, Joseph B; Mitschang, Arik W; Morgan, Douglas L; Mossman, Amy E; Nichols, Joy S; Plummer, David A; Refsdal, Brian L; Rots, Arnold H; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Sundheim, Beth A; Tibbetts, Michael S; Van Stone, David W; Winkelman, Sherry L; Zografou, Panagoula

    2011-01-01

    The first release of the Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) contains ~95,000 X-ray sources in a total area of ~0.75% of the entire sky, using data from ~3,900 separate ACIS observations of a multitude of different types of X-ray sources. In order to maximize the scientific benefit of such a large, heterogeneous data-set, careful characterization of the statistical properties of the catalog, i.e., completeness, sensitivity, false source rate, and accuracy of source properties, is required. Characterization efforts of other, large Chandra catalogs, such as the ChaMP Point Source Catalog (Kim et al. 2007) or the 2 Mega-second Deep Field Surveys (Alexander et al. 2003), while informative, cannot serve this purpose, since the CSC analysis procedures are significantly different and the range of allowable data is much less restrictive. We describe here the characterization process for the CSC. This process includes both a comparison of real CSC results with those of other, deeper Chandra catalogs of the same targets and e...

  12. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF SUBHALOS IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Toru; Matsushita, Kyoko; Sato, Kosuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Okabe, Nobuhiro, E-mail: j1213703@ed.tus.ac.jp, E-mail: matusita@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2015-06-10

    We observed three massive subhalos in the Coma cluster with Suzaku. These subhalos, labeled “ID 1,” “ID 2,” and “ID 32,” were detected with a weak-lensing survey using Subaru/Suprime-Cam, and are located at the projected distances of 1.4 r{sub 500}, 1.2 r{sub 500}, and 1.6 r{sub 500} from the center of the Coma cluster, respectively. The subhalo “ID 1” has a compact X-ray excess emission close to the center of the weak-lensing mass contour, and the gas mass to weak-lensing mass ratio is about 0.001. The temperature of the emission is about 3 keV, which is slightly lower than that of the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM) and that expected for the temperature versus mass relation of clusters of galaxies. The subhalo “ID 32” shows an excess emission whose peak is shifted toward the opposite direction from the center of the Coma cluster. The gas mass to weak-lensing mass ratio is also about 0.001, which is significantly smaller than regular galaxy groups. The temperature of the excess is about 0.5 keV and significantly lower than that of the surrounding ICM and far from the temperature versus mass relation of clusters. However, there is no significant excess X-ray emission in the “ID 2” subhalo. Assuming an infall velocity of about 2000 km s{sup −1}, at the border of the excess X-ray emission, the ram pressures for “ID 1” and “ID 32” are comparable to the gravitational restoring force per area. We also studied the effect of the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability to strip the gas. Although we found X-ray clumps associated with the weak-lensing subhalos, their X-ray luminosities are much lower than the total ICM luminosity in the cluster outskirts.

  13. Suzaku Observations of the Hydra A Cluster out to the Virial Radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takuya; Sasaki, Toru; Matsushita, Kyoko; Sakuma, Eri; Sato, Kosuke; Fujita, Yutaka; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Ichikawa, Kazuya; Kawaharada, Madoka; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ohashi, Takaya; Ota, Naomi; Takizawa, Motokazu; Tamura, Takayuki

    2012-10-01

    We report on Suzaku observations of the northern half of the Hydra A cluster out to ˜ 1.4 Mpc, reaching the virial radius. There are the first Suzaku observations of a medium-size (kT ˜ 3 keV) cluster out to the virial radius. Two observations were conducted, north-west and north-east offsets, which continue in a filament direction and a void direction of the large-scale structure of the Universe, respectively. The X-ray emission and distribution of galaxies elongate in the filament direction. The temperature profiles in the two directions are mostly consistent with each other within the error bars, and drop to 1.5 keV at 1.5 r500 . As observed by Suzaku in hot clusters, the entropy profile becomes flatter beyond r500 , in disagreement with the r1.1 relationship, which is expected from accretion shock heating models. When scaled with the average intracluster medium (ICM) temperature, the entropy profiles of clusters observed with Suzaku are universal, and do not depend on the system mass. The hydrostatic mass values in the void and filament directions are in good agreement, and the Navarro, Frenk, and White universal mass profile represents the hydrostatic mass distribution up to ˜ 2r500 . Beyond r500 , the ratio of the gas mass to the hydrostatic mass exceeds the result of the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe, and at r100 , these ratios in the filament and void directions reach 0.4 and 0.3, respectively. We discuss possible deviations from the hydrostatic equilibrium at cluster outskirts. We derived radial profiles of the gas-mass-to-light ratio and the iron-mass-to-light ratio out to the virial radius. Within r500 , the iron-mass-to-light ratio of the Hydra A cluster was compared with those in other clusters observed with Suzaku.

  14. Gamma ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Balloon Flight Engineering Model Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, D J; Williams, S; Grove, J E; Mizuno, T; Sadrozinski, H F W

    2002-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair-production high-energy (>20 MeV) gamma-ray telescope being built by an international partnership of astrophysicists and particle physicists for a satellite launch in 2006, designed to study a wide variety of high-energy astrophysical phenomena. As part of the development effort, the collaboration has built a Balloon Flight Engineering Model (BFEM) for flight on a high-altitude scientific balloon. The BFEM is approximately the size of one of the 16 GLAST-LAT towers and contains all the components of the full instrument: plastic scintillator anticoincidence system (ACD), high-Z foil/Si strip pair-conversion tracker (TKR), CsI hodoscopic calorimeter (CAL), triggering and data acquisition electronics (DAQ), commanding system, power distribution, telemetry, real-time data display, and ground data processing system. The principal goal of the balloon flight was to demonstrate the performance of this instrument configuration under c...

  15. AGN Spectral Energy Distributions of GLAST Telescope Network Program Objects II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Jeff; Lacy, Mark; Rapp, Steve; Stefaniak, Linda

    2006-03-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has a proposed observing list that includes AGNs and Polars bright enough to be observed optically by amateurs and students. This observing list is maintained by the "GLAST Telescope Network" (GTN) and includes a number of objects that have yet to be observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope. In the first year of the Spitzer Teacher Observing Program, our project observed one of these objects (4C 29.45) with the Spitzer MIPS and the IRAC instruments as well as ground based instruments. These observations were used to determine its Spectral Energy Distribution (SED), which was compared to a model of disk emission in order to determine if there was a component of the SED due to synchrotron radiation induced by the jets. In this proposal we will observe another target from the list and expand our efforts to create simultaneous observations through radio telescopes, optical telescopes (large and small), and other instruments as the opportunity arises.

  16. AGN Spectral Energy Distribution of GLAST Telescope Network Program Object 4C 29.45

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, J.; Stefaniak, L.; Rapp, S.; Hinckley, B.; Lacy, M.

    2006-06-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to be launched in 2006 has a proposed observing list that includes AGNs and Polars bright enough to be observed optically by amateurs and students. This observing list is maintained by the GLAST Telescope Network (GTN) and includes a number of objects that have yet to be observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our project observed one of these objects, 4C 29.45, with the Spitzer MIPS and the IRAC instruments and also using ground based telescopes. Observations were made in seven infrared bands with Spitzer. Additional observations made from the ground by students, amateur astronomers, and small college observatories in R,V, and I were nearly simultaneous with the Spitzer observations. We have used this data to construct the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of 4C 29.45. We compare these data to models of the dust emission from the torus, sychrotron emission from the radio core, and thermal emission from the accretion disk to determine the relative importance of the different emission mechanisms in this object as a function of wavelength.

  17. GLAST LARGE AREA TELESCOPE: DAILY SURVEY OF HIGH-ENERGY SKY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamae, T

    2003-12-12

    GLAST Large Area Telescope was proposed to NASA in 1999 as follow-up of EGRET on-board Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory by an international collaboration. The proposal has been approved as a part of the GLAST observatory mission in its capability to explore w die range of astrophysics with 5-40 times higher sensitivity and extended energy coverage (20 MeV to 300 GeV) than EGRET. The instrument consists of 16 towers of e{sup +}e{sup -} pair tracker, 16 blocks of segmented electro-magnetic calorimeter, and a st of anti-coincidence plastic scintillator tiles covering the tracker towers. It will have 5-10 times larger on-axis effective area, 6 times wider field-of-view (FOV), and up to 5 times better angular resolution when compared with EGRET. The Large Area Telescope will cover about 40% of the sky above the Earth's horizon in its FOV at any given time and will scan nearly the entire Universe every orbit ({approx} 90min): about 20% of Gamma-Ray Bursts will be observed from the onset of the bursts to the initial after-glow phase; all longer-lasting transients and variabilities will be detected daily at the improved sensitivity.

  18. Pre-launch Estimates for GLAST Sensitivity to Dark Matter Annihilation Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltz, E.A.; Berenji, B.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bertone, G.; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.; Bergstrom, L.; /Stockholm U.; Bloom, E.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bringmann, T.; /Stockholm U.; Chiang, J.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Conrad, J.; /Stockholm U.; Edmonds, Y.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Edsjo, J.; /Stockholm U.; Godfrey, G.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Hughes, R.E.; /Ohio State U.; Johnson, R.P.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Lionetto, A.; /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /INFN, Rome2; Moiseev, A.A.; /CRESST; Morselli, A.; /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /INFN, Rome2; Moskalenko, I.V.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Nuss, E.; /Montpellier U.; Ormes, J.F.; /Denver U.; Rando, R.; /INFN, Padua /Ohio State U. /Stockholm U. /Ohio State U. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Ohio State U.

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the sensitivity of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to indirectly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) through the {gamma}-ray signal that their pair annihilation produces. WIMPs are among the favorite candidates to explain the compelling evidence that about 80% of the mass in the Universe is non-baryonic dark matter (DM). They are serendipitously motivated by various extensions of the standard model of particle physics such as Supersymmetry and Universal Extra Dimensions (UED). With its unprecedented sensitivity and its very large energy range (20 MeV to more than 300 GeV) the main instrument on board the GLAST satellite, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), will open a new window of discovery. As our estimates show, the LAT will be able to detect an indirect DM signature for a large class of WIMP models given a cuspy profile for the DM distribution. Using the current state of the art Monte Carlo and event reconstruction software developed within the LAT collaboration, we present preliminary sensitivity studies for several possible sources inside and outside the Galaxy. We also discuss the potential of the LAT to detect UED via the electron/positron channel. Diffuse background modeling and other background issues that will be important in setting limits or seeing a signal are presented.

  19. Chandra Catches Cannibal Galaxy in the Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory image of Perseus A provides new insight into how this supergiant galaxy has grown by cannibalizing other galaxies and gas in the vicinity. For the first time astronomers see an X-ray shadow cast by a smaller galaxy as its gas is being stripped away by the enormous galaxy. The research was reported by Professor Andrew Fabian of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge, England on June 7 at the 196th National Meeting of the American Astronomical Society, in Rochester, NY. Other members of the research team are Jeremy Sanders, Stefano Ettori, Steve Allen, Carolin Crawford, Kazushi Iwasawa, and Roderick Johnstone of the Institute of Astronomy, Gregory Taylor on the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM, and Patrick Ogle of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. Perseus A, or NGC 1275, is in the center of a large galaxy cluster 320 million light years from Earth. The cluster, which contains thousands of galaxies and enough gas to make thousands more, is one of the largest gravitationally bound objects in the universe. Over the eons, Perseus A has accumulated hundreds of billions of stars to become one of the most massive known galaxies as gas and galaxies have been pulled inward by gravity. The Chandra observation shows a region of hot gas that extends over several hundred thousand light years. The gas in the outer portion of the cluster has a temperature of 70 million degrees. The cluster gas cools gradually and settles toward the center of the cluster. A galaxy with "only" about 20 billion stars is falling into Perseus A (located at two o'clock from the center of the image) and appears as a small dark patch due to absorption of X rays by cool gas in the infalling galaxy. Another larger hole seen further out is thought to be due to a bubble of high-energy particles ejected in an explosion from Perseus A hundreds of millions of years ago. These outbursts are presumably fueled by matter releasing tremendous

  20. Stimulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor regulates glutamate transporter GLAST via basic fibroblast growth factor production in cultured cortical microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Norimitsu; Harano, Sakura; Tokuhara, Masato; Idenoshita, Yuko; Zhang, Fang Fang; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor expressed in microglia has a crucial role in neuroprotection. Simulation of α7 nACh receptor leads to increased expression of glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST), which in turn decreases synaptic glutamate levels. However, the upregulation of GLAST in cultured rat cortical microglia appears long after (over 18 h) stimulation of the α7 nACh receptor with nicotine. Thus, the current study elucidated the pathway responsible for the induction of GLAST expression in cultured cortical microglia. Nicotine-induced GLAST mRNA expression was significantly inhibited by cycloheximide pretreatment, indicating that a protein intermediary, such as a growth factor, is required for GLAST expression. The expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) mRNA in cortical microglia was significantly increased 6 and 12h after treatment with nicotine, and this increase was potently inhibited by pretreatment with methyllycaconitine, a selective α7 nACh receptor antagonist. The treatment with nicotine also significantly increased FGF-2 protein expression. Furthermore, treatment with recombinant FGF-2 increased GLAST mRNA, protein expression and (14)C-glutamate uptake, a functional measurement of GLAST activity. Conversely, pretreatment with PD173074, an inhibitor of FGF receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase, significantly prevented the nicotine-induced expression of GLAST mRNA, its protein and (14)C-glutamate uptake. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed FGFR1 mRNA expression was confined to cultured cortical microglia. Together, the current findings demonstrate that the neuroprotective effect of activation of microglial α7 nACh receptors could be due to the expression of FGF-2, which in turn increases GLAST expression, thereby clearing glutamate from synapse and decreasing glutamate neurotransmission.

  1. ASA's Chandra Neon Discovery Solves Solar Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory survey of nearby sun-like stars suggests there is nearly three times more neon in the sun and local universe than previously believed. If true, this would solve a critical problem with understanding how the sun works. "We use the sun to test how well we understand stars and, to some extent, the rest of the universe," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "But in order to understand the sun, we need to know exactly what it is made of," he added. It is not well known how much neon the sun contains. This is critical information for creating theoretical models of the sun. Neon atoms, along with carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, play an important role in how quickly energy flows from nuclear reactions in the sun's core to its edge, where it then radiates into space. Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi The rate of this energy flow determines the location and size of a crucial stellar region called the convection zone. The zone extends from near the sun's surface inward approximately 125,000 miles. The zone is where the gas undergoes a rolling, convective motion much like the unstable air in a thunderstorm. "This turbulent gas has an extremely important job, because nearly all of the energy emitted at the surface of the sun is transported there by convection," Drake said. The accepted amount of neon in the sun has led to a paradox. The predicted location and size of the solar convection zone disagree with those deduced from solar oscillations. Solar oscillations is a technique astronomers previously relied on to probe the sun's interior. Several scientists have noted the problem could be fixed if the abundance of neon is in fact about three times larger than currently accepted. Attempts to measure the precise amount of neon in the Sun have been frustrated by a quirk of nature; neon atoms in the Sun give off no signatures in visible light. However, in a gas

  2. The BMW-Chandra Serendipitous Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Campana, S.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Mottini, M.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2004-08-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalog drawn from all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10 ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by Lazzati et al. (1999) and Campana et al. (1999), which can characterize point-like as well as extended sources, we identified 21325 sources. Among them, 16758 are serendipitous, i.e. not associated with the targets of the pointings, and do not require a non-automated analysis. This makes our catalog the largest compilation of Chandra sources to date. The 0.5--10 keV absorption corrected fluxes of these sources range from ˜ 3× 10-16 to 9×10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 with a median of 7× 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalog consists of count rates and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5--7 keV; soft, 0.5--2 keV; and hard band, 2--7 keV), and source positions relative to the highest signal-to-noise detection among the three bands. The wavelet algorithm also provides an estimate of the extension of the source which we refined with a σ -clipping method. We report on the main properties of the sources in our catalog, such as sky coverage ( ˜ 8 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1) and cosmological log N--log S for a subset at high Galactic latitude (∣ b ∣ > 20o) for a flux as low as ˜ 1.5 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. Support for this work was provided by the Italian MIUR.

  3. Chandra Observations of Embedded Young Stellar Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews the Chandra deep exposure observations of star forming regions, rho-Ophiuchi, Orion Molecular Clouds 2 and 3, Sagittarius B2 and Monoceros R2. The results are; (1) class I protostars are found to exhibit higher temperature plasma than those of T Tauri stars, (2) heavily absorbed X-rays are discovered from the candidates of class 0 protostars, (3) hard and highly variable X-rays are observed from high-mass young stars, and (4) young brown dwarfs emit X-rays similar to those of low-mass young stars.

  4. Chandra Associates Pulsar and Historic Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory have found new evidence that a pulsar in the constellation of Sagittarius was created when a massive star exploded, witnessed by Chinese astronomers in the year 386 AD. If confirmed, this will be only the second pulsar to be clearly associated with a historic event. These results were presented today by Victoria Kaspi and Mallory Roberts of McGill University at the American Astronomical Society meeting. Also participating in the research were Gautum Vasisht from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Eric Gotthelf from Columbia University, Michael Pivovaroff from Therma-Wave, Inc., and Nobuyuki Kawai from the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan. The scientists used Chandra to locate the pulsar exactly at the geometric center of the supernova remnant known as G11.2-0.3. This location provides very strong evidence that the pulsar, a neutron star that is rotating 14 times a second, was formed in the supernova of 386 AD, and therefore has an age of 1615 years. "Determining the true ages of astronomical objects is notoriously difficult, and for this reason, historical records of supernovas are of great importance,"said Kaspi."In roughly the past 2,000 years, fewer than 10 reports of probable supernovae have been archived mostly by Asian astronomers. Of those handful, the remnant of 1054 AD, the Crab Nebula, was until now the only pulsar whose birth could be associated with a historic event - and, hence, the only neutron star that has a firm age." Between mid-April and mid-May in the year 386 AD, a young "guest star", presumably a supernova, was recorded by Chinese observers in the direction of the sky now known as the constellation of Sagittarius. In the 1970s, radio astronomers discovered an expanding nebula of gas and high-energy particles, called G11.2-0.3, that is believed to be the remnant of that explosion. In 1997, a team of X-ray astronomers used Japan’s ASCA satellite to discover a pulsar

  5. High energy gamma-ray emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts -- before GLAST

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft gamma-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high energy gamma-ray emission (>20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  6. High-Latitude Molecular Clouds as (Gamma)-ray Sources for GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, D F; Dame, T M; Digel, S W

    2005-01-05

    For about two decades, a population of relative small and nearby molecular clouds has been known to exist at high Galactic latitudes. Lying more than 10{sup o} from the Galactic plane, these clouds have typical distances of {approx}150 pc, angular sizes of {approx}1{sup o}, and masses of order tens of solar masses. These objects are passive sources of high-energy {gamma}-rays through cosmic ray-gas interactions. Using a new wide-angle CO survey of the northern sky, we show that typical high-latitude clouds are not bright enough in {gamma}-rays to have been detected by EGRET, but that of order 100 of them will be detectable by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST. Thus, we predict a new steady population of {gamma}-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes, perhaps the most numerous after active galactic nuclei.

  7. The Anti-Coincidence Detector for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseev, A.A.; Hartman, R.C.; Ormes, J.F.; Thompson, D.J.; Amato, M.J.; Johnson, T.E.; Segal, K.N.; Sheppard, D.A.

    2007-03-23

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and testing of the Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT). The ACD is LAT's first-level defense against the charged cosmic ray background that outnumbers the gamma rays by 3-5 orders of magnitude. The ACD covers the top and 4 sides of the LAT tracking detector, requiring a total active area of {approx}8.3 square meters. The ACD detector utilizes plastic scintillator tiles with wave-length shifting fiber readout. In order to suppress self-veto by shower particles at high gamma-ray energies, the ACD is segmented into 89 tiles of different sizes. The overall ACD efficiency for detection of singly charged relativistic particles entering the tracking detector from the top or sides of the LAT exceeds the required 0.9997.

  8. The Quality and Stability of Chandra Telescope Spacial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping

    2017-08-01

    Chandra X-ray Observatory revolutionized the X-ray astronomy as being the first, and so far the only, X-ray telescope achieving sub-arcsecond spacial resolution. Chandra is comprised of three principal elements: the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA), Pointing Control and Aspect Determination (PCAD) system, and the Science Instrument Module (SIM), which is where the X-ray detectors mounted and is connected to the HRMA by a 10-meter long Optical Bench Assembly. To achieve and retain the unprecedented imaging quality, it is critical that these three principal elements to stay rigid and stable for the entire life time of the Chandra operation. I will review the issues of telescope pointing stability, optical Axis, aimpoint and their impacts to the Chandra operation, and evaluate the integrity and stability of the telescope. I will show images taken from all four detectors since launch to demonstrate the quality and stability of the Chandra spacial resolution.

  9. Search for X-Ray Emission Associated with the Shapley Supercluster with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Gupta, Anjali; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Takei, Yoh; Ohashi, Takaya; Sato, Kosuke; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Henry, J. Patrick; Kelley, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Suzaku performed observations of 3 regions in and around the Shapley supercluster: a region located between A3558 and A3556, at approx 0.9 times the virial radii of both clusters, and two other regions at 1 deg and 4 away from the first pointing. The 4 deg -otfset observation was used to evaluate the Galactic foreground emission. We did not detect significant redshifted Oxygen emission lines (O VII and O VIII) in the spectra of all three pointings, after subtracting the contribution of foreground and background emission. An upper limit for the redshifted O VIII Ka line intensity of the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) is 1.5 x 10(exp -7) photons / s / sq cm / sq arcmin, which corresponds to an overdensity of approx 380 (Z/0.1 Solar Z)(exp -1/2)(L/3 Mpc)(exp -1/2), assuming T = 3 x 10(exp 6) K. We found excess continuum emission in the 1 deg-offset and on-filament regions, represented by thermal models with kT approximates 1 keV and approximates 2 keV, respectively. The redshifts of both 0 and that of the supercluster (0.048) are consistent with the observed spectra. The approx 1 keV emission can be also fitted with Ne-rich Galactic (zero redshift) thin thermal emission. Radial intensity profile of 2 keV component suggests contribution from A3558 and A3556, but with significant steepening of the intensity slope in the outer region of A3558. Finally, we summarized the previous Suzaku search for the WHIM and discussed the feasibility of constraining the WHIM. An overdensity of 5 x 10 (exp 6) K with the Suzaku XIS. The non detection with Suzaku suggests that typical line-of-sight average overdensity is < 400.

  10. X-raying Galaxies: A Chandra Legacy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Q Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews Chandra's major contribution to the understanding of nearby galaxies. After a brief summary on significant advances in characterizing various types of discrete X-ray sources, the presentation focuses on the global hot gas in and around galaxies, especially normal ones like our own. The hot gas is a product of stellar and AGN feedback -- the least understood part in theories of galaxy formation and evolution. Chandra observations have led to the first characterization of the spatial, thermal, chemical, and kinetic properties of the gas in our Galaxy. The gas is concentrated around the Galactic bulge and disk on scales of a few kpc. The column density of chemically-enriched hot gas on larger scales is at least an order magnitude smaller, indicating that it may not account for the bulk of the missing baryon matter predicted for the Galactic halo according to the standard cosmology. Similar results have also been obtained for other nearby galaxies. The X-ray emission from hot gas is well...

  11. Chandra Observations of SNR RCW 103

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Kari A; Park, Sangwook

    2015-01-01

    We analyze three Chandra observations, with a combined exposure time of 99 ks, of the Galactic supernova remnant RCW 103, a young supernova remnant, previously with no clear detection of metal-rich ejecta. Based on our imaging and spectral analyses of these deep Chandra data, we find evidence for metal-rich ejecta emission scattered throughout the remnant. X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta is generally weak, and the shocked circumstellar medium (CSM) is a largely dominant component across the entire remnant. The CSM component shows abundances of ~0.5 solar, while Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe abundances of the ejecta are up to a few times solar. Comparison of these ejecta abundances with yields from supernova nucleosynthesis models suggests, together with the existence of a central neutron star, a progenitor mass of ~18-20 M$_\\odot$, though the Fe/Si ratios are larger than predicted. The shocked CSM emission suggests a progenitor with high mass-loss rate and subsolar metallicity.

  12. A Deep Chandra Observation of A2052

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, E. L.; Douglass, E. M.; Sarazin, C. L.; Clarke, T. E.; McNamara, B. R.

    We present initial results from a long (125 ksec) Chandra observation of Abell 2052. A2052 is a bright, nearby, cooling core cluster at a redshift of z=0.0348. It was previously observed for 36 ksec with Chandra [3,4]. The longer observation reveals ripples in the surface brightness, similar to what has been seen in e.g., the Perseus cluster [5] and M87/Virgo [6]. The southern cavity now appears to be split into two cavities with the southernmost cavity likely representing a ghost bubble from earlier radio activity. There also appears to be a ghost bubble present to the NW of the cluster center. Bright emission in the X-ray corresponds very well with optical line emission, and the correlated X-ray emission is seen to continue from the N bubble edge closer to the AGN in this longer exposure, tracking the H-α emission. The energy deposited by the radio source, as determined by measuring the pressure in the bright, X-ray shells, averaged over the repetition rate of the radio source (determined from either the ripple separation or the ghost cavity distances) can easily offset the cooling in the core of the cluster.

  13. Stellar Forensics with Striking Image from Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    A spectacular new image shows how complex a star's afterlife can be. By studying the details of this image made from a long observation by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers can better understand how some stars die and disperse elements like oxygen into the next generation of stars and planets. At a distance of about 20,000 light years, G292.0+1.8 is one of only three supernova remnants in the Milky Way known to contain large amounts of oxygen. The image shows a rapidly expanding, intricately structured, debris field that contains, along with oxygen, other elements such as neon and silicon that were forged in the star before it exploded. Hard X-ray Image of G292.0+1.8 Hard X-ray Image of G292.0+1.8 "We are finding that, just like snowflakes, each supernova remnant is complicated and beautiful in its own way," said Sangwook Park of Penn State who led the work, released in conjunction with the "8 Years of Chandra" symposium in Huntsville, Ala. The new, deep Chandra image - equaling nearly 6 days worth of observing time - shows an incredibly complex structure. Understanding the details of G292.0+1.8 is especially important because astronomers have considered it to be a "textbook" case of a supernova created by the death of a massive star. Chandra X-ray Image of G292.0+1.8 Chandra X-ray Image of G292.0+1.8 By mapping the distribution of X-rays in different energy bands, the Chandra image traces the distribution of chemical elements ejected in the supernova. The results imply that the explosion was not symmetrical. For example, blue (silicon and sulfur) and green (magnesium) are seen strongly in the upper right, while yellow and orange (oxygen) dominate the lower left. These elements light up at different temperatures, indicating that the temperature is higher in the upper right portion of G292.0+1.8. Slightly below and to the left of the center of G292.0+1.8 is a pulsar, a dense, rapidly rotating neutron star that remained behind after the original star

  14. Reduced plasma membrane surface expression of GLAST mediates decreased glutamate regulation in the aged striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Justin; Salvatore, Michael F; Pomerleau, Francois; Apparsundaram, Subbu; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2007-11-01

    Extracellular L-glutamate poses a severe excitotoxic threat to neurons and glia when unregulated, therefore low synaptic levels of this neurotransmitter must be maintained via a rapid and robust transport system. A recent study from our laboratory showed a reduced glutamate uptake rate in the striatum of the aged Fischer 344 (F344) rat, yet the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown. The current study utilized in vivo electrochemical recordings, immunoblotting and biotinylation in young (6 months), late-middle aged (18 months) and aged (24 months) F344 rats to elucidate the potential role that glutamate transporters (GLT-1, GLAST, and EAAC1) may play in this mechanism. Here we show that the time necessary to clear glutamate from the late-middle aged and aged striatum is significantly prolonged in comparison to the young striatum. In addition, an analysis of various sub-regions of the striatum revealed a marked dorsoventral gradient in terms of glutamate clearance times in the aged striatum, a phenomenon which was not present in the striatum of the animals of the remaining age groups. We also found that the decreased glutamate clearance time observed in the late-middle aged and aged rats is not due to a decrease in the production of total transporter protein among these three transporters. Rather, a significant reduction in the amount of GLAST expressed on the plasma membrane surface in the aged animals (approximately 55% when compared to young rats) may contribute to this phenomenon. These age-related alterations in extracellular l-glutamate regulation may be key contributors to the increased susceptibility of the aged brain to excitotoxic insults such as stroke and hypoxia.

  15. Suzaku observations of the hard X-ray spectrum of Vela Jr

    CERN Document Server

    Takeda, Sawako; Terada, Yukikatsu; Tashiro, Makoto S; Katsuda, Satoru; Yamazaki, Ryo; Ohira, Yutaka; Iwakiri, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of Suzaku observations of the young supernova remnant, Vela Jr.\\ (RX J0852.0$-$4622), which is known to emit synchrotron X-rays, as well as TeV gamma-rays. Utilizing 39 Suzaku mapping observation data from Vela Jr., a significant hard X-ray emission is detected with the hard X-ray detector (HXD) from the north-west TeV-emitting region. The X-ray spectrum is well reproduced by a single power-law model with the photon index of 3.15$^{+1.18}_{-1.14}$ in the 12--22 keV band. Compiling this with the soft X-ray spectrum simultaneously observed with the X-ray imaging spectrometer (XIS) onboard Suzaku, we find that the wide-band X-ray spectrum in the 2--22 keV band is reproduced with a single power-law or concave broken power-law model, which are statistically consistent with each other. Whichever the model of a single or broken power-law is appropriate, clearly the spectrum has no rolloff structure. Applying this result to the method introduced in \\citet{yama2014}, we find that one-zone synchro...

  16. Suzaku Observations of Iron K-lines from the Intracluster Medium of the Coma Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Takuya; Ota, Naomi; Sato, Kosuke; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Sarazin, Craig L

    2011-01-01

    The Coma cluster was observed with an X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) onboard Suzaku in six pointings, including the central X-ray peak region, the 14'west offset region, 30'and 34'north-west offset regions, and 44'and 60'south-west offset regions. Owing to its lower background level, Suzaku has better sensitivity to Fe K-alpha lines than other satellites. Using precise Fe line measurements, we studied the temperature structure, possible bulk motions, and iron abundance distributions in the intracluster medium (ICM). The observed spectra were well-represented by a single-temperature model, and two- or three- temperature model did not improve chi-square substantially. The temperature, derived from K-alpha line ratios of H-like and He-like Fe, agree with those derived from the single-temperature model. Because the line ratio is a steep function of temperature, the consistency supports the accuracy of temperature measurements conducted with Suzaku. Within the 34'region, the redshift derived from the central ene...

  17. Measurements of the Soft Gamma-Ray Emission from SN2014J with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Y.; Maeda, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Bamba, A.; Ueda, Y.; Katsuda, S.; Enoto, T.; Takahashi, T.; Tamagawa, T.; Röpke, F. K.; Summa, A.; Diehl, R.

    2016-05-01

    The hard X-ray detector (HXD) on board Suzaku measured soft γ-rays from the SN Ia SN2014J at 77 ± 2 days after the explosion. Although the confidence level of the signal is about 90% (i.e., 2σ), the 3σ upper limit has been derived at X-ray background. The flux of SN2014J derived from Suzaku measurements taken in one snapshot at t = 77 ± 2 days after the explosion is consistent with the INTEGRAL values averaged over the period between t = 50 and 100 days and also with explosion models of single or double degenerate scenarios. Being sensitive to the total ejecta mass surrounding the radioactive material, the ratio between continuum and line flux in the soft gamma-ray regime might distinguish different progenitor models. The Suzaku data have been examined with this relation at t = 77 ± 2 days, but could not distinguish models between single and double degenerate-progenitors. We disfavor explosion models with larger 56Ni masses than 1 M ⊙, from our 1σ error on the 170-250 keV X-ray flux of (1.2 ± 0.7) × 10-4 ph s-1 cm-2.

  18. Joint Suzaku and XMM-Newton Spectral Analysis of the Southwest Cygnus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Denis; Hassan, Mohammed

    2013-02-01

    We carry out a joint spectral analysis of the Cygnus Loop using data from all six detectors combined from Suzaku and XMM-Newton. This had not been done before, but if a spectral model is physically realistic, it is required that it be consistent with data from different instruments. Thus, our results are an important verification of spectral models for the Cygnus Loop. One of the prominent features of the Cygnus Loop is the bright "V" region near the southwest rim. We choose this region, in part, because it has been observed by both Suzaku and XMM-Newton. We divide the field of view into 12 box-shaped regions, such that each contains 9000-13,000 photons in the Suzaku-XIS1 camera. A non-equilibrium ionization model with variable abundances (VNEI) or a two-component VNEI model is found to fit the observations. Resulting electron temperatures and ionization timescales are inversely related, consistent with an origin in density variations by a factor of ~3. Element abundances and temperature are strongly correlated, which can be explained by mixing in the outer hydrogen-rich envelope of ejecta: Heavy-element-rich regions have higher velocity to reach this far out from the center of the Cygnus Loop, resulting in higher shock temperature for more element-rich regions.

  19. Swift and Suzaku Observations of the X-Ray Afterglow from the GRB 060105

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, M S; Angelini, L; Barthelmy, S; Gehrels, N; Ishikawa, N; Kaluzienski, L J; Kawai, N; Kelley, R L; Kinugasa, K; Kodaira, H; Kohmura, T; Kubota, K; Maeda, Y; Maeno, S; Murakami, H; Murakami, T; Nakagawa, Y E; Nakazawa, K; Nousek, J; Okuno, S; Onda, K; Reeves, J N; Ricker, G; Sato, G; Sonoda, E; Suzuki, M; Takahashi, T; Tamagawa, T; Torii, K; Ueda, Y; Urata, Y; Yamaoka, K; Yamauchi, M; Yonetoku, D; Yoshida, A; Yoshinari, S

    2006-01-01

    Results are presented of early X-ray afterglow observations of GRB 060105 by Swift and Suzaku. The bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 060105 triggered the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) at 06:49:28 on 5 January 2006. The Suzaku team commenced a pre-planned target of opportunity observation at 19 ks (5.3 hr) after the Swift trigger. Following the prompt emission and successive very steep decay, a shallow decay was observed from T_0+187 s to T_0+1287 s. After an observation gap during T_0 +(1.5-3) ks, an extremely early steep decay was observed in T_0+(4-30) ks. The lightcurve flattened again at T_0+30 ks, and another steep decay followed from T_0+50 ks to the end of observations. Both steep decays exhibited decay indices of 2.3 - 2.4. This very early break, if it is a jet break, is the earliest case among X-ray afterglow observations, suggesting a very narrow jet whose opening angle is well below 1 degree. The unique Suzaku/XIS data allow us to set very tight upper limits on line emission or absorption in thi...

  20. Fate mapping by piggyBac transposase reveals that neocortical GLAST+ progenitors generate more astrocytes than Nestin+ progenitors in rat neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Faez; Chen, Fuyi; Aron, Abraham W; Fiondella, Christopher G; Patel, Komal; LoTurco, Joseph J

    2014-02-01

    Progenitors within the neocortical ventricular zone (VZ) first generate pyramidal neurons and then astrocytes. We applied novel piggyBac transposase lineage tracking methods to fate-map progenitor populations positive for Nestin or glutamate and aspartate transpoter (GLAST) promoter activities in the rat neocortex. GLAST+ and Nestin+ progenitors at embryonic day 13 (E13) produce lineages containing similar rations of neurons and astrocytes. By E15, the GLAST+ progenitor population diverges significantly to produce lineages with 5-10-fold more astrocytes relative to neurons than generated by the Nestin+ population. To determine when birth-dated progeny within GLAST+ and Nestin+ populations diverge, we used a Cre/loxP fate-mapping system in which plasmids are lost after a cell division. By E18, birth-dated progeny of GLAST+ progenitors give rise to 2-3-fold more neocortical astrocytes than do Nestin+ progenitors. Finally, we used a multicolor clonal labeling method to show that the GLAST+ population labeled at E15 generates astrocyte progenitors that produce larger, spatially restricted, clonal clusters than the Nestin+ population. This study provides in vivo evidence that by mid-corticogenesis (E15), VZ progenitor populations have significantly diversified in terms of their potential to generate astrocytes and neurons.

  1. Chandra's View of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This Chandra image reveals, in detail, the turbulent debris created by a supernova explosion that was observed by the Danish Astronomer Tycho Brahe in the year 1572. The colors show different x-ray energies, with red, green, and blue representing low, medium, and high energies, respectively. Most likely caused by the destruction of a white dwarf star, a shock wave produced by the expanding debris is outlined by the sharp blue circular arcs of 20 million degree Celsius gas seen on the outer rim. The stellar debris, visible only by x-ray, has a temperature of about 10 million degrees, and shows up as mottled yellow, green, and red fingers of gas.

  2. Chandra data archive operations: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollough, Michael L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Winkelman, Sherry L.

    2006-06-01

    We present a discussion of the lessons learned from establishing and operating the Chandra Data Archive (CDA). We offer an overview of the archive, what preparations were done before launch, the transition to operations, actual operations, and some of the unexpected developments that had to be addressed in running the archive. From this experience we highlight some of the important issues that need to be addressed in the creation and running of an archive for a major project. Among these are the importance of data format standards; the integration of the archive with the rest of the mission; requirements throughout all phases of the mission; operational requirements; what to expect at launch; the user interfaces; how to anticipate new tasks; and overall importance of team management and organization.

  3. Broad-Band Spectrum of The Black Hole Candidate IGR J17497-2821 Studied with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Paizis, A; Takahashi, H; Dotani, T; Kohmura, T; Kokubun, M; Rodríguez, J; Ueda, Y; Walter, R; Yamada, S; Yamaoka, K; Yuasa, T

    2008-01-01

    The broad-band 1-300 keV Suzaku spectrum of IGR J17497-2821, the X-ray transient discovered by INTEGRAL in September 2006, is presented. Suzaku observed IGR J17497-2821 on September 25, eight days after its discovery, for a net exposure of about 53 ksec. During the Suzaku observation, IGR J17497-2821 is very bright, 2 x 10^37 erg/s at 8 kpc in the 1-300 keV range, and shows a hard spectrum, typical of black hole candidates in the low-hard state. Despite the multi-mission X-ray monitoring of the source, only with Suzaku is it possible to obtain a broad-band spectrum in the 1-300 keV range with a very high signal to noise ratio. A sum of a multi-color disc (DISKBB) and a thermal Comptonization component (COMPPS) with mild reflection is a good representation of our IGR J17497-2821 Suzaku spectrum. The spectral properties of the accretion disc as well as the cut-off energy in the spectrum at about 150 keV are clearly detected and constrained. We discuss the implications on the physical model used to interpret the...

  4. Chandra Survey of Nearby Galaxies: The Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Rui; Ho, Luis C.; Feng, Hua

    2017-02-01

    We searched the public archive of the Chandra X-ray Observatory as of 2016 March and assembled a sample of 719 galaxies within 50 Mpc with available Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observations. By cross-correlation with the optical or near-infrared nuclei of these galaxies, 314 of them are identified to have an X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN). The majority of them are low-luminosity AGNs and are unlikely X-ray binaries based upon their spatial distribution and luminosity functions. The AGN fraction is around 60% for elliptical galaxies and early-type spirals, but drops to roughly 20% for Sc and later types, consistent with previous findings in the optical. However, the X-ray survey is more powerful in finding weak AGNs, especially from regions with active star formation that may mask the optical AGN signature. For example, 31% of the H ii nuclei are found to harbor an X-ray AGN. For most objects, a single power-law model subject to interstellar absorption is adequate to fit the spectrum, and the typical photon index is found to be around 1.8. For galaxies with a non-detection, their stacked Chandra image shows an X-ray excess with a luminosity of a few times 1037 erg s‑1 on average around the nuclear region, possibly composed of faint X-ray binaries. This paper reports on the technique and results of the survey; in-depth analysis and discussion of the results will be reported in forthcoming papers.

  5. The BMW-Chandra Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Campana, S.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.

    We present the BMW-Chandra Source Catalogue drawn from all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10 ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by \\citep{Lazzatiea99} and \\citep{Campanaea99}, which can characterize point-like as well as extended sources, we identified 21325 sources which were visually inspected and verified. Among them, 16758 are not associated with the targets of the pointings and are considered certain; they have a 0.5-10 keV absorption corrected flux distribution median of ˜ 7 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalogue consists of source positions, count rates, extensions and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7 keV; soft, 0.5-2 keV; and hard band, 2-7 keV), as well as the additional information drawn from the headers of the original files. We also extracted source counts in four additional energy bands, (0.5-1.0 keV, 1.0-2.0 keV, 2.0-4.0 keV and 4.0-7.0 keV). We compute the sky coverage in the soft and hard bands. The complete catalogue provides a sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2 keV, S/N =3) of ˜ 8 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1, and ˜ 2 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. http://www.merate.mi.astro.it/~xanadu/BMC/bmc_home.html

  6. Fitting the gamma-ray spectrum from dark matter with DMFIT: GLAST and the galactic center region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeltema, Tesla E [UCO/Lick Observatories, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Profumo, Stefano, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.org, E-mail: profumo@scipp.ucsc.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    We study the potential of GLAST for unveiling particle dark matter properties with gamma-ray observations of the galactic center region. We present full GLAST simulations including all gamma-ray sources known to date in a region of 4 Degree-Sign around the galactic center, in addition to the diffuse gamma-ray background and to the dark matter signal. We introduce DMFIT, a tool that allows one to fit gamma-ray emission from pair annihilation of generic particle dark matter models and to extract information on the mass, normalization and annihilation branching ratios into Standard Model final states. We assess the impact and systematic bias induced by background modeling and theoretical priors on the reconstruction of dark matter particle properties. Our detailed simulations demonstrate that for some well motivated supersymmetric dark matter setups with one year of GLAST data it will be possible not only to significantly detect a dark matter signal over background, but also to estimate the dark matter mass and its dominant pair annihilation mode.

  7. Fitting the Gamma-Ray Spectrum from Dark Matter with DMFIT: GLAST and the Galactic Center Region

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltema, Tesla E

    2008-01-01

    We study the potential of GLAST to unveil particle dark matter properties with gamma-ray observations of the Galactic center region. We present full GLAST simulations including all gamma-ray sources known to date in a region of 4 degrees around the Galactic center, in addition to the diffuse gamma-ray background and to the dark matter signal. We introduce DMFIT, a tool that allows one to fit gamma-ray emission from pair-annihilation of generic particle dark matter models and to extract information on the mass, normalization and annihilation branching ratios into Standard Model final states. We assess the impact and systematic effects of background modeling and theoretical priors on the reconstruction of dark matter particle properties. Our detailed simulations demonstrate that for some well motivated supersymmetric dark matter setups with one year of GLAST data it will be possible not only to significantly detect a dark matter signal over background, but also to estimate the dark matter mass and its dominant ...

  8. In Brief: Chandra Observatory marks 10 years in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-08-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, originally envisioned as a 5-year mission, was deployed into an elliptical orbit around Earth 10 years ago, on 23 July 1999. The most powerful X-ray telescope yet, Chandra has provided a peak into the high-energy universe and has independently confirmed the existence of dark energy. Martin Weisskopf, Chandra project scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., said discoveries made possible by the observatory “have made dramatic changes to our understanding of the universe and its constituents.” “The Great Observatories program—of which Chandra is a major part—shows how astronomers need as many tools as possible to tackle the big questions out there,” said Ed Weiler, associate administrator of NASA's Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The Hubble Space Telescope, Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, and Spitzer Space Telescope are NASA's other Great Observatories. For more information, visit http://chandra.harvard.edu/ten/ and http://chandra.nasa.gov.

  9. Fermi-LAT and Suzaku Observations of the Radio Galaxy Centaurus B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuta, Junichiro; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Tanaka, Y.T.; /Hiroshima U.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; O' Sullivan, S.P.; /Australia, CSIRO, Epping; Cheung, C.C.; /NAS, Washington, D.C.; Kataoka, J.; /Waseda U., RISE; Funk, S.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Yuasa, T.; Odaka, H.; Takahashi, T.; /JAXA, Sagamihara; Svoboda, J.; /European Space Agency

    2012-08-17

    CentaurusB is a nearby radio galaxy positioned in the Southern hemisphere close to the Galactic plane. Here we present a detailed analysis of about 43 months accumulation of Fermi-LAT data and of newly acquired Suzaku X-ray data for Centaurus B. The source is detected at GeV photon energies, although we cannot completely exclude the possibility that it is an artifact due to incorrect modeling of the bright Galactic diffuse emission in the region. The LAT image provides a weak hint of a spatial extension of the {gamma} rays along the radio lobes, which is consistent with the lack of source variability in the GeV range. We note that the extension cannot be established statistically due to the low number of the photons. Surprisingly, we do not detect any diffuse emission of the lobes at X-ray frequencies, with the provided upper limit only marginally consistent with the previously claimed ASCA flux. The broad-band modeling shows that the observed {gamma}-ray flux of the source may be produced within the lobes, if the diffuse non-thermal X-ray emission component is not significantly below the derived Suzaku upper limit. This association would imply that efficient in-situ acceleration of the ultrarelativistic particles is occurring and that the lobes are dominated by the pressure from the relativistic particles. However, if the diffuse X-ray emission is much below the Suzaku upper limits, the observed {gamma}-ray flux is not likely to be produced within the lobes, but instead within the unresolved core of Centaurus B. In this case, the extended lobes could be dominated by the pressure of the magnetic field.

  10. Observations of MCG-5-23-16 with Suzaku, XMM-Newton and Nustar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoghbi, A.; Cackett, E. M.; Reynolds, C.;

    2014-01-01

    MCG-5-23-16 is one of the first active galactic nuclei (AGNs) where relativistic reverberation in the iron K line originating in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole was found, based on a short XMM-Newton observation. In this work, we present the results from long X-ray observations using...... Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and NuSTAR designed to map the emission region using X-ray reverberation. A relativistic iron line is detected in the lag spectra on three different timescales, allowing the emission from different regions around the black hole to be separated. Using NuSTAR coverage of energies above...

  11. Properties of the Diffuse X-ray Background toward MBM20 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Sen-Gupta, A; Koutroumpa, D; Smith, R; Lallement, R

    2009-01-01

    We used Suzaku observations of the molecular cloud MBM20 and a low neutral hydrogen column density region nearby to separate and characterize the foreground and background diffuse X-ray emission. A comparison with a previous observation of the same regions with XMM-Newton indicates a significant change in the foreground flux which is attributed to Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX). The data have also been compared with previous results from similar "shadow" experiments and with a SWCX model to characterize its O VII and O VIII emission.

  12. Status of GRB Observations with the Suzaku Wideband All-sky Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, M S; Urata, Y; Onda, K; Kodaka, N; Endo, A; Suzuki, M; Morigami, K; Yamaoka, K; Nakagawa, Y E; Sugita, S; Fukazawa, Y; Ohno, M; Takahashi, T; Kira, C; Uehara, T; Tamagawa, T; Enoto, T; Miyawaki, R; Nakazawa, K; Makishima, K; Sonoda, E; Yamauchi, M; Maeno, S; Tanaka, H; Hara, R; Suzuki, M; Kokubun, M; Takahashi, T; Hong, S J; Murakami, T; Tajima, H

    2008-01-01

    The Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) is a function of the large lateral BGO shield of the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) onboard Suzaku. Its large geometrical area of 800 cm^2 per side, the large stopping power for the hard X-rays and the wide-field of view make the WAM an ideal detector for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observations in the energy range of 50-5000 keV. In fact, the WAM has observed 288 GRBs confirmed by other satellites, till the end of May 2007.

  13. Suzaku Detection of Diffuse Hard X-Ray Emission outside Vela X

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuda, Satoru; Mori, Koji; Petre, Robert; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Bamba, Aya; Miceli, Marco; Hewitt, John W.; Temim, Tea; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yoshii, Rie

    2011-01-01

    Vela X is a large, 3x2 degrees, radio-emitting pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the Vela pulsar in the Vela supernova remnant. Using four Suzaku/XIS observations pointed just outside Vela X, we find hard X-ray emission extending throughout the fields of view. The hard X-ray spectra are well represented by a power-law. The photon index is measured to be constant at Gamma~2.4, similar to that of the southern outer part of Vela X. The power-law flux decreases with increasing distance from the...

  14. High-energy γ-ray emission from gamma-raybursts-before GLAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Zhong FAN; Tsvi PIRAN

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft γ-rays,which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s.The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs,support the fireball model,and imply a long-activity of the central engine.The high-energy γ-ray emission (>20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work,we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs.Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope.We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  15. Dark Matter and Gamma-Rays From Draco: MAGIC, GLAST and CACTUS

    CERN Document Server

    Bergström, L; Bergstrom, Lars; Hooper, Dan

    2006-01-01

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco has long been considered likely to be one of the brightest point sources of gamma-rays generated through dark matter annihilations. Recent studies of this object have found that it remains largely intact from tidal striping, and may be more massive than previously thought. In this article, we revisit Draco as a source of dark matter annihilation radiation, with these new observational constraints in mind. We discuss the prospects for the experiments MAGIC and GLAST to detect dark matter in Draco, as well as constraints from the observations of EGRET. We also discuss the possibility that the CACTUS experiment has already detected gamma-rays from Draco. We find that it is difficult to generate the flux reported by CACTUS without resorting to non-thermally produced WIMPs and/or a density spike in Draco's dark matter distribution due to the presence of an intermediate mass black hole. We also find that for most annihilation modes, a positive detection of Draco by CACTUS would be ...

  16. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  17. Deep Chandra observations of Pictor A

    CERN Document Server

    Hardcastle, M J; Birkinshaw, M; Croston, J H; Goodger, J L; Marshall, H L; Perlman, E S; Siemiginowska, A; Stawarz, L; Worrall, D M

    2015-01-01

    We report on deep Chandra observations of the nearby broad-line radio galaxy Pictor A, which we combine with new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations. The new X-ray data have a factor 4 more exposure than observations previously presented and span a 15-year time baseline, allowing a detailed study of the spatial, temporal and spectral properties of the AGN, jet, hotspot and lobes. We present evidence for further time variation of the jet, though the flare that we reported in previous work remains the most significantly detected time-varying feature. We also confirm previous tentative evidence for a faint counterjet. Based on the radio through X-ray spectrum of the jet and its detailed spatial structure, and on the properties of the counterjet, we argue that inverse-Compton models can be conclusively rejected, and propose that the X-ray emission from the jet is synchrotron emission from particles accelerated in the boundary layer of a relativistic jet. For the first time, we find evidence that...

  18. Chandra observations of Cygnus OB2

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Nicholas J; Drew, Janet E; Vink, Jorick S

    2011-01-01

    Cygnus OB2 is the nearest example of a massive star forming region, containing over 50 O-type stars and hundreds of B-type stars. We have analyzed two Chandra pointings in Cyg OB2, detecting ~1700 X-ray sources, of which ~1450 are thought to be members of the association. Optical and near-IR photometry has been obtained for ~90% of these sources from recent deep Galactic plane surveys. We have performed isochrone fits to the near-IR color-magnitude diagram, deriving ages of 3.5(+0.75,-1.0) and 5.25(+1.5,-1.0) Myrs for sources in the two fields, both with considerable spreads around the pre-MS isochrones. The presence of a second population in the region, somewhat older than the present-day O-type stars, has been suggested by other authors and fits with the ages derived here. The fraction of sources with inner circumstellar disks (as traced by the K-band excess) is found to be very low, but appropriate for a population of age ~5 Myrs. We measure the stellar mass functions and find a power-law slope of Gamma = ...

