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Sample records for chamber dependent correction

  1. Evaluation of ion chamber dependent correction factors for ionisation chamber dosimetry in proton beams using a Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmans, H. [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Biomedical Physics; Verhaegen, F.

    1995-12-01

    In the last decade, several clinical proton beam therapy facilities have been developed. To satisfy the demand for uniformity in clinical (routine) proton beam dosimetry two dosimetry protocols (ECHED and AAPM) have been published. Both protocols neglect the influence of ion chamber dependent parameters on dose determination in proton beams because of the scatter properties of these beams, although the problem has not been studied thoroughly yet. A comparison between water calorimetry and ionisation chamber dosimetry showed a discrepancy of 2.6% between the former method and ionometry following the ECHED protocol. Possibly, a small part of this difference can be attributed to chamber dependent correction factors. Indications for this possibility are found in ionometry measurements. To allow the simulation of complex geometries with different media necessary for the study of those corrections, an existing proton Monte Carlo code (PTRAN, Berger) has been modified. The original code, that applies Mollire`s multiple scattering theory and Vavilov`s energy straggling theory, calculates depth dose profiles, energy distributions and radial distributions for pencil beams in water. Comparisons with measurements and calculations reported in the literature are done to test the program`s accuracy. Preliminary results of the influence of chamber design and chamber materials on dose to water determination are presented.

  2. Correction of measured Gamma-Knife output factors for angular dependence of diode detectors and PinPoint ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hršak, Hrvoje; Majer, Marija; Grego, Timor; Bibić, Juraj; Heinrich, Zdravko

    2014-12-01

    Dosimetry for Gamma-Knife requires detectors with high spatial resolution and minimal angular dependence of response. Angular dependence and end effect time for p-type silicon detectors (PTW Diode P and Diode E) and PTW PinPoint ionization chamber were measured with Gamma-Knife beams. Weighted angular dependence correction factors were calculated for each detector. The Gamma-Knife output factors were corrected for angular dependence and end effect time. For Gamma-Knife beams angle range of 84°-54°. Diode P shows considerable angular dependence of 9% and 8% for the 18 mm and 14, 8, 4 mm collimator, respectively. For Diode E this dependence is about 4% for all collimators. PinPoint ionization chamber shows angular dependence of less than 3% for 18, 14 and 8 mm helmet and 10% for 4 mm collimator due to volumetric averaging effect in a small photon beam. Corrected output factors for 14 mm helmet are in very good agreement (within ±0.3%) with published data and values recommended by vendor (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). For the 8 mm collimator diodes are still in good agreement with recommended values (within ±0.6%), while PinPoint gives 3% less value. For the 4 mm helmet Diodes P and E show over-response of 2.8% and 1.8%, respectively. For PinPoint chamber output factor of 4 mm collimator is 25% lower than Elekta value which is generally not consequence of angular dependence, but of volumetric averaging effect and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. Diodes P and E represent good choice for Gamma-Knife dosimetry.

  3. Polarity correction factor for flattening filter free photon beams in several cylindrical ionization chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Toshiyuki; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, Masao; Tsudou, Shinji; Masutani, Takashi; Okayama, Takanobu

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the polarity correction factor in ionization chambers for flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams and flattening filter (FF) beams. Measurements were performed with both 6 and 10 MV FFF and FF beams. Five commercial ionization chambers were evaluated: PTW TN30013; IBA Dosimetry CC01, CC04, and CC13; and Exradin A12S. Except for the CC01 ionization chamber, the other four chambers showed less than a 0.3 % difference in the polarity effect between the FFF and the FF beams. The CC01 chamber showed a strong field-size-dependence, unlike the other chambers. The polarity effect for all chambers with FFF beams did not change with the dose rate. Except in the case of the CC01 chamber, the difference in the polarity effect between FFF and FF beams was not significant.

  4. Experimental determination of wall correction factors. Pt. 2; NACP and Markus plane-parallel ionization chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittkaemper, F.W.; Mijnheer, B.J. (Nederlands Kanker Inst. ' Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis' , Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Aalbers, A.H.L. (Netherlands Measurements Inst., Bilthoven (Netherlands))

    1992-04-01

    The formalism to derive the absorbed dose to water from ionization chamber measurements in a phantom includes several wall correction factors depending on shape, size and composition of the chamber. Wall correction factors have been measured for a number of NACP and PTW/Markers Chambers. Significant deviations from calculated values occur due to uncertainties in the contribution to the total ionization from the different materials of these inhomogeneous ionization chambers. The discrepancies illustrate the need for the development of a homogeneous plane-parallel chamber. In addition, detailed Monte Carlo calculations, taking the different wall materials into account, are required to quantitatively predict the response of heterogeneous plane-parallel chambers in photon beams. (UK).

  5. NIST Ionization Chamber “A” Sample-Height Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    For over 30 years scientists in the NIST radioactivity group have been using their pressurized ionization chamber “A” (PIC “A”) to make measurements of radioactivity and radioactive half-lives. We now have evidence that some of those reported measurements were incorrect due to slippage of the source positioning ring over time. The temporal change in the holder caused an error in the source-height within the chamber, which was thought to be invariant. This unaccounted-for height change caused a change in the detector response and thus a relative error in measured activity on the order of 10−5 to 10−3 per year, depending on the radionuclide. The drifting detector response affected calibration factors and half-life determinations. After discovering the problem, we carried out historic research and new sensitivity tests. As a result, we have created a quantitative model of the effect and have used that model to estimate corrections to some of the past measurement results from PIC “A”. In this paper we report the details and results of that model. Meanwhile, we have fixed the positioning ring and are recalibrating the detector using primary measurement methods and enhanced quality control measures. PMID:26900515

  6. NIST Ionization Chamber "A" Sample-Height Corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    For over 30 years scientists in the NIST radioactivity group have been using their pressurized ionization chamber "A" (PIC "A") to make measurements of radioactivity and radioactive half-lives. We now have evidence that some of those reported measurements were incorrect due to slippage of the source positioning ring over time. The temporal change in the holder caused an error in the source-height within the chamber, which was thought to be invariant. This unaccounted-for height change caused a change in the detector response and thus a relative error in measured activity on the order of 10(-5) to 10(-3) per year, depending on the radionuclide. The drifting detector response affected calibration factors and half-life determinations. After discovering the problem, we carried out historic research and new sensitivity tests. As a result, we have created a quantitative model of the effect and have used that model to estimate corrections to some of the past measurement results from PIC "A". In this paper we report the details and results of that model. Meanwhile, we have fixed the positioning ring and are recalibrating the detector using primary measurement methods and enhanced quality control measures.

  7. Update of NIST half-life results corrected for ionization chamber source-holder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterweger, M P; Fitzgerald, R

    2014-05-01

    As reported at the ICRM 2011, it was discovered that the source holder used for calibrations in the NIST 4πγ ionization chamber (IC) was not stable. This has affected a large number of half-life measurement results previously reported and used in compilations of nuclear data. Corrections have been made on all of the half-life data based on the assumption that the changes to the ionization chamber response were gradual. The corrections are energy dependent and therefore radionuclide specific. This presentation will review our results and present the recommended changes in half-life values and/or uncertainties.

  8. A time dependent solution for the operation of ion chambers in a high ionization background

    CERN Document Server

    Velissaris, C

    2005-01-01

    We have derived a time dependent solution describing the development of space charge inside an ion chamber subjected to an externally caused ionization rate N. The solution enables the derivation of a formula that the operational parameters of the chamber must satisfy for saturation free operation. This formula contains a correction factor to account for the finite duration of the ionization rate N.

  9. Results of Posterior Chamber Lens Implantation for Correction of Myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Sorgun Evcili

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To evaluate the results of posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens implantation in myopic patients. Ma te ri al and Met hod: Posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens (STAAR ICL implantation was performed in 58 eyes of 33 patients with mean spherical equivalent of -13.12±5.31 diopters (D (-2.5 - -24.75 D between August 2007 and October 2010 at Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital, Second Eye Clinic. The mean age of the patients was 32.84 ± 9.95 years (18-55 years - 24 (72.7% were male and 9 (27.3% were female. The study was designed as prospective case series. The patients were evaluated regarding visual acuity, refraction, endothelial cell count, and complications in postoperative period. Re sults: The mean follow-up time was 21.5±4.9 (12-24 months months. The mean spherical equivalent was -1.29±1.53 D (-5.6 D - +2.60 D at the last postoperative follow-up visit. Visual acuity was better or equal to preoperative best-corrected value in 42 (72.4% of eyes at the last follow-up visit postoperatively. Mean spherical equivalent was regressed to -1.13±1.59D at 1-month and -1.39±1.53D at 24-month postoperative follow-up visit. Pupillary-block glaucoma in 1 eye (1.7%, anterior subcapsular opacification not affecting the vision in 4 eyes, and retinal detachment in 1 eye were detected at follow-up visits. Dis cus si on: ICL implantation was observed to be an effective and safe method for correction of myopia in two-year follow-up. As possible retinal complications may develop, the patients must be followed carefully during the preoperative and postoperative period. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 349-54

  10. [Theoretical investigation of the saturation correction for ionization chambers irradiated with pulsed beams of arbitrary pulse length].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsch, Leonhard; Pawelke, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    In ionization chambers, not all released charge is collected due to the recombination of charge carriers. This effect is taken into account by the saturation correction factor kS. A physical description of the correction factor has been established for pulsed radiation. However, it is only accurate when the pulse length is short compared with the collection time of the ionization chamber. In this paper we develop a description of the saturation correction for radiation pulses of arbitrary length. For this, a system of partial differential equations is solved iteratively. The numerical solutions are verified experimentally for a Roos ionization chamber (PTW TM34001) exposed to a pulsed electron beam. The results of this iterative procedure describe the experimental data well. The calculations are also possible for beam structures which are experimentally hard to get and thereby contribute to a better understanding and correct description of the saturation correction at arbitrary pulse length. Among other things the pulse length dependent distributions of the charge carriers in the ionization chamber is calculated, inclusive of the transition to the conditions prevailing in the case of continuous irradiation. Furthermore is shown that the formula for kS established by Hochhäuser and Balk is applicable even at arbitrary pulse length, if pulse duration dependent effective values are used for the parameters a and p. These effective values have been determined for the Roos chamber at pulse lengths up to 300 μs.

  11. On the wall perturbation correction for a parallel-plate NACP-02 chamber in clinical electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zink, K.; Wulff, J. [University Hospital Marburg, Philipps-University, D-35043 Marburg, Germany and Institut fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz - IMPS, University of Applied Sciences Giessen-Friedberg, D-35390 Giessen (Germany); Institut fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz - IMPS, University of Applied Sciences Giessen-Friedberg, D-35390 Giessen (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: In recent years, several Monte Carlo studies have been published concerning the perturbation corrections of a parallel-plate chamber in clinical electron beams. In these studies, a strong depth dependence of the relevant correction factors (p{sub wall} and p{sub cav}) for depth beyond the reference depth is recognized and it has been shown that the variation with depth is sensitive to the choice of the chamber's effective point of measurement. Recommendations concerning the positioning of parallel-plate ionization chambers in clinical electron beams are not the same for all current dosimetry protocols. The IAEA TRS-398 as well as the IPEM protocol and the German protocol DIN 6800-2 interpret the depth of measurement within the phantom as the water equivalent depth, i.e., the nonwater equivalence of the entrance window has to be accounted for by shifting the chamber by an amount {Delta}z. This positioning should ensure that the primary electrons traveling from the surface of the water phantom through the entrance window to the chamber's reference point sustain the same energy loss as the primary electrons in the undisturbed phantom. The objective of the present study is the determination of the shift {Delta}z for a NACP-02 chamber and the calculation of the resulting wall perturbation correction as a function of depth. Moreover, the contributions of the different chamber walls to the wall perturbation correction are identified. Methods: The dose and fluence within the NACP-02 chamber and a wall-less air cavity is calculated using the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc in a water phantom at different depths for different clinical electron beams. In order to determine the necessary shift to account for the nonwater equivalence of the entrance window, the chamber is shifted in steps {Delta}z around the depth of measurement. The optimal shift {Delta}z is determined from a comparison of the spectral fluence within the chamber and the bare cavity. The wall

  12. Polarity and ion recombination corrections in continuous and pulsed beams for ionization chambers with high Z chamber walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldosary, Ghada; Safigholi, Habib; Song, William; Seuntjens, Jan; Sarfehnia, Arman

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the response of Farmer-type ionization chambers fitted with high atomic number (Z) walls is studied, and results of the effects of such walls on polarity and ion recombination correction factors in both continuous and pulsed beams are presented. Measurements were made in a continuous Co-60 beam and a pulsed 6MV linac beam using an Exradin-A12 ionization chamber fitted with the manufacturer's C-552 plastic wall, as well as geometrically identical walls made from aluminum, copper and molybdenum. The bias voltage was changed between 10values (range: +50 to +560V). Ion recombination was determined from Jaffé plots and by using the "two-voltage technique". The saturation charge measured with each chamber wall was extrapolated from Jaffé plots. Additionally, the effect of different wall materials on chamber response was studied using MCNP simulations. Results showed that the polarity correction factor is not significantly affected by changes in chamber wall material (within 0.1%). Furthermore, although the saturation charges greatly vary with each chamber wall material, and charge multiplication increases for higher atomic number wall materials, the standard methods of calculating ion recombination yielded results that differed by only 0.2%. Therefore, polarity and ion recombination correction factors are not greatly affected by the chamber wall material. The experimental saturation charges for all the different wall materials agreed well within the uncertainty with MCNP simulations. The breakdown of the linear relationship in Jaffé plots that was previously reported to exist for conventional chamber walls was also observed with the different wall materials.

  13. Investigation of correction factors for non-reference conditions in ion chamber photon dosimetry with Monte-Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, Joerg [Klinik fuer Strahlendiagnostik, Medizinisches Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany); Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS), Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg (Germany); Heverhagen, Johannes T. [Klinik fuer Strahlendiagnostik, Medizinisches Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany); Karle, Heiko [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radioonkologie sowie Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsmedizin der Johannes Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS), Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Current dosimetry protocols require geometrical reference conditions for the determination of absorbed dose in external radiotherapy. Whenever these geometrical conditions cannot be maintained the application of additional corrections becomes necessary, in principle. The current DIN6800-2 protocol includes a corresponding factor k{sub NR}, but numerical values are lacking and no definite information about the magnitude of this correction is available yet. This study presents Monte-Carlo based calculations within the 6 MV-X photon field of a linear accelerator for a common used ion chamber (PTW31010) employing the EGSnrc code system. The linear accelerator model was matched to measurements, showing good agreement and is used as a realistic source. The individual perturbation correction factors as well as the resulting correction factor k{sub NR} were calculated as a function of depth for three field sizes, as a function of central axis distance for the largest field and within the build-up region. The behaviour of the ion chamber was further investigated for an idealized hypothetical field boundary. Within the field of the linear accelerator where charged particle equilibrium is achieved the factor k{sub NR} was generally below {proportional_to}0.5%. In the build-up region a depth dependent correction of up to 2% was calculated when positioning the chamber according to DIN6800-2. Minimizing the depth dependence of the corrections in the build-up region lead to a slightly different positioning of the ion chamber as currently recommended. In regions of the hypothetical field boundary with missing charged particle equilibrium and high dose gradients, the ion chamber response changed by up to {proportional_to}40%, caused by the comparatively large volume (0.125 cm{sup 3}) of the investigated chamber. (orig.)

  14. NIST Ionization Chamber “A” Sample-Height Corrections

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    For over 30 years scientists in the NIST radioactivity group have been using their pressurized ionization chamber “A” (PIC “A”) to make measurements of radioactivity and radioactive half-lives. We now have evidence that some of those reported measurements were incorrect due to slippage of the source positioning ring over time. The temporal change in the holder caused an error in the source-height within the chamber, which was thought to be invariant. This unaccounted-for height change caused ...

  15. A two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in pulsed beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelli, Heikki; Sjoegren, Rickard; Wendelsten, Mikael, E-mail: heikki.tolli@radfys.umu.s [Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, Umeaa University, SE-901 85 Umeaa (Sweden)

    2010-08-07

    The correction for general recombination losses in liquid ionization chambers (LICs) is more complex than that in air-filled ionization chambers. The reason for this is that the saturation charge in LICs, i.e. the charge that escapes initial recombination, depends on the applied voltage. This paper presents a method, based on measurements at two different dose rates in a pulsed beam, for general recombination correction in LICs. The Boag theory for pulsed beams is used and the collection efficiency is determined by numerical methods which are equivalent to the two-voltage method used in dosimetry with air-filled ionization chambers. The method has been tested in experiments in water in a 20 MeV electron beam using two LICs filled with isooctane and tetramethylsilane. The dose per pulse in the electron beam was varied between 0.1 mGy/pulse and 8 mGy/pulse. The relative standard deviations of the collection efficiencies determined with the two-dose-rate method ranged between 0.1% and 1.5%. The dose-rate variations of the general recombination corrected charge measured with the LICs are in excellent agreement with the corresponding values obtained with an air-filled plane parallel ionization chamber.

  16. A comparison of different experimental methods for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Jonas; Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Gomez, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry of highly modulated dose distributions requires a detector with a high spatial resolution. Liquid filled ionization chambers (LICs) have the potential to become a valuable tool for the characterization of such radiation fields. However, the effect of an increased recombination...... of the charge carriers, as compared to using air as the sensitive medium has to be corrected for. Due to the presence of initial recombination in LICs, the correction for general recombination losses is more complicated than for air-filled ionization chambers. In the present work, recently published...

  17. Improved Spin-Dependent WIMP Limits from a Bubble Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, E; Cooper, P S; Crum, K; Crisler, M; Hu, M; Levine, I; Nakazawa, D; Nguyen, H; Odom, B; Ramberg, E; Rasmussen, J; Riley, N; Sonnenschein, A; Szydagis, M; Tschirhart, R

    2008-01-01

    Bubble Chambers provided the dominant particle detection technology in accelerator experiments for several decades, eventually falling into disuse with the advent of other techniques. We report here on the first period of operation of an ultra-clean, room-temperature bubble chamber containing 1.5 kg of superheated CF$_{3}$I, a target maximally sensitive to spin-dependent and -independent Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) couplings. An exposure in excess of 250 kg-days is obtained, with a live-time fraction reaching 80\\%. This illustrates the ability to employ bubble chambers in a new realm, the search for dark matter particles. Improved limits on the spin-dependent WIMP-proton scattering cross section are extracted from this first period. An extreme intrinsic insensitivity to the backgrounds commonly limiting these experiments (a rejection factor for photon-induced electrons of $\\sim\\!10^{-10}$) has been measured in operating conditions leading to the detection of low-energy nuclear recoils such as t...

  18. Determination of ion recombination correction factors for a liquid ionization chamber in megavoltage photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Kum-Bae; Ji, Young Hoon; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Seonghoon; Huh, Hyun Do

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the ion recombination correction factor for a liquid ionization chamber in a high energy photon beam by using our experimental method. The ion recombination correction factors were determined by using our experimental method and were compared with theoretical and experimental methods proposed by using the theoretical method (Greening, Johansson) and the two-dose rate method in a cobalt beam and a high energy photon beam. In order to apply the liquid ionization chamber in a reference and small field dosimetry, we acquired the absorbed dose to water correction coefficient, the beam quality correction factor, and the influence quantities for the microLion chamber according to the TRS-398 protocol and applied the results to a high energy photon beam used in clinical fields. As a result, our experimental method for ion recombination in a cobalt beam agreed with the results from the heoretical method (Greening theory) better than it did with the results from the two-dose rate method. For high energy photon beams, the two-dose rate and our experimental methods were in good agreement, less than 2% deviation, while the theoretical general collection efficiency (Johansson et al.) deviated greatly from the experimental values. When we applied the factors for the absorbed dose to water measurement, the absorbed dose to water for the microLion chamber was in good agreement, within 1%, compared with the values for the PTW 30013 chamber in 6 and 10 MV Clinac iX and 6 and 15 MV Oncor impression. With these results, not only can the microLion ionization chamber be used to measure the absorbed dose to water in a reference condition, it can also be used to a the chamber for small, non-standard field dosimetry.

  19. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, K; van Asselen, B; Kok, J G M; Aalbers, A H L; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-09-07

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  20. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornero-López, Ana M.; Guirado, Damián; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, E-18012 Granada (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Servicio de Radioterapia, Unidad de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, E-46026 Valencia (Spain); Simancas, Fernando; Lallena, Antonio M. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Gazdic-Santic, Maja [Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Safety, Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of {sup 125}I seeds.Methods: Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for {sup 125}I selectSeed{sup TM} brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level.Results: Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber.Conclusions: Variations of the altitude and

  1. PTRAC File Utilization for Calculation of Free-Air Ionization Chamber Correction Factors by MCNPX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šolc, Jaroslav; Sochor, Vladimír

    2014-06-01

    A free-air ionization chamber is used as a standard of photon air-kerma. Several correction factors are applied to the air-kerma value. Correction factors for electron loss (kloss) and for additional ionization current caused by photon scatter (ksc), photon fluorescence (kfl), photon transmission through diaphragm edge (kdtr), and photon scatter from the surface of the diaphragm aperture (kdsc) were determined by the MCNPX code utilizing information stored in Particle Track (PTRAC) output files. Individual steps of the procedure are described and the calculated values of the correction factors are presented. The values are in agreement with the correction factors published in a literature for similar free-air chambers.

  2. [Intraocular lenses for the correction of refraction errors. Part 1: phakic anterior chamber lenses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnen, T; Baumeister, M; Cichocki, M

    2005-10-01

    In this overview, the current status of intraocular lens surgery to correct refractive error is reviewed. The interventions are divided into additive surgery with intraocular lens implantation without extraction of the crystalline lens (phakic intraocular lens, PIOL) or the removal of the crystalline lens with implantation of an IOL (refractive lens exchange, RLE). Phakic IOLs are constructed as angle-supported or iris-fixated anterior chamber lenses and posterior chamber lenses that are fixated in the ciliary sulcus. The implantation of phakic IOLs has been demonstrated to be an effective, safe, predictable and stable procedure to correct higher refractive errors. Complications are rare and differ for the three types of PIOL; for anterior chamber lenses these are mainly pupil ovalization and endothelial cell loss.

  3. Determination of small-field correction factors for cylindrical ionization chambers using a semiempirical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwangwoo; Bak, Jino; Park, Sungho; Choi, Wonhoon; Park, Suk Won

    2016-02-07

    A semiempirical method based on the averaging effect of the sensitive volumes of different air-filled ionization chambers (ICs) was employed to approximate the correction factors for beam quality produced from the difference in the sizes of the reference field and small fields.We measured the output factors using several cylindrical ICs and calculated the correction factors using a mathematical method similar to deconvolution; in the method, we modeled the variable and inhomogeneous energy fluence function within the chamber cavity. The parameters of the modeled function and the correction factors were determined by solving a developed system of equations as well as on the basis of the measurement data and the geometry of the chambers. Further, Monte Carlo (MC) computations were performed using the Monaco® treatment planning system to validate the proposed method.The determined correction factors () were comparable to the values derived from the MC computations performed using Monaco®. For example, for a 6 MV photon beam and a field size of 1  ×  1 cm2, was calculated to be for a PTW 31010 chamber and for a PTW 31016 chamber. On the other hand, the values determined from the MC computations were 1.121 and 1.031, respectively; the difference between the proposed method and the MC computation is less than 2%. In addition, we determined the values for PTW 30013, PTW 31010, PTW 31016, IBA FC23-C, and IBA CC13 chambers as well.We devised a method for determining from both the measurement of the output factors and model-based mathematical computation. The proposed method can be useful in case the MC simulation would not be applicable for the clinical settings.

  4. The wall correction factor for a spherical ionization chamber used in brachytherapy source calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piermattei, A [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Azario, L [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Fidanzio, A [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Viola, P [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Dell' Omo, C [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Iadanza, L [Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata-Rionero in Vulture, Pz (Italy); Fusco, V [Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata-Rionero in Vulture, Pz (Italy); Lagares, J I [Universidad de Sevilla, Facultad de Medicina, Dpto Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Sevilla (Spain); Capote, R [Universidad de Sevilla, Facultad de Medicina, Dpto Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Sevilla (Spain)

    2003-12-21

    The effect of wall chamber attenuation and scattering is one of the most important corrections that must be determined when the linear interpolation method between two calibration factors of an ionization chamber is used. For spherical ionization chambers the corresponding correction factors A{sub w} have to be determined by a non-linear trend of the response as a function of the wall thickness. The Monte Carlo and experimental data here reported show that the A{sub w} factors obtained for an Exradin A4 chamber, used in the brachytherapy source calibration, in terms of reference air kerma rate, are up to 1.2% greater than the values obtained by the linear extrapolation method for the studied beam qualities. Using the A{sub w} factors derived from Monte Carlo calculations, the accuracy of the calibration factor N{sub K,Ir} for the Exradin A4, obtained by the interpolation between two calibration factors, improves about 0.6%. The discrepancy between the new calculated factor and that obtained using the complete calibration curve of the ion-chamber and the {sup 192}Ir spectrum is only 0.1%.

  5. Correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in CyberKnife: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Antolin, Elena; Fayos-Ferrer, Francisco; Simon, Rocio; Gonzalez-Castano, Diego M.; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Gomez, Faustino; Pardo-Montero, Juan [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782 (Spain); Servicio de Fisica Medica, Hospital Ruber Internacional, Madrid 28034 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782, Spain and Laboratorio de Radiofisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782 (Spain); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middx TW11 OLW (United Kingdom); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782, Spain and Laboratorio de Radiofisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, A Coruna 15782 (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the application of the formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [R. Alfonso, P. Andreo, R. Capote, M. S. Huq, W. Kilby, P. Kjaell, T. R. Mackie, H. Palmans, K. Rosser, J. Seuntjens, W. Ullrich, and S. Vatnitsky, 'A new formalism for reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields,' Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] to the CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery system. Correction factors for intermediate calibration fields, a machine-specific reference field (msr) and two plan-class specific reference fields (pcsr), have been studied. Furthermore, the applicability of the new formalism to clinical dosimetry has been analyzed through the investigation of two clinical treatments. Methods: PTW31014 and Scanditronix-Wellhofer CC13 ionization chamber measurements were performed for the fields under investigation. Absorbed dose to water was determined using alanine reference dosimetry, and experimental correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber readings ratios. In addition, correction factors were calculated for the intermediate calibration fields and one of the clinical treatment fields using the Monte Carlo method and these were compared with the experimental values. Results: Overall correction factors deviating from unity by approximately 2% were obtained from both measurements and simulations, with values below and above unity for the studied intermediate calibration fields and clinical fields for the ionization chambers under consideration. Monte Carlo simulations yielded correction factors comparable with those obtained from measurements for the machine-specific reference field, although differences from 1% to 3.3% were observed between measured and calculated correction factors for the composite intermediate calibration fields. Dose distribution inhomogeneities are thought to be responsible for such discrepancies. Conclusions: The differences found between

  6. Calculation of correction factors for ionization chamber measurements with small fields in low-density media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisaturo, O; Pachoud, M; Bochud, F O; Moeckli, R

    2012-07-21

    The quantity of interest for high-energy photon beam therapy recommended by most dosimetric protocols is the absorbed dose to water. Thus, ionization chambers are calibrated in absorbed dose to water, which is the same quantity as what is calculated by most treatment planning systems (TPS). However, when measurements are performed in a low-density medium, the presence of the ionization chamber generates a perturbation at the level of the secondary particle range. Therefore, the measured quantity is close to the absorbed dose to a volume of water equivalent to the chamber volume. This quantity is not equivalent to the dose calculated by a TPS, which is the absorbed dose to an infinitesimally small volume of water. This phenomenon can lead to an overestimation of the absorbed dose measured with an ionization chamber of up to 40% in extreme cases. In this paper, we propose a method to calculate correction factors based on the Monte Carlo simulations. These correction factors are obtained by the ratio of the absorbed dose to water in a low-density medium □D(w,Q,V1)(low) averaged over a scoring volume V₁ for a geometry where V₁ is filled with the low-density medium and the absorbed dose to water □D(w,QV2)(low) averaged over a volume V₂ for a geometry where V₂ is filled with water. In the Monte Carlo simulations, □D(w,QV2)(low) is obtained by replacing the volume of the ionization chamber by an equivalent volume of water, according to the definition of the absorbed dose to water. The method is validated in two different configurations which allowed us to study the behavior of this correction factor as a function of depth in phantom, photon beam energy, phantom density and field size.

  7. Determination of small-field correction factors for cylindrical ionization chambers using a semiempirical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwangwoo; Bak, Jino; Park, Sungho; Choi, Wonhoon; Park, Suk Won

    2016-02-01

    A semiempirical method based on the averaging effect of the sensitive volumes of different air-filled ionization chambers (ICs) was employed to approximate the correction factors for beam quality produced from the difference in the sizes of the reference field and small fields. We measured the output factors using several cylindrical ICs and calculated the correction factors using a mathematical method similar to deconvolution; in the method, we modeled the variable and inhomogeneous energy fluence function within the chamber cavity. The parameters of the modeled function and the correction factors were determined by solving a developed system of equations as well as on the basis of the measurement data and the geometry of the chambers. Further, Monte Carlo (MC) computations were performed using the Monaco® treatment planning system to validate the proposed method. The determined correction factors (k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} ) were comparable to the values derived from the MC computations performed using Monaco®. For example, for a 6 MV photon beam and a field size of 1  ×  1 cm2, k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} was calculated to be 1.125 for a PTW 31010 chamber and 1.022 for a PTW 31016 chamber. On the other hand, the k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} values determined from the MC computations were 1.121 and 1.031, respectively; the difference between the proposed method and the MC computation is less than 2%. In addition, we determined the k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} values for PTW 30013, PTW 31010, PTW 31016, IBA FC23-C, and IBA CC13 chambers as well. We devised a method for determining k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} from both the measurement of the output factors and model-based mathematical computation. The proposed method can be useful in case the MC simulation would not be applicable for the clinical settings.

  8. Investigation of electron-loss and photon scattering correction factors for FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2017-02-01

    The parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber termed FAC-IR-300 was designed at the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, AEOI. This chamber is used for low and medium X-ray dosimetry on the primary standard level. In order to evaluate the air-kerma, some correction factors such as electron-loss correction factor (ke) and photon scattering correction factor (ksc) are needed. ke factor corrects the charge loss from the collecting volume and ksc factor corrects the scattering of photons into collecting volume. In this work ke and ksc were estimated by Monte Carlo simulation. These correction factors are calculated for mono-energy photon. As a result of the simulation data, the ke and ksc values for FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber are 1.0704 and 0.9982, respectively.

  9. Aphakia Correction by Injection of Foldable Intra Ocular Lens in The Anterior Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Kagmeni; Ernest, Moukouri; Christelle, Domngang; Georges, Nguefack-Tsague; Raoul, Cheuteu; Come, Ebana Mvogo; Wiedemann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the outcomes of the use of anterior chamber foldable lens for unilateral aphakia correction at the University Teaching Hospital of Yaounde. In this retrospective, non-comparative, consecutive case series study, we reviewed the records of patients who underwent an operation for aphakia correction by the means of injection of an angular supported foldable lens between January 2009 and December 2011 in the University Teaching Hospital Yaounde. Student’s paired t-test was carried out to compare pre-operative and post-operative visual acuity (VA) and intraocular pressure (IOP). P-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Twenty-one patients were included in the study; twelve were male (57.1%) and nine were female (42.9%). The mean age was 55.38 ± 17.67 years (range 9–75 years). The mean follow-up duration was 5.95 ± 3.14 months (range 2–12 months). The mean log-MAR visual acuity was 1.26 ± 0.46 pre-operatively and 0.78 ± 0.57 post-operatively (P = 0.003). The change in intraocular pressure was not statistically significant. Complications included intraocular hypertension (over 21 mmHg) in 3 patients (14.3%) and macular edema, pupillar ovalization, and retinal detachment in one patient each. The results indicate that injection of an angular support foldable lens in the anterior chamber is a useful technique for the correction of aphakia in eyes without capsular support. More extended follow-up, however, and a larger series of patients are needed to ascertain the effectiveness and safety of this procedure. PMID:24324349

  10. Application of the two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Jonas; Tölli, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    A method to correct for the general recombination losses for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams has been developed. The proposed method has been derived from Greening's theory for continuous beams and is based on measuring the signal from a liquid ionization chamber and an air filled monitor ionization chamber at two different dose rates. The method has been tested with two plane parallel liquid ionization chambers in a continuous radiation x-ray beam with a tube voltage of 120 kV and with dose rates between 2 and 13 Gy min-1. The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers were isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4). The general recombination effect was studied using chamber polarizing voltages of 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 V for both liquids. The relative standard deviation of the results for the collection efficiency with respect to general recombination was found to be a maximum of 0.7% for isooctane and 2.4% for tetramethylsilane. The results are in excellent agreement with Greening's theory for collection efficiencies over 90%. The measured and corrected signals from the liquid ionization chambers used in this work are in very good agreement with the air filled monitor chamber with respect to signal to dose linearity.

  11. Application of the two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jonas; Toelli, Heikki, E-mail: jonas.andersson@radfys.umu.se [Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, Umeaa University, SE-901 85 Umeaa (Sweden)

    2011-01-21

    A method to correct for the general recombination losses for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams has been developed. The proposed method has been derived from Greening's theory for continuous beams and is based on measuring the signal from a liquid ionization chamber and an air filled monitor ionization chamber at two different dose rates. The method has been tested with two plane parallel liquid ionization chambers in a continuous radiation x-ray beam with a tube voltage of 120 kV and with dose rates between 2 and 13 Gy min{sup -1}. The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers were isooctane (C{sub 8}H{sub 18}) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}). The general recombination effect was studied using chamber polarizing voltages of 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 V for both liquids. The relative standard deviation of the results for the collection efficiency with respect to general recombination was found to be a maximum of 0.7% for isooctane and 2.4% for tetramethylsilane. The results are in excellent agreement with Greening's theory for collection efficiencies over 90%. The measured and corrected signals from the liquid ionization chambers used in this work are in very good agreement with the air filled monitor chamber with respect to signal to dose linearity.

  12. Determinations of the correction factors for small fields in cylindrical ionization chambers based on measurement and numerical calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwangwoo; Choi, Wonhoon; Park, Sungho; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Bak, Jino

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the volume averaging effect for air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers to determine the correction factors in a small photon field for a given chamber. We measured output factors with several cylindrical ionization chambers, and by using a mathematical method similar to deconvolution, we modeled the non-constant and inhomogeneous exposure function in the cavity of the chamber. The parameters in the exposure function and the correction factors were determined by solving a system of equations that we had developed by using the measured data and the geometry of the given chamber. The correction factors (CFs) were very similar to those obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For example, the CFs in this study were found to be 1.116 for PTW31010 and 1.0225 for PTW31016 while the CFs obtained from MC simulations were reported as being approximately between 1.17 and 1.20 for PTW31010 and between 1.02 and 1.06 for PTW31016 in a 6-MV photon beam of 1 × 1 cm2. Furthermore, the method of deconvolution combined with the MC result for the chamber's response function showed a similar CF for PTW 30013, which was reported as 2.29 and 1.54 for a 1 × 1 cm2 and a 1.5 × 1.5 cm2 field size, respectively. The CFs from our method were similar, 2.42 and 1.54. In addition, we report CFs for PTW30013, PTW31010, PTW31016, IBA FC23-C, and IBA CC13. As a consequence, we suggest the use of our method to measure the correct output factor by using the fact that an inhomogeneous exposure causes a volume averaging effect in the cavity of air-filled cylindrical ionization chamber. The result obtained by using our method is very similar to that obtained from MC simulations. The method we developed can easily be applied in clinics.

  13. The non-uniformity correction factor for the cylindrical ionization chambers in dosimetry of an HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majumdar Bishnu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to derive the non-uniformity correction factor for the two therapy ionization chambers for the dose measurement near the brachytherapy source. The two ionization chambers of 0.6 cc and 0.1 cc volume were used. The measurement in air was performed for distances between 0.8 cm and 20 cm from the source in specially designed measurement jig. The non-uniformity correction factors were derived from the measured values. The experimentally derived factors were compared with the theoretically calculated non-uniformity correction factors and a close agreement was found between these two studies. The experimentally derived non-uniformity correction factor supports the anisotropic theory.

  14. Assessment of ionization chamber correction factors in photon beams using a time saving strategy with PENELOPE code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, C Q M; Nicolucci, P

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Monte Carlo-based perturbation and beam quality correction factors for ionization chambers in photon beams using a saving time strategy with PENELOPE code. Simulations for calculating absorbed doses to water using full spectra of photon beams impinging the whole water phantom and those using a phase-space file previously stored around the point of interest were performed and compared. The widely used NE2571 ionization chamber was modeled with PENELOPE using data from the literature in order to calculate absorbed doses to the air cavity of the chamber. Absorbed doses to water at reference depth were also calculated for providing the perturbation and beam quality correction factors for that chamber in high energy photon beams. Results obtained in this study show that simulations with phase-space files appropriately stored can be up to ten times shorter than using a full spectrum of photon beams in the input-file. Values of kQ and its components for the NE2571 ionization chamber showed good agreement with published values in the literature and are provided with typical statistical uncertainties of 0.2%. Comparisons to kQ values published in current dosimetry protocols such as the AAPM TG-51 and IAEA TRS-398 showed maximum percentage differences of 0.1% and 0.6% respectively. The proposed strategy presented a significant efficiency gain and can be applied for a variety of ionization chambers and clinical photon beams.

  15. Determination of Correction Factors for Small Field Based on Measurement and Numerical Calculation using Cylindrical Ionization Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Kwangwoo; Park, Sungho; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Bak, Jino

    2015-01-01

    We studied the investigation of volume averaging effect for air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers to determine correction factors in small photon field for the given chamber. As a method, we measured output factors using several cylindrical ionization chambers and calculated with mathematical method similar to deconvolution in which we modeled non-constant and inhomogeneous exposure function in the cavity of chamber. The parameters in exposure function and correction factors were determined by solving a system of equations we developed with measurement data and geometry of the given chamber. Correction factors (CFs) we had found are very similar to that from Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. For example, CFs in this study were computed as 1.116 for PTW31010, and 1.0225 for PTW31016, while CFs from MC were reported as approximately between 1.17 and 1.20 for PTW31010, and between 1.02 and 1.06 for PTW31016 in of 6MV photon beam . Furthermore, the result from the method of deconvolution combined with MC for cham...

  16. Leakage correction estimate for electret ion chamber dielectric material used for long-term environmental gamma monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David F; Paulus, L R

    2008-05-01

    The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality INL Oversight Program (DEQ-INL) operates an environmental gamma radiation detection network consisting of a series of high-pressure ion chambers to provide real-time ambient radiation measurements and a series of passive environmental electret ion chambers to increase coverage area and measure cumulative dose over a calendar quarter. DEQ-INL has identified a consistent over-response of approximately 40% by the electret ion chambers with respect to co-located high-pressure ion chambers since 1998. DEQ-INL conducted a series of three investigations to quantify this over-response. The over-response is likely attributable to a number of factors, including inherent voltage loss by the electret material not due to ionization within the chamber. One aspect of the investigation verified the manufacturer's calibration factor used to convert decrease in voltage to exposure. Additional investigations were performed that identified an average electret voltage loss of 0.2 V d(-1). When this voltage correction was applied to historical environmental data, electret ion chamber response was within 10% of the co-located high-pressure ion chamber response.