  19. A Full Year's Chandra Exposure on SDSS Quasars from the Chandra Multiwavelength Project

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Paul J; Richards, G T; Barkhouse, W A; Constantin, A; Haggard, D; Karovska, M; Kim, D -W; Kim, M; Vikhlinin, A; Mossman, A; Silverman, J D; Anderson, S F; Kashyap, V; Wilkes, B J; Tananbaum, H

    2008-01-01

    We study the spectral energy distributions and evolution of a large sample of optically selected quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that were observed in 323 Chandra images analyzed by the Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP). Our highest-confidence matched sample includes 1135 X-ray detected quasars in the redshift range 0.23 QSOs detected, we find no evidence for evolution out to z~5 for either the X-ray photon index Gamma or for the ratio of optical/UV to X-ray flux alpha_ox. About 10% of detected QSOs are obscured (Nh>1E22), but the fraction might reach ~1/3 if most non-detections are absorbed. We confirm a significant correlation between alpha_ox and optical luminosity, but it flattens or disappears for fainter AGN alone. Gamma hardens significantly both towards higher X-ray luminosity, and for relatively X-ray loud quasars. These trends may represent a relative increase in non-thermal X-ray emission, and our findings thereby strengthen analogies between Galactic black hole binaries and ...

  20. VLT Suzaku observations of the Fermi pulsar PSR J1028-5819

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, R P; Esposito, P; De Luca, A; Marelli, M; Oates, S R; Saz-Parkinson, P

    2012-01-01

    We used optical images taken with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in the B and V bands to search for the optical counterpart of PSR J1028-5819 or constrain its optical brightness. At the same time, we used an archival Suzaku observation to confirm the preliminary identification of the pulsar's X-ray counterpart obtained by Swift. Due to the large uncertainty on the pulsar's radio position and the presence of a bright (V = 13.2) early F-type star at < 4", we could not detect its counterpart down to flux limits of B~25.4 and V ~25.3, the deepest obtained so far for PSR J1028-5819. From the Suzaku observations, we found that the X-ray spectrum of the pulsar's candidate counterpart is best-fit by a power-law with spectral index 1.7 +/- 0.2 and an absorption column density NH < 10^21 cm-2, which would support the proposed X-ray identification. Moreover, we found possible evidence for the presence of diffuse emission around the pulsar. If real, and associated with a pulsar wind nebula (PWN), its surface bright...

  1. Suzaku and XMM-Newton Observations of the Fornax cluster: Temperature and Metallicity Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Murakami, Hideyoshi; Matsushita, Kyoko; Nagino, Ryo; Sato, Takuya; Sato, Kosuke; Kawaharada, Madoka; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ohashi, Takaya; Takei, Yoh

    2011-01-01

    Suzaku observed a central region and five offset regions within 0.2 r180 in the Fornax cluster, a nearby poor cluster, and XMM-Newton mapped the cluster with 15 pointings out to 0.3 r180. The distributions of O, Mg, Si, S, and Fe in the intracluster medium (ICM) were studied with Suzaku, and those of Fe and temperature were studied with XMM. The temperature of the ICM gradually decreases with radius from 1.3 keV at 0.04 r180 to 1 keV at 0.2-0.3 r180. If the new solar abundances of Lodders et al. (2003) and a single-temperature plasma model are adopted, O, Mg, Si, S, and Fe show similar abundances: 0.4-0.6 solar within 0.02-0.2 r180. This Fe abundance is similar to those at 0.1-0.2 r180 in rich clusters and other groups of galaxies. At 0.2-0.3 r180, the Fe abundance becomes 0.2-0.3 solar. A two-temperature plasma model yields ICM abundances that are higher by a factor of 1.2-1.5, but gives similar abundance ratios among O, Mg, Si, S, and Fe. The northern region has a lower ICM temperature and higher brightness...

  2. An X-ray Spectroscopic Search for Dark Matter in the Perseus Cluster with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Tamura, Takayuki; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y

    2014-01-01

    We present the results from deep Suzaku observations of the central region of the Perseus cluster. Bulbul et al. (2014) reported the detection by XMM-Newton instruments of an unidentified X-ray emission line at an energy around 3.5keV in spectra for the Perseus and other clusters. They argued for a possibility of the decay of sterile neutrino, a dark matter candidate. We examine Suzaku X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) spectra of the Perseus cluster for evidence in the 3.5keV line and other possible dark matter features in the 2-6keV energy band. In order to search for and constrain a weak line feature with the XIS, observations of the Crab nebula are used to evaluate the system's effective area. We found no line feature at the claimed position with a systematic line flux upper limit at a half (1.5eV in line equivalent width) of the claimed best-fit value by Bulbul et al. We discuss this inconsistency in terms of instrumental calibration errors and modeling of continuum emission. Future prospects for high-ener...

  3. Search for Oxygen Emission from Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium around A2218 with Suzaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takei, Yoh; Ohashi, Takaya; Henry, J.Patrick; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Tamura, Takayuki; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Tawa, Noriaki; Matsushita,; Bautz, Mark W.; Hughes, John P.; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Arnaud, Keith A.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Tokyo Metropolitan U. /Inst. Astron., Honolulu /Osaka U.

    2006-09-08

    We searched for redshifted O emission lines from the possible warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) surrounding the cluster of galaxies A2218 at z = 0.1756 using the XIS instrument on Suzaku. This cluster is thought to have an elongated structure along the line of sight based on previous studies. We studied systematic uncertainties in the spectrum of the Galactic emission and in the soft X-ray response of the detectors due to the contamination building up on the XIS filters. We detected no significant redshifted O lines, and set a tight constraint on the intensity with upper limits for the surface brightness of O{sub VII} and O{sub VIII} lines of 1.1 x 10{sup -7} and 3.0 x 10{sup -7} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} arcmin{sup -2}, respectively. These upper limits are significantly lower than the previously reported fluxes from the WHIM around other clusters of galaxies. We also discuss the prospect for the detection of the WHIM lines with Suzaku XIS in the future.

  4. Suzaku Observations of the Outskirts of A1835: Deviation from Hydrostatic Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Kazuya; Matsushita, Kyoko; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Sato, Kosuke; Zhang, Y.-Y.; Finoguenov, A.; Fujita, Yutaka; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kawaharada, Madoka; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ohashi, Takaya; Ota, Naomi; Takizawa, Motokazu; Tamura, Takayuki; Umetsu, Keiichi

    2013-04-01

    We present results of four-pointing Suzaku X-ray observations (total ~200 ks) of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the A1835 galaxy cluster (kT ~ 8 keV, z = 0.253) out to the virial radius (r vir ~ 2.9 Mpc) and beyond. Faint X-ray emission from the ICM out to r vir is detected. The temperature gradually decreases with radius from ~8 keV in the inner region to ~2 keV at r vir. The entropy profile is shown to flatten beyond r 500, in disagreement with the r 1.1 dependence predicted from the accretion shock heating model. The thermal pressure profile in the range 0.3r 500 Microwave Anisotropy Probe seven-year data. All these results indicate, rather than the gas-clumping effect, that the bulk of the ICM in the cluster outskirts is far from hydrostatic equilibrium and infalling matter retained some of its kinetic energy. Finally, combining with our recent Suzaku and lensing analysis of A1689, a cluster of similar mass, temperature, and redshift, we show that the cluster temperature distribution in the outskirts is significantly correlated with the galaxy density field in the surrounding large-scale environment at (1-2)r vir.

  5. Search for Oxygen Emission from Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium around A2218 with Suzaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takei, Yoh; Ohashi, Takaya; Henry, J.Patrick; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Tamura, Takayuki; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Tawa, Noriaki; Matsushita,; Bautz, Mark W.; Hughes, John P.; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Arnaud, Keith A.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Tokyo Metropolitan U. /Inst. Astron., Honolulu /Osaka U.

    2006-09-08

    We searched for redshifted O emission lines from the possible warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) surrounding the cluster of galaxies A2218 at z = 0.1756 using the XIS instrument on Suzaku. This cluster is thought to have an elongated structure along the line of sight based on previous studies. We studied systematic uncertainties in the spectrum of the Galactic emission and in the soft X-ray response of the detectors due to the contamination building up on the XIS filters. We detected no significant redshifted O lines, and set a tight constraint on the intensity with upper limits for the surface brightness of O{sub VII} and O{sub VIII} lines of 1.1 x 10{sup -7} and 3.0 x 10{sup -7} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} arcmin{sup -2}, respectively. These upper limits are significantly lower than the previously reported fluxes from the WHIM around other clusters of galaxies. We also discuss the prospect for the detection of the WHIM lines with Suzaku XIS in the future.

  6. Study of the Intracluster and Intergalactic Medium in the Sculptor Supercluster with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Kosuke; Takei, Yoh; Tamura, Takayuki; Yamasaki, Noriko Y; Ohashi, Takaya; Gupta, Anjali; Galeazzi, Massimiliano

    2010-01-01

    We studied the high temperature plasma in the direction of the Sculptor supercluster at z=0.108 with Suzaku. Suzaku carried out four observations in the supercluster: namely, A2811, A2811 offset, A2804, A2801 regions in 2005 Nov.--Dec., including the regions beyond the virial radii of these clusters. The study needed precise background estimation because the measured intensity of the redshifted lines, especially those from oxygen, were strongly affected by the the Galactic emission. The spectra taken in the regions outside of the virial radii of the member clusters were used as the background which included both the Galactic and Cosmic X-ray Background (CXB) components. We also used the background data which were taken near the Sculptor supercluster. Temperature and metal abundance profiles were determined to the virial radii of the member clusters, and then we searched for the oxygen line emission in the region outside of the virial radii of the clusters. As a result, the temperature of the clusters decrease...

  7. Hard X-Ray Spectrum from West Lobe of Radio Galaxy Fornax A Observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, Makoto S; Seta, Hiromi; Matsuta, Keiko; Yaji, Yuichi

    2009-01-01

    An observation of the West lobe of radio galaxy Fornax A (NGC 1316) with Suzaku is reported. Since Feigelson et al. (1995) and Kaneda et al. (1995) discovered the cosmic microwave background boosted inverse-Comptonized (IC) X-rays from the radio lobe, the magnetic field and electron energy density in the lobes have been estimated under the assumption that a single component of the relativistic electrons generates both the IC X-rays and the synchrotron radio emission. However, electrons generating the observed IC X-rays in the 1 -- 10 keV band do not possess sufficient energy to radiate the observed synchrotron radio emission under the estimated magnetic field of a few micro-G. On the basis of observations made with Suzaku, we show in the present paper that a 0.7 -- 20 keV spectrum is well described by a single power-law model with an energy index of 0.68 and a flux density of 0.12+/-0.01 nJy at 1 keV from the West lobe. The derived multiwavelength spectrum strongly suggests that a single electron energy distr...

  8. Suzaku and Multi-wavelength Observations of OJ 287 during the Periodic Optical Outburst in 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Seta, Hiromi; Tashiro, Makoto S; Yaji, Yuichi; Arai, Akira; Fukuhara, Masayuki; Kohno, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Koichiro; Sasada, Mahito; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Tosaki, Tomoka; Uemura, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    Suzaku observations of the blazar OJ 287 were performed in 2007 April 10--13 and November 7--9. They correspond to a quiescent and a flaring state, respectively. The X-ray spectra can be well described with single power-law models in both exposures. The derived X-ray photon index and the flux density at 1 keV were found to be Gamma = 1.65 +- 0.02 and S_{1 keV} = 215 +- 5 nJy, in the quiescent state. In the flaring state, the source exhibited a harder X-ray spectrum (Gamma = 1.50 +- 0.01) with a nearly doubled X-ray flux density S_{1 keV} = 404^{+6}_{-5} nJy. Moreover, significant hard X-ray signals were detected up to ~ 27 keV. In cooperation with the Suzaku, simultaneous radio, optical, and very-high-energy gamma-ray observations were performed with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array, the KANATA telescope, and the MAGIC telescope, respectively. The radio and optical fluxes in the flaring state (3.04 +- 0.46 Jy and 8.93 +- 0.05 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively) were found to be higher by a factor of...

  9. Study of the Intracluster and Intergalactic Medium in the Sculptor Supercluster with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kosuke; Kelley, Richard L.; Takei, Yoh; Tamura, Takayuki; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Ohashi, Takaya; Gupta, Anjali; Galeazzi, Massimiliano

    2010-12-01

    We studied the high-temperature plasma in the direction of the Sculptor supercluster at z = 0.108 with Suzaku. Suzaku carried out four observations in the supercluster: namely, A 2811, A 2811 offset, A 2804, A 2801 regions in 2005 November-December, including the regions beyond the virial radii of these clusters. The spectra taken in regions outside of the virial radii of the member clusters were used as background that included both of the Galactic and Cosmic X-ray Background (CXB) components. Temperature and metal abundance profiles were determined to the virial radii of the member clusters, and we then searched for oxygen line emission in the region outside of the virial radii of the clusters. As a result, the temperature of the clusters decreased toward the virial radii, and the spectral fits for the filament region did not require any extra component other than the Galactic and CXB components. We constrained the intensities of the OVII and OVIII lines to be less than 8.1 and 5.1 × 10-8 photons cm-2 s-1 arcmin-2, respectively, as 2σ upper limits in the filament region. The intensity of OVII indicates nH 1.6 × 10-5 cm-3 (Z/0.1 Zsolar)-2 (L/25 Mpc)-1/2, which corresponds to an over density of δ < 60(Z/0.1 Zsolar)-1/2 (L/25 Mpc)-1/2.

  10. Measurements of the Soft Gamma-ray Emission from SN2014J with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Terada, Y; Fukazawa, Y; Bamba, A; Ueda, Y; Katsuda, S; Enoto, T; Takahashi, T; Tamagawa, T; Roepke, F K; Summa, A; Diehl, R

    2016-01-01

    The hard X-ray detector (HXD) onboard {\\it Suzaku} measured soft $\\gamma$-rays from the Type Ia supernova SN2014J at $77\\pm2$ days after the explosion. Although the confidence level of the signal is about 90\\% (i.e., $2 \\sigma$), the $3 \\sigma$ upper limit has been derived at $< 2.2 \\times10^{-4}$ ph s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ in the 170 -- 250 keV band as the first independent measurement of soft $\\gamma$-rays with an instrument other than {\\it INTEGRAL}. For this analysis, we have examined the reproducibility of the NXB model of HXD/GSO using blank sky data. We find that the residual count rate in the 90 -- 500 keV band is distributed around an average of 0.19\\% with a standard deviation of 0.42\\% relative to the NXB rate. The averaged residual signals are consistent with that expected from the cosmic X-ray background. The flux of SN2014J derived from {\\it Suzaku} measurements taken in one snapshot at $t=77\\pm2$ days after the explosion is consistent with the {\\it INTEGRAL} values averaged over the period betwee...

  11. Suzaku Observation of Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Petre, Robert; Matsumoti, Hironori; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Holt, Stephan S.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Tsuboi, Yohko; Soong, Yang; Kitamoto, Shunji; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Kokubun, Motohide

    2007-01-01

    We studied extended X-ray emission from the Carina Nebula taken with the Suzaku CCD camera XIS on 2005 Aug. 29. The X-ray morphology, plasma temperature and absorption to the plasma are consistent with the earlier Einstein results. The Suzaku spectra newly revealed emission lines from various spices including oxygen, but not from nitrogen. This result restricts the N/O ratio significantly low, compared with evolved massive stellar winds, suggesting that the diffuse emission is originated in an old supernova remnant or a super shell produced by multiple supernova remnants. The X-ray spectra from the north and south of eta Car showed distinct differences between 0.3-2 keV. The south spectrum shows strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while the north spectrum shows them weak in intensity. This means that silicon and iron abundances are a factor of 2-4 higher in the south region than in the north region. The abundance variation may be produced by an SNR ejecta, or relate to the dust formation around the star forming core.

  12. Suzaku Observation of Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, K; Matsumoto, H; Tsujimoto, M; Holt, S S; Ezoe, Y; Ozawa, H; Tsuboi, Y; Soong, Y; Kitamoto, S; Sekiguchi, A; Kokubun, M; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Petre, Robert; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Holt, Stephan S.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Tsuboi, Yohko; Soong, Yang; Kitamoto, Shunji; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Kokubun, Motohide

    2006-01-01

    We studied extended X-ray emission from the Carina Nebula taken with the Suzaku CCD camera XIS on 2005 Aug. 29. The X-ray morphology, plasma temperature and absorption to the plasma are consistent with the earlier Einstein results. The Suzaku spectra newly revealed emission lines from various species including oxygen, but not from nitrogen. This result restricts the N/O ratio significantly low, compared with evolved massive stellar winds, suggesting that the diffuse emission is originated in an old supernova remnant or a super shell produced by multiple supernova remnants. The X-ray spectra from the north and south of Eta Carinae showed distinct differences between 0.3-2 keV. The south spectrum shows strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while the north spectrum shows them weak in intensity. This means that silicon and iron abundances are a factor of 2-4 higher in the south region than in the north region. The abundance variation may be produced by an SNR ejecta, or relate to th...

  13. Testing the Epeak - Eiso relation for GRBs detected by Swift and Suzaku-WAM

    CERN Document Server

    Krimm, H A; Sugita, S; Ohno, M; Sakamoto, T; Barthelmy, S D; Gehrels, N; Hara, R; Norris, J P; Ohmori, N; Onda, K; Sato, G; Tanaka, H; Tashiro, M; Yamauchi, M

    2009-01-01

    One of the most prominent, yet controversial associations derived from the ensemble of prompt-phase observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the apparent correlation in the source frame between the peak energy Epeak) of the nu-F(nu) spectrum and the isotropic radiated energy, Eiso. Since most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have Epeak above the energy range (15-150 keV) of the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift, determining accurate Epeak values for large numbers of Swift bursts has been difficult. However, by combining data from Swift/BAT and the Suzaku Wide-band All-Sky Monitor (WAM), which covers the energy range from 50-5000 keV, for bursts which are simultaneously detected, one can accurately fit Epeak and Eiso and test the relationship between them for the Swift sample. Between the launch of Suzaku in July 2005 and the end of April 2009, there were 48 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which triggered both Swift/BAT and WAM and an additional 48 bursts which triggered Swift and were detected by WAM, but did not trigger...

  14. Study of Swift/BAT Selected Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei Observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Tazaki, Fumie; Terashima, Yuichi; Mushotzky, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We systematically analyze the broadband (0.5--200 keV) X-ray spectra of hard X-ray ($>10$ keV) selected local low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) observed with {\\it Suzaku} and {\\it Swift}/BAT. The sample consists of ten LLAGNs detected with {\\it Swift}/BAT with intrinsic 14--195 keV luminosities smaller than $10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$ available in the {\\it Suzaku} archive, covering a wide range of the Eddington ratio from $10^{-5}$ to $10^{-2}$. The overall spectra can be reproduced with an absorbed cut-off power law, often accompanied by reflection components from distant cold matter, and/or optically-thin thermal emission from the host galaxy. In all objects, relativistic reflection components from the innermost disk are not required. Eight objects show a significant narrow iron-K$\\alpha$ emission line. Comparing their observed equivalent widths with the predictions from the Monte-Carlo based torus model by \\cite{Ike09}, we constrain the column density in the equatorial plane to be $\\log N^{\\rm eq}_...

  15. Relativistic Fe Kα line study in Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, G.; Nandra, K.; Ponti, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present an analysis of a sample of Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with Suzaku. The aim of this work is to examine critically the evidence for a relativistic Fe Kα line in the X-ray spectra of these active galactic nuclei. The sample was compiled from those sources in which a relativistic component was missing in at least one XMM-Newton observation. We analysed the Suzaku spectra of these objects in order to have more constraints on the high-energy emission, including the Compton reflection hump. The results show that the relativistic Fe Kα line is detected (at >95 per cent confidence) in all sources observed with high-signal-to-noise ratio (e.g. where the counts in the 5-7 keV energy band are ≳4 × 104). This is in agreement with the idea that relativistic lines are a ubiquitous feature in the spectra of Seyfert galaxies, but are often difficult to detect without very high-quality data. We also investigate the relation between the Fe Kα line and the reflection continuum at high energies. For most of the sample, the strength of the reflection component is consistent with that of the line. There are exceptions in both senses, however i.e. where the reflection continuum is strong but with weak line emission, and vice versa. These observations present a challenge for standard reflection models.

  16. Relativistic Fe K alpha line study in Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Mantovani, Giulia; Ponti, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of a sample of Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with Suzaku. The aim of this work is to examine critically the evidence for a relativistic Fe K alpha line in the X-ray spectra of these AGN. The sample was compiled from those sources in which a relativistic component was missing in at least one XMM-Newton observation. We analysed the Suzaku spectra of these objects in order to have more constraints on the high energy emission, including the Compton reflection hump. The results show that the relativistic Fe K alpha line is detected (at >95% confidence) in all sources observed with high signal-to-noise ratio (e.g. where the counts in the 5-7 keV energy band are > 4 x 10^4). This is in agreement with the idea that relativistic lines are a ubiquitous feature in the spectra of Seyfert galaxies, but are often difficult to detect without very high quality data. We also investigate the relation between the Fe K alpha line and the reflection continuum at high energies. For most of the sample, the stre...

  17. Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula Observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    A number of giant HII regions are associated with soft diffuse X-ray emission. Among these, the Carina nebula possesses the brightest soft diffuse emission. The required plasma temperature and thermal energy can be produced by collisions or termination of fast winds from main-sequence or embedded young O stars, but the extended emission is often observed from regions apart from massive stellar clusters. The origin of the X-ray emission is unknown. The XIS CCD camera onboard Suzaku has the best spectral resolution for extended soft sources so far, and is therefore capable of measuring key emission lines in the soft band. Suzaku observed the core and the eastern side of the Carina nebula (Car-D1) in 2005 Aug and 2006 June, respectively. Spectra of the south part of the core and Car-D1 similarly showed strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while in the north of the core these lines were much weaker. Fitting the spectra with an absorbed thin-thermal plasma model showed kT~0.2, 0.6 k...

  18. Nustar and Suzaku X-Ray Spectroscopy Of Ngc 4151: Evidence For Reflection From The Inner Accretion Disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, M. L.; Brenneman, L. W.; Ballantyne, D. R.;

    2015-01-01

    We present X-ray timing and spectral analyses of simultaneous 150 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Suzaku X-ray observations of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151. We disentangle the continuum emission, absorption, and reflection properties of the active galactic nucleus (AGN...

  19. The broad-band X-ray spectrum of IC 4329A from a joint NuSTAR/Suzaku observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenneman, L. W.; Madejski, G.; Fuerst, F.

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained a deep, simultaneous observation of the bright, nearby Seyfert galaxy IC 4329A with Suzaku andNuSTAR. Through a detailed spectral analysis, we are able to robustly separate the continuum, absorption, and distant reflection components in the spectrum. The absorbing column is found...

  20. FERMI/GLAST Integrated Trending and Plotting System Release 5.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Sheila; Brumer, Haim; Reitan, Denise

    2012-01-01

    An Integrated Trending and Plotting System (ITPS) is a trending, analysis, and plotting system used by space missions to determine performance and status of spacecraft and its instruments. ITPS supports several NASA mission operational control centers providing engineers, ground controllers, and scientists with access to the entire spacecraft telemetry data archive for the life of the mission, and includes a secure Web component for remote access. FERMI/GLAST ITPS Release 5.0 features include the option to display dates (yyyy/ddd) instead of orbit numbers along orbital Long-Term Trend (LTT) plot axis, the ability to save statistics from daily production plots as image files, and removal of redundant edit/create Input Definition File (IDF) screens. Other features are a fix to address invalid packet lengths, a change in naming convention of image files in order to use in script, the ability to save all ITPS plot images (from Windows or the Web) as GIF or PNG format, the ability to specify ymin and ymax on plots where previously only the desired range could be specified, Web interface capability to plot IDFs that contain out-oforder page and plot numbers, and a fix to change all default file names to show yyyydddhhmmss time stamps instead of hhmmssdddyyyy. A Web interface capability sorts files based on modification date (with newest one at top), and the statistics block can be displayed via a Web interface. Via the Web, users can graphically view the volume of telemetry data from each day contained in the ITPS archive in the Web digest. The ITPS could be also used in nonspace fields that need to plot data or trend data, including financial and banking systems, aviation and transportation systems, healthcare and educational systems, sales and marketing, and housing and construction.

  1. A search for iron emission lines in the Chandra X-ray spectra of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Cackett, E M; Homan, J; Van der Klis, M; Lewin, W H G; Méndez, M; Raymond, J; Steeghs, D; Wijnands, R

    2008-01-01

    While iron emission lines are well studied in black hole systems, both in X-ray binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei, there has been less of a focus on these lines in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). However, recent observations with Suzaku and XMM-Newton have revealed broad asymmetric iron line profiles in 4 neutron star LMXBs, confirming an inner disk origin for these lines in neutron star systems. Here, we present a search for iron lines in 6 neutron star LMXBs. For each object we have simultaneous Chandra and RXTE observations at 2 separate epochs, allowing for both a high resolution spectrum, as well as broadband spectral coverage. Out of the six objects in the survey, we only find significant iron lines in two of the objects, GX 17+2 and GX 349+2. However, we cannot rule out that there are weak, broad lines present in the other sources. The equivalent width of the line in GX 17+2 is consistent between the 2 epochs, while in GX 349+2 the line equivalent width increases by a factor of ~3 betwe...

  2. 75 FR 7471 - Chandra Coffee and Rabun Boatworks, Complainants v. Georgia Power Company, Respondent; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chandra Coffee and Rabun Boatworks, Complainants v. Georgia Power Company... January 8, 2010, Chandra Coffee and Rabun Boatworks (Complainants) filed with the Federal...

  3. Suzaku observations of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2255: The northeast radio relic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, H.; Mizuno, M.; Ota, N.; Zhang, Y.-Y.; van Weeren, R. J.; Kawahara, H.; Fukazawa, Y.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kawaharada, M.; Nakazawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Takizawa, M.; Vink, J.; Zandanel, F.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of deep 140 ks Suzaku X-ray observations of the north-east (NE) radio relic of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2255. The temperature structure of Abell 2255 is measured out to 0.9 times the virial radius (1.9 Mpc) in the NE direction for the first time. The Suzaku temperature map of the central region suggests a complex temperature distribution, which agrees with previous work. Additionally, on a larger-scale, we confirm that the temperature drops from 6 keV around the cluster center to 3 keV at the outskirts, with two discontinuities at r 5' (450 kpc) and 12' (1100 kpc) from the cluster center. Their locations coincide with surface brightness discontinuities marginally detected in the XMM-Newton image, which indicates the presence of shock structures. From the temperature drop, we estimate the Mach numbers to be ℳinner 1.2 and, ℳouter 1.4. The first structure is most likely related to the large cluster core region ( 350-430 kpc), and its Mach number is consistent with the XMM-Newton observation (ℳ 1.24: Sakelliou & Ponman 2006, MNRAS, 367, 1409). Our detection of the second temperature jump, based on the Suzaku key project observation, shows the presence of a shock structure across the NE radio relic. This indicates a connection between the shock structure and the relativistic electrons that generate radio emission. Across the NE radio relic, however, we find a significantly lower temperature ratio (T1/T2 1.44 ± 0.16 corresponds to ℳX-ray 1.4) than the value expected from radio wavelengths, based on the standard diffusive shock acceleration mechanism (T1/T2> 3.2 or ℳRadio> 2.8). This may suggest that under some conditions, in particular the NE relic of A2255 case, the simple diffusive shock acceleration mechanism is unlikely to be valid, and therefore, more a sophisticated mechanism is required.

  4. Chandra Observations of Eight Sources Discovered by INTEGRAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsick, John A.; Krivonos, Roman; Wang, Qinan; Bodaghee, Arash; Chaty, Sylvain; Rahoui, Farid; Rodriguez, Jerome; Fornasini, Francesca M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on 0.3-10 keV observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of eight hard X-ray sources discovered within 8° of the Galactic plane by the International Gamma-ray Astrophysics Laboratory satellite. The short (˜5 ks) Chandra observations of the IGR source fields have yielded very likely identifications of X-ray counterparts for three of the IGR sources: IGR J14091-6108, IGR J18088-2741, and IGR J18381-0924. The first two have very hard spectra in the Chandra band that can be described by a power law with photon indices of Γ = 0.6 ± 0.4 and -{0.7}-0.3+0.4, respectively (90% confidence errors are given), and both have a unique near-IR counterpart consistent with the Chandra position. IGR J14091-6108 also displays a strong iron line and a relatively low X-ray luminosity, and we argue that the most likely source type is a cataclysmic variable (CV), although we do not completely rule out the possibility of a high mass X-ray binary. IGR J18088-2741 has an optical counterpart with a previously measured 6.84 hr periodicity, which may be the binary orbital period. We also detect five cycles of a possible 800-950 s period in the Chandra light curve, which may be the compact object spin period. We suggest that IGR J18088-2741 is also most likely a CV. For IGR J18381-0924, the spectrum is intrinsically softer with {{Γ }}={1.5}-0.4+0.5, and it is moderately absorbed, NH = (4 ± 1) × 1022 cm-2. There are two near-IR sources consistent with the Chandra position, and they are both classified as galaxies, making it likely that IGR J18381-0924 is an active galactic nucleus. For the other five IGR sources, we provide lists of nearby Chandra sources, which may be used along with further observations to identify the correct counterparts, and we discuss the implications of the low inferred Chandra count rates for these five sources.

  5. Chandra x-ray results on v426 ophiuchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Homer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available De las observaciones de 45 ks de Chandra de V426 Oph hemos obtenido espectros de rayos X de alta resoluci on con relaci on se~nal-a-ruido moderada, y una curva de luz no interrumpida de buena calidad. Los espectros se adaptan razonablemente a un modelo de ujo de enfriamiento, similar a EX Hya y U Gem. Nuestro an alisis de las curvas de luz de Chandra y las adicionales de rayos X/ optico revela una modulaci on persistente a 4.2 hr desde 1988 hasta 2003, probablemente el per odo de giro de la enana blanca, indicando una naturaleza polar intermedia para V426 Oph.

  6. Chandra Images Provide New Vision of Cosmic Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    Images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory released today reveal previously unobserved features in the remnants of three different supernova explosions. Two of the remnants G21.5-0.9 and PSR 0540-69 show dramatic details of the prodigious production of energetic particles by a rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron star, as well as the enormous shell structures produced by the explosions. The image of the third remnant, E0102-72, reveals puzzling spoke-like structures in its interior. G21.5-0.9, in the constellation of Scutum, is about 16,000 light years (1 light year = 6 trillion miles) from Earth. Chandra's image shows a bright nebula surrounded by a much larger diffuse cloud. Inside the inner nebula is a bright central source that is thought to be a rapidly rotating highly magnetized neutron star. A rotating neutron star acts like a powerful generator, creating intense electric voltages that accelerate electrons to speeds close to the speed of light. The total output of this generator is greater than a thousand suns. The fluffy appearance of the central nebula is thought to be due to magnetic field lines which constrain the motions of the high-energy electrons. "It's a remarkable image," said Dr. Patrick Slane of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "Neither the inner core nor the outer shell has ever been seen before." "It is as though we have a set of Russian dolls, with structures embedded within structures," said Professor Gordon Garmire of Penn State University, and principal investigator of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, the X-ray camera that was used to make two of the images. NASA's project scientist, Dr. Martin Weisskopf of the Marshall Space Flight Center said, "Chandra's capability to provide surprises and insights continues." PSR 0540-69 PSR 0540-69 The existence of a rotating neutron star, or pulsar, in the center of G21.5-0.9 is inferred from the appearance of the nebula and the energy distribution of X-rays and radio

  7. Suzaku Studies of the Supernova Remnant CTB~109 Hosting the Magnetar 1E~2259+586

    CERN Document Server

    Nakano, Toshio; Hiraga, Junoko S; Uchiyama, Hideki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Enoto, Teruaki

    2015-01-01

    Ages of the magnetar 1E 2259+586 and the associated supernova remnant CTB~109 were studied. Analyzing the Suzaku data of CTB~109, its age was estimated to be $\\sim$14~kyr, which is much shorter than the measured characteristic age of 1E 2259+586, 230 kyr. This reconfirms the previously reported age discrepancy of this magnetar/remnant association, and suggests that the characteristic ages of magnetars are generally over-estimated as compared to their true ages. This discrepancy is thought to arise because the former are calculated without considering decay of the magnetic fields. This novel view is supported independently by much stronger Galactic-plane concentration of magnetars than other pulsars. The process of magnetic field decay in magnetars is mathematically modeled. It is implied that magnetars are much younger objects than previously considered, and can dominate new-born neutron stars.

  8. Suzaku Observations of SGR 1900+14 and SGR 1806-20

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, Yujin E; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Sugita, Satoshi; Murakami, Toshio; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Suzuki, Motoko; Nakajima, Motoki; Tashiro, Makoto; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Spectral and timing studies of Suzaku ToO observations of two SGRs, 1900+14 and 1806-20, are presented. The X-ray quiescent emission spectra were well fitted by a two blackbody function or a blackbody plus a power law model. The non-thermal hard component discovered by INTEGRAL was detected by the PIN diodes and its spectrum was reproduced by the power law model reported by INTEGRAL. The XIS detected periodicity P = 5.1998+/-0.0002 s for SGR 1900+14 and P = 7.6022+/-0.0007 s for SGR 1806-20. The pulsed fraction was related to the burst activity for SGR 1900+14.

  9. Suzaku diagnostics of the energetics in the lobes of the giant radio galaxy 3C 35

    CERN Document Server

    Isobe, Naoki; Gandhi, Poshak; Tashiro, Makoto S

    2010-01-01

    The Suzaku observation of a giant radio galaxy 3C 35 revealed faint extended X-ray emission, associated with its radio lobes and/or host galaxy. After careful subtraction of the X-ray and non-X-ray background and contaminating X-ray sources, the X-ray spectrum of the faint emission was reproduced by a sum of the power-law (PL) and soft thermal components. The soft component was attributed to the thermal plasma emission from the host galaxy. The photon index of the PL component, $\\Gamma = 1.35_{-0.86}^{+0.56} ergy density was calculated as $u_{\\rm m}=(3.1_{-1.0}^{+2.5}

  10. Suzaku Observations of HESS J1616-508: Evidence for a Dark Particle Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, H; Bamba, A; Hyodo, Y; Mori, H; Uchiyama, H; Tsuru, T; Koyama, K; Kataoka, J; Katagiri, H; Takahashi, T; Hiraga, J; Yamauchi, S; Hughes, J P; Senda, A; Kokubun, M; Kohmura, T; Porter, F S; Matsumoto, Hironori; Ueno, Masaru; Bamba, Aya; Hyodo, Yoshiaki; Mori, Hideyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Tsuru, Takeshi; Koyama, Katsuji; Kataoka, Jun; Katagiri, Hideaki; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Hiraga, Junko; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Hughes, John P.; Senda, Atsushi; Kokubun, Motohide; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Porter, Frederick S.

    2006-01-01

    We observed the bright unidentified TeV gamma-ray source HESS J1616-508 with the X-ray Imaging Spectrometers onboard the Suzaku satellite. No X-ray counterpart was found to a limiting flux of 3.1e-13 erg/s/cm^2 in the 2--10 keV band, which is some 60 times below the gamma-ray flux in the 1--10 TeV band. This object is bright in TeV gamma-rays but very dim in the X-ray band, and thus is one of the best examples in the Galaxy of a "dark particle accelerator." We also detected soft thermal emission with kT=0.3--0.6 keV near the location of HESSJ1616. This may be due to the dust grain scattering halo from the nearby bright supernova remnant RCW103.

  11. Broadband Spectroscopy Using Two Suzaku Observations of the HMXB GX 301-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchy, Slawomir; Fuerst, Felix; Pottschmidt, Katja; Caballero, Isabel; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Wilms, Joern; Markowitz, Alex; Rothschild, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the analysis of two Suzaku observations of GX 301-2 at two orbital phases after the periastron passage. Variations in the column density of the line-of-sight absorber are observed, consistent with accretion from a clumpy wind. In addition to a CRSF, multiple fluorescence emission lines were detected in both observations. The variations in the pulse profiles and the CRSF throughout the pulse phase have a signature of a magnetic dipole field. Using a simple dipole model we calculated the expected magnetic field values for different pulse phases and were able to extract a set of geometrical angles, loosely constraining the dipole geometry in the neutron star. From the variation of the CRSF width and energy, we found a geometrical solution for the dipole, making the inclination consistent with previously published values.

  12. Peculiar outburst of A 0535+26 observed with INTEGRAL, RXTE and Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, I; Barragan, L; Ferrigno, C; Kretschmar, P; Suchy, S; Wilms, J; Santangelo, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Rothschild, R; Klochkov, D; Staubert, R; Finger, M H; Camero-Arranz, A; Makishima, K; Mihara, T; Nakajima, M; Enoto, T; Iwakiri, W; Terada, Y

    2010-01-01

    A normal outburst of the Be/X-ray binary system A0535+26 has taken place in August 2009. It is the fourth in a series of normal outbursts that have occured around the periastron passage of the source, but is unusual by starting at an earlier orbital phase and by presenting a peculiar double-peaked light curve. A first "flare" (lasting about 9 days from MJD 55043 on) reached a flux of 440 mCrab. The flux then decreased to less than 220 mCrab, and increased again reaching 440 mCrab around the periastron at MJD 55057. Target of Opportunity observations have been performed with INTEGRAL, RXTE and Suzaku. First results of these observations are presented, with special emphasis on the cyclotron lines present in the X-ray spectrum of the source, as well as in the pulse period and energy dependent pulse profiles of the source.

  13. Suzaku Detection of Diffuse Hard X-Ray Emission outside Vela X

    CERN Document Server

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Bamba, Aya; Miceli, Marco; Hewitt, John W; Temim, Tea; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yoshii, Rie

    2011-01-01

    Vela X is a large, 3x2 degrees, radio-emitting pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the Vela pulsar in the Vela supernova remnant. Using four Suzaku/XIS observations pointed just outside Vela X, we find hard X-ray emission extending throughout the fields of view. The hard X-ray spectra are well represented by a power-law. The photon index is measured to be constant at Gamma~2.4, similar to that of the southern outer part of Vela X. The power-law flux decreases with increasing distance from the pulsar. These properties lead us to propose that the hard X-ray emission is associated with the Vela PWN. The larger X-ray extension found in this work strongly suggests that distinct populations relativistic electrons form the X-ray PWN and Vela X, as was recently inferred from multiwavelength spectral modeling of Vela X.

  14. Suzaku Detection of Diffuse Hard X-Ray Emission Outside Vela X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Mori, Koji; Petre, Robert; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Bamba, Aya; Miceli, Marco; Hewitt, John W.; Temim, Tea; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yoshii, Rie

    2011-01-01

    Vela X is a large, 3 deg x 2 deg, radio-emitting pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the Vela pulsar in the Vela supernova remnant. Using four Suzaku/XIS observations pointed just outside Vela X, we find hard X-ray emission extending throughout the fields of view. The hard X-ray spectra are well represented by a power-law. The photon index is measured to be constant at Gamma approximates 2.4, similar to that of the southern outer part of Vela X. The power-law flux decreases with increasing distance from the pulsar. These properties lead us to propose that the hard X-ray emission is associated with the Vela PWN. The larger X-ray extension found in this work strongly suggests that distinct populations relativistic electrons form the X-ray PWN and Vela X, as was recently inferred from multiwavelength spectral modeling of Vela X.

  15. Peculiar Outburst of A 0535+26 Observed with INTEGRAL, RXTE and Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, I.; Pottschmidt, K.; Barragan, L.; Ferrigno, C.; Kretschmar, P.; Suchy, S.; Wilms, J.; Santangelo, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Rothschild, R.; hide

    2009-01-01

    A normal outburst of the Be/X-ray binary system A0535+26 has taken place in August 2009. It is the fourth in a series of normal outbursts that have occurred around the periastron passage of the source. but is unusual by starting at an earlier orbital phase and by presenting a peculiar double-peaked light curve. A first "flare" (lasting about 9 days from M.ID 55043 on) reached a flux of 440 mCrab. The flux then decreased to less than 220 mCrab. and increased again reaching 440 mCrab around the periastron at MJD 55057. Target of Opportunity observations have been performed with INTEGRAL. RXTE and Suzaku. First results of these observations are presented. with special emphasis on the cyclotron lines present in the X-ray spectrum of the source. as well as in the pulse period and energy dependent pulse profiles of the source

  16. Study of Swift/Bat Selected Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei Observed with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Tazaki, Fumie; Terashima, Yuichi; Mushotzky, Richard

    2016-11-01

    We systematically analyze the broadband (0.5-200 keV) X-ray spectra of hard X-ray (>10 keV) selected local low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) observed with Suzaku and Swift/BAT. The sample consists of 10 LLAGNs detected with Swift/BAT with intrinsic 14-195 keV luminosities smaller than 1042 erg s-1 available in the Suzaku archive, covering a wide range of the Eddington ratio from 10-5 to 10-2. The overall spectra can be reproduced with an absorbed cut-off power law, often accompanied by reflection components from distant cold matter, and/or optically thin thermal emission from the host galaxy. In all of the objects, relativistic reflection components from the innermost disk are not required. Eight objects show a significant narrow iron-Kα emission line. Comparing their observed equivalent widths with the predictions from the Monte-Carlo-based torus model by Ikeda et al. (2009), we constrain the column density in the equatorial plane to be {log} {N}{{H}}{{eq}}\\gt 22.7, or the torus half-opening angle θ oa structure of LLAGNs: the torus becomes large at λ Edd ≳ 2 × 10-4, whereas at lower accretion rates it is little developed. The luminosity correlation between the hard X-ray and mid-infrared (MIR) bands of the LLAGNs follows the same correlation as for more luminous AGNs. This implies that mechanisms other than AGN-heated dust are responsible for the MIR emission in low Eddington ratio LLAGNs.

  17. Suzaku Observations of PSR B1259-63: A New Manifestation of Relativistic Pulsar Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Tanaka, Takaaki; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Mori, Koji; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro

    2009-04-27

    We observed PSR B1259-63, a young non-accreting pulsar orbiting around a Be star SS 2883, eight times with the Suzaku satellite from July to September 2007, to characterize the X-ray emission arising from the interaction between a pulsar relativistic wind and Be star outflows. The X-ray spectra showed a featureless continuum in 0.6-10 keV, modeled by a power law with a wide range of photon index 1.3-1.8. When combined with the Suzaku PIN detector which allowed spectral analysis in the hard 15-50 keV band, X-ray spectra do show a break at {approx} 5 keV in a certain epoch. Regarding the PSR B1259-63 system as a compactified pulsar wind nebula, in which e{sup {+-}} pairs are assumed to be accelerated at the inner shock front of the pulsar wind, we attribute the X-ray spectral break to the low-energy cutoff of the synchrotron radiation associated with the Lorentz factor of the relativistic pulsar wind {gamma}{sub 1} {approx} 4 x 10{sup 5}. Our result indicates that Comptonization of stellar photons by the unshocked pulsar wind will be accessible (or tightly constrained) by observations with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during the next periastron passage. The PSR B1259-63 system allows us to probe the fundamental properties of the pulsar wind by a direct means, being complementary to the study of large-scale pulsar wind nebulae.

  18. Highlights and Discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Tananbaum, H; Tucker, W; Wilkes, B; Edmonds, P

    2014-01-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extrasolar X-ray source in 1962,NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond X-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08Chandra mission provides a long observing baseline with stable and well-calibrated instruments, enabling temporal studies over time-scales from milliseconds to years. In this report we present a selection of highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding ...

  19. Highlights and discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananbaum, H.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Tucker, W.; Wilkes, B.; Edmonds, P.

    2014-06-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extra-solar x-ray source in 1962, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond x-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08 cosmic phenomena. The extended Chandra mission provides a long observing baseline with stable and well-calibrated instruments, enabling temporal studies over timescales from milliseconds to years. In this report we present a selection of highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding of topics as diverse as protoplanetary nebulae; massive stars; supernova explosions; pulsar wind nebulae; the superfluid interior of neutron stars; accretion flows around black holes; the growth of supermassive black holes and their role in the regulation of star formation and growth of galaxies; impacts of collisions, mergers, and feedback on growth and evolution of groups and clusters of galaxies; and properties of dark matter and dark energy.

  20. An Introduction to the Chandra Carina Complex Project

    CERN Document Server

    Townsley, Leisa K; Corcoran, Michael F; Feigelson, Eric D; Gagné, Marc; Montmerle, Thierry; Oey, M S; Smith, Nathan; Garmire, Gordon P; Getman, Konstantin V; Povich, Matthew S; Evans, Nancy Remage; Nazé, Yaël; Parkin, E R; Preibisch, Thomas; Wang, Junfeng; Wolk, Scott J; Chu, You-Hua; Cohen, David H; Gruendl, Robert A; Hamaguchi, Kenji; King, Robert R; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; McCaughrean, Mark J; Moffat, Anthony F J; Oskinova, L M; Pittard, Julian M; Stassun, Keivan G; ud-Doula, Asif; Walborn, Nolan R; Waldron, Wayne L; Churchwell, Ed; Nichols, J S; Owocki, Stanley P; Schulz, N S

    2011-01-01

    The Great Nebula in Carina provides an exceptional view into the violent massive star formation and feedback that typifies giant HII regions and starburst galaxies. We have mapped the Carina star-forming complex in X-rays, using archival Chandra data and a mosaic of 20 new 60ks pointings using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, as a testbed for understanding recent and ongoing star formation and to probe Carina's regions of bright diffuse X-ray emission. This study has yielded a catalog of properties of >14,000 X-ray point sources; >9800 of them have multiwavelength counterparts. Using Chandra's unsurpassed X-ray spatial resolution, we have separated these point sources from the extensive, spatially-complex diffuse emission that pervades the region; X-ray properties of this diffuse emission suggest that it traces feedback from Carina's massive stars. In this introductory paper, we motivate the survey design, describe the Chandra observations, and present some simple results, pr...

  1. Romanticism or Reality? An Exploration of Frances Mary Hendry's "Chandra."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jilaine

    This paper singles out a novel written for children about India, "Chandra" (1995) by Frances Mary Hendry, as a powerful and useful novel to present to today's 11 to 14 year old students. The paper contends that the novel allows students to explore and consider different value systems, challenges them to become aware of prejudice and the…

  2. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory Radiation Environmental Model Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; ODell, Stephen L.; Cameron, Robert A.; Virani, Shanil N.

    2003-01-01

    CRMFLX (Chandra Radiation Model of ion FLUX) is a radiation environment risk mitigation tool for use as a decision aid in planning the operation times for Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detector. The accurate prediction of the proton flux environment with energies of 100 - 200 keV is needed in order to protect the ACIS detector against proton degradation. Unfortunately, protons of this energy are abundant in the region of space where Chandra must operate. In addition, on-board particle detectors do not measure proton flux levels of the required energy range. CRMFLX is an engineering environment model developed to predict the proton flux in the solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetosphere phenomenological regions of geospace. This paper describes the upgrades to the ion flux databases for the magnetosphere, magnetosheath, and solar wind regions. These data files were created by using Geotail and Polar spacecraft flux measurements only when the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft's 0.14 MeV particle flux was below a threshold value. This new database allows for CRMFLX output to be correlated with both the geomagnetic activity level, as represented by the Kp index, as well as with solar proton events. Also, reported in this paper are results of analysis leading to a change in Chandra operations that successfully mitigates the false trigger rate for autonomous radiation events caused by relativistic electron flux contamination of proton channels.

  3. Chandra: Ten Years of Amazing Science with a Great Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    We review briefly review the history of the development of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, highlighting certain details that many attendees of this Conference might not be aware of. We then present a selection of scientific highlights of the first 10 years of this remarkable and unique mission.

  4. Cosmological constraints from Chandra observations of galaxy clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Steven W

    2002-09-15

    Chandra observations of rich, relaxed galaxy clusters allow the properties of the X-ray gas and the total gravitating mass to be determined precisely. Here, we present results for a sample of the most X-ray luminous, dynamically relaxed clusters known. We show that the Chandra data and independent gravitational lensing studies provide consistent answers on the mass distributions in the clusters. The mass profiles exhibit a form in good agreement with the predictions from numerical simulations. Combining Chandra results on the X-ray gas mass fractions in the clusters with independent measurements of the Hubble constant and the mean baryonic matter density in the Universe, we obtain a tight constraint on the mean total matter density of the Universe, Omega(m), and an interesting constraint on the cosmological constant, Omega(Lambda). We also describe the 'virial relations' linking the masses, X-ray temperatures and luminosities of galaxy clusters. These relations provide a key step in linking the observed number density and spatial distribution of clusters to the predictions from cosmological models. The Chandra data confirm the presence of a systematic offset of ca. 40% between the normalization of the observed mass-temperature relation and the predictions from standard simulations. This finding leads to a significant revision of the best-fit value of sigma(8) inferred from the observed temperature and luminosity functions of clusters.

  5. The Suzaku View of the Disk-Jet Connection in the Low Excitation Radio Galaxy NGC 6251

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, D A; Hardcastle, M J; Kraft, R P; Gandhi, P; Croston, J H; Lee, J C

    2011-01-01

    We present results from an 87-ks Suzaku observation of the canonical low-excitation radio galaxy (LERG) NGC 6251. We have previously suggested that LERGs violate conventional AGN unification schemes: they may lack an obscuring torus and are likely to accrete in a radiatively inefficient manner, with almost all of the energy released by the accretion process being channeled into powerful jets. We model the 0.5-20 keV Suzaku spectrum with a single power law of photon index $\\Gamma=1.82^{+0.04}_{-0.05}$, together with two collisionally ionized plasma models whose parameters are consistent with the known galaxy- and group-scale thermal emission. Our observations confirm that there are no signatures of obscured, accretion-related X-ray emission in NGC 6251, and we show that the luminosity of any such component must be substantially sub-Eddington in nature.

  6. NuSTAR, XMM-Newton and Suzaku Observations of the Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Holmberg II X-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, D. J.; Middleton, M. J.; Rana, V.;

    2015-01-01

    We present the first broadband 0.3-25.0 keV X-ray observations of the bright ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) Holmberg II X-1, performed by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku in 2013 September. The NuSTAR data provide the first observations of Holmberg II X-1 above 10 keV and reveal a very steep high...

  7. Probing the accretion disk and central engine structure of NGC4258 with Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, Christopher S; Markoff, Sera; Tueller, Jack; Wilms, Joern; Young, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    [abridged] We present an X-ray study of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in NGC4258 using data from Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and the Swift/BAT survey. We find that signatures of X-ray reprocessing by cold gas are very weak in the spectrum of this Seyfert-2 galaxy; a weak, narrow fluorescent-Kalpha emission line of cold iron is robustly detected in both the Suzaku and XMM-Newton spectra but at a level much below that of most other Seyfert-2 galaxies. We conclude that the circumnuclear environment of this AGN is very "clean" and lacks the Compton-thick obscuring torus of unified Seyfert schemes. From the narrowness of the iron line, together with evidence for line flux variability between the Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations, we constrain the line emitting region to be between $3\\times 10^3r_g$ and $4\\times 10^4r_g$ from the black hole. We show that the observed properties of the iron line can be explained if the line originates from the surface layers of a warped accretion disk. In particular, we ...

  8. Chandra Opens New Line of Investigation on Dark Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Astronomers have detected and probed dark energy by applying a powerful, new method that uses images of galaxy clusters made by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The results trace the transition of the expansion of the Universe from a decelerating to an accelerating phase several billion years ago, and give intriguing clues about the nature of dark energy and the fate of the Universe. "Dark energy is perhaps the biggest mystery in physics," said Steve Allen of the Institute of Astronomy (IoA) at the University of Cambridge in England, and leader of the study. "As such, it is extremely important to make an independent test of its existence and properties." Abell 2029 Chandra X-ray Image of Abell 2029 Allen and his colleagues used Chandra to study 26 clusters of galaxies at distances corresponding to light travel times of between one and eight billion years. These data span the time when the Universe slowed from its original expansion, before speeding up again because of the repulsive effect of dark energy. "We're directly seeing that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating by measuring the distances to these galaxy clusters," said Andy Fabian also of the IoA, a co-author on the study. The new Chandra results suggest that the dark energy density does not change quickly with time and may even be constant, consistent with the "cosmological constant" concept first introduced by Albert Einstein. If so, the Universe is expected to continue expanding forever, so that in many billions of years only a tiny fraction of the known galaxies will be observable. More Animations Animation of the "Big Rip" If the dark energy density is constant, more dramatic fates for the Universe would be avoided. These include the "Big Rip," where dark energy increases until galaxies, stars, planets and eventually atoms are eventually torn apart. The "Big Crunch," where the Universe eventually collapses on itself, would also be ruled out. Chandra's probe of dark energy relies on the unique

  9. The Utilization of the RCT Telescope for Studies of Blazar Continuum Emission during the GLAST Gamma-Ray Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, J. R.; Cominsky, L.; Spear, G.; Carinni, M.; Gelderman, R.; McGruder, C. H.; Guinan, E.; Howell, S.; Davis, D. R.; Everett, M.; Walter, D. K.

    2003-05-01

    The RCT Consortium successfully proposed to refurbish and automate the Kitt Peak 1.3-m telescope, and to operate it as the Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT). Refurbishment is nearing completion, and observations have begun. The capabilities of the RCT for broad-band optical photometry will be described. A program for systematic optical monitoring of blazars with the RCT is planned. We anticipate that an important utilization of the RCT will be in conjunction with multi-wavelength studies of blazar continuum emission during the operation of NASA's Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) satellite, now scheduled for launch in 2006. Refurbishment of the RCT has been made possible by NASA grant NAG58762.

  10. Suzaku And Multi-Wavelength Observations of OJ 287 During the Periodic Optical Outburst in 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seta, Hiromi; /Saitama U.; Isobe, N.; /Kyoto U.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; /Saitama U.; Yaji, Yuichi; /Saitama U.; Arai, Akira; /Hiroshima U.; Fukuhara, Masayuki; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Kohno, Kotaro; /Tokyo U.; Nakanishi, Koichiro; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Sasada, Mahito; /Hiroshima U.; Shimajiri, Yoshito; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Tosaki, Tomoka; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Uemura, Makoto; /Hiroshima U.; Anderhub, Hans; /Zurich, ETH; Antonelli, L.A.; /INFN, Rome; Antoranz, Pedro; /Madrid U.; Backes, Michael; /Dortmund U.; Baixeras, Carmen; /Barcelona, Autonoma U.; Balestra, Silvia; /Madrid U.; Barrio, Juan Abel; /Madrid U.; Bastieri, Denis; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Becerra Gonzalez, Josefa; /IAC, La Laguna /Dortmund U. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /DESY /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /INFN, Rome /Dortmund U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /IAC, La Laguna /Madrid, CIEMAT /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Zurich, ETH /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Wurzburg U. /Barcelona, IFAE /UC, Davis /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /SLAC /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Rome /UC, Davis /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Wurzburg U. /INFN, Rome /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Wurzburg U. /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /UC, Santa Cruz /Madrid U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Trieste /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Dortmund U. /Barcelona, IEEC /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IFAE /Zurich, ETH /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Wurzburg U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /INFN, Rome /Sierra Nevada Observ. /DESY /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /Wurzburg U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Zurich, ETH /Turku U. /INFN, Rome /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Barcelona, IFAE /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IEEC /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U.

    2011-12-01

    Suzaku observations of the blazar OJ 287 were performed in 2007 April 10-13 and November 7-9. They correspond to a quiescent and a flaring state, respectively. The X-ray spectra of the source can be well described with single power-law models in both exposures. The derived X-ray photon index and the flux density at 1 keV were found to be {Lambda} = 1.65 {+-} 0.02 and S{sub 1keV} = 215 {+-} 5 nJy, in the quiescent state. In the flaring state, the source exhibited a harder X-ray spectrum ({Lambda} = 1.50 {+-} 0.01) with a nearly doubled X-ray flux density S{sub 1keV} = 404{sub -5}{sup +6} nJy. Moreover, significant hard X-ray signals were detected up to {approx} 27 keV. In cooperation with the Suzaku, simultaneous radio, optical, and very-high-energy {gamma}-ray observations of OJ 287 were performed with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array, the KANATA telescope, and the MAGIC telescope, respectively. The radio and optical fluxes in the flaring state (3.04 {+-} 0.46 Jy and 8.93 {+-} 0.05 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively) were found to be higher by a factor of 2-3 than those in the quiescent state (1.73 {+-} 0.26 Jy and 3.03 {+-} 0.01 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively). No notable {gamma}-ray events were detected in either observation. The spectral energy distribution of OJ 287 indicated that the X-ray spectrum was dominated by inverse Compton radiation in both observations, while synchrotron radiation exhibited a spectral cutoff around the optical frequency. Furthermore, no significant difference in the synchrotron cutoff frequency was found between the quiescent and flaring states. According to a simple synchrotron self-Compton model, the change of the spectral energy distribution is due to an increase in the energy density of electrons with small changes of both the magnetic field strength and the maximum Lorentz factor of electrons.

  11. Chandra and Swift Observations of Unidentified Fermi-LAT Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Davide; Cheung, T.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-03-01

    In the last year we targeted some of the unidentified Fermi-LAT objects (UFOs) at high Galactic latitude with Chandra and Swift in order to determine the basic properties (positions, fluxes, hardness ratios) of all X-ray sources within the Fermi-LAT localization circles. These satellites enable us to detect the X-ray conterparts with a flux limit that is at least an order of magnitude lower than achieved in extant RASS data and to further follow-up at other wavelengths, with the ultimate goal to reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray sources. Here we present the results obtained with 5 Chandra pointings of high Galactic latitude UFOs in the Fermi-LAT 3-months bright source list. The association of detected X-ray sources within the improved 11-months Fermi-LAT localization circles with available optical and radio observations is discussed.

  12. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project III: Cosmological Parameter Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Burenin, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    , and nearly a factor of 2 improvement in systematics compared with constraints that can be obtained without clusters. The joint analysis of these four data sets puts a conservative upper limit on the masses of light neutrinos ∑m ν ...Chandra observations of large samples of galaxy clusters detected in X-rays by ROSAT provide a new, robust determination of the cluster mass functions at low and high redshifts. Statistical and systematic errors are now sufficiently small, and the redshift leverage sufficiently large for the mass...... function evolution to be used as a useful growth of a structure-based dark energy probe. In this paper, we present cosmological parameter constraints obtained from Chandra observations of 37 clusters with langzrang = 0.55 derived from 400 deg2 ROSAT serendipitous survey and 49 brightest z ≈ 0.05 clusters...

  13. Variability of Optical Counterparts in the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Britt, Christopher T; Johnson, C B; Baldwin, A; Jonker, P G; Nelemans, G; Torres, M A P; Maccarone, T; Steeghs, D; Greiss, S; Heinke, C; Bassa, C G; Collazzi, A; Villar, A; Gabb, M; Gossen, L

    2014-01-01

    We present optical lightcurves of variable stars consistent with the positions of X-ray sources identified with the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey. Using data from the Mosaic-II instrument on the Blanco 4m Telescope at CTIO, we gathered time-resolved photometric data on timescales from $\\sim2$ hr to 8 days over the $\\frac{3}{4}$ of the X-ray survey containing sources from the initial GBS catalog. Among the lightcurve morphologies we identify are flickering in interacting binaries, eclipsing sources, dwarf nova outbursts, ellipsoidal variations, long period variables, spotted stars, and flare stars. $87\\%$ of X-ray sources have at least one potential optical counterpart. $24\\%$ of these candidate counterparts are detectably variable; a much greater fraction than expected for randomly selected field stars, which suggests that most of these variables are real counterparts. We discuss individual sources of interest, provide variability information on candidate counterparts, and di...

  14. Adapative software solutions: lessons learned from Chandra flight operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shropshire, Daniel P.; Bucher, Sabina; Rose, Joseph

    2006-06-01

    After over 6 highly successful years on orbit, the Chandra X-ray Observatory continues to deliver world class science to members of the X-ray community. Much of this success can be attributed to an excellent space vehicle, however; the creation of several unique software tools has allowed for extremely efficient and smooth running operations. The Chandra Flight Operations Team, staffed by members of Northrop Grumman Space Technology, has created a suite of software tools designed to help optimize on-console operations, mission planning and scheduling, and spacecraft engineering and trending. Many of these tools leverage COTS products and Web based technologies. We describe the original mission concepts, need for supplemental software tools, development and implementation, use of these tools in the current operations scenario, and efficiency improvements due to their use.

  15. BibCat: The Chandra Data Archive Bibliography Cataloging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, S.; Rots, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Chandra Data Archive (CDA) has been tracking publications in refereed journals and on-line conference proceedings that are based on Chandra observations since early in the mission. Over the years this database and its associated tools have expanded dramatically. In this paper we describe our newly renovated bibliography architecture with an emphasis on new features which have been added including: auto-scan capabilities to reduce in an automated fashion the number of papers which need to be manually classified and to flag keywords (such as observatory names or surveys) used within papers; multi-user classification allowing quality assurance checks; multi-observatory capabilities allowing multiple facilities to use the same database independently; and plug-in support allowing access to associated observatory data to more fully describe data links in papers.

  16. Updates on Chandra Data Analysis and Calibration Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Jonathan C.; Nowak, M. A.; X-ray Center, Chandra

    2008-03-01

    We review recent issues and improvements in Chandra data analysis, highlighting changes to the instrument and telescope calibration, the availability of new tools and scripts, and the completion of the "Repro 3" reprocessing. In CALDB 3.4.2, released in December 2007, new time dependent ACIS gain files were released. CALDB 3.4.1 (Sep 2007) included new ACIS blank sky background files as well as a new HRC-I degap geometry file. Following reprocessing of the entire archive (except for some early postlaunch observations) retrieved data should be consistent with the latest processing system, which makes a number of earlier analysis steps obsolete. Finally, we will briefly describe the forthcoming Chandra Source Catalog.

  17. Highlights and discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananbaum, H; Weisskopf, M C; Tucker, W; Wilkes, B; Edmonds, P

    2014-06-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extra-solar x-ray source in 1962, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond x-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08 black holes; the growth of supermassive black holes and their role in the regulation of star formation and growth of galaxies; impacts of collisions, mergers, and feedback on growth and evolution of groups and clusters of galaxies; and properties of dark matter and dark energy.

  18. Dark Matter Reality Check: Chandra Casts Cloud On Alternative Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    New evidence from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory challenges an alternative theory of gravity that eliminates the need for dark matter. The observation also narrows the field for competing forms of dark matter, the elusive material thought to be the dominant form of matter in the universe. An observation of the galaxy NGC 720 shows it is enveloped in a slightly flattened, or ellipsoidal cloud of hot gas that has an orientation different from that of the optical image of the galaxy. The flattening is too large to be explained by theories in which stars and gas are assumed to contain most of the mass in the galaxy. "The shape and orientation of the hot gas cloud require it to be confined by an egg-shaped dark matter halo," said David Buote of the University of California, Irvine, and lead author of a report on this research in the 2002 September 20 issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "This means that dark matter is not just an illusion due to a shortcoming of the standard theory of gravity - it is real." According to the generally accepted standard theory of gravity, the hot X-ray cloud would need an additional source of gravity - a halo of dark matter - to keep the hot gas from expanding away. The mass of dark matter required would be about five to ten times the mass of the stars in the galaxy. If the dark matter tracked the optical light from the stars in the galaxy, the hot X-ray cloud would be more round than it is. The flattened shape of the hot gas cloud requires a flattened dark matter halo. An alternative theory of gravity called MOND, for Modified Newtonian Dynamics, was proposed in 1983 by Mordecai Milgrom of the Weizmann Institute in Israel, and has remained viable over the years. MOND does away with the need for dark matter by modifying the theory where the acceleration produced by gravity is very small, such as the outskirts of galaxies. However, MOND cannot explain the Chandra observation of NGC 720. This is apparently the first dynamical evidence that

  19. Cross-matching within the Chandra Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots, Arnold H.; Burke, Douglas J.; Civano, Francesca; Hain, Roger; Nguyen, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Cross-matching among overlapping source detections in the development of the Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) presents considerable challenges, since the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the Chandra X-ray Observatory varies significantly over the field of view. For the production of the second release of the CSC we have developed a cross-match tool that is based on the Bayesian algorithms by Budavari, Heinis, and Szalay (ApJ 679, 301 and 705, 739), making use of the error ellipses for the derived positions of the detections.However, calculating match probabilities only on the basis of error ellipses breaks down when the PSFs are significantly different. This is an issue that is not commonly addressed in cross-match tools. We have applied a satisfactory modification to the algorithm that, although not perfect, ameliorates the issue for the vast majority of such cases.A separate issue is that as the number of overlapping detections increases, the number of matches to be considered increases at an alarming rate, requiring procedural adjustments to ensure that the cross-matching finishes within a Hubble time.We intend to make the tool available as a general purpose cross-match engine for calculating match probabilities between sources in multiple catalogs simultaneously.This work has been supported by NASA under contract NAS 8-03060 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for operation of the Chandra X-ray Center.

  20. Unveiling obscured accretion in the Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, F; Santini, P; Puccetti, S; Brusa, M; Feruglio, C; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Comastri, A; Gruppioni, C; Pozzi, F; Zamorani, G; Vignali, C

    2007-01-01

    A large population of heavily obscured, Compton Thick AGNs is predicted by models of galaxy formation, models of Cosmic X-ray Background and by the ``relic'' super-massive black-hole mass function measured from local bulges. However, so far only a handful of Compton thick AGNs have been possibly detected using even the deepest Chandra and XMM surveys. Compton-thick AGNs can be recovered thanks to the reprocessing of the AGN UV emission in the infrared by selecting sources with AGN luminosity's in the mid-infrared and faint near-infrared and optical emission. To this purpose, we make use of deep HST, VLT, Spitzer and Chandra data on the Chandra Deep Field South to constrain the number of Compton thick AGN in this field. We show that sources with high 24micron to optical flux ratios and red colors form a distinct source population, and that their infrared luminosity is dominated by AGN emission. Analysis of the X-ray properties of these extreme sources shows that most of them are indeed likely to be highly obsc...

  1. Studying the Evolving Universe with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Hasinger, G

    2003-01-01

    First indications of the warm/hot intergalactic medium, tracing out the large scale structure of the universe, have been obtained in sensitive Chandra and XMM-Newton high resolution absorption line spectroscopy of bright blazars. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy and imaging also provides important new constraints on the physical condition of the cooling matter in the centers of clusters, requiring major modifications to the standard cooling flow models. XMM-Newton and Chandra low resolution spectroscopy detected significant Fe K_alpha absorption features in the spectrum of the ultraluminous, high redshift lensed broad absorption line QSO APM 08279+5255, yielding new insights in the outflow geometry indicating a supersolar Fe/O ratio. Chandra high resolution imaging spectroscopy of the nearby ULIRG/obscured QSO NGC 6240 for the first time gave evidence of two active supermassive black holes in the same galaxy, likely bound to coalesce in the course of the ongoing major merger in this galaxy. Deep X-ray surve...

  2. Assessing black hole spin in deep Suzaku observations of Seyfert 1 AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Patrick, A R; Lobban, A P; Porquet, D; Markowitz, A G

    2011-01-01

    We present a broad-band analysis of deep Suzaku observations of nearby Seyfert 1 AGN: Fairall 9, MCG--6-30-15, NGC 3516, NGC 3783 and NGC 4051. The use of deep observations (exposures >200 ks) with high S/N allows the complex spectra of these objects to be examined in full, taking into account features such as the soft excess, reflection continuum and complex absorption components. After a self-consistent modelling of the broad-band data (0.6-100.0 keV, also making use of BAT data from Swift), the subtle curvature which may be introduced as a consequence of warm absorbers has a measured affect upon the spectrum at energies >3 keV and the Fe K region. Forming a model (including absorption) of these AGN allows the true extent to which broadened diskline emission is present to be examined and as a result the measurement of accretion disc and black hole parameters which are consistent over the full 0.6-100.0 keV energy range. Fitting relativistic line emission models appear to rule out the presence of maximally s...

  3. Suzaku study on the Ejecta of the Supernova Remnant G272.2$-$3.2

    CERN Document Server

    Kamitsukasa, Fumiyoshi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Mori, Koji; Katsuda, Satoru; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We report re-analyses of the Suzaku observations of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), G272.2$-$3.2, for which the previous studies were limited below 3 keV. With careful data reduction and background subtraction, we discover the K-shell lines of Ar, Ca, and Fe above 3 keV. The X-ray spectrum of G272.2$-$3.2 consists of two components, a low-temperature collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) plasma ($kT_{\\rm e} \\sim 0.2$ keV) and a high-temperature non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) plasma ($kT_{\\rm e} = 0.6$-$3$ keV). The CIE plasma has solar abundances over the entire area, hence it would originate from the interstellar medium. On the other hand, the abundances of the NEI plasma increase toward the inner region, suggesting the ejecta origin. The line center energy of the Fe K-shell emission ($\\sim 6.4$ keV) suggests that the ejecta are recently heated by the reverse shock, a common feature in Type Ia SNRs.

  4. Suzaku Observations of the North Polar Spur: Evidence for Nitrogen Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Eric D; Bautz, Mark W; McCammon, Dan; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Hughes, John P; Katsuda, Satoru; Kokubun, Motohide; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Porter, F Scott; Takei, Yoh; Tsuboi, Yohko; Yamasaki, Noriko Y

    2007-01-01

    We present observations of the North Polar Spur (NPS) using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) aboard the Suzaku X-ray satellite. The NPS is a large region of enhanced soft X-ray and radio emission projected above the plane of the Galaxy, likely produced by a series of supernovae and stellar winds from the nearby Sco-Cen OB association. The exceptional sensitivity and spectral resolution of the XIS below 1 keV allow unprecedented probing of low-energy spectral lines, including CVI (0.37 keV) and NVII (0.50 keV), and we have detected highly-ionized nitrogen toward the NPS for the first time. For this single pointing toward the brightest 3/4 keV emission (l = 26.8 deg, b = +22.0 deg), the best-fit NPS emission model implies a hot (kT ~ 0.3 keV), collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) plasma with depleted C, O, Ne, Mg, and Fe abundances of less than 0.5 solar, but an enhanced N abundance, with N/O = 4.0 +0.4,-0.5 times solar. The temperature and total thermal energy of the gas suggest heating by one or more ...

  5. Suzaku and XMM-Newton Observations of the North Polar Spur: Charge Exchange or ISM Absorption?

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Liyi; Costantini, Elisa; Kaastra, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    By revisiting the Suzaku and XMM-Newton data of the North Polar Spur, we discovered that the spectra are inconsistent with the traditional model consisting of pure thermal emission and neutral absorption. The most prominent discrepancies are the enhanced O VII and Ne IX forbidden-to-resonance ratios, and a high O VIII Ly$\\beta$ line relative to other Lyman series. A collisionally ionized absorption model can naturally explain both features, while a charge exchange component can only account for the former. By including the additional ionized absorption, the plasma in the North Polar Spur can be described by a single-phase CIE component with temperature of 0.25 keV, and nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and iron abundances of $0.4-0.8$ solar. The abundance pattern of the North Polar Spur is well in line with those of the Galactic halo stars. The high nitrogen-to-oxygen ratio reported in previous studies can be migrated to the large transmission of the O VIII Ly$\\alpha$ line. The ionized absorber is characteri...

  6. A systematic X-ray study of the dwarf novae observed with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Qazuya; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken; Hayashi, Takayuki

    2017-02-01

    X-ray behavior of the dwarf novae (DNe) outside the quiescent state has not been fully understood. We thus assembled 21 data sets of the 15 DNe observed by the Suzaku satellite by the end of 2013, which include spectra taken during not only the quiescence, but also the transitional, outburst, and super-outburst states. Starting with the traditional cooling flow model to explain the X-ray emission from the boundary layer, we made several modifications to account for the observed spectra. As a result, we found that the best-fitting spectral model depends strongly on the state of the DNe with only a few exceptions. Spectra in the quiescent state are explained by the cooling flow model plus a Fe fluorescent line emission attenuated by an interstellar extinction. Spectra in the transitional state require an additional partial covering extinction. Spectra in the outburst and super-outburst state require additional low-temperature thin-thermal plasma component(s). Spectra in the super-outburst state further require a high value of minimum temperature for the boundary layer. We present an interpretation on the required modifications to the cooling flow model for each state.

  7. A Systematic X-ray Study of the Dwarf Novae Observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Wada, Qazuya; Ebisawa, Ken; Hayashi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    X-ray behavior of the dwarf novae (DNe) outside the quiescent state has not been fully understood. We thus assembled 21 data sets of the 15 DNe observed by the Suzaku satellite by the end of 2013, which include spectra taken during not only the quiescence, but also the transitional, outburst, and super-outburst states. Starting with the traditional cooling flow model to explain the X-ray emission from the boundary layer, we made several modifications to account for the observed spectra. As a result, we found that the best-fit spectral model depends strongly on the state of the DNe with only a few exceptions. Spectra in the quiescent state are explained by the cooling flow model plus a Fe fluorescent line emission attenuated by an interstellar extinction. Spectra in the transitional state require an additional partial covering extinction. Spectra in the outburst and super-outburst state require additional low-temperature thin-thermal plasma component(s). Spectra in the super-outburst state further require a hi...

  8. Suzaku Monitoring of the Iron K Emission Line in the Type 1 AGN NGC 5548

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yuan; McHardy, Ian M; Grupe, Dirk; Wilkes, Belinda J; Reeves, James; Brickhouse, Nancy; Krongold, Yair; Mathur, Smita; Minezaki, Takeo; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2010-01-01

    We present 7 sequential weekly observations of NGC 5548 conducted in 2007 with the \\textit{Suzaku} X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) in the 0.2-12 keV band and Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) in 10-600 keV band. The iron K$\\alpha$ line is well detected in all seven observations and K$\\beta$ line is also detected in four observations. In this paper, we investigate the origin of the Fe K lines using both the width of the line and the reverberation mapping method. With the co-added XIS and HXD spectra, we identify Fe K$\\alpha$ and K$\\beta$ line at 6.396$_{-0.007}^{+0.009}$ keV and 7.08$_{-0.05}^{+0.05}$ keV, respectively. The width of line obtained from the co-added spectra is 38$_{-18}^{+16}$ eV ($\\textrm{FWHM}=4200_{-2000}^{+1800}$ km/s) which corresponds to a radius of 20$_{-10}^{+50}$ light days, for the virial production of $1.220\\times10^7$ M$_{\\odot}$ in NCG 5548. To quantitatively investigate the origin of the narrow Fe line by the reverberation mapping method, we compare the observed light curves of Fe K$\\alph...

  9. Universal Profiles of the Intracluster Medium from Suzaku X-Ray and Subaru Weak Lensing Obesrvations

    CERN Document Server

    Okabe, N; Tamura, T; Fujita, Y; Takizawa, M; Zhang, Y -Y; Matsushita, K; Hamana, T; Fukazawa, Y; Futamase, T; Kawaharada, M; Miyazaki, S; Mochizuki, Y; Nakazawa, K; Ohashi, T; Ota, N; Sasaki, T; Sato, K; Tam, S I

    2014-01-01

    We conduct a joint X-ray and weak-lensing study of four relaxed galaxy clusters (Hydra A, A478, A1689 and A1835) observed by both Suzaku and Subaru out to virial radii, with an aim to understand recently-discovered unexpected feature of the ICM in cluster outskirts. We show that the average hydrostatic-to-lensing total mass ratio for the four clusters decreases from \\sim 70% to \\sim 40% as the overdensity contrast decreases from 500 to the virial value.The average gas mass fraction from lensing total mass estimates increases with cluster radius and agrees with the cosmic mean baryon fraction within the virial radius, whereas the X-ray-based gas fraction considerably exceeds the cosmic values due to underestimation of the hydrostatic mass. We also develop a new advanced method for determining normalized cluster radial profiles for multiple X-ray observables by simultaneously taking into account both their radial dependence and multivariate scaling relations with weak-lensing masses. Although the four clusters ...

  10. Suzaku Observations of the Non-thermal Supernova Remnant HESS J1731-347

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Aya; Acero, Fabio; Klochkov, Dmitry; Tian, Wenwu; Yamazaki, Ryo; Li, Zhiyuan; Horns, Dieter; Kosack, Karl; Komin, Nukri

    2012-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the nonthermal X-ray emission from the North-Western and Southern parts of the supernova remnant (SNR) HESS J1731$ - $347 with {\\it Suzaku} is presented. The shell portions covered by the observations emit hard and line-less X-rays. The spectrum can be reproduced by a simple absorbed power-law model with a photon index $\\Gamma$ of 1.8-2.7 and an absorption column density $N_{\\rm H}$ of (1.0-2.1)$\\times 10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$. These quantities change significantly from region to region; the North-Western part of the SNR has the hardest and most absorbed spectrum. The Western part of the X-ray shell has a smaller curvature than North-Western and Southern shell segments. A comparison of the X-ray morphology to the Very High Energy (VHE) gamma-ray and radio images was performed. The efficiency of electron acceleration and emission mechanism in each portion of the shell are discussed. Thermal X-ray emission from the SNR was searched for but could not be detected at a significant level.

  11. Discovery of Red-Skewed K_alpha iron line in Cyg X-2 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Shaposhnikov, Nikolai; Laurent, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    We report on the Suzaku observation of neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-2 which reveals a presence of the iron K_alpha emission line. The line profile shows a significant red wing. This discovery increases the number of neutron star sources where red-skewed iron lines were observed and strongly suggests that this phenomenon is common not only in black holes but also in other types of accreting compact objects. We examine the line profile in terms of models which attribute its production to the relativistic effects due to reflection of X-ray radiation from a cold accretion disk and also as a result of the line formation in the extended wind/outflow configuration. Both models are able to adequately represent the observed line profile. We consider the results of line modeling in the context of subsecond variability. While we were unable to conclusively disqualify one of the models, we find that the wind paradigm has several advantages over the relativistic disk reflection model.

  12. A Variable-Density Absorption Event in NGC 3227 mapped with Suzaku and Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Beuchert, T; Krauß, F; Miniutti, G; Longinotti, A L; Guainazzi, M; de La Calle, I; Malkan, M; Elvis, M; Miyaji, T; Hiriart, D; López, J M; Agudo, I; Dauser, T; Garcia, J; Kreikenbohm, A; Kadler, M; Wilms, J

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of the circumnuclear gas accreting onto supermassive black holes in Seyfert galaxies remains a topic of much debate. As the innermost regions of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are spatially unresolved, X-ray spectroscopy, and in particular line-of-sight absorption variability, is a key diagnostic to map out the distribution of gas. Observations of variable X-ray absorption in multiple Seyferts and over a wide range of timescales indicate the presence of clumps/clouds of gas within the circumnuclear material. Eclipse events by clumps transiting the line of sight allow us to explore the properties of the clumps over a wide range of radial distances from the optical/UV Broad Line Region (BLR) to beyond the dust sublimation radius. Time-resolved absorption events have been extremely rare so far, but suggest a range of density profiles across Seyferts. We resolve a weeks-long absorption event in the Seyfert NGC 3227. We examine six Suzaku and twelve Swift observations from a 2008 campaign spanning 5 w...

  13. Spectral and Timing Studies of Cyg X-1 in the Low/Hard State with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Torii, Shunsuke; Makishima, Kazuo; Sakurai, Soki; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Noda, Hirofumi; Done, Chris; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Gandhi, Poshak

    2011-01-01

    From 2005 to 2009, 25 observations of Cyg X-1 were performed with Suzaku, achieving a total exposure of 446 ks. In all observations, the source was found in the low/hard state, while the 1.5--12.0 keV count rate of the All-Sky Monitor onboard RXTE varied by a factor of ~ 3. In each observation, the 10--60 keV HXD-PIN spectrum and the 60--400 keV HXD-GSO spectrum were fitted successfully by a thermal Comptonization model plus reflection by a thick neutral material. As the soft X-ray intensity increased, the Compton y-parameter was found to decrease from 1.0 to 0.6, while the solid angle of reflection to increase by ~ 30%. Also conducted was timing analysis over a frequency range of 0.001--10 Hz. As the source became brighter in soft X-rays, the characteristic frequency of hard X-ray variation increased from 0.03 to 0.3 Hz, while the fractional hard X-ray variation integrated over 0.001--0.01 Hz decreased by a factor of ~ 5. The signals in the 60--200 keV band were generally found to vary on shorter time scales...

  14. Analysing the Suzaku spectra of the broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxy CBS 126

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Reis, R. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Grupe, D.; Tsuruta, S.

    2012-09-01

    We analysed new simultaneous Suzaku and Swift data of the broad-line Seyfert 1 (BLS1) galaxy CBS 126. A clear Fe emission line and a strong soft excess are present in the source spectra. We fit the spectra with a relativistic reflection model and find that the model tends to fit the data with a high iron abundance possibly due to the large soft excess present. By checking the difference and the rms spectra, we find that there is likely an absorption edge at ˜0.89 keV, which might be caused by oxygen or neon. We also produced an analysis of the time-resolved spectra in order to examine the existence of the edge. Although high iron abundance is required more in the time-resolved spectra, a model of solar iron abundance together with an absorption edge gives a more physical explanation. Variation of the ionization parameter is an alternative, plausible explanation for the excess seen in the difference spectra. It is difficult to know if there are warm absorbers in this source from the current data. To further investigate the presence of possible warm absorbers, higher signal-to-noise ratio low-energy data are needed. The work presented here tentatively suggests that the spectra of a BLS1 galaxy can be explained by a relativistic reflection model similar to that often seen in their narrow-line cousins.

  15. Spectral evolution of GRB 060904A observed with Swift and Suzaku -- Possibility of Inefficient Electron Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Yonetoku, Daisuke; Murakami, Toshio; Emura, Naomi; Aoyama, Yuka; Kidamura, Takashi; Kodaira, Hironobu; Kodama, Yoshiki; Kozaka, Ryota; Nashimoto, Takuro; Okuno, Shinya; Yokota, Satoshi; Yoshinari, Satoru; Abe, Keiichi; Onda, Kaori; Tashiro, Makoto S; Urata, Yuji; Nakagawa, Yujin E; Sugita, Satoshi; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Ishimura, Takuto; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Shimokawabe, Takashi; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kubota, Kaori; Sugiyasu, Kei; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Masui, Kensuke; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Maeno, Shouta; Sonoda, Eri; Yamauchi, Makoto; Kuwahara, Makoto; Tamagawa, Toru; Matsuura, Daisuke; Suzuki, Motoko; Barthelmy, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Nousek, John

    2007-01-01

    We observed an X-ray afterglow of GRB 060904A with the Swift and Suzaku satellites. We found rapid spectral softening during both the prompt tail phase and the decline phase of an X-ray flare in the BAT and XRT data. The observed spectra were fit by power-law photon indices which rapidly changed from $\\Gamma = 1.51^{+0.04}_{-0.03}$ to $\\Gamma = 5.30^{+0.69}_{-0.59}$ within a few hundred seconds in the prompt tail. This is one of the steepest X-ray spectra ever observed, making it quite difficult to explain by simple electron acceleration and synchrotron radiation. Then, we applied an alternative spectral fitting using a broken power-law with exponential cutoff (BPEC) model. It is valid to consider the situation that the cutoff energy is equivalent to the synchrotron frequency of the maximum energy electrons in their energy distribution. Since the spectral cutoff appears in the soft X-ray band, we conclude the electron acceleration has been inefficient in the internal shocks of GRB 060904A. These cutoff spectr...

  16. X-ray Weekly Monitoring of the Galactic Center Sgr A* with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yoshitomo; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Hayashi, Takayuki; Iizuka, Ryo; Saitoh, Takayuki; Murakami, Hiroshi

    A small gas cloud, G2, is on an orbit almost straight into the supermassive blackhole Sgr A* by spring 2014. This event gives us a rare opportunity to test the mass feeding onto the blackhole by a gas. To catch a possible rise of the mass accretion from the cloud, we have been performing the bi-week monitoring of Sgr A* in autumn and spring in the 2013 fiscal year. The key feature of Suzaku is the high-sensitivity wide-band X-ray spectroscopy all in one observatory. It is characterized by a large effective area combined with low background and good energy resolution, in particular a good line spread function in the low-energy range. Since the desired flare events associated with the G2 approach is a transient event, the large effective area is critical and powerful tools to hunt them. The first monitoring in 2013 autumn was successfully made. The X-rays from Sgr A* and its nearby emission were clearly resolved from the bright transient source AX J1745.6-2901. No very large flare from Sgr A*was found during the monitoring. We also may report the X-ray properties of two serendipitous sources, the neutron star binary AX J1745.6-2901 and a magnetar SGR J1745-29.

  17. Suzaku spectroscopy of the neutron star transient 4U 1608-52 during its outburst decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas Padilla, M.; Ueda, Y.; Hori, T.; Shidatsu, M.; Muñoz-Darias, T.

    2017-01-01

    We test the proposed 3-component spectral model for neutron star low mass X-ray binaries using broad-band X-ray data. We have analysed 4 X-ray spectra (0.8-30 keV) obtained with Suzaku during the 2010 outburst of 4U 1608-52, which have allowed us to perform a comprehensive spectral study covering all the classical spectral states. We use a thermally Comptonized continuum component to account for the hard emission, as well as two thermal components to constrain the accretion disc and neutron star surface contributions. We find that the proposed combination of multicolor disc, single-temperature black body and Comptonization components successfully reproduces the data from soft to hard states. In the soft state, our study supports the neutron star surface (or boundary layer) as the dominant source for the Comptonization seed photons yielding the observed weak hard emission, while in the hard state both solutions, either the disc or the neutron star surface, are equally favoured. The obtained spectral parameters as well as the spectral/timing correlations are comparable to those observed in accreting black holes, which support the idea that black hole and neutron star low mass X-ray binaries undergo a similar state evolution during their accretion episodes.

  18. {\\it Suzaku} observation of Galactic supernova remnant CTB 37A (G348.5+0.1)

    CERN Document Server

    Sezer, A; Hudaverdi, M; Ercan, E N

    2011-01-01

    We present here the results of the observation of CTB 37A obtained with the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer onboard the {\\it Suzaku} satellite. The X-ray spectrum of CTB 37A is well fitted by two components, a single-temperature ionization equilibrium component (VMEKAL) with solar abundances, an electron temperature of $kT_{\\rm e}\\sim0.6$ keV, absorbing column density of $N_{\\rm H}\\sim3\\times10^{22}$ ${\\rm cm^{-2}}$ and a power-law component with photon index of $\\Gamma$ $\\sim 1.6$. The X-ray spectrum of CTB 37A is characterized by clearly detected K-shell emission lines of Mg, Si, S, and Ar. The plasma with solar abundances supports the idea that the X-ray emission originates from the shocked interstellar material. The ambient gas density, and age of the remnant are estimated to be $\\sim1f^{-1/2}$${\\rm cm^{-3}}$ and $\\sim3\\times10^{4}f^{1/2}$ yr, respectively. The center-filling X-ray emission surrounded by a shell-like radio structure and other X-ray properties indicate that this remnant would be a new member of...

  19. Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations of the North Polar Spur: Charge exchange or ISM absorption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liyi; Mao, Junjie; Costantini, Elisa; Kaastra, Jelle

    2016-10-01

    By revisiting the Suzaku and XMM-Newton data of the North Polar Spur, we discovered that the spectra are inconsistent with the traditional model consisting of pure thermal emission and neutral absorption. The most prominent discrepancies are the enhanced O vii and Ne ix forbidden-to-resonance ratios, and a high O viii Lyβ line relative to other Lyman series. A collisionally ionized absorption model can naturally explain both features, while a charge exchange component can only account for the former. By including the additional ionized absorption, the plasma in the North Polar Spur can be described by a single-phase collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) component with a temperature of 0.25 keV, and nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and iron abundances of 0.4-0.8 solar. The abundance pattern of the North Polar Spur is well in line with those of the Galactic halo stars. The high nitrogen-to-oxygen ratio reported in previous studies can be migrated to the large transmission of the O viii Lyα line. The ionized absorber is characterized by a balance temperature of 0.17-0.20 keV and a column density of 3-5 × 1019 cm-2. Based on the derived abundances and absorption, we speculate that the North Polar Spur is a structure in the Galactic halo, so that the emission is mostly absorbed by the Galactic interstellar medium in the line of sight.

  20. Search for X-Ray Emission Associated with the Shapley Supercluster with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Yamasaki, Noriko Y; Takei, Yoh; Ohashi, Takaya; Sato, Kosuke; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Henry, J Patrick; Kelley, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Suzaku performed observations of 3 regions in and around the Shapley supercluster: a region located between A3558 and A3556, at ~0.9 times the virial radii of both clusters, and two other regions at 1{\\deg}and 4{\\deg}away from the first pointing. The 4{\\deg}-offset observation was used to evaluate the Galactic foreground emission. We did not detect significant redshifted Oxygen emission lines (O VII and O VIII) in the spectra of all three pointings, after subtracting the contribution of foreground and background emission. An upper limit for the redshifted O VIII Ka line intensity of the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) is 1.5 \\times 10^-7 photons s^-1 cm^-2 arcmin^-2, which corresponds to an overdensity of ~380 (Z/0.1 Z_solar)^{-1/2} (L/3 Mpc)^{-1/2}, assuming T=3\\times10^6 K. We found excess continuum emission in the 1{\\deg}-offset and on-filament regions, represented by thermal models with kT ~1 keV and ~2 keV, respectively. The redshifts of both 0 and that of the supercluster (0.048) are consistent wit...

  1. X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Classical Nova V458 Vulpeculae with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Drake, Jeremy J; Ness, Jan-Uwe; Kitamoto, Shunji

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a target of opportunity X-ray observation of the classical nova V458 Vulpeculae 88 days after the explosion using the Suzaku satellite. With a 20 ks exposure, the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer detected X-ray emission significantly harder than typical super-soft source emission. The X-ray spectrum shows K lines from N, Ne, Mg, Si, and S, and L-series emission from Fe in highly ionized states. The spectrum can be described by a single temperature (0.64 keV) thin thermal plasma model in collisional equilibrium with a hydrogen-equivalent extinction column density of ~3e21/cm2, a flux of ~1e-12 erg/s/cm2, and a luminosity of ~6e34 erg/s in the 0.3-3.0 keV band at an assumed distance of 13 kpc. We found a hint of an enhancement of N and deficiencies of O and Fe relative to other metals. The observed X-ray properties can be interpreted as the emission arising from shocks of ejecta from an ONe-type nova.

  2. A Suzaku Observation of the Low-Ionization Fe-Line Emission from RCW 86

    CERN Document Server

    Ueno, M; Kataoka, J; Bamba, A; Harrus, I; Hiraga, J; Hughes, J P; Kilbourne, C A; Koyama, K; Kokubun, M; Nakajima, H; Ozaki, M; Petre, R; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tomida, H; Yamaguchi, H; Ueno, Masaru; Sato, Rie; Kataoka, Jun; Bamba, Aya; Harrus, Ilana; Hiraga, Junko; Hughes, John P.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Koyama, Katsuji; Kokubun, Motohide; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Petre, Robert; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tomida, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2006-01-01

    The newly operational X-ray satellite Suzaku observed the southwestern quadrant of the supernova remnant (SNR) RCW 86 in February 2006 to study the nature of the 6.4 keV emission line first detected with the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astronomy (ASCA). The new data confirm the existence of the line, localizing it for the first time; most of the line emission is adjacent and interior to the forward shock and not at the locus of the continuum hard emission. We also report the first detection of a 7.1 keV line that we interpret as the K-beta emission from low-ionization iron. The Fe-K line features are consistent with a non-equilibrium plasma of Fe-rich ejecta with n_{e}t <~ 10^9 cm^-3 s and kT_{e} ~ 5 keV. This combination of low n_{e}t and high kT_{e} suggests collisionless electron heating in an SNR shock. The Fe K-alpha line shows evidence for intrinsic broadening, with a width of 47 (34--59) eV (99% error region). The difference of the spatial distributions of the hard continuum above 3 keV and...

  3. New X-ray views of the Galactic center observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K; Inui, T; Koyama, Katsuji; Hyodo, Yoshiaki; Inui, Tatsuya

    2006-01-01

    We report the diffuse X-ray emissions from the Sgr A and B regions observed with Suzaku. From the Sgr A region, we found many K-shell transition lines of iron and nickel. The brightest are K alpha lines from FeI, FeXXV and FeXXVI at 6.4 keV, 6.7 keV and 6.9 keV. In addition, K alpha lines of NiI and NiXXVII, K beta of FeI, FeXXV and FeXXVI, and K gamma of FeXXV and FeXXVI are detected for the first time. The center energy of K alpha of FeXXV favors collisional excitation as the origin for this line emission. The ionization temperature determined from the flux ratio of K alpha of FeXXV and FeXXVI is similar to the electron temperature determined from the flux ratio of K alpha and K beta of FeXXV, which are in the range of 5-7 keV. Consequently, the Galactic Center diffuse X-rays (GCDX) are consistent with emission from a plasma nearly in ionization equilibrium. The radio complex Sgr B region also exhibits K alpha lines of FeI, FeXXV and FeXXVI. The 6.7 keV line (FeXXV) map exhibits a local excess at (l,b) = (0...

  4. Hot Halo Emission Detected at Outskirts of Two Poor Galaxy Groups Using Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Jenna; Dai, Xinyu; Sun, Ming

    2015-01-01

    We present Suzaku off-center observations of two poor galaxy groups, NGC 3402 and NGC 5129, with temperatures below 1 keV. Through spectral decomposition, we measure their surface brightnesses and temperatures out to 420 and 300 times the critical density of the universe for NGC 3402 and NGC 5129, respectively. These quantities are consistent with extrapolations from existing inner measurements of the two groups. With the refined X-ray luminosities, the two groups prefer LX-T relations without a break in the group regime. Furthermore, we measure the electron number densities and hydrostatic masses at these radii. We find that the electron number density profiles require three β-model components, including one with a flat slope, for both groups. Adding the gas mass measured from the X-ray data and stellar mass from group galaxy members, we measure baryon fractions of fb = 0.120 and 0.116 for NGC 3402 and NGC 5129, respectively. Combining other poor groups with well measured X-ray emission to the outskirts, we find an average baryon fraction of fb,ave = 0.111 for X-ray bright groups with temperatures between 0.8-1.3 keV, extending existing constraints to lower mass systems.

  5. Giant Lobes of Centaurus A Radio Galaxy Observed with the Suzaku X-ray Satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Stawarz, L; Madejski, G; O'Sullivan, S P; Cheung, C C; Feain, I J; Fukazawa, Y; Gandhi, P; Hardcastle, M J; Kataoka, J; Ostrowski, M; Reville, B; Siemiginowska, A; Simionescu, A; Takahashi, T; Takei, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Werner, N

    2012-01-01

    [abridged] We report on Suzaku observations of selected regions within the Southern giant lobe of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. We focus on distinct X-ray features likely associated with fine radio structure of the lobe. We find that the spectral properties of the detected X-ray features are equally consistent with thermal emission from hot gas, or with a power-law radiation continuum. However, the plasma parameters implied by these different models favor a synchrotron origin for the analyzed X-ray spots, indicating that a very efficient acceleration of electrons is taking place within the giant structure of Centaurus A, albeit only in isolated and compact regions. We also present a detailed analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission, resulting in a tentative detection of a soft excess component best fitted by a thermal model with a temperature of 0.5 keV. The exact origin of the observed excess remains uncertain, although energetic considerations point to thermal gas filling the bulk of the volume of the lobe an...

  6. Suzaku broad band observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxies Mrk 509 and Mrk 841

    CERN Document Server

    Cerruti, M; Boisson, C; Costantini, E; Longinotti, A L; Matt, G; Mouchet, M; Petrucci, P O

    2011-01-01

    We report an analysis and modelling of new Suzaku observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxies Mrk509 and Mrk841, taken between April and November 2006, for Mrk509, and January and July 2007, for Mrk841, for a total exposure time of ~100 ks each. Data from XIS and HXD/PIN instruments, going from 0.5 to 60 keV, represent the best resolution simultaneous broad band X-ray spectrum for these objects. We fitted the broad band spectrum of both sources with a double Comptonisation model, adding a neutral reflection from distant material and a two-phase warm absorber. We then studied the two competitive models aimed to explain the soft excess with atomic processes: a blurred ionised disc reflection and an ionised absorption by a high velocity material. When fitting the data in the 3-10 keV range with a power law spectrum, and extrapolating this result to low energies, a soft excess is clearly observed below 2 keV: its strength is however weak compared to past observations of both sources. A moderate hard excess is seen at ...

  7. New Insights on the Accretion Disk-Winds Connection in Radio-Loud AGNs from Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Sambruna, R. M.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.; Cappi, M.; Reynolds, S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    From the spectral analysis of long Suzaku observations of five radio-loud AGNs we have been able to discover the presence of ultra-fast outflows with velocities ,,approx.0.1 c in three of them, namely 3C III, 3C 120 and 3C 390.3. They are consistent with being accretion disk winds/outflows. We also performed a follow-up on 3C III to monitor its outflow on approx.7 days time-scales and detected an anti-correlated variability of a possible relativistic emission line with respect to blue-shifted Fe K features, following a flux increase. This provides the first direct evidence for an accretion disc-wind connection in an AGN. The mass outflow rate of these outflows can be comparable to the accretion rate and their mechanical power can correspond to a significant fraction of the bolometric luminosity and is comparable to their typical jet power. Therefore, they can possibly play a significant role in the expected feedback from AGNs and can give us further clues on the relation between the accretion disk and the formation of winds/jets.

  8. In-Orbit Performance of the Hard X-ray Detector on board Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Kokubun, M; Takahashi, T; Murakami, T; Tashiro, M; Fukazawa, Y; Kamae, T; Madejski, G M; Nakazawa, K; Yamaoka, K; Terada, Y; Yonetoku, D; Watanabe, S; Tamagawa, T; Mizuno, T; Kubota, A; Isobe, N; Takahashi, I; Sato, G; Takahashi, H; Hong, S; Kawaharada, M; Kawano, N; Mitani, T; Murashima, M; Suzuki, M; Abe, K; Miyawaki, R; Ohno, M; Tanaka, T; Yanagida, T; Itoh, T; Ohnuki, K; Tamura, K; Endo, Y; Hirakuri, S; Hiruta, T; Kitaguchi, T; Kishishita, T; Sugita, S; Takeda, S; Enoto, T; Hirasawa, A; Katsuta, J; Matsumura, S; Onda, K; Sato, M; Ushio, M; Ishikawa, S; Murase, K; Odaka, H; Yaji, Y; Yamada, S; Yamasaki, T; Yuasa, T

    2006-01-01

    The in-orbit performance and calibration of the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board the X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku are described. Its basic performances, including a wide energy bandpass of 10-600 keV, energy resolutions of ~4 keV (FWHM) at 40 keV and ~11% at 511 keV, and a high background rejection efficiency, have been confirmed by extensive in-orbit calibrations. The long-term gains of PIN-Si diodes have been stable within 1% for half a year, and those of scintillators have decreased by 5-20%. The residual non-X-ray background of the HXD is the lowest among past non-imaging hard X-ray instruments in energy ranges of 15-70 and 150-500 keV. We provide accurate calibrations of energy responses, angular responses, timing accuracy of the HXD, and relative normalizations to the X-ray CCD cameras using multiple observations of the Crab Nebula.

  9. Spectral Evolutions in Gamma-Ray Burst Exponential Decays Observed with Suzaku WAM

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, Makoto S; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Ohno, Masahiro; Sugita, Satoshi; Uehara, Takeshi; Seta, Hiromi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the spectral evolution of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emissions observed with the Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM). By making use of the WAM data archive, 6 bright GRBs exhibiting 7 well-separated fast-rise-exponential-decay (FRED) shaped light curves are presented and the evaluated exponential decay time constants of the energy-resolved light curves from these FRED peak light curves are shown to indicate significant spectral evolution. The energy dependence of the time constants is well described with a power-law function tau(E) ~ E^gamma, where gamma ~ -(0.34 +/- 0.12) in average, although 5 FRED peaks show consistent value of gamma = -1/2 which is expected in synchrotron or inverse-Compton cooling models. In particular, 2 of the GRBs were located with accuracy sufficient to evaluate the time-resolved spectra with precise energy response matrices. Their behavior in spectral evolution suggests two different origins of emissions. In the case of GRB081224, the derived 1-s ...

  10. A Suzaku Search for Dark Matter Emission Lines in the X-ray Brightest Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Urban, O; Allen, S W; Simionescu, A; Kaastra, J S; Strigari, L E

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a search for unidentified emission lines in deep Suzaku X-ray spectra for the central regions of the four X-ray brightest galaxy clusters: Perseus, Coma, Virgo and Ophiuchus. We employ an optimized energy range for our analysis (3.2-5.3 keV) that is relatively free of instrumental features, and a baseline plasma emission model that incorporates the abundances of elements with the strongest expected emission lines at these energies (S, Ar, Ca) as free parameters. For the Perseus Cluster core, employing this baseline model, we find evidence for an additional emission feature at an energy $3.51^{+0.02}_{-0.01}$ keV with a flux of ~$2.87\\times10^{-7}$ ph/s/cm^2/arcmin^2. At slightly larger radii, we detect an emission line at 3.59+/-0.02 keV with a flux of ~$4.8\\times10^{-8}$ ph/s/cm^2/arcmin^2. The energies and fluxes of these features are broadly consistent with previous claims, although the radial variation of the line strength appears in tension with standard dark matter (DM) model p...

  11. Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) observations of GRBs and SGRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Ohno, Masanori; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Hurley, Kevin; Krimm, Hans A.; Lien, Amy Y.; Ohmori, Norisuke; Sugita, Satoshi; Urata, Yuji; Yasuda, Tetsuya; Enomoto, Junichi; Fujinuma, Takeshi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Hanabata, Yoshitaka; Iwakiri, Wataru; Kawano, Takafumi; Kinoshita, Ryuuji; Kokubun, Motohide; Makishima, Kazuo; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Yujin; Nakaya, Souhei; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nishioka, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Takanori; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Sawako; Terada, Yukikatsu; Yabe, Seiya; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yoshida, Hiraku

    2017-06-01

    We will review results for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs), obtained from the Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) which operated for about 10 years from 2005 to 2015. The WAM is a BGO (bismuth germanate: Bi4Ge3O12) lateral shield for the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD), used mainly for rejecting its detector background, but it also works as an all-sky monitor for soft gamma-ray transients in the 50-5000 keV range thanks to its large effective area (˜600 cm2 at 1 MeV for one detector) and wide field of view (about half of the entire sky). The WAM actually detected more than 1400 GRBs and 300 bursts from SGRs, and this detection number is comparable to that of other GRB-specific instruments. Based on the 10 years of operation, we describe timing and spectral performance for short GRBs, weak GRBs with high redshifts, and time-resolved pulses with good statistics.