  17. [Intraocular lenses for the correction of refraction errors. Part II. Phakic posterior chamber lenses and refractive lens exchange with posterior chamber lens implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnen, T; Kasper, T; Terzi, E

    2005-11-01

    In this overview, the current status of intraocular lens surgery to correct refractive error is reviewed. The interventions are divided into additive surgery with intraocular lens implantation without extraction of the crystalline lens (phakic intraocular lens, PIOL) or removal of the crystalline lens with implantation of an IOL (refractive lens exchange, RLE). Phakic IOLs are constructed as angle-supported or iris-fixated anterior chamber lenses and posterior chamber lenses which are fixated in the ciliary sulcus. The implantation of phakic IOLs has been demonstrated to be an effective, safe, predictable and stable procedure to correct higher refractive errors. Complications are rare and differ for the three types of PIOL; for posterior chamber lenses these are mainly cataract formation and pigment dispersion. RLE is preferable in cases of high ametropia in which the natural lens has lost its accommodative effect. The main complications for myopic RLA include retinal detachment, while hyperopic refractive lens exchange may be associated with surgical problems in the narrower anterior eye segment.

  18. Derivation of a formula describing the saturation correction of plane-parallel ionization chambers in pulsed fields with arbitrary repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsch, Leonhard

    2016-04-01

    Gas-filled ionization chambers are widely used radiation detectors in radiotherapy. A quantitative description and correction of the recombination effects exists for two cases, for continuous radiation exposure and for pulsed radiation fields with short single pulses. This work gives a derivation of a formula for pulsed beams with arbitrary pulse rate for which the prerequisites of the two existing descriptions are not fulfilled. Furthermore, an extension of the validity of the two known cases is investigated. The temporal evolution of idealized charge density distributions within a plane parallel chamber volume is described for pulsed beams of vanishing pulse duration and arbitrary pulse repetition rate. First, the radiation induced release, movement and collection of the charge carriers without recombination are considered. Then, charge recombination is calculated basing on these simplified charge distributions and the time dependent spatial overlap of positive and negative charge carrier distributions. Finally, a formula for the calculation of the saturation correction factor is derived by calculation and simplification of the first two terms of a Taylor expansion for small recombination. The new formula of saturation correction contains the two existing cases, descriptions for exposure by single pulses and continuous irradiation, as limiting cases. Furthermore, it is possible to determine the pulse rate range for which each of the three descriptions is applicable by comparing the dependencies of the new formula with the two existing cases. As long as the time between two pulses is lower than one third of the collection time of the chamber, the formalism for a continuous exposure can be used. The known description for single pulse irradiation is only valid if the repetition rate is less than 1.2 times the inverse collection time. For all other repetition rates in between the new formula should be used. The experimental determination by Jaffe diagrams can be

  19. Derivation of a formula describing the saturation correction of plane-parallel ionization chambers in pulsed fields with arbitrary repetition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsch, Leonhard

    2016-04-21

    Gas-filled ionization chambers are widely used radiation detectors in radiotherapy. A quantitative description and correction of the recombination effects exists for two cases, for continuous radiation exposure and for pulsed radiation fields with short single pulses. This work gives a derivation of a formula for pulsed beams with arbitrary pulse rate for which the prerequisites of the two existing descriptions are not fulfilled. Furthermore, an extension of the validity of the two known cases is investigated. The temporal evolution of idealized charge density distributions within a plane parallel chamber volume is described for pulsed beams of vanishing pulse duration and arbitrary pulse repetition rate. First, the radiation induced release, movement and collection of the charge carriers without recombination are considered. Then, charge recombination is calculated basing on these simplified charge distributions and the time dependent spatial overlap of positive and negative charge carrier distributions. Finally, a formula for the calculation of the saturation correction factor is derived by calculation and simplification of the first two terms of a Taylor expansion for small recombination. The new formula of saturation correction contains the two existing cases, descriptions for exposure by single pulses and continuous irradiation, as limiting cases. Furthermore, it is possible to determine the pulse rate range for which each of the three descriptions is applicable by comparing the dependencies of the new formula with the two existing cases. As long as the time between two pulses is lower than one third of the collection time of the chamber, the formalism for a continuous exposure can be used. The known description for single pulse irradiation is only valid if the repetition rate is less than 1.2 times the inverse collection time. For all other repetition rates in between the new formula should be used. The experimental determination by Jaffe diagrams can be

  20. Evaluation of the energy dependence of ionization chambers pencil type calibrated beam tomography standards; Avaliacao da dependencia energetica de camaras de ionizacao do tipo lapis calibradas em feixes padroes de tomografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira; Potiens, Maria da Penha A., E-mail: lpfontes@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Instrument Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI - IPEN) performs calibrations of pencil-type ionization chambers (IC) used in measures of dosimetric survey on clinical systems of Computed Tomography (CT). Many users make mistakes when using a calibrated ionization chamber in their CT dosimetry systems. In this work a methodology for determination of factors of correction for quality (Kq) through the calibration curve that is specific for each ionization chamber was established. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate the energy dependence on an pencil-type Ionization Chamber(IC) calibrated at the LCI - IPEN. (author)

  1. Theoretical investigation of the saturation correction for ionization chambers irradiated with pulsed beams of arbitrary pulse length; Theoretische Untersuchung der Saettigungskorrektion von Ionisationskammern in gepulsten Strahlungsfeldern bei beliebiger Pulsdauer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsch, Leonhard; Pawelke, Joerg [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    In ionization chambers, not all released charge is collected due to the recombination of charge carriers. This effect is taken into account by the saturation correction factor k{sub S}. A physical description of the correction factor has been established for pulsed radiation. However, it is only accurate when the pulse length is short compared with the collection time of the ionization chamber. In this paper we develop a description of the saturation correction for radiation pulses of arbitrary length. For this, a system of partial differential equations is solved iteratively. The numerical solutions are verified experimentally for a Roos ionization chamber (PTW TM34001) exposed to a pulsed electron beam. The results of this iterative procedure describe the experimental data well. The calculations are also possible for beam structures which are experimentally hard to get and thereby contribute to a better understanding and correct description of the saturation correction at arbitrary pulse length. Among other things the pulse length dependent distributions of the charge carriers in the ionization chamber is calculated, inclusive of the transition to the conditions prevailing in the case of continuous irradiation. Furthermore is shown that the formula for k{sub S} established by Hochhaeuser and Balk is applicable even at arbitrary pulse length, if pulse duration dependent effective values are used for the parameters a and p. These effective values have been determined for the Roos chamber at pulse lengths up to 300 μs. (orig.)

  2. Determination of the recombination correction for the BIPM parallel-plate ionization chamber type in a pulsed photon beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, Susanne; Burns, David T. [Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, Pavillon de Breteuil, F92312 Sevres cedex (France); Ostrowsky, Aime [Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel - LNHB, CEA Saclay - 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    The correction factor for recombination losses k{sub s} has been determined for the BIPM parallel-plate ionization chamber type in the pulsed photon beam of a clinical linear accelerator. Initial recombination is in agreement with that obtained for the same chamber type in a continuous beam, while linearity in the volume recombination loss is confirmed at dose rates up to 80 pC per pulse, which corresponds to about 0.33 mGy per pulse (or around 2 Gy min{sup -1} at 100 Hz)

  3. A correction to Birks' Law in liquid argon ionization chamber simulations for highly ionizing particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdin, Sergey [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Horbatsch, Marko [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Taylor, Wendy, E-mail: taylorw@yorku.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada)

    2012-02-01

    We present a study of the performance of Birks' Law in liquid argon ionization chamber simulations as applied to highly ionizing particles, such as particles with multiple electric charges or with magnetic charge. We used Birks' Law to model recombination effects in a GEANT4 simulation of heavy ions in a liquid argon calorimeter. We then compared the simulation to published heavy-ion data to extract a highly ionizing particle correction to Birks' Law.

  4. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Quartin, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the "orbital dipole", which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10^(-3), due to coupling with the "solar dipole" (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  5. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartin, Miguel; Notari, Alessio

    2015-09-01

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the "orbital dipole", which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10-3, due to coupling with the "solar dipole" (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  6. Monte Carlo calculation of beam quality correction factors in proton beams using detailed simulation of ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomà, Carles; Andreo, Pedro; Sempau, Josep

    2016-03-01

    This work calculates beam quality correction factors (k Q ) in monoenergetic proton beams using detailed Monte Carlo simulation of ionization chambers. It uses the Monte Carlo code penh and the electronic stopping powers resulting from the adoption of two different sets of mean excitation energy values for water and graphite: (i) the currently ICRU 37 and ICRU 49 recommended {{I}\\text{w}}=75~\\text{eV} and {{I}\\text{g}}=78~\\text{eV} and (ii) the recently proposed {{I}\\text{w}}=78~\\text{eV} and {{I}\\text{g}}=81.1~\\text{eV} . Twelve different ionization chambers were studied. The k Q factors calculated using the two different sets of I-values were found to agree with each other within 1.6% or better. k Q factors calculated using current ICRU I-values were found to agree within 2.3% or better with the k Q factors tabulated in IAEA TRS-398, and within 1% or better with experimental values published in the literature. k Q factors calculated using the new I-values were also found to agree within 1.1% or better with the experimental values. This work concludes that perturbation correction factors in proton beams—currently assumed to be equal to unity—are in fact significantly different from unity for some of the ionization chambers studied.

  7. Bias-corrected estimation of stable tail dependence function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beirlant, Jan; Escobar-Bach, Mikael; Goegebeur, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    We consider the estimation of the stable tail dependence function. We propose a bias-corrected estimator and we establish its asymptotic behaviour under suitable assumptions. The finite sample performance of the proposed estimator is evaluated by means of an extensive simulation study where...

  8. Monte Carlo correction factors for a Farmer 0.6 cm{sup 3} ion chamber dose measurement in the build-up region of the 6 MV clinical beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, J [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sanchez-Doblado, F [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, RadioFisica, Sevilla (Spain); Departamento de FisiologIa y BioFisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Capote, R [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Terron, J A [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, RadioFisica, Sevilla (Spain); Departamento de FisiologIa y BioFisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Gomez, F [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2006-03-21

    Reference dosimetry of photon fields is a well-established subject and currently available protocols (such as the IAEA TRS-398 and AAPM TG-51) provide methods for converting the ionization chamber (IC) reading into dose to water, provided reference conditions of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) are fulfilled. But these protocols cannot deal with the build-up region, where the lack of CPE limits the applicability of the cavity theorems and so the chamber correction factors become depth dependent. By explicitly including the IC geometry in the Monte Carlo simulations, depth-dependent dose correction factors are calculated for a PTW 30001 0.6 cm{sup 3} ion chamber in the build-up region of the 6 MV photon beam. The corrected percentage depth dose (PDD) agrees within 2% with that measured using the NACP 02 plane-parallel ion chamber in the build-up region at depths greater than 0.4 cm, where the Farmer chamber wall reaches the phantom surface.

  9. Identifying microproduction inaccuracies with Knudsen number depending correction functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groll, R.; Gomez, J.

    2016-11-01

    The pressure drop of a transonic Laval nozzle depends on the rarefaction of the gas flow. So relative deviations of the numerical data are a measure for describing the influence of the rarefaction of the gas flow. This deviation is predicted by using a second-order modeling approximation for the Knudsen number depending correction function in the slip-flow regime. The production accuracy is able to be read in these deviation functions because of a deviation from the analytical solutions of the slip-flow influence. With the usage of experimental data the correction function can be calibrated through elimination of the error resulting from the accuracy. The investigated case is a micronozzle flow with Knudsen numbers of slip-flow regime near the nozzle throat in vacuum environment. Compared gases are neon, argon, krypton and xenon.

  10. Evaluation of linearity of response and angular dependence of an ionization chamber for dosimetry in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio P.; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: mxavier@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: khoury@ufpe.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    In this paper a pencil-type ionization chamber designed and manufactured at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares was evaluated for dosimetric applications in computed tomography beams. To evaluate the performance of this chamber two tests were undertaken: linearity of response and angular dependence. The results obtained in these tests showed good results, within the international recommendations. Moreover, this homemade ionization chamber is easy to manufacture, of low cost and efficient. (author)

  11. Characterization of radiation beams used to determinate the correction factor for a CyberKnife® unit reference field using ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-Martínez, Nestor; Gómez-Muñoz, Arnulfo; Massillon-JL, Guerda

    2014-11-01

    This paper aimed to characterize a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian® iX linear accelerator in order to obtain the correction factors needed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism1. The experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom under different irradiation conditions: a) Calibration of the reference field of 10 cm × 10 cm at 90 cm SSD and 10 cm depth was carried out according to the TRS-398 protocol using three ionization chambers (IC) calibrated in different reference laboratory and b) Measurement of the absorbed dose rate at 70 cm SSD and 10 cm depth in a 10 cm × 10 cm and 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm fields was obtained in order to simulate the CyberKnife® conditions where maximum distance between the source and the detector is equal to 80 cm and the maximum field size is 6 cm diameter. Depending where the IC was calibrated, differences between 0.16% and 2.24% in the absorbed dose rate measured in the 10 cm × 10 cm field at 90 cm SSD were observed, while for the measurements at 70 cm SSD, differences between 1.27% and 3.88% were obtained. For the 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm field, the absorbed dose measured with the three ICs varies between 1.37% and 3.52%. The increase in the difference on the absorbed dose when decreasing the SSD could possibly be associated to scattering radiation generated from the collimators and/or the energy dependence of the ionization chambers to low-energy radiation. The results presented in this work suggest the importance of simulating the CyberKnife® conditions using other linear accelerator for obtaining the correction factors as proposed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism in order to measure the absorbed dose with acceptable accuracy.

  12. Characterization of radiation beams used to determinate the correction factor for a CyberKnife® unit reference field using ionization chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragón-Martínez, Nestor, E-mail: nestoraragon@fisica.unam.mx; Massillon-JL, Guerda, E-mail: massillon@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, D.F (Mexico); Gómez-Muñoz, Arnulfo [Hospital de Oncología, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI, D.F (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    This paper aimed to characterize a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian® iX linear accelerator in order to obtain the correction factors needed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism{sup 1}. The experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom under different irradiation conditions: a) Calibration of the reference field of 10 cm × 10 cm at 90 cm SSD and 10 cm depth was carried out according to the TRS-398 protocol using three ionization chambers (IC) calibrated in different reference laboratory and b) Measurement of the absorbed dose rate at 70 cm SSD and 10 cm depth in a 10 cm × 10 cm and 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm fields was obtained in order to simulate the CyberKnife® conditions where maximum distance between the source and the detector is equal to 80 cm and the maximum field size is 6 cm diameter. Depending where the IC was calibrated, differences between 0.16% and 2.24% in the absorbed dose rate measured in the 10 cm × 10 cm field at 90 cm SSD were observed, while for the measurements at 70 cm SSD, differences between 1.27% and 3.88% were obtained. For the 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm field, the absorbed dose measured with the three ICs varies between 1.37% and 3.52%. The increase in the difference on the absorbed dose when decreasing the SSD could possibly be associated to scattering radiation generated from the collimators and/or the energy dependence of the ionization chambers to low-energy radiation. The results presented in this work suggest the importance of simulating the CyberKnife® conditions using other linear accelerator for obtaining the correction factors as proposed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism in order to measure the absorbed dose with acceptable accuracy.

  13. Characterization of a new ionization chamber in radiotherapy beams: angular dependence and variation of response with distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jonas O; Linda V E, Caldas

    2012-10-01

    A new double faced ionization chamber was constructed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. It has different collecting electrode materials: aluminum and graphite. It was irradiated in standard radiotherapy beams ((60)Co and X-rays). The response variation with distance and the angular dependence of this ionization chamber were evaluated. It was verified that the chamber response follows the inverse square law within a maximum variation of 11.2% in relation to the reference value. For the angular dependence it showed good agreement with international standards.

  14. SU-E-T-225: Correction Matrix for PinPoint Ionization Chamber for Dosimetric Measurements in the Newly Released Incise™ Multileaf Collimator Shaped Small Field for CyberKnife M6™ Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Li, T; Heron, D; Huq, M [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC CancerCenter, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For small field dosimetry, such as measurements of output factors for cones or MLC-shaped irregular small fields, ion chambers often Result in an underestimation of the dose, due to both the volume averaging effect and the lack of lateral charged particle equilibrium. This work presents a mathematical model for correction matrix for a PTW PinPoint ionization chamber for dosimetric measurements made in the newly released Incise™ Multileaf collimator fields of the CyberKnife M6™ machine. Methods: A correction matrix for a PTW 0.015cc PinPoint ionization chamber was developed by modeling its 3D dose response in twelve cone-shaped circular fields created using the 5mm, 7.5mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 15mm, 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 60mm cones in a CyberKnife M6™ machine. For each field size, hundreds of readings were recorded for every 2mm chamber shift in the horizontal plane. The contribution of each dose pixel to a measurement point depended on the radial distance and the angle to the chamber axis. These readings were then compared with the theoretical dose as obtained with Monte Carlo calculation. A penalized least-square optimization algorithm was developed to generate the correction matrix. After the parameter fitting, the mathematical model was validated for MLC-shaped irregular fields. Results: The optimization algorithm used for parameter fitting was stable and the resulted response factors were smooth in spatial domain. After correction with the mathematical model, the chamber reading matched with the calculation for all the tested fields to within 2%. Conclusion: A novel mathematical model has been developed for PinPoint chamber for dosimetric measurements in small MLC-shaped irregular fields. The correction matrix is dependent on detector, treatment unit and the geometry of setup. The model can be applied to non-standard composite fields and provides an access to IMRT point dose validation.

  15. SU-E-T-552: Monte Carlo Calculation of Correction Factors for a Free-Air Ionization Chamber in Support of a National Air-Kerma Standard for Electronic Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mille, M; Bergstrom, P [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To use Monte Carlo radiation transport methods to calculate correction factors for a free-air ionization chamber in support of a national air-kerma standard for low-energy, miniature x-ray sources used for electronic brachytherapy (eBx). Methods: The NIST is establishing a calibration service for well-type ionization chambers used to characterize the strength of eBx sources prior to clinical use. The calibration approach involves establishing the well-chamber’s response to an eBx source whose air-kerma rate at a 50 cm distance is determined through a primary measurement performed using the Lamperti free-air ionization chamber. However, the free-air chamber measurements of charge or current can only be related to the reference air-kerma standard after applying several corrections, some of which are best determined via Monte Carlo simulation. To this end, a detailed geometric model of the Lamperti chamber was developed in the EGSnrc code based on the engineering drawings of the instrument. The egs-fac user code in EGSnrc was then used to calculate energy-dependent correction factors which account for missing or undesired ionization arising from effects such as: (1) attenuation and scatter of the x-rays in air; (2) primary electrons escaping the charge collection region; (3) lack of charged particle equilibrium; (4) atomic fluorescence and bremsstrahlung radiation. Results: Energy-dependent correction factors were calculated assuming a monoenergetic point source with the photon energy ranging from 2 keV to 60 keV in 2 keV increments. Sufficient photon histories were simulated so that the Monte Carlo statistical uncertainty of the correction factors was less than 0.01%. The correction factors for a specific eBx source will be determined by integrating these tabulated results over its measured x-ray spectrum. Conclusion: The correction factors calculated in this work are important for establishing a national standard for eBx which will help ensure that dose

  16. Determination of the beam quality correction factor k_{Q,Q_0 } for the microLion chamber in a clinical photon beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Huh, Hyun Do; Kim, Kum-Bae; Kim, SeongHoon

    2013-01-01

    The mcroLion chamber, which has a small volume (0.0017cc) and a high sensitivity suitable for small field dosimetry, is an ionization chamber with liquid (isooctane) filling the cavity volume. In the present work, we used two alternative ways to estimate the beam quality correction factor k_{Q,Q_0 }^{micL} of the microLion chamber in the 6 MV photon beam from a Clinac iX accelerator (Varian, USA); Monte Carlo simulations and experimental methods. The Monte Carlo calculation (1.0183 ± 0.58%) agreed to within 0.56% with the experimental determination (1.024 ± 0.58%). The results from the two methods were in good agreement within acceptable uncertainties. We think that the averaged factor, 1.0212, could be used for the microLion chamber in reference dosimetry.

  17. Modeling and Correcting the Time-Dependent ACS PSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Albert, Justin; Taylor, James E.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Leauthaud, Alexie

    2006-01-01

    The ability to accurately measure the shapes of faint objects in images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) depends upon detailed knowledge of the Point Spread Function (PSF). We show that thermal fluctuations cause the PSF of the ACS Wide Field Camera (WFC) to vary over time. We describe a modified version of the TinyTim PSF modeling software to create artificial grids of stars across the ACS field of view at a range of telescope focus values. These models closely resemble the stars in real ACS images. Using 10 bright stars in a real image, we have been able to measure HST s apparent focus at the time of the exposure. TinyTim can then be used to model the PSF at any position on the ACS field of view. This obviates the need for images of dense stellar fields at different focus values, or interpolation between the few observed stars. We show that residual differences between our TinyTim models and real data are likely due to the effects of Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) degradation. Furthermore, we discuss stochastic noise that is added to the shape of point sources when distortion is removed, and we present MultiDrizzle parameters that are optimal for weak lensing science. Specifically, we find that reducing the MultiDrizzle output pixel scale and choosing a Gaussian kernel significantly stabilizes the resulting PSF after image combination, while still eliminating cosmic rays/bad pixels, and correcting the large geometric distortion in the ACS. We discuss future plans, which include more detailed study of the effects of CTE degradation on object shapes and releasing our TinyTim models to the astronomical community.

  18. Correction of the volumetric effect in a 2D-array of ionisation chambers; Correccion del efecto volumetrico en una matriz 2D de camaras de ionizacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Fuentes, R.; Cabello Murillo, E.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Ferrando Sanchez, A.; Clemente Gutierrez, F.; Casas de Julian, M. A. de la; Adaimi Hernandez, P.

    2011-07-01

    There are three main snags related to the measurement of spatial distributions of absorbed dose with two-dimensional array devices of ionisation chambers: spatial under-sampling, volumetric effect and inaccuracy in electric charge to absorbed dose conversion coefficient due to lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. In this work we have experimentally estimated the error in the raw measurement of dose by one of such chambers. We have found that the major error factor is the volumetric effect, which can be corrected through the well-known techniques of convolution/deconvolution. (Author) 14 refs.

  19. Correction factors for A1SL ionization chamber dosimetry in TomoTherapy: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Rodriguez-Romero, Ruth; Sanchez-Rubio, Patricia; Miguel Gonzalez-Castano, Diego; Gomez, Faustino; Nunez, Luis; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Pardo-Montero, Juan [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Madrid 28222 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain) and Radiation Physics Laboratory, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Madrid, 28222 (Spain); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middx, TW11 OLW (United Kingdom); Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Recently, an international working group on nonstandard fields presented a new formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [Alfonso et al., Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] which has been adopted by AAPM TG-148. This work presents an experimental determination of the correction factors for reference dosimetry with an Exradin A1SL thimble ionization chamber in a TomoTherapy unit, focusing on: (i) machine-specific reference field, (ii) plan-class-specific reference field, and (iii) two clinical treatments. Methods: Ionization chamber measurements were performed in the TomoTherapy unit for intermediate (machine-specific and plan-class-specific) calibration fields, based on the reference conditions defined by AAPM TG-148, and two clinical treatments (lung and head-and-neck). Alanine reference dosimetry was employed to determine absorbed dose to water at the point of interest for the fields under investigation. The corresponding chamber correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber measurements ratios. Results: Two different methods of determining the beam quality correction factor k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} for the A1SL ionization chamber in this TomoTherapy unit, where reference conditions for conventional beam quality determination cannot be met, result in consistent values. The observed values of overall correction factors obtained for intermediate and clinical fields are consistently around 0.98 with a typical expanded relative uncertainty of 2% (k = 2), which when considered make such correction factors compatible with unity. However, all of them are systematically lower than unity, which is shown to be significant when a hypothesis test assuming a t-student distribution is performed (p=1.8x10{sup -2}). Correction factors k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub p{sub c{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub p}{sub c}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}}} and k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s

  20. Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Cromer, Deborah; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-01-01

    [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.].......[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.]....

  1. Rate-dependent performance of ion chambers for particle-ID at the GSI fragment separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hucka, Jan-Paul; Allred, Timothy; Enders, Joachim [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Gernhaeuser, Roman; Maurus, Steffen [Physik Department, TU Muenchen (Germany); Nociforo, Chiara; Pietri, Stephane; Prochazka, Andrej [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    At the GSI Fragment Separator (FRS), multi-sampling ion chambers (MUSIC) employing a Frisch grid are used for charge identification of secondary ion beams. At the FAIR Super-FRS, higher rates are expected, and an event-by-event determination of the charge of secondary ions will be needed at rates of several 100000 events per second. The comparison of results from test measurements for the MUSIC performance with that of a recently constructed tilted-electrode gas ion chamber (TEGIC), which was designed similar to the one discussed, is presented.

  2. Evaluation of wall correction factor of INER's air-kerma primary standard chamber and dose variation by source displacement for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Wang, J N; Huang, T T; Su, S H; Chang, B J; Su, C H; Hsu, S M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR) ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the ¹⁹²Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK) for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR ¹⁹²Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity.

  3. SU-E-T-96: Demonstration of a Consistent Method for Correcting Surface Dose Measurements Using Both Solid State and Ionization Chamber Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, T; Gerbi, B; Higgins, P [UniversityMinnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the surface dose (SD) measured using a PTW 30-360 extrapolation chamber with different commonly used dosimeters (Ds): parallel plate ion chambers (ICs): RMI-449 (Attix), Capintec PS-033, PTW 30-329 (Markus) and Memorial; TLD chips (cTLD), TLD powder (pTLD), optically stimulated (OSLs), radiochromic (EXR2) and radiographic (EDR2) films, and to provide an intercomparison correction to Ds for each of them. Methods: Investigations were performed for a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian Clinac 2300, 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field, SSD = 100 cm). The Ds were placed at the surface of the solid water phantom and at the reference depth dref=1.7cm. The measurements for cTLD, OSLs, EDR2 and EXR2 were corrected to SD using an extrapolation method (EM) indexed to the baseline PTW 30-360 measurements. A consistent use of the EM involved: 1) irradiation of three Ds stacked on top of each other on the surface of the phantom; 2) measurement of the relative dose value for each layer; and, 3) extrapolation of these values to zero thickness. An additional measurement was performed with externally exposed OSLs (eOSLs), that were rotated out of their protective housing. Results: All single Ds measurements overestimated the SD compared with the extrapolation chamber, except for Attix IC. The closest match to the true SD was measured with the Attix IC (− 0.1%), followed by pTLD (0.5%), Capintec (4.5%), Memorial (7.3%), Markus (10%), cTLD (11.8%), eOSL (12.8%), EXR2 (14%), EDR2 (14.8%) and OSL (26%). The EM method of correction for SD worked well for all Ds, except the unexposed OSLs. Conclusion: This EM cross calibration of solid state detectors with an extrapolation or Attix chamber can provide thickness corrections for cTLD, eOSLs, EXR2, and EDR2. Standard packaged OSLs were not found to be simply corrected.

  4. Multiplicity dependent and non-binomial efficiency corrections for particle number cumulants

    CERN Document Server

    Bzdak, Adam; Koch, Volker

    2016-01-01

    In this note we extend previous work on efficiency corrections for cumulant measurements [1,2]. We will discuss the limitations of the methods presented in these papers. Specifically we will consider multiplicity dependent efficiencies as well as a non-binomial efficiency distributions. We will discuss the most simple and straightforward methods to implement those corrections.

  5. Dependence of SOA oxidation on organic aerosol mass concentration and OH exposure: experimental PAM chamber studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA is studied with mass spectra analysis of SOA formed in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM chamber, a small flow-through photo-oxidation chamber with extremely high OH and ozone levels. The OH exposure from a few minutes in the PAM chamber is similar to that from days to weeks in the atmosphere. The mass spectra were measured with a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS for SOA formed from oxidation of α-pinene, m-xylene, p-xylene, and a mixture of the three. The organic mass fractions of m/z 44 (CO2+ and m/z 43 (mainly C2H3O+, named f44 and f43 respectively, are used as indicators of the degree of organic aerosol (OA oxidation that occurs as the OA mass concentration or the OH exposure are varied. The degree of oxidation is sensitive to both. For a fixed OH exposure, the degree of oxidation initially decreases rapidly and then more slowly as the OA mass concentration increases. For fixed initial precursor VOC amounts, the degree of oxidation increases linearly with OH exposure, with f44 increasing and f43 decreasing. In this study, the degree of SOA oxidation spans much of the range observed in the atmosphere. These results, while sensitive to the determination of f44 and f43, provide evidence that some characteristics of atmospheric OA oxidation can be generated in a PAM chamber. For all measurements in this study, the sum of f44 and f43 is 0.25 ± 0.03, so that the slope of a linear regression is approximately −1 on an f44 vs. f43 plot. This constancy of the sum suggests that these ions are complete proxies for organic mass in the OA studied.

  6. Inclusion of temperature dependent shell corrections in Landau theory for hot rotating nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Shanmugam; P Arumugam

    2001-07-01

    Landau theory used for studying hot rotating nuclei usually uses zero temperature Strutinsky smoothed total energy for the temperature dependent shell corrections. This is replaced in this work by the temperature dependent Strutinsky smoothed free energy. Our results show that this replacement has only marginal effect for temperatures greater than 1 MeV but plays significant role at lower temperatures.

  7. Clinically evaluating directional dependence of 2D seven29 ion-chamber array with different IMRT plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syam Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to clinically evaluate the directional dependence of a 2D seven29 ion-chamber array with different intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plans. Methods: Twenty-five patients who had already been treated with IMRT plans were selected for the study. Verification plans were created in an Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS for each treatment plan. The verification plans were executed twice for each patient. The first IMRT plan used a true gantry angle (plan-related approach, and the second plan used a 0° gantry angle (field-related approach. Measurements were performed using a Varian Clinac 2100 iX linear accelerator. The fluence was measured for all the delivered plans and analyzed using Verisoft software. A comparison of the fluence was performed between IMRT with a static gantry (0° gantry angle and real gantry angles. Results: The results indicate that the Gamma average was 98.8 % for IMRT with a 0° gantry angle and 96.616% for IMRT with a true gantry angle. Average percent difference of normalized doses for IMRT delivered with zero degree gantry angle and IMRT with actual gantry angles is 0.15 and 0.88 respectively. Conclusion: The ion chamber of the 2D array used in IMRT verification has angular dependence, reducing the verification accuracy when the 2D array is used for measuring the actual beams of the treatment plan.

  8. Liquid ionization chamber initial recombination dependence on LET for electrons and photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Erik; Andersson, Jonas; Johansson, Lennart; Tölli, Heikki

    2013-06-21

    The possibility of indirect measurements of linear energy transfer (LET) with a liquid ionization chamber (LIC) has been investigated by studying initial recombination losses at different applied voltages. A linear fit is made to the voltage-signal curve and the intersection point of the fit and the voltage-axis is shown to correlate with LET. The LIC applied voltages were 100-700 V, which corresponds to electric field strengths between 0.3 and 2.0 MV m(-1). Several different photon and electron beams have been studied, and by using MCNPX™ the respective LET spectra have been determined. The beam qualities in this study were found to have a fluence averaged LET between 0.17 and 1.67 keV µm(-1) and a corresponding dose averaged LET between 0.97 and 4.62 keV µm(-1). For the experimental data in this study the linear fit method yields consistent results with respect to Monte Carlo simulated LET values. A calibration curve for LET determination is provided for the LIC used in the present work.

  9. Correction

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Tile Calorimeter modules stored at CERN. The larger modules belong to the Barrel, whereas the smaller ones are for the two Extended Barrels. (The article was about the completion of the 64 modules for one of the latter.) The photo on the first page of the Bulletin n°26/2002, from 24 July 2002, illustrating the article «The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter gets into shape» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.

  10. Spatial resolution is dependent on image content for SPECT with iterative reconstruction incorporating distance dependent resolution (DDR) correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Daniel; Barnden, Leighton

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the dependence of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) spatial resolution on the content of images for iterative reconstruction with distance dependent resolution (DDR) correction. An experiment was performed using a perturbation technique to measure change in resolution of line sources in simple and complex images with iterative reconstruction with increasing iteration. Projections of the line sources were reconstructed alone and again after the addition of projections of a uniform flood or a complex phantom. An alternative experiment used images of a realistic brain phantom and evaluated an effective spatial resolution by matching the images to the digital version of the phantom convolved with 3D Gaussian kernels. The experiments were performed using ordered subset expectation maximisation iterative reconstruction with and without the use of DDR correction. The results show a significant difference in reconstructed resolution between images of line sources depending on the content of the added image. The full width at half maximum of images of a line source reconstructed using DDR correction increased by 20-30 % when the added image was complex. Without DDR this difference was much smaller and disappeared with increasing iteration. Reported SPECT resolution should be taken as indicative only with regard to clinical imaging if the measurement is made using a point or line source alone and an iterative reconstruction algorithm is used.

  11. Correction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The photo on the second page of the Bulletin n°48/2002, from 25 November 2002, illustrating the article «Spanish Visit to CERN» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.   The Spanish delegation, accompanied by Spanish scientists at CERN, also visited the LHC superconducting magnet test hall (photo). From left to right: Felix Rodriguez Mateos of CERN LHC Division, Josep Piqué i Camps, Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology), Juan Antonio Rubio, ETT Division Leader at CERN, Manuel Aguilar-Benitez, Spanish Delegate to Council, Manuel Delfino, IT Division Leader at CERN, and Gonzalo León, Secretary-General of Scientific Policy to the Minister.

  12. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Tagler, M. J., and Jeffers, H. M. (2013. Sex differences in attitudes toward partner infidelity. Evolutionary Psychology, 11, 821–832: The authors wish to correct values in the originally published manuscript. Specifically, incorrect 95% confidence intervals around the Cohen's d values were reported on page 826 of the manuscript where we reported the within-sex simple effects for the significant Participant Sex × Infidelity Type interaction (first paragraph, and for attitudes toward partner infidelity (second paragraph. Corrected values are presented in bold below. The authors would like to thank Dr. Bernard Beins at Ithaca College for bringing these errors to our attention. Men rated sexual infidelity significantly more distressing (M = 4.69, SD = 0.74 than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 4.32, SD = 0.92, F(1, 322 = 23.96, p < .001, d = 0.44, 95% CI [0.23, 0.65], but there was little difference between women's ratings of sexual (M = 4.80, SD = 0.48 and emotional infidelity (M = 4.76, SD = 0.57, F(1, 322 = 0.48, p = .29, d = 0.08, 95% CI [−0.10, 0.26]. As expected, men rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.44, SD = 0.70 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.66, SD = 1.37, F(1, 322 = 120.00, p < .001, d = 1.12, 95% CI [0.85, 1.39]. Although women also rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.40, SD = 0.62 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.09, SD = 1.10, this difference was not as large and thus in the evolutionary theory supportive direction, F(1, 322 = 72.03, p < .001, d = 0.77, 95% CI [0.60, 0.94].

  13. Correction of a Depth-Dependent Lateral Distortion in 3D Super-Resolution Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Carlini

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D localization-based super-resolution microscopy (SR requires correction of aberrations to accurately represent 3D structure. Here we show how a depth-dependent lateral shift in the apparent position of a fluorescent point source, which we term `wobble`, results in warped 3D SR images and provide a software tool to correct this distortion. This system-specific, lateral shift is typically > 80 nm across an axial range of ~ 1 μm. A theoretical analysis based on phase retrieval data from our microscope suggests that the wobble is caused by non-rotationally symmetric phase and amplitude aberrations in the microscope's pupil function. We then apply our correction to the bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ in live bacteria and demonstrate that the corrected data more accurately represent the true shape of this vertically-oriented ring-like structure. We also include this correction method in a registration procedure for dual-color, 3D SR data and show that it improves target registration error (TRE at the axial limits over an imaging depth of 1 μm, yielding TRE values of < 20 nm. This work highlights the importance of correcting aberrations in 3D SR to achieve high fidelity between the measurements and the sample.

  14. Target mass corrections for spin-dependent structure functions in collinear factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Accardi, A

    2008-01-01

    We derive target mass corrections (TMC) for the spin-dependent nucleon structure function g1 and polarization asymmetry A1 in collinear factorization at leading twist. The TMCs are found to be significant for g1 at large xB, even at relatively high Q^2 values, but largely cancel in A1. A comparison of TMCs obtained from collinear factorization and from the operator product expansion shows that at low Q^2 the corrections drive the proton A1 in opposite directions.

  15. Multiplicity-dependent and nonbinomial efficiency corrections for particle number cumulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzdak, Adam; Holzmann, Romain; Koch, Volker

    2016-12-01

    In this article we extend previous work on efficiency corrections for cumulant measurements [Bzdak and Koch, Phys. Rev. C 86, 044904 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.044904; Phys. Rev. C 91, 027901 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevC.91.027901]. We will discuss the limitations of the methods presented in these papers. Specifically we will consider multiplicity dependent efficiencies as well as nonbinomial efficiency distributions. We will discuss the most simple and straightforward methods to implement those corrections.

  16. Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In the article by Quintavalle et al (Quintavalle C, Anselmi CV, De Micco F, Roscigno G, Visconti G, Golia B, Focaccio A, Ricciardelli B, Perna E, Papa L, Donnarumma E, Condorelli G, Briguori C. Neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin and contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2015;8:e002673. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.115.002673.), which published online September 2, 2015, and appears in the September 2015 issue of the journal, a correction was needed. On page 1, the institutional affiliation for Elvira Donnarumma, PhD, “SDN Foundation,” has been changed to read, “IRCCS SDN, Naples, Italy.” The institutional affiliation for Laura Papa, PhD, “Institute for Endocrinology and Experimental Oncology, National Research Council, Naples, Italy,” has been changed to read, “Institute of Genetics and Biomedical Research, Milan Unit, Milan, Italy” and “Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Italy.” The authors regret this error.

  17. Impact of hadronic and nuclear corrections on global analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Accardi, Alberto [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Melnitchouk, Wally [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We present the first results of a new global next-to-leading order analysis of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from the most recent world data on inclusive polarized deep-inelastic scattering, focusing in particular on the large-x and low-Q^2 regions. By directly fitting polarization asymmetries we eliminate biases introduced by using polarized structure function data extracted under nonuniform assumptions for the unpolarized structure functions. For analysis of the large-x data we implement nuclear smearing corrections for deuterium and 3He nuclei, and systematically include target mass and higher twist corrections to the g_1 and g_2 structure functions at low Q^2. We also explore the effects of Q^2 and W^2 cuts in the data sets, and the potential impact of future data on the behavior of the spin-dependent parton distributions at large x.

  18. Temperature-dependency analysis and correction methods of in-situ power-loss estimation for crystalline silicon modules undergoing potential-induced degradation stress testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Peter; Sera, Dezso

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of in-situ characterization of the photovoltaic module power at standard test conditions using superposition of the dark current-voltage (I-V) curve measured at elevated stress temperature during potential-induced degradation (PID) testing. PID chamber studies were performed...... on several crystalline silicon module designs to determine the extent to which the temperature dependency of maximum power is affected by the degradation of the modules. The results using the superposition principle show a mismatch between the power degradation measured at stress temperature and the power...... degradation measured at 25ºC, which depends on module design, stress temperature, and level of degradation. We apply a correction to this mismatch using two maximum-power temperature translation methods found in the literature. For the first method, which is based on the maximum-power temperature coefficient...

  19. Time dependent corrections to absolute gravity determinations in the establishment of modern gravity control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykowski, Przemyslaw; Krynski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The establishment of modern gravity control with the use of exclusively absolute method of gravity determination has significant advantages as compared to the one established mostly with relative gravity measurements (e.g. accuracy, time efficiency). The newly modernized gravity control in Poland consists of 28 fundamental stations (laboratory) and 168 base stations (PBOG14 - located in the field). Gravity at the fundamental stations was surveyed with the FG5-230 gravimeter of the Warsaw University of Technology, and at the base stations - with the A10-020 gravimeter of the Institute of Geodesy and Cartography, Warsaw. This work concerns absolute gravity determinations at the base stations. Although free of common relative measurement errors (e.g. instrumental drift) and effects of network adjustment, absolute gravity determinations for the establishment of gravity control require advanced corrections due to time dependent factors, i.e. tidal and ocean loading corrections, atmospheric corrections and hydrological corrections that were not taken into account when establishing the previous gravity control in Poland. Currently available services and software allow to determine high accuracy and high temporal resolution corrections for atmospheric (based on digital weather models, e.g. ECMWF) and hydrological (based on hydrological models, e.g. GLDAS/Noah) gravitational and loading effects. These corrections are mostly used for processing observations with Superconducting Gravimeters in the Global Geodynamics Project. For the area of Poland the atmospheric correction based on weather models can differ from standard atmospheric correction by even ±2 µGal. The hydrological model shows the annual variability of ±8 µGal. In addition the standard tidal correction may differ from the one obtained from the local tidal model (based on tidal observations). Such difference at Borowa Gora Observatory reaches the level of ±1.5 µGal. Overall the sum of atmospheric and

  20. SU-E-T-299: Small Fields Profiles Correction Through Detectors Spatial Response Functions and Field Size Dependence Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipuzzi, M; Garrigo, E; Venencia, C [Instituto de Radioterapia - Fundacion Marie Curie, Cordoba, Cordoba (Spain); Germanier, A [CEPROCOR, Cordoba, Cordoba (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To calculate the spatial response function of various radiation detectors, to evaluate the dependence on the field size and to analyze the small fields profiles corrections by deconvolution techniques. Methods: Crossline profiles were measured on a Novalis Tx 6MV beam with a HDMLC. The configuration setup was SSD=100cm and depth=5cm. Five fields were studied (200×200mm2,100×100mm2, 20×20mm2, 10×10mm2and 5×5mm2) and measured were made with passive detectors (EBT3 radiochromic films and TLD700 thermoluminescent detectors), ionization chambers (PTW30013, PTW31003, CC04 and PTW31016) and diodes (PTW60012 and IBA SFD). The results of passive detectors were adopted as the actual beam profile. To calculate the detectors kernels, modeled by Gaussian functions, an iterative process based on a least squares criterion was used. The deconvolutions of the measured profiles were calculated with the Richardson-Lucy method. Results: The profiles of the passive detectors corresponded with a difference in the penumbra less than 0.1mm. Both diodes resolve the profiles with an overestimation of the penumbra smaller than 0.2mm. For the other detectors, response functions were calculated and resulted in Gaussian functions with a standard deviation approximate to the radius of the detector in study (with a variation less than 3%). The corrected profiles resolve the penumbra with less than 1% error. Major discrepancies were observed for cases in extreme conditions (PTW31003 and 5×5mm2 field size). Conclusion: This work concludes that the response function of a radiation detector is independent on the field size, even for small radiation beams. The profiles correction, using deconvolution techniques and response functions of standard deviation equal to the radius of the detector, gives penumbra values with less than 1% difference to the real profile. The implementation of this technique allows estimating the real profile, freeing from the effects of the detector used for the

  1. Correcting direction-dependent gains in the deconvolution of radio interferometric images

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatnagar, S; Golap, K; Uson, Juan M

    2008-01-01

    Astronomical imaging using aperture synthesis telescopes requires deconvolution of the point spread function as well as calibration of instrumental and atmospheric effects. In general, such effects are time-variable and vary across the field of view as well, resulting in direction-dependent (DD), time-varying gains. Most existing imaging and calibration algorithms assume that the corruptions are direction independent, preventing even moderate dynamic range full-beam, full-Stokes imaging. We present a general framework for imaging algorithms which incorporate DD errors. We describe as well an iterative deconvolution algorithm that corrects known DD errors due to the antenna power patterns and pointing errors for high dynamic range full-beam polarimetric imaging. Using simulations we demonstrate that errors due to realistic primary beams as well as antenna pointing errors will limit the dynamic range of upcoming higher sensitivity instruments and that our new algorithm can be used to correct for such errors. We...

  2. Determination of light output function and angle dependent correction for a stilbene crystal scintillation neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, W. E-mail: hansen@metrs1.mw.tu-dresden.de; Richter, D

    2002-01-01

    In addition to liquid NE213 scintillators also stilbene solid crystals are applied traditionally for fast neutron spectrometry. A proper evaluation of experimental data provides a precise determination of the nonlinear light output function for the given scintillator/photomultiplier combination, and for stilbene additionally an adequate correction of the anisotropy effect. Calibration experiments with monoenergetic neutrons (1.2, 2.5, 5.0, 13.95, 14.8, 19.0 MeV) and various neutron incidence angles were carried out at the accelerator facility of the PTB Braunschweig for two cylindrical scintillators (diameter 30 mm x 25 mm, diameter 10 mm x 10 mm). An improved analytic light output function as well as an adequate angle dependent correction function were derived.

  3. How important is self-consistency for the dDsC density dependent dispersion correction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brémond, Éric; Corminboeuf, Clémence, E-mail: clemence.corminboeuf@epfl.ch [Laboratory for Computational Molecular Design, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Golubev, Nikolay [Laboratory for Computational Molecular Design, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Steinmann, Stephan N., E-mail: sns25@duke.edu [Laboratory for Computational Molecular Design, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    The treatment of dispersion interactions is ubiquitous but computationally demanding for seamless ab initio approaches. A highly popular and simple remedy consists in correcting for the missing interactions a posteriori by adding an attractive energy term summed over all atom pairs to standard density functional approximations. These corrections were originally based on atom pairwise parameters and, hence, had a strong touch of empiricism. To overcome such limitations, we recently proposed a robust system-dependent dispersion correction, dDsC, that is computed from the electron density and that provides a balanced description of both weak inter- and intramolecular interactions. From the theoretical point of view and for the sake of increasing reliability, we here verify if the self-consistent implementation of dDsC impacts ground-state properties such as interaction energies, electron density, dipole moments, geometries, and harmonic frequencies. In addition, we investigate the suitability of the a posteriori scheme for molecular dynamics simulations, for which the analysis of the energy conservation constitutes a challenging tests. Our study demonstrates that the post-SCF approach in an excellent approximation.

  4. Lente fácica de câmara posterior para correção da miopia Posterior chamber phakic lens for the correction of myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Queiroz Guimarães

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar a eficácia, previsibilidade e segurança do implante de lente intra-ocular de câmara posterior em pacientes com miopia moderada e elevada. Métodos: Analisamos os resultados das cirurgias realizadas em 93 olhos de 54 pacientes para implante de lente fácica de câmara posterior com a finalidade de corrigir miopia moderada e elevada. O objetivo da cirurgia era a emetropia. O acompanhamento médio foi de 9 meses, variando de 1 a 38 meses (desvio padrão 10,45. Resultados: O equivalente esférico médio pré-operatório era -13,56 D (variando de -5,75 a -20,38 D e o equivalente esférico médio pós-operatório no último exame foi -0,92 D (variando de -3,88 a +1,00 D. No último exame, 39 olhos (41,9% se encontravam entre ±0,50 D da emetropia, 64 olhos (68,8% estavam entre ±1,00 D e 88 olhos (94,6% estavam entre ±2,00 D da emetropia. Um ganho de duas ou mais linhas de visão foi observado em 45,17% (42 olhos. Em 15 olhos (16,1% ocorreu algum tipo de complicação: em 2 olhos (2,2% houve perda de células endoteliais, em 2 olhos (2,2% ocorreu bloqueio pupilar e em 11 olhos (11,8% houve alterações de transparência lenticular, assintomática em 5 olhos (5,4% e sintomática em 6 olhos (6,5%. Conclusão: O implante de lente fácica de câmara posterior para correção de miopia moderada e alta é um método eficaz, previsível e seguro. O significativo ganho de linhas de visão é uma observação freqüente nesta técnica. Um acompanhamento pós-operatório mais prolongado em um maior número de pacientes é necessário para confirmar a estabilidade dos resultados a longo prazo.Purpose: To examine the efficacy, predictability and safety of posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens implantation in patients with moderate and high myopia. Methods: We analyzed the results of 93 eyes of 54 patients who were submitted to the implantation of a posterior chamber phakic lens for the correction of their myopia. The target postoperative

  5. Comparison of the sulfur hexafluoride tracer and respiration chamber techniques for estimating methane emissions and correction for rectum methane output from dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, C; Yan, T; Wills, D A; Murray, S; Gordon, A W

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were to compare the sulfur hexafluoride (SF₆) and respiration chamber techniques for measuring methane (CH₄) emissions from dairy cows and to determine the proportion of CH₄ that is released through the rectum. Data used were derived from 20 early lactation dairy cows in a 2 × 2 factorial design study for 4 periods with 6 wk/period. The 4 treatment diets consisted of grass silage and 2 levels of concentrate (30 and 60% dry matter basis), with or without yeast supplement. At the end of each period, CH₄ emissions were measured simultaneously using the SF₆ and respiration chamber techniques when cows were housed in chambers. The SF₆ technique was also used when cows were housed in digestibility units (barn location) before and after respiratory chamber measurements (chamber location). The simultaneous measurements in chamber location revealed that CH₄ emission estimates by the SF₆ technique were similar to those by the respiration chamber technique in the first 3 periods, although the SF₆ estimates were significantly higher in period 4. The regression of all data from the 4 periods demonstrated a linear relationship between the SF₆ and respiration chamber measurements for total CH₄ emissions (g/d, R² = 0.69) and for CH₄ emissions per unit of milk yield (g/kg, R² = 0.88), and a quadratic relationship for CH₄ emissions per unit of dry matter intake (g/kg, R² = 0.64). The CH₄ emissions from the rectum were calculated as the difference between CH₄ estimates from the SF₆ technique when cows were housed in respiratory chambers and barn locations, which was 3% of the total CH₄ emissions from the mouth, nostrils, and rectum. The SF₆ estimates in the chamber location accounted for all sources of emissions, whereas those in the barn location, like that in grazing conditions, did not include CH₄ emission from the rectum. Therefore, the SF₆ measurements for grazing cattle should be adjusted for CH

  6. Correction of sound velocity depending on the temperature for unconsolidated marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Choul

    2016-04-01

    laboratory sound velocity measurements with systematic temperature change on unconsolidated marine sediment have been performed to establish the precise correction curves between temperature and the sound velocity. Piston and box core samples recovered from the East Sea and the South Sea of Korea were used for the measurement. The core samples were cooled (at temperature of nearly 0℃) and the temperature was gradually increased (from 0℃ to 30℃) to measure sound velocity depending on the changes in temperature. The sediment texture and physical properties (porosity, water content, and bulk density) were measured separately at the same depth. The rate of velocity increase for muddy, silty, and sandy sediment are about 2.63 m/s/℃, 2.74 m/s/℃, and 2.96 m/s/℃, respectively. This is similar to the velocity change rate, 2.97 m/s/℃ presented by Del Grosso (1952). The samples used in this research, however, have relatively higher porosity than those of Del Grosso (1952). Thus, the possibility of discrepancy is differences in water content which affect the sound velocity and measurement system. We used recently developed digital velocity measurement system using PXI based on LabVIEW. We suggest to employ this correction for the accurate in situ geoacoustic property from laboratory data particularly for the deep cold water sample such as the East Sea sediment that has very low bottom water temperature about 0℃. Keywords : in situ geoacoustic property, temperature correction, East Sea Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Agency for Defense Development (UD14003DD) and by "Marine geological and geophysical mapping of the Korean seas" of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM).

  7. PET energy-based scatter estimation and image reconstruction with energy-dependent corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, L M; Lewitt, Robert M; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 423 Guardian Drive, 4th floor Blockley Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6021 (United States)

    2006-06-07

    In this paper we propose a comprehensive energy-based scatter correction approach for positron emission tomography (PET). We take advantage of the marked difference between the energy spectra of the unscattered and scattered photons, and use the detailed energy information that comes with the list-mode data for the estimation of the scattered events distribution in the data space. Also, inside the maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) image reconstruction algorithm, we introduce energy-dependent factors that individualize the correction terms for each event, given its position and energy information. The central piece of our approach is the two-dimensional detector energy response model represented as a linear combination of four components, each one representing a particular state a PET event can be found in: both photons unscattered, the second scattered while the first not, the first photon scattered while the second not and both photons scattered. For a set of events collected in the vicinity of a point in the projection space, the coefficient of each component is determined by applying a statistical estimator. As a result we obtain the number of scattered events that are in the given set. The model also gives us the variation of scatter fraction with the photon pair energies for that particular position in the data space. A simulation study that demonstrates the proposed methods is presented.

  8. Ehrenfest-time dependence of quantum transport corrections and spectral statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltner, Daniel; Kuipers, Jack

    2010-12-01

    The Ehrenfest-time scale in quantum transport separates essentially classical propagation from wave interference and here we consider its effect on the transmission and reflection through quantum dots. In particular, we calculate the Ehrenfest-time dependence of the next-to-leading-order quantum corrections to the transmission and reflection for dc and ac transport and check that our results are consistent with current conservation relations. Looking as well at spectral statistics in closed systems, we finally demonstrate how the contributions analyzed here imply changes in the calculation, given by Brouwer [Phys. Rev. E 74, 066208 (2006)], of the next-to-leading order of the spectral form factor. Our semiclassical result coincides with the result obtained by Tian and Larkin [Phys. Rev. B 70, 035305 (2004)] by field-theoretical methods.

  9. Latitudinal Dependence of Cosmic Rays Modulation at 1 AU and Interplanetary-Magnetic-Field Polar Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Bobik, P; Boschini, M J; Consolandi, C; Della Torre, S; Gervasi, M; Grandi, D; Kudela, K; Pensotti, S; Rancoita, P G; Rozza, D; Tacconi, M

    2012-01-01

    The cosmic rays differential intensity inside the heliosphere, for energy below 30 GeV/nuc, depends on solar activity and interplanetary magnetic field polarity. This variation, termed solar modulation, is described using a 2-D (radius and colatitude) Monte Carlo approach for solving the Parker transport equation that includes diffusion, convection, magnetic drift and adiabatic energy loss. Since the whole transport is strongly related to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) structure, a better understanding of his description is needed in order to reproduce the cosmic rays intensity at the Earth, as well as outside the ecliptic plane. In this work an interplanetary magnetic field model including the standard description on ecliptic region and a polar correction is presented. This treatment of the IMF, implemented in the HelMod Monte Carlo code (version 2.0), was used to determine the effects on the differential intensity of Proton at 1\\,AU and allowed one to investigate how latitudinal gradients of proton...

  10. Radon exhalation rates corrected for leakage and back diffusion – Evaluation of radon chambers and radon sources with application to ceramic tile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abo-Elmagd

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The natural radon decay, leakage and back diffusion are the main removal processes of radon from its container. Ignoring these processes leads to underestimate the measured value of radon related parameters like exhalation rate and radium content. This work is aimed to evaluate two different radon chambers through determining their leakage rate λv and evaluation of radon source by determine its back diffusion rate λb inside the evaluated radon chambers as well as a small sealed cup. Two different methods are adapted for measuring both the leakage rate and the back diffusion rate. The leakage rate can be determined from the initial slope of the radon decay curve or from the exponential fitting of the whole decay curve. This can be achieved if a continuous monitoring of radon concentration inside the chamber is available. Also, the back diffusion rate is measured by sealing the radon source in the chamber and used the initial slope of the buildup curve to determine λb and therefore the exhalation rate of the source. This method was compared with simple equation for λb based on the ratio of the source to the chamber volume. The obtained results are applied to ceramic tile as an important radon source in homes. The measurement is targeted the ceramic glaze before and after firing as well as the obtained tile after adhere the glaze on the tile main body. Also, six different tile brands from Egyptian market are subjected to the study for comparison.

  11. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  12. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  13. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Proportional multi-wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle. Proportional wire chambers allow a much quicker reading than the optical or magnetoscriptive readout wire chambers.

  14. Latitudinal Dependence of Cosmic Rays Modulation at 1 AU and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Polar Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bobik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cosmic rays differential intensity inside the heliosphere, for energy below 30 GeV/nuc, depends on solar activity and interplanetary magnetic field polarity. This variation, termed solar modulation, is described using a 2D (radius and colatitude Monte Carlo approach for solving the Parker transport equation that includes diffusion, convection, magnetic drift, and adiabatic energy loss. Since the whole transport is strongly related to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF structure, a better understanding of his description is needed in order to reproduce the cosmic rays intensity at the Earth, as well as outside the ecliptic plane. In this work an interplanetary magnetic field model including the standard description on ecliptic region and a polar correction is presented. This treatment of the IMF, implemented in the HelMod Monte Carlo code (version 2.0, was used to determine the effects on the differential intensity of Proton at 1 AU and allowed one to investigate how latitudinal gradients of proton intensities, observed in the inner heliosphere with the Ulysses spacecraft during 1995, can be affected by the modification of the IMF in the polar regions.

  15. Impact of physiological noise correction on detecting blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast in the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Tess E.; Manavaki, Roido; Graves, Martin J.; Patterson, Andrew J.; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2017-01-01

    Physiological fluctuations are expected to be a dominant source of noise in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments to assess tumour oxygenation and angiogenesis. This work investigates the impact of various physiological noise regressors: retrospective image correction (RETROICOR), heart rate (HR) and respiratory volume per unit time (RVT), on signal variance and the detection of BOLD contrast in the breast in response to a modulated respiratory stimulus. BOLD MRI was performed at 3 T in ten volunteers at rest and during cycles of oxygen and carbogen gas breathing. RETROICOR was optimized using F-tests to determine which cardiac and respiratory phase terms accounted for a significant amount of signal variance. A nested regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of RETROICOR, HR and RVT on the model fit residuals, temporal signal-to-noise ratio, and BOLD activation parameters. The optimized RETROICOR model accounted for the largest amount of signal variance ( Δ R\\text{adj}2   =  3.3  ±  2.1%) and improved the detection of BOLD activation (P  =  0.002). Inclusion of HR and RVT regressors explained additional signal variance, but had a negative impact on activation parameter estimation (P  <  0.001). Fluctuations in HR and RVT appeared to be correlated with the stimulus and may contribute to apparent BOLD signal reactivity.

  16. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  17. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber.Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  18. Predicting the Sabine absorption coefficients of fibrous absorbers for various air backing conditions with a frequency-dependent diffuseness correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Fibrous absorbers can be installed with various air backing conditions to fulfil a given low frequency acoustic requirement. Since absorber manufacturers cannot provide the absorption coefficients for all possible mounting conditions, acousticians have difficulties knowing the absorption...... characteristics of their own configurations. This study aims to predict the absorption coefficient for various mounting conditions from a single measurement of an arbitrary mounting condition by extracting the air flow resistivity of the test specimen and the frequency-dependent effect of the chamber...... on the measured absorption coefficients. With two homogeneous fibrous absorbers, the predicted absorption coefficients agree well with the measurements....

  19. On the gas dependence of thermal transpiration and a critical appraisal of correction methods for capacitive diaphragm gauges

    CERN Document Server

    Daudé, Barthélémy; Janssen, Christof

    2013-01-01

    Thermal transpiration effects are commonly encountered in low pressure measurements with capacitance diaphragm gauges. They arise from the temperature difference between the measurement volume and the temperature stabilised manometer. Several approaches have been proposed to correct for the pressure difference, but surface and geometric effects usually require that the correction is determined for each gas type and gauge individually. Common (semi) empirical corrections are based on studies of atoms or small molecules. We present a simple calibration method for diaphragm gauges and compare transpiration corrections for argon and styrene at pressures above 1 Pa. We find that characteristic pressures at which the pressure difference reaches half its maximum value, are compatible with the universal scaling p_{1/2} = 2 \\{\\eta} \\cdot \\{v_{th}} / d, thus essentially depending on gas viscosity \\eta, thermal molecular speed v_{th} and gauge tubing diameter d. This contradicts current recommendations based on the Taka...

  20. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1986-01-01

    Two wire chambers made originally for the R807 Experiment at CERN's Intersecting Storage Rings. In 1986 they were used for the PS 201 experiment (Obelix Experiment) at LEAR, the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. The group of researchers from Turin, using the chambers at that time, changed the acquisition system using for the first time 8 bit (10 bit non linear) analog to digital conversion for incoming signals from the chambers. The acquisition system was controlled by 54 CPU and 80 digital signal processors. The power required for all the electronics was 40 kW. For the period, this system was one of the most powerful on-line apparatus in the world. The Obelix Experiment was closed in 1996. To find more about how a wire chamber works, see the description for object CERN-OBJ-DE-038.

  1. Evolution of temperature-dependent charge transfer inefficiency correction for ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Catherine E.; Bautz, Marshall W.; Durham, R. Nick; Plucinsky, Paul P.

    2016-07-01

    As ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory enters its seventeenth year of operation, it continues to perform well and produce spectacular scientific results. The response of ACIS has evolved over the lifetime of the observatory due to radiation damage and aging of the spacecraft. The ACIS instrument team developed a software tool which applies a correction to each X-ray event and mitigates charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) and spectral resolution degradation. The behavior of the charge traps that cause CTI are temperature dependent, however, and warmer temperatures reduce the effectiveness of the correction algorithm. As the radiator surfaces on Chandra age, ACIS cooling has become less efficient and temperatures can increase by a few degrees. A temperature-dependent component was added to the CTI correction algorithm in 2010. We present an evaluation of the effectiveness of this algorithm as the radiation damage and thermal environment continue to evolve and suggest updates to improve the calibration fidelity.

  2. Thermal calculation of ground contact structures: Correction factors of environment- and structure-dependent effects on the heat transfer coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    The heat loss at ground contact structures is taken into consideration in building heat loss calculations. However, the heat loss through the ground depends not only the soil and the building structure, but the environment as well. New calculation methods based on parametrized transient finite element thermal modelling are introduced in the preceding research article [3]. This paper is the further demonstration of the methods’ environment- or structure-depending correction factors which descr...

  3. Time-dependent corrections to effective rate and event statistics in Michaelis-Menten kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Sinitsyn, N. A.; Nemenman, I.

    2010-01-01

    We generalize the concept of the geometric phase in stochastic kinetics to a noncyclic evolution. Its application is demonstrated on kinetics of the Michaelis-Menten reaction. It is shown that the nonperiodic geometric phase is responsible for the correction to the Michaelis-Menten law when parameters, such as a substrate concentration, are changing with time. We apply these ideas to a model of chemical reactions in a bacterial culture of a growing size, where the geometric correction qualita...

  4. An empirical method to correct for temperature-dependent variations in the overlap function of CHM15k ceilometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervo, Maxime; Poltera, Yann; Haefele, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Imperfections in a lidar's overlap function lead to artefacts in the background, range and overlap-corrected lidar signals. These artefacts can erroneously be interpreted as an aerosol gradient or, in extreme cases, as a cloud base leading to false cloud detection. A correct specification of the overlap function is hence crucial in the use of automatic elastic lidars (ceilometers) for the detection of the planetary boundary layer or of low cloud. In this study, an algorithm is presented to correct such artefacts. It is based on the assumption of a homogeneous boundary layer and a correct specification of the overlap function down to a minimum range, which must be situated within the boundary layer. The strength of the algorithm lies in a sophisticated quality-check scheme which allows the reliable identification of favourable atmospheric conditions. The algorithm was applied to 2 years of data from a CHM15k ceilometer from the company Lufft. Backscatter signals corrected for background, range and overlap were compared using the overlap function provided by the manufacturer and the one corrected with the presented algorithm. Differences between corrected and uncorrected signals reached up to 45 % in the first 300 m above ground. The amplitude of the correction turned out to be temperature dependent and was larger for higher temperatures. A linear model of the correction as a function of the instrument's internal temperature was derived from the experimental data. Case studies and a statistical analysis of the strongest gradient derived from corrected signals reveal that the temperature model is capable of a high-quality correction of overlap artefacts, in particular those due to diurnal variations. The presented correction method has the potential to significantly improve the detection of the boundary layer with gradient-based methods because it removes false candidates and hence simplifies the attribution of the detected gradients to the planetary boundary layer. A

  5. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  6. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in ISR (Intersecting Storage Ring) split field magnet experiment. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  7. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  8. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  9. Time-dependent corrections to effective rate and event statistics in Michaelis-Menten kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsyn, N A; Nemenman, I

    2010-11-01

    The authors generalise the concept of the geometric phase in stochastic kinetics to a non-cyclic evolution. Its application is demonstrated on kinetics of the Michaelis-Menten reaction. It is shown that the non-periodic geometric phase is responsible for the correction to the Michaelis-Menten law when parameters, such as a substrate concentration, are changing with time. The authors apply these ideas to a model of chemical reactions in a bacterial culture of a growing size, where the geometric correction qualitatively changes the outcome of the reaction kinetics.

  10. Using rain-on-snow events to evaluate the quality of bias correction to represent complex inter-variable dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Ole; Bosshard, Thomas; Weingartner, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    A key issue for adaptation planning is the information of projections about changes of extremes. Climate projections of meteorological extremes and their downscaling are a challenge on their own. Yet - at least in hydrology - meteorological extremes are not necessarily hydrological extremes. These can also result from a sequence of days with only moderate meteorological conditions, too. This sequences are called "storylines". In climate change impact assess studies it is relevant to know, whether these meteorological storylines are represented in regional climate models, and how well can bias correction preserve or improve the representation. One storyline leading to hydrological extremes are rain-on-snow events, and more specifically rain-on-snowfall events. These events challenge the regional climate model and the bias correction in terms of representing absolute values and inter-variable dependences. This study makes use of the rain-on-snow-storylines to evaluate the performance of regional climate models and a bias correction method in reproducing complex inter-variable dependencies. At first, we applied a hydrological model to a mesoscale catchment in Switzerland that is known to be effected by rain-on-snow events. At second, the ERA-Interim driven regional climate model RCA4.5 - developed at SMHI - with a spatial resolution of 0.11 * 0.11 degree was used to drive the hydrological model. At third, bias-correction of the RCM was done applying the distribution based scaling (DBS) bias-correction method (Yang et al., 2010) developed at the SMHI. The bias-corrected data then also served as driving input data to the hydrological model. Based on the simulated runoff, as well as simulated precipitation, temperature, and snow pack data, an algorithm to detect rain-on-snow events was applied. Finally, the presence or absents of rain-on-snow events for the three different climate input data, ERA.RCA4.5, DBS corrected ERA.RC4 and observed climate, are evaluated within

  11. Experimental validation of gallium production and isotope-dependent positron range correction in PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, L. M.; Herraiz, J. L.; Udías, J. M.; Cal-González, J.; Corzo, P. M. G.; España, S.; Herranz, E.; Pérez-Liva, M.; Picado, E.; Vicente, E.; Muñoz-Martín, A.; Vaquero, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    Positron range (PR) is one of the important factors that limit the spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) preclinical images. Its blurring effect can be corrected to a large extent if the appropriate method is used during the image reconstruction. Nevertheless, this correction requires an accurate modelling of the PR for the particular radionuclide and materials in the sample under study. In this work we investigate PET imaging with 68Ga and 66Ga radioisotopes, which have a large PR and are being used in many preclinical and clinical PET studies. We produced a 68Ga and 66Ga phantom on a natural zinc target through (p,n) reactions using the 9-MeV proton beam delivered by the 5-MV CMAM tandetron accelerator. The phantom was imaged in an ARGUS small animal PET/CT scanner and reconstructed with a fully 3D iterative algorithm, with and without PR corrections. The reconstructed images at different time frames show significant improvement in spatial resolution when the appropriate PR is applied for each frame, by taking into account the relative amount of each isotope in the sample. With these results we validate our previously proposed PR correction method for isotopes with large PR. Additionally, we explore the feasibility of PET imaging with 68Ga and 66Ga radioisotopes in proton therapy.

  12. Experimental validation of gallium production and isotope-dependent positron range correction in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraile, L.M., E-mail: lmfraile@ucm.es [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Dpto. Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Herraiz, J.L.; Udías, J.M.; Cal-González, J.; Corzo, P.M.G.; España, S.; Herranz, E.; Pérez-Liva, M.; Picado, E.; Vicente, E. [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Dpto. Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Muñoz-Martín, A. [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-01

    Positron range (PR) is one of the important factors that limit the spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) preclinical images. Its blurring effect can be corrected to a large extent if the appropriate method is used during the image reconstruction. Nevertheless, this correction requires an accurate modelling of the PR for the particular radionuclide and materials in the sample under study. In this work we investigate PET imaging with {sup 68}Ga and {sup 66}Ga radioisotopes, which have a large PR and are being used in many preclinical and clinical PET studies. We produced a {sup 68}Ga and {sup 66}Ga phantom on a natural zinc target through (p,n) reactions using the 9-MeV proton beam delivered by the 5-MV CMAM tandetron accelerator. The phantom was imaged in an ARGUS small animal PET/CT scanner and reconstructed with a fully 3D iterative algorithm, with and without PR corrections. The reconstructed images at different time frames show significant improvement in spatial resolution when the appropriate PR is applied for each frame, by taking into account the relative amount of each isotope in the sample. With these results we validate our previously proposed PR correction method for isotopes with large PR. Additionally, we explore the feasibility of PET imaging with {sup 68}Ga and {sup 66}Ga radioisotopes in proton therapy.

  13. Testing Rate Dependent corrections on timing mode EPIC-pn spectra of the accreting Neutron Star GX 13+1

    CERN Document Server

    Pintore, F; di Salvo, T; Guainazzi, M; D'Aì, A; Riggio, A; Burderi, L; Iaria, R; Robba, N R

    2014-01-01

    When the EPIC-pn instrument on board XMM-Newton is operated in Timing mode, high count rates (>100 cts/s) of bright sources may affect the calibration of the energy scale, resulting in a modification of the real spectral shape. The corrections related to this effect are then strongly important in the study of the spectral properties. Tests of these calibrations are more suitable in sources which spectra are characterised by a large number of discrete features. Therefore, in this work, we carried out a spectral analysis of the accreting Neutron Star GX 13+1, which is a dipping source with several narrow absorption lines and a broad emission line in its spectrum. We tested two different correction approaches on an XMM-Newton EPIC-pn observation taken in Timing mode: the standard Rate Dependent CTI (RDCTI or epfast) and the new, Rate Dependent Pulse Height Amplitude (RDPHA) corrections. We found that, in general, the two corrections marginally affect the properties of the overall broadband continuum, while hints...

  14. On the gas dependence of thermal transpiration and a critical appraisal of correction methods for capacitive diaphragm gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudé, Barthélémy; Elandaloussi, Hadj; Janssen, Christof

    2014-06-01

    Thermal transpiration effects are commonly encountered in low pressure measurements with capacitance diaphragm gauges. They arise from the temperature difference between the measurement volume and the temperature stabilised manometer. Several approaches have been proposed to correct for the pressure difference, but surface and geometric effects usually require that the correction is determined for each gas type and gauge individually. Common (semi) empirical corrections are based on studies of atoms or small molecules. We present a simple calibration method for diaphragm gauges and compare transpiration corrections for argon and styrene at pressures above 1 Pa. We find that characteristic pressures at which the pressure difference reaches half its maximum value, are compatible with the universal scaling p_{1/2} = 2 \\{\\eta} \\cdot \\{v_{th}} / d, thus essentially depending on gas viscosity \\eta, thermal molecular speed v_{th} and gauge tubing diameter d. This contradicts current recommendations based on the Takaishi and Sensui formula, which show an unphysical scaling with molecular size. Our results support the Miller or \\v{S}etina equations where the pressure dependency is basically determined by the Knudsen number. The use of these two schemes is therefore recommended, especially when thermal transpiration has to be predicted for new molecules. Implications for investigations on large polyatomics are discussed.

  15. Time-Dependent Corrections to the Ly-alpha Escape Probability During Cosmological Hydrogen Recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Chluba, J

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects connected with the detailed radiative transfer during the epoch of cosmological recombination on the ionization history of our Universe. We focus on the escape of photons from the hydrogen Lyman-alpha resonance at redshifts 600<~z<~2000, one of two key mechanisms defining the rate of cosmological recombination. We approach this problem within the standard formulation, and corrections due to two-photon interactions are deferred to another paper. As a main result we show here that within a non-stationary approach to the escape problem the resulting correction in the free electron fraction, N_e, is about ~1.6-1.8% in the redshift range 800<~z<~1200. Therefore the discussed process results in one of the biggest modification to the ionization history close to the maximum of Thomson-visibility function at z~1100 considered sofar. We prove our results both numerically and analytically, deriving the escape probability, and considering both Lyman-alpha line-emission an...

  16. Single-image-based solution for optics temperature-dependent nonuniformity correction in an uncooled long-wave infrared camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanpeng; Tisse, Christel-Loic

    2014-02-01

    In this Letter, we propose an efficient and accurate solution to remove temperature-dependent nonuniformity effects introduced by the imaging optics. This single-image-based approach computes optics-related fixed pattern noise (FPN) by fitting the derivatives of correction model to the gradient components, locally computed on an infrared image. A modified bilateral filtering algorithm is applied to local pixel output variations, so that the refined gradients are most likely caused by the nonuniformity associated with optics. The estimated bias field is subtracted from the raw infrared imagery to compensate the intensity variations caused by optics. The proposed method is fundamentally different from the existing nonuniformity correction (NUC) techniques developed for focal plane arrays (FPAs) and provides an essential image processing functionality to achieve completely shutterless NUC for uncooled long-wave infrared (LWIR) imaging systems.

  17. Ionization chambers for LET determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    2010-01-01

    resolution and high sensitivity are necessary. For exact dosimetry which is done using ionization chambers (ICs), the recombination taking place in the IC has to be known. Up to now, recombination is corrected phenomenologically and more practical approaches are currently used. Nevertheless, Jaff´e's theory...... of columnar recombination was designed to model the detector efficiency of an ionization chamber. Here, we have shown that despite the approximations and simplification made, the theory is correct for the LETs typically found in clinical radiotherapy employing particles from protons to carbon ions...

  18. Correcting atmospheric effects on InSAR with MERIS water vapour data and elevation-dependent interpolation model

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Z. W.

    2012-05-01

    The propagation delay when radar signals travel from the troposphere has been one of the major limitations for the applications of high precision repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). In this paper, we first present an elevation-dependent atmospheric correction model for Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR—the instrument aboard the ENVISAT satellite) interferograms with Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) integrated water vapour (IWV) data. Then, using four ASAR interferometric pairs over Southern California as examples, we conduct the atmospheric correction experiments with cloud-free MERIS IWV data. The results show that after the correction the rms differences between InSAR and GPS have reduced by 69.6 per cent, 29 per cent, 31.8 per cent and 23.3 per cent, respectively for the four selected interferograms, with an average improvement of 38.4 per cent. Most importantly, after the correction, six distinct deformation areas have been identified, that is, Long Beach–Santa Ana Basin, Pomona–Ontario, San Bernardino and Elsinore basin, with the deformation velocities along the radar line-of-sight (LOS) direction ranging from −20 mm yr−1 to −30 mm yr−1 and on average around −25 mm yr−1, and Santa Fe Springs and Wilmington, with a slightly low deformation rate of about −10 mm yr−1 along LOS. Finally, through the method of stacking, we generate a mean deformation velocity map of Los Angeles over a period of 5 yr. The deformation is quite consistent with the historical deformation of the area. Thus, using the cloud-free MERIS IWV data correcting synchronized ASAR interferograms can significantly reduce the atmospheric effects in the interferograms and further better capture the ground deformation and other geophysical signals.

  19. SU-C-304-01: Investigation of Various Detector Response Functions and Their Geometry Dependence in a Novel Method to Address Ion Chamber Volume Averaging Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barraclough, B; Lebron, S [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Li, J; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, C; Yan, G [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel convolution-based approach has been proposed to address ion chamber (IC) volume averaging effect (VAE) for the commissioning of commercial treatment planning systems (TPS). We investigate the use of various convolution kernels and its impact on the accuracy of beam models. Methods: Our approach simulates the VAE by iteratively convolving the calculated beam profiles with a detector response function (DRF) while optimizing the beam model. At convergence, the convolved profiles match the measured profiles, indicating the calculated profiles match the “true” beam profiles. To validate the approach, beam profiles of an Elekta LINAC were repeatedly collected with ICs of various volumes (CC04, CC13 and SNC 125) to obtain clinically acceptable beam models. The TPS-calculated profiles were convolved externally with the DRF of respective IC. The beam model parameters were reoptimized using Nelder-Mead method by forcing the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. We evaluated three types of DRFs (Gaussian, Lorentzian, and parabolic) and the impact of kernel dependence on field geometry (depth and field size). The profiles calculated with beam models were compared with SNC EDGE diode-measured profiles. Results: The method was successfully implemented with Pinnacle Scripting and Matlab. The reoptimization converged in ∼10 minutes. For all tested ICs and DRFs, penumbra widths of the TPS-calculated profiles and diode-measured profiles were within 1.0 mm. Gaussian function had the best performance with mean penumbra width difference within 0.5 mm. The use of geometry dependent DRFs showed marginal improvement, reducing the penumbra width differences to less than 0.3 mm. Significant increase in IMRT QA passing rates was achieved with the optimized beam model. Conclusion: The proposed approach significantly improved the accuracy of the TPS beam model. Gaussian functions as the convolution kernel performed consistently better than Lorentzian and

  20. 75 FR 32293 - Nonduplication; Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Register on September 30, 1997, at 62 FR 51274, amending 38 CFR 3.503, by redesignating paragraphs (a... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 21 Nonduplication; Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity...

  1. Robust and bias-corrected estimation of the coefficient of tail dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutang, C.; Goegebeur, Y.; Guillou, A.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a robust and asymptotically unbiased estimator for the coefficient of tail dependence in multivariate extreme value statistics. The estimator is obtained by fitting a second order model to the data by means of the minimum density power divergence criterion. The asymptotic properties ...

  2. A mathematical model of aerosol holding chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Madsen, J; Berg, E

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical model of aerosol delivery from holding chambers (spacers) was developed incorporating tidal volume (VT), chamber volume (Vch), apparatus dead space (VD), effect of valve insufficiency and other leaks, loss of aerosol by immediate impact on the chamber wall, and fallout of aerosol...... in the chamber with time. Four different spacers were connected via filters to a mechanical lung model, and aerosol delivery during "breathing" was determined from drug recovery from the filters. The formula correctly predicted the delivery of budesonide aerosol from the AeroChamber (Trudell Medical, London...

  3. Can echocardiographic particle image velocimetry correctly detect motion patterns as they occur in blood inside heart chambers? A validation study using moving phantoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prinz Christian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To validate Echo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV Methods High fidelity string and rotating phantoms moving with different speed patterns were imaged with different high-end ultrasound systems at varying insonation angles and frame rates. Images were analyzed for velocity and direction and for complex motion patterns of blood flow with dedicated software. Post-processing was done with MATLAB-based tools (Dflow, JUV, University Leuven. Results Velocity estimation was accurate up to a velocity of 42 cm/s (r = 0.99, p  Conclusion Echo-PIV appears feasible. Velocity estimates are accurate, but the maximal detectable velocity depends strongly on acquisition parameters. Direction estimation works sufficiently, even at higher velocities. Echo-PIV appears to be a promising technical approach to investigate flow patterns by echocardiography.

  4. Low-level measurements of Ra-226/Rn-222 by pulse ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Daoushy, Fand; Garcia-Tenorio, Rafael

    1988-10-01

    Characteristics of two ionization chambers have been studied and the chambers utilized for 226Ra/ 222Rn measurements for more than ten years. The results obtained show that coating of internal surfaces with a pure and thin Ag-layer enhances the background of ionization chambers in spite of some improvements at the early stages of operation. In addition to previously known parameters influencing the accuracy in routine measurements, new correction factors are suggested. 226Ra impurities in the body of ionization chambers are found to act not only as a permanent, but also as a temperature-dependent source of background. Earlier accuracies of 226Ra/ 222Rn measurements have been considerably improved by assuring long-term mechanical and thermal stability of the ionization chambers.