  12. Properties of the intracluster medium of Abell 3667 observed with Suzaku XIS

    CERN Document Server

    Akamatsu, H; Kaastra, J; Ishisaki, Y; Ohashi, T; Kawaharada, M; Nakazawa, K

    2011-01-01

    We observed the northwest region of the cluster of galaxies A3667 with the Suzaku XIS instrument. The temperature and surface brightness of the intracluster medium were measured up to the virial radius (r200-2.3 Mpc). The radial temperature profile is flatter than the average profile for other clusters until the radius reaches the northwest radio relic. The temperature drops sharply from 5 keV to about 2 keV at the northwest radio relic region. The sharp changes of the temperature can be interpreted as a shock with a Mach number of about 2.5. The entropy slope becomes flatter in the outer region and negative around the radio relic region. In this region, the relaxation timescale of electron-ion Coulomb collisions is longer than the time elapsed after the shock heating and the plasma may be out of equilibrium. Using differential emission measure (DEM) models, we also confirm the multi-temperature structure around the radio relic region, characterized by two peaks at 1 keV and 4 keV. These features suggest that...

  13. New insights on the accretion disk-winds connection in radio-loud AGNs from Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Tombesi, F; Reeves, J N; Braito, V; Cappi, M; Reynolds, C S; Mushotzky, R F

    2011-01-01

    From the spectral analysis of long Suzaku observations of five radio-loud AGNs we have been able to discover the presence of ultra-fast outflows with velocities ~0.1c in three of them, namely 3C 111, 3C 120 and 3C 390.3. They are consistent with being accretion disk winds/outflows. We also performed a follow-up on 3C 111 to monitor its outflow on ~7days time-scales and detected an anti-correlated variability of a possible relativistic emission line with respect to blue-shifted Fe K features, following a flux increase. This provides the first direct evidence for an accretion disk-wind connection in an AGN. The mass outflow rate of these outflows can be comparable to the accretion rate and their mechanical power can correspond to a significant fraction of the bolometric luminosity and is comparable to their typical jet power. Therefore, they can possibly play a significant role in the expected feedback from AGNs and can give us further clues on the relation between the accretion disk and the formation of winds/...

  14. Probing the Disk-jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Kataoka, J; Iwasawa, K; Markowitz, A G; Mushotzky, R F; Arimoto, M; Takahashi, T; Tsubuku, Y; Ushio, M; Watanabe, S; Gallo, L C; Madejski, G M; Terashima, Y; Isobe, N; Tashiro, M S; Kohmura, T; Kataoka, Jun; Reeves, James N.; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Markowitz, Alex G.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Arimoto, Makoto; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tsubuku, Yoshihiro; Ushio, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Shin; Gallo, Luigi C.; Madejski, Greg M.; Terashima, Yuichi; Isobe, Naoki; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Kohmura, Takayoshi

    2006-01-01

    Broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) are a rare type of radio-loud AGN, in which the broad optical permitted emission lines have been detected in addition to the extended jet emission. Here we report on deep (40ksec x4) observations of the bright BLRG 3C~120 using Suzaku. The observations were spaced a week apart, and sample a range of continuum fluxes. An excellent broadband spectrum was obtained over two decades of frequency (0.6 to 50 keV) within each 40 ksec exposure. We clearly resolved the iron K emission line complex, finding that it consists of a narrow K_a core (sigma ~ 110 eV or an EW of 60 eV), a 6.9 keV line, and an underlying broad iron line. Our confirmation of the broad line contrasts with the XMM-Newton observation in 2003, where the broad line was not required. The most natural interpretation of the broad line is iron K line emission from a face-on accretion disk which is truncated at ~10 r_g. Above 10 keV, a relatively weak Compton hump was detected (reflection fraction of R ~ 0.6), superposed ...

  15. Spectral Analysis of the Accretion Flow in NGC 1052 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Brenneman, L W; Kadler, M; Tüller, J; Marscher, A; Ros, E; Zensus, A; Kovalev, Y Y; Aller, M; Aller, H; Irwin, J; Kerp, J; Kaufmann, S

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of the 101 ks, 2007 Suzaku spectrum of the LINER galaxy NGC 1052. The 0.5-10 keV continuum is well-modeled by a power-law modified by Galactic and intrinsic absorption, and it exhibits a soft, thermal emission component below 1 keV. Both a narrow core and a broader component of Fe K emission centered at 6.4 keV are robustly detected. While the narrow line is consistent with an origin in material distant from the black hole, the broad line is best fit empirically by a model that describes fluorescent emission from the inner accretion disk around a rapidly rotating black hole. We find no evidence in this observation for Comptonized reflection of the hard X-ray source by the disk above 10 keV, however, which casts doubt on the hypothesis that the broad iron line originates in the inner regions of a standard accretion disk. We explore other possible scenarios for producing this spectral feature and conclude that the high equivalent width (EW ~ 185 keV) and full-width-half-maximum velocity o...

  16. Chandra Grating Spectroscopy of Three Hot White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczak, J.; Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Schuh, S.; Drake, J. J.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observations of single hot white dwarfs are scarce. With the Chandra Low-Energy Transmission Grating, we have observed two white dwarfs, one is of spectral type DA (LB1919) and the other is a non-DA of spectral type PG1159 (PG1520+525). The spectra of both stars are analyzed, together with an archival Chandra spectrum of another DA white dwarf (GD246). Aims. The soft X-ray spectra of the two DA white dwarfs are investigated in order to study the effect of gravitational settling and radiative levitation of metals in their photospheres. LB1919 is of interest because it has a significantly lower metallicity than DAs with otherwise similar atmospheric parameters. GD246 is the only white dwarf known that shows identifiable individual iron lines in the soft X-ray range. For the PG1159 star, a precise effective temperature determination is performed in order to confine the position of the blue edge of the GW Vir instability region in the HRD. Methods. The Chandra spectra are analyzed with chemically homogeneous as well as stratified NLTE model atmospheres that assume equilibrium between gravitational settling and radiative acceleration of chemical elements. Archival EUV and UV spectra obtained with EUVE, FUSE, and HST are utilized to support the analysis. Results. No metals could be identified in LB1919. All observations are compatible with a pure hydrogen atmosphere. This is in stark contrast to the vast majority of hot DA white dwarfs that exhibit light and heavy metals and to the stratified models that predict significant metal abundances in the atmosphere. For GD246 we find that neither stratified nor homogeneous models can fit the Chandra spectrum. The Chandra spectrum of PG1520+525 constrains the effective temperature to T(sub eff) = 150 000 +/- 10 000 K. Therefore, this nonpulsating star together with the pulsating prototype of the GWVir class (PG1159-035) defines the location of the blue edge of the GWVir instability region

  17. Chandra Reviews Black Hole Musical: Epic But Off-Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    A gigantic sonic boom generated by a supermassive black hole has been found with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, along with evidence for a cacophony of deep sound. This discovery was made by using data from the longest X-ray observation ever of M87, a nearby giant elliptical galaxy. M87 is centrally located in the Virgo cluster of galaxies and is known to harbor one of the Universe's most massive black holes. Scientists detected loops and rings in the hot, X-ray emitting gas that permeates the cluster and surrounds the galaxy. These loops provide evidence for periodic eruptions that occurred near the supermassive black hole, and that generate changes in pressure, or pressure waves, in the cluster gas that manifested themselves as sound. Chandra Low Energy X-ray Images of M87 Chandra Low Energy X-ray Images of M87 "We can tell that many deep and different sounds have been rumbling through this cluster for most of the lifetime of the Universe," said William Forman of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). The outbursts in M87, which happen every few million years, prevent the huge reservoir of gas in the cluster from cooling and forming many new stars. Without these outbursts and resultant heating, M87 would not be the elliptical galaxy it is today. "If this black hole wasn't making all of this noise, M87 could have been a completely different type of galaxy," said team member Paul Nulsen, also of the CfA, "possibly a huge spiral galaxy about 30 times brighter than the Milky Way." Chandra High Energy X-ray Image of M87 Chandra High Energy X-ray Image of M87 The outbursts result when material falls toward the black hole. While most of the matter is swallowed, some of it was violently ejected in jets. These jets are launched from regions close to the black hole (neither light nor sound can escape from the black hole itself) and push into the cluster's gas, generating cavities and sound which then propagate outwards. Chandra's M87 observations also

  18. W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics Lecture: The making of GLAST: Being creative with experimental particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, William

    2012-03-01

    The extension of astrophysical observations to gamma-ray energies requires the utilization of detectors invented and developed for the pursuit of High Energy Particle Physics. GLAST is the result of a close collaboration between the astrophysics and the HEP communities. The exceedingly small signal-to-noise (cosmic rays) ratio coupled with the need for the best angular resolution possible presented a host of problems. How these were successfully met and the resulting instrument and its science are reviewed.

  19. The Chandra X-ray Observatory is prepped for solar panel deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the Vertical Processing Facility, a TRW technician checks the attachment of the solar panel array (out of sight to the right) to the Chandra X-ray Observatory, at left. Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93.

  20. Dark Energy, Black Holes and Exploding Stars: NASA's Chandra Observatory Marks Five Years of Scientific Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    On Aug. 12, 1999, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory opened its sunshade doors for the first time, allowing celestial X-ray light to reach the observatory's mirrors. This one small step for the observatory proved to be a giant leap for science as Chandra began its mission to shed new light on a violent, mysterious universe invisible to the human eye. The Marshall Center manages the Chandra program. On August 12, 1999, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory opened its sunshade doors for the first time, allowing celestial X-ray light to reach the observatory's mirrors. This one small step for the observatory proved to be a giant leap for science as Chandra began its mission to shed new light on a violent, mysterious universe invisible to the human eye. "Humans cannot see X-rays, but Chandra can," said Chandra project scientist Dr. Martin C. Weisskopf of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. "And what the observatory has revealed in five short years has been nothing short of amazing. Thanks to Chandra, we've gleaned new information on dark energy, black holes, exploding stars and all other categories of astronomical objects." "Chandra's resolving power is equivalent to the ability to read a newspaper headline a half-mile away," said Chandra Program Manager Keith Hefner of the Marshall Center. "It's an engineering marvel that has performed nearly flawlessly and provided major science discoveries over the past five years." A Chandra timeline reveals some of its most noteworthy discoveries: * Chandra finds a ring around the Crab Nebula. After only two months in space, the observatory reveals a brilliant ring around the heart of the Crab Pulsar in the Crab Nebula - the remains of a stellar explosion - providing clues about how the nebula is energized by a pulsing neutron, or collapsed, star. (Sept. 28, 1999) * Chandra reveals a possible black hole in the Milky Way. Culminating 25 years of searching by astronomers, researchers say that a faint X-ray source, newly

  1. A Chandra Observation of the Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy IRAS 19254-7245 (The Superantennae): X-Ray Emission from the Compton-Thick Active Galactic Nucleus and the Diffuse Starburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jianjun; Ptak, Andrew; Heckman, Timothy M.; Braito, Valentina; Reeves, James

    2012-01-01

    We present a Chandra observation of IRAS 19254-7245, a nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy also known as the Superantennae. The high spatial resolution of Chandra allows us to disentangle for the first time the diffuse starburst (SB) emission from the embedded Compton-thick active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the southern nucleus. No AGN activity is detected in the northern nucleus. The 2-10 keV spectrum of the AGN emission is fitted by a flat power law (TAU = 1.3) and an He-like Fe Kalpha line with equivalent width 1.5 keV, consistent with previous observations. The Fe K line profile could be resolved as a blend of a neutral 6.4 keV line and an ionized 6.7 keV (He-like) or 6.9 keV (H-like) line. Variability of the neutral line is detected compared with the previous XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations, demonstrating the compact size of the iron line emission. The spectrum of the galaxy-scale extended emission excluding the AGN and other bright point sources is fitted with a thermal component with a best-fit kT of approximately 0.8 keV. The 2-10 keV luminosity of the extended emission is about one order of magnitude lower than that of the AGN. The basic physical and structural properties of the extended emission are fully consistent with a galactic wind being driven by the SB. A candidate ultraluminous X-ray source is detected 8 south of the southern nucleus. The 0.3 - 10 keV luminosity of this off-nuclear point source is approximately 6 x 10(exp 40) erg per second if the emission is isotropic and the source is associated with the Superantennae.

  2. Testing the E(sub peak)-E(sub iso) Relation for GRBs Detected by Swift and Suzaku-WAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimm, H. A.; Yamaoka, K.; Sugita, S.; Ohno, M.; Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Hara, R.; Onda, K.; Sato, G.; Tanaka, H.; Tashiro, M.; Yamauchi, M.; Norris, J. P.; Ohmori, N.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most prominent, yet controversial associations derived from the ensemble of prompt-phase observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the apparent correlation in the source frame between the peak energy (E(sub peak)) of the nuF(nu) spectrum and the isotropic radiated energy, E(sub iso). Since most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have E(sub peak) above the energy range (15-150 keV) of the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift, determining accurate E(sub peak) values for large numbers of Swift bursts has been difficult. However, by combining data from Swift/BAT and the Suzaku Wide-band All-Sky Monitor (WAM), which covers the energy range from 50-5000 keV, for bursts which are simultaneously detected ; one can accurately fit E(sub peak) and E(sub iso) and test the relationship between them for the Swift sample. Between the launch of Suzaku in July 2005 and the end of March 2009, there were 45 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which triggered both Swift/BAT and WAM and an additional 47 bursts which triggered Swift and were detected by WAM, but did not trigger. A BAT-WAM team has cross-calibrated the two instruments using GRBs, and we are now able to perform joint fits on these bursts to determine spectral parameters. For those bursts with spectroscopic redshifts.. we can also calculate the isotropic energy. Here we present the results of joint Swift/BAT-Suzaku/WAM spectral fits for 86 of the bursts detected by the two instruments. We show that the distribution of spectral fit parameters is consistent with distributions from earlier missions and confirm that Swift, bursts are consistent with earlier reported relationships between Epeak and isotropic energy. We show through time-resolved spectroscopy that individual burst pulses are also consistent with this relationship.

  3. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF γ-RAY BRIGHT RADIO GALAXIES: ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY EMISSION AND BROADBAND MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukazawa, Yasushi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Tokuda, Shin' ya [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Finke, Justin [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7653, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Stawarz, Łukasz [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Tanaka, Yasuyuki, E-mail: fukazawa@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2015-01-10

    We performed a systematic X-ray study of eight nearby γ-ray bright radio galaxies with Suzaku in order to understand the origins of their X-ray emissions. The Suzaku spectra for five of those have been presented previously, while the remaining three (M87, PKS 0625–354, and 3C 78) are presented here for the first time. Based on the Fe-K line strength, X-ray variability, and X-ray power-law photon indices, and using additional information on the [O III] line emission, we argue for a jet origin of the observed X-ray emission in these three sources. We also analyzed five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) GeV gamma-ray data on PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 to understand these sources within the blazar paradigm. We found significant γ-ray variability in the former object. Overall, we note that the Suzaku spectra for both PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are rather soft, while the LAT spectra are unusually hard when compared with other γ-ray detected low-power (FR I) radio galaxies. We demonstrate that the constructed broadband spectral energy distributions of PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are well described by a one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model. The results of the modeling indicate lower bulk Lorentz factors compared to those typically found in other BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects, but consistent with the values inferred from modeling other LAT-detected FR I radio galaxies. Interestingly, the modeling also implies very high peak (∼10{sup 16} Hz) synchrotron frequencies in the two analyzed sources, contrary to previously suggested scenarios for Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I/BL Lac unification. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the FR I/BL Lac unification schemes.

  4. Probing the Accretion Disk and Central Engine Structure of the NGC 4258 with Suzaku and XMM-Newton Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Markoff, Sera; Tueller, Jack; Wilms, Joern; Young, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    We present an X-ray study of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in NGC 4258 using data from Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope survey. We find that signatures of X-ray reprocessing by cold gas are very weak in the spectrum of this Seyfert-2 galaxy; a weak, narrow fluorescent K(alpha) emission line of cod iron is robustly detected in both the Suzaku and XMM-Newton spectra but at a level much below that of most other Seyfert-2 galaxies. We conclude that the circumnuclear environment of this AGN is very "clean" and lacks the Compton-thick obscuring torus of unified Seyfert schemes. From the narrowness of the iron line, together with evidence of line flux variability between the Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations, we constrain the line emitting region to be between 3 x 10(exp 3)r(sub g) and 4 x 10(exp 4)r(sub g), from the black hole. We show that the observed properties of the iron line can be explained if the line originates from the surface layers of a warped accretion disk. In particular, we present explicit calculations of the expected iron line from a disk warped by Lens-Thirring precession from a misaligned central black hole. Finally, the Suzaku data reveal clear evidence of large amplitude 2-10 keV variability on timescales of 50 ksec and smaller amplitude flares on timescales as short as 5-10 ksec. If associated with accretion disk processes, such rapid variability requires an origin in the innermost regions of the disk (r approx. equals 10(r(sub g) or less). Analysis of the difference spectrum between a high- and low-flux states suggests that the variable component of the X-ray emission is steeper and more absorbed than the average AGN emission, suggesting that the primary X-ray source and absorbing screen have a spatial structure on comparable scales. We note the remarkable similarity between the circumnuclear environment of NGC 4258 and another well studied low-luminosity AGN, M81*.

  5. The Reflection Component from Cygnus X-1 in the Soft State Measured by NuSTAR and Suzaku

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomsick, John A.; Nowak, Michael A.; Parker, Michael

    2014-01-01

    with absorption from highly ionized material in the system. The high throughput of NuSTAR allows for a very high quality measurement of the complex iron line region as well as the rest of the reflection component. The iron line is clearly broadened and is well-described by a relativistic blurring model, providing......The black hole binary Cygnus X-1 was observed in late-2012 with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Suzaku, providing spectral coverage over the ~1-300 keV range. The source was in the soft state with a multi-temperature blackbody, power-law, and reflection components along...

  6. Yes, High School Students Can Analyze Chandra Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, J. W.; Clearfield, C. R.; Olbert, C. M.

    2002-12-01

    For the past two years, high school students at the North Carolina School of Science and Math (NCSSM) have worked with new and archival Chandra data, and have produced interesting scientific results. These results have included one refereed paper in the Ap.J., and about a dozen presentations at scientific meetings (including three at this meeting). The students were selected, based on interest, from the junior class at NCSSM, to stay on campus and work intensively for 2 to 4 weeks over the summer. Each team of students selected an object with public Chandra ACIS data, and were taught how to produce data products such as images and spectra, as well as conduct a literature search. In most cases, a paper had already been published using those data, and the students were usually able to reproduce the results. As the students waded through the literature, they would search for a theory to test or an interesting new phenomenon. Often the students would request an image in another wavelength to compare in detail to the Chandra data. After the summer, many students continued to work throughout the following fall semester, producing a paper for submission to the Siemens Westinghouse Science and Technology Competition by the beginning of October. In the process of conducting research, the students learn to apply many physics concepts, and learn valuable scientific research and writing skills. Those students that choose to continue with astrophysics can often dive directly into a high-level research project immediately when they arrive at college. These programs have been funded by NASA, through E/PO grants attached to parent research grants.

  7. Chandra X-Ray Sources in the LALA Cetus Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. X.; Zheng, Z. Y.; Malhotra, S.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Rhoads, J. E.; Norman, C. A.; Heckman, T. M.

    2007-11-01

    The 174 ks Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer exposure of the Large Area Lyman Alpha Survey (LALA) Cetus field is the second of the two deep Chandra images on LALA fields. In this paper we present the Chandra X-ray sources detected in the Cetus field, along with an analysis of X-ray source counts, stacked X-ray spectrum, and optical identifications. A total of 188 X-ray sources were detected: 174 in the 0.5-7.0 keV band, 154 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band, and 113 in the 2.0-7.0 keV band. The X-ray source counts were derived and compared with LALA field (172 ks exposure). Interestingly, we find consistent hard-band X-ray source density, but (36+/-12)% higher soft-band X-ray source density in Cetus field. The weighted stacked spectrum of the detected X-ray sources can be fitted by a power law with photon index Γ=1.55. Based on the weighted stacked spectrum, we find that the resolved fraction of the X-ray background drops from (72+/-1)% at 0.5-1.0 keV to (63+/-4)% at 6.0-8.0 keV. The unresolved spectrum can be fitted by a power law over the range 0.5-7 keV, with a photon index Γ=1.22. We also present optical counterparts for 154 of the X-ray sources, down to a limiting magnitude of r'=25.9 (Vega), using a deep r'-band image obtained with the MMT. Optical Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution.

  8. Assessing black hole spin in deep Suzaku observations of Seyfert 1 AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, A. R.; Reeves, J. N.; Lobban, A. P.; Porquet, D.; Markowitz, A. G.

    2011-10-01

    We present a broad-band analysis of deep Suzaku observations of nearby Seyfert 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN): Fairall 9, MCG-6-30-15, NGC 3516, 3783 and 4051. The use of deep observations (exposures >200 ks) with high signal-to-noise ratio allows the complex spectra of these objects to be examined in full, taking into account features such as the soft excess, reflection continuum and complex absorption components. After a self-consistent modelling of the broad-band data (0.6-100.0 keV, also making use of Burst Alert Telescope data from Swift), the subtle curvature which may be introduced as a consequence of warm absorbers has a measured affect upon the spectrum at energies >3 keV and the Fe K region. Forming a model (including absorption) of these AGN allows the true extent to which broadened disc line emission is present to be examined and as a result the measurement of accretion disc and black hole parameters which are consistent over the full 0.6-100.0 keV energy range. Fitting relativistic line emission models appears to rule out the presence of maximally spinning black holes in all objects at the 90 per cent confidence level, in particular MCG-6-30-15 at >99.5 per cent confidence. Relativistic Fe K line emission is only marginally required in NGC 3516 and not required in NGC 4051, over the full energy bandpass. None the less, statistically significant broadened 6.4 keV Fe Kα emission is detected in Fairall 9, MCG-6-30-15 and NGC 3783 yielding black hole spin estimates of a= 0.67+0.10- 0.11, a= 0.49+0.20- 0.12 and a < -0.04, respectively, when fitted with disc emission models.

  9. Suzaku Discovery of Ultra-fast Outflows in Radio-loud AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Tombesi, F.; Reeves, J.; Braito, V.; Gofford, J.; Cappi, M.

    2010-03-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the 3.5--10.5 keV spectra of five bright Broad-Line Radio Galaxies (BLRGs) using proprietary and archival Suzaku observations. In three sources -- 3C 111, 3C 120, and 3C 390.3 -- we find evidence, for the first time in a radio-loud AGN, for absorption features at observed energies 7 keV and 8--9 keV, with high significance according to both the F-test and extensive Monte Carlo simulations (99% or larger). In the remaining two BLRGs, 3C 382 and 3C 445, there is no evidence for such absorption features in the XIS spectra. If interpreted as due to Fe XXV and/or Fe XXVI K-shell resonance lines, the absorption features in 3C 111, 3C 120, and 3C 390.3 imply an origin from an ionized gas outflowing with velocities in the range v 0.04-0.15c, reminiscent of Ultra-Fast Outflows (UFOs) previously observed in radio-quiet Seyfert galaxies. A fit with specific photoionization models gives ionization parameters log ξ 4--5.6 erg s-1 cm and column densities of NH 1022-23 cm-2, similar to the values observed in Seyferts. Based on light travel time arguments, we estimate that the UFOs in the three BLRGs are located within 20--500 gravitational radii from the central black hole, and thus most likely are connected to disk winds/outflows. Our estimates show that the UFOs mass outflow rate is comparable to the accretion rate and their kinetic energy a significant fraction of the AGN bolometric luminosity, making these outflows significant for the global energetic of these systems, in particular for mechanisms of jet formation.

  10. The Suzaku View of Highly Ionized Outflows in AGN. 1; Statistical Detection and Global Absorber Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofford, Jason; Reeves, James N.; Tombesi, Francesco; Braito, Valentina; Turner, T. Jane; Miller, Lance; Cappi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a new spectroscopic study of Fe K-band absorption in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Using data obtained from the Suzaku public archive we have performed a statistically driven blind search for Fe XXV Healpha and/or Fe XXVI Lyalpha absorption lines in a large sample of 51 Type 1.0-1.9 AGN. Through extensive Monte Carlo simulations we find that statistically significant absorption is detected at E greater than or approximately equal to 6.7 keV in 20/51 sources at the P(sub MC) greater than or equal tov 95 per cent level, which corresponds to approximately 40 per cent of the total sample. In all cases, individual absorption lines are detected independently and simultaneously amongst the two (or three) available X-ray imaging spectrometer detectors, which confirms the robustness of the line detections. The most frequently observed outflow phenomenology consists of two discrete absorption troughs corresponding to Fe XXV Healpha and Fe XXVI Lyalpha at a common velocity shift. From xstar fitting the mean column density and ionization parameter for the Fe K absorption components are log (N(sub H) per square centimeter)) is approximately equal to 23 and log (Xi/erg centimeter per second) is approximately equal to 4.5, respectively. Measured outflow velocities span a continuous range from less than1500 kilometers per second up to approximately100 000 kilometers per second, with mean and median values of approximately 0.1 c and approximately 0.056 c, respectively. The results of this work are consistent with those recently obtained using XMM-Newton and independently provides strong evidence for the existence of very highly ionized circumnuclear material in a significant fraction of both radio-quiet and radio-loud AGN in the local universe.

  11. Search for the warm-hot intergalactic medium around A 2744 using Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Shiho; Ota, Naomi; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Finoguenov, Alexis

    2017-06-01

    We present the results from Suzaku satellite observations of the surrounding region of a galaxy cluster, A 2744, at z = 0.3. To search for oxygen emission lines from the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM), we analyzed X-ray spectra from two northeastern regions 2.2-3.3 and 3.3-4.4 Mpc from the center of the cluster, which offers the first test on the presence of a WHIM near the typical accretion shock radius (∼2 r200) predicted by hydrodynamical simulations. For the 2.2-3.3 Mpc region, the spectral fit significantly (99.2% significance) improved when we included O vii and O viii lines in the spectral model. A comparable WHIM surface brightness was obtained in the 3.3-4.4 Mpc region and the redshift of the O viii line is consistent with z = 0.3 within errors. The present results support that the observed soft X-ray emission originated from the WHIM. However, considering both statistical and systematic uncertainties, O viii detection in the northeast regions was marginal. The surface brightnesses of the O viii line in 10-7 photons cm-2 s-1 arcmin-2 for the 2.2-3.3 and 3.3-4.4 Mpc regions were measured to be 2.7 ± 1.0 and 2.1 ± 1.2, giving upper limits on the baryon overdensity of δ = 319(distribution of A 2744 to detect a clear discontinuity at the location of the radio relic. This suggests that the cluster has undergone strong shock heating by mass accretion along the filament.

  12. A Million-Second Chandra View of Cassiopeia A

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, U; Badenes, C; Berends, F A; Blondin, J M; Cioffi, D; Delaney, T A; Dewey, D; Fesen, R A; Flanagan, K A; Fryer, C L; Ghavamian, P; Hughes, J P; Morse, J A; Plucinsky, P P; Petre, R; Pohl, M; Rudnick, L; Sankrit, R; Slane, P O; Smith, R K; Vink, J; Warren, J S; Hwang, Una; Badenes, Carles; Berendse, Fred; Blondin, John; Cioffi, Denis; Laney, Tracey De; Dewey, Daniel; Fesen, Robert; Flanagan, Kathryn A.; Fryer, Christopher L.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Hughes, John P.; Morse, Jon A.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Petre, Robert; Pohl, Martin; Rudnick, Lawrence; Sankrit, Ravi; Slane, Patrick O.; Smith, Randall K.; Vink, Jacco; Warren, Jessica S.

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a million-second observation of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The bipolar structure of the Si-rich ejecta (NE jet and SW counterpart) is clearly evident in the new images, and their chemical similarity is confirmed by their spectra. These are most likely due to jets of ejecta as opposed to cavities in the circumstellar medium, since we can reject simple models for the latter. The properties of these jets and the Fe-rich ejecta will provide clues to the explosion of Cas A.

  13. Chandra Observations of Tycho’s Supernova Remnant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U. Hwang; R. Petre; A. E. Szymkowiak; S. S. Holt

    2002-03-01

    We present a new Chandra observation of Tycho’s supernova remnant with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. Multicolor X-ray imaging reveals new details of the outer shock and ejecta. At energies between 4 and 6 keV, the outline of the outer shock is clearly revealed in X-rays for the first time. The distribution of the emission from lines of Si and Fe are confirmed to have a different morphology from each other, and the Si ejecta are shown to extend to the blast shock at several locations. Characteristic spectra of the outer shock and ejecta are also presented.

  14. Chandra ACIS Observations of the Nearby Spiral Galaxy NGC 300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobar, Dale; Turner, Kevin; Schlegel, Eric M.

    2017-01-01

    The ACIS detector (Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer) onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory has imaged the nearby spiral NGC 300 over three epochs for a total exposure of 1.885x102 ksec. We describe each observation as well as the merged data set. Each exposure contains 132 individual sources. We focus on the time variability and luminosity distributions of the sources. Initial results show no diffuse emissions in the galaxy. Finally, we compare the merged data set and the detected sources with other wavebands.

  15. Lessons Learned Designing and Building the Chandra Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenberg, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    This poster offers some of the major lessons learned by key members of the Chandra Telescope team. These lessons are gleaned from our experiences developing, designing, building and testing the telescope and its subsystems, with 15 years of hindsight. Among the topics to be discussed are the early developmental tests, known as VETA-I and VETA-II, requirements derivation, the impact of late requirements and reflection on the conservatism in the design process. This poster offers some opinions on how these lessons can affect future missions.

  16. Chandra Discovers Eruption and Pulsation in Nova Outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered a giant outburst of X-rays and unusual cyclical pulsing from a white dwarf star that is closely orbiting another star -- the first time either of these phenomena has been seen in X-rays. The observations are helping scientists better understand the thermonuclear explosions that occur in certain binary star systems. The observations of Nova Aquilae were reported today at the "Two Years of Science with Chandra" symposium by an international team led by Sumner Starrfield of Arizona State University. "We found two important results in our Chandra observations. The first was an underlying pulsation every 40 minutes in the X-ray brightness, which we believe comes from the cyclical expansion and contraction of the outer layers of the white dwarf," said Starrfield. "The other result was an enormous flare of X-rays that lasted for 15 minutes. Nothing like this has been seen before from a nova, and we don't know how to explain it." Novas occur on a white dwarf (a star which used up all its nuclear fuel and shrank to roughly the size of the Earth) that is orbiting a normal size star. Strong gravity tides drag hydrogen gas off the normal star and onto the white dwarf, where it can take more than 100,000 years for enough hydrogen to accumulate to ignite nuclear fusion reactions. Gradually, these reactions intensify until a cosmic-sized hydrogen bomb blast results. The outer layers of the white dwarf are then blown away, producing a nova outburst that can be observed for a period of months to years as the material expands into space. "Chandra has allowed us to see deep into the gases ejected by this giant explosion and extract unparalleled information on the evolution of the white dwarf whose surface is exploding," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The brightening of Nova Aquilae was first detected by optical astronomers in December 1999. "Although this star is at a distance of more than 6

  17. Historical Remembrances of the Chandra X-ray Observatory: How Partnerships Created Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Robert

    2009-09-01

    As the astronomy community plans for new ventures in space, we're forced to find creative solutions to operate within the ever increasing fiscal constraints of the current economic environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory program offers an example of how missions can be successfully developed within manageable budget constraints. The ten year anniversary offers us the chance to look back at the Chandra team's special partnership between scientists, managers, and industry that led to our success.Chandra experienced many of the challenges common to major observatories: state-of-the-art technical requirements, budget-induced slips, and restructurings. Yet the Chandra team achieved excellent performance for dramatically lower cost. In fact, Chandra completed its prime mission for billions of dollars less than originally planned. In 1992, NASA MSFC and Northrop Grumman (then TRW) together led a major restructure that saved approximately 3.4B in program cost, while we improved the imaging capability and observing efficiency of Chandra. This was accomplished by a combination of team-work, systems engineering, advanced technology insertion, and effective approaches for program implementation, combined with a high performance culture that aligned goals and focused on mission success. Northrop Grumman is proud of our role in supporting the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and our academic partners in advancing the frontiers of x-ray astronomy and scientific discovery with Chandra. As Chandra continues its extended mission, the observatory continues to provide superb scientific performance.

  18. Chandra and XMM–Newton Observations of H2O Maser Galaxy Mrk 348

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Wang; J. S. Zhang; Q. Guo

    2014-09-01

    For H2O megamaser galaxy Mrk 348, Chandra and XMM–Newton data are analysed. The nuclear fitting results of XMM–Newton data suggest the possible existence of a heavily obscured AGN. But the nuclear spectrum extracted from Chandra cannot be well-fitted by the best fitting model for XMM–Newton. Further optimal fitting and discussions are needed.

  19. Effects of rhEPO on Expressions of GLT-1 and GLAST in Rat Astrocyte of Cultured by Oxygen-glucose Deprivation%rhEPO 对缺糖缺氧大鼠星形胶质细胞GLT-1和 GLAST 表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞一强; 杨静; 吴刚; 汪静; 姜树原

    2016-01-01

    为了研究重组人促红细胞生成素(rhEPO)对缺糖缺氧(OGD)培养大鼠星形胶质细胞 GLT-1和 GLAST 表达的影响,将缺糖缺氧培养星形胶质细胞分成不同浓度 rhEPO 处理组:0、20、100 U/mL,不同浓度 rhEPO 与星形胶质细胞在缺氧缺糖条件下培养6 h,用 RT-PCR 测定 GLT-1和 GLAST 的 mRNA 表达变化,免疫印迹技术测定 GLT-1和 GLAST 蛋白的表达变化。20、100 U/mL rhEPO 星形胶质细胞 GLT-1的 mRNA 和蛋白质水平较 OGD 对照组明显升高(P <0.05),GLAST 的 mRNA 和蛋白质水平变化不明显(P >0.05)。GLT-1水平可能与 rhEPO 对缺糖缺氧培养大鼠星形胶质细胞的保护作用有关。%In order to study effects of rhEPO on the expressions of GLT-1 and GLAST in rat astrocytes cul-tured by oxygen-glucose deprivation,the astrocytes of rats cultured by oxygen-glucose deprivation were di-vided into three groups with different concentrations of rhEPO 0,20,100 U/mL and cultured for 6 hours by hypoxia-glucose deprivation.The real-time PCR and Western blot were used to detect the changes of mRNA and protein expressions of GLT-1 and GLAST,respectively.In comparison with OGD control,mR-NA and protein levels of GLT-1 were found to be increased in the groups of 20 and 100 U/mL rhEPO (P 0.05).The changes of GLT-1 may be related to protective effects of rhEPO on astrocytes of rats cultured by oxygen-glucose deprivation.

  20. A Deep Chandra ACIS Survey of M51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Kilgard, Roy E.

    2016-08-01

    We have obtained a deep X-ray image of the nearby galaxy M51 using Chandra. Here we present the catalog of X-ray sources detected in these observations and provide an overview of the properties of the point-source population. We find 298 sources within the D 25 radii of NGC 5194/5, of which 20% are variable, a dozen are classical transients, and another half dozen are transient-like sources. The typical number of active ultraluminous X-ray sources in any given observation is ˜5, and only two of those sources persist in an ultraluminous state over the 12 yr of observations. Given reasonable assumptions about the supernova remnant population, the luminosity function is well described by a power law with an index between 1.55 and 1.7, only slightly shallower than that found for populations dominated by high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which suggests that the binary population in NGC 5194 is also dominated by HMXBs. The luminosity function of NGC 5195 is more consistent with a low-mass X-ray binary dominated population. Based on observations made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under contract #NAS83060, and the data were obtained through program GO1-12115.

  1. The Chandra Deep Field South the 1 Million Second

    CERN Document Server

    Rosati, P; Giacconi, R; Gilli, R; Hasinger, G; Kewley, L J; Mainieri, V; Nonino, M; Norman, C; Szokoly, G; Wang, J X; Zirm, A W; Bergeron, J; Borgani, S; Gilmozzi, R; Grogin, N A; Koekemoer, A M; Schreier, E J; Zheng, W

    2002-01-01

    We present the main results from our 940 ksec observation of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS), using the source catalog described in an accompanying paper (Giacconi et al. 2001). We extend the measurement of source number counts to 5.5e-17 erg/cm^2/s in the soft 0.5-2 keV band and 4.5e-16 erg/cm^2/s in the hard 2-10 keV band. The hard band LogN-LogS shows a significant flattening (slope~=0.6) below ~1e-14 erg/cm^2/s, leaving at most 10-15% of the X-ray background (XRB) to be resolved, the main uncertainty lying in the measurement of the total flux of the XRB. On the other hand, the analysis in the very hard 5-10 keV band reveals a relatively steep LogN-LogS (slope ~=1.3) down to 1e-15 erg/cm^2/s. Together with the evidence of a progressive flattening of the average X-ray spectrum near the flux limit, this indicates that there is still a non negligible population of faint hard sources to be discovered at energies not well probed by Chandra, which possibly contribute to the 30 keV bump in the spectrum of the...

  2. A Chandra Study of the Galactic Globular Cluster Omega Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Haggard, Daryl; Davies, Melvyn B

    2009-01-01

    We analyze a ~70 ksec Chandra ACIS-I exposure of the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139). The ~17 amin x 17 amin field of view fully encompasses three core radii and almost twice the half-mass radius. We detect 180 sources to a limiting flux of ~4.3x10^-16 erg/cm^2/s (Lx = 1.2x10^30 erg/s at 4.9 kpc). After accounting for the number of active galactic nuclei and possible foreground stars, we estimate that 45-70 of the sources are cluster members. Four of the X-ray sources have previously been identified as compact accreting binaries in the cluster--three cataclysmic variables (CVs) and one quiescent neutron star. Correlating the Chandra positions with known variable stars yields eight matches, of which five are probable cluster members that are likely to be binary stars with active coronae. Extrapolating these optical identifications to the remaining unidentified X-ray source population, we estimate that 20-35 of the sources are CVs and a similar number are active binaries. This likely represents most ...

  3. Chandra Multiwavelength Project X-ray Point Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, M; Wilkes, B J; Green, P J; Kim, E; Anderson, C S; Barkhouse, W A; Evans, N R; Ivezic, Z; Karovska, M; Kashyap, V L; Lee, M G; Maksym, P; Mossman, A E; Silverman, J D; Tananbaum, H D; Kim, Minsun; Kim, Dong-Woo; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Green, Paul J.; Kim, Eunhyeuk; Anderson, Craig S.; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Evans, Nancy R.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Maksym, Peter; Mossman, Amy E.; Silverman, John D.; Tananbaum, Harvey D.

    2006-01-01

    We present the Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP) X-ray point source catalog with ~6,800 X-ray sources detected in 149 Chandra observations covering \\~10 deg^2. The full ChaMP catalog sample is seven times larger than the initial published ChaMP catalog. The exposure time of the fields in our sample ranges from 0.9 to 124 ksec, corresponding to a deepest X-ray flux limit of f_{0.5-8.0} = 9 x 10^{-16} erg/cm2/sec. The ChaMP X-ray data have been uniformly reduced and analyzed with ChaMP-specific pipelines, and then carefully validated by visual inspection. The ChaMP catalog includes X-ray photometric data in 8 different energy bands as well as X-ray spectral hardness ratios and colors. To best utilize the ChaMP catalog, we also present the source reliability, detection probability and positional uncertainty. To quantitatively assess those parameters, we performed extensive simulations. In particular, we present a set of empirical equations: the flux limit as a function of effective exposure time, and the p...

  4. Chandra Observation of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 2146

    CERN Document Server

    Inui, T; Tsuru, T G; Koyama, K; Matsushita, S; Peck, A B; Tarchi, A; Inui, Tatsuya; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Koyama, Katsuji; Matsushita, Satoki; Peck, Alison B.; Tarchi, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    We present six monitoring observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 2146 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have detected 67 point sources in the 8'.7 x 8'.7 field of view of the ACIS-S detector. Six of these sources were Ultra-Luminous X-ray Sources, the brightest of which has a luminosity of 5 x 10^{39} ergs s^{-1}. One of the source, with a luminosity of ~1 x 10^{39} ergs s^{-1}, is coincident with the dynamical center location, as derived from the ^{12}CO rotation curve. We suggest that this source may be a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus. We have produced a table where the positions and main characteristics of the Chandra-detected sources are reported. The comparison between the positions of the X-ray sources and those of compact sources detected in NIR or radio does not indicate any definite counterpart. Taking profit of the relatively large number of sources detected, we have derived a logN-logS relation and a luminosity function. The former shows a break at \\~10^{-15} ergs cm^{-2} s^{-1}, t...

  5. Chandra Observes the End of an Era SN 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Kari A; Park, Sangwook; McCray, Richard; Dwek, Eli; Burrows, David N

    2016-01-01

    Updated imaging and photometric results from Chandra observations of SN 1987A, covering the last 16 years, are presented. We find that the 0.5-2 keV light curve has remained constant at ~8x10^-12 erg s^-1 cm^-2 since 9500 days, with the 3-8 keV light curve continuing to increase until at least 10000 days. The expansion rate of the ring is found to be energy dependent, such that after day 6000 the ring expands faster in the 2-10 keV band than it does at energies <2 keV. Images show a reversal of the east-west asymmetry between 7000 and 8000 days after the explosion. The latest images suggest the southeastern side of the equatorial ring is beginning to fade. Consistent with the latest optical and infrared results, our Chandra analysis indicates the blast wave is now leaving the dense equatorial ring, which marks the beginning of a major change in the evolutionary phase of the supernova remnant 1987A.

  6. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project III: Cosmological Parameter Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Vikhlinin, A; Burenin, R A; Ebeling, H; Forman, W R; Hornstrup, A; Jones, C; Murray, S S; Nagai, D; Quintana, H; Voevodkin, A

    2008-01-01

    Chandra observations of large samples of galaxy clusters detected in X-rays by ROSAT provide a new, robust determination of the cluster mass functions at low and high redshifts. Statistical and systematic errors are now sufficiently small, and the redshift leverage sufficiently large for the mass function evolution to be used as a useful growth of structure based dark energy probe. In this paper, we present cosmological parameter constraints obtained from Chandra observations of 36 clusters with =0.55 derived from 400deg^2 ROSAT serendipitous survey and 49 brightest z=~0.05 clusters detected in the All-Sky Survey. Evolution of the mass function between these redshifts requires Omega_Lambda>0 with a ~5sigma significance, and constrains the dark energy equation of state parameter to w0=-1.14+-0.21, assuming constant w and flat universe. Cluster information also significantly improves constraints when combined with other methods. Fitting our cluster data jointly with the latest supernovae, WMAP, and baryonic aco...

  7. The Chandra COSMOS Legacy survey: optical/IR identifications

    CERN Document Server

    Marchesi, S; Elvis, M; Salvato, M; Brusa, M; Comastri, A; Gilli, R; Hasinger, G; Lanzuisi, G; Miyaji, T; Treister, E; Urry, C M; Vignali, C; Zamorani, G; Allevato, V; Cappelluti, N; Cardamone, C; Finoguenov, A; Griffiths, R E; Karim, A; Laigle, C; LaMassa, S M; Jahnke, K; Ranalli, P; Schawinski, K; Schinnerer, E; Silverman, J D; Smolcic, V; Suh, H; Trakhtenbrot, B

    2015-01-01

    We present the catalog of optical and infrared counterparts of the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy Survey, a 4.6 Ms Chandra program on the 2.2 square degrees of the COSMOS field, combination of 56 new overlapping observations obtained in Cycle 14 with the previous C-COSMOS survey. In this Paper we report the i, K, and 3.6 micron identifications of the 2273 X-ray point sources detected in the new Cycle 14 observations. We use the likelihood ratio technique to derive the association of optical/infrared (IR) counterparts for 97% of the X-ray sources. We also update the information for the 1743 sources detected in C-COSMOS, using new K and 3.6 micron information not available when the C-COSMOS analysis was performed. The final catalog contains 4016 X-ray sources, 97% of which have an optical/IR counterpart and a photometric redshift, while 54% of the sources have a spectroscopic redshift. The full catalog, including spectroscopic and photometric redshifts and optical and X-ray properties described here in detail, is availa...

  8. The BMW-Chandra survey. Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, P; Campana, S; Moretti, A; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G; Mottini, M

    2009-01-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalogue derived from Chandra ACIS-I observations (exposure time >10ks) public as of March 2003 by using a wavelet detection algorithm (Lazzati et al. 1999; Campana et al. 1999). The catalogue contains a total of 21325 sources, 16758 of which are serendipitous. Our sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2 keV, S/N =3) is ~8 deg^2 for F_X > 10^-13 erg cm^-2 s-1, and ~2 deg^2 for F_X >10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1. The catalogue contains information on positions, count rates (and errors) in three energy bands. (total, 0.5-7 keV; soft, 0.5-2 keV; and hard, 2-7keV), and in four additional energy bands, SB1 (0.5-1keV), SB2 (1-2 keV), HB1 (2-4 keV), and HB2 (4-7keV), as well as information on the source extension, and cross-matches with the FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS, and GSC-2 catalogues.

  9. The BMW-Chandra survey. Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Mignani, R. P.; Campana, S.; Moretti, A.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Mottini, M.

    2009-07-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalogue derived from Chandra ACIS-I observations (exposure time > 10ks) public as of March 2003 by using a wavelet detection algorithm (Lazzati et al. 1999; Campana et al. 1999). The catalogue contains a total of 21325 sources, 16758 of which are serendipitous. Our sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2keV, S/N=3) is ~ 8 deg2 for FX ≥ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1, and ~ 2 deg2 for FX ≥ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalogue contains information on positions, count rates (and errors) in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7keV; soft, 0.5-2keV; and hard, 2-7keV), and in four additional energy bands, SB1 (0.5-1keV), SB2 (1-2keV), HB1 (2-4keV), and HB2 (4-7keV), as well as information on the source extension, and cross-matches with the FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS, and GSC-2 catalogues.

  10. VARIABILITY OF OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS IN THE CHANDRA GALACTIC BULGE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, C. T.; Hynes, R. I.; Johnson, C. B.; Baldwin, A.; Collazzi, A.; Gossen, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Jonker, P. G.; Torres, M. A. P. [SRON, Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Nelemans, G. [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Maccarone, T. [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Box 41051, Science Building, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Steeghs, D.; Greiss, S. [Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Heinke, C. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-183, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Bassa, C. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Villar, A. [Department of Physics, Massachussettes Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Gabb, M. [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We present optical light curves of variable stars consistent with the positions of X-ray sources identified with the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS). Using data from the Mosaic-II instrument on the Blanco 4 m Telescope at CTIO, we gathered time-resolved photometric data on timescales from ∼2 hr to 8 days over the 3/4 of the X-ray survey containing sources from the initial GBS catalog. Among the light curve morphologies we identify are flickering in interacting binaries, eclipsing sources, dwarf nova outbursts, ellipsoidal variations, long period variables, spotted stars, and flare stars. Eighty-seven percent of X-ray sources have at least one potential optical counterpart. Twenty-seven percent of these candidate counterparts are detectably variable; a much greater fraction than expected for randomly selected field stars, which suggests that most of these variables are real counterparts. We discuss individual sources of interest, provide variability information on candidate counterparts, and discuss the characteristics of the variable population.

  11. Suzaku Observations of the Dwarf Nova V893 Scorpii: the Discovery of a Partial X-ray Eclipse

    CERN Document Server

    Mukai, K; Still, M

    2009-01-01

    V893 Sco is an eclipsing dwarf nova that had attracted little attention from X-ray astronomers until it was proposed as the identification of an RXTE all-sky slew survey (XSS) source. Here we report on the pointed X-ray observations of this object using Suzaku. V893 Sco was in quiescence at the time, as indicated by the coordinated optical photometry we obtained at the South African Astronomical Observatory. Our Suzaku data show V893 Sco to be X-ray bright, with a highly absorbed spectrum. Most importantly, we have discovered a partial X-ray eclipse in V893 Sco. This is the first time that a partial eclipse is seen in X-ray light curves of a dwarf nova. Our preliminary simulations demonstrate that the partial X-ray eclipse can be in principle reproduced if the white dwarf in V893 Sco is partially eclipsed. Higher quality observations of this object have the potential to place significant constraints on the latitudinal extent of the X-ray emission region and thereby discriminating between an equatorial boundar...

  12. Discovery of the Red-Skewed K-alpha Iron Line in Cyg X-2 with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaposhnikov, Nikolai; Titarchuk, Lev; Laurent, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    We report on the Suzaku observation of neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-2 which reveals strong iron K-alpha emission line. The line profile shows a prominent red wing extending down to 4 keV. This discovery increases the number of neutron star sources where red-skewed iron lines were observed and strongly suggests that this phenomenon is common not only in black holes but also in other types of compact objects. We examine the line profile by fitting it with the model which attributes its production to the relativistic effects due to disk reflection of X-ray radiation. We also apply an alternative model where the red wing is a result of down-scattering effect of the first order with respect to electron velocity in the wind outflow. Both models describe adequately the observed line profile. However, the X-ray variability in a state similar to that in the Suzaku observation which we establish by analysing RXTE observation favors the wind origin of the line formation.

  13. Search for Diffuse X-rays from the Bow Shock Region of Runaway Star BD+43$^\\circ$3654 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Terada, Yukikatsu; Bamba, Aya; Yamazaki, Ryo; Kouzu, Tomomi; Koyama, Shu; Seta, Hiromi

    2012-01-01

    The bow shocks of runaway stars with strong stellar winds of over 2000 km s$^{-1}$ can serve as particle acceleration sites. The conversion from stellar wind luminosity into particle acceleration power has an efficiency of the same order of magnitude as those in supernova remnants, based on the radio emission from the bow shock region of runaway star BD+43$^\\circ$3654 \\citep{Benaglia10}.If this object exhibits typical characteristics, then runaway star systems can contribute a non-negligible fraction of Galactic cosmic-ray electrons. To constrain the maximum energy of accelerated particles from measurements of possible non-thermal emissions in the X-ray band, Suzaku observed BD+43$^\\circ$3654 in April 2011 with an exposure of 99 ks. Because the onboard instruments have a stable and low background level, Suzaku detected a possible enhancement over the background of $7.6\\pm 3.4$ cnt arcmin$^{-2}$ at the bow shock region, where the error represents the 3 sigma statistics only. However, the excess is not signific...

  14. Searching for the 3.5 keV Line in the Stacked Suzaku Observations of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bulbul, Esra; Foster, Adam; Miller, Eric; Bautz, Mark; Loewenstein, Mike; Randall, Scott W; Smith, Randall K

    2016-01-01

    We perform a detailed study of the stacked Suzaku observations of 47 galaxy clusters, spanning a redshift range of 0.01-0.45, to search for the unidentified 3.5 keV line. This sample provides an independent test for the previously detected line. We detect only a 2sigma-significant spectral feature at 3.5 keV in the spectrum of the full sample. When the sample is divided into two subsamples (cool-core and non-cool core clusters), cool-core subsample shows no statistically significant positive residuals at the line energy. A very weak (2sigma-confidence) spectral feature at 3.5 keV is permitted by the data from the non-cool core clusters sample. The upper limit on a neutrino decay mixing angle from the full Suzaku sample is consistent with the previous detections in the stacked XMM-Newton sample of galaxy clusters (which had a higher statistical sensitivity to faint lines), M31, and Galactic Center at a 90% confidence level. However, the constraint from the present sample, which does not include the Perseus clu...

  15. Suzaku Observations of Luminous Quasars: Revealing the Nature of High-Energy Blazar Emission in Quiescent States

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Sikora, M; Schady, P; Roming, P; Chester, M M; Maraschi, L

    2010-01-01

    We present the results from the Suzaku X-ray observations of five flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), namely PKS0208-512, Q0827+243, PKS1127-145, PKS1510-089 and 3C 454.3. All these sources were additionally monitored simultaneously or quasi-simultaneously by the Fermi satellite in gamma-rays and the Swift UVOT in the UV and optical bands, respectively. We constructed their broad-band spectra covering the frequency range from 10^14 Hz up to 10^25 Hz, and those reveal the nature of high-energy emission of luminous blazars in their low-activity states. The analyzed X-ray spectra are well fitted by a power-law model with photoelectric absorption. In the case of PKS0208-512, PKS1127-145, and 3C 454.3, the X-ray continuum showed indication of hard-ening at low-energies. Moreover, when compared with the previous X-ray observations, we see a significantly increasing contribution of low-energy photons to the total X-ray fluxes when the sources are getting fainter. The same behavior can be noted in the Suzaku data al...

  16. The Suzaku X-ray spectrum of NGC 3147. Further insights on the best "true" Seyfert 2 galaxy candidate

    CERN Document Server

    Matt, G; Guainazzi, M; Barcons, X; Panessa, F

    2012-01-01

    NGC 3147 is so far the most convincing case of a "true" Seyfert 2 galaxy, i.e. a source genuinely lacking the Broad Line Regions. We obtained a Suzaku observation with the double aim to study in more detail the iron line complex, and to check the Compton-thick hypothesis for the lack of observed optical broad lines. The Suzaku XIS and HXD/PIN spectra of the source were analysed in detail. The line complex is composed of at least two unresolved lines, one at about 6.45 keV and the other one at about 7 keV, most likely identified with Fe XVII/XIX, the former, and Fe XXVI, the latter. The high-ionization line can originate either in a photoionized matter or in an optically thin thermal plasma. In the latter case, an unusually high temperature is implied. In the photoionized model case, the large equivalent width can be explained either by an extreme iron overabundance or by assuming that the source is Compton-thick. In the Compton-thick hypothesis, however, the emission above 2 keV is mostly due to a highly ioni...

  17. Broadband X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous x-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 observed with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Grefenstette, B. W.;

    2014-01-01

    We present results from the coordinated broadband X-ray observations of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 performed by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku in late 2012. These observations provide the first high-quality spectra of Holmberg IX X-1 above 10 keV to date, extending the X...

  18. Chandra's Find of Lonely Halo Raises Questions About Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Dark matter continues to confound astronomers, as NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory demonstrated with the detection of an extensive envelope of dark matter around an isolated elliptical galaxy. This discovery conflicts with optical data that suggest a dearth of dark matter around similar galaxies, and raises questions about how galaxies acquire and keep such dark matter halos. The observed galaxy, known as NGC 4555, is unusual in that it is a fairly large, elliptical galaxy that is not part of a group or cluster of galaxies. In a paper to be published in the November 1, 2004 issue of the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Ewan O'Sullivan of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA and Trevor Ponman of the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom, use the Chandra data to show that the galaxy is embedded in a cloud of 10-million-degree-Celsius gas. X-ray/Optical Composite of NGC 4555 X-ray/Optical Composite of NGC 4555 This hot gas cloud has a diameter of about 400,000 light years, about twice that of the visible galaxy. An enormous envelope, or halo, of dark matter is needed to confine the hot cloud to the galaxy. The total mass of the dark matter halo is about ten times the combined mass of the stars in the galaxy, and 300 times the mass of the hot gas cloud. A growing body of evidence indicates that dark matter - which interacts with itself and "normal" matter only through gravity - is the dominant form of matter in the universe. According to the popular "cold dark matter" theory, dark matter consists of mysterious particles left over from the dense early universe that were moving slowly when galaxies and galaxy clusters began to form. "The observed properties of NGC 4555 confirm that elliptical galaxies can posses dark matter halos of their own, regardless of their environment," said O'Sullivan. "This raises an important question: what determines whether elliptical galaxies have dark matter halos?" DSS Optical Image of NGC

  19. Chandra Locates Mother Lode of Planetary Ore in Colliding Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered rich deposits of neon, magnesium, and silicon in a pair of colliding galaxies known as The Antennae. When the clouds in which these elements are present cool, an exceptionally high number of stars with planets should form. These results may foreshadow the fate of the Milky Way and its future collision with the Andromeda Galaxy. "The amount of enrichment of elements in The Antennae is phenomenal," said Giuseppina Fabbiano of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in Cambridge, Mass. at a press conference at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta, Ga. "This must be due to a very high rate of supernova explosions in these colliding galaxies." Fabbiano is lead author of a paper on this discovery by a team of U.S. and U.K. scientists that will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. When galaxies collide, direct hits between stars are extremely rare, but collisions between huge gas clouds in the galaxies can trigger a stellar baby boom. The most massive of these stars race through their evolution in a few million years and explode as supernovas. Heavy elements manufactured inside these stars are blown away by the explosions and enrich the surrounding gas for thousands of light years. "The amount of heavy elements supports earlier studies that indicate there was a very high rate of relatively recent supernovas, 30 times that of the Milky Way," according to collaborator Andreas Zezas of the CfA. Animation of Colliding Galaxies Animation of Colliding Galaxies The supernova violence also heats the gas to millions of degrees Celsius. This makes much of the matter in the clouds invisible to optical telescopes, but it can be observed by an X-ray telescope. Chandra data revealed for the first time regions of varying enrichment in the galaxies – in one cloud magnesium and silicon are 16 and 24 times as abundant as in the Sun. "These are the kinds of elements that

  20. Chandra Finds Surprising Black Hole Activity In Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Scientists at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, California, have uncovered six times the expected number of active, supermassive black holes in a single viewing of a cluster of galaxies, a finding that has profound implications for theories as to how old galaxies fuel the growth of their central black holes. The finding suggests that voracious, central black holes might be as common in old, red galaxies as they are in younger, blue galaxies, a surprise to many astronomers. The team made this discovery with NASA'S Chandra X-ray Observatory. They also used Carnegie's 6.5-meter Walter Baade Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile for follow-up optical observations. "This changes our view of galaxy clusters as the retirement homes for old and quiet black holes," said Dr. Paul Martini, lead author on a paper describing the results that appears in the September 10 issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "The question now is, how do these black holes produce bright X-ray sources, similar to what we see from much younger galaxies?" Typical of the black hole phenomenon, the cores of these active galaxies are luminous in X-ray radiation. Yet, they are obscured, and thus essentially undetectable in the radio, infrared and optical wavebands. "X rays can penetrate obscuring gas and dust as easily as they penetrate the soft tissue of the human body to look for broken bones," said co-author Dr. Dan Kelson. "So, with Chandra, we can peer through the dust and we have found that even ancient galaxies with 10-billion-year-old stars can have central black holes still actively pulling in copious amounts of interstellar gas. This activity has simply been hidden from us all this time. This means these galaxies aren't over the hill after all and our theories need to be revised." Scientists say that supermassive black holes -- having the mass of millions to billions of suns squeezed into a region about the size of our Solar System -- are the engines in the cores of

  1. Chandra Looks Over a Cosmic Four-Leaf Clover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    A careful analysis of observations by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory of a rare quadruple quasar has uncovered evidence that possibly a single star in a foreground galaxy magnified X-rays coming from the quasar. This discovery gives astronomers a new and extremely precise probe of the gas flow around the supermassive black hole that powers the quasar. "If our interpretation is correct, then we are seeing details around this black hole that are 50,000 times smaller than either the Hubble Space Telescope or Chandra could see under ordinary circumstances," said George Chartas of Penn State University in University Park, and lead author of a recent article on the Cloverleaf quasar in The Astrophysical Journal. The Cloverleaf quasar is a single object about 11 billion light years from Earth that appears as four images produced by a process known as gravitational lensing. If one or more galaxies lie along the line of sight to a more distant quasar, the gravitational field of the intervening galaxies can bend and magnify the light from the quasar and produce multiple images of it. The four images of the Cloverleaf quasar have been produced by one or more intervening galaxies. Cloverleaf Quasar Chandra X-ray Image of the Cloverleaf quasar One of the images (A), in the Cloverleaf is brighter than the others in both optical and X-ray light. Chartas and his colleagues found the relative brightness of this image was greater in X-ray than in optical light. The X-rays from iron atoms were also enhanced relative to X-rays at lower energies. Since the amount of brightening due to gravitational lensing does not vary with the wavelength, this means that an additional object has magnified the X-rays. The increased magnification of the X-ray light can be explained by gravitational microlensing, an effect which has been used to search for compact stars and planets in our galaxy. Microlensing occurs when a star or a multiple star system passes in front of light from a background object

  2. Chandra Observations of Shock Kinematics in Supernova Remnant 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Zhekov, S A; Borkowski, K J; Burrows, D N; Park, S

    2005-01-01

    We report the first results from deep X-ray observations of the SNR 1987A with the Chandra LETG. Temperatures inferred from line ratios range from 0.1 - 2 keV and increase with ionization potential. Expansion velocities inferred from X-ray line profiles range from 300 - 1700 km/s, much less than the velocities inferred from the radial expansion of the radio and X-ray images. We can account for these observations with a scenario in which the X-rays are emitted by shocks produced where the supernova blast wave strikes dense protrusions of the inner circumstellar ring, which are also responsible for the optical hot spots.

  3. Chandra LETG Observations of Supernova Remnant 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Zhekov, S A; Burrows, D N; McCray, R; Park, S; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Burrows, David N.; Cray, Richard Mc; Park, Sangwook; Zhekov, Svetozar A.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the results from deep Chandra LETG observations of the supernova remnant 1987A (SNR 1987A). We find that a distribution of shocks, spanning the same range of velocities (from 300 to 1700 km/s) as deduced in the first part of our analysis (Zhekov et al. 2005, ApJL, 628, L127), can account for the entire X-ray spectrum of this object. The post-shock temperature distribution is bimodal, peaking at kT 0.5 and 3 keV. Abundances inferred from the X-ray spectrum have values similar to those for the inner circumstellar ring, except that the abundances of nitrogen and oxygen are approximately a factor of two lower than those inferred from the optical/UV spectrum. The velocity of the X-ray emitting plasma has decreased since 1999, apparently because the blast wave has entered the main body of the inner circumstellar ring.

  4. Chandra LETGS and XMM-Newton observations of NGC 4593

    CERN Document Server

    Steenbrugge, K C; Blustin, A J; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Sako, M; Behar, E; Kahn, S M; Paerels, F B S; Walter, R

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4593 obtained with the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS), the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) and the European Photon Imaging Camera's (EPIC) onboard of XMM-Newton. The two observations were separated by ~7 months. In the LETGS spectrum we detect a highly ionized warm absorber corresponding to an ionization state of 400x10^{-9} W m, visible as a depression at 10-18 AA. This depression is formed by multiple weak Fe and Ne lines. A much smaller column density was found for the lowly ionized warm absorber, corresponding to xi = 3x10^{-9} W m. However, an intermediate ionization warm absorber is not detected. For the RGS data the ionization state is hard to constrain. The EPIC results show a narrow Fe Kalpha line.

  5. THE CHANDRA COSMOS LEGACY SURVEY: OPTICAL/IR IDENTIFICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, S.; Civano, F.; Urry, C. M. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Elvis, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Salvato, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Brusa, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Vignali, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Zamorani, G.; Cappelluti, N. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Hasinger, G. [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Miyaji, T. [Instituto de Astronomía sede Ensenada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Km. 103, Carret. Tijunana-Ensenada, Ensenada, BC (Mexico); Treister, E. [Universidad de Concepción, Departamento de Astronomía, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Allevato, V.; Finoguenov, A. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2a, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Cardamone, C. [Department of Science, Wheelock College, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Griffiths, R. E. [Physics and Astronomy Dept., Natural Sciences Division, University of Hawaii at Hilo, 200 W. Kawili Street, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Karim, A. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); and others

    2016-01-20

    We present the catalog of optical and infrared counterparts of the Chandra  COSMOS-Legacy  Survey, a 4.6 Ms Chandra  program on the 2.2 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field, combination of 56 new overlapping observations obtained in Cycle 14 with the previous C-COSMOS survey. In this Paper we report the i, K, and 3.6 μm identifications of the 2273 X-ray point sources detected in the new Cycle 14 observations. We use the likelihood ratio technique to derive the association of optical/infrared (IR) counterparts for 97% of the X-ray sources. We also update the information for the 1743 sources detected in C-COSMOS, using new K and 3.6 μm information not available when the C-COSMOS analysis was performed. The final catalog contains 4016 X-ray sources, 97% of which have an optical/IR counterpart and a photometric redshift, while ≃54% of the sources have a spectroscopic redshift. The full catalog, including spectroscopic and photometric redshifts and optical and X-ray properties described here in detail, is available online. We study several X-ray to optical (X/O) properties: with our large statistics we put better constraints on the X/O flux ratio locus, finding a shift toward faint optical magnitudes in both soft and hard X-ray band. We confirm the existence of a correlation between X/O and the the 2–10 keV luminosity for Type 2 sources. We extend to low luminosities the analysis of the correlation between the fraction of obscured AGNs and the hard band luminosity, finding a different behavior between the optically and X-ray classified obscured fraction.

  6. X-ray Mass Profiles from Chandra Galaxy Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paggi, Alessandro; Kim, Dong-Woo; Anderson, Craig; Burke, Douglas J.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Fruscione, Antonella; Lauer, Jennifer L.; McCollough, Michael L.; Morgan, Douglas; Mossman, Amy; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Trinchieri, Ginevra

    2016-04-01

    We present preliminary results of a Chandra/XMM-Newton joint analysis on a sample of three Early Type Galaxies (ETGs, namely NGC4649, NGC4636 and NGC5846). X-ray observations of the hot ISM is used to measure the total enclosed mass assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, and compasion with mass distributions obtained through optical kinematics data of globular clusters and planetary nebulae yields informations about disturbances in the ISM distribution due to nuclear activity, merging history, etc. Our analysis makes use of the Chandra Galaxy Atlas (CGA) data products - exploiting the unmatched spatial resolution of the ACIS detectors to reveal fine ISM features and disturbances in the inner galactic regions - and XMM-Newton data - relying on the large field of view of EPIC detector to extend the mass profiles to larger radii. We then measured the mass profiles in various pie sectors to separate different gas features (e.g., discontinuity and extended tail) and compared them with GCs/PNe based mass profiles. The X-ray mass profiles of NGC4649 show a generally relaxed morphology and, in agreement with previous analysis, the comparison with the optical mass profiles shows a significant deviations on parsec scale likely due to non-thermal pressure linked to nuclear activity. In significantly disturbed cases (NGC4648 and NGC5846) where we found discontinuities and extended tails, we found that the mass profiles are over-estimated toward the compressed discontinuity and under-estimated toward the extended tails, similar to inflow and outflow cases. These preliminary results are promising toward an extended analysis of the whole CGA sample in order to study the distribution of gas temperature and metal abundances in the ISM, and to investigate scaling relations between ETG global quantities like ISM temperature, luminosity and total mass.

  7. Automated classification of Chandra X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Derek; Kargaltsev, O.; Rangelov, B.; Volkov, I.; Pavlov, G. G.

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of the latest generation X-ray telescopes there has been a major influx of data associated with the detection of hundreds of thousands X-ray sources. As one can rarely tell a source type from its X-ray properties alone, the full potential of the X-ray catalogs can only be unlocked by correlating multiwavelength (MW) properties via cross-identification with other surveys. However, one would spend an enormous amount of time classifying these objects by their physical nature if the classification was to be done on a source-by-source basis by humans. Therefore, we are using a supervised learning algorithm to classify sources detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The classifications are based on a training dataset which currently includes about 7,000 X-ray sources of known nature (main sequence stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, young stars, active galactic nuclei, low mass X-ray binaries, high mass x-ray binaries, and neutron stars). For each source, the training dataset includes up to 24 multiwavelength properties. The efficiency and accuracy of the classification is verified by dividing the training dataset in two and performing cross-validation. The results are also inspected by plotting source properties in 2D slices of the parameter space. As an application of our automated procedure we classified unidentified sources in the supernova remnant (SNR) G352.7-0.1, in the field of HESS J1809-193, and in part of the Chandra Source Catalog 1.0. We present the results of the verification tests and the classification results. This research was partially supported by NASA/SAO grant AR3-14017X.

  8. An investigation into a half page from Newton's Principia in the wake of Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Snow, W M

    2002-01-01

    There is a section in Chandrashekar's ''Newton's Principia for the Common Reader '', (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1995) in which he claims to find a small error in the Principia. . However we believe that there is a mistake of interpretation underlying Chandra's claim and that the Principia is correct as it stands. This short paper describes Chandra's misinterpretation of a geometric construction of Newton and gives an outline of Newton's demonstration by following the standard English version of the Principia line by line and converting it into modern mathematical notation in the spirit of Chandra's book.

  9. Searching for bulk motions in the ICM of massive, merging clusters with Chandra CCD data

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ang; Tozzi, Paolo; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We search for bulk motions in the Intra Cluster Medium (ICM) of massive clusters showing evidence of an ongoing or a recent major merger, with spatially resolved spectroscopy in {\\sl Chandra} CCD data. We identify a sample of 6 merging clusters with >150 ks {\\sl Chandra} exposure in the redshift range 0.1 1000$ km/s in the ICM of massive merging clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.3. Despite the CCD spectral resolution is not sufficient for a detailed analysis of the ICM dynamics, {\\sl Chandra} CCD data constitute a key diagnostic tool complementary to X-ray bolometers onboard future X-ray missions.

  10. NASA'S Chandra Finds New Evidence on Origin of Supernovas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    CAMBRIDGE, Ma. -- Astronomers may now know the cause of an historic supernova explosion that is an important type of object for investigating dark energy in the universe. The discovery, made using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, also provides strong evidence that a star can survive the explosive impact generated when a companion star goes supernova. The new study examined the remnant of a supernova observed by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe in 1572. The object, dubbed Tycho for short, was formed by a Type Ia supernova, a category of stellar explosion useful in measuring astronomical distances because of their reliable brightness. Type Ia supernovas have been used to determine that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate, an effect attributed to the prevalence of an invisible, repulsive force throughout space called dark energy. A team of researchers analyzed a deep Chandra observation of Tycho and found an arc of X-ray emission in the supernova remnant. Evidence supports the conclusion that a shock wave created the arc when a white dwarf exploded and blew material off the surface of a nearby companion star. "There has been a long-standing question about what causes Type Ia supernovas," said Fangjun Lu of the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. "Because they are used as steady beacons of light across vast distances, it is critical to understand what triggers them." One popular scenario for Type Ia supernovas involves the merger of two white dwarfs. In this case, no companion star or evidence for material blasted off a companion should exist. In the other main competing theory, a white dwarf pulls material from a "normal," or sun-like, companion star until a thermonuclear explosion occurs. Both scenarios may actually occur under different conditions, but the latest Chandra result from Tycho supports the latter one. n addition, the Tycho study seems to show the remarkable resiliency of stars, as the supernova

  11. Chandra Finds Well-Established Black Holes In Distant Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Pushing further back toward the first generation of objects to form in the universe, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has observed the three most distant known quasars and found them to be prodigious producers of X-rays. This indicates that the supermassive black holes powering them were already in place when the Universe was only about one billion years old. "Chandra's superb sensitivity has allowed the detection of X-rays from the dawn of the modern universe, when the first massive black holes and galaxies were forming," said Niel Brandt of Penn State University, leader of one the teams involved. "These results indicate that future X-ray surveys should be able to detect the first black holes to form in the Universe." The three quasars were recently discovered at optical wavelengths by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and are 13 billion light years from Earth, making them the most distant known quasars. The X-rays Chandra detected were emitted when the universe was only a billion years old, about 7 percent of the present age of the Universe. Since X-rays reveal conditions in the immediate vicinity of supermassive black holes, Brandt proposed that Chandra look at these objects in three snapshots of about two hours each to see if they were different from their older counterparts. The observations on January 29, 2002 were made public immediately and the four different teams quickly went to work on them. Brandt's team concluded that the quasars looked similar to ones that were at least twice as old, so the conditions around the central black hole had not changed much in that time, contrary to some theoretical expectations. A team led by Smita Mathur of Ohio State University reached a similar conclusion. "These young quasars do not appear to be any different from their older cousins, based upon our current understanding and assumptions," said Mathur. "Perhaps the most remarkable thing about them may be that they are so absolutely unremarkable." Jill Bechtold of the

  12. Suzaku Discovery of Fe K-Shell Line from the O-Rich SNR G292.0+1.8

    CERN Document Server

    Kamitsukasa, Fumiyoshi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Ueda, Shutaro; Mori, Koji; Katsuda, Satoru; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    We report the Suzaku/XIS results of the Galactic oxygen-rich supernova remnant (SNR), G292.0+1.8, a remnant of a core-collapse supernova. The X-ray spectrum of G292.0+1.8 consists of two type plasmas, one is in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) and the other is in non-equilibrium ionization (NEI). The CIE plasma has nearly solar abundances, and hence would be originated from the circumstellar and interstellar mediums. The NEI plasma has super-solar abundances, and the abundance pattern indicates that the plasma originates from the supernova ejecta with a main sequence of 30-35 Msolar. Iron K-shell line at energy of 6.6 keV is detected for the first time in the NEI plasma.

  13. Type Ia and II supernovae contributions to the metal enrichment in intra-cluster medium observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Kosuke; Matsushita, Kyoko; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y; Ishida, Manabu; Ohashi, Takaya

    2007-01-01

    We studied the properties of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in two clusters of galaxies (AWM 7 and Abell 1060) and two groups (HCG 62 and NGC 507) with the X-ray Observatory Suzaku. Based on spatially resolved energy spectra, we measured for the first time precise cumulative ICM metal masses within 0.1 and ~0.3 r_{180}. Comparing our results with supernova nucleosynthesis models, the number ratio of type II (SNe II) to type Ia (SNe Ia) is estimated to be ~3.5, assuming the metal mass in the ICM is represented by the sum of products synthesized in SNe Ia and SNe II. Normalized by the K-band luminosities of present galaxies, and including the metals in stars, the integrated number of past SNe II explosions is estimated to be close to or somewhat higher than the star formation rate determined from Hubble Deep Field observations.

  14. Monte-Carlo Simulator and Ancillary Response Generator of Suzaku XRT/XIS System for Spatially Extended Source Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ishisaki, Y; Fujimoto, R; Ozaki, M; Ebisawa, K; Takahashi, T; Ueda, Y; Ogasaka, Y; Ptak, A; Mukai, K; Hamaguchi, K; Hirayama, M; Kotani, T; Kubo, H; Shibata, R; Ebara, M; Furuzawa, A; Iizuka, R; Inoue, H; Mori, H; Okada, S; Yokoyama, Y; Matsumoto, H; Nakajima, H; Yamaguchi, H; Anabuki, N; Tawa, N; Nagai, M; Katsuda, S; Hayashida, K; Bamba, A; Miller, E D; Sato, K; Yamasaki, N Y

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a framework for the Monte-Carlo simulation of the X-Ray Telescopes (XRT) and the X-ray Imaging Spectrometers (XIS) onboard Suzaku, mainly for the scientific analysis of spatially and spectroscopically complex celestial sources. A photon-by-photon instrumental simulator is built on the ANL platform, which has been successfully used in ASCA data analysis. The simulator has a modular structure, in which the XRT simulation is based on a ray-tracing library, while the XIS simulation utilizes a spectral "Redistribution Matrix File" (RMF), generated separately by other tools. Instrumental characteristics and calibration results, e.g., XRT geometry, reflectivity, mutual alignments, thermal shield transmission, build-up of the contamination on the XIS optical blocking filters (OBF), are incorporated as completely as possible. Most of this information is available in the form of the FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) files in the standard calibration database (CALDB). This simulator can also be ut...

  15. A Suzaku, NuSTAR, and XMM-Newton view on variable absorption and relativistic reflection in NGC 4151

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchert, T.; Markowitz, A. G.; Dauser, T.; García, J. A.; Keck, M. L.; Wilms, J.; Kadler, M.; Brenneman, L. W.; Zdziarski, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    We disentangle X-ray disk reflection from complex line-of-sight absorption in the nearby Seyfert NGC 4151, using a suite of Suzaku, NuSTAR, and XMM-Newton observations. Extending upon earlier published work, we pursue a physically motivated model using the latest angle-resolved version of the lamp-post geometry reflection model relxillCp_lp together with a Comptonization continuum. We use the long-look simultaneous Suzaku/NuSTAR observation to develop a baseline model wherein we model reflected emission as a combination of lamp-post components at the heights of 1.2 and 15.0 gravitational radii. We argue for a vertically extended corona as opposed to two compact and distinct primary sources. We find two neutral absorbers (one full-covering and one partial-covering), an ionized absorber (log ξ = 2.8), and a highly-ionized ultra-fast outflow, which have all been reported previously. All analyzed spectra are well described by this baseline model. The bulk of the spectral variability between 1 keV and 6 keV can be accounted for by changes in the column density of both neutral absorbers, which appear to be degenerate and inversely correlated with the variable hard continuum component flux. We track variability in absorption on both short (2 d) and long ( 1 yr) timescales; the observed evolution is either consistent with changes in the absorber structure (clumpy absorber at distances ranging from the broad line region to the inner torus or a dusty radiatively driven wind) or a geometrically stable neutral absorber that becomes increasingly ionized at a rising flux level. The soft X-rays below 1 keV are dominated by photoionized emission from extended gas that may act as a warm mirror for the nuclear radiation.

  16. The Making of the Chandra X-ray Observatory: the Project Scientist's Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Martin C

    2010-01-01

    We review the history of the development of the Chandra X-ray Observatory from our personal perspective. This review is necessarily biased and limited by space since it attempts to cover a time span approaching 5 decades.

  17. Chandra position of IGR J17454-2919 and discovery of a possible NIR counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paizis, A.; Nowak, M.; Chati, S.;

    2015-01-01

    On 2014 November 3, we observed the recently discovered INTEGRAL source IGR J17454-2919 (ATels #6530, #6574 and #6602) with Chandra HETGS for 20ks. The J2000.0 Chandra position we obtain is RA: 17 45 27.689 DEC: -29 19 53.83 (90% uncertainty of 0.6") This position (2.4" away from the Swift positi...

  18. Resolving galaxy cluster gas properties at z~1 with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Bartalucci, I; Pratt, G W; Démoclès, J; van der Burg, R F J; Mazzotta, P

    2016-01-01

    We present a pilot X-ray study of the five most massive ($M_{500}>5 \\times 10^{14} M_{\\odot}$), distant (z~1), galaxy clusters detected via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. We optimally combine XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations by leveraging the throughput of XMM to obtain spatially-resolved spectroscopy, and the spatial resolution of Chandra to probe the bright inner parts and to detect embedded point sources. Capitalising on the excellent agreement in flux-related measurements, we present a new method to derive the density profiles, constrained in the centre by Chandra and in the outskirts by XMM. We show that the Chandra-XMM combination is fundamental for morphological analysis at these redshifts, the Chandra resolution being required to remove point source contamination, and the XMM sensitivity allowing higher significance detection of faint substructures. The sample is dominated by dynamically disturbed objects. We use the combined Chandra-XMM density profiles and spatially-resolved temperature prof...

  19. Spatial Correlation Function of the Chandra Selected Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    2006-01-01

    We present the spatial correlation function analysis of non-stellar X-ray point sources in the Chandra Large Area Synoptic X-ray Survey of Lockman Hole Northwest (CLASXS). Our 9 ACIS-I fields cover a contiguous solid angle of 0.4 deg(exp 2) and reach a depth of 3 x 10(exp -15) erg/square cm/s in the 2-8 keV band. We supplement our analysis with data from the Chandra Deep Field North (CDFN). The addition of this field allows better probe of the correlation function at small scales. A total of 233 and 252 sources with spectroscopic information are used in the study of the CLASXS and CDFN fields respectively. We calculate both redshift-space and projected correlation functions in co-moving coordinates, averaged over the redshift range of 0.1 tau(sub 0 = 8.1(sup +1.2 sub -2.2) Mpc, and gamma = 2.1 +/- 0.5 for the CLASXS field, and tau(sub 0) = 5.8(sup +.1.0 sub -1.5) Mpc, gamma = 1.38(sup +0.12 sub -0.14 for the CDFN field. By comparing the real- and redshift-space correlation functions in the combined CLASXS and CDFN samples, we are able to estimate the redshift distortion parameter Beta = 0.4 +/- 0.2 at an effective redshift z = 0.94. We compare the correlation functions for hard and soft spectra sources in the CLASXS field and find no significant difference between the two groups. We have also found that the correlation between X-ray luminosity and clustering amplitude is weak, which, however, is fully consistent with the expectation using the simplest relations between X-ray luminosity, black hole mass, and dark halo mass. We study the evolution of the AGN clustering by dividing the samples into 4 redshift bins over 0.1 Mpcestimate the evolution of the bias, and find that the bias increases rapidly with redshift (b(z = 0.45) = 0.95 +/- 0.15 and b(z = 2.07) = 3.03 +/- 0.83): The typical mass of the dark matter halo derived from the bias estimates show little change with redshift. The average halo mass is found to be log (M(sub halo)/M(sun))approximates 12.1. Subject

  20. Chandra's Darkest Bright Star: not so Dark after All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2008-11-01

    The Chandra High Resolution camera (HRC) has obtained numerous short exposures of the ultraviolet (UV)-bright star Vega (α Lyrae; HD 172167: A0 V), to calibrate the response of the detector to out-of-band (non-X-ray) radiation. A new analysis uncovered a stronger "blue leak" in the imaging section (HRC-I) than reported in an earlier study of Vega based on a subset of the pointings. The higher count rate—a factor of nearly 2 above prelaunch estimates—raised the possibility that genuine coronal X-rays might lurk among the out-of-band events. Exploiting the broader point-spread function of the UV leak compared with soft X-rays identified an excess of counts centered on the target, technically at 3σ significance. A number of uncertainties, however, prevent a clear declaration of a Vegan corona. A more secure result would be within reach of a deep uninterrupted HRC-I pointing.

  1. The Chandra COSMOS Legacy survey: overview and point source catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Civano, F; Comastri, A; Urry, M C; Elvis, M; Cappelluti, N; Puccetti, S; Brusa, M; Zamorani, G; Hasinger, G; Aldcroft, T; Alexander, D M; Allevato, V; Brunner, H; Capak, P; Finoguenov, A; Fiore, F; Fruscione, A; Gilli, R; Glotfelty, K; Griffiths, R E; Hao, H; Harrison, F A; Jahnke, K; Kartaltepe, J; Karim, A; LaMassa, S M; Lanzuisi, G; Miyaji, T; Ranalli, P; Salvato, M; Sargent, M; Scoville, N J; Schawinski, K; Schinnerer, E; Silverman, J; Smolcic, V; Stern, D; Toft, S; Trakhenbrot, B; Treister, E; Vignali, C

    2016-01-01

    The COSMOS-Legacy survey is a 4.6 Ms Chandra program that has imaged 2.2 deg$^2$ of the COSMOS field with an effective exposure of $\\simeq$160 ks over the central 1.5 deg$^2$ and of $\\simeq$80 ks in the remaining area. The survey is the combination of 56 new observations, obtained as an X-ray Visionary Project, with the previous C-COSMOS survey. We describe the reduction and analysis of the new observations and the properties of 2273 point sources detected above a spurious probability of 2$\\times 10^{-5}$. We also present the updated properties of the C-COSMOS sources detected in the new data. The whole survey includes 4016 point sources (3814, 2920 and 2440 in the full, soft and hard band). The limiting depths are 2.2 $\\times$ 10$^{-16}$, 1.5 $\\times$ 10$^{-15}$ and 8.9$\\times$ 10$^{-16}$ ${\\rm erg~cm}^{-2}~{\\rm s}^{-1}$ in the 0.5-2, 2-10 and 0.5-10 keV bands, respectively. The observed fraction of obscured AGN with column density $> 10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$ from the hardness ratio (HR) is $\\sim$50$^{+17}_{-16}$%...

  2. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Image of Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    After barely 2 months in space, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) took this sturning image of the Crab Nebula, the spectacular remains of a stellar explosion, revealing something never seen before, a brilliant ring around the nebula's heart. The image shows the central pulsar surrounded by tilted rings of high-energy particles that appear to have been flung outward over a distance of more than a light-year from the pulsar. Perpendicular to the rings, jet-like structures produced by high-energy particles blast away from the pulsar. Hubble Space Telescope images have shown moving knots and wisps around the neutron star, and previous x-ray images have shown the outer parts of the jet and hinted at the ring structure. With CXO's exceptional resolution, the jet can be traced all the way in to the neutron star, and the ring pattern clearly appears. The image was made with CXO's Advanced Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and High Energy Transmission Grating. The Crab Nebula, easily the most intensively studied object beyond our solar system, has been observed using virtually every astronomical instrument that could see that part of the sky

  3. Chandra observation of the supernova remnant N11L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Chen, Yang; Chu, You-Hua; Williams, Rosa M.

    2016-06-01

    We performed a Chandra X-ray study of the supernova remnant (SNR) N11L in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The X-ray emission is predominantly distributed within the main shell and the northern loop-like filaments traced by the optical narrow band images, with an indistinct extension along the north area. The brightest emission comes from a northeast-southwest ridge, and peaks at two patches at center and southwest. Spectral analysis indicates that the blast wave is propagating in a inhomogenous environment, and the X-ray emission overall is dominated by thermal gas whose composition is consistent with the LMC average abundance. The ionization time of the hot plasma implied by the X-ray spectral analysis is consistent with the Sedov age of the SNR derived from the best-fit parameters and the apparent radius of the SNR based on the optical images, however, the consequent explosion energy is no only at least one order of magnitude less than the canonical value of 10^{51} ergs, but also takes a small portion of the thermal energy of the hot gas. That discrepancy supports the blown-out scenario.

  4. Investigating the cores of fossil systems with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Bharadwaj, V; Sanders, J S; Schellenberger, G

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the cores of fossil galaxy groups and clusters (`fossil systems') using archival Chandra data for a sample of 17 fossil systems. We determined the cool-core fraction for fossils via three observable diagnostics, the central cooling time, cuspiness, and concentration parameter. We quantified the dynamical state of the fossils by the X-ray peak/brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and the X-ray peak/emission weighted centre separations. We studied the X-ray emission coincident with the BCG to detect the presence of potential thermal coronae. A deprojection analysis was performed for z < 0.05 fossils to obtain cooling time and entropy profiles, and to resolve subtle temperature structures. We investigated the Lx-T relation for fossils from the 400d catalogue to see if the scaling relation deviates from that of other groups. Most fossils are identified as cool-core objects via at least two cool-core diagnostics. All fossils have their dominant elliptical galaxy within 50 kpc of the X-ray peak, and mo...

  5. LOFAR, VLA, and Chandra observations of the Toothbrush galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    van Weeren, R J; Brüggen, M; Andrade-Santos, F; Ogrean, G A; Williams, W L; Röttgering, H J A; Dawson, W A; Forman, W R; de Gasperin, F; Hardcastle, M J; Jones, C; Miley, G K; Rafferty, D A; Rudnick, L; Sabater, J; Sarazin, C L; Shimwell, T W; Bonafede, A; Best, P N; Bîrzan, L; Cassano, R; Chyży, K T; Croston, J H; Dijkema, T J; Ensslin, T; Ferrari, C; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horellou, C; Jarvis, M J; Kraft, R P; Mevius, M; Intema, H T; Murray, S S; Orrú, E; Pizzo, R; Sridhar, S S; Simionescu, A; Stroe, A; van der Tol, S; White, G J

    2016-01-01

    We present deep LOFAR observations between 120-181 MHz of the "Toothbrush" (RX J0603.3+4214), a cluster that contains one of the brightest radio relic sources known. Our LOFAR observations exploit a new and novel calibration scheme to probe 10 times deeper than any previous study in this relatively unexplored part of the spectrum. The LOFAR observations, when combined with VLA, GMRT, and Chandra X-ray data, provide new information about the nature of cluster merger shocks and their role in re-accelerating relativistic particles. We derive a spectral index of $\\alpha = -0.8 \\pm 0.1$ at the northern edge of the main radio relic, steepening towards the south to $\\alpha \\approx - 2$. The spectral index of the radio halo is remarkably uniform ($\\alpha = -1.16$, with an intrinsic scatter of $\\leq 0.04$). The observed radio relic spectral index gives a Mach number of $\\mathcal{M} = 2.8^{+0.5}_{-0.3}$, assuming diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). However, the gas density jump at the northern edge of the large radio r...

  6. Coronal physics and the chandra emission line project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Brickhouse

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el lanzamiento del observatorio de rayos-X Chandra se ha iniciado la espectroscop a de alta resoluci on en rayos-X de las fuentes c osmicas. Observa- ciones profundas de tres fuentes estelares con emisi on coronal|Capela, Proci on y HR 1099|est an dando no s olo datos de calibraci on invaluables sino tambi en medios de comparaci on para los modelos de emisi on de plasmas. Estos modelos, que han sido cuestionados por los problemas para entender los datos de baja y moderada re- soluci on de ASCA y del EUVE, son necesarios para interpretar los datos de coronas estelares, galaxias y c umulos de galaxias, remanentes de supernova y otras fuentes. El Proyecto de L neas de Emisi on es una colaboraci on para mejorar los modelos y su primera fase es la comparaci on de los modelos con los espectros observados de Capela, Proci on y HR 1099. Las metas de la comparaci on son (1 determinar y veri car la precisi on y fortaleza de los diagn osticos y (2 identi car y priorizar los elementos de la espectroscop a que requieran m as trabajo tanto te orico como de laboratorio. Uno de los puntos cr ticos de esta labor es entender hasta que punto se pueden aplicar las hip otesis simpli cadoras comunmente usadas (equilibrio coro- nal, baja opacidad. Discutimos, en este contexto, los avances m as recientes en el entendimiento de las coronas estelares.

  7. Chandra Multiwavelength Project: Normal Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, D W; Colmenero, E R; Green, P J; Kim, M; Mossman, A; Schlegel, E M; Silverman, J D; Aldcroft, T; Ivezic, Z; Anderson, C; Kashyap, V; Tananbaum, H; Wilkes, B J

    2005-01-01

    (abridged) We have investigated 136 Chandra extragalactic sources without broad optical emission lines, including 93 galaxies with narrow emission lines (NELG) and 43 with only absorption lines (ALG). Based on fx/fo, Lx, X-ray spectral hardness and optical emission line diagnostics, we have conservatively classified 36 normal galaxies (20 spirals and 16 ellipticals) and 71 AGNs. We found no statistically significant evolution in Lx/LB, within the limited z range. We have built log(N)-log(S), after correcting for completeness based on a series of simulations. The best-fit slope is -1.5 for both S and B energy bands, which is considerably steeper than that of the AGN-dominated cosmic background sources, but slightly flatter than the previous estimate, indicating normal galaxies will not exceed the AGN population until fx ~ 2 x 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 (a factor of ~5 lower than the previous estimate). A group of NELGs appear to be heavily obscured in X-rays, i.e., a typical type 2 AGN. After correcting for intrinsic ...

  8. Echoes of multiple outbursts of Sagittarius A* revealed by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Clavel, Maïca; Goldwurm, A; Morris, M R; Ponti, G; Soldi, S; Trap, G

    2013-01-01

    The relatively rapid spatial and temporal variability of the X-ray radiation from some molecular clouds near the Galactic center shows that this emission component is due to the reflection of X-rays generated by a source that was luminous in the past, most likely the central supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*. Studying the evolution of the molecular cloud reflection features is therefore a key element to reconstruct Sgr A*'s past activity. The aim of the present work is to study this emission on small angular scales in order to characterize the source outburst on short time scales. We use Chandra high-resolution data collected from 1999 to 2011 to study the most rapid variations detected so far, those of clouds between 5' and 20' from Sgr A* towards positive longitudes. Our systematic spectral-imaging analysis of the reflection emission, notably of the Fe Kalpha line at 6.4 keV and its associated 4-8 keV continuum, allows us to characterize the variations down to 15" angular scale and 1-year time scale. ...

  9. Chandra Phase-Resolved Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, M C; Paerels, F; Becker, W; Tennant, A F; Swartz, D A; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Dell, Stephen L. O'; Paerels, Frits; Becker, Werner; Tennant, Allyn F.; Swartz, Douglas A.

    2004-01-01

    We present the first phase-resolved study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar that covers all pulse phases. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity, even at pulse minimum. Analysis of the pulse-averaged spectrum measures interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We confirm previous findings that the line-of-sight to the Crab is underabundant in oxygen, although more-so than recently measured. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms, Allen & McCray (2000) we find [O/H] = (3.33 +/-0.25) x 10**-4. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase measures the low-energy X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum -- albeit with large statistical uncertainty -- and we find marginal evidence for variations of the spectral index. The data are also used to set a new (3-sigma) upper lim...

  10. Stellar X-ray sources in the Chandra COSMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Nicholas J; Civano, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the X-ray properties of a sample of solar- and late-type field stars identified in the Chandra Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), a deep (160ks) and wide (0.9 deg2) extragalactic survey. The sample of 60 sources was identified using both morphological and photometric star/galaxy separation methods. We determine X-ray count rates, extract spectra and light curves and perform spectral fits to determine fluxes and plasma temperatures. Complementary optical and near-IR photometry is also presented and combined with spectroscopy for 48 of the sources to determine spectral types and distances for the sample. We find distances ranging from 30pc to ~12kpc, including a number of the most distant and highly active stellar X-ray sources ever detected. This stellar sample extends the known coverage of the L_X-distance plane to greater distances and higher luminosities, but we do not detect as many intrinsically faint X-ray sources compared to previous surveys. Overall the sample is typically more...

  11. Invisible Giant: Chandra's Limits on X-rays from Betelgeuse

    CERN Document Server

    Posson-Brown, J; Pease, D O; Drake, J J; Posson-Brown, Jennifer; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Pease, Deron O.; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed Chandra calibration observations of Betelgeuse ($\\alpha$ Ori, M2 Iab, $m_{V} = 0.58$, 131 pc) obtained at the aimpoint locations of the HRC-I (8 ks), HRC-S (8 ks), and ACIS-I (5 ks). Betelgeuse is undetected in all the individual observations as well as cumulatively. We derive $3\\sigma$ upper limits to its X-ray count rates and compute the corresponding X-ray flux upper limits for isothermal coronal plasma over a range of temperatures, $T=0.3-10$~MK. We place a flux limit at the telescope of $\\fx\\approx4\\times10^{-15}$~ergs~s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ at T=1~MK. The upper limit is lowered by a factor of $\\approx3$ at higher temperatures, roughly an order of magnitude lower than that obtained previously. Assuming that the entire stellar surface is active, these fluxes correspond to a surface flux limit that ranges from 30-7000~ergs~s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ at T=1~MK, to $\\approx 1$~ergs~s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ at higher temperatures, five orders of magnitude lower than the quiet Sun X-ray surface flux. We discuss...

  12. Chandra Observations of Outflows from PSR J1509-5850

    CERN Document Server

    Klingler, Noel; Rangelov, Blagoy; Pavlov, George G; Posselt, Bettina; Ng, C -Y

    2016-01-01

    PSR J1509-5850 is a middle-aged pulsar with the period P ~ 89 ms, spin-down power Edot = 5.1 x 10^35 erg/s, at a distance of about 3.8 kpc. We report on deep Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of this pulsar and its pulsar wind nebula (PWN). In addition to the previously detected tail extending up to 7' southwest from the pulsar (the southern outflow), the deep images reveal a similarly long, faint diffuse emission stretched toward the north (the northern outflow) and the fine structure of the compact nebula (CN) in the pulsar vicinity. The CN is resolved into two lateral tails and one axial tail pointing southwest (a morphology remarkably similar to that of the Geminga PWN), which supports the assumption that the pulsar moves towards the northeast. The luminosities of the southern and northern outflows are about 1 x 10^33 and 4 x 10^32 erg/s, respectively. The spectra extracted from four regions of the southern outflow do not show any softening with increasing distance from the pulsar. The lack of synchr...

  13. AEGIS: Chandra Observation of DEEP2 Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, T; Davis, D; Newman, J; Davis, M; Nandra, K; Laird, E; Koo, D; Coil, A; Cooper, M; Croton, D; Yan, R

    2006-01-01

    We present a 200 ksec Chandra observation of seven spectroscopically selected, high redshift (0.75 < z < 1.03) galaxy groups and clusters discovered by the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). X-ray emission at the locations of these systems is consistent with background. The 3-sigma upper limits on the bolometric X-ray luminosities (L_X) of these systems put a strong constraint on the relation between L_X and the velocity dispersion of member galaxies sigma_gal at z~1; the DEEP2 systems have lower luminosity than would be predicted by the local relation. Our result is consistent with recent findings that at high redshift, optically selected clusters tend to be X-ray underluminous. A comparison with mock catalogs indicates that it is unlikely that this effect is entirely caused by a measurement bias between sigma_gal and the dark matter velocity dispersion. Physically, the DEEP2 systems may still be in the process of forming and hence not fully virialized, or they may be defic...

  14. Chandra Confirmation of a Pulsar Wind Nebula in DA 495

    CERN Document Server

    Arzoumanian, Z; Landecker, T L; Kothes, R; Camilo, F

    2008-01-01

    As part of a multiwavelength study of the unusual radio supernova remnant DA 495, we present observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Imaging and spectroscopic analysis confirms the previously detected X-ray source at the heart of the annular radio nebula, establishing the radiative properties of two key emission components: a soft unresolved source with a blackbody temperature of 1 MK consistent with a neutron star, surrounded by a nonthermal nebula 40'' in diameter exhibiting a power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma = 1.6+/-0.3, typical of a pulsar wind nebula. The implied spin-down luminosity of the neutron star, assuming a conversion efficiency to nebular flux appropriate to Vela-like pulsars, is ~10^{35} ergs/s, again typical of objects a few tens of kyr old. Morphologically, the nebular flux is slightly enhanced along a direction, in projection on the sky, independently demonstrated to be of significance in radio polarization observations; we argue that this represents the orientation o...

  15. Chandra counterparts of CANDELS GOODS-S sources

    CERN Document Server

    Cappelluti, N; Fontana, A; Zamorani, G; Amorin, R; Castellano, M; Merlin, E; Santini, P; Elbaz, D; Schreiber, C; Shu, X; Wang, T; Dunlop, J S; Bourne, N; Bruce, V A; Buitrago, F; Michałowski, Michał J; Derriere, S; Ferguson, H C; Faber, S M; Vito, F

    2015-01-01

    Improving the capabilities of detecting faint X-ray sources is fundamental to increase the statistics on faint high-z AGN and star-forming galaxies.We performed a simultaneous Maximum Likelihood PSF fit in the [0.5-2] keV and [2-7] keV energy bands of the 4 Ms {\\em Chandra} Deep Field South (CDFS) data at the position of the 34930 CANDELS H-band selected galaxies. For each detected source we provide X-ray photometry and optical counterpart validation. We validated this technique by means of a raytracing simulation. We detected a total of 698 X-ray point-sources with a likelihood $\\mathcal{L}$$>$4.98 (i.e. $>$2.7$\\sigma$). We show that the prior knowledge of a deep sample of Optical-NIR galaxies leads to a significant increase of the detection of faint (i.e. $\\sim$10$^{-17}$ cgs in the [0.5-2] keV band) sources with respect to "blind" X-ray detections. By including previous catalogs, this work increases the total number of X-ray sources detected in the 4 Ms CDFS, CANDELS area to 793, which represents the large...

  16. Imaging the Circumnuclear Region of NGC 1365 with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junfeng; Elvis, M; Risaliti, G; Mazzarella, J M; Howell, J H; Lord, S

    2009-01-01

    We present the first Chandra/ACIS imaging study of the circumnuclear region of the nearby Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365. The X-ray emission is resolved into point-like sources and complex, extended emission. The X-ray morphology of the extended emission shows a biconical soft X-ray emission region extending ~5 kpc in projection from the nucleus, coincident with the high excitation outflow cones seen in optical emission lines particularly to the northwest. Harder X-ray emission is detected from a kpc-diameter circumnuclear ring, coincident with the star-forming ring prominent in the Spitzer mid-infrared images; this X-ray emission is partially obscured by the central dust lane of NGC 1365. Spectral fitting of spatially separated components indicates a thermal plasma origin for the soft extended X-ray emission (kT=0.57 keV). Only a small amount of this emission can be due to photoionization by the nuclear source. Detailed comparison with [OIII]5007 observations shows the hot interstellar medium (ISM) is spatially ant...

  17. Reviewing ChIPS, The Chandra Imaging and Plotting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Burke, D. J.; Evans, I. N.; Evans, J. D.; McLaughlin, W.

    2015-09-01

    The Chandra Imaging and Plotting System (ChIPS) is a 2D plotting system designed to allow users to easily create, manipulate, and produce publication quality visualizations. ChIPS has a simple but very powerful interactive interface that allows users to dynamically modify the contents and layout of their plots quickly and efficiently, with the results of any changes being immediately visible. ChIPS allows users to construct their plots fully interactively, and then save the final plot commands as a Python script. This bypasses the need to iteratively edit and rerun the script when developing the plot. Features such as undo and redo commands allow users to easily step backwards and forwards through previous commands, while the ability so save ChIPS sessions in a platform-independent state file allows the session to be restored at any time, even on another machine. Because ChIPS offers a Python interface, users can analyze their data using the broad array of modules offered in Python, and visualize the information in ChIPS at the same time. In this paper we explore the design decisions behind the development of ChIPS and some of the lessons learned along the way.

  18. Chandra Confirmation of a Pulsar Wind Nebula in DA 495

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Safi-Harb, S.; Landecker, T.L.; Kothes, R.; Camilo, F.

    2008-01-01

    As part of a multiwavelength study of the unusual radio supernova remnant DA 495, we present observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Imaging and spectroscopic analysis confirms the previously detected X-ray source at the heart of the annular radio nebula, establishing the radiative properties of two key emission components: a soft unresolved source with a blackbody temperature of 1 MK consistent with a neutron star, surrounded by a nontherma1 nebula 40" in diameter exhibiting a power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma = 1.63, typical of a pulsar wind nebula. Morphologically, the nebula appears to be slightly extended along a direction, in projection on the sky, previously demonstrated to be of significance in radio and ASCA observations; we argue that this represents the orientation of the pulsar spin axis. At smaller scales, a narrow X-ray feature is seen extending out 5" from the point source, but energetic arguments suggest that it is not the resolved termination shock of the pulsar wind against the ambient medium. Finally, we argue based on synchrotron lifetimes in the nebular magnetic field that DA 495 represents the first example of a pulsar wind nebula in which electromagnetic flux makes up a significant part, together with particle flux, of the neutron star's wind.