  5. The effects of depth-dependent crustal viscosity variation on visco-elastic response to inflation/deflation of magma chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    Development of the satellite observations (GPS and/or InSAR) has allowed us to precisely measure surface deformation. However any geodetic observation by itself does not tell us a mechanism of the deformation. All we can do the most is to compare such an observation to some quantitative predictions, only from which we can deduce a possible deformation mechanism. We therefore need to understand characteristic deformation pattern for a given source mechanism. This study particularly pays attention to magmatic activity in depth as the source, aiming to distinguish magma-induced crustal deformation by better knowing how the activity can be reflected in geodetically observable surface deformation. A parallelized 3-D finite element code, OREGANO_VE [e.g., Yamasaki and Houseman, 2015, J. Geodyn., 88, 80-89], is used to solve the linear Maxwell visco-elastic response to an applied internal inflation/deflation of magma chamber. The rectangular finite element model is composed with a visco-elastic layer overlaid by an elastic layer with thickness of H, and the visco-elastic layer extends over the rest of crust and the uppermost mantle. The visco-elastic crust has a depth-dependent viscosity (DDV) as an exponential function of depth due to temperature-dependent viscosity: hc = h0 exp[c(1 - z/L0)], where h0 is the viscosity at the bottom of the crust, c is a constant; c > 0 for DDV model and c = 0 for uniform viscosity (UNV) model, z is the depth, and L0 is a reference length-scale. The visco-elastic mantle has a spatially uniform viscosity hm. The inflation and/or deflation of sill-like magma chamber is implemented by using the split node method developed by Melosh and Raefsky [1981, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am., 71, 1391-1400]. UNV model with c = 0 employed in this study shows that the inflation-induced surface uplift would abate with time by visco-elastic relaxation. The post-inflation subsidence would erase the uplift in ~ 50 - 100 times Maxwell relaxation time of the crust

  6. SU-E-T-533: LET Dependence Correction of Radiochromic Films for Application in Low Energy Proton Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, S; Wuerl, M; Assmann, W; Parodi, K [Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Garching, DE (Germany); Greubel, C [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universitaet der Bundeswehr, Neubiberg, DE (United States); Wilkens, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich, DE (Germany); Hillbrand, M [Rinecker Proton Therapy Center, Munich, DE (Germany); Mairani, A [Medical Physics Unit CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many cell irradiation experiments with low-energy laser-driven ions rely on radiochromic films (RCF), because of their dose-rate independent response and superior spatial resolution. RCF dosimetry in low-energy ion beams requires a correction of the LET dependent film response. The relative efficiency (RE), the ratio of photon to proton dose that yields the same film darkening, is a measure for the film’s LET dependence. A direct way of RE determination is RCF irradiation with low-energy mono-energetic protons and hence, well-defined LET. However, RE is usually determined using high energy proton depth dose measurements where RE corrections require knowledge of the average LET in each depth, which can be either track (tLET) or dose (dLET) averaged. The appropriate LET concept has to be applied to allow a proper film response correction. Methods: Radiochromic EBT2 and EBT3 films were irradiated in clinical photon and proton beams. For each depth of the 200 MeV proton depth dose curve, tLET and dLET were calculated by special user routines from the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. Additional irradiations with mono-energetic low energy protons (4–20 MeV) serve as reference for the RE determination. Results: The difference of dLET and tLET increases with depth, with the dLET being almost twice as large as the tLET for the maximum depth. The comparison with mono-energetic measurements shows a good agreement of the RE for the dLET concept, while a considerably steeper drop in RE is observed when applying the tLET. Conclusion: RCF can be used as reference dosimeter for biomedical experiments with low-energy proton beams if appropriate LET corrections are applied. When using depth dose measurements from clinical proton accelerators for these corrections, the concept of dLET has to be applied. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the DFG Cluster of Excellence ‘Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics’ (MAP). This work was funded by the DFG Cluster of Excellence

  7. Proton form-factor dependence of the finite-size correction to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, J D; Rafelski, J; Miller, G A

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the 2P^{F=2}_{3/2} to 2S^{F=1}_{1/2} transition in muonic hydrogen by Pohl et al. and subsequent analysis has led to the conclusion that the rms radius of the proton differs from the accepted (CODATA) value by approximately 4%, corresponding to a 4.9 sigma discrepancy. We investigate the finite-size effects - in particular the dependence on the shape of the proton electric form-factor - relevant to this transition using bound-state QED with nonperturbative, relativistic Dirac wave-functions for a wide range of idealised charge-distributions and a parameterization of experimental data in order to comment on the extent to which the perturbation-theory analysis which leads to the above conclusion can be confirmed. We find no statistically significant dependence of this correction on the shape of the proton form-factor.

  8. Renormalization scheme dependence of the two-loop QCD corrections to the neutral Higgs-boson masses in the MSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowka, S. [University of Zurich, Institute for Physics, Zurich (Switzerland); Hahn, T.; Heinrich, G.; Hollik, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Muenchen (Germany); Heinemeyer, S. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    Reaching a theoretical accuracy in the prediction of the lightest MSSM Higgs-boson mass, M{sub h}, at the level of the current experimental precision requires the inclusion of momentum-dependent contributions at the two-loop level. Recently two groups presented the two-loop QCD momentum-dependent corrections to M{sub h} (Borowka et al., Eur Phys J C 74(8):2994, 2014; Degrassi et al., Eur Phys J C 75(2):61, 2015), using a hybrid on-shell-DR scheme, with apparently different results. We show that the differences can be traced back to a different renormalization of the top-quark mass, and that the claim in Ref. Degrassi et al. (Eur Phys J C 75(2):61, 2015) of an inconsistency in Ref. Borowka et al. (Eur Phys J C 74(8):2994, 2014) is incorrect. We furthermore compare consistently the results for M{sub h} obtained with the top-quark mass renormalized on-shell and DR. The latter calculation has been added to the FeynHiggs package and can be used to estimate missing higher-order corrections beyond the two-loop level. (orig.)

  9. Momentum-dependent two-loop QCD corrections to the neutral Higgs-boson masses in the MSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowka, S.; Hahn, T.; Heinrich, G.; Hollik, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Munich (Germany); Heinemeyer, S. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Results are presented for the momentum-dependent two-loop contributions of O(α{sub t}α{sub s}) to the masses and mixing effects in the Higgs sector of the MSSM. They are obtained in the Feynman-diagrammatic approach using a mixed on-shell/DR renormalization that can directly be matched onto the higher-order corrections included in the code FeynHiggs. The new two-loop diagrams are evaluated with the program SecDec. The combination of the new momentum-dependent two-loop contribution with the existing one- and two-loop corrections in the on-shell/DR scheme leads to an improved prediction of the light MSSM Higgs boson mass and a correspondingly reduced theoretical uncertainty. We find that the corresponding shifts in the lightest Higgs-boson mass M{sub h} are below 1 GeV in all scenarios considered, but they can extend up to the level of the current experimental uncertainty. The results are included in the code FeynHiggs. (orig.)

  10. Chamber transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  11. Implante de lentes intra-oculares de câmara posterior em olhos fácicos para correção de hipermetropia Implantation of posterior chamber intraocular lens in phakic eyes for the correction of hyperopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Moreira Salera

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a eficácia, a previsibilidade e a segurança do implante da lente fácica de câmara posterior para a correção da hipermetropia. MÉTODOS: Analisamos, retrospectivamente, os prontuários de 16 pacientes (31 olhos submetidos à implantação de lente fácica de câmara posterior para correção da hipermetropia. RESULTADOS: O equivalente esférico médio pré-operatório na refração dinâmica era +5,39 D (variando de +1,25 a +10,50 D e na refração estática era +6,44 D (variando de +3,25 a +10,75 D. O equivalente esférico médio da refração dinâmica do último exame pós-operatório era de -0,45 D (variando de -2,75 a +1,25 D. Observa-se que em três olhos (9,7% ocorreu perda de uma linha de visão e 19 olhos (61,3% mantiveram a mesma acuidade visual pré-operatória com correção. Em seis olhos (19,3% houve ganho de uma linha de visão e em três olhos (9,7% ocorreu ganho de duas linhas de visão. Quanto às complicações, em 13 (41,9% olhos foi observada a presença de depósito de pigmentos finos sobre a lente e três pacientes (18,7% queixaram-se de "glare". CONCLUSÃO: O implante de lente fácica de câmara posterior para correção de hipermetropia moderada e elevada se mostrou método eficaz, previsível e seguro. É necessário acompanhamento pós-operatório mais prolongado para melhor avaliação da estabilidade e do surgimento de complicações tardias.PURPOSE: To examine the efficacy, predictability and safety of posterior chamber phakic intra-ocular lens implantation in patients with hyperopia. METHODS: The authors analyzed retrospectively 16 patients (31 eyes submitted to the implantation of a posterior chamber phakic lens for the correction of hyperopia. RESULTS: The mean preoperative spherical equivalent manifest refraction was +5.39D (ranging from +1.25 to +10.50D and cycloplegia refraction was +6.44D (ranging from +3.25 to +10.75D. The mean postoperative spherical equivalent at the last visit was

  12. Age dependence of spleen- and muscle-corrected hepatic signal enhancement on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matoori, Simon [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zurich (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Breitenstein, Stefan [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Surgery, Clinic for Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, Winterthur (Switzerland); Doert, Aleksis [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Pozdniakova, Viktoria [Stavanger University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stavanger (Norway); Koh, Dow-Mu [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Surrey, England (United Kingdom); Gutzeit, Andreas [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    To identify correlations of signal enhancements (SE) and SE normalized to reference tissues of the spleen, kidney, liver, musculus erector spinae (MES) and ductus hepatocholedochus (DHC) on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate-enhanced MRI with patient age in non-cirrhotic patients. A heterogeneous cohort of 131 patients with different clinical backgrounds underwent a standardized 3.0-T gadoxetate-enhanced liver MRI between November 2008 and June 2013. After exclusion of cirrhotic patients, a cohort of 75 patients with no diagnosed diffuse liver disease was selected. The ratio of signal intensity 20 min post- to pre-contrast administration (SE) in the spleen, kidney, liver, MES and DHC, and the SE of the kidney, liver and DHC normalized to the reference tissues spleen or MES were compared to patient age. Patient age was inversely correlated with the liver SE normalized to the spleen and MES SE (both p < 0.001) and proportionally with the SE of the spleen (p = 0.043), the MES (p = 0.030) and the kidney (p = 0.022). No significant correlations were observed for the DHC (p = 0.347) and liver SE (p = 0.606). The age dependence of hepatic SE normalized to the enhancement in the spleen and MES calls for a cautious interpretation of these quantification methods. (orig.)

  13. First Density Correction to the Transport Coefficients for a Square Well Gas: Temperature Dependence and Bound State Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Gregory Ellis

    The temperature dependence of transport properties of a moderately dense square well gas is studied in order to understand the effects of attractive forces (particularly bound states). The quantum cluster expansions of the Green -Kubo time correlation functions for the thermal conductivity, shear viscosity, and self-diffusion coefficients are given, and exact expressions to zeroth (Boltzmann level) and first order in the density are obtained. Specializing to Boltzmann statistics and the classical square well potential allows calculations of the kinetic potential parts of the first density correction; the important contributions to the remaining triple collision parts are discussed. Good agreement with molecular dynamics results is found; quantitative difference from real fluids are observed, however. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are discussed. A brief description of the ultility and limitations of the hard sphere model is given for comparison. The dynamics structure factor is calculated for a dense fluid of hard spheres and compared with recent neutron scattering data for Krypton.

  14. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-03

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans.

  15. Coulomb Corrections in Deep Inelastic Scattering and the Nuclear Dependence of R =σL /σT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, David

    2011-04-01

    Measurements of Deep Inelastic structure functions from nuclei are typically performed at very high energies, hence effects from the Coulombic acceleration or deceleration of the incident and scattered lepton due to additional protons in a heavy nucleus are typically ignored. However, re-analysis of data taken at SLAC from experiments E140 and E139 indicates that the effect of including Coulomb corrections, while not large, is non-zero and impacts the extracted results non-trivially. In particular, there is a significant impact when these data are used to extrapolate the magnitude of the EMC effect to nuclear matter. In addition, the conclusion from E140 that there is no evidence for a nuclear dependence of R =σL /σT is thrown into question. When combined with recent data from Jefferson Lab, RA -RD at x = 0 . 5 is found to differ from zero by two σ.

  16. Doriot Climatic Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Doriot Climatic Chambers are two, 60-feet long, 11-feet high, 15-feet wide chambers that are owned and operated by NSRDEC. The Doriot Climatic Chambers are among...

  17. Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber comprises a power anechoic chamber and one transverse electromagnetic cell for characterizing radiofrequency (RF) responses of...

  18. Effects of chamber shape and fiber orientation on relations between fiber dynamics and chamber dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regen, D M

    1988-01-01

    The function of a chamber depends on its hydrodynamic properties: isometric pressures it can exert in the operating range of distensions, compliances in the operating range of distensions, and wall-displacement resistances in the operating range of distensions. Wall-displacement resistance is the departure of pressure from isometric pressure relative to rate of cavity-volume change. The dependence of pressure on average stress and wall/cavity volume ratio is indifferent to chamber shape, which suggests that the volume-based compliance-elastance and resistance-viscosity equations would be only moderately shape dependent. The present study shows that this supposition is correct. If the wall is thin, these relations are shape indifferent. At higher wall/cavity volume ratio, cylindricity increases slightly the P-V-curve slope relative to elastance and either increases slightly or does not affect resistance relative to viscosity. The compliance-elastance and resistance-viscosity relations also depend only slightly on fiber orientation. Therefore, with the sphere equations, one can account accurately for normal and abnormal function of a prolate spheroid in terms of volume dimensions of the wall and apparent average fiber properties.

  19. Performance evaluation of multi sampling ionization chamber for heavy ion beams by comparison with GEANT4 simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanke, Yuki; Himac H093 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    In high-energy heavy-ion accelerator facilities, multi sampling ionization chambers are often used for the identification of the atomic number Z by detecting the energy deposit in it. In the study at GSI, the picture of the escape of secondary electrons, δ rays, from the ionization chamber explains the experimental data of pulse-height resolution. If this picture is correct, the pulse-height resolution should depend on the effective area of the ionization chamber. The experiment have been performed at NIRS-HIMAC. The pulse-height resolutions of two ionization chambers with different effective area were compared by using a 400-MeV/u Ni beam and their fragments. The difference in the pulse-height resolutions was observed. By comparison with the GEANT4 simulation including the δ-rays emission, the performance of the ionization chamber have been evaluated.

  20. The influence of an extrapolation chamber over the low energy X-ray beam radiation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanuri de F, M. T.; Da Silva, T. A., E-mail: mttf@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    The extrapolation chambers are detectors whose sensitive volume can be modified by changing the distance between the electrodes and has been widely used for beta particles primary measurement system. In this work, was performed a PTW 23392 extrapolation chamber Monte Carlo simulation, by mean the MCNPX code. Although the sensitive volume of an extrapolation chamber can be reduced to very small size, their packaging is large enough to modify the radiation field and change the absorbed dose measurements values. Experiments were performed to calculate correction factors for this purpose. The validation of the Monte Carlo model was done by comparing the spectra obtained with a CdTe detector according to the ISO 4037 criteria. Agreements smaller than 5% for half value layers, 10% for spectral resolution and 1% for mean energy, were found. It was verified that the correction factors are dependent of the X-ray beam quality. (Author)

  1. Correction of Diabetic Hyperglycemia and Amelioration of Metabolic Anomalies by Minicircle DNA Mediated Glucose-Dependent Hepatic Insulin Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tausif Alam

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is caused by immune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Commonly used insulin injection therapy does not provide a dynamic blood glucose control to prevent long-term systemic T1DM-associated damages. Donor shortage and the limited long-term success of islet transplants have stimulated the development of novel therapies for T1DM. Gene therapy-based glucose-regulated hepatic insulin production is a promising strategy to treat T1DM. We have developed gene constructs which cause glucose-concentration-dependent human insulin production in liver cells. A novel set of human insulin expression constructs containing a combination of elements to improve gene transcription, mRNA processing, and translation efficiency were generated as minicircle DNA preparations that lack bacterial and viral DNA. Hepatocytes transduced with the new constructs, ex vivo, produced large amounts of glucose-inducible human insulin. In vivo, insulin minicircle DNA (TA1m treated streptozotocin (STZ-diabetic rats demonstrated euglycemia when fasted or fed, ad libitum. Weight loss due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia was reversed in insulin gene treated diabetic rats to normal rate of weight gain, lasting ∼1 month. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGT demonstrated in vivo glucose-responsive changes in insulin levels to correct hyperglycemia within 45 minutes. A single TA1m treatment raised serum albumin levels in diabetic rats to normal and significantly reduced hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia. Elevated serum levels of aspartate transaminase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase were restored to normal or greatly reduced in treated rats, indicating normalization of liver function. Non-viral insulin minicircle DNA-based TA1m mediated glucose-dependent insulin production in liver may represent a safe and promising approach to treat T1DM.

  2. The retrieval of the Asian dust depolarization ratio in Korea with the correction of the polarization-dependent transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sungkyun; Müller, Detlef; Kim, Y. J.; Tatarov, Boyan; Shin, Dongho; Seifert, Patric; Noh, Young Min

    2013-01-01

    The linear particle depolarization ratios were retrieved from the observation with a multiwavelength Raman lidar at the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Korea (35.11°N, 126.54°E). The measurements were carried out in spring (March to May) 2011. The transmission ratio measurements were performed to solve problems of the depolarization-dependent transmission at a receiver of the lidar and applied to correct the retrieved depolarization ratio of Asian dust at first time in Korea. The analyzed data from the GIST multiwavelength Raman lidar were classified into three categories according to the linear particle depolarization ratios, which are pure Asian dust on 21 March, the intermediate case which means Asian dust mixed with urban pollution on 13 May, and haze case on 10 April. The measured transmission ratios were applied to these cases respectively. We found that the transmission ratio is needed to be used to retrieve the accurate depolarization ratio of Asian dust and also would be useful to distinguish the mixed dust particles between intermediate case and haze. The particle depolarization ratios of pure Asian dust were approximately 0.25 at 532 nm and 0.14 at 532 nm for the intermediate case. The linear particle depolarization ratios of pure Asian dust observed with the GIST multiwavelength Raman lidar were compared to the linear particle depolarization ratios of Saharan dust observed in Morocco and Asian dust observed both in Japan and China.

  3. MPS II drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  4. Solid state temperature-dependent NUC (non-uniformity correction) in uncooled LWIR (long-wave infrared) imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanpeng; Tisse, Christel-Loic

    2013-06-01

    In uncooled LWIR microbolometer imaging systems, temperature fluctuations of FPA (Focal Plane Array) as well as lens and mechanical components placed along the optical path result in thermal drift and spatial non-uniformity. These non-idealities generate undesirable FPN (Fixed-Pattern-Noise) that is difficult to remove using traditional, individual shutterless and TEC-less (Thermo-Electric Cooling) techniques. In this paper we introduce a novel single-image based processing approach that marries the benefits of both statistical scene-based and calibration-based NUC algorithms, without relying neither on extra temperature reference nor accurate motion estimation, to compensate the resulting temperature-dependent non-uniformities. Our method includes two subsequent image processing steps. Firstly, an empirical behavioral model is derived by calibrations to characterize the spatio-temporal response of the microbolometric FPA to environmental and scene temperature fluctuations. Secondly, we experimentally establish that the FPN component caused by the optics creates a spatio-temporally continuous, low frequency, low-magnitude variation of the image intensity. We propose to make use of this property and learn a prior on the spatial distribution of natural image gradients to infer the correction function for the entire image. The performance and robustness of the proposed temperature-adaptive NUC method are demonstrated by showing results obtained from a 640×512 pixels uncooled LWIR microbolometer imaging system operating over a broad range of temperature and with rapid environmental temperature changes (i.e. from -5°C to 65°C within 10 minutes).

  5. Phase separation of polymer solutions. The calculation of the cloudpoint curve with a concentration and temperature-dependent free energy correction parameter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmerik, van P.T.; Smolders, C.A.

    1973-01-01

    The free enthalpy correction parameter g in the Flory-Huggins equation for the Gibbs free enthalpy of mixing in polymer solutions is considered generally as a concentration- and temperature-independent parameter. It has been extended here with linear concentration- and temperature-dependent terms. W

  6. Measurement of absorbed dose with a bone-equivalent extrapolation chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlois, François; Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Seuntjens, Jan P; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2002-03-01

    A hybrid phantom-embedded extrapolation chamber (PEEC) made of Solid Water and bone-equivalent material was used for determining absorbed dose in a bone-equivalent phantom irradiated with clinical radiation beams (cobalt-60 gamma rays; 6 and 18 MV x rays; and 9 and 15 MeV electrons). The dose was determined with the Spencer-Attix cavity theory, using ionization gradient measurements and an indirect determination of the chamber air-mass through measurements of chamber capacitance. The collected charge was corrected for ionic recombination and diffusion in the chamber air volume following the standard two-voltage technique. Due to the hybrid chamber design, correction factors accounting for scatter deficit and electrode composition were determined and applied in the dose equation to obtain absorbed dose in bone for the equivalent homogeneous bone phantom. Correction factors for graphite electrodes were calculated with Monte Carlo techniques and the calculated results were verified through relative air cavity dose measurements for three different polarizing electrode materials: graphite, steel, and brass in conjunction with a graphite collecting electrode. Scatter deficit, due mainly to loss of lateral scatter in the hybrid chamber, reduces the dose to the air cavity in the hybrid PEEC in comparison with full bone PEEC by 0.7% to approximately 2% depending on beam quality and energy. In megavoltage photon and electron beams, graphite electrodes do not affect the dose measurement in the Solid Water PEEC but decrease the cavity dose by up to 5% in the bone-equivalent PEEC even for very thin graphite electrodes (<0.0025 cm). In conjunction with appropriate correction factors determined with Monte Carlo techniques, the uncalibrated hybrid PEEC can be used for measuring absorbed dose in bone material to within 2% for high-energy photon and electron beams.

  7. Project, construction and characterization of ionization chambers for use as standard systems in X and gamma radiation beams; Projeto, construcao e caracterizacao de camaras de ionizacao para utilizacao como sistemas padroes em feixes de radiacao X e gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana Paula

    2013-07-01

    Ionization chambers present some advantages in relation to other dosimeters: easiness of handling, low energy dependence and high precision. The advantages associated to ionization chambers and the large number of diagnostic radiology exams and therapeutic treatments motivated the development of this PhD program. In this project ionization chambers were developed and characterized to be applied in diagnostic radiology and therapy beam dosimetry, with high precision and performance, in compliance with international recommendations. They were assembled in a simple way, utilizing low-cost national materials, so they can be reproduced and applied at calibration laboratories. The project of these ionization chambers presents some differences in relation to commercial ionization chambers, as the materials utilized and geometrical arrangements. Besides the development of the ionization chambers to be utilized in standard X-ray beam dosimetry as work standard systems, two graphite parallel-plate ionization chambers were developed and characterized to be applied as reference standard systems for determining the air kerma rates of gamma radiation sources. Comparing the air kerma rates determined with the reference standard of the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN, a Farmer ionization chamber, with the values of the air kerma rates obtained with the graphite ionization chambers, the maximum differences obtained were only 1.7% and 1.2% for the G1 and G2 graphite ionization chambers, respectively. Moreover, these ionization chambers presented correction factors close to 1.000, which is ideal for an ionization chamber be characterized as a reference standard system. (author)

  8. Development of special ionization chambers for a quality control program in mammography; Desenvolvimento de camaras de ionizacao especiais para controle de qualidade em mamografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jonas Oliveira da

    2013-07-01

    Mammography is an imaging method that uses X-rays. The use of ionization chambers in mammography quality control programs presents an essential role which is to verify whether the parameters of the patient exposure are correct. However, the commercial ionization chambers for dosimetry in mammography represent a high cost for small and medium size clinics that wish to have this equipment or for professionals that work with quality control programs. The innovative feature of this work was to develop ionization chambers for this purpose. In this work ionization chambers for X radiation beams in the mammography energy range were designed, constructed and characterized. The ionization chambers were tested in standard X radiation beams at the LCI/IPEN. The main characterization tests performed with the ionization chambers were: saturation curve, linearity of response, angular and energy dependence. The response stability tests of the ionization chambers were also conducted at the LCI, presenting results within 2.0 % for long-term stability. The results of the remaining tests are in accordance with international standards. These ionization chambers were also submitted to quality control tests of mammography equipment: linearity of the air kerma rates, determination of half-value layers and mean glandular doses. The results for air kerma rate linearity were less than 10 %, as recommended in international standards. The mean glandular dose obtained with the developed chambers presented values comparable to those of commercial ionization chambers tested, with an estimated variation within international standards. (author)

  9. ISR Intersection Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This special vacuum chamber presenting a lateral opening at the beam crossing point is one of the many chambers specifically designed for a particular experiment. Here it is shown during assembly at the ISR mechanical worshop.

  10. Recombination characteristics of therapeutic ion beams on ion chamber dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Matsuyama, Tetsuharu; Sato, Shinji; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    In heavy ion radiotherapy, ionization chambers are regarded as a standard for determining the absorbed dose given to patients. In ion dosimetry, it is necessary to correct the radiation quality, which depends on the initial recombination effect. This study reveals for the radiation quality dependence of the initial recombination in air in ion dosimetry. Ionization charge was measured for the beams of protons at 40-160 MeV, carbon at 21-400 MeV/n, and iron at 23.5-500 MeV/n using two identical parallel-plate ionization chambers placed in series along the beam axis. The downstream chamber was used as a monitor operated with a constant applied voltage, while the other chamber was used for recombination measurement by changing the voltage. The ratio of the ionization charge measured by the two ionization chambers showed a linear relationship with the inverse of the voltage in the high-voltage region. The initial recombination factor was estimated by extrapolating the obtained linear relationship to infinite voltage. The extent of the initial recombination was found to increase with decreasing incident energy or increasing atomic number of the beam. This behavior can be explained with an amorphous track structure model: the increase of ionization density in the core region of the track due to decreasing kinetic energy or increasing atomic number leads to denser initial ion production and results in a higher recombination probability. For therapeutic carbon ion beams, the extent of the initial recombination was not constant but changed by 0.6% even in the target region. This tendency was quantitatively well reproduced with the track-structure based on the initial recombination model; however, the transitional change in the track structure is considered to play an important role in further understanding of the characteristics of the initial recombination.

  11. Assessment of a simple correction for the long-range charge-transfer problem in time-dependent density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Johannes; Gritsenko, Oleg; Baerends, Evert Jan

    2006-06-01

    The failure of the time-dependent density-functional theory to describe long-range charge-transfer (CT) excitations correctly is a serious problem for calculations of electronic transitions in large systems, especially if they are composed of several weakly interacting units. The problem is particularly severe for molecules in solution, either modeled by periodic boundary calculations with large box sizes or by cluster calculations employing extended solvent shells. In the present study we describe the implementation and assessment of a simple physically motivated correction to the exchange-correlation kernel suggested in a previous study [O. Gritsenko and E. J. Baerends J. Chem. Phys. 121, 655 (2004)]. It introduces the required divergence in the kernel when the transition density goes to zero due to a large spatial distance between the "electron" (in the virtual orbital) and the "hole" (in the occupied orbital). A major benefit arises for solvated molecules, for which many CT excitations occur from solvent to solute or vice versa. In these cases, the correction of the exchange-correlation kernel can be used to automatically "clean up" the spectrum and significantly reduce the computational effort to determine low-lying transitions of the solute. This correction uses a phenomenological parameter, which is needed to identify a CT excitation in terms of the orbital density overlap of the occupied and virtual orbitals involved. Another quantity needed in this approach is the magnitude of the correction in the asymptotic limit. Although this can, in principle, be calculated rigorously for a given CT transition, we assess a simple approximation to it that can automatically be applied to a number of low-energy CT excitations without additional computational effort. We show that the method is robust and correctly shifts long-range CT excitations, while other excitations remain unaffected. We discuss problems arising from a strong delocalization of orbitals, which leads

  12. Assessment of a simple correction for the long-range charge-transfer problem in time-dependent density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Johannes; Gritsenko, Oleg; Baerends, Evert Jan

    2006-06-07

    The failure of the time-dependent density-functional theory to describe long-range charge-transfer (CT) excitations correctly is a serious problem for calculations of electronic transitions in large systems, especially if they are composed of several weakly interacting units. The problem is particularly severe for molecules in solution, either modeled by periodic boundary calculations with large box sizes or by cluster calculations employing extended solvent shells. In the present study we describe the implementation and assessment of a simple physically motivated correction to the exchange-correlation kernel suggested in a previous study [O. Gritsenko and E. J. Baerends J. Chem. Phys. 121, 655 (2004)]. It introduces the required divergence in the kernel when the transition density goes to zero due to a large spatial distance between the "electron" (in the virtual orbital) and the "hole" (in the occupied orbital). A major benefit arises for solvated molecules, for which many CT excitations occur from solvent to solute or vice versa. In these cases, the correction of the exchange-correlation kernel can be used to automatically "clean up" the spectrum and significantly reduce the computational effort to determine low-lying transitions of the solute. This correction uses a phenomenological parameter, which is needed to identify a CT excitation in terms of the orbital density overlap of the occupied and virtual orbitals involved. Another quantity needed in this approach is the magnitude of the correction in the asymptotic limit. Although this can, in principle, be calculated rigorously for a given CT transition, we assess a simple approximation to it that can automatically be applied to a number of low-energy CT excitations without additional computational effort. We show that the method is robust and correctly shifts long-range CT excitations, while other excitations remain unaffected. We discuss problems arising from a strong delocalization of orbitals, which leads

  13. Prototype multiwire proportional chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    Chambers of this type were initially developed within the Alpha project (finally not approved). They were designed such to minimize the radiation length with a view to a mass spectrometer of high resolution meant to replace the Omega detector. The chambers were clearly forerunners for the (drift) chambers later built for R606 with the novel technique of crimping the wires. See also photo 7510039X.

  14. Streamer chamber: pion decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    The real particles produced in the decay of a positive pion can be seen in this image from a streamer chamber. Streamer chambers consist of a gas chamber through which a strong pulsed electric field is passed, creating sparks as a charged particle passes through it. A magnetic field is added to cause the decay products to follow curved paths so that their charge and momentum can be measured.

  15. Electromagnetic reverberation chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Besnier, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Dedicated to a complete presentation on all aspects of reverberation chambers, this book provides the physical principles behind these test systems in a very progressive manner. The detailed panorama of parameters governing the operation of electromagnetic reverberation chambers details various applications such as radiated immunity, emissivity, and shielding efficiency experiments.In addition, the reader is provided with the elements of electromagnetic theory and statistics required to take full advantage of the basic operational rules of reverberation chambers, including calibration proc

  16. Characterization of a homemade ionization chamber for radiotherapy beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P; Perini, Ana P; dos Santos, Gelson P; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A homemade cylindrical ionization chamber was studied for routine use in therapy beams of (60)Co and X-rays. Several characterization tests were performed: leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, stability, stabilization time, chamber orientation and energy dependence. All results obtained were within international recommendations. Therefore the homemade ionization chamber presents usefulness for routine dosimetric procedures in radiotherapy beams.

  17. Refrigeration Test Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The enclosed and environmentally controlled chamber is able to test four units (single-phase) simultaneously at conditions ranging from tundra to desert temperatures...

  18. DORIOT CLIMATIC CHAMBERS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Doriot Climatic Chambers reproduce environmental conditions occurring anywhere around the world. They provide an invaluable service by significantly reducing the...

  19. A new statistical time-dependent model of earthquake occurrence: failure processes driven by a self-correcting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondi, Renata; Varini, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    The long-term recurrence of strong earthquakes is often modelled by the stationary Poisson process for the sake of simplicity, although renewal and self-correcting point processes (with non-decreasing hazard functions) are more appropriate. Short-term models mainly fit earthquake clusters due to the tendency of an earthquake to trigger other earthquakes; in this case, self-exciting point processes with non-increasing hazard are especially suitable. In order to provide a unified framework for analyzing earthquake catalogs, Schoenberg and Bolt proposed the SELC (Short-term Exciting Long-term Correcting) model (BSSA, 2000) and Varini employed a state-space model for estimating the different phases of a seismic cycle (PhD Thesis, 2005). Both attempts are combinations of long- and short-term models, but results are not completely satisfactory, due to the different scales at which these models appear to operate. In this study, we split a seismic sequence in two groups: the leader events, whose magnitude exceeds a threshold magnitude, and the remaining ones considered as subordinate events. The leader events are assumed to follow a well-known self-correcting point process named stress release model (Vere-Jones, J. Phys. Earth, 1978; Bebbington & Harte, GJI, 2003, Varini & Rotondi, Env. Ecol. Stat., 2015). In the interval between two subsequent leader events, subordinate events are expected to cluster at the beginning (aftershocks) and at the end (foreshocks) of that interval; hence, they are modeled by a failure processes that allows bathtub-shaped hazard function. In particular, we have examined the generalized Weibull distributions, a large family that contains distributions with different bathtub-shaped hazard as well as the standard Weibull distribution (Lai, Springer, 2014). The model is fitted to a dataset of Italian historical earthquakes and the results of Bayesian inference are shown.

  20. Study of the Dependence of the Source check ionization chamber with pressure; Estudio de la dependencia de la camara de ionizacion Sourcecheck con la presion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornero-Lopez, A. M.; Ruiz-Arrabola, S.; Moreno-Torres, M.; Simancas, F.; Guerrero, R.; Guirado, D.

    2013-07-01

    Because of the importance of accurate measurement of power low-energy photons, such as I-125 seeds used in brachytherapy, and the widespread use of Source Check in Europe, this work is to study whether this camera features any dependence the pressure and shows included in the pressure-temperature factor usual. (Author)

  1. Calibrating passive acoustic monitoring: correcting humpback whale call detections for site-specific and time-dependent environmental characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Campbell, Greg S; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the importance of accounting for environmental effects on passive underwater acoustic monitoring results. The situation considered is the reduction in shipping off the California coast between 2008-2010 due to the recession and environmental legislation. The resulting variations in ocean noise change the probability of detecting marine mammal vocalizations. An acoustic model was used to calculate the time-varying probability of detecting humpback whale vocalizations under best-guess environmental conditions and varying noise. The uncorrected call counts suggest a diel pattern and an increase in calling over a two-year period; the corrected call counts show minimal evidence of these features.

  2. Correction Technique for Raman Water Vapor Lidar Signal-Dependent Bias and Suitability for Water Wapor Trend Monitoring in the Upper Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Cadirola, M.; Venable, D.; Calhoun, M.; Miloshevich, L; Vermeesch, K.; Twigg, L.; Dirisu, A.; Hurst, D.; Hall, E.; Jordan, A.; Voemel, H.

    2012-01-01

    The MOHAVE-2009 campaign brought together diverse instrumentation for measuring atmospheric water vapor. We report on the participation of the ALVICE (Atmospheric Laboratory for Validation, Interagency Collaboration and Education) mobile laboratory in the MOHAVE-2009 campaign. In appendices we also report on the performance of the corrected Vaisala RS92 radiosonde measurements during the campaign, on a new radiosonde based calibration algorithm that reduces the influence of atmospheric variability on the derived calibration constant, and on other results of the ALVICE deployment. The MOHAVE-2009 campaign permitted the Raman lidar systems participating to discover and address measurement biases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The ALVICE lidar system was found to possess a wet bias which was attributed to fluorescence of insect material that was deposited on the telescope early in the mission. Other sources of wet biases are discussed and data from other Raman lidar systems are investigated, revealing that wet biases in upper tropospheric (UT) and lower stratospheric (LS) water vapor measurements appear to be quite common in Raman lidar systems. Lower stratospheric climatology of water vapor is investigated both as a means to check for the existence of these wet biases in Raman lidar data and as a source of correction for the bias. A correction technique is derived and applied to the ALVICE lidar water vapor profiles. Good agreement is found between corrected ALVICE lidar measurments and those of RS92, frost point hygrometer and total column water. The correction is offered as a general method to both quality control Raman water vapor lidar data and to correct those data that have signal-dependent bias. The influence of the correction is shown to be small at regions in the upper troposphere where recent work indicates detection of trends in atmospheric water vapor may be most robust. The correction shown here holds promise for permitting useful upper

  3. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Experience Japan The Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry will further promote its Japan-experience program and seek cooperation with various Chinese institutions.Between early May and June 2007,the chamber organized a Chinese college student delegation to Japan with the support from its members in China.

  4. Target chambers for gammashpere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  5. BEBC bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Looking up into the interior of BEBC bubble chamber from the expansion cylinder. At the top of the chamber two fish-eye lenses are installed and three other fish-eye ports are blanked off. In the centre is a heat exchanger.

  6. The Mobile Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  7. Fluidized bed combustion chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kullendorff, A.; Wikner, J.

    1985-03-25

    The chamber is confined in a pressure vessel. The lower part of the chamber has tilted parallel gutters up to the height of the fluidized bed. The slope of the gutter walls is 5 degrees-15 degrees and the top area of the gutters is 1.3 to 3 times larger than their bottom.

  8. DELPHI time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The time projection chamber is inserted inside the central detector of the DELPHI experiment. Gas is ionised in the chamber as a charged particle passes through, producing an electric signal from which the path of the particle can be found. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  9. LEP vacuum chamber, early prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    The structure of LEP, with long bending magnets and little access to the vacuum chamber between them, required distributed pumping. This is an early prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, made from extruded aluminium. The main opening is for the beam. The small channel to the right is for cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchroton radiation from the beam. The 4 slots in the channel to the left house the strip-shaped ion-getter pumps (see 7810255). The ion-getter pumps depended on the magnetic field of the bending magnets, too low at injection energy for the pumps to function well. Also, a different design was required outside the bending magnets. This design was therefore abandoned, in favour of a thermal getter pump (see 8301153 and 8305170).

  10. (Un)determined finite regularization dependent quantum corrections: the Higgs decay into two photons and the two photon scattering examples

    CERN Document Server

    Cherchiglia, A L; Nemes, M C; Sampaio, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the appearance of arbitrary, regularization dependent parameters introduced by divergent integrals in two a priori finite but superficially divergent amplitudes: the Higgs decay into two photons and the two photon scattering. We use a general parametrization of ultraviolet divergences which explicitates such ambiguities. Thus we separate in a consistent way using Implicit Regularization the divergent, finite and regularization dependent parts of the amplitudes which in turn are written as surface terms. We find that, although finite, these amplitudes are ambiguous before the imposition of physical conditions namely momentum routing invariance in the loops of Feynman diagrams. In the examples we study momentum routing invariance turns out to be equivalent to gauge invariance. We also discuss the results obtained by different regularizations and show how they can be reproduced within our framework allowing for a clear view on the origin of regularization ambiguities.

  11. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  12. PS wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A wire chamber used at CERN's Proton Synchrotron accelerator in the 1970s. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  13. Machine Learning Based Multi-Physical-Model Blending for Enhancing Renewable Energy Forecast -- Improvement via Situation Dependent Error Correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Siyuan; Hwang, Youngdeok; Khabibrakhmanov, Ildar; Marianno, Fernando J.; Shao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Hamann, Hendrik F.

    2015-07-15

    With increasing penetration of solar and wind energy to the total energy supply mix, the pressing need for accurate energy forecasting has become well-recognized. Here we report the development of a machine-learning based model blending approach for statistically combining multiple meteorological models for improving the accuracy of solar/wind power forecast. Importantly, we demonstrate that in addition to parameters to be predicted (such as solar irradiance and power), including additional atmospheric state parameters which collectively define weather situations as machine learning input provides further enhanced accuracy for the blended result. Functional analysis of variance shows that the error of individual model has substantial dependence on the weather situation. The machine-learning approach effectively reduces such situation dependent error thus produces more accurate results compared to conventional multi-model ensemble approaches based on simplistic equally or unequally weighted model averaging. Validation over an extended period of time results show over 30% improvement in solar irradiance/power forecast accuracy compared to forecasts based on the best individual model.

  14. Comment on ‘Proton beam monitor chamber calibration’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmans, Hugo; Vatnitsky, Stanislav M.