  19. X-ray and Optical Correlation of Type I Seyfert NGC 3516 Studied with Suzaku and Japanese Ground-Based Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Noda, Hirofumi; Watanabe, Makoto; Kokubo, Mitsuru; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Itoh, Ryosuke; Morihana, Kumiko; Saito, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Hikaru; Imai, Masataka; Moritani, Yuki; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Kawabata, Miho; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Uemura, Makoto; Kawabata, Koji; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Arai, Akira; Takagi, Yuhei; Morokuma, Tomoki; Doi, Mamoru; Itoh, Yoichi; Yamada, Shin'ya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    From 2013 April to 2014 April, we performed an X-ray and optical simultaneous monitoring of the type 1.5 Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516. It employed Suzaku, and 5 Japanese ground-based telescopes, the Pirka, Kiso Schmidt, Nayuta, MITSuME, and the Kanata telescopes. The Suzaku observations were conducted seven times with various intervals ranging from days, weeks, to months, with an exposure of $\\sim50$ ksec each. The optical $B$-band observations not only covered those of Suzaku almost simultaneously, but also followed the source as frequently as possible. As a result, NGC 3516 was found in its faint phase with the 2-10 keV flux of $0.21-2.70 \\times 10^{-11}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$. The 2-45 keV X-ray spectra were composed of a dominant variable hard power-law continuum with a photon index of $\\sim1.7$, and a non-relativistic reflection component with a prominent Fe-K$\\alpha$ emission line. Producing the $B$-band light curve by differential image photometry, we found that the $B$-band flux changed by $\\sim2.7 \\times...

  20. A Spectral Study of the Black Hole Candidate XTE J1752-223 in the High/Soft State with MAXI, Suzaku and Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Nakahira, Satoshi; Uedu, Yoshihiro; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Matsuoka, Masaru; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Makishima, Kazuo; Ebisawa, Ken; Kubota, Aya; Yamada, Shin'ya; Negoro, Hitoshi; Hiroi, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Masaki; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Masashi; Kitayama, Hiroki; Kohama, Mitsuhiro; Matsumura, Takanori; Morii, Mikio; Nakajima, Motoki; Serino, Motoko; Shidatsu, Megumi; Sootome, Tetsuya; Sugimori, Kousuke; Suwa, Fumitoshi; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yoko; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Usui, Ryuichi; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Kyohei; Tashiro, Makoto S; Terada, Yukikatsu; Seta, Hiromi

    2011-01-01

    We report on the X-ray spectral analysis of the black hole candidate XTE\\ J1752--223 in the 2009--2010 outburst, utilizing data obtained with the MAXI/Gas Slit Camera (GSC), the Swift/XRT, and Suzaku, which work complementarily. As already reported by Nakahira et al. (2010) MAXI monitored the source continuously throughout the entire outburst for about eight months. All the MAXI/GSC energy spectra in the high/soft state lasting for 2 months are well represented by a multi-color disk plus power-law model. The innermost disk temperature changed from $\\sim$0.7 keV to $\\sim$0.4 keV and the disk flux decreased by an order of magnitude. Nevertheless, the innermost radius is constant at $\\sim$41 $D_{3.5}(\\cos{\\it i})^{-1/2}$ km, where $D_{3.5}$ is the source distance in units of 3.5 kpc and $i$ the inclination. The multi-color disk parameters obtained with the MAXI/GSC are consistent with those with the Swift/XRT and Suzaku. The Suzaku data also suggests a possibility that the disk emission is slightly Comptonized, ...

  1. The Chandra X-ray Observatory is prepped for solar panel deployment copy form; photos beginning with

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    TRW workers in the Vertical Processing Facility check equipment after deployment of the solar panel array above them, attached to the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93.

  2. Shelter from the Storm: Protecting the Chandra X-ray Observatory from Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robert A.; Morris, David C.; Virani, Shanil N.; Wolk, Scott J.; Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; O'dell, Stephen L.

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory was launched in July 1999, and the first images were recorded by the ACIS x-ray detector in August 1999. Shortly after first light, degradation of the energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency in the ACIS CCD detectors was observed, and this was quickly attributed to cumulative particle radiation damage in the CCD's, in particular from 100 keV to 200 keV protons. Since the onset of this radiation damage to ACIS, several improvements have been made to autonomous Chandra operation and ground-based operations and mission planning, to limit the effects of radiation while preserving optimum observing efficiency for the Observatory. These changes include implementing an automatic science instrument radiation protection system on Chandra, implementing a real-time radiation monitoring and alert system by the Science Operations Team, and improving the radiation prediction models used in mission planning for the Observatory. These satellite- and ground-based systems provide protection for Chandra from passages through the Earth's trapped radiation belts and outer magnetosphere and from flares and coronal mass ejections from the Sun. We describe the design and performance of the automatic on-board radiation protection system on Chandra, and the ground-based software systems and data products for real-time radiation monitoring. We also describe the development and characterize the performance of the Chandra Radiation Model (CRM), which provides predictions of the solar wind and magnetospheric proton fluxes along Chandra's orbit, indexed by the geomagnetic activity index, Kp. We compare the observed and predicted damage rates to ACIS based on net mission proton fluence, and outline planned enhancements to the CRM.

  3. The End of Days -- Chandra Catches X-ray Glow From Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Through a combination of serendipity and skill, scientists have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to capture a rare glimpse of X-radiation from the early phases of a supernova, one of the most violent events in nature. Although more than a thousand supernovas have been observed by optical astronomers, the early X-ray glow from the explosions has been detected in less than a dozen cases. The Chandra observations were made under the direction of a team of scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, led by Walter Lewin and his graduate student, Derek Fox. When combined with simultaneous observations by radio and optical telescopes, the X-ray observations tell about the thickness of the shell that was blown off, its density, its speed, and how much material was shed by the star before it exploded. Chandra observed an X-ray glow from SN1999em with the total power of 50,000 suns. Ten days later it observed the supernova for another nine hours, and found that the X rays had faded to half their previous intensity. The optical luminosity, which had the brightness of 200 million suns, had faded somewhat less. No radio emission was detected at any time. With this information, the MIT group and their colleagues are already piecing together a picture of the catastrophic explosion. Observations by optical astronomers showed that SN1999em was a Type II supernova produced by the collapse of the core of a star ten or more times as massive as the Sun. The intense heat generated in the collapse produces a cataclysmic rebound that sends high speed debris flying outward at speeds in excess of 20 million miles per hour. The debris crashes into matter shed by the former star before the explosion. This awesome collision generates shock waves that heat expanding debris to three million degrees. The X-ray glow from this hot gas was detected by Chandra and gives astrophysicists a better understanding of the dynamics of the explosion, as well as the

  4. First Images From Chandra X-Ray Observatory to be Released

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    The first images from the world's most powerful X-ray telescope, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, will be unveiled at a media briefing at 1 p.m. EDT, Thursday, Aug. 26. The briefing will be held in the James E. Webb Auditorium at NASA Headquarters, 300 E St. SW, Washington, DC. The images include the spectacular remnants of a supernova and other astronomical objects. Panelists will be: - Dr. Edward Weiler, Associate Administrator for Space Science, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC; - Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, Director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X-ray Center, Cambridge, MA; - Dr. Martin Weisskopf, NASA's Chandra Project Scientist, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL; and - Dr. Robert Kirshner, astrophysicist, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The event will be carried live on NASA Television with question-and-answer capability for reporters covering the briefing from participating NASA centers and from the Chandra Operations Control Center in Cambridge. NASA Television is available on transponder 9C, satellite GE-2 at 85 degrees West longitude, vertical polarization, frequency 3880 MHz, audio of 6.8 MHz. Chandra has been undergoing activation and checkout since it was placed into orbit during Space Shuttle mission STS-93 in July. Chandra will examine exploding stars, black holes, colliding galaxies and other high-energy cosmic phenomena to help scientists gain a better understanding of the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra images and additional information will be available following the briefing on the Internet at: http://chandra.nasa.gov and http://chandra.harvard.edu NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending an Internet electronic mail message to domo@hq.nasa.gov. In the body of the message (not the subject line) users should type the words "subscribe press-release" (no quotes). The system will reply with a confirmation via E-mail of each subscription. A second

  5. Chandra Counterparts of CANDELS GOODS-S Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Fontana, A.; Zamorani, G.; Amorin, R.; Castellano, M.; Merlin, E.; Santini, P.; Elbaz, D.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.; Dunlop, J. S.; Bourne, N.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Michałowski, Michał J.; Derriere, S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Faber, S. M.; Vito, F.

    2016-06-01

    Improving the capabilities of detecting faint X-ray sources is fundamental for increasing the statistics on faint high-z active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star-forming galaxies (SFGs). We performed a simultaneous maximum likelihood point-spread function fit in the [0.5-2] keV and [2-7] keV energy bands of the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) data at the position of the 34,930 CANDELS H-band selected galaxies. For each detected source we provide X-ray photometry and optical counterpart validation. We validated this technique by means of a ray-tracing simulation. We detected a total of 698 X-ray point sources with a likelihood { L }\\gt 4.98 (i.e., >2.7σ). We show that prior knowledge of a deep sample of optical-NIR galaxies leads to a significant increase in the detection of faint (i.e., ˜10-17 cgs in the [0.5-2] keV band) sources with respect to “blind” X-ray detections. By including previous X-ray catalogs, this work increases the total number of X-ray sources detected in the 4 Ms CDFS, CANDELS area to 793, which represents the largest sample of extremely faint X-ray sources assembled to date. Our results suggest that a large fraction of the optical counterparts of our X-ray sources determined by likelihood ratio actually coincides with the priors used for the source detection. Most of the new detected sources are likely SFGs or faint, absorbed AGNs. We identified a few sources with putative photometric redshift z > 4. Despite the low number statistics and the uncertainties on the photo z, this sample significantly increases the number of X-ray-selected candidate high-z AGNs.

  6. LOFAR, VLA, and Chandra Observations of the Toothbrush Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Brunetti, G.; Brüggen, M.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; Williams, W. L.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Dawson, W. A.; Forman, W. R.; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jones, C.; Miley, G. K.; Rafferty, D. A.; Rudnick, L.; Sabater, J.; Sarazin, C. L.; Shimwell, T. W.; Bonafede, A.; Best, P. N.; Bîrzan, L.; Cassano, R.; Chyży, K. T.; Croston, J. H.; Dijkema, T. J.; Enßlin, T.; Ferrari, C.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kraft, R. P.; Mevius, M.; Intema, H. T.; Murray, S. S.; Orrú, E.; Pizzo, R.; Sridhar, S. S.; Simionescu, A.; Stroe, A.; van der Tol, S.; White, G. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present deep LOFAR observations between 120 and 181 MHz of the “Toothbrush” (RX J0603.3+4214), a cluster that contains one of the brightest radio relic sources known. Our LOFAR observations exploit a new and novel calibration scheme to probe 10 times deeper than any previous study in this relatively unexplored part of the spectrum. The LOFAR observations, when combined with VLA, GMRT, and Chandra X-ray data, provide new information about the nature of cluster merger shocks and their role in re-accelerating relativistic particles. We derive a spectral index of α =-0.8+/- 0.1 at the northern edge of the main radio relic, steepening toward the south to α ≈ -2. The spectral index of the radio halo is remarkably uniform (α =-1.16, with an intrinsic scatter of ≤slant 0.04). The observed radio relic spectral index gives a Mach number of { M }={2.8}-0.3+0.5, assuming diffusive shock acceleration. However, the gas density jump at the northern edge of the large radio relic implies a much weaker shock ({ M }≈ 1.2, with an upper limit of { M }≈ 1.5). The discrepancy between the Mach numbers calculated from the radio and X-rays can be explained if either (i) the relic traces a complex shock surface along the line of sight, or (ii) if the radio relic emission is produced by a re-accelerated population of fossil particles from a radio galaxy. Our results highlight the need for additional theoretical work and numerical simulations of particle acceleration and re-acceleration at cluster merger shocks.

  7. AGN Activity in Nucleated Galaxies as Measured by Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foord, Adi; Gallo, Elena; Hodges-Kluck, Edmund; Miller, Brendan P.; Baldassare, Vivienne F.; Gültekin, Kayhan; Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    2017-05-01

    Motivated by theoretical expectations that nuclear star clusters (NSCs) in galactic centers may provide a favorable environment for supermassive black holes to form and/or efficiently grow, we set out to measure the fraction of nearby nucleated galaxies that also host an active galactic nucleus. We targeted a distance-limited sample of 98 objects with the Chandra X-ray Telescope, down to a uniform X-ray luminosity threshold of ˜1038 erg s-1. The sample is composed of 47 late-types and 51 early-types, enabling us to further investigate the active fraction as a function of galactic morphology. After correcting for contamination to the nuclear X-ray signal from bright X-ray binaries, we measure an active fraction f=11.2{ % }-4.9+7.4 (1σ C.L.) across the whole sample, in agreement with previous estimates based on a heterogeneous combination of optical, X-ray, and radio diagnostics, by Seth et al. After accounting for the different stellar mass distributions in our samples, we find no statistically significant difference in the active fraction of early- versus late-type nucleated galaxies, with f=10.6{ % }-4.9+11.9 and 10.8{ % }-6.3+11.3, respectively. For the early-type nucleated galaxies, we are able to carry out a controlled comparison with a parent sample of non-nucleated galaxies covering the same stellar mass range, again finding no statistically significant difference in the active fraction. Taken at face value, our findings suggest that the presence of an NSC does not facilitate or enhance accretion-powered emission from a nuclear supermassive black hole. This is true even for late-type nucleated galaxies, home to bluer NSCs and arguably larger gas reservoirs.

  8. NASA's High Energy Vision: Chandra and the X-Ray Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mais, D. E.; Stencel, R. E.; Richards, D.

    2004-05-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory is the most sophisticated X-ray observatory launched by NASA. Chandra is designed to observe X-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as the remnants of supernovae explosions, col- liding galaxies, black holes, pulsars, neutron stars, quasars, and X-ray bi- nary stars. The spectacular results from the first five years of Chandra ob- servations are changing and redefining theories with each observation. Every exciting new image shows glimpses of such exotic phenomena as super-massive black holes, surprising black hole activity in old galaxies, rivers of grav- ity that define the cosmic landscape, unexpected x-ray activity in proto- stars and failed stars, puzzling distributions of elements in supernovae remnants, the sound waves from a super-massive black hole, and the even the tantalizing possibility of an entirely new form of matter - the strange quark star. On September 14, 2000, triggered by alerts from amateur astron- omers worldwide, Chandra observed the outburst of the brightest northern dwarf nova SS Cygni. The cooperation of hundreds of amateur variable star astronomers and the Chandra X-Ray scientists and spacecraft specialists pro- vided proof that the collaboration of amateur and professional astronomers is a powerful tool to study cosmic phenomena.

  9. Suzaku discovery of iron absorption lines in outburst spectra of the X-ray transient 4U 1630-472

    CERN Document Server

    Kubota, A; Cottam, J; Kotani, T; Done, C; Ueda, Y; Fabian, A C; Yasuda, T; Takahashi, H; Fukazawa, Y; Yamaoka, K; Makishima, K; Yamada, S; Kohmura, T; Angelini, L; Kubota, Aya; Dotani, Tadayasu; Cottam, Jean; Kotani, Taro; Done, Chris; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Yasuda, Tomonori; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Makishima, Kazuo; Yamada, Shinya; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Angelini, Lorella

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of six Suzaku observations of the recurrent black hole transient 4U1630-472 during its decline from outburst from February 8 to March 23 in 2006. All observations show the typical high/soft state spectral shape in the 2-50keV band, roughly described by an optically thick disk spectrum in the soft energy band plus a weak power-law tail that becomes dominant only above \\~20keV. The disk temperature decreases from 1.4keV to 1.2keV as the flux decreases by a factor 2, consistent with a constant radius as expected for disk-dominated spectra. All the observations reveal significant absorption lines from highly ionized (H-like and He-like) iron Ka at 7.0keV and 6.7keV. The brightest datasets also show significant but weaker absorption structures between 7.8keV and 8.2keV, which we identify as a blend of iron Kb and nickel Ka absorption lines. The energies of these absorption lines suggest a blue shift with an outflow velocity of ~1000km/s.. The H-like iron Ka equivalent width remains approxima...

  10. NuSTAR, XMM-Newton and Suzaku Observations of the Ultraluminous X-ray Source Holmberg II X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Walton, D J; Rana, V; Miller, J M; Harrison, F A; Fabian, A C; Bachetti, M; Barret, D; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Fuerst, F; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Madsen, K K; Stern, D; Zhang, W

    2015-01-01

    We present the first broadband 0.3-25.0 kev X-ray observations of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) Holmberg II X-1, performed by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton and Suzaku in September 2013. The NuSTAR data provide the first observations of Holmberg II X-1 above 10 keV, and reveal a very steep high-energy spectrum, similar to other ULXs observed by NuSTAR to date. This implies that Holmberg II X-1 accretes at a high fraction of its Eddington accretion rate, and possibly exceeds it. The soft X-ray spectrum (E<10 keV) appears to be dominated by two blackbody-like emission components, the hotter of which may be associated with an accretion disk. However, all such models under-predict the NuSTAR data above ~10 keV, implying the presence of an additional emission component at the highest energies probed. We investigate plausible physical origins for this component, and favor a scenario in which the excess arises from Compton scattering in a hot corona of electrons with some properties similar to the very-high st...

  11. NuSTAR and Suzaku X-ray Spectroscopy of NGC 4151: Evidence for Reflection from the Inner Accretion Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Keck, M L; Ballantyne, D R; Bauer, F; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Dauser, T; Elvis, M; Fabian, A C; Fuerst, F; García, J; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Madejski, G; Marinucci, A; Matt, G; Reynolds, C S; Stern, D; Walton, D J; Zoghbi, A

    2015-01-01

    We present X-ray timing and spectral analyses of simultaneous 150 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Suzaku X-ray observations of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151. We disentangle the continuum emission, absorption, and reflection properties of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) by applying inner accretion disk reflection and absorption-dominated models. With a time-averaged spectral analysis, we find strong evidence for relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disk. We find that relativistic emission arises from a highly ionized inner accretion disk with a steep emissivity profile, which suggests an intense, compact illuminating source. We find a preliminary, near-maximal black hole spin a>0.9 accounting for statistical and systematic modeling errors. We find a relatively moderate reflection fraction with respect to predictions for the lamp post geometry, in which the illuminating corona is modeled as a point source. Through a time-resolved spectral analysis, we find that modest coron...

  12. NUSTAR and Suzaku x-ray spectroscopy of NGC 4151: Evidence for reflection from the inner accretion disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, M. L.; Brenneman, L. W.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bauer, F.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Dauser, T.; Elvis, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Fuerst, F.; García, J.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Madejski, G.; Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Reynolds, C. S.; Stern, D.; Walton, D. J.; Zoghbi, A.

    2015-06-15

    We present X-ray timing and spectral analyses of simultaneous 150 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Suzaku X-ray observations of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151. We disentangle the continuum emission, absorption, and reflection properties of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) by applying inner accretion disk reflection and absorption-dominated models. With a time-averaged spectral analysis, we find strong evidence for relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disk. We find that relativistic emission arises from a highly ionized inner accretion disk with a steep emissivity profile, which suggests an intense, compact illuminating source. We find a preliminary, near-maximal black hole spin $a\\gt 0.9$ accounting for statistical and systematic modeling errors. We find a relatively moderate reflection fraction with respect to predictions for the lamp post geometry, in which the illuminating corona is modeled as a point source. Through a time-resolved spectral analysis, we find that modest coronal and inner disk reflection (IDR) flux variation drives the spectral variability during the observations. We discuss various physical scenarios for the IDR model and we find that a compact corona is consistent with the observed features.

  13. Suzaku investigation into the nature of the nearest ultraluminous X-ray source, M33 X-8

    CERN Document Server

    Isobe, Naoki; Sato, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Tsunefumi

    2012-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of the nearest ultraluminous X-ray source, M33 X-8, obtained by Suzaku during 2010 January 11 -- 13, was closely analyzed to examine its nature. It is, by far, the only data with the highest signal statistic in 0.4 -- 10 keV range. Despite being able to reproduce the X-ray spectrum, Comptonization of the disk photons failed to give a physically meaningful solution. A modified version of the multi-color disk model, in which the dependence of the disk temperature on the radius is described as r^(-p) with p being a free parameter, can also approximate the spectrum. From this model, the innermost disk temperature and bolometric luminosity were obtained as T_in = 2.00-0.05+0.06 keV and L_disk = 1.36 x 10^39 (cos i)^(-1) ergs/s, respectively, where i is the disk inclination. A small temperature gradient of p = 0.535-0.005+0.004, together with the high disk temperature, is regarded as the signatures of the slim accretion disk model, suggesting that M33 X-8 was accreting at high mass accretion rate...

  14. Suzaku Detection of Thermal X-Ray Emission Associated with the Western Radio Lobe of Fornax A

    CERN Document Server

    Seta, Hiromi; Inoue, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of X-ray mapping observations of the western radio lobe of the Fornax A galaxy, using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) onboard the Suzaku satellite with a total exposure time of 327 ks. The purpose of this study is to investigate the nature and spatial extent of the diffuse thermal emission around the lobe by exploiting the low and stable background of the XIS. The diffuse thermal emission had been consistently reported in all previous studies of this region, but its physical nature and relation to the radio lobe had not been examined in detail. Using the data set covering the entire western lobe and the central galaxy NGC 1316, as well as comparison sets in the vicinity, we find convincingly the presence of thermal plasma emission with a temperature of ~1 keV in excess of conceivable background and contaminating emission (cosmic X-ray background, Galactic halo, intra-cluster gas of Fornax, interstellar gas of NGC 1316, and the ensemble of point-like sources). Its surface brightness...

  15. The reflection component from Cygnus X-1 in the soft state measured by NuSTAR and Suzaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Nowak, Michael A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Parker, Michael; Fabian, Andy C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Miller, Jon M.; King, Ashley L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Harrison, Fiona A.; Forster, Karl; Fürst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Natalucci, Lorenzo [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, INAF-IAPS, via del Fosso del Cavaliere, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Pottschmidt, Katja [CRESST and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ross, Randy R., E-mail: jtomsick@ssl.berkeley.edu [Physics Department, College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA 01610 (United States); and others

    2014-01-01

    The black hole binary Cygnus X-1 was observed in late 2012 with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Suzaku, providing spectral coverage over the ∼1-300 keV range. The source was in the soft state with a multi-temperature blackbody, power law, and reflection components along with absorption from highly ionized material in the system. The high throughput of NuSTAR allows for a very high quality measurement of the complex iron line region as well as the rest of the reflection component. The iron line is clearly broadened and is well described by a relativistic blurring model, providing an opportunity to constrain the black hole spin. Although the spin constraint depends somewhat on which continuum model is used, we obtain a {sub *} > 0.83 for all models that provide a good description of the spectrum. However, none of our spectral fits give a disk inclination that is consistent with the most recently reported binary values for Cyg X-1. This may indicate that there is a >13° misalignment between the orbital plane and the inner accretion disk (i.e., a warped accretion disk) or that there is missing physics in the spectral models.

  16. Suzaku Discovery of Non-thermal X-ray Emission from the Rotating Magnetized White Dwarf, AE Aquarii

    CERN Document Server

    Terada, Yukikatsu; Ishida, Manabu; Mukai, Koji; Dotani, Tadayas u; Okada, Shunsaku; Nakamura, Ryoko; Naik, Sachindra; Bamba, Aya; Makishima, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    The fast rotating magnetized white dwarf, AE Aquarii, was observed with Suzaku, in October 2005 and October 2006 with exposures of 53.1 and 42.4 ks, respectively. In addition to clear spin modulation in the 0.5--10 keV band of the XIS data at the barycentric period of 33.0769 \\pm 0.0001 s, the 10--30 keV HXD data in the second half of the 2005 observation also showed statistically significant periodic signals at a consistent period. On that occasion, the spin-folded HXD light curve exhibited two sharp spikes separated by about 0.2 cycles in phase, in contrast to approximately sinusoidal profiles observed in energies below about 4 keV. The folded 4--10 keV XIS light curves are understood as a superposition of those two types of pulse profiles. The phase averaged 1.5--10 keV spectra can be reproduced by two thermal components with temperatures of $2.90_{-0.16}^{+0.20}$ keV and $0.53_{-0.13}^{+0.14}$ keV, but the 12-25 keV HXD data show a significant excess above the extrapolated model. This excess can be explai...

  17. Probing the Accretion Scheme of the Dipping X-ray Binary 4U 1915-05 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhongli; Sakurai, Soki; Sasano, Makoto; Ono, Kou

    2014-01-01

    The dipping low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1915-05 was observed by Suzaku on 2007 November 8 for a net exposure of 39 ksec. It was detected by the XIS with a 0.8-10 keV signal rate of 9.84+\\-0.01 cts/s per camera, and HXD-PIN with a 12-45 keV signal rate of 0.29+/-0.01 cts/s. After removing the periodic dips and an X-ray burst, the 0.8 - 45 keV continuum was successfully described by an optically thick disk emission with an inner-disk temperature ~ 0.7 keV and a neutron-star blackbody emission with a temperature ~ 1.3 keV, on condition that the blackbody component, or possibly the disk emission too, is significantly Comptonized. This successful modeling is consistent with 4U 1915-05 being in a high-soft state in this observation, and implies that its broadband spectrum can be interpreted in the same scheme as for many non-dipping Low-mass X-ray binaries in the soft state. Its bolometric luminosity (~ 0.02 times the Eddington limit) is relatively low for the soft state, but within a tolerance, if considering the dis...

  18. Evidence for a Cool Disk and Inhomogeneous Coronae from Wide-band Temporal Spectroscopy of Cygnus X-1 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, Shin'ya; Done, Chris; Torii, Shunsuke; Noda, Hirofumi; Sakurai, Soki

    2013-01-01

    Unified X-ray spectral and timing studies of Cygnus X-1 in the low/hard and hard intermediate state were conducted in a model-independent manner, using broadband Suzaku data acquired on 25 occasions from 2005 to 2009 with a total exposure of ~ 450 ks. The unabsorbed 0.1--500 keV source luminosity changed over 0.8--2.8% of the Eddington limit for 14.8 solar masses. Variations on short (1--2 seconds) and long (days to months) time scales require at least three separate components: a constant component localized below ~2 keV, a broad soft one dominating in the 2--10 keV range, and a hard one mostly seen in 10--300 keV range. In view of the truncated disk/hot inner flow picture, these are respectively interpreted as emission from the truncated cool disk, a soft Compton component, and a hard Compton component. Long-term spectral evolution can be produced by the constant disk increasing in temperature and luminosity as the truncation radius decreases. The soft Compton component likewise increases, but the hard Comp...

  19. Suzaku Discovery of a Hard Component Varying Independently of the Power-Law Emission in MCG-6-30-15

    CERN Document Server

    Noda, Hirofumi; Uehara, Yuuichi; Yamada, Shin'ya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Focusing on hard X-ray variability, we reanalyzed Suzaku data of Type I Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15 obtained in 2006. Intensity-sorted spectroscopy and a principal component analysis consistently revealed a very hard component that varies independently of the dominant power-law emission. Although the exact nature of this hard component is not yet identified, it can be modeled as a power-law with a photon index ~2 affected by a partial covering absorption, or as a thermal Comptonization emission with a relatively large optical depth. When this component is included in the fitting model, the time-averaged 2.5-55 keV spectrum of MCG-6-30-15 can be reproduced successfully by invoking a mildly broadened iron line with its emission region located at > 8 times the gravitational radii from the central black hole, and a moderate reflection with a covering fraction of ~3.4. This result implies that the solution of a highly spinning black hole in MCG-6-30-15, obtained by Miniutti et al. (2007, PASJ, 59, S315) using the s...

  20. Suzaku measurement of electron and magnetic energy densities in the east lobe of the giant radio galaxy DA 240

    CERN Document Server

    Isobe, Naoki; Tashiro, Makoto S

    2011-01-01

    A careful analysis of the Suzaku data of the giant radio galaxy DA 240, of which the size is 1.48 Mpc, revealed diffuse X-ray emission associated with its east lobe. The diffuse X-ray spectrum was described with a simple power-law model with a photon index of 1.92 (-0.17+0.13) (-0.06+0.04), where the first and second errors represent the statistical and systematic ones. The agreement with the synchrotron radio photon index, 1.95 +- 0.01 in 326 -- 608.5 MHz, ensures that the excess X-ray emission is attributed to the inverse Compton emission from the synchrotron-radiating electrons, boosting up the cosmic microwave background photons. From the X-ray flux density, 51.5 +-3.9 (-5.4+6.2) nJy at 1 keV derived with the photon index fixed at the radio index, in comparison with the synchrotron radio intensity of 10.30 +- 0.12 Jy at 326 MHz, the magnetic and electron energy densities was estimated as u_m = (3.0 +-0.2 +-0.4) \\times 10^(-14) ergs/cm3 and u_e = (3.4 (-0.2+0.3) (-0.4+0.5)) \\times 10^(-14) ergs/cm3 integra...

  1. Highly Ionized Fe-K Absorption Line from Cygnus X-1 in the High/Soft State Observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, S; Mineshige, S; Ueda, Y; Kubota, A; Gandhi, P; Done, C; Noda, H; Yoshikawa, A; Makishima, K

    2013-01-01

    We present observations of a transient He-like Fe K alpha absorption line in Suzaku observations of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 on 2011 October 5 near superior conjunction during the high/soft state, which enable us to map the full evolution from the start and the end of the episodic accretion phenomena or dips for the first time. We model the X-ray spectra during the event and trace their evolution. The absorption line is rather weak in the first half of the observation, but instantly deepens for ~10 ks, and weakens thereafter. The overall change in equivalent width is a factor of ~3, peaking at an orbital phase of ~0.08. This is evidence that the companion stellar wind feeding the black hole is clumpy. By analyzing the line with a Voigt profile, it is found to be consistent with a slightly redshifted Fe XXV transition, or possibly a mixture of several species less ionized than Fe XXV. The data may be explained by a clump located at a distance of ~10^(10-12) cm with a density of ~10^((-13)-(-11)) g cm^-...

  2. Suzaku X-Ray Observation of the Dwarf Nova Z Camelopardalis at the Onset of an Optical Outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Saitou, Kei; Ebisawa, Ken; Ishida, Manabu

    2012-01-01

    We present the result of a Suzaku X-ray spectroscopic observation of the dwarf nova Z Camelopardalis, which was conducted by chance at the onset of an optical outburst. We used the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (a 38 ks exposure) and the Hard X-ray Detector (34 ks) to obtain a 0.35-40 keV spectrum simultaneously. Spectral characteristics suggest that the source was in the X-ray quiescent state despite being in the rising phase of an outburst in the optical band. The spectrum shows a clear signature of circumstellar absorption in excess of interstellar absorption and the reprocessed emission features of Fe fluorescence and Compton scattering. The extra absorption is explained due to partial coverage by either neutral or ionized matter. We found a spectral change during the observation, which is attributable only to the change in the circumstellar absorption. Such an X-ray spectral variation is reported for the first time in dwarf novae. We speculate that the variation in the circumstellar absorption is interprete...

  3. Suzaku Observations of Spectral Variations of the Ultra Luminous X-ray Source Holmberg IX X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Shogo B; Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the Ultra Luminous X-ray source (ULX) Holmberg IX X-1 were carried out with Suzaku twice, once on 2012 April 13 and then on 2012 October 24, with exposures of 180 ks and 217 ks, respectively. The source showed a hard power-law shape spectrum with a mild cutoff at $\\sim 8$ keV, which is typical of ULXs when they are relatively dim. On both occasions, the 0.6-11 keV spectrum was explained successfully in terms a cool ($\\sim 0.2$ keV) multi-color disk blackbody emission model and a thermal Comptonization emission produced by an electron cloud with a relatively low temperature and high optical depth, assuming that a large fraction of the disk-blackbody photons are Comptonized whereas the rest is observed directly. The 0.5-10 keV luminosity was $1.2\\times10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$ in April, and $\\sim 14\\%$ higher in October. This brightening was accompanied by spectral softening in $\\ge 2$ keV, with little changes in the $\\le 2$ keV spectral shape. This behavior can be understood if the accretion disk r...

  4. Revealing the High Energy Emission from the Obscured Seyfert Galaxy MCG -5-23-16 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Reeves, J N; Dewangan, G C; Fabian, A C; Fukazawa, Y; Gallo, L; Griffiths, R; Inoue, H; Kunieda, H; Markowitz, A; Miniutti, G; Mizuno, T; Mushotzky, R; Okajima, T; Ptak, A; Takahashi, T; Terashima, Y; Ushio, M; Watanabe, S; Yamasaki, T; Yamauchi, M; Yaqoob, T; Reeves, James N.; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Fabian, Andy C.; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Gallo, Luigi; Griffiths, Richard; Inoue, Hajime; Kunieda, Hideyo; Markowitz, Alex; MiniuttI, Giovanni; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mushotzky, Richard; Okajima, Takashi; Ptak, Andy; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Terashima, Yuichi; Ushio, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Shin; Yamasaki, Tomonori; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yaqoob, Tahir

    2006-01-01

    We report on a 100 ks Suzaku observation of the bright, nearby (z=0.008486) Seyfert 1.9 galaxy MCG -5-23-16. The broad-band (0.4-100 keV) X-ray spectrum allows us to determine the nature of the high energy emission with little ambiguity. The X-ray continuum consists of a cutoff power-law of photon index $\\Gamma=1.9$, absorbed through Compton-thin matter of column density $N_{\\rm H}=1.6\\times10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$. A soft excess is observed below 1 keV and is likely a combination of emission from scattered continuum photons and distant photoionized gas. The iron K line profile is complex, showing narrow neutral iron K$\\alpha$ and K$\\beta$ emission, as well as a broad line which can be modeled by a moderately inclined accretion disk. The line profile shows either the disk is truncated at a few tens of gravitational radii, or the disk emissivity profile is relatively flat. A strong Compton reflection component is detected above 10 keV, which is best modeled by a combination of reflection off distant matter and the a...

  5. NuSTAR AND SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF THE HARD STATE IN CYGNUS X-1: LOCATING THE INNER ACCRETION DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, M. L.; Lohfink, A.; Fabian, A. C.; Alston, W. N.; Kara, E. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Tomsick, J. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, West Hall 311, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Yamaoka, K. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Department of Particles and Astronomy, Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Nowak, M.; Grinberg, V. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [Danish Technical University, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Fürst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gandhi, P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); King, A. L. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); and others

    2015-07-20

    We present simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR ) and Suzaku observations of the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 in the hard state. This is the first time this state has been observed in Cyg X-1 with NuSTAR, which enables us to study the reflection and broadband spectra in unprecedented detail. We confirm that the iron line cannot be fit with a combination of narrow lines and absorption features, instead requiring a relativistically blurred profile in combination with a narrow line and absorption from the companion wind. We use the reflection models of García et al. to simultaneously measure the black hole spin, disk inner radius, and coronal height in a self-consistent manner. Detailed fits to the iron line profile indicate a high level of relativistic blurring, indicative of reflection from the inner accretion disk. We find a high spin, a small inner disk radius, and a low source height and rule out truncation to greater than three gravitational radii at the 3σ confidence level. In addition, we find that the line profile has not changed greatly in the switch from soft to hard states, and that the differences are consistent with changes in the underlying reflection spectrum rather than the relativistic blurring. We find that the blurring parameters are consistent when fitting either just the iron line or the entire broadband spectrum, which is well modeled with a Comptonized continuum plus reflection model.

  6. NuSTAR and Suzaku observations of the hard state in Cygnus X-1: locating the inner accretion disk

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, M L; Miller, J M; Yamaoka, K; Lohfink, A; Nowak, M; Fabian, A C; Alston, W N; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Fuerst, F; Gandhi, P; Grefenstette, B W; Grinberg, V; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Kara, E; King, A L; Stern, D; Walton, D J; Wilms, J; Zhang, W W

    2015-01-01

    We present simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR ) and Suzaku observations of the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 in the hard state. This is the first time this state has been observed in Cyg X-1 with NuSTAR, which enables us to study the reflection and broad-band spectra in unprecedented detail. We confirm that the iron line cannot be fit with a combination of narrow lines and absorption features, and instead requires a relativistically blurred profile in combination with a narrow line and absorption from the companion wind. We use the reflection models of Garcia et al. (2014) to simultaneously measure the black hole spin, disk inner radius, and coronal height in a self-consistent manner. Detailed fits to the iron line profile indicate a high level of relativistic blurring, indicative of reflection from the inner accretion disk. We find a high spin, a small inner disk radius, and a low source height, and rule out truncation to greater than three gravitational radii at the 3{\\sigma} confidence le...

  7. Suzaku Monitoring of Hard X-ray Emission from Eta Carinae over a Single Binary Orbital Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yuasa, Takayuki; Ishida, Manabu; Gull, Theodore R; Pittard, Julian M; Russell, Christopher M P; Madura, Thomas I

    2014-01-01

    The Suzaku X-ray observatory monitored the supermassive binary system Eta Carinae 10 times during the whole 5.5 year orbital cycle between 2005-2011. This series of observations presents the first long-term monitoring of this enigmatic system in the extremely hard X-ray band between 15-40 keV. During most of the orbit, the 15-25 keV emission varied similarly to the 2-10 keV emission, indicating an origin in the hard energy tail of the kT ~4 keV wind-wind collision (WWC) plasma. However, the 15-25 keV emission declined only by a factor of 3 around periastron when the 2-10 keV emission dropped by two orders of magnitude due probably to an eclipse of the WWC plasma. The observed minimum in the 15-25 keV emission occurred after the 2-10 keV flux had already recovered by a factor of ~3. This may mean that the WWC activity was strong, but hidden behind the thick primary stellar wind during the eclipse. The 25-40 keV flux was rather constant through the orbital cycle, at the level measured with INTEGRAL in 2004. Thi...

  8. Discovery of ultra-fast outflows in a sample of Broad Line Radio Galaxies observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Tombesi, F; Reeves, J N; Braito, V; Ballo, L; Gofford, J; Cappi, M; Mushotzky, R F

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a uniform and systematic search for blue-shifted Fe K absorption lines in the X-ray spectra of five bright Broad-Line Radio Galaxies (BLRGs) observed with Suzaku. We detect, for the first time at X-rays in radio-loud AGN, several absorption lines at energies greater than 7 keV in three out of five sources, namely 3C 111, 3C 120 and 3C 390.3. The lines are detected with high significance according to both the F-test and extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Their likely interpretation as blue-shifted Fe XXV and Fe XXVI K-shell resonance lines implies an origin from highly ionized gas outflowing with mildly relativistic velocities, in the range 0.04-0.15c. A fit with specific photo-ionization models gives ionization parameters in the range log_xi~4-5.6 and column densities of N_H~10^22-10^23 cm^-2. These characteristics are very similar to those of the Ultra-Fast Outflows (UFOs) previously observed in radio-quiet AGN. Their estimated location within ~0.01-0.3pc from the central super-mass...

  9. Suzaku X-ray Observations of the Fermi Bubbles: Northernmost Cap and Southeast Claw Discovered with MAXI-SSC

    CERN Document Server

    Tahara, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    We report on Suzaku observations of large-scale X-ray structures possibly related with the Fermi Bubbles obtained in 2013 with a total duration of ~ 80 ks. The observed regions were the: (i) northern cap (N-cap; l ~ 0 deg, 45 deg < b < 55 deg) seen in the Mid-band (1.7-4.0 keV) map recently provided by MAXI-SSC and (ii) southeast claw (SE-claw; l ~ 10 deg, -20 deg < b < -10 deg) seen in the ROSAT all-sky map and MAXI-SSC Low-band (0.7-1.7 keV) map. In each region, we detected diffuse X-ray emissions which are represented by a three component plasma model consisting of an unabsorbed thermal component (kT ~ 0.1 keV) from the Local Bubble, absorbed kT = 0.30+/-0.05 keV emission representing the Galactic Halo, and a power-law component due to the isotropic cosmic X-ray background radiation. The emission measure of the GH component in the SE-claw shows an excess by a factor of ~ 2.5 over the surrounding emission at 2 deg away. We also found a broad excess in the 1.7-4.0 keV count rates across the N-cap...

  10. Suzaku Observation of the Dwarf Nova V893 Scorpii: The Discovery of a Partial X-Ray Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Koji; Zietsman, E.; Still, M.

    2008-01-01

    V893 Sco is an eclipsing dwarf nova that had attracted little attention from X-ray astronomers until it was proposed as the identification of an RXTE all-sky slew survey (XSS) source. Here we report on the po inted X-ray observations of this object using Suzaku. We confirm V893 Sco to be X-ray bright, whose spectrum is highly absorbed for a dwar f nova. We have also discovered a partial X-ray eclipse in V893 Sco. This is the first time that a partial eclipse is seen in Xray light c urves of a dwarf nova. We have successfully modeled the gross features of the optical and X-ray eclipse light curves using a boundary layer geometry of the X-ray emission region. Future observations may lead to confirmation of this basic picture, and allow us to place tight co nstraints on the size of the X-ray emission region. The partial X-ray eclipse therefore should make V893 Sco a key object in understanding the physics of accretion in quiescent dwarf nova.

  11. A Suzaku Search for Non-thermal Emission at Hard X-ray Energies in the Coma Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Wik, Daniel R; Finoguenov, Alexis; Matsushita, Kyoko; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Clarke, Tracy E

    2009-01-01

    The brightest cluster radio halo known resides in the Coma cluster of galaxies. The relativistic electrons producing this diffuse synchrotron emission should also produce inverse Compton emission that becomes competitive with thermal emission from the ICM at hard X-ray energies. Thus far, claimed detections of this emission in Coma are controversial (Fusco-Femiano et al. 2004; Rossetti & Molendi 2004). We present a Suzaku HXD-PIN observation of the Coma cluster in order to nail down its non-thermal hard X-ray content. The contribution of thermal emission to the HXD-PIN spectrum is constrained by simultaneously fitting thermal and non-thermal models to it and a spatially equivalent spectrum derived from an XMM-Newton mosaic of the Coma field (Schuecker et al. 2004). We fail to find statistically significant evidence for non-thermal emission in the spectra, which are better described by only a single or multi-temperature model for the ICM. Including systematic uncertainties, we derive a 90% upper limit on t...

  12. The Suzaku view of highly-ionised outflows in AGN: I - Statistical detection and global absorber properties

    CERN Document Server

    Gofford, Jason; Tombesi, Francesco; Braito, Valentina; Turner, T Jane; Miller, Lance; Cappi, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a new spectroscopic study of Fe K-band absorption in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Using data obtained from the Suzaku public archive we have performed a statistically driven blind search for Fe XXV Hea and/or Fe XXVI Lyb absorption lines in a large sample of 51 type 1.0-1.9 AGN. Through extensive Monte Carlo simulations we find statistically significant absorption is detected at E>6.7 keV in 20/51 sources at the P(MC)>95% level, which corresponds to ~40% of the total sample. In all cases, individual absorption lines are detected independently and simultaneously amongst the two (or three) available XIS detectors which confirms the robustness of the line detections. The most frequently observed outflow phenomenology consists of two discrete absorption troughs corresponding to Fe XXV Hea and Fe XXVI Lyb at a common velocity shift. From xstar fitting the mean column density and ionisation parameter for the Fe K absorption components are log(NH/cm^{-2})~23 and log(xi/erg cm s^{-1})~4.5, ...

  13. Suzaku view of Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 during Type I X-ray outbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K; Epili, Prahlad

    2016-01-01

    We report the timing and spectral properties of Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 by using two Suzaku observations during its 2010 August and 2012 January X-ray outbursts. Pulsations at ~275 s were clearly detected in the light curves from both the observations. Pulse profiles were found to be strongly energy-dependent. During 2010 observation, prominent dips seen in soft X-ray ($\\leq$10 keV) pulse profiles were found to be absent at higher energies. However, during 2012 observation, the pulse profiles were complex due to the presence of several dips. Significant changes in the shape of the pulse profiles were detected at high energies ($>$35 keV). A phase shift of $\\sim$0.3 was detected while comparing the phase of main dip in pulse profiles below and above $\\sim$35 keV. Broad-band energy spectrum of pulsar was well described by a partially absorbed Negative and Positive power-law with Exponential cutoff (NPEX) model with 6.4 keV iron line and a cyclotron absorption feature. Energy of cyclotron absorption line...

  14. Chandra Observations of the Components of Clusters, Groups, and Galaxies and their Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Forman, W; Markevitch, M L; Vikhlinin, A A; Churazov, E

    2001-01-01

    We discuss two themes from Chandra observations of galaxies, groups, and clusters. First, we review the merging process as seen through the high angular resolution of Chandra. We present examples of sharp, edge-like surface brightness structures ``cold fronts'', the boundaries of the remaining cores of merger components and the Chandra observations of CL0657, the first clear example of a strong cluster merger shock. In addition to reviewing already published work, we present observations of the cold front around the elliptical galaxy NGC1404 which is infalling into the Fornax cluster and we discuss multiple ``edges'' in ZW3146. Second, we review the effects of relativistic, radio-emitting plasmas or ``bubbles'', inflated by active galactic nuclei, on the hot X-ray emitting gaseous atmospheres in galaxies and clusters. We review published work and also discuss the unusual X-ray structures surrounding the galaxies NGC4636 and NGC507.

  15. Managing radiation degradation of CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Bissell, Bradley A.; Blackwell, William C.; Cameron, Robert A.; Chappell, Jon II.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Gage, Kenneth R.; Grant, Catherine E.; Harbison, Christine F.

    2005-01-01

    The CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory are vulnerable to radiation damage from low-energy protons scattered off the telescope's mirrors onto the focal plane. Following unexpected damage incurred early in the mission, the Chandra Team developed, implemented, and maintains a radiation-protection program. This program - involving scheduled radiation safing during radiation-belt passes, intervention based upon real-time space-weather conditions and radiation-environment modeling, and on-board radiation monitoring with autonomous radiation safing - has successfully managed the radiation damage to the CCDs. Since implementing the program, the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) has increased at an average annual rate of only 2.9x10^-6 (2.3%) for the front- illuminated CCDs and 0.95x10^-6 (6.5%) for the back-illuminated CCDs. This paper describes the current status of Chandra radiation-management program.

  16. The Chandra Deep Field-North Survey and the Cosmic X-ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, W N; Bauer, F E; Hornschemeier, A E

    2002-01-01

    Chandra has performed a 1.4 Ms survey centred on the Hubble Deep Field-North (HDF-N), probing the X-ray Universe 55-550 times deeper than was possible with pre-Chandra missions. We describe the detected point and extended X-ray sources and discuss their overall multiwavelength (optical, infrared, submillimeter, and radio) properties. Special attention is paid to the HDF-N X-ray sources, luminous infrared starburst galaxies, optically faint X-ray sources, and high-to-extreme redshift AGN. We also describe how stacking analyses have been used to probe the average X-ray emission properties of normal and starburst galaxies at cosmologically interesting distances. Finally, we discuss plans to extend the survey and argue that a 5-10 Ms Chandra survey would lay key groundwork for future missions such as XEUS and Generation-X.

  17. Intrinsic Absorption in the Spectrum of Mrk 279: Simultaneous Chandra, FUSE, and STIS Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Jennifer E.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Lee, Julia C; Arav, Nahum; Ogle, Patrick; Roraback, Kenneth; Weaver, Kimberly; Alexander, Tal; Brotherton, Michael; Green, Richard F.; Hutchings, John; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Marshall, Herman; Oegerle, William; Zheng, Wei

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the intrinsic X-ray and far-ultraviolet absorption in the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy Markarian 279 using simultaneous observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). We also present FUSE observations made at three additional epochs. We detect the Fe K-alpha emission line in the Chandra spectrum, and its flux is consistent with the low X-ray continuu...

  18. The Young Stellar Population in M17 Revealed by Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broos, Patrick S.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Wang, Junfeng; Garmire, Gordon P.; Jiang, Zhibo; Tsuboi, Yohko

    2007-04-01

    We report here results from a Chandra ACIS observation of the stellar populations in and around the M17 H II region. The field reveals 886 sources with observed X-ray luminosities (uncorrected for absorption) between ˜29.3 ergs s-1tables of X-ray source properties, several results are presented: 1. The X-ray luminosity function is calibrated to that of the Orion Nebula Cluster population to infer a total population of roughly 8000-10,000 stars in M17, one-third lying in the central NGC 6618 cluster. 2. About 40% of the ACIS sources are heavily obscured with AV>10 mag. Some are concentrated around well-studied star-forming regions -- IRS 5/UC1, the Kleinmann-Wright Object, and M17-North -- but most are distributed across the field. As previously shown, star formation appears to be widely distributed in the molecular clouds. X-ray emission is detected from 64 of the hundreds of Class I protostar candidates that can be identified by near- and mid-infrared colors. These constitute the most likely protostar candidates known in M17. 3. The spatial distribution of X-ray stars is complex: in addition to the central NGC 6618 cluster and well-known embedded groups, we find a new embedded cluster (designated M17-X), a 2 pc long arc of young stars along the southwest edge of the M17 H II region, and 0.1 pc substructure within various populations. These structures may indicate that the populations are dynamically young. 4. All (14/14) of the known O stars but only about half (19/34) of the known B0-B3 stars in the M17 field are detected. These stars exhibit the long-reported correlation between X-ray and bolometric luminosities of LX˜10-7Lbol. While many O and early-B stars show the soft X-ray emission expected from microshocks in their winds or moderately hard emission that could be caused by magnetically channeled wind shocks, six of these stars exhibit very hard thermal plasma components (kT>4 keV) that may be due to colliding wind binaries. More than 100 candidate new OB

  19. Chandra Observations of Dying Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims. We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods. We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results. The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions. We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  20. The Chandra Survey of Extragalactic Sources in the 3CR Catalog: X-ray Emission from Nuclei, Jets, and Hotspots in the Chandra Archival Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F; Liuzzo, E; Orienti, M; Paladino, R; Paggi, A; Tremblay, G R; Wilkes, B J; Kuraszkiewicz, J; Baum, S A; O'Dea, C P

    2016-01-01

    As part of our program to build a complete radio and X-ray database of all the 3CR extragalactic radio sources, we present an analysis of 93 sources for which Chandra archival data are available. Most of these sources have been already published. Here we provide a uniform re-analysis and present nuclear X-ray fluxes and X-ray emission associated with radio jet knots and hotspots using both publicly available radio images and new radio images that have been constructed from data available in the VLA archive. For about 1/3 of the sources in the selected sample a comparison between the Chandra and the radio observations was not reported in the literature: we find X-ray detections of 2 new radio jet knots and 17 hotspots. We also report the X-ray detection of extended emission from the intergalactic medium of 15 galaxy clusters, two of which were most likely unknown previously.

  1. THE CHANDRA SURVEY OF EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES IN THE 3CR CATALOG: X-RAY EMISSION FROM NUCLEI, JETS, AND HOTSPOTS IN THE CHANDRA ARCHIVAL OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Wilkes, B. J.; Kuraszkiewicz, J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Liuzzo, E.; Orienti, M.; Paladino, R. [Istituto di Radioastronomia, INAF, via Gobetti 101, I-40129, Bologna (Italy); Tremblay, G. R. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States); Baum, S. A.; O’Dea, C. P. [University of Manitoba, Dept of Physics and Astronomy, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    As part of our program to build a complete radio and X-ray database of all Third Cambridge catalog extragalactic radio sources, we present an analysis of 93 sources for which Chandra archival data are available. Most of these sources have already been published. Here we provide a uniform re-analysis and present nuclear X-ray fluxes and X-ray emission associated with radio jet knots and hotspots using both publicly available radio images and new radio images that have been constructed from data available in the Very Large Array archive. For about 1/3 of the sources in the selected sample, a comparison between the Chandra and radio observations was not reported in the literature: we find X-ray detections of 2 new radio jet knots and 17 hotspots. We also report the X-ray detection of extended emission from the intergalactic medium for 15 galaxy clusters.

  2. The 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North Survey and the 250 ks Extended Chandra Deep Field-South Survey: Improved Point-Source Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, Y Q; Brandt, W N; Alexander, D M; Bauer, F E; Lehmer, B D; Yang, G

    2016-01-01

    We present improved point-source catalogs for the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N) and the 250 ks Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDF-S), implementing a number of recent improvements in Chandra source-cataloging methodology. For the CDF-N/E-CDF-S, we provide a main catalog that contains 683/1003 X-ray sources detected with wavdetect at a false-positive probability threshold of $10^{-5}$ that also satisfy a binomial-probability source-selection criterion of $P<0.004$/$P<0.002$. Such an approach maximizes the number of reliable sources detected: a total of 196/275 main-catalog sources are new compared to the Alexander et al. (2003) CDF-N/Lehmer et al. (2005) E-CDF-S main catalogs. We also provide CDF-N/E-CDF-S supplementary catalogs that consist of 72/56 sources detected at the same wavdetect threshold and having $P$ of $0.004-0.1$/$0.002-0.1$ and $K_s\\le22.9/K_s\\le22.3$ mag counterparts. For all $\\approx1800$ CDF-N and E-CDF-S sources, including the $\\approx500$ newly detected ones (these being...

  3. Suzaku Observation of HESS J1825-137: Discovery of Largely-Extended X-rays near from PSR J1826-1334

    CERN Document Server

    Uchiyama, H; Tsuru, T G; Koyama, K; Bamba, A

    2008-01-01

    We observed the brightest part of HESS J1825-137 with the Suzaku XIS, and found diffuse X-rays extending at least up to 15' (~ 17 pc) from the pulsar PSR J1826-1334. The spectra have no emission line, and are fitted with an absorbed power-law model. The X-rays, therefore, are likely due to synchrotron emission from a pulsar wind nebula. The photon index near at the pulsar (r 8.8 times 10^3 km s^{-1}.

  4. Chandra High Resolution Spectroscopy of the Burst Spectrum of EXO 0748-67

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telis, G.; Paerels, F.; Audard, M.; Lanz, T.; Cottam, J.; Méndez, R.M.; Bildsten, L.; Chang, P.; Marshall, H.

    2004-01-01

    We have observed EXO0748-67 for approximately 300 ksec with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer on Chandra. A total of 35 Type I X-ray bursts occurred during our observation, and from these we obtained a composite burst spectrum with high sensitivity in the Fe K band. Along with the sp

  5. The STS-93 crew takes part in payload familiarization of the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A TRW technician joins STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins (center) and Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby (right) as they observe the Chandra X- ray Observatory on its work stand inside the Vertical Processing Facility. Other members of the STS-93 crew who are at KSC for payload familiarization are Mission Specialists Catherine G. Coleman and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as a shuttle mission commander. She was the first woman pilot of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-63, and also served as pilot on mission STS-84. The fifth member of the crew is Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe.

  6. Chandra and XMM–Newton Observations of H2O Maser Galaxy Mrk 266

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Wang; J. S. Zhang; J. H. Fan

    2011-03-01

    For H2O megamaser galaxy Mrk 266, its Chandra and XMM–Newton data are analyzed here. It shows existence of two obscured nuclei (separation is ∼ 5''). Our preferred model, the high energy reflected model can fit the hard component of both nuclei spectra well.

  7. Dissecting Photometric Redshift for Active Galactic Nucleus Using XMM- and Chandra-COSMOS Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvato, M.; Ilbert, O.; Hasinger, G.; Rau, A.; Civano, F.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Elvis, M.; Vignali, C.; Aussel, H.; Comastri, A.; Fiore, F.; Le Floc'h, E.; Mainieri, V.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Capak, P.; Caputi, K.; Cappelluti, N.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Fotopoulou, S.; Fruscione, A.; Gilli, R.; Halliday, C.; Kneib, J. -P.; Kakazu, Y.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Kovac, K.; Ideue, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Impey, C. D.; Le Fevre, O.; Lamareille, F.; Lanzuisi, G.; Le Borgne, J. -F.; Le Brun, V.; Lilly, S.; Maier, C.; Manohar, S.; Masters, D.; McCracken, H.; Messias, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Nagao, T.; Pello, R.; Puccetti, S.; Perez-Montero, E.; Renzini, A.; Sargent, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scodeggio, M.; Scoville, N.; Shopbell, P.; Silvermann, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Trump, J. R.; Zucca, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric redsh

  8. Dissecting Photometric Redshift for Active Galactic Nucleus Using XMM- and Chandra-COSMOS Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvato, M.; Ilbert, O.; Hasinger, G.; Rau, A.; Civano, F.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Elvis, M.; Vignali, C.; Aussel, H.; Comastri, A.; Fiore, F.; Le Floc'h, E.; Mainieri, V.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Capak, P.; Caputi, K.; Cappelluti, N.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Fotopoulou, S.; Fruscione, A.; Gilli, R.; Halliday, C.; Kneib, J. -P.; Kakazu, Y.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Kovac, K.; Ideue, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Impey, C. D.; Le Fevre, O.; Lamareille, F.; Lanzuisi, G.; Le Borgne, J. -F.; Le Brun, V.; Lilly, S.; Maier, C.; Manohar, S.; Masters, D.; McCracken, H.; Messias, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Nagao, T.; Pello, R.; Puccetti, S.; Perez-Montero, E.; Renzini, A.; Sargent, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scodeggio, M.; Scoville, N.; Shopbell, P.; Silvermann, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Trump, J. R.; Zucca, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric redsh

  9. Finding Supernova Ia Progenitors with the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel T. B.; Nelemans, Gijs; Voss, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    We examine pre-supernova Chandra images to find X-ray luminosities of type Ia supernova progenitors. At present, we have one possible direct detection and upper limits for the X-ray luminosities of a number of other supernova progenitors. The method has also yielded a possible detection of a X...

  10. CHANDRA Observations of V407 Vul: Confirmation of the Spin-up

    CERN Document Server

    Strohmayer, T E

    2004-01-01

    V407 Vul is a candidate double-degenerate binary with a putative 1.756 mHz (9.5 min) orbital frequency. In a previous timing study using archival ROSAT and ASCA data we reported evidence for an increase of this frequency at a rate consistent with expectations for gravitational radiation from a detached ultracompact binary system. Here we report the results of new CHANDRA timing observations which confirm the previous indications of spin-up of the X-ray frequency, and provide much tighter constraints on the frequency derivative. We obtained with CHANDRA a total of 90 ksec of exposure in two epochs separated in time by 11.5 months. The total time span of the archival ROSAT, ASCA and new CHANDRA data is now 10.5 years. This more than doubles the interval spanned by the ROSAT and ASCA data alone, providing much greater sensitivity to a frequency derivative. With the addition of the CHANDRA data an increasing frequency is unavoidable, with a value df/dt = 7.0 x 10-18 Hz/s. Although a long-term spin-up trend is con...

  11. X-ray observations of dust obscured galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Corral, A; Comastri, A; Ranalli, P; Akylas, A; Salvato, M; Lanzuisi, G; Vignali, C; Koutoulidis, L

    2016-01-01

    We present the properties of X-ray detected dust obscured galaxies (DOGs) in the Chandra Deep Field South. In recent years, it has been proposed that a significant percentage of the elusive Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGN) could be hidden among DOGs. In a previous work, we presented the properties of X-ray detected DOGs by making use of the deepest X-ray observations available at that time, the 2Ms observations of the Chandra deep fields. In that work, we only found a moderate percentage ($<$ 50%) of CT AGN among the DOGs sample, but we were limited by poor photon statistics. In this paper, we use not only a deeper 6 Ms Chandra survey of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), but combine these data with the 3 Ms XMM-Newton survey of the CDF-S. We also take advantage of the great coverage of the CDF-S region from the UV to the far-IR to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of our sources. Out of the 14 AGN composing our sample, 9 are highly absorbed (but only 3 could be CT AGN), wherea...

  12. Dissecting Photometric Redshift for Active Galactic Nucleus Using XMM- and Chandra-COSMOS Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvato, M.; Ilbert, O.; Hasinger, G.; Rau, A.; Civano, F.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Elvis, M.; Vignali, C.; Aussel, H.; Comastri, A.; Fiore, F.; Le Floc'h, E.; Mainieri, V.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Capak, P.; Caputi, K.; Cappelluti, N.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Fotopoulou, S.; Fruscione, A.; Gilli, R.; Halliday, C.; Kneib, J. -P.; Kakazu, Y.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Kovac, K.; Ideue, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Impey, C. D.; Le Fevre, O.; Lamareille, F.; Lanzuisi, G.; Le Borgne, J. -F.; Le Brun, V.; Lilly, S.; Maier, C.; Manohar, S.; Masters, D.; McCracken, H.; Messias, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Nagao, T.; Pello, R.; Puccetti, S.; Perez-Montero, E.; Renzini, A.; Sargent, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scodeggio, M.; Scoville, N.; Shopbell, P.; Silvermann, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Trump, J. R.; Zucca, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric

  13. Chandra Data Analysis of H2O Megamaser Galaxy NGC 4258

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baisheng Liu; Jiangshui Zhang; Jin Wang

    2011-03-01

    Chandra observations of NGC 4258 were analyzed to investigate the circumnuclear environment of the H2O megamaser galaxy. Its adaptively-smoothed image shows a bright nucleus and another weak source nearby. For the maser host nucleus, our preferred fitting of its spectra gives the absorption of ∼ 7 × 1022cm-2.

  14. A Chandra X-Ray observation of the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogdanov, S.; Archibald, A.M.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Kaspi, V.M.; Lorimer, D.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Ransom, S.M.; Stairs, I.H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S variability, spectroscopy, and imaging study of the peculiar binary containing the millisecond pulsar J1023+0038. The X-ray emission from the system exhibits highly significant (12.5σ) large-amplitude (factor of two to three) orbital variability over the

  15. Chandra observations of comet 9P/Tempel 1 during the Deep Impact campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisse, C. M.; Dennerl, K.; Christian, D. J.; Wolk, S. J.; Bodewits, D.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Hansen, K. C.; Hoekstra, R.; Combi, M.; Fry, C. D.; Dryer, M.; Maekinen, T.; Sun, W.; Jansen, K.C.; Mäkinen, T.

    2007-01-01

    We present results from the Chandra X-ray Observatory's extensive campaign studying Comet 9P/Tempel 1 (T1) in support of NASA's Deep Impact (DI) mission. T1 was observed for similar to 295 ks between 30th June and 24th July 2005, and continuously for similar to 64 ks on July 4th during the impact ev

  16. Analytic parameter dependence of Harish-Chandra modules for real reductive Lie groups - a family affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Noort, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is written in the subfield of mathematics known as representation theory of real reductive Lie groups. Let G be a Lie group in the Harish-Chandra class with maximal compact subgroup K and Lie algebra g. Let Omega be a connected complex manifold. By a family of G-representations parametri

  17. Analytic parameter dependence of Harish-Chandra modules for real reductive Lie groups - a family affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Noort, V.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837768

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is written in the subfield of mathematics known as representation theory of real reductive Lie groups. Let G be a Lie group in the Harish-Chandra class with maximal compact subgroup K and Lie algebra g. Let Omega be a connected complex manifold. By a family of G-representations parametri

  18. Sharp Chandra View of ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Sources: I. Improvement of Positional Accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shuang; Liu, Jifeng

    2016-01-01

    The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) represents one of the most complete and sensitive soft X-ray all-sky surveys to date. However, the deficient positional accuracy of the RASS Bright Source Catalog (BSC) and subsequent lack of firm optical identifications affect the multi-wavelength studies of X-ray sources. The widely used positional errors $\\sigma_{pos}$ based on the Tycho Stars Catalog (Tycho-1) have previously been applied for identifying objects in the optical band. The considerably sharper Chandra view covers a fraction of RASS sources, whose $\\sigma_{pos}$ could be improved by utilizing the sub-arcsec positional accuracy of Chandra observations. We cross-match X-ray objects between the BSC and \\emph{Chandra} sources extracted from the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) archival observations. A combined counterparts list (BSCxACIS) with \\emph{Chandra} spatial positions weighted by the X-ray flux of multi-counterparts is employed to evaluate and improve the former identifications of BSC with the other...

  19. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet Chandra Survey. The serendipitous source catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, P; Mignani, R P; Moretti, A; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G; Mottini, M

    2009-01-01

    We present the Brera Multi-scale Wavelet Chandra (BMW-Chandra) source catalogue drawn from essentially all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by Lazzati et al. (1999) and Campana et al. (1999), which can characterise both point-like and extended sources, we identified 21325 sources. Among them, 16758 are serendipitous, i.e. not associated with the targets of the pointings. This makes our catalogue the largest compilation of Chandra sources to date. The 0.5-10keV absorption corrected fluxes of these sources range from 3E-16 to 9E-12 erg/cm2/s with a median of 7E-15 erg/cm2/s. The catalogue consists of count rates and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7keV; soft, 0.5-2keV; and hard, 2-7keV), where the detection was performed, and source positions relative to the highest signal-to-noise detection among the three bands. The wavelet algorithm also provides an estimate...

  20. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project. II. Samples and X-Ray Data Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Burenin, R. A.; Ebeling, H.;

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the measurements of the galaxy cluster mass functions at z ≈ 0.05 and z ≈ 0.5 using high-quality Chandra observations of samples derived from the ROSAT PSPC All-Sky and 400 deg2 surveys. We provide a full reference for the data analysis procedures, present updated calibration of relati...

  1. The Chandra ACIS Timing Survey Project: glimpsing a sample of faint X-ray pulsators

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, Gian Luca; Castillo, Guillermo Andres Rodriguez; Sidoli, Lara

    2016-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 41 new pulsating sources in the data of the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, which is sensitive to X-ray photons in the 0.3-10 keV band. The archival data of the first 15 years of Chandra observations were retrieved and analysed by means of fast Fourier transforms, employing a peak-detection algorithm able to screen candidate signals in an automatic fashion. We carried out the search for new X-ray pulsators in light curves with more than 50 photons, for a total of about 190,000 lightcurves out of about 430,000 extracted. With these numbers, the ChAndra Timing Survey at Brera And Roma astronomical observatories (CATS@BAR) - as we called the project - represents the largest ever systematic search for coherent signals in the classic X-ray band. More than 50 per cent of the signals were confirmed by further Chandra (for those sources with two or more pointings), XMM-Newton or ROSAT data. The period distribution of the new X-ray pulsators above about 2,000s resembles that of...

  2. Intrinsic Absorption in the Spectrum of Mrk 279: Simultaneous Chandra, FUSE, and STIS Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, J E; Lee, J C; Arav, N; Ogle, P M; Roraback, K; Weaver, K; Alexander, T; Brotherton, M; Green, R F; Hutchings, J B; Kaiser, M E; Marshall, H; Oegerle, W; Zheng, W; Scott, Jennifer E.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Lee, Julia C.; Arav, Nahum; Ogle, Patrick; Roraback, Kenneth; Weaver, Kimberly; Alexander, Tal; Brotherton, Michael; Green, Richard F.; Hutchings, John; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Marshall, Herman; Oegerle, William; Zheng, Wei

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the intrinsic X-ray and far-ultraviolet absorption in the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy Markarian 279 using simultaneous observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). We also present FUSE observations made at three additional epochs. We detect the Fe K-alpha emission line in the Chandra spectrum, and its flux is consistent with the low X-ray continuum flux level of Mrk 279 at the time of the observation. Due to low signal-to-noise ratios in the Chandra spectrum, no O VII or O VIII absorption features are observable in the Chandra data, but the UV spectra reveal strong and complex absorption from HI and high-ionization species such as O VI, N V, and C IV, as well as from low-ionization species such as C III, N III, C II, and N II in some velocity components. The far-UV spectral coverage of the FUSE data provides information on high-order Lyman series absorption, which...

  3. Discovery of Ultra-fast Outflows in a Sample of Broad-line Radio Galaxies Observed with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, F.; Sambruna, R. M.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.; Ballo, L.; Gofford, J.; Cappi, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of a uniform and systematic search for blueshifted Fe K absorption lines in the X-ray spectra of five bright broad-line radio galaxies observed with Suzaku. We detect, for the first time in radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at X-rays, several absorption lines at energies greater than 7 keV in three out of five sources, namely, 3C 111, 3C 120, and 3C 390.3. The lines are detected with high significance according to both the F-test and extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Their likely interpretation as blueshifted Fe XXV and Fe XXVI K-shell resonance lines implies an origin from highly ionized gas outflowing with mildly relativistic velocities, in the range v ~= 0.04-0.15c. A fit with specific photoionization models gives ionization parameters in the range log ξ ~= 4-5.6 erg s-1 cm and column densities of N H ~= 1022-1023 cm-2. These characteristics are very similar to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) previously observed in radio-quiet AGNs. Their estimated location within ~0.01-0.3 pc of the central super-massive black hole suggests a likely origin related with accretion disk winds/outflows. Depending on the absorber covering fraction, the mass outflow rate of these UFOs can be comparable to the accretion rate and their kinetic power can correspond to a significant fraction of the bolometric luminosity and is comparable to their typical jet power. Therefore, these UFOs can play a significant role in the expected feedback from the AGN to the surrounding environment and can give us further clues on the relation between the accretion disk and the formation of winds/jets in both radio-quiet and radio-loud AGNs.

  4. HIGHLY IONIZED Fe-K ABSORPTION LINE FROM CYGNUS X-1 IN THE HIGH/SOFT STATE OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, S.; Yoshikawa, A.; Makishima, K. [Cosmic Radiation Laboratory, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Torii, S.; Noda, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Mineshige, S. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kubota, A. [Department of Electronic Information Systems, Shibaura Institute of Technology, 307 Fukasaku, Minuma-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama 337-8570 (Japan); Gandhi, P. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamiharas, 229-8510 Kanagawa (Japan); Done, C. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-20

    We present observations of a transient He-like Fe K{alpha} absorption line in Suzaku observations of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 on 2011 October 5 near superior conjunction during the high/soft state, which enable us to map the full evolution from the start to the end of the episodic accretion phenomena or dips for the first time. We model the X-ray spectra during the event and trace their evolution. The absorption line is rather weak in the first half of the observation, but instantly deepens for {approx}10 ks, and weakens thereafter. The overall change in equivalent width is a factor of {approx}3, peaking at an orbital phase of {approx}0.08. This is evidence that the companion stellar wind feeding the black hole is clumpy. By analyzing the line with a Voigt profile, it is found to be consistent with a slightly redshifted Fe XXV transition, or possibly a mixture of several species less ionized than Fe XXV. The data may be explained by a clump located at a distance of {approx}10{sup 10-12} cm with a density of {approx}10{sup (-13)-(-11)} g cm{sup -3}, which accretes onto and/or transits the line of sight to the black hole, causing an instant decrease in the observed degree of ionization and/or an increase in density of the accreting matter. Continued monitoring for individual events with future X-ray calorimeter missions such as ASTRO-H and AXSIO will allow us to map out the accretion environment in detail and how it changes between the various accretion states.

  5. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G32.8-0.1 WITH SUZAKU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamba, Aya; Sawada, Makoto [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University 5-10-1 Fuchinobe Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Terada, Yukikatsu [Department of Physics, Science, Saitama University, Sakura, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Hewitt, John; Petre, Robert; Angelini, Lorella [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Safi-Harb, Samar [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Zhou, Ping [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Bocchino, Fabrizio [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134, Palermo (Italy)

    2016-02-10

    We present the first dedicated X-ray study of the supernova remnant (SNR) G32.8−0.1 (Kes 78) with Suzaku. X-ray emission from the whole SNR shell has been detected for the first time. The X-ray morphology is well correlated with the emission from the radio shell, while anti-correlated with the molecular cloud found in the SNR field. The X-ray spectrum shows not only conventional low-temperature (kT ∼ 0.6 keV) thermal emission in a non-equilibrium ionization state, but also a very high-temperature (kT ∼ 3.4 keV) component with a very low ionization timescale (∼2.7 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −3} s), or a hard nonthermal component with a photon index Γ ∼ 2.3. The average density of the low-temperature plasma is rather low, of the order of 10{sup −3}–10{sup −2} cm{sup −3}, implying that this SNR is expanding into a low-density cavity. We discuss the X-ray emission of the SNR, also detected in TeV with H.E.S.S., together with multi-wavelength studies of the remnant and other gamma-ray emitting SNRs, such as W28 and RCW 86. Analysis of a time-variable source, 2XMM J185114.3−000004, found in the northern part of the SNR, is also reported for the first time. Rapid time variability and a heavily absorbed hard-X-ray spectrum suggest that this source could be a new supergiant fast X-ray transient.

  6. Suzaku observations of spectral variations of the ultra-luminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shogo B.; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Makishima, Kazuo

    2017-02-01

    Observations of the ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) Holmberg IX X-1 were carried out with Suzaku twice, once on 2012 April 13 and then on 2012 October 24, with exposures of 180 ks and 217 ks, respectively. The source showed a hard power-law shaped spectrum with a mild cutoff at ˜8 keV, which is typical of ULXs when they are relatively dim. On both occasions, the 0.6-11 keV spectrum was explained successfully in terms of a cool (˜0.2 keV) multi-color disk blackbody emission model and thermal Comptonization emission produced by an electron cloud with a relatively low temperature and high optical depth, assuming that a large fraction of the disk-blackbody photons are Comptonized whereas the rest are observed directly. The 0.5-10 keV luminosity was 1.2 × 1040 erg s-1 in April, and ˜14% higher in October. This brightening was accompanied by spectral softening in ≥2 keV, with little change in the ≤2 keV spectral shape. This behavior can be understood if the accretion disk remains unchanged while the electron cloud covers a variable fraction of the disk. The absorbing column density was consistent with the galactic line-of sight value, and did not vary by more than 1.6 × 1021 cm-2. Together with the featureless spectra, these properties may not be reconciled easily with the super-critical accretion scenario of this source.

  7. Resolving galaxy cluster gas properties at z ∼ 1 with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalucci, I.; Arnaud, M.; Pratt, G. W.; Démoclès, J.; van der Burg, R. F. J.; Mazzotta, P.

    2017-02-01

    Massive, high-redshift, galaxy clusters are useful laboratories to test cosmological models and to probe structure formation and evolution, but observations are challenging due to cosmological dimming and angular distance effects. Here we present a pilot X-ray study of the five most massive (M500 > 5 × 1014M⊙), distant (z 1), clusters detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich effect. We optimally combine XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations by leveraging the throughput of XMM-Newton to obtain spatially-resolved spectroscopy, and the spatial resolution of Chandra to probe the bright inner parts and to detect embedded point sources. Capitalising on the excellent agreement in flux-related measurements, we present a new method to derive the density profiles, which are constrained in the centre by Chandra and in the outskirts by XMM-Newton. We show that the Chandra-XMM-Newton combination is fundamental for morphological analysis at these redshifts, the Chandra resolution being required to remove point source contamination, and the XMM-Newton sensitivity allowing higher significance detection of faint substructures. Measuring the morphology using images from both instruments, we found that the sample is dominated by dynamically disturbed objects. We use the combined Chandra-XMM-Newton density profiles and spatially-resolved temperature profiles to investigate thermodynamic quantities including entropy and pressure. From comparison of the scaled profiles with the local REXCESS sample, we find no significant departure from standard self-similar evolution, within the dispersion, at any radius, except for the entropy beyond 0.7 R500. The baryon mass fraction tends towards the cosmic value, with a weaker dependence on mass than that observed in the local Universe. We make a comparison with the predictions from numerical simulations. The present pilot study demonstrates the utility and feasibility of spatially-resolved analysis of individual objects at high-redshift through

  8. Chandra Detects Halo Of Hot Gas Around Milky Way-Like Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The first unambiguous evidence for a giant halo of hot gas around a nearby, spiral galaxy much like our own Milky Way was found by astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This discovery may lead to a better understanding of our own Galaxy, as well the structure and evolution of galaxies in general. A team of astronomers, led by Professor Daniel Wang of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, observed NGC 4631, a spiral galaxy approximately 25 million light years from Earth with both Chandra and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. While previous X-ray satellites have detected extended X-ray emission from this and other spiral galaxies, because of Chandra's exceptional resolution this is the first time that astronomers were able to separate the individual X-ray sources from the diffuse halo. Chandra found the diffuse halo of X-ray gas to be radiating at a temperature of almost 3 million degrees and extending some 25,000 light years from the galactic plane. "Scientists have debated for over 40 years whether the Milky Way has an extended corona, or halo, of hot gas," said Wang, lead author of the paper which appeared this month in The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "Of course since we are within the Milky Way, we can't get outside and take a picture. However, by studying similar galaxies like NGC 4631, we can get an idea of what's going on within our own Galaxy." The Chandra image reveals a halo of hot gas that extends for approximately 25,000 light years above the disk of the galaxy. One important feature of the X-ray emission from NGC 4631 is that it closely resembles the overall size and shape seen in the radio emission from the galaxy. This indicates that there may be a close connection between the outflows of hot gas, seen in X-rays, and the galaxy's magnetic field, revealed by radio emission. The Hubble image of NGC 4631 shows filamentary, loop-like structures enclosing enhanced X-ray-emitting gas and emanating from regions of recent star formation in

  9. The Chandra ACIS Timing Survey Project: glimpsing a sample of faint X-ray pulsators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, G. L.; Esposito, P.; Rodríguez Castillo, G. A.; Sidoli, L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the discovery of 41 new pulsating sources in the data of the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, which is sensitive to X-ray photons in the 0.3-10 keV band. The archival data of the first 15 yr of Chandra observations were retrieved and analysed by means of fast Fourier transforms, employing a peak-detection algorithm able to screen candidate signals in an automatic fashion. We carried out the search for new X-ray pulsators in light curves with more than 50 photons, for a total of about 190 000 light curves out of about 430 000 extracted. With these numbers, the ChAndra Timing Survey at Brera And Roma astronomical observatories (CATS @ BAR) - as we called the project - represents the largest ever systematic search for coherent signals in the classic X-ray band. More than 50 per cent of the signals were confirmed by further Chandra (for those sources with two or more pointings), XMM-Newton or ROSAT data. The period distribution of the new X-ray pulsators above ˜2000 s resembles that of cataclysmic variables, while there is a paucity of sources with shorter period and low fluxes. Since there is not an obvious bias against these detections, a possible interpretation is in terms of a magnetic gating mechanism in accreting neutron stars. Finally, we note that CATS @ BAR is a living project and the detection algorithm will continue to be routinely applied to the new Chandra data as they become public. Based on the results obtained so far, we expect to discover about three new pulsators every year.

  10. Chandra Resolves Cosmic X-ray Glow and Finds Mysterious New Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    While taking a giant leap towards solving one of the greatest mysteries of X-ray astronomy, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory also may have revealed the most distant objects ever seen in the universe and discovered two puzzling new types of cosmic objects. Not bad for being on the job only five months. Chandra has resolved most of the X-ray background, a pervasive glow of X-rays throughout the universe, first discovered in the early days of space exploration. Before now, scientists have not been able to discern the background's origin, because no X-ray telescope until Chandra has had both the angular resolution and sensitivity to resolve it. "This is a major discovery," said Dr. Alan Bunner, Director of NASA's Structure andEvolution of the universe science theme. "Since it was first observed thirty-seven years ago, understanding the source of the X-ray background has been aHoly Grail of X-ray astronomy. Now, it is within reach." The results of the observation will be discussed today at the 195th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta, Georgia. An article describing this work has been submitted to the journal Nature by Dr. Richard Mushotzky, of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., Drs. Lennox Cowie and Amy Barger at the University of Hawaii, Honolulu, and Dr. Keith Arnaud of the University of Maryland, College Park. "We are all very excited by this finding," said Mushotzky. "The resolution of most of the hard X-ray background during the first few months of the Chandra mission is a tribute to the power of this observatory and bodes extremely well for its scientific future," Scientists have known about the X-ray glow, called the X-ray background, since the dawn of X-ray astronomy in the early 1960s. They have been unable to discern its origin, however, for no X-ray telescope until Chandra has had both the angular resolution and sensitivity to resolve it. The German-led ROSAT mission, now completed, resolved much of the lower

  11. X-Ray Spectra of The High-Mass X-RAY Binary 4U~1700-37 using BeppoSAX, Suzaku and RXTE Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Seifina, Elena; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    We present an X-ray spectral analysis of the high-mass binary 4U~1700-37 during its hard-soft state evolution. We use the BeppoSAX, Suzaku and RXTE (Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer), Suzaku and BeppoSAX observations for this investigation. We argue that the X-ray broad-band spectra during all spectral states can be adequately reproduced by a model, consisting of a low-temperature Blackbody component, two Comptonized components both due to the presence of a Compton cloud (CC) that up-scatters seed photons of $T_{s1}$~< 1.4 keV, and $T_{s2}<$1 keV, and an iron-line component. We find using this model that the photon power-law index is almost constant, $\\Gamma_{1}\\sim 2$ for all spectral states. However, $\\Gamma_{2}$ shows a behavior depending on the spectral state. Namely, $\\Gamma_{2}$ is quasi-constant at the level of $\\Gamma_{2}\\sim 2$ while the CC plasma temperature $kT^{(2)}_e$ is less than 40 keV; on the other hand, $\\Gamma_{2}$ is in the range of $1.3<\\Gamma_{2}<2$, when $kT^{(2)}_e$ is greater th...

  12. The Suzaku Discovery of A Hard Power-Law Component in the Spectra of Short Bursts from SGR 0501+4516

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, Yujin E; Enoto, Teruaki

    2011-01-01

    Using data with the Suzaku XIS and HXD, spectral studies of short bursts from the soft gamma repeater SGR 0501+4516 were performed. In total, 32 bursts were detected during the ~60 ks of observation conducted in the 2008 August activity. Excluding the strongest one, the remaining 31 bursts showed an average 2--40 keV fluence of 1.0(-0.5,+0.3)*10^-9 erg cm^-2. A 1--40 keV spectrum summed over them leaves significant positive residuals in the HXD-PIN band with chi^2/d.o.f. = 74/50, when fitted with a two-blackbody function. By adding a power law model, the fit became acceptable with chi^2/d.o.f. = 56/48, yielding a photon index of Gamma=1.0(-0.3,+0.4). This photon index is comparable to Gamma=1.33(-0.16,+0.23) (Enoto et al. 2010a) for the persistent emission of the same object obtained with Suzaku. The two-blackbody components showed very similar ratios, both in the temperature and the emission radii, to those comprising the persistent emission. However, the power-law to two-blackbody flux ratio was possibly hi...

  13. Suzaku X-ray Follow-up Observations of Seven Unassociated Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Sources at High Galactic Latitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Yosuke; Nakamori, Takeshi; Maeda, Koto; Makiya, Ryu; Totani, Tomonori; Cheung, Chi Chiu; Stawarz, Łukasz; Guillemot, Lucas; Freire, Paulo César Carvalho; Cognard, Ismaël

    2011-01-01

    We report on our second-year campaign of X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified Fermi-LAT \\gamma-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes (|b|>10 degree) using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer onboard the Suzaku X-ray Observatory. In this second year of the project, seven new targets were selected from the First Fermi-LAT Catalog, and studied with 20-40 ks effective Suzaku exposures. We detected an X-ray point source coincident with the position of the recently discovered millisecond pulsar PSR J2302+4442 within the 95% confidence error circle of 1FGL J2302.8+4443. The X-ray spectrum of the detected counterpart was well fit by a blackbody model with temperature of kT ~0.3 keV, consistent with an origin of the observed X-ray photons from the surface of a rotating magnetized neutron star. For four other targets which were also recently identified with a normal pulsar (1FGL J0106.7+4853) and millisecond pulsars (1FGL J1312.6+0048, J1902.0-5110, and J2043.2+1709), only upper limits in the 0.5-10 keV band were o...

  14. A Search for a keV Signature of Radiatively Decaying Dark Matter with Suzaku XIS Observations of the X-ray Diffuse Background

    CERN Document Server

    Sekiya, Norio; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    We performed the deepest search for an X-ray emission line between 0.5 and 7 keV from non-baryonic dark matter with the Suzaku XIS. Dark matter associated with the Milky Way galaxy was selected as the target to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio. From the Suzaku archive, we selected 187 data sets of blank sky regions which were dominated by the X-ray diffuse background. The data sets were from 2005 to 2013. Instrumental responses were adjusted by multiple calibration data sets of the Crab Nebula. We also improved the technique of subtracting lines of instrumental origin. These energy spectra were well described by X-ray emission due to charge exchange around the Solar System, hot plasma in and around the Milky Way and superposition of extra-galactic point sources. A signal of a narrow emission line was searched for, and the significance of detection was evaluated in consideration of the blind search method (the Look-elsewhere Effect). Our results exhibited no significant detection of an emission line featu...

  15. A broad spectral feature detected during the cooling phase of a type I X-ray burst from GRS 1747-312 with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Masachika; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ozaki, Masanobu; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Mori, Hideyuki; Saji, Shigetaka

    2017-08-01

    We analyzed the Suzaku archive data of a type I X-ray burst from GRS 1747-312, a low-mass X-ray binary located in the globular cluster Terzan 6. During the Galactic bulge mapping observations with Suzaku, which covered Terzan 6, an X-ray burst of long duration and with moderate photospheric-radius expansion was serendipitously detected and was considered to be most probably originating from GRS 1747-312. The time-divided burst spectra were reproduced well with an absorbed blackbody over the majority of the time, but significant deviation was detected late in the cooling phase. The deviation was due to a rolled-off feature, which gradually developed in the cooling phase of the burst, in the energy spectra above ∼7 keV. We tested various models to reproduce the spectral feature and found three types of models (reflection by cold matter, partial-covering absorption, and Doppler-smeared absorption edges due to the rapid spin of a neutron star) gave a statistically acceptable fit. We discussed the feasibility of these models, including a non-Planckian nature of the burst spectra.

  16. Extreme Blazars Studied with Fermi-LAT and Suzaku: 1ES 0347-121 and Blazar Candidate HESS J1943+213

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Y T; Finke, J; Cheung, C C; Dermer, C D; Kataoka, J; Bamba, A; Dubus, G; De Naurois, M; Wagner, S J; Fukazawa, Y; Thompson, D J

    2014-01-01

    We report on our study of high-energy properties of two peculiar TeV emitters: the "extreme blazar" 1ES 0347-121 and the "extreme blazar candidate" HESS J1943+213 located near the Galactic Plane. Both objects are characterized by quiescent synchrotron emission with flat spectra extending up to the hard X-ray range, and both were reported to be missing GeV counterparts in the Fermi-LAT 2-year Source Catalog. We analyze a 4.5 year accumulation of the Fermi-LAT data, resulting in the detection of 1ES 0347-121 in the GeV band, as well as in improved upper limits for HESS J1943+213. We also present the analysis results of newly acquired Suzaku data for HESS J1943+213. The X-ray spectrum is well represented by a single power law extending up to 25 keV with photon index 2.00+/-0.02 and a moderate absorption in excess of the Galactic value, in agreement with previous X-ray observations. No short-term X-ray variability was found over the 80 ks duration of the Suzaku exposure. Under the blazar hypothesis, we modeled th...

  17. Chandra Discovers X-Ray Ring Around Cosmic Powerhouse in Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    After barely two months in space, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has taken a stunning image of the Crab Nebula, the spectacular remains of a stellar explosion, and has revealed something never seen before: a brilliant ring around the nebula's heart. Combined with observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, the image provides important clues to the puzzle of how the cosmic "generator," a pulsing neutron star, energizes the nebula, which still glows brightly almost 1,000 years after the explosion. "The inner ring is unique," said Professor Jeff Hester of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ. "It has never been seen before, and it should tell us a lot about how the energy from the pulsar gets into the nebula. It's like finding the transmission lines between the power plant and the light bulb." Professor Mal Ruderman of Columbia University, New York, NY, agreed. "The X-rays Chandra sees are the best tracer of where the energy is. With images such as these, we can directly diagnose what is going on." What is going on, according to Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Chandra Project Scientist from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, is awesome. "The Crab pulsar is accelerating particles up to the speed of light and flinging them out into interstellar space at an incredible rate." The image shows tilted rings or waves of high-energy particles that appear to have been flung outward over the distance of a light year from the central star, and high-energy jets of particles blasting away from the neutron star in a direction perpendicular to the spiral. Hubble Space Telescope images have shown moving knots and wisps around the neutron star, and previous X-ray images have shown the outer parts of the jet and hinted at the ring structure. With Chandra's exceptional resolution, the jet can be traced all the way in to the neutron star, and the ring pattern clearly appears. The image was made with Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer and High Energy Transmission

  18. Iron-line and continuum variations in the XMM-Newton and Suzaku spectra of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyu, Ming; Méndez, Mariano; Sanna, Andrea; Homan, Jeroen; Belloni, Tomaso; Hiemstra, Beike

    2014-01-01

    We used six simultaneous XMM-Newton and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer plus five Suzaku observations to study the continuum spectrum and the iron emission line in the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53. We modelled the spectra with two thermal components (representing the accretion disc and

  19. Iron-line and continuum variations in the XMM-Newton and Suzaku spectra of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyu, Ming; Mendez, Mariano; Belloni, Tomaso; Homan, Jeroen; Sanna, Andrea; Hiemstra, Beike

    2014-01-01

    We used six simultaneous XMM-Newton and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer plus five Suzaku observations to study the continuum spectrum and the iron emission line in the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53 as a function of the position of the source in the colour-colour diagram. We modelled the

  20. Iron-line and continuum variations in the XMM-Newton and Suzaku spectra of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyu, Ming; Mendez, Mariano; Belloni, Tomaso; Homan, Jeroen; Sanna, Andrea; Hiemstra, Beike

    2014-01-01

    We used six simultaneous XMM-Newton and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer plus five Suzaku observations to study the continuum spectrum and the iron emission line in the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1636-53 as a function of the position of the source in the colour-colour diagram. We modelled the

  1. Properties of the cosmological filament between two clusters: A possible detection of a large-scale accretion shock by Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, H.; Fujita, Y.; Akahori, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Hayashida, K.; Hoshino, A.; Mernier, F.; Yoshikawa, K.; Sato, K.; Kaastra, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    We report on the results of a Suzaku observation of the plasma in the filament located between the two massive clusters of galaxies, Abell 399 and Abell 401. Abell 399 (z = 0.0724) and Abell 401 (z = 0.0737) are expected to be in the initial phase of a cluster merger. In the region between the two clusters, we find a clear enhancement in the temperature of the filament plasma from 4 keV (expected value of a typical cluster temperature profile) to kT 6.5 keV. Our analysis also shows that filament plasma is present out to a radial distance of 15' (1.3 Mpc) from a line connecting the two clusters. The temperature profile is characterized by an almost flat radial shape with kT 6-7 keV within 10' or 0.8 Mpc. Across r = 8' from the axis, the temperature of the filament plasma shows a drop from 6.3 keV to 5.1 keV, indicating the presence of a shock front. The Mach number based on the temperature drop is estimated to be ℳ 1.3. We also successfully determined the abundance profile up to 15' (1.3 Mpc), showing an almost constant value (Z = 0.3 solar) at the cluster outskirts. We estimated the Compton y parameter to be 14.5 ± 1.3 × 10-6, which is in agreement with the Planck results (14-17 × 10-6 on the filament). The line-of-sight depth of the filament is l 1.1 Mpc, which indicates that the geometry of filament is likely a pancake shape rather than cylindrical. The total mass of the filamentary structure is 7.7 × 1013M⊙. We discuss a possible interpretation of the drop of X-ray emission at the rim of the filament, which was pushed out by the merging activity and formed by the accretion flow induced by the gravitational force of the filament.

  2. Chandra Observes the End of an Era in SN 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Kari A.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Park, Sangwook; McCray, Richard; Dwek, Eli; Burrows, David N.

    2016-09-01

    Updated imaging and photometric results from Chandra observations of SN 1987A, covering the last 16 years, are presented. We find that the 0.5-2 keV light curve has remained constant at ˜8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 since 9500 days, with the 3-8 keV light curve continuing to increase until at least 10,000 days. The expansion rate of the ring is found to be energy dependent, such that after day 6000 the ring expands faster in the 2-10 keV band than it does at energies fade. Consistent with the latest optical and infrared results, our Chandra analysis indicates the blast wave is now leaving the dense ER, which marks the beginning of a major change in the evolutionary phase of the supernova remnant 1987A.

  3. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Steve; Swartz, Doug; Tice, Neil; Plucinsky, Paul; Grant, Catherine; Marshall, Herman; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60degC) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition may have changed, perhaps partially related to changes in the operating temperature of the ACIS housing. This evolution of the accumulation of the molecular contamination has motivated further analysis of contamination migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory, particularly within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon monitored temperature data, and an accordingly refined model of the molecular transport.

  4. Joint XMM-Newton, Chandra, and RXTE Observations of Cyg X-1 at Phase Zero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottschmidt, Katja

    2008-01-01

    We present first results of simultaneous observations of the high mass X-ray binary Cyg X-1 for 50 ks with XMM-Newton, Chandra-HETGS and RXTE in 2008 April. The observations are centered on phase 0 of the 5.6 d orbit when pronounced dips in the X-ray emission from the black hole are known to occur. The dips are due to highly variable absorption in the accretion stream from the O-star companion to the black hole. Compared to previous high resolution spectroscopy studies of the dip and non-dip emission with Chandra, the addition of XMM-Newton data allows for a better determination of the continuum, especially through the broad iron line region (with RXTE constraining the greater than 10 keV continuum).

  5. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a particle radiation monitor II

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, C E; Bautz, M W; O'Dell, S L

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer is an instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the radiation belts and solar storms. The Chandra team has implemented procedures to protect ACIS during high-radiation events including autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor. Elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board monitor. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. In this paper, we explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

  6. Observations of the Crab Nebula with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2012-01-01

    The Crab Nebula and its pulsar has been the subject of a number of detailed observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The superb angular resolution of Chandra s high-resolution telescope has made possible numerous remarkable results. Here we describe a number of specific studies of the Crab that I and my colleagues have undertaken. We discuss the geometry of the system, which indicates that the "inner X-ray ring", typically identified with the termination shock of the pulsar s particle wind, is most likely not in the equatorial plane of the pulsar. Other topics are the northern wisps and their evolution with time; the characterization of features in the jet to the southeast; pulse-phase spectroscopy and possible correlations with the features at other wavelengths, particularly the optical polarization; and a search for correlations of the X-ray flux with the recently-discovered gamma -ray flares.

  7. The Precise Location of the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1627-41 with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Patel, S. K.; Tennant, A. F.; Woods, P. M.; Eichler, D.; Lyubarsky, Y.; Bouchet, P.

    2003-01-01

    We report the precise localization of the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1627-41 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The best position for SGR 1627-41 was determined to be RA=16:35:51.844, DEC=-47:35:23.31 (J2000) with an accuracy of 0.6 arcsec. We present the results of our search for an IR counterpart to SGR 1627-41 and compare our results to the existing detections and limits of other magnetar infrared and optical observations in the literature. We also present new observations of SGR 1806-20 obtained during the recent reactivation of the source. In addition, we have determined a precise location for archival Chandra observations and reanalyzed archival IR data in the search for a counterpart.

  8. Deep Medium-Band Subaru Imaging of the MUSYC Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urry, C. Megan; Cardamone, C.; van Dokkum, P.; Gawiser, E.; Brammer, G.; Taylor, N.; Treister, E.; Taniguchi, Y.; Sasaki, S.; Virani, S.; Kriek, M.

    2009-01-01

    We report on deep medium-band imaging with the Subaru telescope, in 18 filters from 427 nm to 856 nm, of the MUSYC survey field in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. We detect 80,000 galaxies to equivalent magnitude R 27 mag, of which approximately 1,000 are X-ray-luminous AGN observed with Chandra and XMM. Combining the Subaru data with optical and IR data (in U,U38,B,V,R,I,z,J,K) we obtain photometric redshifts using EAZY, a fast public photometric redshift code, in the range 0outliers. We describe the colors of normal galaxies and AGN host galaxies at 0

  9. An Overview of the Performance of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, M C; Bautz, M; Cameron, R A; Dewey, D; Drake, J J; Grant, C E; Marshall, H L; Murray, S S

    2003-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory is the X-ray component of NASA's Great Observatory Program which includes the recently launched Spitzer Infrared Telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for observations in the visible, and the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) which, after providing years of useful data has reentered the atmosphere. All these facilities provide, or provided, scientific data to the international astronomical community in response to peer-reviewed proposals for their use. The Chandra X-ray Observatory was the result of the efforts of many academic, commercial, and government organizations primarily in the United States but also in Europe. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) manages the Project and provides Project Science; Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST -- formerly TRW) served as prime contractor responsible for providing the spacecraft, the telescope, and assembling and testing the Observatory; and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) provides technical support a...

  10. Applying the Background-Source separation algorithm to Chandra Deep Field South data

    CERN Document Server

    Guglielmetti, F; Fischer, R; Rosati, P; Tozzi, P

    2012-01-01

    A probabilistic two-component mixture model allows one to separate the diffuse background from the celestial sources within a one-step algorithm without data censoring. The background is modeled with a thin-plate spline combined with the satellite's exposure time. Source probability maps are created in a multi-resolution analysis for revealing faint and extended sources. All detected sources are automatically parametrized to produce a list of source positions, fluxes and morphological parameters. The present analysis is applied to the Chandra Deep Field South 2 Ms public released data. Within its 1.884 ks of exposure time and its angular resolution (0.984 arcsec), the Chandra Deep Field South data are particularly suited for testing the Background-Source separation algorithm.

  11. Supernova Remnant 1987A: High Resolution Images and Spectrum from Chandra Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S; Burrows, D N; Racusin, J L; McCray, R; Borkowski, K J; Park, Sangwook; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Burrows, David N.; Racusin, Judith L.; Cray, Richard Mc; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the morphological and spectral evolution of SNR 1987A from the monitoring observations with the Chandra/ACIS. As of 2005, the X-ray-bright lobes are continuously brightening and expanding all around the ring. The softening of the overall X-ray spectrum also continues. The X-ray lightcurve is particularly remarkable: i.e., the recent soft X-ray flux increase rate is significantly deviating from the model which successfully fits the earlier data, indicating even faster flux increase rate since early 2004 (day ~6200). We also report results from high resolution spectral analysis with deep Chandra/LETG observations. The high resolution X-ray line emission features unambiguously reveal that the X-ray emission of SNR 1987A is originating primarily from a "disk" along the inner ring rather than from a spherical shell. We present the ionization structures, elemental abundances, and the shock velocities of the X-ray emitting plasma.

  12. The BMW Detection Algorithm applied to the Chandra Deep Field south deeper and deeper

    CERN Document Server

    Moretti, A; Campana, S; Tagliaferri, G

    2002-01-01

    Chandra deep fields represent the deepest look at the X-ray sky. We analyzed the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) with the aid of a dedicated wavelet-based algorithm. Here we present a detailed description of the procedures used to analyze this field, tested and verified by means of extensive simulations. We show that we can safely reconstruct the LogN-Log S source distribution of the CDFS down to limiting fluxes of 2.4x10^-17 and 2.1x10^-16 erg s^-1 cm^-2 in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV) bands, respectively, fainter by a factor ~ 2 than current estimates. At these levels we can account for ~ 90% of the 1-2 keV and 2-10 keV X-ray background.

  13. Chandra's Cosmos: Dark Matter, Black Holes, and Other Wonders Revealed by NASA's Premier X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Wallace H.

    2017-03-01

    On July 23, 1999, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the most powerful X-ray telescope ever built, was launched aboard the space shuttle Columbia. Since then, Chandra has given us a view of the universe that is largely hidden from telescopes sensitive only to visible light. In Chandra's Cosmos, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra science spokesperson Wallace H. Tucker uses a series of short, connected stories to describe the telescope's exploration of the hot, high-energy face of the universe. The book is organized in three parts: "The Big," covering the cosmic web, dark energy, dark matter, and massive clusters of galaxies; "The Bad," exploring neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes; and "The Beautiful," discussing stars, exoplanets, and life. Chandra has imaged the spectacular, glowing remains of exploded stars and taken spectra showing the dispersal of their elements. Chandra has observed the region around the supermassive black hole in the center of our Milky Way and traced the separation of dark matter from normal matter in the collision of galaxies, contributing to both dark matter and dark energy studies. Tucker explores the implications of these observations in an entertaining, informative narrative aimed at space buffs and general readers alike.

  14. Real Time Space Weather Support for Chandra X-Ray Observatory Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Minow, Joseph I.; Miller, J. Scott; Wolk, Scott J.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Spitzbart, Bradley D.; Swartz. Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA launched the Chandra X-ray Observatory in July 1999. Soon after first light in August 1999, however, degradation in the energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) x-ray detectors was observed. The source of the degradation was quickly identified as radiation damage in the charge-transfer channel of the front-illuminated CCDs, by weakly penetrating ( soft , 100 500 keV) protons as Chandra passed through the Earth s radiation belts and ring currents. As soft protons were not considered a risk to spacecraft health before launch, the only on-board radiation monitoring system is the Electron, Proton, and Helium Instrument (EPHIN) which was included on Chandra with the primary purpose of monitoring energetic solar particle events. Further damage to the ACIS detector has been successfully mitigated through a combination of careful mission planning, autonomous on-board radiation protection, and manual intervention based upon real-time monitoring of the soft-proton environment. The AE-8 and AP-8 trapped radiation models and Chandra Radiation Models are used to schedule science operations in regions of low proton flux. EPHIN has been used as the primary autonomous in-situ radiation trigger; but, it is not sensitive to the soft protons that damage the front-illuminated CCDs. Monitoring of near-real-time space weather data sources provides critical information on the proton environment outside the Earth s magnetosphere due to solar proton events and other phenomena. The operations team uses data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) to provide near-real-time monitoring of the proton environment; however, these data do not give a representative measure of the soft-proton (Space Weather Prediction Center. This presentation describes the radiation mitigation strategies to minimize the proton damage in the ACIS CCD detectors and the importance of real-time data sources that are used to protect

  15. The Restless Universe - Understanding X-Ray Astronomy in the Age of Chandra and Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Eric M.

    2002-10-01

    Carl Sagan once noted that there is only one generation that gets to see things for the first time. We are in the midst of such a time right now, standing on the threshold of discovery in the young and remarkable field of X-ray astronomy. In The Restless Universe , astronomer Eric Schlegel offers readers an informative survey of this cutting-edge science. Two major space observatories launched in the last few years--NASA's Chandra and the European Newton --are now orbiting the Earth, sending back a gold mine of data on the X-ray universe. Schlegel, who has worked on the Chandra project for seven years, describes the building and launching of this space-based X-ray observatory. But the book goes far beyond the story of Chandra . What Schlegel provides here is the background a nonscientist would need to grasp the present and follow the future of X-ray astronomy. He looks at the relatively brief history of the field, the hardware used to detect X-rays, the satellites--past, present, and future--that have been or will be flown to collect the data, the way astronomers interpret this data, and, perhaps most important, the insights we have already learned as well as speculations about what we may soon discover. And throughout the book, Schlegel conveys the excitement of looking at the universe from the perspective brought by these new observatories and the sharper view they deliver. Drawing on observations obtained from Chandra, Newton , and previous X-ray observatories, The Restless Universe gives a first look at an exciting field which significantly enriches our understanding of the universe.

  16. A Chandra Observation of the Face-on Spiral Galaxy NGC 3938

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhidar, Kelsey; Schlegel, Eric M.

    2017-01-01

    The ACIS detector (Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer) onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory has imaged the face-on spiral NGC 3938 for 50 ksec. We will detect ~50 sources within the D25 radius. We will describe the luminosity distribution in comparison with distributions from other nearby spiral galaxies. We do not detect any diffuse emission. We will compare the X-ray data to observations at other wavebands.