    2016-09-01

    We comment on a recent article (Gomà et al 2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) which compares different routes of reference dosimetry for the energy dependent beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams. In this article, a 3% discrepancy is reported between a Faraday cup and a plane-parallel ionization chamber in the experimental determination of the number of protons per monitor unit. It is further claimed that similar discrepancies between calorimetry and ionization chamber based dosimetry indicate that {{k}Q} -values tabulated for proton beams in IAEA TRS-398 might be overestimated. In this commentary we show, however, that this supporting argument misrepresents the evidence in the literature and that the results presented, together with published data, rather confirm that there exist unresolved problems with Faraday cup dosimetry. We also show that the comparison in terms of the number of protons gives a biased view on the uncertainty estimates for both detectors while the quantity of interest is absorbed dose to water or dose-area-product to water, even if a beam monitor is calibrated in terms of the number of protons. Gomà et al (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) also report on the discrepancy between cylindrical and plane-parallel ionization chambers and confirm experimentally that in the presence of a depth dose gradient, theoretical values of the effective point of measurement, or alternatively a gradient correction factor, account for the discrepancy. We believe this does not point to an error or shortcoming of IAEA TRS-398, which prescribes taking the centre of cylindrical ionization chambers as reference point, since it recommends reference dosimetry to be performed in the absence of a depth dose gradient. But these observations reveal that important aspects of beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams are not addressed in IAEA TRS-398 given that those types of beams were not widely implemented at the time of its publication.

  15. Positioning of a plane-parallel ionization chamber in clinical electron beams and the impact on perturbation factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, K; Wulff, J

    2009-04-21

    Current dosimetry protocols recommend the use of plane-parallel ionization chambers for the dosimetry of clinical electron beams. The necessary perturbation corrections p(wall) and p(cav) are assumed to be unity, independent of the depth of measurement and the energy of the primary electrons. To verify these assumptions detailed Monte Carlo studies of a Roos chamber in clinical electron beams with energies in the range of 6-21 MeV are performed at different depths in water and analyzed in terms of Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Separate simulations for the perturbation corrections p(wall) and p(cav) indicate quite different properties of both correction factors with depth. Dose as well as fluence calculations show a nearly depth-independent wall correction factor for a shift of the Roos chamber Deltaz = -0.017 cm toward the focus. This value is in good agreement with the positioning recommendation given in all dosimetry protocols. Regarding the fluence perturbation p(cav) the simulation of the electron fluence inside the air cavity in comparison to water unambiguously reveals an in-scattering of low energy electrons, despite the fact, that the cavity is 'well guarded'. For depths beyond the reference depth z(ref) this effect is superimposed by an increased loss of primary electrons from the beam resulting in p(cav) > 1. This effect is largest for low electron energies but present for all electron energies involved in this study. Based on the different depth dependences of p(wall) and p(cav) it is possible to choose a chamber shift Deltaz in a way to minimize the depth dependence of the overall perturbation factor p. For the Roos chamber this shift is Deltaz = -0.04 cm independent of electron energy.

  16. Positioning of a plane-parallel ionization chamber in clinical electron beams and the impact on perturbation factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zink, K; Wulff, J [Institut fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz-IMPS, University of Applied Sciences Giessen-Friedberg, Wiesenstr. 14, D-35390 Giessen (Germany)], E-mail: klemens.zink@tg.fh-giessen.de

    2009-04-21

    Current dosimetry protocols recommend the use of plane-parallel ionization chambers for the dosimetry of clinical electron beams. The necessary perturbation corrections p{sub wall} and p{sub cav} are assumed to be unity, independent of the depth of measurement and the energy of the primary electrons. To verify these assumptions detailed Monte Carlo studies of a Roos chamber in clinical electron beams with energies in the range of 6-21 MeV are performed at different depths in water and analyzed in terms of Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Separate simulations for the perturbation corrections p{sub wall} and p{sub cav} indicate quite different properties of both correction factors with depth. Dose as well as fluence calculations show a nearly depth-independent wall correction factor for a shift of the Roos chamber {delta}z = -0.017 cm toward the focus. This value is in good agreement with the positioning recommendation given in all dosimetry protocols. Regarding the fluence perturbation p{sub cav} the simulation of the electron fluence inside the air cavity in comparison to water unambiguously reveals an in-scattering of low energy electrons, despite the fact, that the cavity is 'well guarded'. For depths beyond the reference depth z{sub ref} this effect is superimposed by an increased loss of primary electrons from the beam resulting in p{sub cav} > 1. This effect is largest for low electron energies but present for all electron energies involved in this study. Based on the different depth dependences of p{sub wall} and p{sub cav} it is possible to choose a chamber shift {delta}z in a way to minimize the depth dependence of the overall perturbation factor p. For the Roos chamber this shift is {delta}z = -0.04 cm independent of electron energy.

  17. ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Lippmann, C

    2013-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device in the ALICE 'central barrel' for the tracking and identification (PID) of charged particles. It has to cope with unprecedented densities of charges particles.

  18. Vacuum chamber 'bicone'

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This chamber is now in the National Museum of History and Technology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA, where it was exposed in an exhibit on the History of High Energy Accelerators (1977).

  19. High rate drift chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, D.C. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Berisso, M.C. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Gutierrez, G. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Holmes, S.D. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Wehmann, A. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Avilez, C. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Felix, J. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Moreno, G. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Romero, M. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Sosa, M. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Forbush, M. (Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)); Huson, F.R. (Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)); Wightman, J.A. (Department of Physi

    1994-06-01

    Fermilab experiment 690, a study of target dissociation reactions pp[yields]pX using an 800 GeV/c proton beam and a liquid hydrogen target, collected data in late 1991. The incident beam and 600-800 GeV/c scattered protons were measured using a system of six 6 in.x4 in. and two 15 in.x8 in. pressurized drift chambers spaced over 260 m. These chambers provided precise measurements at rates above 10 MHz (2 MHz per cm of sense wire). The measurement resolution of the smaller chambers was 90 [mu]m, and the resolution of the larger chambers was 125 [mu]m. Construction details and performance results, including radiation damage, are presented. ((orig.))

  20. Toxic Test Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Hazardous material test facility Both facilities have 16,000 cubic foot chambers, equipped with 5000 CFM CBR filter systems with an air change...

  1. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  2. SU-E-T-448: On the Perturbation Factor P-cav of the Markus Parallel Plate Ion Chambers in Clinical Electron Beams, Monte Carlo Based Reintegration of An Historical Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigts-Rhetz, P von; Zink, K [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen - University of Applied Sciences, Giessen, Hessen (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: All present dosimetry protocols recommend well-guarded parallel-plate ion chambers for electron dosimetry. For the guard-less Markus chamber an energy dependent fluence perturbation correction pcav is given. This perturbation correction was experimentally determined by van der Plaetsen by comparison of the read-out of a Markus and a NACP chamber, which was assumed to be “perturbation-free”. Aim of the present study is a Monte Carlo based reiteration of this experiment. Methods: Detailed models of four parallel-plate chambers (Roos, Markus, NACP and Advanced Markus) were designed using the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc and placed in a water phantom. For all chambers the dose to the active volume filled with low density water was calculated for 13 clinical electron spectra (E{sub 0}=6-21 MeV) at the depth of maximum and at the reference depth under reference conditions. In all cases the chamber's reference point was positioned at the depth of measurement. Moreover, the dose to water DW was calculated in a small water voxel positioned at the same depth. Results: The calculated dose ratio D{sub NACP}/D{sub Markus}, which according to van der Plaetsen reflects the fluence perturbation correction of the Markus chamber, deviates less from unity than the values given by van der Plaetsen's but exhibits a similar energy dependence. The same holds for the dose ratios of the other well guarded chambers. But, in comparison to water, the Markus chamber reveals the smallest overall perturbation correction which is nearly energy independent at both investigated depths. Conclusion: The simulations principally confirm the energy dependence of the dose ratio D{sub NACP}/D{sub Markus} as published by van der Plaetsen. But, as shown by our simulations of the ratio D{sub W}/D{sub Markus}, the conclusion drawn in all dosimetry protocols is questionable: in contrast to all well-guarded chambers the guard-less Markus chamber reveals the smallest overall perturbation

  3. Development and characterization of a new graphite ionization chamber for dosimetry of {sup 60}Co beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, Lucio Pereira; Perini, Ana Paula; Santos, William de Souza; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br, E-mail: aperini@ipen.br, E-mail: wssantos@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Ionization chambers are the most employed dosimeters for precise measurements, as those required in radiotherapy. In this work, a new graphite ionization chamber was developed and characterized in order to compose a primary standard system for the beam dosimetry of the {sup 60}Co sources. This dosimeter is a cylindrical type ionization chamber, with walls and collecting electrode made of high-purity graphite, and the insulators and stem made of Teflon®. The walls are 3.0 mm thick, and it has a sensitive volume of 1.40 cm{sup 3}. The characterization was divided in two steps: experimental and Monte Carlo evaluations. This new dosimeter was evaluated in relation to its saturation curve, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, short- and medium-term stabilities, leakage current, stabilization time, linearity of response and angular dependence. All results presented values within the established limits. The second part of the characterization process involved the determination of the correction factors, obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. Comparing these correction factors values with those from other primary standard laboratories, the highest differences were those for the wall and stem correction factors. The air-kerma rate of the {sup 60}Co source was determined with this new dosimeter and with the IPEN standard system, presenting a difference of 1.7%. These results indicate that this new dosimeter may be used as a primary standard system for {sup 60}Co gamma beams. (author)

  4. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuhong; Cela, Racel G; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential "cure." Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained.

  5. Material dependence of Casimir interaction between a sphere and a plate: First analytic correction beyond proximity force approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Teo, L P

    2013-01-01

    We derive analytically the asymptotic behavior of the Casimir interaction between a sphere and a plate when the distance between them, $d$, is much smaller than the radius of the sphere, $R$. The leading order and next-to-leading order terms are derived from the exact formula for the Casimir interaction energy. They are found to depend nontrivially on the dielectric functions of the objects. As expected, the leading order term coincides with that derived using the proximity force approximation. The result on the next-to-leading order term complements that found by Bimonte, Emig and Kardar [Appl. Phys. Lett. \\textbf{100}, 074110 (2012)] using derivative expansion. Numerical results are presented when the dielectric functions are given by the plasma model or the Drude model, with the plasma frequency (for plasma and Drude models) and relaxation frequency (for Drude model) given respectively by 9eV and 0.035eV, the conventional values used for gold metal. It is found that if plasma model is used instead of Drude...

  6. Liquid ionization chambers for LET determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    Liquid ionization chambers [1] (LICs) have have been used in the last decades as background dosemeters. Since a few years LICs are also commercially available for dosimetry and are used for measurements of dose distributions where a high spatial distribution is necessary. Also in the last decades...... a differential equation applying several simplifications and approximations leading to discrepancies between theory and experiments [3]. The theory predicts the collection efficiency as a function of the electrical field and was applied for both air filled ionization chambers and liquid filled ionization...... chambers. For liquids the LET can be roughly deduced from the collection efficiency dependency on the electrical field inside a liquid ionization chambers [4] using an extrapolation method. We solved the fundamental differential equation again presented by Jaffe numerically, but now taking into account...

  7. Opposing roles of PKA and EPAC in the cAMP-dependent regulation of schwann cell proliferation and differentiation [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available In Schwann cells (SCs, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP not only induces differentiation into a myelinating SC-related phenotype, but also synergistically enhances the mitogenic action of growth factors such as neuregulin. To better understand the molecular mechanism by which cAMP exerts these apparently contradictory functions, we investigated the role of the two main effectors of cAMP, protein kinase A (PKA and the exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC, on the proliferation and differentiation of both isolated and axon-related SCs. For these studies, a variety of PKA and EPAC agonists and antagonists were used, including pathway-selective analogs of cAMP and pharmacological inhibitors. Our studies indicated that the activity of PKA rather than EPAC was required for the adjuvant effect of cAMP on S-phase entry, whereas the activity of EPAC rather than PKA was required for SC differentiation and myelin formation. Even though selective EPAC activation had an overall anti-proliferative effect in SCs, it failed to drive the expression of Krox-20, a master regulator of myelination, and that of myelin-specific proteins and lipids, suggesting that EPAC activation was insufficient to drive a full differentiating response. Interestingly, inhibition of EPAC activity resulted in a drastic impairment of SC differentiation and myelin formation but not Krox-20 expression, which indicates an independent mechanism of Krox-20 regulation in response to cAMP. In conclusion, our data supports the idea that the outcome of cAMP signaling in SCs depends on the particular set of effectors activated. Whereas the mitogenic action of cAMP relies exclusively on PKA activity, the differentiating action of cAMP requires a PKA-independent (non-canonical cAMP-specific pathway that is partially transduced by EPAC.

  8. Opposing roles of PKA and EPAC in the cAMP-dependent regulation of schwann cell proliferation and differentiation [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V

    2013-01-01

    In Schwann cells (SCs), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) not only induces differentiation into a myelinating SC-related phenotype, but also synergistically enhances the mitogenic action of growth factors such as neuregulin. To better understand the molecular mechanism by which cAMP exerts these apparently contradictory functions, we investigated the role of the two main effectors of cAMP, protein kinase A (PKA) and the exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC), on the proliferation and differentiation of both isolated and axon-related SCs. For these studies, a variety of PKA and EPAC agonists and antagonists were used, including pathway-selective analogs of cAMP and pharmacological inhibitors. Our studies indicated that the activity of PKA rather than EPAC was required for the adjuvant effect of cAMP on S-phase entry, whereas the activity of EPAC rather than PKA was required for SC differentiation and myelin formation. Even though selective EPAC activation had an overall anti-proliferative effect in SCs, it failed to drive the expression of Krox-20, a master regulator of myelination, and that of myelin-specific proteins and lipids, suggesting that EPAC activation was insufficient to drive a full differentiating response. Interestingly, inhibition of EPAC activity resulted in a drastic impairment of SC differentiation and myelin formation but not Krox-20 expression, which indicates an independent mechanism of Krox-20 regulation in response to cAMP. In conclusion, our data supports the idea that the outcome of cAMP signaling in SCs depends on the particular set of effectors activated. Whereas the mitogenic action of cAMP relies exclusively on PKA activity, the differentiating action of cAMP requires a PKA-independent (non-canonical) cAMP-specific pathway that is partially transduced by EPAC.

  9. Asymptotic correction of the exchange-correlation kernel of time-dependent density functional theory for long-range charge-transfer excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Oleg; Baerends, Evert Jan

    2004-07-08

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations of charge-transfer excitation energies omegaCT are significantly in error when the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) is employed for the exchange-correlation kernel fxc. We relate the error to the physical meaning of the orbital energy of the Kohn-Sham lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO). The LUMO orbital energy in Kohn-Sham DFT--in contrast to the Hartree-Fock model--approximates an excited electron, which is correct for excitations in compact molecules. In CT transitions the energy of the LUMO of the acceptor molecule should instead describe an added electron, i.e., approximate the electron affinity. To obtain a contribution that compensates for the difference, a specific divergence of fxc is required in rigorous TDDFT, and a suitable asymptotically correct form of the kernel fxc(asymp) is proposed. The importance of the asymptotic correction of fxc is demonstrated with the calculation of omegaCT(R) for the prototype diatomic system HeBe at various separations R(He-Be). The TDDFT-ALDA curve omegaCT(R) roughly resembles the benchmark ab initio curve omegaCT CISD(R) of a configuration interaction calculation with single and double excitations in the region R=1-1.5 A, where a sizable He-Be interaction exists, but exhibits the wrong behavior omegaCT(R)

  10. Wide Field-of-View Fluorescence Imaging with Optical-Quality Curved Microfluidic Chamber for Absolute Cell Counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohiuddin Khan Shourav

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Field curvature and other aberrations are encountered inevitably when designing a compact fluorescence imaging system with a simple lens. Although multiple lens elements can be used to correct most such aberrations, doing so increases system cost and complexity. Herein, we propose a wide field-of-view (FOV fluorescence imaging method with an unconventional optical-quality curved sample chamber that corrects the field curvature caused by a simple lens. Our optics simulations and proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that a curved substrate with lens-dependent curvature can reduce greatly the distortion in an image taken with a conventional planar detector. Following the validation study, we designed a curved sample chamber that can contain a known amount of sample volume and fabricated it at reasonable cost using plastic injection molding. At a magnification factor of approximately 0.6, the curved chamber provides a clear view of approximately 119 mm2, which is approximately two times larger than the aberration-free area of a planar chamber. Remarkably, a fluorescence image of microbeads in the curved chamber exhibits almost uniform intensity over the entire field even with a simple lens imaging system, whereas the distorted boundary region has much lower brightness than the central area in the planar chamber. The absolute count of white blood cells stained with a fluorescence dye was in good agreement with that obtained by a commercially available conventional microscopy system. Hence, a wide FOV imaging system with the proposed curved sample chamber would enable us to acquire an undistorted image of a large sample volume without requiring a time-consuming scanning process in point-of-care diagnostic applications.

  11. Non-uniform sound intensity distributions when measuring absorption coefficients in reverberation chambers using a phased beam tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Measured absorption coefficients in reverberation chambers often differ from theoretical random incidence absorption coefficients, because ideal assumptions for the theoretical random incidence absorption coefficient are not fulfilled during measurements in actual reverberation chambers. Therefore...... sound intensity distributions on absorber under measurement conditions have been simulated using a phased beam tracing, and used as correction functions for reducing discrepancies between the measured and theoretical absorption coefficients. Two reverberation rooms were investigated by assuming...... that a test specimen was attached to a vertical surface and the floor. The frequency-dependent sound intensity distributions on absorbers were found to be affected by the reverberation chamber geometry and dimensions, the absorption capability of the specimen, and the placement of the specimen. High frequency...

  12. DELPHI Barrel Muon Chamber Module

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The module was used as part of the muon identification system on the barrel of the DELPHI detector at LEP, and was in active use from 1989 to 2000. The module consists of 7 individual muons chambers arranged in 2 layers. Chambers in the upper layer are staggered by half a chamber width with respect to the lower layer. Each individual chamber is a drift chamber consisting of an anode wire, 47 microns in diameter, and a wrapped copper delay line. Each chamber provided 3 signal for each muon passing through the chamber, from which a 3D space-point could be reconstructed.

  13. SU-D-213-04: Accounting for Volume Averaging and Material Composition Effects in An Ionization Chamber Array for Patient Specific QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fugal, M; McDonald, D; Jacqmin, D; Koch, N; Ellis, A; Peng, J; Ashenafi, M; Vanek, K [Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study explores novel methods to address two significant challenges affecting measurement of patient-specific quality assurance (QA) with IBA’s Matrixx Evolution™ ionization chamber array. First, dose calculation algorithms often struggle to accurately determine dose to the chamber array due to CT artifact and algorithm limitations. Second, finite chamber size and volume averaging effects cause additional deviation from the calculated dose. Methods: QA measurements were taken with the Matrixx positioned on the treatment table in a solid-water Multi-Cube™ phantom. To reduce the effect of CT artifact, the Matrixx CT image set was masked with appropriate materials and densities. Individual ionization chambers were masked as air, while the high-z electronic backplane and remaining solid-water material were masked as aluminum and water, respectively. Dose calculation was done using Varian’s Acuros XB™ (V11) algorithm, which is capable of predicting dose more accurately in non-biologic materials due to its consideration of each material’s atomic properties. Finally, the exported TPS dose was processed using an in-house algorithm (MATLAB) to assign the volume averaged TPS dose to each element of a corresponding 2-D matrix. This matrix was used for comparison with the measured dose. Square fields at regularly-spaced gantry angles, as well as selected patient plans were analyzed. Results: Analyzed plans showed improved agreement, with the average gamma passing rate increasing from 94 to 98%. Correction factors necessary for chamber angular dependence were reduced by 67% compared to factors measured previously, indicating that previously measured factors corrected for dose calculation errors in addition to true chamber angular dependence. Conclusion: By comparing volume averaged dose, calculated with a capable dose engine, on a phantom masked with correct materials and densities, QA results obtained with the Matrixx Evolution™ can be significantly

  14. The KLOE drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervelli, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; Lucia, E. De; Robertis, G. De; Sangro, R. De; Simone, P. De; Zorzi, G. De; Dell' Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Domenico, A. Di; Donato, C. Di; Falco, S. Di; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U.V.; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P. E-mail: paolo.valente@lnf.infn.it; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y

    2001-04-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K{sub L} produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm{sup 2} in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm{sup 2} in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  15. The KLOE drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervelli, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; Lucia, E D; Robertis, G D; Sangro, R D; Simone, P D; Zorzi, G D; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Domenico, A D; Donato, C D; Falco, S D; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Von Hagel, U; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Panareo, M; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2001-01-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K sub L produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm sup 2 in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm sup 2 in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  16. Charpak hemispherical wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    pieces. Mesures are of the largest one. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  17. micro strip gas chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    About 16 000 Micro Strip Gas Chambers like this one will be used in the CMS tracking detector. They will measure the tracks of charged particles to a hundredth of a millimetre precision in the region near the collision point where the density of particles is very high. Each chamber is filled with a gas mixture of argon and dimethyl ether. Charged particles passing through ionise the gas, knocking out electrons which are collected on the aluminium strips visible under the microscope. Such detectors are being used in radiography. They give higher resolution imaging and reduce the required dose of radiation.

  18. Performance of a multi-axis ionization chamber array in a 1.5 T magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, K; Kok, J G M; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2014-04-07

    At the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of an 8 MV Elekta linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips MRI system. This paper investigates the performance of the IC PROFILER™, a multi-axis ionization chamber array, in a 1.5 T magnetic field. The influence of the magnetic field on the IC PROFILER™ reproducibility, dose response linearity, pulse rate frequency dependence, power to electronics, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape were investigated. The linearity, reproducibility, pulse rate frequency dependence, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape are unaffected by the magnetic field. When the measurements results are normalized to the centre reference chamber, the measurements can commence unaltered. Orientation of the ionization chambers in the magnetic field is of importance, therefore caution must be taken when comparing or normalizing results from several different axes. IC PROFILER™ dose profiles were compared with film dose profiles obtained simultaneously in the MR-linac. Deviation between the film and the IC PROFILER™ data was caused by the noise in the film, indicating correct performance of the IC PROFILER™ in the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field.

  19. Performance of a multi-axis ionization chamber array in a 1.5 T magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, K.; Kok, J. G. M.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2014-04-01

    At the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of an 8 MV Elekta linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips MRI system. This paper investigates the performance of the IC PROFILER™, a multi-axis ionization chamber array, in a 1.5 T magnetic field. The influence of the magnetic field on the IC PROFILER™ reproducibility, dose response linearity, pulse rate frequency dependence, power to electronics, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape were investigated. The linearity, reproducibility, pulse rate frequency dependence, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape are unaffected by the magnetic field. When the measurements results are normalized to the centre reference chamber, the measurements can commence unaltered. Orientation of the ionization chambers in the magnetic field is of importance, therefore caution must be taken when comparing or normalizing results from several different axes. IC PROFILER™ dose profiles were compared with film dose profiles obtained simultaneously in the MR-linac. Deviation between the film and the IC PROFILER™ data was caused by the noise in the film, indicating correct performance of the IC PROFILER™ in the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field.

  20. SU-E-T-460: Impact of the LINAC Repetition Rate On a High-Resolution Liquid Ionization Chamber Array for Patient-Specific QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S; Driewer, J; Zheng, D; Lei, Y; Zhang, Q; Zhu, X; Li, S; Enke, C; Zhou, S [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Xu, B [The Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fu Zhou, Fu Jian (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the LINAC repetition-rate (dose-rate) dependence of OCTAVIUS 1000SRS liquid ionization chamber (LIC) array for patient specific QA of SRT plans delivered with flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams. Methods: 1) The repetition-rate dependence of 1000SRS was measured in a phantom constructed with 5-cm solid water above and below the array for build-up and backscatter. A 0.3cc calibrated ion chamber was also placed along the central axis 2.3cm below the center chamber of the array for normalizing LINAC output fluctuation. The signals from the center chamber of the array under different repetition rates in the range of 400–2400 MU/min for 6xFFF and 10xFFF beams on a Varian TrueBeamSTx LINAC, normalized by the independent chamber readings, were analyzed for the array response dependence on repetition rates. 2) Twelve Step-and-shoot IMRS QA plans (6xFFF and 10xFFF) were delivered to the array under different repetition rates for analysis and comparison. 3) The absolute doses measured by the center chamber were compared to measurements using an independent ionization chamber with the identical setup, taken as the gold standard. 4) The correction factors based on the actual delivery repetition rate were applied to the measurements, and the results were compared again to the gold standard. Results: 1) The 1000SRS array exhibited repetition-rate dependence for FFF beams, up to 5% for 6xFFF and 10% for 10xFFF; 2) The array showed clinically-acceptable repetition-rate dependence for regular flattened beams; 3) This repetition-rate dependence significantly affected the measurement accuracy, thereby affecting IMRS QA results; 4) By applying an empirical repetition-rate correction, the corrected measurements agreed better with the gold standard ion chamber measurements. Conclusion: OCTAVIUS 1000SRS LIC array exhibited considerable repetition-rate dependence for FFF beams, which will affect the accuracy of the absolute QA

  1. Potential errors in relative dose measurements in kilovoltage photon beams due to polarity effects in plane-parallel ionisation chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, S.; Tyler, M.; McNamara, J.; Sloan, K.; Ceylan, A.; Rinks, A.

    2016-12-01

    Plane-parallel ionisation chambers are regularly used to conduct relative dosimetry measurements for therapeutic kilovoltage beams during commissioning and routine quality assurance. This paper presents the first quantification of the polarity effect in kilovoltage photon beams for two types of commercially available plane-parallel ionisation chambers used for such measurements. Measurements were performed at various depths along the central axis in a solid water phantom and for different field sizes at 2 cm depth to determine the polarity effect for PTW Advanced Markus and Roos ionisation chambers (PTW-Freiburg, Germany). Data was acquired for kilovoltage beams between 100 kVp (half-value layer (HVL)  =  2.88 mm Al) and 250 kVp (HVL  =  2.12 mm Cu) and field sizes of 3-15 cm diameter for 30 cm focus-source distance (FSD) and 4  ×  4 cm2-20  ×  20 cm2 for 50 cm FSD. Substantial polarity effects, up to 9.6%, were observed for the Advanced Markus chamber compared to a maximum 0.5% for the Roos chamber. The magnitude of the polarity effect was observed to increase with field size and beam energy but was consistent with depth. The polarity effect is directly influenced by chamber design, with potentially large polarity effects for some plane-parallel ionisation chambers. Depending on the specific chamber used, polarity corrections may be required for output factor measurements of kilovoltage photon beams. Failure to account for polarity effects could lead to an incorrect dose being delivered to the patient.

  2. Potential errors in relative dose measurements in kilovoltage photon beams due to polarity effects in plane-parallel ionisation chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, S; Tyler, M; McNamara, J; Sloan, K; Ceylan, A; Rinks, A

    2016-11-15

    Plane-parallel ionisation chambers are regularly used to conduct relative dosimetry measurements for therapeutic kilovoltage beams during commissioning and routine quality assurance. This paper presents the first quantification of the polarity effect in kilovoltage photon beams for two types of commercially available plane-parallel ionisation chambers used for such measurements. Measurements were performed at various depths along the central axis in a solid water phantom and for different field sizes at 2 cm depth to determine the polarity effect for PTW Advanced Markus and Roos ionisation chambers (PTW-Freiburg, Germany). Data was acquired for kilovoltage beams between 100 kVp (half-value layer (HVL)  =  2.88 mm Al) and 250 kVp (HVL  =  2.12 mm Cu) and field sizes of 3-15 cm diameter for 30 cm focus-source distance (FSD) and 4  ×  4 cm(2)-20  ×  20 cm(2) for 50 cm FSD. Substantial polarity effects, up to 9.6%, were observed for the Advanced Markus chamber compared to a maximum 0.5% for the Roos chamber. The magnitude of the polarity effect was observed to increase with field size and beam energy but was consistent with depth. The polarity effect is directly influenced by chamber design, with potentially large polarity effects for some plane-parallel ionisation chambers. Depending on the specific chamber used, polarity corrections may be required for output factor measurements of kilovoltage photon beams. Failure to account for polarity effects could lead to an incorrect dose being delivered to the patient.

  3. LEP vacuum chamber, prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, see 8305170 for more details. Here we see the strips of the NEG pump, providing "distributed pumping". The strips are made from a Zr-Ti-Fe alloy. By passing an electrical current, they were heated to 700 deg C.

  4. LEP Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is a cut-out of a LEP vacuum chamber for dipole magnets showing the beam channel and the pumping channel with the getter (NEG) strip and its insulating supports. A water pipe connected to the cooling channel can also be seen at the back.The lead radiation shield lining is also shown. See also 8305563X.

  5. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  6. OPAL Muon Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the 4 experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 to 2000. This is a slice of the outermost layer of OPAL : the muon chambers. This outside layer detects particles which are not stopped by the previous layers. These are mostly muons.

  7. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  8. Heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1965-01-01

    The CERN Heavy liquid bubble chamber being installed in the north experimental hall at the PS. On the left, the 1180 litre body; in the centre the magnet, which can produce a field of 26 800 gauss; on the right the expansion mechanism.

  9. Secondary emission gas chamber

    CERN Document Server

    In'shakov, V; Skvortsov, V

    2014-01-01

    For a hadron calorimeter active element there is considered a gaseous secondary emis-sion detector (150 micron gap, 50 kV/cm). Such one-stage parallel plate chamber must be a radiation hard, fast and simple. A model of such detector has been produced, tested and some characteristics are presented.

  10. Optical Alignment System for the PHENIX Muon Tracking Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Murata, J; Armendariz, R L; Brooks, M L; Horaguchi, T; Kamihara, N; Kobayashi, H; Lee, D M; Shibata, T A; Sondheim, W E

    2003-01-01

    A micron-precision optical alignment system (OASys) for the PHENIX muon tracking chambers is developed. To ensure the required mass resolution of vector meson detection, the relative alignment between three tracking station chambers must be monitored with a precision of 25$\\mu$m. The OASys is a straightness monitoring system comprised of a light source, lens and CCD camera, used for determining the initial placement as well as for monitoring the time dependent movement of the chambers on a micron scale.

  11. Analysis of dose perturbation factors of a NACP-02 ionization chamber in clinical electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, E; Palmans, H; Shipley, D; Bailey, M; Verhaegen, F

    2009-01-21

    For well-guarded plane-parallel ionization chambers, international dosimetry protocols recommend a value of unity for electron perturbation factors in water. However, recent data published by various groups have challenged this. Specifically for the NACP-02 chamber, non-unity electron perturbation factors have already been published by Verhaegen et al (2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1221-35) and Buckley and Rogers (2006 Med. Phys. 33 1788-96). Recently it was found that the mass thickness of the front chamber window can be 35% greater than is listed in the IAEA's TRS-398 absorbed dose protocol (Chin et al 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 N119-26). This study therefore recalculated NACP-02 electron perturbation correction factors for energies 4-18 MeV at depths z(ref) and R(50) to determine the effect of the chamber model change. Results showed that perturbation factors at z(ref) are fairly stable for similar chamber models but become highly sensitive to small changes at deeper depths. The results also showed some dependence on using 1 keV versus 10 keV for the transport cut-off. Additional investigations revealed that the wall perturbation factor, p(wall), is strongly influenced by the chamber back wall at z(ref) and at larger depths small changes in the positioning of the effective point of measurement cause large fluctuations in the final value. Finally, the cavity perturbation factor, p(cav), was found to be primarily influenced by electron backscatter.

  12. Dark Matter Search Results from the PICO-60 C$_3$F$_8$ Bubble Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C.; et al.

    2017-02-24

    New results are reported from the operation of the PICO-60 dark matter detector, a bubble chamber filled with 52 kg of C$_3$F$_8$ located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory. As in previous PICO bubble chambers, PICO-60 C$_3$F$_8$ exhibits excellent electron recoil and alpha decay rejection, and the observed multiple-scattering neutron rate indicates a single-scatter neutron background of less than 1 event per month. A blind analysis of an efficiency-corrected 1167-kg-day exposure at a 3.3-keV thermodynamic threshold reveals no single-scattering nuclear recoil candidates, consistent with the predicted background. These results set the most stringent direct-detection constraint to date on the WIMP-proton spin-dependent cross section at 3.4 $\\times$ 10$^{-41}$ cm$^2$ for a 30-GeV$\\thinspace$c$^{-2}$ WIMP, more than one order of magnitude improvement from previous PICO results.

  13. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Gooden, M.E., E-mail: megooden@tunl.duke.edu [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605 (United States); Howell, C.R. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Kelley, J.H. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605 (United States); Tornow, W. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Arnold, C.W.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Moody, W.A.; Rundberg, R.S.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Becker, J.A.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.A.; Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal.

  14. Use of a liquid ionization chamber for stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A; Crop, F; Lacornerie, T; Vandevelde, F; Reynaert, N

    2013-04-21

    Liquid ionization chambers (LICs) offer an interesting tool in the field of small beam dosimetry, allowing better spatial resolution and reduced perturbation effects. However, some aspects remain to be addressed, such as the higher recombination and the effects from the materials of the detector. Our aim was to investigate these issues and their impact. The first step was the evaluation of the recombination effects. Measurements were performed at different SSDs to vary the dose per pulse, and the collection efficiency was obtained. The BEAMnrc code was then used to model the Cyberknife head. Finally, the liquid ionization chamber itself was modelled using the EGSnrc-based code Cavity allowing the evaluation of the influence of the volume and the chamber materials. The liquid ionization charge collection efficiency is approximately 0.98 at 1.5 mGy pulse(-1), the highest dose per pulse that we have measured. Its impact on the accuracy of output factors is less than half a per cent. The detector modelling showed a significant contribution from the graphite electrode, up to 6% for the 5 mm collimator. The dependence of the average electronic mass collision stopping power of iso-octane with beam collimation is negligible and thus has no influence on output factor measurements. Finally, the volume effect reaches 5% for the small 5 mm collimator and becomes much smaller (<0.5%) for diameters above 10 mm. LICs can effectively be used for small beam relative dosimetry as long as adequate correction factors are applied, especially for the electrode and volume effects.

  15. Anechoic Radio Frequency Test Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This chamber is used for characterization test of such systems as communications gear, tanks, radar, missiles, and helicopters. The dimensions of the chamber are 114...

  16. PICO Bubble Chambers for Dark Matter Searches: Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Russell; PICO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The PICO collaboration uses bubble chambers to search for WIMP dark matter particles. The bubble chambers are operated in a moderately superheated state, providing superb rejection of the dominant gamma background, and are filled with fluorinated target fluids ideally suited for investigating spin-dependent WIMP-proton interactions. PICO currently operates a 2-liter (PICO-2L) and a 32-liter (PICO-60) bubble chamber at the SNOLAB deep underground laboratory. I will discuss recent activities by the PICO collaboration to understand and mitigate an anomalous background that has impacted previous dark matter searches, plans for the operating experiments, and prospects for a future ton-scale PICO bubble chamber.

  17. Spin-orbit relativistic long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory for investigating spin-forbidden transitions in photochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Ayako; Tsuneda, Takao; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2011-12-14

    A long-range corrected (LC) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) incorporating relativistic effects with spin-orbit couplings is presented. The relativistic effects are based on the two-component zeroth-order regular approximation Hamiltonian. Before calculating the electronic excitations, we calculated the ionization potentials (IPs) of alkaline metal, alkaline-earth metal, group 12 transition metal, and rare gas atoms as the minus orbital (spinor) energies on the basis of Koopmans' theorem. We found that both long-range exchange and spin-orbit coupling effects are required to obtain Koopmans' IPs, i.e., the orbital (spinor) energies, quantitatively in DFT calculations even for first-row transition metals and systems containing large short-range exchange effects. We then calculated the valence excitations of group 12 transition metal atoms and the Rydberg excitations of rare gas atoms using spin-orbit relativistic LC-TDDFT. We found that the long-range exchange and spin-orbit coupling effects significantly contribute to the electronic spectra of even light atoms if the atoms have low-lying excitations between orbital spinors of quite different electron distributions.

  18. Characterization of a homemade ionization chamber for radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, Lucio P., E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Perini, Ana P., E-mail: aperini@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Santos, Gelson P. dos, E-mail: gpsantos@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Xavier, Marcos, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: khoury@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, 50740-540 Recife (Brazil); Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    A homemade cylindrical ionization chamber was studied for routine use in therapy beams of {sup 60}Co and X-rays. Several characterization tests were performed: leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, stability, stabilization time, chamber orientation and energy dependence. All results obtained were within international recommendations. Therefore the homemade ionization chamber presents usefulness for routine dosimetric procedures in radiotherapy beams. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A homemade ionization chamber was studied for routine use in radiotherapy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several characterization tests were performed and the results were satisfactory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This chamber was compared to commercial ones and the results were similar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This chamber is suitable for calibration procedures in {sup 60}Co beams.

  19. Super-resolution non-parametric deconvolution in modelling the radial response function of a parallel plate ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmala, A; Tenhunen, M

    2012-11-07

    The signal of the dosimetric detector is generally dependent on the shape and size of the sensitive volume of the detector. In order to optimize the performance of the detector and reliability of the output signal the effect of the detector size should be corrected or, at least, taken into account. The response of the detector can be modelled using the convolution theorem that connects the system input (actual dose), output (measured result) and the effect of the detector (response function) by a linear convolution operator. We have developed the super-resolution and non-parametric deconvolution method for determination of the cylinder symmetric ionization chamber radial response function. We have demonstrated that the presented deconvolution method is able to determine the radial response for the Roos parallel plate ionization chamber with a better than 0.5 mm correspondence with the physical measures of the chamber. In addition, the performance of the method was proved by the excellent agreement between the output factors of the stereotactic conical collimators (4-20 mm diameter) measured by the Roos chamber, where the detector size is larger than the measured field, and the reference detector (diode). The presented deconvolution method has a potential in providing reference data for more accurate physical models of the ionization chamber as well as for improving and enhancing the performance of the detectors in specific dosimetric problems.

  20. Establishment of a tandem ionization chamber system in standard mammography beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jonas O. da; Caldas, L.V.E., E-mail: jonas.silva@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    A double-faced tandem ionization chamber system was developed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. It has different collecting electrode materials: aluminium and graphite. The response repeatability and reproducibility and the energy dependence test of this tandem ionization chamber were evaluated. The chamber response stability is within the {+-}3% limit recommended in international standards. The energy dependence test of the ionization chamber system using the tandem curve obtained, presented agreement with literature results. (author)

  1. Dosimetric characteristics of the novel 2D ionization chamber array OCTAVIUS Detector 1500

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelljes, T. S., E-mail: tenzin.s.stelljes@uni-oldenburg.de; Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Poppe, B. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26129 (Germany); Harmeyer, A.; Reuter, J. [WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26129 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen 37073 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric properties of the OCTAVIUS Detector 1500 (OD1500) ionization chamber array (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) have been investigated. A comparative study was carried out with the OCTAVIUS Detector 729 and OCTAVIUS Detector 1000 SRS arrays. Methods: The OD1500 array is an air vented ionization chamber array with 1405 detectors in a 27 × 27 cm{sup 2} measurement area arranged in a checkerboard pattern with a chamber-to-chamber distance of 10 mm in each row. A sampling step width of 5 mm can be achieved by merging two measurements shifted by 5 mm, thus fulfilling the Nyquist theorem for intensity modulated dose distributions. The stability, linearity, and dose per pulse dependence were investigated using a Semiflex 31013 chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) as a reference detector. The effective depth of measurement was determined by measuring TPR curves with the array and a Roos chamber type 31004 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). Comparative output factor measurements were performed with the array, the Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber and the Diode 60012 (both PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). The energy dependence of the OD1500 was measured by comparing the array’s readings to those of a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber for varying mean photon energies at the depth of measurement, applying to the Semiflex chamber readings the correction factor k{sub NR} for nonreference conditions. The Gaussian lateral dose response function of a single array detector was determined by searching the convolution kernel suitable to convert the slit beam profiles measured with a Diode 60012 into those measured with the array’s central chamber. An intensity modulated dose distribution measured with the array was verified by comparing a OD1500 measurement to TPS calculations and film measurements. Results: The stability and interchamber sensitivity variation of the OD1500 array were within ±0.2% and ±0.58%, respectively. Dose linearity was within 1

  2. Calibration of the TWIST high-precision drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Grossheim, A; Olin, A; 10.1016/j.nima.2010.08.105

    2010-01-01

    A method for the precise measurement of drift times for the high-precision drift chambers used in the TWIST detector is described. It is based on the iterative correction of the space-time relationships by the time residuals of the track fit, resulting in a measurement of the effective drift times. The corrected drift time maps are parametrised individually for each chamber using spline functions. Biases introduced by the reconstruction itself are taken into account as well, making it necessary to apply the procedure to both data and simulation. The described calibration is shown to improve the reconstruction performance and to extend significantly the physics reach of the experiment.