  17. Deep Chandra observations of TeV binaries I : LS I+61 303

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rea, N.; Torres, D.F.; Klis, M. van der; Mendez, M.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Jonker, P.G.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a 95 ks Chandra observation of the TeV emitting High Mass X– ray Binary LS I+61303, using the ACIS-S camera in Continuos Clocking mode to search for a possible X-ray pulsar in this system. The observation was performed while the compact object was passing from phase 0.94 to 0.98 in its

  18. SEARCHING FOR BULK MOTIONS IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM OF MASSIVE, MERGING CLUSTERS WITH CHANDRA CCD DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ang; Yu, Heng; Tozzi, Paolo; Zhu, Zong-Hong, E-mail: yuheng@bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhuzh@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875 (China)

    2016-04-10

    We search for bulk motions in the intracluster medium (ICM) of massive clusters showing evidence of an ongoing or recent major merger with spatially resolved spectroscopy in Chandra CCD data. We identify a sample of six merging clusters with >150 ks Chandra exposure in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.3. By performing X-ray spectral analysis of projected ICM regions selected according to their surface brightness, we obtain the projected redshift maps for all of these clusters. After performing a robust analysis of the statistical and systematic uncertainties in the measured X-ray redshift z{sub X}, we check whether or not the global z{sub X} distribution differs from that expected when the ICM is at rest. We find evidence of significant bulk motions at more than 3σ in A2142 and A115, and less than 2σ in A2034 and A520. Focusing on single regions, we identify significant localized velocity differences in all of the merger clusters. We also perform the same analysis on two relaxed clusters with no signatures of recent mergers, finding no signs of bulk motions, as expected. Our results indicate that deep Chandra CCD data enable us to identify the presence of bulk motions at the level of v{sub BM} > 1000 km s{sup −1} in the ICM of massive merging clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.3. Although the CCD spectral resolution is not sufficient for a detailed analysis of the ICM dynamics, Chandra CCD data constitute a key diagnostic tool complementing X-ray bolometers on board future X-ray missions.

  19. X-rays beware: the deepest Chandra catalogue of point sources in M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulic, N.; Gallagher, S. C.; Barmby, P.

    2016-10-01

    This study represents the most sensitive Chandra X-ray point source catalogue of M31. Using 133 publicly available Chandra ACIS-I/S observations totalling ˜1 Ms, we detected 795 X-ray sources in the bulge, north-east, and south-west fields of M31, covering an area of ≈0.6 deg2, to a limiting unabsorbed 0.5-8.0 keV luminosity of ˜1034 erg s-1. In the inner bulge, where exposure is approximately constant, X-ray fluxes represent average values because they were determined from many observations over a long period of time. Similarly, our catalogue is more complete in the bulge fields since monitoring allowed more transient sources to be detected. The catalogue was cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalogue of M31's D25 isophote consisting of 1948 X-ray sources, with only 979 within the field of view of our survey. We found 387 (49 per cent) of our Chandra sources (352 or 44 per cent unique sources) matched to within 5 arcsec of 352 XMM-Newton sources. Combining this result with matching done to previous Chandra X-ray sources we detected 259. new sources in our catalogue. We created X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) in the soft (0.5-2.0 keV) and hard (2.0-8.0 keV) bands that are the most sensitive for any large galaxy based on our detection limits. Completeness-corrected XLFs show a break around ≈1.3 × 1037 erg s-1, consistent with previous work. As in past surveys, we find that the bulge XLFs are flatter than the disc, indicating a lack of bright high-mass X-ray binaries in the disc and an aging population of low-mass X-ray binaries in the bulge.

  20. Chandra observations of the H2O megamaser galaxy Mrk1210

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We present the first Chandra X-ray observations of the H2O megamaser galaxy Mrk1210 (UGC4203), a Seyfert 2 galaxy at an approximate distance of D~57.6 Mpc. The Chandra X-ray image, with by far the highest angular resolution (~1"), displays an unresolved compact core toward the nuclear region of Mrk1210. Comparisons with the previous X-ray observations in the nuclear emission and the spectral shape indicate a fairly stable phase between 2001 (BeppoSAX and XMM-Newton) and 2004 (Chandra) after a dramatic variation since 1995 (ASCA). The best-fit model of Chandra X-ray spectrum consists of two components. The soft scattered component can be best fitted by a moderately absorbed power-law model adding a spectral line at ~0.9 keV (possibly a Ne-Kα fluorescent line), while the hard nuclear component can be well reproduced by a heavily absorbed power-law model (NH~2×1023 cm-2) with an additional line at ~6.19 keV (close to the Fe-Kα fluorescent line). The derived absorption-corrected X-ray luminosity implies that the dramatic variation of spectral properties is caused by significant changes of the absorbing column density along the line-of-sight, while the intrinsic nuclear X-ray lu-minosity remains stable. In this case, the absorbers should be anisotropic and its size can be constrained to be less than 0.0013 pc. In addition, we also estimate the mass of central engine, the disk radius and the accretion rate of the accretion disk to be 107.12±0.31M⊙, ~1 pc and 0.006, respectively.

  1. Chandra observations of the H2O megamaser galaxy Mrk1210

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JiangShui; FAN JunHui

    2009-01-01

    We present the first Chandra X-ray observations of the H2O megamaser galaxy Mrk1210 (UGC4203), a Seyfert 2 galaxy at an approximate distance of D~57.6 Mpc. The Chandra X-ray image, with by far the highest angular resolution (~1"), displays an unresolved compact core toward the nuclear region of Mrk1210. Comparisons with the previous X-ray observations in the nuclear emission and the spectral shape indicate a fairly stable phase between 2001 (BeppoSAX and XMM-Newton) and 2004 (Chandra) after a dramatic variation since 1995 (ASCA). The best-fit model of Chandra X-ray spectrum consists of two components. The soft scattered component can be best fitted by a moderately absorbed power-law model adding a spectral line at ~0.9 keV (possibly a Ne-Kα fluorescent line), while the hard nuclear component can be well reproduced by a heavily absorbed power-law model (NH~2×1023cm-2) with an additional line at~6.19 keV (close to the Fe-Kα fluorescent line). The derived absorption-corrected X-ray luminosity implies that the dramatic variation of spectral properties is caused by significant changes of the absorbing column density along the line-of-sight, while the intrinsic nuclear X-ray luminosity remains stable. In this case, the absorbers should be anisotropic and its size can be constrained to be less than 0.0013 pc. In addition, we also estimate the mass of central engine, the disk radius and the accretion rate of the accretion disk to be 107.12±0.31M⊙, ~1 pc and 0.006, respectively.

  2. Deep Chandra observations of TeV binaries - I. LS I +61°303

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rea, N.; Torres, D.F.; van der Klis, M.; Jonker, P.G.; Méndez, M.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a 95 ks Chandra observation of the TeV emitting high-mass X-ray binary LS I +61°303, using the ACIS-S camera in continuous clocking mode to search for a possible X-ray pulsar in this system. The observation was performed while the compact object was passing from phase 0.94 to 0.98 in it

  3. Deep Chandra observations of TeV binaries : I. LSI+61°303

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rea, N.; Torres, D. F.; van der Klis, M.; Jonker, P.G.; Mendez, M.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a 95 ks Chandra observation of the TeV emitting high-mass X-ray binary LS I +61 degrees 303, using the ACIS-S camera in continuous clocking mode to search for a possible X-ray pulsar in this system. The observation was performed while the compact object was passing from phase 0.94 to 0.

  4. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory's Radiation Environment and the AP-8/AE-8 Model

    CERN Document Server

    Virani, S N; Plucinsky, P P; Butt, Y M; Virani, Shanil N.; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Butt, Yousaf M.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) was launched on July 23, 1999 and reached its final orbit on August 7, 1999. The CXO is in a highly elliptical orbit, approximately 140,000 km x 10,000 km, and has a period of approximately 63.5 hours (~ 2.65 days). It transits the Earth's Van Allen belts once per orbit during which no science observations can be performed due to the high radiation environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center (CXC) currently uses the National Space Science Data Center's ``near Earth'' AP-8/AE-8 radiation belt model to predict the start and end times of passage through the radiation belts. However, our scheduling software uses only a simple dipole model of the Earth's magnetic field. The resulting B, L magnetic coordinates, do not always give sufficiently accurate predictions of the start and end times of transit of the Van Allen belts. We show this by comparing to the data from Chandra's on-board radiation monitor, the EPHIN (Electron, Proton, Helium Instrument particle detector) instr...

  5. Chandra X-ray Detection of the Enigmatic Field Star BP Psc

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, Joel H; Rodriguez, David; Grosso, Nicolas; Zuckerman, B; Perrin, Marshall D; Forveille, Thierry; Graham, James R

    2010-01-01

    BP Psc is a remarkable emission-line field star that is orbited by a dusty disk and drives a parsec-scale system of jets. We report the detection by the Chandra X-ray Observatory of a weak X-ray point source coincident with the centroids of optical/IR and submillimeter continuum emission at BP Psc. As the star's photosphere is obscured throughout the visible and near-infrared, the Chandra X-ray source likely represents the first detection of BP Psc itself. The X-rays most likely originate with magnetic activity at BP Psc and hence can be attributed either to a stellar corona or to star-disk interactions. The log of the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity (log(L_X/L_{bol}) lies in the range -5.8 to -4.2. This is smaller than log(L_X/L_{bol}) ratios typical of low-mass, pre-main sequence stars, but is well within the log(L_X/L_{bol}) range observed for rapidly-rotating (FK Com-type) G giant stars. Hence, the Chandra results favor an exotic model wherein the disk/jet system of BP Psc is the result of its ver...

  6. An X-ray Tour of Massive Star-forming Regions with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Townsley, L K

    2006-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory is providing fascinating new views of massive star-forming regions, revealing all stages in the life cycles of massive stars and their effects on their surroundings. I present a Chandra tour of some of the most famous of these regions: M17, NGC 3576, W3, Tr14 in Carina, and 30 Doradus. Chandra highlights the physical processes that characterize the lives of these clusters, from the ionizing sources of ultracompact HII regions (W3) to superbubbles so large that they shape our views of galaxies (30 Dor). X-ray observations usually reveal hundreds of pre-main sequence (lower-mass) stars accompanying the OB stars that power these great HII region complexes, although in one case (W3 North) this population is mysteriously absent. The most massive stars themselves are often anomalously hard X-ray emitters; this may be a new indicator of close binarity. These complexes are sometimes suffused by soft diffuse X-rays (M17, NGC 3576), signatures of multi-million-degree plasmas created by fas...

  7. Finding Rare AGN: X-ray Number Counts of Chandra Sources in Stripe 82

    CERN Document Server

    LaMassa, Stephanie M; Glikman, Eilat; Cappelluti, Nico; Civano, Francesca; Comastri, Andrea; Treister, Ezequiel; Arifin,; Boehringer, Hans; Cardamone, Carie; Chon, Gayoung; Kephart, Miranda; Murray, Stephen S; Richards, Gordon; Ross, Nic; Rozner, Joshua S; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We present the first results of a wide area X-ray survey within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, a 300 deg$^2$ region of the sky with a substantial investment in multi-wavelength coverage. We analyzed archival {\\it Chandra} observations that cover 7.5 deg$^2$ within Stripe 82 ("Stripe 82 ACX"), reaching 4.5$\\sigma$ flux limits of 7.9$\\times10^{-16}$, 3.4$\\times10^{-15}$ and 1.8$\\times10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ in the soft (0.5-2 keV), hard (2-7 keV) and full (0.5-7 keV) bands, to find 774, 239 and 1118 X-ray sources, respectively. Three hundred twenty-one sources are detected only in the full band and 9 sources are detected solely in the soft band. Utilizing data products from the {\\it Chandra} Source Catalog, we construct independent Log$N$-Log$S$ relationships, detailing the number density of X-ray sources as a function of flux, which show general agreement with previous {\\it Chandra} surveys. We compare the luminosity distribution of Stripe 82 ACX with the smaller, deeper CDF-S + E-CDFS...

  8. Simultaneous Chandra and RXTE Observations of the nearby bright Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4945

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madejski, Grzegorz

    2003-01-30

    We analyze recent simultaneous Chandra/RXTE observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4945. The unprecedented spatial resolution of Chandra means we are able to separate the spectra of the nucleus, starburst and superwind regions, while the RXTE data extend the spectrum to higher energies. The extreme absorbing column of N{sub H} {approx} 4 x 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} means that the nucleus is only seen directly above 8-10 keV, while the lower energy spectrum from the nuclear region in Chandra is dominated by reflection. By contrast, the superwind is dominated by emission from hot plasma, but the starburst region contains both hot plasma and reaction signatures. To form a reflected spectrum requires that the starburst region contains clumps of cool, optically thick material, perhaps star forming cores, which are irradiated by 7-10 keV photons from the nucleus. Since photons of this energy are obscured along the line sight then this confirms the result of Madejski et al. (2000) that the extreme absorption material is disk-like rather than a torus. However, the IR/optical limits on the lack of high excitation emission lines show that by contrast the lower energy photons from the nucleus are obscured in all directions. We discuss the complex absorption structure revealed by these observations, and propose an overall source geometry in which the nucleus is completely embedded in material with N{sub H} {approx} 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}.

  9. Finding Rare AGN: XMM-Newton and Chandra Observations of SDSS Stripe 82

    CERN Document Server

    LaMassa, Stephanie M; Cappelluti, Nico; Civano, Francesca; Ranalli, Piero; Glikman, Eilat; Treister, Ezequiel; Richards, Gordon; Ballantyne, David; Stern, Daniel; Comastri, Andrea; Cardamone, Carie; Schawinski, Kevin; Boehringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Murray, Stephen S; Green, Paul; Nandra, Kirpal

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the {\\it XMM-Newton} and {\\it Chandra} data overlapping $\\sim$16.5 deg$^2$ of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82, including $\\sim$4.6 deg$^2$ of proprietary {\\it XMM-Newton} data that we present here. In total, 3362 unique X-ray sources are detected at high significance. We derive the {\\it XMM-Newton} number counts and compare them with our previously reported {\\it Chandra} Log$N$-Log$S$ relations and other X-ray surveys. The Stripe 82 X-ray source lists have been matched to multi-wavelength catalogs using a maximum likelihood estimator algorithm. We discovered the highest redshift ($z=5.86$) quasar yet identified in an X-ray survey. We find 2.5 times more high luminosity (L$_x \\geq 10^{45}$ erg s$^{-1}$) AGN than the smaller area {\\it Chandra} and {\\it XMM-Newton} survey of COSMOS and 1.3 times as many identified by XBo\\"otes. Comparing the high luminosity AGN we have identified with those predicted by population synthesis models, our results suggest that this AGN population is a more import...

  10. Intrinsic Absorption in the Spectrum of NGC 7469: Simultaneous Chandra, FUSE, and STIS Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, J E; Lee, J C; Quijano, J K; Brotherton, M; Canizares, C R; Green, R F; Hutchings, J B; Kaiser, M E; Marshall, H; Oegerle, W; Ogle, P; Zheng, W; Scott, Jennifer E.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Lee, Julia C.; Quijano, Jessica Kim; Brotherton, Michael; Canizares, Claude R.; Green, Richard F.; Hutchings, John; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Marshall, Herman; Oegerle, William; Ogle, Patrick; Zheng, Wei

    2005-01-01

    We present simultaneous X-ray, far-ultraviolet, and near-ultraviolet spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 7469 obtained with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. Previous non-simultaneous observations of this galaxy found two distinct UV absorption components, at -560 and -1900 km/s, with the former as the likely counterpart of the X-ray absorber. We confirm these two absorption components in our new UV observations, in which we detect prominent O VI, Ly alpha, N V, and C IV absorption. In our Chandra spectrum we detect O VIII emission, but no significant O VIII or O VII absorption. We also detect a prominent Fe K alpha emission line in the Chandra spectrum, as well as absorption due to hydrogen-like and helium-like neon, magnesium, and silicon at velocities consistent with the -560 km/s UV absorber. The FUSE data reveal that the H I and C IV column densities in this UV- and X-ray- absorbing compon...

  11. The Chandra Cygnus OB2 Legacy Survey: Design and X-ray Point Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Nicholas J; Guarcello, Mario G; Aldcroft, Tom L; Kashyap, Vinay L; Damiani, Francesco; DePasquale, Joe; Fruscione, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The Cygnus OB2 association is the largest concentration of young and massive stars within 2 kpc of the Sun, including an estimated 65 O-type stars and hundreds of OB stars. The Chandra Cygnus OB2 Legacy Survey is a large imaging program undertaken with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The survey has imaged the central 0.5 deg^2 of the Cyg OB2 association with an effective exposure of 120ks and an outer 0.35 deg^2 area with an exposure of 60ks. Here we describe the survey design and observations, the data reduction and source detection, and present a catalog of 8,000 X-ray point sources. The survey design employs a grid of 36 heavily (~50%) overlapping pointings, a method that overcomes Chandra's low off-axis sensitivity and produces a highly uniform exposure over the inner 0.5 deg^2. The full X-ray catalog is described here and is made available online.

  12. SNR 1E0102.2-7219 after Six Years with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, M. J.; Schlegel, E. M.; Keohane, J.

    2005-12-01

    We present Chandra X-ray Observatory archived observations of the supernova remnant 1E0102.2-7219 in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Combining 22 ACIS-I observations for 230 ks of total exposure time, we present ACIS images with an unprecedented signal to noise ratio for this remnant. We present three upper limits on the X-ray flux for the remnant's elusive central compact object, which are consistent with current neutron star cooling models, based on a Cas A-like blackbody spectrum. Additionally, we discuss the elliptical structure of the remnant and the relative positions of the blast wave, the reverse shock, and the extent of 1E0102.2-7219's rim. This research was supported by the NSF REU Program at SAO under Eric Schlegel, whose research was supported by contract number NAS8-39073 from NASA to SAO for operation of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Jonathan Keohane's research was supported by Chandra award GO3-4070C.

  13. TGCat, The Chandra Transmission Grating Catalog and Archive: Systems, Design and Accessibility

    CERN Document Server

    Mitschang, Arik W; Nichols, Joy S

    2010-01-01

    The recently released Chandra Transmission Grating Catalog and Archive, TGCat, presents a fully dynamic on-line catalog allowing users to browse and categorize Chandra gratings observations quickly and easily, generate custom plots of resulting response corrected spectra on-line without the need for special software and to download analysis ready products from multiple observations in one convenient operation. TGCat has been registered as a VO resource with the NVO providing direct access to the catalogs interface. The catalog is supported by a back-end designed to automatically fetch newly public data, process, archive and catalog them, At the same time utilizing an advanced queue system integrated into the archive's MySQL database allowing large processing projects to take advantage of an unlimited number of CPUs across a network for rapid completion. A unique feature of the catalog is that all of the high level functions used to retrieve inputs from the Chandra archive and to generate the final data produc...

  14. Chandra and XMM Observations of the Composite Supernova Remnant G327.1-1.1

    CERN Document Server

    Temim, Tea; Gaensler, B M; Hughes, John P; van der Swaluw, Eric

    2008-01-01

    We present new X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of a composite supernova remnant G327.1-1.1 using the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories. G327.1-1.1 has an unusual morphology consisting of a symmetric radio shell and an off center nonthermal component that indicates the presence of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Radio observations show a narrow finger of emission extending from the PWN structure towards the northwest. X-ray studies with ASCA, ROSAT, and BeppoSAX revealed elongated extended emission and a compact source at the tip of the finger that may be coincident with the actual pulsar. The high resolution Chandra observations provide new insight into the structure of the inner region of the remnant. The images show a compact source embedded in a cometary structure, from which a trail of X-ray emission extends in the southeast direction. The Chandra images also reveal two prong-like structures that appear to originate from the vicinity of the compact source and extend into a large bubble that is oriente...

  15. Maintaining Software for Active Missions: A Case Study of Chandra's Instrumentation Over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, D. G., II; Chen, J. C.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Allen, G. E.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Primini, F. A.

    2011-07-01

    During eleven plus years of operation, ample knowledge has been gained regarding the Chandra X-ray Observatory's scientific instruments and how they are performing over time. In this paper we will summarize the significant software changes related to the performance and knowledge gained about the observatory's instrumentation specifically targeting the last five years of the mission. With this knowledge, numerous upgrades to the Chandra processing software have taken place to correct issues that have developed on orbit (ACIS CTI effects, LETG/ACIS rotation), to correct for hardware issues (HRC timing), and for our better understanding of the evolution of the instrumentation (temporal gain shifts in both instruments). In addition, we will discuss the challenges in maintaining software when the calibrations for different operating modes are incrementally made available. This includes challenges in maintaining an archive with a mixture of data products with different calibrations applied. This paper roughly covers the era of the 3rd reprocessing of the Chandra archive (Repro-3).

  16. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet Chandra Survey. I. Serendipitous source catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, P; Mignani, R P; Moretti, A; Mottini, M; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G

    2008-01-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalogue drawn from essentially all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by Lazzati et al. (1999) and Campana et al. (1999), which can characterise both point-like and extended sources, we identified 21325 sources. Among them, 16758 are serendipitous, i.e. not associated with the targets of the pointings, and do not require a non-automated analysis. This makes our catalogue the largest compilation of Chandra sources to date. The 0.5--10 keV absorption corrected fluxes of these sources range from ~3E-16 to 9E-12 erg cm^-2 s^-1 with a median of 7E-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1. The catalogue consists of count rates and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7keV; soft, 0.5-2keV; and hard, 2-7keV), and source positions relative to the highest signal-to-noise detection among the three bands. The wavelet algorithm also provides an estimate of the exten...

  17. Identifications of Four INTEGRAL Sources in the Galactic Plane via Chandra Localizations

    CERN Document Server

    Tomsick, J A; Foschini, L; Kaaret, Philip; Rodríguez, J; Walter, R; Chaty, Sylvain; Foschini, Luigi; Kaaret, Philip; Rodriguez, Jerome; Tomsick, John A.; Walter, Roland

    2006-01-01

    Hard X-ray imaging of the Galactic plane by the INTEGRAL satellite is uncovering many new 20-100 keV sources. A significant fraction of these sources are High-Mass X-Ray Binaries (HMXBs) containing neutron stars. In this work, we present results from INTEGRAL, Chandra, optical, and IR observations of 4 of the IGR sources: IGR J16195-4945, IGR J16207-5129, IGR J16167-4957, and IGR J17195-4100. In all four cases, one relatively bright Chandra source is seen in the INTEGRAL error circle, and these are all likely to be counterparts of the IGR sources. The sources have hard 0.3-10 keV spectra with power-law photon indices of 0.5-1.1. The Chandra positions along with optical and IR sky survey catalogs as well as our own photometry have allowed us to obtain optical and IR identifications for all 4 sources. The J-band magnitudes are in the range 14.9-10.4, and we have used the optical/IR spectral energy distributions to constrain the nature of the sources. Blackbody components with temperature lower limits of >9400 K...

  18. The Chandra Local Volume Survey: The X-ray Point Source Catalog of NGC 300

    CERN Document Server

    Binder, Breanna; Eracleous, Michael; Gaetz, Terrance J; Plucinsky, Paul P; Skillman, Evan D; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Anderson, Scott F; Weisz, Daniel R; Kong, Albert K H

    2012-01-01

    We present the source catalog of a new Chandra ACIS-I observation of NGC 300 obtained as part of the Chandra Local Volume Survey. Our 63 ks exposure covers ~88% of the D25 isophote (R~6.3 kpc) and yields a catalog of 95 X-ray point sources detected at high significance to a limiting unabsorbed 0.35-8 keV luminosity of ~10^36 erg s^-1. Sources were cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalog, and we find 75 "X-ray transient candidate" sources that were detected by one observatory, but not the other. We derive an X-ray scale length of 1.7+/-0.2 kpc and a recent star formation rate of 0.12 Msun yr^-1, in excellent agreement with optical observations. Deep, multi-color imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope, covering ~32% of our Chandra field, was used to search for optical counterparts to the X-ray sources, and we have developed a new source classification scheme to determine which sources are likely X-ray binaries, supernova remnants, and background AGN candidates. Finally, we present the X-ray luminos...

  19. X-Rays Beware: The Deepest Chandra Catalogue of Point Sources in M31

    CERN Document Server

    Vulic, N; Barmby, P

    2016-01-01

    This study represents the most sensitive Chandra X-ray point source catalogue of M31. Using 133 publicly available Chandra ACIS-I/S observations totalling ~1 Ms, we detected 795 X-ray sources in the bulge, northeast, and southwest fields of M31, covering an area of approximately 0.6 deg$^{2}$, to a limiting unabsorbed 0.5-8.0 keV luminosity of $10^{34}$ erg/s. In the inner bulge, where exposure is approximately constant, X-ray fluxes represent average values because they were determined from many observations over a long period of time. Similarly, our catalogue is more complete in the bulge fields since monitoring allowed more transient sources to be detected. The catalogue was cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalogue of M31's $D_{25}$ isophote consisting of 1948 X-ray sources, with only 979 within the field of view of our survey. We found 387 (49%) of our Chandra sources (352 or 44% unique sources) matched to within 5 arcsec of 352 XMM-Newton sources. Combining this result with matching done to ...

  20. X-Ray and Optical Correlation of Type I Seyfert NGC 3516 Studied with Suzaku and Japanese Ground-based Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Hirofumi; Minezaki, Takeo; Watanabe, Makoto; Kokubo, Mitsuru; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Itoh, Ryosuke; Morihana, Kumiko; Saito, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Hikaru; Imai, Masataka; Moritani, Yuki; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Kawabata, Miho; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Uemura, Makoto; Kawabata, Koji; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Arai, Akira; Takagi, Yuhei; Morokuma, Tomoki; Doi, Mamoru; Itoh, Yoichi; Yamada, Shin'ya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    From 2013 April to 2014 April, we performed X-ray and optical simultaneous monitoring of the type 1.5 Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516. We employed Suzaku and five Japanese ground-based telescopes—the Pirka, Kiso Schmidt, Nayuta, MITSuME, and the Kanata telescopes. The Suzaku observations were conducted seven times with various intervals ranging from days or weeks to months, with an exposure of ˜50 ks each. The optical B-band observations not only covered those of Suzaku almost simultaneously, but also followed the source as frequently as possible. As a result, NGC 3516 was found in its faint phase with a 2-10 keV flux of 0.21-2.70 × 10-11 erg s-1 cm-2. The 2-45 keV X-ray spectra were composed of a dominant variable hard power-law (PL) continuum with a photon index of ˜1.7 and a non-relativistic reflection component with a prominent Fe-Kα emission line. Producing the B-band light curve by differential image photometry, we found that the B-band flux changed by ˜2.7 × 10-11 erg s-1 cm-2, which is comparable to the X-ray variation, and we detected a significant flux correlation between the hard PL component in X-rays and the B-band radiation, for the first time in NGC 3516. By examining their correlation, we found that the X-ray flux preceded that in the B band by {2.0}-0.6+0.7 days (1σ error). Although this result supports the X-ray reprocessing model, the derived lag is too large to be explained by the standard view, which assumes a “lamppost”-type X-ray illuminator located near a standard accretion disk. Our results are better explained by assuming a hot accretion flow and a truncated disk.

  1. Chandra Observations and Models of the Mixed Morphology Supernova Remnant W44: Global Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, R. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; Petre, R.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the Chandra observations of the archetypical mixed morphology (or thermal composite) supernova remnant, W44. As with other mixed morphology remnants, W44's projected center is bright in thermal X-rays. It has an obvious radio shell, but no discernable X-ray shell. In addition, X-ray bright knots dot W44's image. The spectral analysis of the Chandra data show that the remnant s hot, bright projected center is metal-rich and that the bright knots are regions of comparatively elevated elemental abundances. Neon is among the affected elements, suggesting that ejecta contributes to the abundance trends. Furthermore, some of the emitting iron atoms appear to be underionized with respect to the other ions, providing the first potential X-ray evidence for dust destruction in a supernova remnant. We use the Chandra data to test the following explanations for W44's X-ray bright center: 1.) entropy mixing due to bulk mixing or thermal conduction, 2.) evaporation of swept up clouds, and 3.) a metallicity gradient, possibly due to dust destruction and ejecta enrichment. In these tests, we assume that the remnant has evolved beyond the adiabatic evolutionary stage, which explains the X-ray dimness of the shell. The entropy mixed model spectrum was tested against the Chandra spectrum for the remnant's projected center and found to be a good match. The evaporating clouds model was constrained by the finding that the ionization parameters of the bright knots are similar to those of the surrounding regions. While both the entropy mixed and the evaporating clouds models are known to predict centrally bright X-ray morphologies, their predictions fall short of the observed brightness gradient. The resulting brightness gap can be largely filled in by emission from the extra metals in and near the remnant's projected center. The preponderance of evidence (including that drawn from other studies) suggests that W44's remarkable morphology can be attributed to dust destruction

  2. CHANDRA Observations of RX J1914.4+ 2456: Spin-up of a White Dwarf?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2004-01-01

    RX 51914.4+2456 is a candidate double-degenerate binary with a putative 1.756 mHz orbital frequency. In a previous timing study using archival ROSAT and ASCA data we reported evidence for an increase of the putative orbital frequency at a rate consistent with expectations for gravitational radiation from the system. Here we report the results of new Chandra timing observations which confirm the previous indications of spin-up of the X-ray frequency, and provide much tighter constraints on the frequency derivative, u. We obtained with Chandra a total of 75 ksec of exposure in two epochs separated in time by 10.3 months. The total time span of the archival ROSAT, ASCA and new Chandra data is now 10.2 years. This more than doubles the interval spanned by the ROSAT and ASCA data alone, providing much greater sensitivity to a frequency derivative. With the addition of the Chandra data an increasing frequency is unavoidable, and the mean i/ is 5.9f0.9 x 10-l' Hz s-'. Interestingly, power spectra of the longest Chandra pointing show evidence for a sideband structure to the 1.756 mHz frequency. The fundamental and first harmonic show evidence for upper sidebands with a frequency separation of E 0.5 mHz from their parent peaks. Additionally, the first and second harmonics show evidence for lower sidebands with approximately half the frequency separation of the upper sidebands. Similar sideband structure is a common feature of Intermediate Polars (Ips)-although it is usually observed in the optical-and suggests the presence of a longer period in the system, perhaps the previously unseen orbital period. If this is correct the sideband structure indicates an orbital period close to 1 hr, and the observed u likely represents the accretion-induced spin-up of a white dwarf. We discuss the implications of these findings for the nature of RX J1914.4+2456.

  3. CHANDRA Observations of V407 Vul: Confirmation of the Spin-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, T.

    2004-01-01

    V407 Vu1 (RX J1914.4+2456) is a candidate double-degenerate binary with a putative 1.756 mHz (9.5 min) orbital frequency. In a previous timing study using archival ROSAT and ASCA data we reported evidence for an increase of this frequency at a rate consistent with expectations for gravitational radiation from a detached ultracompact binary system. Here we report the results of new Chandra timing observations which confirm the previous indications of spin-up of the X-ray frequency, and provide much tighter constraints on the frequency derivative, nu (raised dot). We obtained with Chandra a total of 90 ksec of exposure in two epochs separated in time by 11.5 months. The total time span of the archival ROSAT, ASCA and new Chandra data is now approximately equal to 10.5 years. This more than doubles the interval spanned by the ROSAT and ASCA data alone, providing much greater sensitivity to a frequency derivative. With the addition of the Chandra data an increasing frequency is unavoidable, and the mean nu (raised dot) is 7.0 plus or minus 0.8 x l0(exp -18) Hz per second. Although a long-term spin-up trend is confirmed, there is excess variance in the phase timing residuals, perhaps indicative of shorter timescale torque fluctuations or phase instability associated with the source of the X-ray flux. Power spectral searches for periods longward of the 9.5 minute period do not find any significant modulations, however, the sensitivity of searches in this frequency range are somewhat compromised by the dithering of the Chandra attitude. The observed spin-up is of a magnitude consistent with that expected from gravitational radiation decay, however, the factor of approximately equal to 3 variations in flux combined with the timing noise could conceivably result from accretion-induced spin-up of a white dwarf. Continued monitoring to explore correlations of torque with X-ray flux could provide a further test of this hypothesis.

  4. Flickering Quasar Helps Chandra Measure the Expansion Rate of the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Astronomers using the Chandra X-ray Observatory have identified a flickering, four-way mirage image of a distant quasar. A carefully planned observation of this mirage may be used to determine the expansion rate of the universe as well as to measure the distances to extragalactic objects, arguably two of the most important pursuits in modern astronomy. quasar RX J0911.4+0551 This figure is a composite of the X-ray image of the gravitational lens RX J0911.4+551 (top panel) and the light curves of the lensed images A2 (left panel) and A1 (right panel). Credit: NASA George Chartas, senior research associate at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) and Marshall W. Bautz, principal research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Center for Space Research, present their findings today at the meeting of the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society in Honolulu, Hawaii. "With a carefully planned follow-up, the Chandra observation of quasar RX J0911.4+0551 may lead to a measurement of the Hubble constant, the expansion rate of the universe, in less than a day," said Chartas. The observation would be done not with mirrors but with mirages--four images of a single quasar that capture the quasar's light at different moments of time due to the speed of light and the location of the mirages. Quasars are extremely distant galaxies with cores that glow with the intensity of 10 trillion Suns, a phenomenon likely powered by a supermassive black hole in the heart of the galaxy. This single "point source" image of a quasar may appear as four or five sources when the quasar--from our vantage point on Earth--is behind a massive intervening deflector, such as a dim galaxy. A mirage of images form when the gravity of the intervening deflector forces light rays to bend and take different paths to reach us. The time it takes for light to reach us from the distant object will depend on which path a ray decides to take. "An

  5. Observations of MCG-5-23-16 with Suzaku, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR: Disk Tomography and Compton Hump Reverberation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, A.; Cackett, E. M.; Reynolds, C.; Kara, E.; Harrison, F. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Lohfink, A.; Matt, G.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    MCG-5-23-16 is one of the first active galactic nuclei (AGNs) where relativistic reverberation in the iron K line originating in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole was found, based on a short XMM-Newton observation. In this work, we present the results from long X-ray observations using Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and NuSTAR designed to map the emission region using X-ray reverberation. A relativistic iron line is detected in the lag spectra on three different timescales, allowing the emission from different regions around the black hole to be separated. Using NuSTAR coverage of energies above 10 keV reveals a lag between these energies and the primary continuum, which is detected for the first time in an AGN. This lag is a result of the Compton reflection hump responding to changes in the primary source in a manner similar to the response of the relativistic iron K line.

  6. The 172 ks Chandra Exposure of the LALA Bootes Field: X-Ray Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. X.; Malhotra, S.; Rhoads, J. E.; Brown, M. J. I.; Dey, A.; Heckman, T. M.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Norman, C. A.; Tiede, G. P.; Tozzi, P.

    2004-01-01

    We present an analysis of a deep, 172 ks Chandra observation of the Large Area Lyman Alpha survey (LALA) Bootes field, obtained with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-I) on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. This is one of the deepest Chandra images of the extragalactic sky; only the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field North (CDF-N) and 1 Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) are substantially deeper. In this paper we present the X-ray source catalog obtained from this image, along with an analysis of source counts and optical identifications. The X-ray image is composed of two individual observations obtained in 2002 and reaches 0.5-2.0 and 2.0-10.0 keV flux limits of 1.5×10-16 and 1.0×10-15 ergs cm-2 s-1, respectively, for point sources near the aim point. A total of 168 X-ray sources were detected: 160 in the 0.5-7.0 keV band, 132 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band, and 111 in the 2.0-7.0 keV band. The X-ray source counts were derived and compared with those from other Chandra deep surveys; the hard X-ray source density of the LALA Bootes field is 33% higher than that of CDF-S at the flux level of 2.0×10-15 ergs cm-2 s-1, confirming the field-to-field variances of the hard-band source counts reported by previous studies. The deep exposure resolves >~72% of the 2.0-10.0 keV X-ray background. Our primary optical data are R-band imaging from the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS), with a limiting magnitude of R=25.7 (Vega, 3 σ, and 4" diameter aperture). We have found optical counterparts for 152 of the 168 Chandra sources (90%); 144 of these are detected in the R-band image, and eight have optical counterparts in other bands (either BW, V, I, or z'). Among the R-band nondetected sources, not more than 11 of them can possibly be at z>5, based on the hardness ratios of their X-ray emission and nondetections in bluer bands (BW, V). The majority (~76%) of the X-ray sources are found to have log(fX/fR) within 0.0+/-1 these are believed to be AGNs. Most of the X

  7. A search for a keV signature of radiatively decaying dark matter with Suzaku XIS observations of the X-ray diffuse background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Norio; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2016-06-01

    We performed the deepest search for an X-ray emission line at between 0.5 and 7 keV from non-baryonic dark matter by the Suzaku XIS. Dark matter associated with the Milky Way was selected as the target to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio. From the Suzaku archive, we selected 187 data sets of blank-sky regions that were dominated by the X-ray diffuse background. The data sets were from 2005 to 2013. The instrumental responses were adjusted by multiple calibration data sets of the Crab Nebula. We also improved the technique of subtracting lines of instrumental origin. These energy spectra were well described by X-ray emission due to charge exchange around the Solar System, hot plasma in and around the Milky Way, and the superposition of extra-galactic point sources. A signal of a narrow emission-line was searched for, and the significance of detection was evaluated in consideration of the blind search method (the Look-elsewhere Effect). Our results exhibited no significant detection of an emission line feature from dark matter. The 3 σ upper limit for the emission line intensity between 1 and 7 keV was ˜ 10-2 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1, or ˜ 5 × 10-4 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 per M⊙ pc-2, assuming a dark matter distribution with the Galactic rotation curve. The parameters of sterile neutrinos as candidates of dark-matter were also constrained.

  8. Chandra Finds Oxygen and Neon Ring in Ashes of Exploded Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed an expanding ring-like structure of oxygen and neon that was hurled into space by the explosion of a massive star. The image of E0102-72 provides unprecedented details about the creation and dispersal of heavy elements necessary to form planets like Earth. The results were reported by Professor Claude Canizares of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, at the 195th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta, Ga. Drs. Kathryn Flanagan, David Davis, and John Houck of MIT collaborated with Canizares in this investigation. E0102-72 is the remnant of a supernova explosion located in our neighbor galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud, nearly 200,000 light years away. It was created by the explosion of a star that was more than ten times as massive as our Sun. We are seeing the aftermath of the explosion a thousand or more years after the outburst. Shock waves are heating gas to temperatures of nearly 10 million degrees, so it glows with X-rays that are detected by Chandra's instruments. By using the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETG), astronomers were able to pinpoint the distribution of each chemical element individually and measure the velocities of different parts of the expanding ring. They also show the shock wave in a kind of "freeze-frame," revealing the progressive heating of the stellar matter as it plows into the surrounding gas. This is the first time such detailed X-ray information has ever been obtained for a supernova remnant, and should provide critical clues to the nature of supernovas. The grating spectrometer, which was built by an MIT team led by Canizares, spreads the X-rays according to their wavelength, giving distinct images of the object at specific wavelengths characteristic of each chemical element. Small wavelength shifts caused by the Doppler effect are used to measure the expansion velocities of each element independently. "We've been

  9. NASA's Chandra Finds That Saturn Reflects X-rays From Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    When it comes to mysterious X-rays from Saturn, the ringed planet may act as a mirror, reflecting explosive activity from the sun, according to scientists using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The findings stem from the first observation of an X-ray flare reflected from Saturn's low-latitudes - the region that correlates to Earth's equator and tropics. Led by Dr. Anil Bhardwaj, a planetary scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Ala., the study revealed that Saturn acts as a diffuse mirror for solar X-rays. Counting photons - particles that carry electromagnetic energy including X-rays - was critical to this discovery. For every few thousand X-ray photons Saturn receives from the sun, it reflects a single X-ray photon back. Previous studies revealed that Jupiter, with a diameter 11 times that of Earth, behaves in a similar fashion. Saturn is about 9.5 times as big as Earth, but is twice as far from Earth as Jupiter. "The bigger the planet and nearer to the Sun, the more solar photons it will intercept - resulting in more reflected X-rays," said Bhardwaj. "These results imply we could use giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn as remote-sensing tools. By reflecting solar activity back to us, they could help us monitor X-ray flaring on portions of the sun facing away from Earth's space satellites." Massive solar explosions called flares often accompany coronal mass ejections, which emit solar material and magnetic field. When directed toward the Earth, these ejections can wreak havoc on communication systems from cell phones to satellites. Even as the research appears to have solved one mystery - the source of Saturn's X-rays, it fueled longstanding questions about magnetic fields. Earth's magnetic field is the reason compasses work, since the field acts like a huge bar magnet, causing the magnetic north pole of a compass to point to the magnetic south pole of the Earth. In addition, migratory birds seem to sense the magnetic field

  10. THE CHANDRA LOCAL VOLUME SURVEY: THE X-RAY POINT-SOURCE CATALOG OF NGC 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, B.; Williams, B. F.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Anderson, S. F.; Weisz, D. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Eracleous, M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Gaetz, T. J.; Plucinsky, P. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Skillman, E. D. [Astronomy Department, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Kong, A. K. H. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-10

    We present the source catalog of a new Chandra ACIS-I observation of NGC 300 obtained as part of the Chandra Local Volume Survey. Our 63 ks exposure covers {approx}88% of the D{sub 25} isophote (R Almost-Equal-To 6.3 kpc) and yields a catalog of 95 X-ray point sources detected at high significance to a limiting unabsorbed 0.35-8 keV luminosity of {approx}10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Sources were cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalog, and we find 75 'X-ray transient candidate' sources that were detected by one observatory, but not the other. We derive an X-ray scale length of 1.7 {+-} 0.2 kpc and a recent star formation rate of 0.12 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} in excellent agreement with optical observations. Deep, multi-color imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope, covering {approx}32% of our Chandra field, was used to search for optical counterparts to the X-ray sources, and we have developed a new source classification scheme to determine which sources are likely X-ray binaries, supernova remnants, and background active galactic nucleus candidates. Finally, we present the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) at different X-ray energies, and we find the total NGC 300 X-ray point-source population to be consistent with other late-type galaxies hosting young stellar populations ({approx}< 50 Myr). We find that XLF of sources associated with older stellar populations has a steeper slope than the XLF of X-ray sources coinciding with young stellar populations, consistent with theoretical predictions.

  11. Applications for edge detection techniques using Chandra and XMM-Newton data: galaxy clusters and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S. A.; Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-09-01

    The unrivalled spatial resolution of the Chandra X-ray observatory has allowed many breakthroughs to be made in high-energy astrophysics. Here we explore applications of Gaussian gradient magnitude (GGM) filtering to X-ray data, which dramatically improves the clarity of surface brightness edges in X-ray observations, and maps gradients in X-ray surface brightness over a range of spatial scales. In galaxy clusters, we find that this method is able to reveal remarkable substructure behind the cold fronts in Abell 2142 and Abell 496, possibly the result of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. In Abell 2319 and Abell 3667, we demonstrate that the GGM filter can provide a straightforward way of mapping variations in the widths and jump ratios along the lengths of cold fronts. We present results from our ongoing programme of analysing the Chandra and XMM-Newton archives with the GGM filter. In the Perseus cluster, we identify a previously unseen edge around 850 kpc from the core to the east, lying outside a known large-scale cold front, which is possibly a bow shock. In MKW 3s we find an unusual `V' shape surface brightness enhancement starting at the cluster core, which may be linked to the AGN jet. In the Crab nebula a new, moving feature in the outer part of the torus is identified which moves across the plane of the sky at a speed of ˜0.1c, and lies much further from the central pulsar than the previous motions seen by Chandra.

  12. Deep Chandra Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud. II. Timing Analysis of X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, JaeSub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Haberl, Frank; Sasaki, Manami; Drake, Jeremy J.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Laycock, Silas

    2017-09-01

    We report the timing analysis results of X-ray pulsars from a recent deep Chandra survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We analyzed a total exposure of 1.4 Ms from 31 observations over a 1.2 deg2 region in the SMC under a Chandra X-ray Visionary Program. Using the Lomb–Scargle and epoch-folding techniques, we detected periodic modulations from 20 pulsars and a new candidate pulsar. The survey also covered 11 other pulsars with no clear sign of periodic modulation. The 0.5–8 keV X-ray luminosity (L X ) of the pulsars ranges from 1034 to 1037 erg s‑1 at 60 kpc. All of the Chandra sources with L X ≳ 4 × 1035 erg s‑1 exhibit X-ray pulsations. The X-ray spectra of the SMC pulsars (and high-mass X-ray binaries) are in general harder than those of the SMC field population. All but SXP 8.02 can be fitted by an absorbed power-law model with a photon index of Γ ≲ 1.5. The X-ray spectrum of the known magnetar SXP 8.02 is better fitted with a two-temperature blackbody model. Newly measured pulsation periods of SXP 51.0, SXP 214, and SXP 701, are significantly different from the previous XMM-Newton and RXTE measurements. This survey provides a rich data set for energy-dependent pulse profile modeling. Six pulsars show an almost eclipse-like dip in the pulse profile. Phase-resolved spectral analysis reveals diverse spectral variations during pulsation cycles: e.g., for an absorbed power-law model, some exhibit an (anti)-correlation between absorption and X-ray flux, while others show more intrinsic spectral variation (i.e., changes in photon indices).

  13. A CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF THE ECLIPSING WOLF-RAYET BINARY CQ Cep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Stephen L. [CASA, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Zhekov, Svetozar A. [Space Research and Technology Institute, Akad. G. Bonchev Str., Sofia, 1113 (Bulgaria); Güdel, Manuel [Dept. of Astrophysics, Univ. of Vienna, Türkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Schmutz, Werner, E-mail: stephen.skinner@colorado.edu, E-mail: szhekov@space.bas.bg, E-mail: manuel.guedel@univie.ac.at, E-mail: werner.schmutz@pmodwrc.ch [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos and World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC), Dorfstrasse 33, CH-7260 Davos Dorf (Switzerland)

    2015-02-01

    The short-period (1.64 d) near-contact eclipsing WN6+O9 binary system CQ Cep provides an ideal laboratory for testing the predictions of X-ray colliding wind shock theory at close separation where the winds may not have reached terminal speeds before colliding. We present results of a Chandra X-ray observation of CQ Cep spanning ∼1 day during which a simultaneous Chandra optical light curve was acquired. Our primary objective was to compare the observed X-ray properties with colliding wind shock theory, which predicts that the hottest shock plasma (T ≳ 20 MK) will form on or near the line-of-centers between the stars. The X-ray spectrum is strikingly similar to apparently single WN6 stars such as WR 134 and spectral lines reveal plasma over a broad range of temperatures T ∼ 4-40 MK. A deep optical eclipse was seen as the O star passed in front of the Wolf-Rayet star and we determine an orbital period P {sub orb} = 1.6412400 d. Somewhat surprisingly, no significant X-ray variability was detected. This implies that the hottest X-ray plasma is not confined to the region between the stars, at odds with the colliding wind picture and suggesting that other X-ray production mechanisms may be at work. Hydrodynamic simulations that account for such effects as radiative cooling and orbital motion will be needed to determine if the new Chandra results can be reconciled with the colliding wind picture.

  14. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.; Tennant, Allyn F.

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon temperature data, and a refined model of the molecular transport.

  15. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory - III

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexy A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Dahmer, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    During its first 16 years of operation, the cold (about -60 C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity, in part to evaluate potential bake-out scenarios intended to reduce the level of contamination. Keywords: X-ray astronomy, CCDs, contamination, modeling and simulation, spacecraft operations

  16. The Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating: Design, Fabrication, Ground Calibration and Five Years in Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Canizares, C R; Dewey, D; Flanagan, K A; Galton, E B; Huenemoerder, D P; Ishibashi, K; Markert, T H; Marshall, H L; McGuirk, M; Schattenburg, M L; Schulz, N S; Smith, H I; Wise, M; Canizares, Claude R.; Davis, John E.; Dewey, Daniel; Flanagan, Kathryn A.; Galton, Eugene B.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Markert, Thomas H.; Marshall, Herman L.; Guirk, Michael Mc; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Smith, Henry I.; Wise, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Details of the design, fabrication, ground and flight calibration of the High Energy Transmission Grating, HETG, on the Chandra X-ray Observatory are presented after five years of flight experience. Specifics include the theory of phased transmission gratings as applied to the HETG, the Rowland design of the spectrometer, details of the grating fabrication techniques, and the results of ground testing and calibration of the HETG. For nearly six years the HETG has operated essentially as designed, although it has presented some subtle flight calibration effects.

  17. Metal abundances in PG1159 stars from Chandra and FUSE spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, K; Dreizler, S; Rauch, T; Barstow, M A; Kruk, J W

    2002-01-01

    We investigate FUSE spectra of three PG1159 stars and do not find any evidence for iron lines. From a comparison with NLTE models we conclude a deficiency of 1-1.5 dex. We speculate that iron was transformed into heavier elements. A soft X-ray Chandra spectrum of the unique H- and He-deficient star H1504+65 is analyzed. We find high neon and magnesium abundances and confirm that H1504+65 is the bare core of either a C-O or a O-Ne-Mg white dwarf.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: A deep Chandra ACIS survey of M51 (Kuntz+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Long, K. S.; Kilgard, R. E.

    2016-11-01

    This deep study of M51 is composed of 107ks of archival Chandra observations, to which we have added another 745ks of observations. All of the observations were made with the ACIS-S array. M51 has been observed extensively with HST. In particular, essentially all of M51 and its companion NGC 5195 was imaged with Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) in V, R, and I (F435W, F555W, F814W) and Hα (F658N) as a Hubble Legacy Project (Proposal ID 10452, PI: S. Beckwith). (4 data files).

  19. High-Redshift AGNs and the Next Decade of Chandra and XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, W N

    2016-01-01

    We briefly review how X-ray observations of high-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z = 4-7 have played a critical role in understanding their basic demographics as well as their physical processes; e.g., absorption by nuclear material and winds, accretion rates, and jet emission. We point out some key remaining areas of uncertainty, highlighting where further Chandra and XMM-Newton observations/analyses, combined with new multiwavelength survey data, can advance understanding over the next decade.

  20. Chandra Observes Cosmic Traffic Pile-Up In Energetic Quasar Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Using the unrivaled high resolution of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have seen important new details in the powerful jet shooting from the quasar 3C273. This research, coupled with optical and radio data, may reveal how these very high velocity jets are driven from the supermassive black holes that scientists believe lurk in the center of quasars. "For the first time, Chandra has given us an X-ray view into the area between 3C273's core and the beginning of the jet," says MIT's Herman Marshall, lead author on the paper submitted to Astrophysical Journal Letters. "Instead of being void of X-ray emission, Chandra has enabled us to detect a faint, but definite, stream of energy." The high-powered jets driven from quasars, often at velocities very close to the speed of light, have long been perplexing for scientists. Instead of seeing a smooth stream of material driven from the core of the quasar, most optical, radio, and earlier X-ray observations have revealed inconsistent, "lumpy" clouds of gas. This newly discovered continuous X-ray flow in 3C273 from the core to the jet may reveal insight on the physical processes that power these jets. Scientists would like to learn why matter is violently ejected from the quasar's core, then appears to suddenly slow down. "If there is a slower car in front on a highway, a faster one from behind will eventually catch up and maybe cause a wreck," says Marshall. "If the jet flow velocity changes, then gas shocks may result, which are akin to car collisions. These gigantic clouds of high-energy electrons, now seen in X rays with Chandra, may indeed be the result of some sort of cosmic traffic pile-up." The X-ray power produced in one of these pile-ups is tremendous. For example, the X-ray output of the first knot in the jet is greater than that of most Seyfert galaxies, which are thought to be powered by supermassive black holes. The abundance of X-ray emission suggests that large amounts of energy may also be