  3. Vacuum Chambers for LEP sections

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The picture shows sections of the LEP vacuum chambers to be installed in the dipole magnets (left) and in the quadrupoles (right). The dipole chamber has three channels: the beam chamber, the pumping duct where the NEG (non-evaporabe getter) is installed and the water channel for cooling (on top in the picture). The pumping duct is connected to the beam chamber through holes in the separating wall. The thick lead lining to shield radiation can also be seen. These chambers were manufactured as extruded aluminium alloy profiles.

  4. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Smith, Graham (Port Jefferson, NY); Mahler, George J. (Rocky Point, NY); Vanier, Peter E. (Setauket, NY)

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  5. The APS ceramic chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  6. Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    To complete the revamp of CERN’s Council Chamber, a new exhibition is being installed just in time for the June Council meetings.   Panels will showcase highlights of CERN’s history, using some of the content prepared for the exhibitions marking 50 years of the PS, which were displayed in the main building last November. The previous photo exhibition in the Council Chamber stopped at the 1970s. To avoid the new panels becoming quickly out of date, photos are grouped together around specific infrastructures, rather than following a classic time-line. “We have put the focus on the accelerators – the world-class facilities that CERN has been offering researchers over the years, from the well-known large colliders to the lesser-known smaller facilities,” says Emma Sanders, who worked on the content. The new exhibition will be featured in a future issue of the Bulletin with photos and an interview with Fabienne Marcastel, designer of the exhibit...

  7. A new plant chamber facility PLUS coupled to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-11-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been build and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees are mixed with synthetic air and are transferred to the SAPHIR chamber where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important enviromental parameters (e.g. temperature, PAR, soil RH etc.) are well-controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leafes of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to FEP Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces only to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 LED panels which have an emission strength up to 800 μmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOC) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light and temperature dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus Ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus Ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental set up and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  8. A new plant chamber facility, PLUS, coupled to the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2016-03-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been built and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow-through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees is mixed with synthetic air and transferred to the SAPHIR chamber, where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important environmental parameters (e.g., temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), soil relative humidity (RH)) are well controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leaves of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to only fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 light-emitting diode (LED) panels, which have an emission strength up to 800 µmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light- and temperature- dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental setup and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  9. Evaluation of Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Huu Phuoc; Knuth, Williams; Michaels, Scott; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Rocket-based combined-cycle engines (RBBC) being considered at NASA for future generation launch vehicles feature clusters of small rocket thrusters as part of the engine components. Depending on specific RBBC concepts, these thrusters may be operated at various operating conditions including power level and/or propellant mixture ratio variations. To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for the subject cycle engine application. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer the system simplicity but they also would enhance the combustion performance. The test results showed that the chamber performance was markedly high even at a low chamber length-to- diameter ratio (L/D). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging.

  10. Opaque closed chambers underestimate methane fluxes of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Anke; Jurasinski, Gerald; Huth, Vytas; Glatzel, Stephan

    2014-04-01

    Closed chamber measurements for methane emission estimation are often carried out with opaque chambers to avoid heating of the headspace. However, mainly in wetlands, some plants possess an internal convective gas transport which quickly responds to changes in irradiation. These plants have also been found to often channel a large part of the released methane in temperate fens. We compare methane fluxes derived from transparent versus opaque chambers on Carex-, Phragmites-, and Typha-dominated stands of a temperate fen. Transparent chamber fluxes almost doubled opaque chamber fluxes in the convective transporting Phragmites stand. In Typha, a trend of higher fluxes determined with the transparent chambers was detectable, whereas in Carex, transparent and opaque chamber fluxes did not differ significantly. Thus, opaque chambers bias the outcome of methane measurements, depending on dominant vegetation. We recommend the use of transparent chambers when determining emissions of convective plants or extrapolating fluxes to larger scales.

  11. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  12. The ALICE time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    This time projection chamber is part of the ALICE detector on the new LHC accelerator at CERN. Particles produced in collisions at the core of the detector will follow paths outward through the various sub-detector layers. If these particles carry a charge, they will ionise the gas contained within this chamber producing an electric signal as the ions drift in the chamber's electric field.

  13. 高度近视有晶状体眼后房型人工矫正晶状体植入术后视觉质量的临床评价%Clinical evaluation of visual quality following implantation of posterior chamber phakic intraocular corrective lens for high myopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王松田; 郑广瑛; 李志刚; 王洁; 赵丽君; 王瑞娜

    2011-01-01

    Background Implantation of phakic posterior chamber intraocular corrective lens(ICL)is a new choice for correction of high myopia.Different from laser assisted in situ keratomileusis,implantation of phakic posterior chamber ICL will allow the good imaging quality because it remaines the matched relationship between cornea and lens.But its visual quality after operation is concerned by patient and ophthalmologists.ObjectiveThis study was to observe the effectiveness of implantation of posterior chamber phakic ICL on visual quality in patients with high myopia.Methods Eighty-four high myopia eyes of 42 patients accepted implantation of posterior chamber phakic ICL and follow-up of 6-month duration.The visual acuity,refractive status,wavefront,contrast sensitivity and accommodation were examined and compared before and after surgery.This clinical study complied with Declaration of Helsinki.The written informed consent was obtained from each patient before operation.Results A prospective observational trial design was used.The uncorrected visual acuity and best corrected visual acuity after operation were better than preoperative ones in all of the patients.The eye numbers of > 0.3 were increased after operation in comparison with before operation with a stable result among 1 day,1 month and 6 months after surgery (x2 =10.70,P>0.05).Spherical equivalent refraction was(-15.38 ± 1.03)D before surgery and(+0.55 ±0.06)at 1 day,(-1.22±0.09)D at 1 month and(-0.68 ± 0.06)D after 6 months,showing a significant difference among them(F=16 559.90,P<0.05).Total aberrations and higher-order aberrations were 11.00±0.25 and 0.43 ±0.05 before surgery,the wavefront aberrations were 2.21 ± 0.56 and 0.47±0.04 at 6 months after surgery with significant difference(t =1.65,P =0.10).Each spatial frequency contrast sensitivity and glare sensitivity on photopic and seotopie conditions in postoperation were higher compared with the preoperative(P<0.05).The accommodation in 1

  14. Relevant parameters for construction of a radon controlled chamber; Parametros relevantes para construcao de uma camara controlada de radonio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, Julio J.S.; Matta, Luiz E.S.C. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Alves, Rex N. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1997-10-01

    This work intends to discuss important parameters to be considered during the construction of a controlled radon chamber. Based on the review of different chambers, it was noticed that some characteristics such as size, shape, volume, and source activity are dependent on the chamber applications. Parameters such as aerosol generation, humidity, temperature and pressure inside the chamber are also discussed. A design of a multipurpose controlled radon chamber is suggested. (author). 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Development of Fission Chamber Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGJinwei; ZHANGWei; SONGXianying; LIXu

    2003-01-01

    The fission chambers which are gas counters with fissile material inside chamber,provide essential information for plasma opcharacteristics. In conjunction with the neutron flux monitor system these provide time-resolved measurements of the global neutron source strength and fusion power from thermal nuclear fusion reactor as ITER for all plasma conditions for which neutrons are produced.

  16. The Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The 3.70 metre Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC), dismantled on 9 August 1984. During operation it was one of the biggest detectors in the world, producing direct visual recordings of particle tracks. 6.3 million photos of interactions were taken with the chamber in the course of its existence.

  17. Iris-claw intraocular lens implantation: Anterior chamber versus retropupillary implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvacı, Sezer; Demirdüzen, Selahaddin; Öksüz, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes of anterior chamber and retropupillary implantation of iris-claw Artisan intraocular lenses (IOL). Design: Prospective, randomized, single-blinded study. Patients and Methods: Forty eyes of forty aphakic patients were enrolled. Patients were randomized into two groups. Each group includes twenty patients. Group 1 received anterior chamber Artisan IOL implantation. Group 2 received retropupillary Artisan IOL implantation. Preoperative and postoperative corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), and all complications were noted and compared at 6 months follow-up. Results: Each two groups obtained a significant improvement in CDVA (P < 0.05). Four patients in Group 1 and five patients in Group 2 had significant but nonpermanent increase at IOP values. There were one and two pupillary irregularity in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively. In one patient, a shallow and inferior located retinal detachment were encountered in anterior chamber group. Conclusions: The results were not significantly different between the two fixation techniques for iris-claw lens. The surgery procedure is dependent to surgeon experience and eye's conditions. PMID:26953023

  18. Initial recombination in the track of heavy charged particles: Numerical solution for air filled ionization chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Modern particle therapy facilities enable sub-millimeter precision in dose deposition. Here, also ionization chambers (ICs) are used, which requires knowledge of the recombination effects. Up to now, recombination is corrected using phenomenological approaches for practical reasons...

  19. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This

  20. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  1. The CLEO III drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, D; Briere, R A; Chen, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Csorna, S; Dickson, M; Dombrowski, S V; Ecklund, K M; Lyon, A; Marka, S; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Sadoff, A; Thies, P; Thorndike, E H; Urner, D

    2002-01-01

    The CLEO group at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring has constructed and commissioned a new central drift chamber. With 9796 cells arranged in 47 layers ranging in radius from 13.2 to 79 cm, the new drift chamber has a smaller outer radius and fewer wires than the drift chamber it replaces, but allows the CLEO tracking system to have improved momentum resolution. Reduced scattering material in the chamber gas and in the inner skin separating the drift chamber from the silicon vertex detector provides a reduction of the multiple scattering component of the momentum resolution and an extension of the usable measurement length into the silicon. Momentum resolution is further improved through quality control in wire positioning and symmetry of the electric fields in the drift cells which have provided a reduction in the spatial resolution to 88 mu m (averaged over the full drift range).

  2. On the Frisch-Grid signal in ionization chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Adili, A. [EC-JRC - Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Division of Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Hambsch, F.-J., E-mail: Franz-Josef.HAMBSCH@ec.europa.eu [EC-JRC - Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Bencardino, R. [EC-JRC - Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Pomp, S. [Division of Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Oberstedt, S. [EC-JRC - Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Zeynalov, Sh. [JINR - Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, R-141980 (Russian Federation)

    2012-04-11

    A recent theoretical approach concerning the grid-inefficiency (GI) problem in Twin Frisch-Grid Ionization Chambers was validated experimentally. The experimental verification focused on the induced signal on the anode plate. In this work the investigation was extended by studying the grid signal. The aim was to verify the grid-signal dependency on the grid inefficiency {sigma}. The measurements were made with fission fragments from {sup 252}Cf(sf), using two different grids, with 1 and 2 mm wire distances, leading to the GI values: {sigma}=0.031 and {sigma}=0.083, respectively. The theoretical grid signal was confirmed because the detected grid pulse-height distribution was smaller for the larger {sigma}. By applying the additive GI correction approach, the two grid pulse heights were consistent. In the second part of the work, the corrected grid signal was used to deduce emission angles of the fission fragments. It is inconvenient to treat the grid signal by means of conventional analogue electronics, because of its bipolarity. Therefore, the anode and grid signals were summed to create a unipolar, angle-dependent pulse height. Until now the so-called summing method has been the well-established approach to deduce the angle from the grid signal. However, this operation relies strongly on an accurate and stable calibration between the two summed signals. By application of digital-signal processing, the grid signal's bipolarity is no longer an issue. Hence one can bypass the intermediate summation step of the two different pre-amplifier signals, which leads to higher stability. In this work the grid approach was compared to the summing method in three cases: {sup 252}Cf(sf), {sup 235}U(n,f) and {sup 234}U(n,f). By using the grid directly, the angular resolution was found equally good in the first case but gave 7% and 20% improvements, respectively, in the latter cases.

  3. Dark matter searches with PICO bubble chambers: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Orin; PICO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The PICO collaboration uses bubble chambers to search for dark matter, with world-leading sensitivity to the direct-detection of WIMPs with spin-dependent couplings to protons. PICO currently operates a 2 liter (PICO-2L) and a 32 liter (PICO 60) bubble chamber at the SNOLAB deep underground laboratory, and is currently constructing a 40 liter demonstration device that is expected to eliminate an anomalous background that has previously proven significant for the scaling of the bubble chamber technique to a future ton-scale experiment (PICO-500). A discussion of the technology, recent progress, and future plans will be presented.

  4. Pseudophakic hyperopia in nanophthalmic eyes managed by a posterior chamber implantable collamer lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari Kulin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a bilateral posterior chamber implantable collamer lens (ICL implantation post-clear lens extraction, to reduce the residual hyperopia, in a patient with nanophthalmic eyes. A 30-year-old female patient, keen to reduce her dependency on glasses and contact lenses, came to our refractive surgery department. Her refractive error was +12.0 and +12.5 diopters in the right and left eye, respectively, with steep corneas on keratometry and a shallow anterior chamber depth. She underwent clear lens extraction with implantation of +35.0 D and +40.0 D IOL in the right eye and left eye, respectively. Her post-operative best-corrected visual acuity was 20/30 with +8.5 D in the right eye and +6 D in the left. She underwent bilateral ICL implantation. Postoperatively after 6 months, her unaided visual acuity was 20/30 in both eyes. In conclusion, ICL implantation can be considered to correct residual hypermetropic ametropia in pseudophakic eyes when other options have limitations.

  5. The response of ionization chambers to relativistic heavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Grimm, G.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    The LBL Bevalac for the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on HEAO-3, compared the response of a set of laboratory ionization chambers to beams of 26Fe, 36Kr, 54Xe, 67 Ho, and 79Au nuclei at maximum energies ranging from 1666 MeV/amu for Fe to 1049 MeV/amu for Au. The response of these chambers shows a significant deviation from the expected energy dependence, but only a slight deviation from Z sq scaling.

  6. Dosimetric Performance of Newly Developed Farmer-Type Ionization Chamber in Radiotherapy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saminathan, Sathiyan; Godson, Henry Finlay; Ponmalar, Retna; Manickam, Ravikumar; Mazarello, James; Fernandes, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    Dose measurement with ionization chamber is essential to deliver accurate dose to the tumor in radiotherapy. The cylindrical Farmer-type ionization chamber is recommended by various dosimetry protocols for dose measurement of radiotherapy beams. The air-equivalent graphite wall Farmer-type ionization chamber (FAR 65 GB) of active volume 0.65 cm(3) with aluminum as the central electrode material was fabricated. Various dosimetric parameters were studied for the newly developed ionization chamber in cobalt-60, 6 and 18 MV photon beams. The preirradiation and postirradiation leakage of the chamber was within 0.08%. The long-term stability and the stem effect of the chamber were within 0.07% and 0.3%, respectively. The sensitivity of the ionization chamber was found to be 22.15 nC/Gy. The chamber shows linear response with dose for cobalt-60, 6 and 18 MV photon beams. The ion recombination correction factor increases with increase in bias voltage. For all energies and field sizes, the polarity correction factor is almost closer to unity. The ion recombination and polarity correction measurements show that the polarizing potential and polarity recommended during the calibration of ionization chamber should be used for routine measurement to avoid the uncertainty. The chamber response is independent of dose rate and energy. The chamber is cost-effective and shows precise and reproducible response. The study carried out confirms that the newly fabricated ion chamber can be used in the measurement of absolute dose for high-energy photon beams.

  7. Quantification accuracy and partial volume effect in dependence of the attenuation correction of a state-of-the-art small animal PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Julia G; Judenhofer, Martin S; Schmid, Andreas; Tillmanns, Julia; Stiller, Detlef; Sossi, Vesna; Pichler, Bernd J

    2012-06-21

    Quantification accuracy and partial volume effect (PVE) of the Siemens Inveon PET scanner were evaluated. The influence of transmission source activities (40 and 160 MBq) on the quantification accuracy and the PVE were determined. Dynamic range, object size and PVE for different sphere sizes, contrast ratios and positions in the field of view (FOV) were evaluated. The acquired data were reconstructed using different algorithms and correction methods. The activity level of the transmission source and the total emission activity in the FOV strongly influenced the attenuation maps. Reconstruction algorithms, correction methods, object size and location within the FOV had a strong influence on the PVE in all configurations. All evaluated parameters potentially influence the quantification accuracy. Hence, all protocols should be kept constant during a study to allow a comparison between different scans.

  8. The Detector Control Systems for the CMS Resistive Plate Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Paolucci, P; Gómez-Reino, R; Viviani, C; Shahzad, R; Khurshid, T

    2010-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chamber system is composed by 912 double-gap chambers equipped with about $10^4$ front-end boards. The correct and safe operation of the RPC system requires a sophisticated and complex online Detector Control System, able to monitor and control 2$\\cdot10^4$ hardware devices distributed on an area of about 5000 m$^2$. The RPC DCS acquires, monitors and stores about $10^5$ parameters coming from the detector, the electronics, the power system, the gas, and cooling systems. The DCS system and the first results, obtained during the 2007 and 2008 CMS cosmic runs, will be described in this paper.

  9. Neutron Dosimetry Using a Tissue-Equivalent Ionization Chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    procedures are described, and correction factors discussed. /’ On a montg et v~rifiA un systtme de niesure d’oZz la dose ou le kerma tissulaire neutronique ...tube 3.8 cm in diameter. At the same time, it is advantageous to keep the active volume as large as possible in order to maximize sensitivity. The...CHAMBER The construction of the FWT TE Ionization chamber is Illustrated in figure 1. The active volume lies between the central electrode and the

  10. Cyclically controlled welding purge chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An arrangement for butt-welding cylindrical sections of large, thin-wall tanks includes a rotatable mandrel with side-by-side sets of radial position adjusters. Each set of adjusters bears on one of the tank sections adjacent the seam, to prevent the sections from sagging out-of-round. The mandrel rotates relative to the welder, so that a continuous seam is formed. A purge chamber is fixed in position behind the seam at the weld head, and is flushed with inert gas. The purge chamber includes a two-sided structure which is contiguous with the cylindrical sections and a circumferential vane to form an open-ended tube-like structure, through which the radial position adjusters pass as the mandrel and cylindrical workpiece sections rotate. The tube-like structure is formed into a chamber by a plurality of movable gates which are controlled to maintain a seal while allowing adjusters to progress through the purge chamber.

  11. The multigap resistive plate chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeballos, E. Cerron [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Crotty, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hatzifotiadou, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Valverde, J. Lamas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Univ. Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Neupane, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Williams, M. C. S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Zichichi, A. [Univ. of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2015-02-03

    The paper describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). This is a variant of the wide gap RPC. However it has much improved time resolution, while keeping all the other advantages of the wide gap RPC design.

  12. The PHENIX Time Expansion Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosati, M.; Barish, K.; Botelho, S.; Chang, W.C.; Gogoi, A.L. de; Dietzsch, O.; Ferdousi, T.; Franz, A.; Fung, S.Y.; Gannon, J.; Harder, J.; Kandasamy, A.; Khomutnikov, A.; Kotchekov, D.; Lebedev, A.; Li, X.H.; Mahon, J.; Munirassimann, M.; Negrin, J.; O' Brien, E.; O' Connor, P.; Pisani, R.; Rankowitz, S.; Seto, R.; Takagui, E.M.; Wang, H.Q

    1999-12-27

    The TEC/TRD subsystem will track all charged particles and contribute to the particle identification by the measurement of energy loss. The design, construction and testing of the TEC chambers are described.

  13. The PHENIX Time Expansion Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Rosati, M; Botelho, S; Chang, W C; Gogoi, A L D; Dietzsch, O; Ferdousi, T; Franz, A; Fung, S Y; Gannon, J; Harder, J; Kandasamy, A; Khomutnikov, A; Kotchekov, D; Lebedev, A; Li, X H; Mahon, J; Munirassimann, M; Negrin, J; O'Brien, E; O'Connor, P; Pisani, R; Rankowitz, S; Seto, R; Takagui, E M; Wang, H Q

    1999-01-01

    The TEC/TRD subsystem will track all charged particles and contribute to the particle identification by the measurement of energy loss. The design, construction and testing of the TEC chambers are described.

  14. Vaporization chambers and associated methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.; McKellar, Michael G.; Shunn, Lee P.

    2017-02-21

    A vaporization chamber may include at least one conduit and a shell. The at least one conduit may have an inlet at a first end, an outlet at a second end and a flow path therebetween. The shell may surround a portion of each conduit and define a chamber surrounding the portion of each conduit. Additionally, a plurality of discrete apertures may be positioned at longitudinal intervals in a wall of each conduit, each discrete aperture of the plurality of discrete apertures sized and configured to direct a jet of fluid into each conduit from the chamber. A liquid may be vaporized by directing a first fluid comprising a liquid into the inlet at the first end of each conduit, directing jets of a second fluid into each conduit from the chamber through discrete apertures in a wall of each conduit and transferring heat from the second fluid to the first fluid.

  15. Vacuum chambers for LHC LSS

    CERN Document Server

    Costa-Pinto, P

    2004-01-01

    The approximately 6 km total length of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) warm sections consist of about 1000 chambers. Most of these chambers, of various length and cross sections, are made of copper, but different lengths in stainless steel, mumetal, aluminium and beryllium will also be used. All the chambers will be internally coated with a thin film of TiZrV, to reduce both the secondary electron yield and the photon and electron stimulated desorption, with the further advantage of providing a huge additional pumping speed. In order to cope with the tight production schedule, a new dedicated coating facility was created, which allows four chambers to be coated per working day. This coating facility and its operating mode are described, together with the TiZrV film characteristics (structure, morphology) and performance (pumping speed, ultimate pressure, discharge gas outgassing).

  16. BEBC Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    A view of the dismantling of the magnet of BEBC, the 3.7 m European Bubble Chamber : iron magnetic shielding ; lower and upper parts of the vacuum enclosure of the magnet; turbo-molecular vacuum pumps for the "fish-eye" windows; the two superconducting coils; a handling platform; the two cryostats suspended from the bar of the travelling crane which has a 170 ton carrying capacity. The chamber proper, not dismantled, is inside the shielding.

  17. Anterior chamber depth during hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracitelli CPB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Pelegrini Barbosa Gracitelli,1 Francisco Rosa Stefanini,1 Fernando Penha,1 Miguel Ângelo Góes,2 Sérgio Antonio Draibe,2 Maria Eugênia Canziani,2 Augusto Paranhos Junior1 1Ophthalmology Department, 2Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo – UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Exacerbation of chronic glaucoma or acute glaucoma is occasionally observed in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD because of anterior chamber depth changes during this therapy. Purpose: To evaluate anterior chamber depth and axial length in patients during HD sessions. Methods: A total of 67 eyes of 35 patients were prospectively enrolled. Axial length and anterior chamber depth were measured using ultrasonic biometry, and these measures were evaluated at three different times during HD sessions. Body weight and blood pressure pre- and post-HD were also measured. Results: There was no difference in the axial length between the three measurements (P = 0.241. We observed a significantly decreased anterior chamber depth (P = 0.002 during HD sessions. Conclusion: Our results support the idea that there is a change in anterior chamber depth in HD sessions. Keywords: anterior chamber, hemodialysis, axial length, acute angle-closure glaucoma

  18. Determination of the correction factor for attenuation, dispersion and production of electrons (K{sub wall}) in the wall of graphite of a ionization chamber Pattern National Type CC01 in fields of gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co; Determinacion del factor de correccion por atenuacion, dispersion y produccion de electrones (K{sub wall}) en la pared de grafito de una Camara de Ionizacion Patron Nacional Tipo CC01 en campos de radiacion gamma de {sup 60} Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Morales P, J.; Cruz E, P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-12-15

    It was determined the Kwall correction factor for the wall of graphite of the chamber of the pattern national type CC01 series 133 for a radiation field Gamma of {sup 60}Co. With this end to measured the currents of ionization l(x) as function of the thickness of the wall of the chamber: X=4,8,12,16 and 20 mm.The mensurations for each thickness consisting of three groups, of sizes n = 30 or 60 data for each group; obtaining 8 complete groups of mensurations independent in eight different dates.The determinate the factor carried out using three regression models: lineal, logarithmic and quadratic, models that were tried to validate with the tests of : i) Shapiro-Wilk and {chi}{sup 2} for the normality of the entrance data ii) Tests of Bartlett for variances homogeneity among groups for each thickness iii) The tests of Duncan for the stockings among groups of each thickness, and iv) The tests of adjustment lack (LOF) for the models used. Nevertheless, alone the models of the group of corresponding mensurations at 01-03-2000 17-08-2001 they can be validated by LOF, but not for tests of normality and homogeneity of variances. Among other assignable causes of variation we have: i) The values captured by the system of mensuration of the variables of it influences: pressure, temperature and relative humidity don{sup t} belong together with the existent ones to the moment to capture the l(x). ii) The mensuration room presents flows of air, for what was suited o diminish their volume and to eliminate the flows of air. iii) A protocol settled down of taking of measures that it consisted in: - Pre-irradiation 5 minutes the chamber after the change of polarity and hood change, with a period of stabilization of 5 minutes after the pre-irradiation. - Pre-irradiation for 5 minutes before the taking of the readings, with the object of eliminating variation sources assigned to currents of escapes or due variations to transitory. iv) To realize corrections for relative humidity of

  19. Computational investigation of the temperature separation in vortex chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anish, S. [National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Mangalore (India); Setoguchi, T. [Institute of Ocean Energy, Saga University (Japan); Kim, H. D. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The vortex chamber is a mechanical device, without any moving parts that separates compressed gas into a high temperature region and a low temperature region. Functionally vortex chamber is similar to a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube (RVHT), but it is a simpler and compact structure. The objective of the present study is to investigate computationally the physical reasoning behind the energy separation mechanism inside a vortex chamber. A computational analysis has been performed using three-dimensional compressible Navier Stokes equations. A fully implicit finite volume scheme was used to solve the governing equations. A commercial software ANSYS CFX is used for this purpose. The computational predictions were validated with existing experimental data. The results obtained show that the vortex chamber contains a large free vortex zone and a comparatively smaller forced vortex region. The physical mechanism that causes the heating towards periphery of the vortex chamber is identified as the work done by the viscous force. The cooling at the center may be due to expansion of the flow. The extent of temperature separation greatly depends on the outer diameter of the vortex chamber. A small amount of compression is observed towards the periphery of the vortex chamber when the outer diameter is reduced.

  20. Liquid rocket combustion chamber acoustic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Magno de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, many solid and liquid rocket motors have experienced combustion instabilities. Among other causes, there is the interaction of acoustic modes with the combustion and/or fluid dynamic processes inside the combustion chamber. Studies have been showing that, even if less than 1% of the available energy is diverted to an acoustic mode, combustion instability can be generated. On one hand, this instability can lead to ballistic pressure changes, couple with other propulsion systems such as guidance or thrust vector control, and in the worst case, cause motor structural failure. In this case, measures, applying acoustic techniques, must be taken to correct/minimize these influences on the combustion. The combustion chamber acoustic behavior in operating conditions can be estimated by considering its behavior in room conditions. In this way, acoustic tests can be easily performed, thus identifying the cavity modes. This paper describes the procedures to characterize the acoustic behavior in the inner cavity of four different configurations of a combustion chamber. Simple analytical models are used to calculate the acoustic resonance frequencies and these results are compared with acoustic natural frequencies measured at room conditions. Some comments about the measurement procedures are done, as well as the next steps for the continuity of this research. The analytical and experimental procedures results showed good agreement. However, limitations on high frequency band as well as in the identification of specific kinds of modes indicate that numerical methods able to model the real cavity geometry and an acoustic experimental modal analysis may be necessary for a more complete analysis. Future works shall also consider the presence of passive acoustic devices such as baffles and resonators capable of introducing damping and avoiding or limiting acoustic instabilities.

  1. Radon progeny deposition in track-detection diffusion chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Pressyanov, D; Simeonov, G

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity dependence for cylindrical diffusion chambers that are used for radon track-detection measurements on the deposition fraction of radon progeny atoms has been theoretically studied (sensitivity is the ratio: area track density/integrated sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn activity concentration). Experimentally, the sensitivity values of both the metal- and plastic-made chambers were determined. Results indicate that the experimental sensitivity for metal chambers is in accordance with the theoretical model while a deviation of 15% is observed for plastic chambers. The uncertainty in the sensitivity values that is related to possible variations of the diffusion coefficient for sup 2 sup 1 sup 8 Po atoms was estimated to be less than 10%. (author)

  2. Nuclear Fission Investigation with Twin Ionization Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeynalova, O.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Nazarenko, M.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to report the recent results, obtained in development of digital pulse processing mathematics for prompt fission neutron (PFN) investigation using twin ionization chamber (TIC) along with fast neutron time-of-flight detector (ND). Due to well known ambiguities in literature (see refs. [4, 6, 9 and 11]), concerning a pulse induction on TIC electrodes by FF ionization, we first presented detailed mathematical analysis of fission fragment (FF) signal formation on TIC anode. The analysis was done using Ramo-Shockley theorem, which gives relation between charged particle motion between TIC electrodes and so called weighting potential. Weighting potential was calculated by direct numerical solution of Laplace equation (neglecting space charge) for the TIC geometry and ionization, caused by FF. Formulae for grid inefficiency (GI) correction and digital pulse processing algorithms for PFN time-of-flight measurements and pulse shape analysis are presented and discussed.

  3. Technical Note: Drifting vs. anchored flux chambers for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from running waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lorke

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stream networks were recently discovered as major but poorly constrained natural greenhouse gas (GHG sources. A fundamental problem is that several measurement approaches have been used without cross comparisons. Flux chambers represent a potentially powerful methodological approach if robust and reliable ways to use chambers on running water can be defined. Here we compare the use of anchored and freely drifting chambers on various streams having different flow velocities. The study clearly shows that (1 drifting chambers have a very small impact on the water turbulence under the chamber and thus generate more reliable fluxes, (2 anchored chambers enhance turbulence under the chambers and thus elevate fluxes, (3 the bias of the anchored chambers greatly depends on chamber design and sampling conditions, and (4 there is a promising method to reduce the bias from anchored chambers by using a flexible plastic foil seal to the water surface rather than having rigid chamber walls penetrating into the water. Altogether, these results provide novel guidance on how to apply flux chambers in running water, which will have important consequences for measurements to constrain the global GHG balances.

  4. Nonfreeze epikeratophakia for the correction of myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumeich, J H; Swinger, C A

    1987-03-15

    We developed a procedure for preparing epikeratophakia tissue lenses for the correction of myopia from unfrozen tissue using a newly developed artificial anterior chamber and the BKS-1000 (Barraquer-Krumeich-Swinger) refractive set. The results of 23 clinical cases involving tissue that was not frozen or lyophilized demonstrate a correlation coefficient of 0.90 in terms of accuracy of correction and good visual acuity results.

  5. Induced signals in resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, W

    2002-01-01

    We derive theorems for induced signals on electrodes embedded in a medium with a position and frequency dependent permittivity $\\vep(\\vx,s)$ and conductivity $\\sigma(\\vx,s)$ that are connected with arbitrary discrete elements. The problem is treated using the quasi-static approximation of Maxwell's equations for weakly conducting media \\cite{melcher}\\cite{quasi}. The induced signals can be derived by time dependent weighting fields and potentials and the result is the same as the one given in \\cite{gatti}. We also show how these time dependent weighting fields can be derived from electrostatic solutions. Finally we will apply the results to Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) where we discuss the effects of the resistive plates and thin resistive layers on the signals induced on plane electrodes and strips.

  6. Curvature dependence of semiclassical corrections to ray optics: How Goos-Hänchen shift and Fresnel filtering deviate from the planar case result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockschläder, P.; Kreismann, J.; Hentschel, M.

    2014-09-01

    Ray optics is a useful tool even in the regime where, actually, full wave calculations would be appropriate. However, wave-inspired adjustments are needed to ensure the accuracy of ray-based predictions. Here, we investigate these semiclassical corrections to the ray picture —the Goos-Hänchen shift and the Fresnel filtering effect— for the reflection of light beams at curved, rather than planar, interfaces. We present analytical and numerical results that highlight the role of boundary curvature and show clear deviations from the planar case. The Goos-Hänchen shift is decreased at convexely curved interfaces present in optical microcavities and microlasers compared to the planar case, and increased for concave curvature. In contrast, the Fresnel filtering effect is increased by both kinds of curvature. For a straightforward explanation of these findings we introduce an intuitive picture that explicitly takes curvature into account and that allows for a qualitative understanding of the beam shift behaviour.

  7. Combustion chamber analysis code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Lai, Y. G.; Krishnan, A.; Avva, R. K.; Giridharan, M. G.

    1993-05-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent, Favre averaged, finite volume Navier-Stokes code has been developed to model compressible and incompressible flows (with and without chemical reactions) in liquid rocket engines. The code has a non-staggered formulation with generalized body-fitted-coordinates (BFC) capability. Higher order differencing methodologies such as MUSCL and Osher-Chakravarthy schemes are available. Turbulent flows can be modeled using any of the five turbulent models present in the code. A two-phase, two-liquid, Lagrangian spray model has been incorporated into the code. Chemical equilibrium and finite rate reaction models are available to model chemically reacting flows. The discrete ordinate method is used to model effects of thermal radiation. The code has been validated extensively against benchmark experimental data and has been applied to model flows in several propulsion system components of the SSME and the STME.

  8. The Certification of Environmental Chambers for Testing Flight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The JPL chamber certification process for ensuring that test chambers used to test flight hardware meet a minimum standard is critical to the safety of the hardware and personnel. Past history has demonstrated that this process is important due to the catastrophic incidents that could occur if the chamber is not set up correctly. Environmental testing is one of the last phases in the development of a subsystem, and it typically occurs just before integration of flight hardware into the fully assembled flight system. A seemingly insignificant -miscalculation or missed step can necessitate rebuilding or replacing a subsystem due to over-testing or damage from the test chamber. Conversely, under-testing might fail to detect weaknesses that might cause failure when the hardware is in service. This paper describes the process that identifies the many variables that comprise the testing scenario and screening of as built chambers, the training of qualified operators, and a general "what-to-look-for" in minimum standards.

  9. The CLAS drift chamber system

    CERN Document Server

    Mestayer, M D; Asavapibhop, B; Barbosa, F J; Bonneau, P; Christo, S B; Dodge, G E; Dooling, T; Duncan, W S; Dytman, S A; Feuerbach, R; Gilfoyle, G P; Gyurjyan, V; Hicks, K H; Hicks, R S; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jacobs, G; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Magahiz, R A; Major, R W; Martin, C; McGuckin, T; McNabb, J; Miskimen, R A; Müller, J A; Niczyporuk, B B; O'Meara, J E; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Robb, J; Roudot, F; Schumacher, R A; Tedeschi, D J; Thompson, R A; Tilles, D; Tuzel, W; Vansyoc, K; Vineyard, M F; Weinstein, L B; Wilkin, G R; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2000-01-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on the toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  10. "Flat-Fish" Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    The picture shows a "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber being prepared in the ISR workshop for testing prior to installation in the Split Field Magnet (SFM) at intersection I4. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of thin stainless steel sheets to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the vertical component of the atmospheric pressure force. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber ever made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature. In this picture the thin sheets transferring the vertical component of the atmosferic pressure force are attached to a support frame for testing. See also 7712182, 7712179.

  11. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  12. Ionization Chamber Measures Extreme Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Robert W.

    1987-01-01

    Ionization chamber operates in nearly total photon absorption as stable, self-calibrating detector of ionizing extreme ultraviolet radiation. Working gas of instrument is neon; photoionization properties well known and readily applicable to absolute measurements. Designed for measurements of solar ultraviolet flux aboard sounding rocket, instrument used on Earth to measure ultraviolet radiation in vacuum systems. Ionization chamber collects positive neon ions and electrons produced by irradiation of neon gas by ultraviolet photons. Approximately one ion produced by each photon; consequently, photoionization current nearly proportional to photon flux.

  13. Bub3-BubR1-dependent sequestration of Cdc20Fizzy at DNA breaks facilitates the correct segregation of broken chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derive, Nicolas; Landmann, Cedric; Montembault, Emilie; Claverie, Marie-Charlotte; Pierre-Elies, Priscillia; Goutte-Gattat, Damien; Founounou, Nabila; McCusker, Derek; Royou, Anne

    2015-11-09

    The presence of DNA double-strand breaks during mitosis is particularly challenging for the cell, as it produces broken chromosomes lacking a centromere. This situation can cause genomic instability resulting from improper segregation of the broken fragments into daughter cells. We recently uncovered a process by which broken chromosomes are faithfully transmitted via the BubR1-dependent tethering of the two broken chromosome ends. However, the mechanisms underlying BubR1 recruitment and function on broken chromosomes were largely unknown. We show that BubR1 requires interaction with Bub3 to localize on the broken chromosome fragments and to mediate their proper segregation. We also find that Cdc20, a cofactor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), accumulates on DNA breaks in a BubR1 KEN box-dependent manner. A biosensor for APC/C activity demonstrates a BubR1-dependent local inhibition of APC/C around the segregating broken chromosome. We therefore propose that the Bub3-BubR1 complex on broken DNA inhibits the APC/C locally via the sequestration of Cdc20, thus promoting proper transmission of broken chromosomes.

  14. Posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens implantation for high myopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈晔; 杜持新; 顾扬顺; 王竞

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy, safety and stability of posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens (PIOLs) implantation for the correction of high myopia.Methods Thirty-nine eyes of twenty patients with high myopia (between-11.75 and-25.75 diopters) had a posterior chamber PIOL (Staar ICL) implanted. During 6-48 months' follow-up, visual acuity, refraction, intraocular pressure (IOP), corneal reaction and space between crystal lens and intraocular lens (IOLs) were tested.Results Successful implantation was achieved in all patients. Visual acuity without correction greater than 0.5 was found in 34 eyes at 1 day and 3 months postoperatively. Thirty-five eyes maintained a low negative power of refraction (-1.42±1.32 doipters), which did not prevent the patients from most of their daily activities. During 3-48 months' follow-up, refraction was stable and no cornea edema and glaucoma was found. Two eyes of one patient had corticosteroid glaucoma and another eye showed cataractogenesis under anterior capsular membrane.Conclusion Posterior chamber PIOL implantation is predictable, safe, and effective in the correction of high myopia, and its indications should be carefully selected.

  15. Space shuttle maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program. Task 11: Low epsilon stability test report data dump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauckert, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The stability characteristics of the like-doublet injector were defined over the range of OME chamber pressures and mixture ratios. This was accomplished by bomb testing the injector and cavity configurations in solid wall thrust chamber hardware typical of a flight contour with fuel heated to regenerative chamber outlet temperatures. It was found that stability in the 2600-2800 Hz region depends upon injector hydraulics and on chamber acoustics.

  16. Testing an hydrogen streamer chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    A 2x10 cm gap streamer chamber, 35x55 cm2 in surface, was built and tested at CERN. Good tracks of cosmic rays were obtained up to atmospheric pressure, see F. Rohrbach et al, CERN-LAL (Orsay) Collaboration, Nucl. Instr. Methods 141 (1977) 229. Michel Cathenoz stand on the center.

  17. A dual deformable reverberation chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank

    2010-01-01

    There is disclosed an arrangement for measuring the effectiveness of a shielding material against electromagnetic fields. The arrangement comprises a first and a second reverberation chamber sharing a common wall. The common wall is partly made of the shielding material. A first antenna is arranged

  18. Bubble chamber: colour enhanced tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    This artistically-enhanced image of real particle tracks was produced in the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). Liquid hydrogen is used to create bubbles along the paths of the particles as a piston expands the medium. A magnetic field is produced in the detector causing the particles to travel in spirals, allowing charge and momentum to be measured.

  19. DELPHI's Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The hundreds of mirrors around this Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber reflect cones of light created by fast moving particles to a detector. The velocity of a particle can be measured by the size of the ring produced on the detector. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  20. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, HBOT is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. HBOT is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The HHC technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system to provide controlled pressurization and adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the patient and operating personnel, and physiological considerations. The simple schematic, comprised of easily acquired commercial hardware

  1. Correction of the angular dependence of MatriXX Evolution detectors and its impact in the IMRT and VMAT treatment validation; Correccion de la dependencia angular de los detectores del MatriXX Evolution y su impacto en la validacion de tratamientos de IMRT y VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casares Magaz, O.; Seongheon, K.; Hernandez Armas, J.; Papanikolaou, N.

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to create detector element-specific angular correction factors for each detector of the MatriXX planar ion chamber array and compare them to vendor-default angular correction factors. Additionally, the impact of both factors on gamma index was quantified using two corrections. The correction factor of each element is determined irradiating the detector at different incidences by the ratio of the calculated expected dose to the MatriXX measured dose as a gantry angle function. To evaluate its impact, sixty-five pre-irradiated patient-specific dose validations were re-analyzed using the gamma index with: 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm criteria. The factors for 6 MV were found to differ (7%) from the default ones for specific angles particularly for 85 degree centigrade to 95 degree centigrade. For 10 MV, differences (1.0%) existed when correction factors were created using various ROI's. Two corrections were proposed, absolute differences for 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, and 1%/1 mm were up to 1.5%, 4.2% and 4.1% ( p < 0.01), respectively. Large differences in the default and specific factors were noted for 6 MV and lead to improvement of the absolute gamma index value of up to 4.2%. In general, gamma index value increases for patient specific dose validations when using device specific factors. (Author)

  2. Ion chamber-electrometer measurement system for radiation protection tests in X-ray equipment for interventional procedures; Sistema de medicao camara de ionizacao-eletrometro para ensaios de protecao radiologica em equipamentos de raios X para procedimentos intervencionistas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottaro, Marcio

    2012-07-01

    A new parallel plate ionization chamber with volume of 500 cc and an electrometer with digital interface for data acquisition, configuring an ion chamber electrometer measurement system, were developed to comply with specific requirements for compulsory radiation protection tests in interventional X-ray equipment. The ion chamber has as main characteristics: low cost, mechanical strength and response variation with beam energy of less than 5% in the 40 kV to 150 kV range. The electrometer has a high gain (5x10{sup 8} V/A) transimpedance amplifier circuit and a data acquisition and control system developed in LabVIEW Registered-Sign platform, including an integrated power supply for the ion chamber bias with adjustable DC voltage output from O to 1000 V and an air density correction system. Electric field calculations, laboratory measurements in standard beams and computational simulations of radiation interactions in chamber volume with Monte Carlo Method were employed in the elaborated methodology of the ion chamber development, which was tested and validated. It was also developed a simplified methodology for electrometer calibration that assures metrological trustworthiness of the measurement system. Tests for the system performance evaluation as environmental influence response, energy response, angular dependency, linearity and air kerma and air kerma rate dependency were performed according to international standards and requirements. Additionally, for a detailed evaluation of the developed ion chamber, simulations with various scattered radiation spectra were performed. The system was applied in leakage radiation, residual radiation and scattered radiation tests, being compared with other reference systems and validated for laboratorial test routine. (author)

  3. 有晶状体眼后房型人工晶状体植入矫正高度近视的中远期疗效评价%Mid-long term follow-up results in correction of extreme mvopia by posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周天安; 沈晔; 汪阳; 夏建华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the mid-long term stability and safety of posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens (ICL) implantation for the correction of extreme myopia. Methods This retrospective study included 993 eyes of 498 patients received ICL implantation from June 1996 to December 2008.Multivariate analysis and variance analysis were used to evaluate the stability of the results and to identify risk factors of the complications. Results Successful implantation was achieved in all patients.Spherical equivalent(SE) was (16.23 ±4.12,mean ±SD) D before the operation and ( -0.92 ± 1.22) D at the last examination. Intraocular pressure was (13.58 ± 2.93) mm Hg( 1 mm Hg =0.133 kPa)preoperatively which was ( 13.90 ± 3.01 ) mm Hg at the last examination. There was no statistical significance in follow-up( t =0.44 ~1.30,P > 0.05 ).Endothelial cell density was (2858.21 ± 395.13 )/mm2 before the operation and (2567.19 ± 423.45 ) /mm2 at last examination.Pupillary block glaucoma occurred in 2 eyes (0.2% ) at two hours and 1 eye (0.1% ) at one month after the operation.Three eyes developed anterior cataracts between 6 months to 1 year after ICL implantation and another 2 eyes subcapsular opacification at semi-peripheral regions occurred 4 years after the operation,and was not related with age,SE and vaults (F=2.42,1.98,0.81,P>0.05). Macular puckers were found in 5 eyes (0.5%) 1 year postoperatively,including 2 eyes developed choroidal neovascularization and received PDT,best corrected visual acuity lost more than 2 lines.Retinal detachment occurred in 2 eyes at 1.5 years after the operation.Acute iritis happened in 1 eye (0.1% ) and chronic iritis in 1 eye (0.1% ) which combined with slight pupil distortion and elevation of intraocular pressure.Iris stroma atrophy and pupil distortion were found in 2 eyes (0.2% ).Conclusion Correction of high myopia by ICL implantation is a safe procedure and the results are stable.%目的 总结有晶状体眼后房

  4. Growing and Analyzing Biofilms in Flow Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic...... conditions, and the environment can be carefully controlled and easily changed. The protocols in this unit include construction of the flow chamber and the bubble trap, assembly and sterilization of the flow chamber system, inoculation of the flow chambers, running of the system, image capture and analysis...

  5. Growing and analyzing biofilms in flow chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic...... conditions, and the environment can be carefully controlled and easily changed. The protocols in this unit include construction of the flow chamber and the bubble trap, assembly and sterilization of the flow chamber system, inoculation of the flow chambers, running of the system, image capture and analysis...

  6. Extended T2-IVIM model for correction of TE dependence of pseudo-diffusion volume fraction in clinical diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, N. P.; d'Arcy, J. A.; Feiweier, T.; Koh, D.-M.; Leach, M. O.; Collins, D. J.; Orton, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    The bi-exponential intravoxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM) model for diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) fails to account for differential T 2 s in the model compartments, resulting in overestimation of pseudodiffusion fraction f. An extended model, T2-IVIM, allows removal of the confounding echo-time (TE) dependence of f, and provides direct compartment T 2 estimates. Two consented healthy volunteer cohorts (n  =  5, 6) underwent DWI comprising multiple TE/b-value combinations (Protocol 1: TE  =  62-102 ms, b  =  0-250 mm-2s, 30 combinations. Protocol 2: 8 b-values 0-800 mm-2s at TE  =  62 ms, with 3 additional b-values 0-50 mm-2s at TE  =  80, 100 ms scanned twice). Data from liver ROIs were fitted with IVIM at individual TEs, and with the T2-IVIM model using all data. Repeat-measures coefficients of variation were assessed for Protocol 2. Conventional IVIM modelling at individual TEs (Protocol 1) demonstrated apparent f increasing with longer TE: 22.4  ±  7% (TE  =  62 ms) to 30.7  ±  11% (TE  =  102 ms) T2-IVIM model fitting accounted for all data variation. Fitting of Protocol 2 data using T2-IVIM yielded reduced f estimates (IVIM: 27.9  ±  6%, T2-IVIM: 18.3  ±  7%), as well as T 2  =  42.1  ±  7 ms, 77.6  ±  30 ms for true and pseudodiffusion compartments, respectively. A reduced Protocol 2 dataset yielded comparable results in a clinical time frame (11 min). The confounding dependence of IVIM f on TE can be accounted for using additional b/TE images and the extended T2-IVIM model.

  7. RETAINED STONE PIECE IN ANTERIOR CHAMBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZvornicaninJasmin, Nadarevic-VodencarevicAmra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We read with interest the article by Surekha et al. regarding the retained stone piece in anterior chamber. Similar to the results of previous studies, the authors found that delayed intraocular foreign body (IOFB management can result in good visual outcome without an apparent increased risk of endophthalmitis or other deleterious side effects. However, the authors failed to explain the exact reason for the diminution of vision in patients left eye. It is unclear what the uncorrected visual acuity was and what kind of correction was used, more precisely type and amount of cylinder, given the presence of the corneal opacity. Since the size of the IOFB is approximately 4x4x1mm, significant irido-corneal angle changes resulting in intraocular pressure raise and optic nerve head damage can be expected. Traumatic glaucoma following open globe injury can occur in 2.7 to 19% of cases, with several risk factors associated with glaucoma development (advanced age, poor visual acuity at presentation,perforating rather than penetrating ocular injury,lens injury, presence of vitreous hemorrhage and presence of an IOFB. Earlier reportsof latetraumaticoptic neuropathy onset, even after several years, indicate that this possibility cannot be completely ruled out too. Therefore, repeated intraocular pressure measurements, gonioscopy, pupillary reaction assessment, together with through posterior segment examination including visual field and optical coherence tomography examinations can be useful in determining the possible optic nerve damage as one of the possible reasons for visual acuity reduction. The authors did not suggest any operative treatment at this time. However, it should bear in mind that the inert anterior chamber IOFB could be a risk factor for non-infectious endophthalmitis development even after many years. Also, long term retained anterior chamber foreign body leads to permanent endothelial cell loss and can even result in a corneal

  8. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Huang, Tseng-Te; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chen, Yen-Fu; Wu, Shu-Wei; Nievaart, Sander; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary 60Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the 60Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations reached 7

  9. Gravitational Correction to Vacuum Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D

    2015-01-01

    We consider the gravitational correction to (electronic) vacuum polarization in the presence of a gravitational background field. The Dirac propagators for the virtual fermions are modified to include the leading gravitational correction (potential term) which corresponds to a coordinate-dependent fermion mass. The mass term is assumed to be uniform over a length scale commensurate with the virtual electron-positron pair. The on-mass shell renormalization condition ensures that the gravitational correction vanishes on the mass shell of the photon, i.e., the speed of light is unaffected by the quantum field theoretical loop correction, in full agreement with the equivalence principle. Nontrivial corrections are obtained for off-shell, virtual photons. We compare our findings to other works on generalized Lorentz transformations and combined quantum-electrodynamic gravitational corrections to the speed of light which have recently appeared in the literature.

  10. A portable miniature anechoic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorthioir, Jack; Gavin, Paul

    The portable miniature anechoic chamber (PMAC), a low-cost alternative to a full-size anechoic chamber, is presented. The PMAC is a miniature, enclosed, RF-tight microwave antenna range, which approximates the performance of an indoor range over the C through Ku (G through J)-band frequencies. The small footprint, four by six feet, allows for ease of movement by one person to a test site, indoors or outdoors. The PMAC can be used at I (intermediate)-level to support the operational readiness (OR) requirements of the U.S. Army, Navy or Air Force. In conjunction with the antenna test equipment (ATE), and under TPS control, it can be used for performance verification, fault detection and fault isolation. A typical application using the PMAC in this operating mode is described.

  11. Development of multiwire proportional chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    Charpak, G

    1969-01-01

    It has happened quite often in the history of science that theoreticians, confronted with some major difficulty, have successfully gone back thirty years to look at ideas that had then been thrown overboard. But it is rare that experimentalists go back thirty years to look again at equipment which had become out-dated. This is what Charpak and his colleagues did to emerge with the 'multiwire proportional chamber' which has several new features making it a very useful addition to the armoury of particle detectors. In the 1930s, ion-chambers, Geiger- Muller counters and proportional counters, were vital pieces of equipment in nuclear physics research. Other types of detectors have since largely replaced them but now the proportional counter, in new array, is making a comeback.

  12. Actuator System with Dual Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    (8), the lid having a shaft opening (17) for a shaft (6) coupled to the magnetic rotor (5), wherein the magnetic rotor (5), when inserted in the translator cylinder (2), is arranged to translate a linear movement of the translator cylinder (2) into a rotational movement of the magnetic rotor by using...... magnetic flux (82) interacting between the magnetic stator and the magnetic rotor, said rotational movements is being transferred through a shaft (6), the lid (8) with a shaft opening (17) arranged for receiving the shaft (6), wherein the shaft is arranged to make both the linear and the rotational...... movement in the shaft opening (17), the lid (8) being arranged for confining the second end (15) of the translator cylinder (2), the translator cylinder confined by the lid (8) forms,when divided by the magnetic rotor (5), a first chamber (TC) with a first volume and a second chamber(BC) with a second...

  13. LET measurements with a liquid ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegami, Sara

    2013-02-08

    Deep-seated tumors can be efficiently treated with heavy charged particles. The characteristic depth dose profile inside the tissue (Bragg peak) allows to deliver a high dose inside the tumor, while sparing the neighboring healthy tissue. As compared to protons, heavy ions like carbon or oxygen produce a higher amount of ionization events along their track (and in particular at the end of the ion beam path), resulting in an irreparable damage to the DNA of the tumor cells. The density of such ionization events is described in terms of Linear Energy Transfer (LET), an important physical quantity, but difficult to be measured directly. The aim of this work is to determine LET of hadrontherapy beams by using Liquid Ionization Chambers (LIC). The ionization signal in LICs is affected by recombination effects that depend on the LET of the incident radiation. Differences in recombination effects in LICs and air-filled ionization chambers can be exploited to obtain the recombination index, which can be related to the LET, calculated by Monte Carlo methods. We thus developed a method to construct a calibration curve, which relates the recombination index with the LET at each depth in water. The result of this work can be used for online monitoring of the ion beam quality.

  14. NRAO RF Anechoic Chamber & Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A shielded anechoic chamber measuring 15 by 15 by 37 feet is located in the Jansky Laboratory at Green Bank. This chamber has been outfitted as a far-field antenna...

  15. (r) Mass Resolution versus Chamber Resolution in ALICE Dimuon Forward Spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Tao

    2007-01-01

    The precisions and its sources of spatial resolutions of tracking chambers and mass resolutions of dimuon signals in ALICE Dimuon Forward Spectrometer are explored by tracking and reconstruction of AliRoot software. The dependences of (r) mass resolution on spatial resolution of tracking chambers are presented with and without background events through simulations.

  16. Cosmic ray tests of a 4.6 m-long test drift chamber for JLC

    CERN Document Server

    Kurihara, Y; Sudo, S; Abe, T; Fujii, K; Ishihara, N; Khalatyan, N; Matsui, T; Nitoh, O; Ohama, T; Okuno, H; Sugiyama, A; Takahashi, K; Watanabe, T; Yoshida, T

    2000-01-01

    Performance of a 4.6 m-long drift chamber filled with a CO sub 2 iso-butane (90:10) mixture was studied using cosmic-ray data, in the course of detector R and D for JLC. After correcting the data for wire displacements due to gravitational and electrostatic forces, a spatial resolution of 100 mu m per wire was achieved over the full length of the chamber. The relation between wire efficiency and oxygen remnant in the chamber gas is also discussed.

  17. Anterior Chamber Iris Claw Lens for the Treatment of Aphakia in a Patient with Megalocornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffra, Norman; Rakhamimov, Aleksandr; Masini, Robert; Rosenthal, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Megalocornea in isolation is a rare congenital enlargement of the cornea greater than 13 mm in diameter. Patients with megalocornea are prone to cataract formation, crystalline lens subluxation, zonular deficiencies and dislocation of the posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL) within the capsular bag. A 55-year-old male with megalocornea in isolation developed subluxation of the capsular bag and PCIOL. The PCIOL and capsular bag were explanted, and the patient was subsequently implanted with an anterior chamber iris claw lens. An anterior chamber iris claw lens is an effective option for the correction of aphakia in patients with megalocornea. PMID:26120314

  18. Backscattered radiation into a transmission ionization chamber: measurement and Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    Backscattered radiation (BSR) from field-defining collimators can affect the response of a monitor chamber in X-radiation fields. This contribution must be considered since this kind of chamber is used to monitor the equipment response. In this work, the dependence of a transmission ionization chamber response on the aperture diameter of the collimators was studied experimentally and using a Monte Carlo (MC) technique. According to the results, the BSR increases the chamber response of over 4.0% in the case of a totally closed collimator and 50 kV energy beam, using both techniques. The results from Monte Carlo simulation confirm the validity of the simulated geometry.

  19. Monte Carlo studies on Cathode Strip/Pad Chambers for the ALICE Di-Muon Arm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzinger, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Willis, N.

    1996-04-01

    A general overview about the properties of Cathode Strip and Pad Chambers is given. Position finding methods are discussed and compared within Monte Carlo studies. Noise contributions and their minimization are discussed. Pad chambers allow a two-dimensional readout with spatial resolution of {sigma} < 100 {mu}m in direction parallel to the anode wire. The resolution normal to the anode wire depends mainly on the wire spacing. Special attention is paid on the double-hit resolution capability of the pad chamber. An outlook is given on the possible utilisation of Cathode Pad Chambers in the Di-Muon Arm of the ALICE detector at LHC. (author). 44 refs.

  20. 乙二胺四乙酸依赖性假性血小板减少症简易纠正方案%Simple correcting scheme of EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑军; 黄秀霞

    2015-01-01

    目的:乙二胺四乙酸(EDTA)依赖性假性血小板减少症标本通过肝素锂、枸橼酸钠及改良方案进行纠正,对血小板测定结果进行评估,建立一个简单、实用、且不延长结果报告时间(TAT)的方法。方法征集ED‐TA依赖性假性血小板减少症志愿者120例,同时收集肝素锂、枸橼酸钠、EDTA‐K3抗凝标本各一份,其中EDTA‐K3标本采用改良方法处理后再检测,三组检测结果与参考方法的测定结果进行比较。评估差异有无统计学意义。结果肝素锂、枸橼酸钠、改良方案的纠正率分别为80.5%、39.2%、100.0%;与参考方法比较,P值分别0.129、0.013、0.051。T A T分别为(2.03±0.29)、(1.8±0.35)、(0.47±0.19)h。结论肝素锂组的结果与参考方法测定结果相关性最好,可比性最好。其次是改良组和枸橼酸钠组。改良方案对 TAT影响最小、不用进行患者的二次采血,并且结果与枸橼酸钠相似,因此该改良方案可以用于临床上对PTCP标本的纠正。%Objective To correct the specimens of EDTA‐dependent pseudothrombocytopenia(PTCT ) by a‐dopting heparin lithium ,sodium sitrate and the improved corrective solution and to evaluate the platelet detection re‐sults for establishing a simple ,practical method without extending the results report time .Methods 120 volunteer of EDTA‐dependent PTCT and each anti‐coagulation specimen with EDTA‐K3 ,heparin lithium and sodium citrate were collected ,in which the specimens of EDTA‐K3 was treated by the improved method and then the detection was con‐ducted .The detection results in 3 groups were compared with the detection results by the reference method and whether having the statistical significance was evaluated .Results The corrective rates of heparin lithium ,sodium cit‐rate and improved corrective solution were 80 .5% ,39 .2% and 100 .0% .Their P values were 0

  1. Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szydagis, Matthew Mark [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

  2. Multiplicity counting from fission chamber signals in the current mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pázsit, I.; Pál, L.; Nagy, L.

    2016-12-01

    In nuclear safeguards, estimation of sample parameters using neutron-based non-destructive assay methods is traditionally based on multiplicity counting with thermal neutron detectors in the pulse mode. These methods in general require multi-channel analysers and various dead time correction methods. This paper proposes and elaborates on an alternative method, which is based on fast neutron measurements with fission chambers in the current mode. A theory of "multiplicity counting" with fission chambers is developed by incorporating Böhnel's concept of superfission [1] into a master equation formalism, developed recently by the present authors for the statistical theory of fission chamber signals [2,3]. Explicit expressions are derived for the first three central auto- and cross moments (cumulants) of the signals of up to three detectors. These constitute the generalisation of the traditional Campbell relationships for the case when the incoming events represent a compound Poisson distribution. Because now the expressions contain the factorial moments of the compound source, they contain the same information as the singles, doubles and triples rates of traditional multiplicity counting. The results show that in addition to the detector efficiency, the detector pulse shape also enters the formulas; hence, the method requires a more involved calibration than the traditional method of multiplicity counting. However, the method has some advantages by not needing dead time corrections, as well as having a simpler and more efficient data processing procedure, in particular for cross-correlations between different detectors, than the traditional multiplicity counting methods.

  3. Wire chamber degradation at the Argonne ZGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberichter, W.; Spinka, H.

    1986-01-01

    Experience with multiwire proportional chambers at high rates at the Argonne Zero Gradient Synchrotron is described. A buildup of silicon on the sense wires was observed where the beam passed through the chamber. Analysis of the chamber gas indicated that the density of silicon was probably less than 10 ppM.

  4. 21 CFR 868.5470 - Hyperbaric chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hyperbaric chamber. 868.5470 Section 868.5470 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5470 Hyperbaric chamber. (a) Identification. A hyperbaric chamber is a device that is intended to increase the environmental oxygen pressure to promote...

  5. Vacuum chamber at intersection I-6

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    The vacuum chamber at intersection region I-6, one of these where experiments in colliding-beam physics will be taking place. The "wheels" prevent the thin wall (1.5 mm) of the chamber from collapsing. The chamber is equipped with heating tapes and its wrapped in thermal insulation. Residual gas pressure at this and other similar regions is around 10_11.

  6. Characterization tests and application of special ionization chambers in standard mammography beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Cristiane J.C.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: cristianehonda@usp.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Silva, Jonas O., E-mail: jonas.silva@ufg.br [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2015-07-01

    The most used instrument for quality assurance programs in mammography beams is the ionization chamber. At the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN three different ionization chambers were recently designed and assembled for dosimetry in standard mammography beams. These ionization chambers are parallel plate chambers, with different geometries. The objective of this work was to study the performance of all three ionization chambers in relation to a commercial one. The established standard beams at an industrial X-ray system Pantak-Seifert were used for the characterization tests of the ionization chambers as short- and medium-term stability, saturation curves, polarity effect, ion collection efficiency, response linearity and angular dependence. All of the results obtained were within the limits recommended by the international standards IEC 61674 and IEC 60731. (author)

  7. Ionisation chamber containing boron as a neutron detector in medical accelerator fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielczynski, M; Gryzinski, M A; Golnik, N; Tulik, P

    2007-01-01

    A combination of the recombination principle of H(10) measurements with the use of the ionisation chambers containing boron has been presented, in order to increase the relative sensitivity of the chamber to neutrons by a factor close to the radiation quality factor of photoneutrons. Three types of the chambers were investigated. Two of them were filled with BF(3) and the third one contained electrodes covered with B(4)C. All the chambers were placed in paraffin moderators. The response of the chambers was investigated, depending on gas pressure and polarising voltage. The results showed that it was possible to obtain nearly the same response of the chamber to H(10) for photons and neutrons in a restricted energy range; however, further investigations are needed to make an optimum design.

  8. Unexpected bias in NIST 4πγ ionization chamber measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterweger, M P; Fitzgerald, R

    2012-09-01

    In January of 2010, it was discovered that the source holder used for calibrations in the NIST 4πγ ionization chamber (IC) has not been stable. The positioning ring that determines the height of the sample in the reentrant tube of the IC has slowly shifted during 35 years of use. This has led to a slow change in the calibration factors for the various radionuclides measured by this instrument. The changes are dependent on γ-ray energy and the time the IC was calibrated for a given radionuclide. A review of the historic data with regard to when the calibrations were done has enabled us to approximate the magnitude of the changes with time. This requires a number of assumptions, and corresponding uncertainty components, including whether the changes in height were gradual or in steps as will be shown in drawings of sample holder. For calibrations the changes in calibration factors have been most significant for low energy gamma emitters such as (133)Xe, (241)Am, (125)I and (85)Kr. The corrections to previous calibrations can be approximated and the results corrected with an increase in the overall uncertainty. At present we are recalibrating the IC based on new primary measurements of the radionuclides measured on the IC. Likewise we have been calibrating a new automated ionization-chamber system. A bigger problem is the significant number of half-life results NIST has published over the last 35 years that are based on IC measurements. The effect on half-life is largest for long-lived radionuclei, especially low-energy γ-ray emitters. This presentation will review our results and recommend changes in values and/or uncertainties. Any recommendation for withdrawal of any results will also be undertaken.

  9. Design and preliminary test of a free-air ionization chamber for low-energy X-ray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jin-Jie; YANG Yuan-Di; WANG Pei-Wei; CHEN Jing; LIU Jia-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    A free-air ionization chamber in low-energy X-ray has been designed and manufactured at theNational Institute of Metrology (NIM, China) according to the defination of alr-kerma. The results of a preliminary test show that the leakage current of ionization chamber is around 2×10A, and the correction factor of ion recombination for the ionization chamber is also obtained. The free-air ionization chamber is suitable for the primary standard in low-energy X-rays.

  10. Research Development of Correction Methodology of EDTA-dependent Pseudothrombocytopenia%纠正EDTA依赖性假性血小板减少的方法学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜树朋(综述); 李艳(审校)

    2015-01-01

    EDTA-K2 is taken as the proposed anticoagulant in blood count by International Council for Standardization in Hematology ( ICSH ) . However, occasionally EDTA-dependency pseudothrombocytopenia ( EDTA-PTCP) occurs. In order to prevent clinical misdiagnosis,mistherapy and unnecessary platelets trans-fusion,it is necessary to correct the platelet count. At present the main correction methods are dilution model method,alternative anticoagulant method, micro centrifuge tube method, drug stability method, reticulocyte count method,channel PLT reference method etc.%乙二胺四乙酸二钾(EDTA-K2)是国际血液学标准化委员会建议的血细胞计数抗凝剂,其在应用过程中偶尔会发生EDTA依赖性假性血小板减少症( EDTA-PTCP)。为了防止临床误诊误治,导致不必要的血小板输注,必须对血小板计数进行纠正。目前纠正方法主要有稀释模式法、替代抗凝剂法、微量离心管法、药物稳定法、网织红细胞通道法、血小板计数参考方法等。

  11. Photochemistry of Glyoxal in Wet Aerosols: Smog Chamber Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Y. B.; Kim, H.; Turpin, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aqueous chemistry is an important pathway for the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Reaction vessel studies provide evidence that in the aqueous phase photooxidation of water soluble organic compounds (e.g., glyoxal, methylglyoxal) form multifunctional organic products and oligomers. In this work, we extend this bulk-phase chemistry to the condensed-phase chemistry that occurs in/on aerosols by conducting smog chamber experiments — photooxidation of ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols containing glyoxal and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of NOx under dry/humid conditions. Particles were analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). In the irradiated chamber, photooxidation products of glyoxal as seen in reaction vessel experiments (e.g., oxalic acids and tartaric acids) were also formed in both ammonium sulfate aerosols and sulfuric acid aerosols at humid and even dry conditions. However, the major products were organosulfurs (CHOS), organonitrogens (CHON), and nitrooxy-organosulfates (CHONS), which were also dominantly formed in the dark chamber. These products were formed via non-radical reactions, which depend on acidity and humidity. However, the real-time profiles in the dark chamber and the irradiated chamber were very different, suggesting photochemistry substantially affects non-radical formation in the condensed phase.

  12. Detector to detector corrections: a comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azangwe, Godfrey; Grochowska, Paulina; Georg, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    -doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C), organic plastic scintillators, diamond detectors, liquid filled ion chamber, and a range of small volume air filled ionization chambers (volumes ranging from 0.002 cm3 to 0.3 cm3). All detector measurements were corrected for volume averaging effect and compared with dose ratios.......148 for the 0.14 cm3 air filled ionization chamber and were as high as 1.924 for the 0.3 cm3 ionization chamber. After applying volume averaging corrections, the detector readings were consistent among themselves and with alanine measurements for several small detectors but they differed for larger detectors......, in particular for some small ionization chambers with volumes larger than 0.1 cm3. Conclusions: The results demonstrate how important it is for the appropriate corrections to be applied to give consistent and accurate measurements for a range of detectors in small beam geometry. The results further demonstrate...

  13. Loss of ions in cavity ionization chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takata, N. [Ionizing Radiation Section, NMIJ/AIST, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)]. E-mail: n.takata@aist.go.jp; Tran, N.T. [Institute for Nuclear Science and Technique, VAEC, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Kim, E. [Radiation Safety Section, NIRS, Inageku, Chiba-city 263-8555 (Japan); Marsoem, P. [P3KRBiN-BATAN, JL Cinere-Pasar Jum' at, Jakarta 12070 (Indonesia); Kurosawa, T. [Ionizing Radiation Section, NMIJ/AIST, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Koyama, Y. [Ionizing Radiation Section, NMIJ/AIST, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2005-12-01

    Ion losses due to initial recombination, volume recombination, and back diffusion were each determined by measurements and calculations for different size cylindrical ionization chambers and spherical ionization chambers. By measuring signal currents from these ionization chambers irradiated with {sup 60}Co gamma rays, two groups of ion losses were obtained. (Group 1) Ion loss due to initial recombination and diffusion, which changes proportionally to the inverse of the voltage applied to the ionization chambers; (and group 2) ion loss due to volume recombination, which changes proportionally to the inverse of the square of the applied voltage. The diffusion loss was obtained separately by computing electric field distributions in the ionization chambers. It was found that diffusion loss is larger than initial recombination loss for the cylindrical ionization chambers and vise versa for the spherical ionization chambers.

  14. Pupillary block glaucoma following implantation of a posterior chamber pseudophakos in the anterior chamber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Anil

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Pupillary block glaucoma is a common complication of cataract surgery, especially following anterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. We report a case of pupillary block glaucoma with a posterior chamber IOL that was implanted in the anterior chamber following a complicated extracapsular cataract extraction. The case was successfully managed by explantation of the posterior chamber lens, anterior vitrectomy, peripheral iridectomy and secondary anterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. The intraocular pressure was controlled with a single topical antiglaucoma medication.

  15. Detector to detector corrections: A comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azangwe, Godfrey, E-mail: g.azangwe@iaea.org; Grochowska, Paulina; Izewska, Joanna; Meghzifene, Ahmed [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Georg, Dietmar; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Lechner, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University Vienna/AKH Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria and Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Andersen, Claus E.; Beierholm, Anders R.; Helt-Hansen, Jakob [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Risø Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukumura, Akifumi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan); Yajima, Kaori [Association for Nuclear Technology in Medicine, 7-16, Nihonbashikodenmacho, chuou-ku, Tokyo 103-0001 (Japan); Gouldstone, Clare; Sharpe, Peter [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Palmans, Hugo [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW, United Kingdom and EBG MedAustron GmbH, Medical Physics Department, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially useful as a reference data set for small beam dosimetry measurements. Methods: Dose response of passive and real time detectors was investigated for small field sizes shaped with a micromultileaf collimator ranging from 0.6 × 0.6 cm{sup 2} to 4.2 × 4.2 cm{sup 2} and the measurements were extended to larger fields of up to 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}. Measurements were performed at 5 cm depth, in a 6 MV photon beam. Detectors used included alanine, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), stereotactic diode, electron diode, photon diode, radiophotoluminescent dosimeters (RPLDs), radioluminescence detector based on carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C), organic plastic scintillators, diamond detectors, liquid filled ion chamber, and a range of small volume air filled ionization chambers (volumes ranging from 0.002 cm{sup 3} to 0.3 cm{sup 3}). All detector measurements were corrected for volume averaging effect and compared with dose ratios determined from alanine to derive a detector correction factors that account for beam perturbation related to nonwater equivalence of the detector materials. Results: For the detectors used in this study, volume averaging corrections ranged from unity for the smallest detectors such as the diodes, 1.148 for the 0.14 cm{sup 3} air filled ionization chamber and were as high as 1.924 for the 0.3 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber. After applying volume averaging corrections, the detector readings were consistent among themselves and with alanine measurements for several small detectors but they differed for larger detectors, in particular for some small ionization chambers with volumes larger than 0.1 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: The results demonstrate

  16. Compaction and Crystallisation in Magma Chambers: Towards a Model of the Skaergaard Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    The equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy are first simplified by using the extended Boussinesq approximation, and then solved numerically to study the time dependent behaviour of a compacting solidifying layer at the base of a magma chamber when variations in the horizontal plane can be neglected. The most important result is that the concept of a trapped liquid fraction, which has been widely used to model the bulk composition of layered intrusions, is a useful concept to describe the steady state behaviour of compacting layers. The result is at first sight surprising, because there is relative movement between the melt and crystals during compaction, and the system is therefore open. The reason why it is correct is because both the melt and the crystals are moving downwards in a frame fixed to the upper surface of the compacting layer. Since the mass of all elements must be conserved, what goes into the top of the layer as melt and solid must come out of its bottom as a solid when the behaviour is not time dependent. However, when time dependent behaviour occurs the concept of a trapped liquid fraction ceases to be useful. The governing equations are then used to model the concentration of phosphorous in the lower part of the Skaergaard intrusion, where it behaves incompatibly. The observed behaviour requires the viscosity of the solid part of the compacting layer to have a viscosity of about 10^18 Pa s.

  17. Physicist makes muon chamber sing

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    This Monitored Drift Tube detector, consisting of argon-CO2-filled aluminium tubes with a wire down the centre of each, will track muons in ATLAS; Tiecke used a single tube from one of these detectors to create the pipes in his organ. Particle physicists can make good musicians; but did you know particle detectors can make good music? That's what NIKHEF physicist Henk Tiecke learned when he used pipes cut from the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube detector (MDT) to build his own working Dutch-style barrel organ in the autumn of 2005. 'I like to work with my hands,' said Tiecke, who worked as a senior physicist at NIKHEF, Amsterdam, on ZEUS until his retirement last summer. Tiecke had already constructed his barrel organ when he visited some colleagues in the ATLAS muon chambers production area at Nikhef in 2005. He noticed that the aluminium tubes they were using to build the chambers were about three centimetres in diameter-just the right size for a pipe in a barrel organ. 'The sound is not as nice as from wooden...

  18. Limits to Drift Chamber Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS (A Large Toroidal LHC Apparatus) will be a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider that will be operational at CERN in the year 2004. The ATLAS muon spectrometer aims for a momentum resolution of 10% for a transverse momentum of pT=1TeV. The precision tracking devices in the muon system will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs) with a single wire resolution of 1100 chambers covering an area of ≈ 2500m2. The high counting rates in the spectrometer as well as the aim for excellent spatial resolution and high efficiency put severe constraints on the MDT operating parameters. This work describes a detailed study of all the resolution limiting factors in the ATLAS environment. A ’full chain’ simulation of the MDT response to photons and charged particles as well as quantitative comparisons with measurements was performed. The good agreement between simulation and measurements resulted in a profound understanding of the drift chamber processes and the individual contributions to the spat...

  19. kQ factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in clinical proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatnitsky, S M; Siebers, J V; Miller, D W

    1996-01-01

    We discuss a formalism for clinical proton beam dosimetry based on the use of ionization chamber absorbed dose-to-water calibration and beam quality correction factors. A quantity kQ, the beam quality correction factor, is defined which corrects the absorbed dose-to-water calibration factor ND,w in a reference beam of quality Q0 to that in a user's beam of quality Q1. This study of proton beam quality correction factors used 60Co (kQ gamma) and proton (kQp) reference beams. The kQ gamma factors were measured using combined water calorimetry and ionometry for PTW and Capintec-Farmer-type ionization chambers, and were computed from standard dosimetry protocols. Agreement between measured and calculated kQ gamma values for both chambers was found within 1.2% in the plateau region for a monoenergetic 250-MeV beam and within 1.8% at the spread-out Bragg peak for a 155-MeV range-modulated beam. Comparison of absorbed doses to water determined in the range-modulated 155-MeV beam was performed with the PTW chamber using three calibration methods: Ngas calibration (AAPM Report 16), ND,w,gamma calibration in a 60Co beam in conjunction with a kQ gamma factor, and ND,w,p calibration in a proton beam in conjunction with a kQp factor. Absorbed doses to water obtained with the three methods agreed within 2% when ionization chamber dosimetry data were analyzed using the proton W-value for air from the AAPM Report 16 and the ICRU 49 proton stopping powers. The use of the proton-calibrated reference ionization chamber, in conjunction with the beam quality correction factor kQp, significantly reduced the systematic uncertainty of the absorbed dose determination.

  20. A two-dimensional liquid-filled ionization chamber array prototype for small-field verification: characterization and first clinical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brualla-González, Luis; Gómez, Faustino; Vicedo, Aurora; González-Castaño, Diego M; Gago-Arias, Araceli; Pazos, Antonio; Zapata, Martín; Roselló, Joan V; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2012-08-21

    In this work we present the design, characterization and first clinical tests of an in-house developed two-dimensional liquid-filled ionization chamber prototype for the verification of small radiotherapy fields and treatments containing such small fields as in radiosurgery, which consists of 2 mm × 2 mm pixels arranged on a 16×8 rectangular grid. The ionization medium is isooctane. The characterization of the device included the study of depth, field-size and dose-rate dependences, which are sufficiently moderate for a good operation at therapy radiation levels. However, the detector presents an important anisotropic response, up to ≃ 12% for front versus near-lateral incidence, which can impact the verification of full treatments with different incidences. In such a case, an anisotropy correction factor can be applied. Output factors of small square fields measured with the device show a small systematic over-response, less than 1%, when compared to unshielded diode measurements. An IMRT radiosurgery treatment has been acquired with the liquid-filled ionization chamber device and compared with film dosimetry by using the gamma method, showing good agreement: over 99% passing rates for 1.2% and 1.2 mm for an incidence-per-incidence analysis; 100% passing rates for tolerances 1.8% and 1.8 mm when the whole treatment is analysed and the anisotropy correction factor is applied. The point dose verification for each incidence of the treatment performed with the liquid-filled ionization chamber agrees within 1% with a CC01 ionization chamber. This prototype has shown the utility of this kind of technology for the verification of small fields/treatments. Currently, a larger device covering a 5 cm × 5 cm area is under development.

  1. Radiative corrections to Bose condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A. (Academia de Ciencias de Cuba, La Habana. Inst. de Matematica, Cibernetica y Computacion)

    1985-04-01

    The Bose condensation of the scalar field in a theory behaving in the Coleman-Weinberg mode is considered. The effective potential of the model is computed within the semiclassical approximation in a dimensional regularization scheme. Radiative corrections are shown to introduce certain ..mu..-dependent ultraviolet divergences in the effective potential coming from the Many-Particle theory. The weight of radiative corrections in the dynamics of the system is strongly modified by the charge density.

  2. Accuracy of Spencer-Attix cavity theory and calculations of fluence correction factors for the air kerma formalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Russa, D J; Rogers, D W O

    2009-09-01

    EGSnrc calculations of ion chamber response and Spencer-Attix (SA) restricted stopping-power ratios are used to test the assumptions of the SA cavity theory and to assess the accuracy of this theory as it applies to the air kerma formalism for 60Co beams. Consistent with previous reports, the EGSnrc calculations show that the SA cavity theory, as it is normally applied, requires a correction for the perturbation of the charged particle fluence (K(fl)) by the presence of the cavity. The need for K(fl) corrections arises from the fact that the standard prescription for choosing the low-energy threshold delta in the SA restricted stopping-power ratio consistently underestimates the values of delta needed if no perturbation to the fluence is assumed. The use of fluence corrections can be avoided by appropriately choosing delta, but it is not clear how delta can be calculated from first principles. Values of delta required to avoid K(fl) corrections were found to be consistently higher than delta values obtained using the conventional approach and are also observed to be dependent on the composition of the wall in addition to the cavity size. Values of K(fl) have been calculated for many of the graphite-walled ion chambers used by the national metrology institutes around the world and found to be within 0.04% of unity in all cases, with an uncertainty of about 0.02%.

  3. In vitro study of the pulp chamber temperature rise during light-activated bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaise Graciele Carrasco

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated in vitro the pulp chamber temperature rise induced by the light-activated dental bleaching technique using different light sources. The root portions of 78 extracted sound human mandibular incisors were sectioned approximately 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The root cavities of the crowns were enlarged to facilitate the correct placing of the sensor into the pulp chamber. Half of specimens (n=39 was assigned to receive a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on the buccal surface and the other halt (n=39 not to receive the bleaching agent. Three groups (n=13 were formed for each condition (bleach or no bleach according to the use of 3 light sources recommended for dental bleaching: a light-emitting diode (LEDlaser system, a LED unit and a conventional halogen light. The light sources were positioned perpendicular to the buccal surface at a distance of 5 mm and activated during 30 s. The differences between the initial and the highest temperature readings for each specimen were obtained, and, from the temperature changes, the means for each specimen and each group were calculated. The values of temperature rise were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test at 1% significance level. Temperature rise varied significantly depending on the light-curing unit, with statistically significant differences (p0.01. When the bleaching agent was applied, there were significant differences among groups (p<0.01: halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (1.41±0.64ºC, and LED-laser system the lowest (0.33±0.12ºC; however, there was no difference between LED-laser system and LED unit (0.44±0.11ºC. LED and LED-laser system did not differ significantly from each other regardless the temperature rise occurred with or without bleaching agent application. It may be concluded that during light-activated tooth bleaching, with or without the bleaching agent, halogen light promoted higher pulp chamber temperature rise than LED unit and LED

  4. Chamber-dependent circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Georg, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Henrik L

    2010-01-01

    OFF. Eight animals (4 males and 4 females) were included at each time point. Another 48 animals were killed during the second cycle of dark/dark (designated Circadian Time or CT: CT 4, CT 8, CT 12, CT 16, CT 20, and CT 24). The cellular contents of the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 as well as ANP, BNP......Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) have important local functions within the myocardium, where they protect against accelerated fibrosis. As circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides could be of importance in local cardiac protection against disease, we...

  5. Ion distributions in plane and cylindrical chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, R; George, E P

    1975-11-01

    The ion chamber equations of Thomson include both ion recombination and space-charge terms. Neglecting the space-charge term, an exact solution is obtained for the ion densities across a plane ionization chamber. The method is extended to the cylindrical chamber, and examples are given of the expected ion distributions in both geometries. Current-voltage relationships are derived for both chambers and compared with those of other workers. If the space-charge term is retained, the ion chamber equations for both geometries are not soluble in closed form. The cylindrical chamber is considered and a computer solution is obtained for the ion distributions and current. Comparison with the nonspace-charge solution shows that while there is only a small difference in the current-voltage relationship, a significant difference can occur in the ion concentrations.

  6. Tests of anechoic chamber for aeroacoustics investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchikovskiy, V. V.; Bersenev, Yu. V.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Belyaev, I. V.; Korin, I. A.; Sorokin, E. V.; Khramtsov, I. V.; Kustov, O. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the results of qualification tests in the new anechoic chamber of Perm National Research Polytechnic University (PNRPU) built in 2014-2015 and evaluation of the chamber quality in aeroacoustic experiments. It describes design features of the chamber and its sound-absorption lining. The qualification tests were carried out with tonal and broadband noise sources in the frequency range 100 Hz - 20 kHz for two different cases of the source arrangement. In every case, measurements were performed in three directions by traverse microphones. Qualification tests have determined that in the chamber there is a free acoustic field within radius of 2 m for tonal noise and 3 m for broadband noise. There was also evaluated acoustic quality of the chamber by measurements of the jet noise and vortex ring noise. The results of the experiments demonstrate that PNRPU anechoic chamber allows the aeroacoustic measurements to be performed to obtain quantitative results.

  7. The ARGUS microvertex drift chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, E.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Appuhn, R. D.; Buchmüller, J.; Kolanoski, H.; Kreimeier, B.; Lange, A.; Siegmund, T.; Walther, A.; Edwards, K. W.; Fernholz, R. C.; Kapitza, H.; MacFarlane, D. B.; O'Neill, M.; Parsons, J. A.; Prentice, J. D.; Seidel, S. C.; Tsipolitis, G.; Ball, S.; Babaev, A.; Danilov, M.; Tichomirov, I.

    1989-11-01

    The ARGUS collaboration is currently building a new microvertex drift chamber (μVDC) as an upgrade of their detector. The μVDC is optimized for B-meson physics at DORIS energies. Important design features are minimal multiple scattering for low-momentum particles and three-dimensional reconstruction of decay vertices with equal resolutions in r- φ and r- z. Vertex resolutions of 15-25 μm are expected. Prototypes of the μVDC have been tested with different gas mixtures at various pressures. Spatial resolutions as small as 20 μm were obtained using CO 2/propane at 4 bar and DME at 1 bar. New readout electronics have been developed for the μVDC aiming at low thresholds for the TDC measurements. Employing a novel idea for noise and cross-talk suppression, which is based on a discrimination against short pulses, very low threshold settings are possible.

  8. The CAST Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Autiero, D; Cébrian, S; Carmona, J M; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Davenport, M; Delattre, M; Di Lella, L; Formenti, F; Gomez, H; Hasinoff, M; Irastorza, I G; Lakic, B; Luzón, G; Morales, J; Musa, L; Ortiz, A; Placci, A; Rodríguez, A; Ruz, J; Villar, J A; Zioutas, K

    2007-01-01

    One of the three X-ray detectors of the CAST experiment searching for solar axions is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) as a readout structure. Its design has been optimized to provide high sensitivity to the detection of the low intensity X-ray signal expected in the CAST experiment. A low hardware threshold of 0.8 keV is safely set during normal data taking periods, and the overall efficiency for the detection of photons coming from conversion of solar axions is 62 %. Shielding has been installed around the detector, lowering the background level to 4.10 x 10^-5 counts/cm^2/s/keV between 1 and 10 keV. During phase I of the CAST experiment the TPC has provided robust and stable operation, thus contributing with a competitive result to the overall CAST limit on axion-photon coupling and mass.

  9. Free-Flow Open-Chamber Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Free-flow open-chamber electrophoresis variant of free-flow electrophoresis performed in chamber with open ends and in which velocity of electro-osmotic flow adjusted equal to and opposite mean electrophoretic velocity of sample. Particles having electrophoretic mobilities greater than mean mobility of sample particles move toward cathode, those with mobilities less move toward anode. Technique applied to separation of components of mixtures of biologically important substances. Sensitivity enhanced by use of tapered chamber.

  10. Vacuum Chamber for the Booster Bending Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    To minimize eddy currents, induced by the rising magnetic field, the chamber was made from thin stainless steel of high specific electric resistance. For mechanical stength, it was corrugated in a hydro-forming process. The chamber is curved, to follow the beam's orbital path. Under vacuum, the chamber tends to staighten, the ceramic spacer along half of its length keeps it in place (see also 7402458).

  11. Bubble chamber: Omega production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This image is taken from one of CERN's bubble chambers and shows the decay of a positive kaon in flight. The decay products of this kaon can be seen spiraling in the magnetic field of the chamber. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that has been heated to boiling point.

  12. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  13. Measurements of the relative backscatter contribution to the monitor chamber for modern medical linear accelerators; A multi-center study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibolt, Patrik; Cronholm, Rickard O.; Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg

    2015-01-01

    Conversion to absolute dose in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of MV radiotherapy beams needs correct modeling of backscatter (BS) to the linear accelerator (linac) monitor chamber. For some linacs the BS depends largely on jaw settings. The backscattered fraction (BSF) of radiation can be determined...... experimentally by measuring ratios of target charge for a given number of monitor units as a function of jaw settings. This was done using the in-house developed ME40 dosimetry system, which is able to determine the target charge for each radiation pulse from the linac. The BSF measurements were performed...... for different linac models at five Danish radiotherapy clinics. The investigated linacs were four Varian TrueBeams (TB), one Varian iX (iX) and one Elekta Synergy (ES). BSF measurements were performed for square field side lengths ranging from 1 to 40 cm, using the 10 × 10 cm2 field as reference. The impact...

  14. A compact multi-chamber setup for degradation and lifetime studies of organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C;

    2011-01-01

    A controlled atmosphere setup designed for long-term degradation studies of organic solar cells under illumination is presented. The setup was designed with ease-of-use and compactness in mind and allows for multiple solar cells distributed on four glass substrates to be studied in four different...... chambers with temperature and atmosphere control. The four chambers are situated at close proximity in the setup thereby allowing the solar cells to be subjected to as uniform an illumination distribution as possible for the given solar simulator employed. The cell substrates serve as the front window...... and present a tight seal. Hence no illumination correction needs to be performed due to transmission and reflection losses as otherwise seen with test chambers employing a window as a seal. The solar cells in each chamber are continuously and individually electrically monitored under biased conditions...

  15. Proposal of a controlled radon chamber; Proposta de uma camara controlada de radonio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matta, Luiz E.S. de C.; Estrada, Julio J.S. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Alves, Rex N. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1996-07-01

    This work intends to establish the characteristics a radon chamber should have to fulfill, in the best way, the nowadays needs. Eleven radon chambers were studied, it has been observed that they are different in size and shape. Other characteristics asrandom source activity, aerosol generation control and ambient air control were also reviewed. It could be concluded that the chamber should have a parallelepiped shape and 30 M{sup 3} of volume, with an antechamber. The radon should be generated by a 400 MBq radium salt source, divided in five smaller sources to simulates environments having a wider range of radon activity concentration. Parameters such as aerosol generation, humidity, temperature and pressure, can be controlled by instruments available in the market. A radon chamber built in steps is proposed, at the end of each step, some experiments will already be possible to be made, the project could them be improved or corrected. (author)

  16. Congenitally corrected transposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debich-Spicer Diane

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenitally corrected transposition is a rare cardiac malformation characterized by the combination of discordant atrioventricular and ventriculo-arterial connections, usually accompanied by other cardiovascular malformations. Incidence has been reported to be around 1/33,000 live births, accounting for approximately 0.05% of congenital heart malformations. Associated malformations may include interventricular communications, obstructions of the outlet from the morphologically left ventricle, and anomalies of the tricuspid valve. The clinical picture and age of onset depend on the associated malformations, with bradycardia, a single loud second heart sound and a heart murmur being the most common manifestations. In the rare cases where there are no associated malformations, congenitally corrected transposition can lead to progressive atrioventricular valvar regurgitation and failure of the systemic ventricle. The diagnosis can also be made late in life when the patient presents with complete heart block or cardiac failure. The etiology of congenitally corrected transposition is currently unknown, and with an increase in incidence among families with previous cases of congenitally corrected transposition reported. Diagnosis can be made by fetal echocardiography, but is more commonly made postnatally with a combination of clinical signs and echocardiography. The anatomical delineation can be further assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and catheterization. The differential diagnosis is centred on the assessing if the patient is presenting with isolated malformations, or as part of a spectrum. Surgical management consists of repair of the associated malformations, or redirection of the systemic and pulmonary venous return associated with an arterial switch procedure, the so-called double switch approach. Prognosis is defined by the associated malformations, and on the timing and approach to palliative surgical care.

  17. Engineering verification of the biomass production chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M., III; Sager, J. C.; Jones, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for life support systems, both biological and physical-chemical, for long-term human attended space missions are under serious study throughout NASA. The KSC 'breadboard' project has focused on biomass production using higher plants for atmospheric regeneration and food production in a special biomass production chamber. This chamber is designed to provide information on food crop growth rate, contaminants in the chamber that alter plant growth requirements for atmospheric regeneration, carbon dioxide consumption, oxygen production, and water utilization. The shape and size, mass, and energy requirements in relation to the overall integrity of the biomass production chamber are under constant study.

  18. Precision Radio Frequency Anechoic Chamber Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs measurements and calibration of antennas for satellites and aircraft or groundbased systems. The chamber is primarily used for optimizing antenna...

  19. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.; Hayes, K.; Hoard, C.; Hower, N.; Hutchinson, D.; Jaros, J.A.; Koetke, D.; Kowalski, L.A.

    1989-03-01

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 {mu}m spatial resolution and <1000 {mu}m track-pair resolution in pressurized CO{sub 2} gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO{sub 2} mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Micro acoustic resonant chambers for heating/agitating/mixing (MARCHAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Noell, Aaron C.; Fisher, Anita M.; Takano, Nobuyuki; Grunthaner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A variety of applications require the mixing and/or heating of a slurry made from a powder/fluid mixture. One of these applications, Sub Critical Water Extraction (SCWE), is a process where water and an environmental powder sample (sieved soil, drill cuttings, etc.) are heated in a sealed chamber to temperatures greater than 200 degrees Celsius by allowing the pressure to increase, but without reaching the critical point of water. At these temperatures, the ability of water to extract organics from solid particulate increases drastically. This paper describes the modeling and experimentation on the use of an acoustic resonant chamber which is part of an amino acid detection instrument called Astrobionibbler [Noell et al. 2014, 2015]. In this instrument we use acoustics to excite a fluid- solid fines mixture in different frequency/amplitude regimes to accomplish a variety of sample processing tasks. Driving the acoustic resonant chamber at lower frequencies can create circulation patterns in the fluid and mixes the liquid and fines, while driving the chamber at higher frequencies one can agitate the fluid and powder and create a suspension. If one then drives the chamber at high amplitude at resonance heating of the slurry occurs. In the mixing and agitating cell the particle levitation force depends on the relative densities and compressibility's of the particulate and fluid and on the kinetic and potential energy densities associated with the velocity and pressure fields [Glynne-Jones, Boltryk and Hill 2012] in the cell. When heating, the piezoelectric transducer and chamber is driven at high power in resonance where the solid/fines region is modelled as an acoustic transmission line with a large loss component. In this regime, heat is pumped into the solution/fines mixture and rapidly heats the sample. We have modeled the piezoelectric transducer/chamber/ sample using Mason's equivalent circuit. In order to assess the validity of the model we have built and

  1. Determination of relative ion chamber calibration coefficients from depth-ionization measurements in clinical electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-10-01

    A method is presented to obtain ion chamber calibration coefficients relative to secondary standard reference chambers in electron beams using depth-ionization measurements. Results are obtained as a function of depth and average electron energy at depth in 4, 8, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams from the NRC Elekta Precise linac. The PTW Roos, Scanditronix NACP-02, PTW Advanced Markus and NE 2571 ion chambers are investigated. The challenges and limitations of the method are discussed. The proposed method produces useful data at shallow depths. At depths past the reference depth, small shifts in positioning or drifts in the incident beam energy affect the results, thereby providing a built-in test of incident electron energy drifts and/or chamber set-up. Polarity corrections for ion chambers as a function of average electron energy at depth agree with literature data. The proposed method produces results consistent with those obtained using the conventional calibration procedure while gaining much more information about the behavior of the ion chamber with similar data acquisition time. Measurement uncertainties in calibration coefficients obtained with this method are estimated to be less than 0.5%. These results open up the possibility of using depth-ionization measurements to yield chamber ratios which may be suitable for primary standards-level dissemination.

  2. Ionization Chambers for Monitoring in High-Intensity Neutrino Beams

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, J; Velissaris, C; Erwin, A R; Ping, H; Viren, B M; Diwan, M V

    2002-01-01

    Radiation-hard ionization chambers were tested using an intense electron beam from the accelerator test facility (ATF) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The detectors were designed to be used as the basic element for monitoring muons in the Main Injector Neutrino beamline (NuMI) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). Measurements of linearity of response, voltage dependence, and the onset of ionization saturation as a function of gap voltage were performed.

  3. Detailed models for timing and efficiency in resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    2003-01-01

    We discuss detailed models for detector physics processes in Resistive Plate Chambers, in particular including the effect of attachment on the avalanche statistics. In addition, we present analytic formulas for average charges and intrinsic RPC time resolution. Using a Monte Carlo simulation including all the steps from primary ionization to the front-end electronics we discuss the dependence of efficiency and time resolution on parameters like primary ionization, avalanche statistics and threshold.

  4. Iris-fixated anterior chamber phakic intraocular lens for myopia moves posteriorly with mydriasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruysberg, L.P.J.; Doors, M.; Berendschot, T.T.; Brabander, J. De; Webers, C.A.; Nuijts, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To elucidate the physiological characteristics of eyes implanted with iris-fixated anterior chamber phakic intraocular lenses (pIOLs), which are increasingly being used for the correction of higher myopic and hyperopic refractive errors. METHODS: In a case series of 20 patients (39 eyes), t

  5. On the property of measurements with the PTW microLion chamber in continuous beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jonas; Johansson, Erik; Toelli, Heikki [Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, Umea University, SE-901 85 Umea (Sweden); Swedish Defense Research Agency, FOI CBRN Defense and Security, SE-901 82 Umea (Sweden); Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, Umea University, SE-901 85 Umea (Sweden)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The performance of liquid ionization chambers, which may prove to be useful tools in the field of radiation dosimetry, is based on several chamber and liquid specific characteristics. The present work investigates the performance of the PTW microLion liquid ionization chamber with respect to recombination losses and perturbations from ambient electric fields at various dose rates in continuous beams. Methods: In the investigation, experiments were performed using two microLion chambers, containing isooctane (C{sub 8}H{sub 18}) and tetramethylsilane [Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}] as the sensitive media, and a NACP-02 monitor chamber. An initial activity of approximately 250 GBq {sup 18}F was employed as the radiation source in the experiments. The initial dose rate in each measurement series was estimated to 1.0 Gy min{sup -1} by Monte Carlo simulations and the measurements were carried out during the decay of the radioactive source. In the investigation of general recombination losses, employing the two-dose-rate method for continuous beams, the liquid ionization chambers were operated at polarizing voltages 25, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 300 V. Furthermore, measurements were also performed at 500 V polarizing voltage in the investigation of the sensitivity of the microLion chamber to ambient electric fields. Results: The measurement results from the liquid ionization chambers, corrected for general recombination losses according to the two-dose-rate method for continuous beams, had a good agreement with the signal to dose linearity from the NACP-02 monitor chamber for general collection efficiencies above 70%. The results also displayed an agreement with the theoretical collection efficiencies according to the Greening theory, except for the liquid ionization chamber containing isooctane operated at 25 V. At lower dose rates, perturbations from ambient electric fields were found in the microLion chamber measurement results. Due to the perturbations, measurement

  6. Equations of two-phase flow in spray chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新禹; 张志红; 金星; 徐杰

    2009-01-01

    The downstream water-air heat and moisture transfer system in a moving coordinate was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the misted droplets and the spray pressure was determined. Based on the theory of the relative velocity,the two-phase flow mode of the spray chamber and the efficiency equation for heat and moisture exchange were established. Corrections were carried out for the efficiency equation with spray pressure of 157 kPa. The results show that the pressure plays an important part in determining the efficiency of heat and moisture exchange. When the spray pressure is less than 157 kPa,better coincidence is noticed between the theoretical analysis and the test results with the error less than 6%. Greater error will be resulted in the case when the spray pressure is beyond 157 kPa. After the correction treatment,the coincidence between the theoretical and the experimental results is greatly improved.

  7. Source geometry factors for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, D. R.; Sander, T.; Nutbrown, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated 192Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR 192Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, ksg, is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR 192Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR 192Ir Flexisource ksg was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  8. Saturation curves of parallel-plate ionization chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallone, B.G.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    A new analytical expression is presented to describe the full saturation curve of parallel-plate ionization chambers. In contrast to the presently known expressions, which hold only for the near saturation region, this empirically determined expression is in excellent agreement with measurements in the whole collection efficiency range from 0 to 1 for x-ray sources with effective energies from 20 to 150 keV and cobalt-60 gamma rays. The dependence of the ion collection efficiency and the extrapolated electric field, which is a parameter in the new saturation curve expression, on electric field, dose, dose rate, beam quality, and chamber volume, is discussed. The effect of photoemission from the chamber polarizing electrode for low-energy x-ray beams on the saturation current is demonstrated. A universal ionization chamber constant is derived experimentally. It is shown that all parameters of the saturation curve equation and thus the saturation curve itself, can be calculated from one single measurement of ionization current at a given electric field and air gap thickness.

  9. Outcomes of Phacoemulsification with Anterior Chamber Maintainer in Vitrectomized Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Betül Türkoğlu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To evaluate the outcomes of phacoemulsification with anterior chamber maintainer in vitrectomized eyes with complicated cataract. Ma te ri al and Met hod: Twenty eyes of 20 patients who developed complicated cataract after pars plana vitrectomy (PPV were included in the study. Phacoemulsification with clear corneal incision and foldable intraocular lens implantation was performed. In group 1, anterior chamber maintainer (ACM was used during phacoemusification and in group 2, ACM was not used. Pre- and postoperative visual acuities as well as per- and postoperative complications were reviewed retrospectively. Re sults: Anterior chamber maintainer was used during the surgery in 12 (60% cases and was not used in 8 (40% cases. Phacoemulsification was performed 16.5±9.2 (4-40 months after PPV. Best-corrected visual acuities were between hand motions and 0.4 preoperatively and between counting fingers from 1 meter and 1.0 postoperatively in group 1. Best-corrected visual acuities were between hand motions and 0.1 preoperatively and between counting fingers from 1 meter and 0.8 postoperatively in group 2. Posterior capsule was ruptured in 1 eye peroperatively in group 1. In group 2, phacoemulsification was more difficult due to deep anterior chamber in 8 eyes and intraoperative complications were iris sphincter rupture in 1 eye and posterior capsule rupture in 1 eye. Mild corneal edema in 7 (58.3% eyes, fibrin reaction in 2 (16.6%, intraocular lens decentralization in 1 (8.3% and posterior capsule opacification in 4 (33.3% eyes were the postoperative complications in group 1. Mild corneal edema in 5 (62.5% eyes, fibrin reaction in 1 (12.5% and posterior capsule opacification in 2 (25% eyes were the postoperative complications in group 2. Dis cus si on: Complicated cataracts which may develop after PPV can be treated safely with phacoemulsification. Continuous irrigation during the surgery may provide a stable anterior chamber and prevents

  10. [Influence on measurements of pre-irradiation due to differences in ionization chamber shape or frequency in use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimono, Tetsunori; Nambu, Hidekazu; Matsubara, Kosuke; Koshida, Kichiro; Gomi, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Ionization chamber measurements in radiation therapy should be repeatedly performed until a stable reading is obtained. Ionization chambers exhibit a response which depends on time elapsed since the previous irradiation. In this study, we investigated the response of a set of two Farmer-style, one Plane parallel, and seven small ionization chambers, which are exposed to 4, 6, 10, and 14 MV. The results show that Farmer-style and Plane parallel ionization chambers settle quickly within 9-20 min. On the other hand, small ionization chambers exhibit settling times of 12-33 min for 6, 10, and 14 MV. It will take longer for a settling time of 4 MV. The settling time showed time dependent irradiation. The first reading was up to 0.76% lower in the Farmer-style and Plane parallel ionization chambers. The small ionization chambers had a 2.60% lower first reading and more gradual response in reaching a stable reading. In this study, individual ionization chambers can vary significantly in their settling behavior. Variation of the responses on ionization chambers were confirmed not only when radiation was not used for a week but also when it was halted for a month. Pre-irradiation of small ionization chambers is clearly warranted for eliminating inadvertent error in the calibration of radiation beams.

  11. An ionization chamber with magnetic levitated electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Kawaguchi, T

    1999-01-01

    A new type of ionization chamber which has magnetically levitated electrodes has been developed. The electrodes are supplied voltages for the repelling of ions by a battery which is also levitated with the electrodes. The characteristics of this ionization chamber are investigated in this paper.

  12. HVAC&R Equipment Environmental Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:Large "Truck" ChamberThe large "truck" chamber provides controlled air conditions from -7 °C (20 °F) to 65 °C (150 °F).Air-Conditioner and Heat Pump Test...

  13. Supersonic Jet Interactions in a Plenum Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Venugopal

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding thè supersonic jet interactions in a plenum chamber is essential for thè design of hot launch systems. Static tests were conducted in a small-scale rocket motor ioaded with a typical nitramine propellaiit to produce a nozzle exit Mach number of 3. This supersonic jet is made to interact with plenum chambers having both open and closed sides. The distance between thè nozzle exit and thè back piate of plenum chamber are varied from 2. 5 to 7. 0 times thè nozzle exit diameter. The pressure rise in thè plenum chamber was measured using pressure transducers mounted at different locatìons. The pressure-time data were analysed to obtain an insight into thè flow field in thè plenum chamber. The maximum pressure exerted on thè back piate of plenum chamber is about 25-35 per cent. of thè maximum stagnation pressure developed in thè rocket motor. Ten static tests were carried out to obtain thè effect of axial distance between thè nozzle exit and thè plenum chamber back piate, and stagnation pressure in thè rocket motoron thè flow field in thè open-sided and closed-sided plenum chambers configurations.

  14. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber. (a) Identification. An anaerobic chamber is a device intended for medical purposes to maintain an anaerobic...

  15. ME1/1 Cathode Strip Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Erchov, Yu V; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Khabarov, Serguei; Moissenz, P V; Moissenz, K P; Movchan, Sergey; Perelygin, Victor; Vassiliev, S E; Zarubin, Anatoli; Tchekhovski, V A

    2008-01-01

    The 76 innermost ME1/1 cathode strip chambers (CSC) of the CMS Experiment were designed and produced in Dubna. The chambers have been installed in the detector and commissioning has been completed. This paper describes the design of the CSCs, their main mechanical parameters and read-out electronics, and the results of tests with cosmic-ray muons.

  16. Results from the MAC Vertex chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-05-01

    The design, construction, and performance characteristics of a high precision gaseous drift chamber made of thin walled proportional tubes are described. The device achieved an average spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m in use for physics analysis with the MAC detector. The B-lifetime result obtained with this chamber is discussed.

  17. Raymond J. Chambers--A Personal Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffikin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper is presented as a tribute to Raymond J. Chambers. As its title suggests, it is a personal reflection through the eyes of someone who worked closely with him over a period of 10 years during a latter part of his career, and who completed a doctoral thesis with aspects of the work of Chambers as its subject. During this time, author…

  18. Destabilization analysis of overlapping underground chambers induced by blasting vibration with catastrophe theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Chang-bin; XU Guo-yuan; ZUO Yu-jun

    2006-01-01

    According to the main characters of overlapping underground chambers, the roof (floor) of two adjacent underground chambers is simplified to the mechanical model that is the beam with build-in ends. And vibration load due to blasting is simplified to harmonic wave. The catastrophic model of double cusp for underground chambers destabilization induced by blasting vibration has been established under the circumstances of considering deadweight of the beam, and the condition of destabilization has been worked out. The critical safety thickness of the roof (floor) of underground chambers has been confirmed according to the destabilization condition. The influence of amplitude and frequency of blasting vibration load on the critical safety thickness has been analyzed, and the quantitative relation between velocity, frequency of blasting vibration and critical safety thickness has been determined. Research results show that the destabilization of underground chambers is not only dependent on the amplitude and frequency of blasting vibration load, but also related to deadweight load and intrinsic attribute. It is accordant to testing results and some related latest research results of blasting seismic effect. With increasing amplitude, the critical safety thickness of underground chambers decreases gradually. And the possibility of underground chambers destabilization increases. When the frequency of blasting vibration is equal to or very close to the frequency of beam, resonance effect will take place in the system. Then the critical safety thickness will turn to zero, underground chambers will be damaged severely, and its loading capacity will lose on the whole.

  19. Correction for near vision in pseudophakic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dujić Mirjana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study was to show the mean values of correction for near vision and to discuss the presbyopic correction in pseudophakic patients. Setting was the Eye department where authors work. Inclusion criteria for 55 patients were native or corrected distant vision of 0.8-1.0 on Snellen's chart; 0,6 on Jagger's chart for near vision; round pupil and good position of the implant. Biometry of the anterior chamber depth with Alcon biophysics during distant and near vision was performed in our study. „Hi square" test was carried out and it was concluded that patients younger than 59 years (41 eyes had median correction of +2.0 dsph, while patients older than 60 years (36 eyes had correction of+3.0 dsph, but it was not statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference of the correction between pseudophakic (41 and phakic (19 eyes in patients younger than 59 years. The anterior movement of the IOL was 0.18 mm in the younger group and 0.15 mm in the older group. With good IOL movement and new materials which could have changeable refractive power, the problem of pseudophakic correction for near vision might be solved.

  20. The SAMURAI Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Steven

    2011-10-01

    The SAMURAI Time Projection Chamber (TPC) will be used to study particle collisions by colliding a beam of particles with a stationary gas which will be contained in a field cage inside the TPC. When the beam collides with the gas, charged particles are accelerated into the pad plane by an electric field. The paths of these particles will be curved by a magnetic field created by the SAMURAI magnet at the RIKEN facility in Japan. The charged particles will then collide with the pad plane which will be located on the bottom of the TPC. The pad plane will take these collisions and create electrical signals and send them to supporting electronics where the data can be interpreted. The TPC will be used to help determine the Equation of State for asymmetric nuclear matter. Measurements of neutron, proton, 3H and 3He flow will be taken with the NEBULA array which consists of nebula scintillators. The poster will contain information on the laser calibration system and the electronics that will be used for the TPC. The electronics used are the same electronics used in the STAR TPC experiment.

  1. The CAST time projection chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autiero, D.; Beltrán, B.; Carmona, J. M.; Cebrián, S.; Chesi, E.; Davenport, M.; Delattre, M.; Di Lella, L.; Formenti, F.; Irastorza, I. G.; Gómez, H.; Hasinoff, M.; Lakic, B.; Luzón, G.; Morales, J.; Musa, L.; Ortiz, A.; Placci, A.; Rodrigurez, A.; Ruz, J.; Villar, J. A.; Zioutas, K.

    2007-06-01

    One of the three x-ray detectors of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment searching for solar axions is a time projection chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) as a readout structure. Its design has been optimized to provide high sensitivity to the detection of the low intensity x-ray signal expected in the CAST experiment. A low hardware threshold of 0.8 keV is set to a safe level during normal data taking periods, and the overall efficiency for the detection of photons coming from conversion of solar axions is 62%. Shielding has been installed around the detector, lowering the background level to 4.10 × 10-5 counts cm-2 s-1 keV-1 between 1 and 10 keV. During phase I of the CAST experiment the TPC has provided robust and stable operation, thus contributing with a competitive result to the overall CAST limit on axion photon coupling and mass.

  2. ALEPH Time Projection Chamber (TPC)

    CERN Multimedia

    ALEPH was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The detector was used by a collaboration of hundreds of physicists, mostly from Europe but also from China and the USA. The ALEPH superconducting magnet coils provide a very uniform magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. The current in the coil is about 5000 A and the stored energy is 136 MJ. The coils are cooled by liquid Helium. Two correction coils serve to improve the uniformity of the field.

  3. Self-attraction effect and correction on the T-1 absolute gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Hu, H.; Wu, K.; Li, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    The self-attraction effect (SAE) in an absolute gravimeter is a kind of systematic error due to the gravitation of the instrument to the falling object. This effect depends on the mass distribution of the gravimeter, and is estimated to be a few microgals (1 μGal  =  10-8 m s-2) for the FG5 gravimeter. In this paper, the SAE of a home-made T-1 absolute gravimeter is analyzed and calculated. Most of the stationary components, including the dropping chamber, the laser interferometer, the vibration isolation device and two tripods, are finely modelled, and the related SAEs are computed. In addition, the SAE of the co-falling carriage inside the dropping chamber is carefully calculated because the distance between the falling object and the co-falling carriage varies during the measurement. In order to get the correction of the SAE, two different methods are compared. One is to linearize the SAE curve, the other one is to calculate the perturbed trajectory. The results from these two methods agree with each other within 0.01 μGal. With an uncertainty analysis, the correction of the SAE of the T-1 gravimeter is estimated to be (-1.9  ±  0.1) μGal.

  4. Dosimetry of Cobalt 60 Gamma Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Upadhyay

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Ferrous sulphate-benzoic acid-xylen(tl orange (FBX dosimetric system is linear in the range fl|0m 0.01 Gy to 10 Gy and can be used in the case of a nuclear accident, for documenting clinical doses in total-body irradiations in radiation therapy as well as for measuring daily radiation dose during external beam therapy because of its tissue-equivallency. FBX system is stable up to 15 days in the range 15 - 60 degree centigrade. It is independent of photon energy up to 3 ke V and is fairly dose rate in dependent in the range from 0.01 to 2.5 Gy/min. Besides its use in radiation therapy, external beam therapy and nuclear accidents, the present study shows that this dosimeter can be effectively used for determining positional variation inside the gamma chamber. This has been detected by placing dosimetric solutions in small bottles kept in two racks of the phantom in a symmetrical fashion. Average variations in two tracks were found to be 2.74 per cent, 0.33 per cent, 4 per cent and 4.83 per cent.

  5. Free-air ionization chamber, FAC-IR-300, designed for medium energy X-ray dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2017-01-01

    The primary standard for X-ray photons is based on parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber (FAC). Therefore, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) is tried to design and build the free-air ionization chamber, FAC-IR-300, for low and medium energy X-ray dosimetry. The main aim of the present work is to investigate specification of the FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber and design it. FAC-IR-300 dosimeter is composed of two parallel plates, a high voltage (HV) plate and a collector plate, along with a guard electrode that surrounds the collector plate. The guard plate and the collector were separated by an air gap. For obtaining uniformity in the electric field distribution, a group of guard strips was used around the ionization chamber. These characterizations involve determining the exact dimensions of the ionization chamber by using Monte Carlo simulation and introducing correction factors.

  6. Source self-attenuation in ionization chamber measurements of (57)Co solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cessna, Jeffrey T; Golas, Daniel B; Bergeron, Denis E

    2016-03-01

    Source self-attenuation for solutions of (57)Co of varying density and carrier concentration was measured in nine re-entrant ionization chambers maintained at NIST. The magnitude of the attenuation must be investigated to determine whether a correction is necessary in the determination of the activity of a source that differs in composition from the source used to calibrate the ionization chamber. At our institute, corrections are currently made in the measurement of (144)Ce, (109)Cd, (67)Ga, (195)Au, (166)Ho, (177)Lu, and (153)Sm. This work presents the methods used as recently applied to (57)Co. A range of corrections up to 1% were calculated for dilute to concentrated HCl at routinely used carrier concentrations.

  7. Note: A single-chamber tool for plasma activation and surface functionalization in microfabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Adam J.; Scherrer, Joseph R.; Reiserer, Ronald S., E-mail: ron.reiserer@vanderbilt.edu [Vanderbilt Institute for Integrative Biosystems Research and Education and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present a simple apparatus for improved surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices. A single treatment chamber for plasma activation and chemical/physical vapor deposition steps minimizes the time-dependent degradation of surface activation that is inherent in multi-chamber techniques. Contamination and deposition irregularities are also minimized by conducting plasma activation and treatment phases in the same vacuum environment. An inductively coupled plasma driver allows for interchangeable treatment chambers. Atomic force microscopy confirms that silane deposition on PDMS gives much better surface quality than standard deposition methods, which yield a higher local roughness and pronounced irregularities in the surface.

  8. Constructal approach to bio-engineering: the ocular anterior chamber temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto; Grisolia, Giulia; Dolcino, Daniela; Astori, Maria Rosa; Massa, Eugenio; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse the pressure inside the eyes anterior chamber, namedintraocular pressure (IOP), in relation to the biomechanical properties of corneas. The approach used was based on the constructal law, recently introduced in vision analysis. Results were expressed as the relation between the temperature of the ocular anterior chamber and the biomechanical properties of the cornea. The IOP, the elastic properties of the cornea, and the related refractive properties of the eye were demonstrated to be dependent on the temperature of the ocular anterior chamber. These results could lead to new perspectives for experimental analysis of the IOP in relation to the properties of the cornea.

  9. Performance of a parallel plate ionization chamber in beta radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, Patricia L.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: patrilan@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    A homemade parallel plate ionization chamber with graphite collecting electrode, and developed for use in mammography beams, was tested in relation to its usefulness in beta radiation dosimetry at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. Characterization tests of this ionization chamber were performed, using the Sr-90 + Y-90, Kr-85 and Pm-147 sources of a beta secondary standard system. The results of saturation, leakage current, stabilization time, response stability, linearity, angular dependence, and calibration coefficients are within the recommended limits of international recommendations that indicate that this chamber may be used for beta radiation dosimetry. (author)

  10. Many-Body Perturbation Theory (MBPT) and Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TD-DFT): MBPT Insights About What Is Missing In, and Corrections To, the TD-DFT Adiabatic Approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, Mark E; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    In their famous paper, Kohn and Sham formulated a formally exact density-functional theory (DFT) for the ground-state energy and density of a system of N interacting electrons, albeit limited at the time by certain troubling representability questions. As no practical exact form of the exchange-correlation (xc) energy functional was known, the xc-functional had to be approximated, ideally by a local or semilocal functional. Nowadays, however, the realization that Nature is not always so nearsighted has driven us up Perdew's Jacob's ladder to find increasingly nonlocal density/wavefunction hybrid functionals. Time-dependent (TD-) DFT is a younger development which allows DFT concepts to be used to describe the temporal evolution of the density in the presence of a perturbing field. Linear response (LR) theory then allows spectra and other information about excited states to be extracted from TD-DFT. Once again the exact TD-DFT xc-functional must be approximated in practical calculations and this has historically been done using the TD-DFT adiabatic approximation (AA) which is to TD-DFT very similar to what the local density approximation (LDA) is to conventional ground-state DFT. Although some of the recent advances in TD-DFT focus on what can be done within the AA, others explore ways around the AA. After giving an overview of DFT, TD-DFT, and LR-TD-DFT, this chapter focuses on many-body corrections to LR-TD-DFT as one way to build hybrid density-functional/wavefunction methodology for incorporating aspects of nonlocality in time not present in the AA.

  11. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Felis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L.

  12. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-06-10

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L).

  13. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  14. Some specific features of ionization chamber calibrations in linac x-ray beams at the LNE-LNHB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, F; Ostrowsky, A

    2007-05-07

    The purpose of this note is to give some details about the modus operandi employed today to calibrate ionization chambers in radiotherapy linac photon beams at the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB). Some specific features are described: first the equipment (including the external monitoring ionization chambers), second the calculations of the profile or radial non-uniformity correction factors (up to 0.5% effect for commonly used ionization chambers) and finally the calculations to get the calibration coefficients for customer beam qualities.

  15. Development and characterization of a graphite-walled ionization chamber as a reference dosimeter for 60Co beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio P.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-11-01

    A graphite-walled ionization chamber with a sensitive volume of 6.4 cm3 was developed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI) to determine the air kerma rate of a 60Co source. This new prototype was developed to be a simple chamber, without significant nongraphite components and with a simple set-up, which allows the determination of its various required correction factors by Monte Carlo simulations. This new ionization chamber was characterized according to the IEC 60731 standard, and all results were obtained within its limits. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulations were undertaken to obtain the correction factors involved with the air kerma determination. The air kerma rate obtained with the graphite-walled ionization chamber was compared with that from the reference dosimeter at the LCI, a PTW ionization chamber (model TN30002). The results obtained showed good agreement within the statistical uncertainties. A graphite ionization chamber was assembled and characterized as a reference dosimeter. The characterization test results were within recommended limits. Monte Carlo simulations were undertaken to obtain the correction factors. The air kerma rate of a 60Co source was obtained with satisfactory results.

  16. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumard, B. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: shumard@phy.anl.gov; Henderson, D.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rehm, K.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Tang, X.D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the ({alpha}, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for ({alpha}, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only ({alpha}, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. x 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the ({alpha}, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the ({alpha}, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  17. 有晶状体眼后房型人工晶状体植入和准分子激光原位角膜磨削术矫正超高度近视的临床评价%Evaluations of Extreme Myopia Correction with Phakic Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lens and Laser in Situ Keratomileusis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈晔; 李毓敏; 王竞

    2004-01-01

    目的:比较和评价有晶状体眼后房型人工晶状体(Phakic Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lens,PPCIOL)植入和准分子激光原位角膜磨削术(Laserin situ Keratomileusis,Lasik)矫正高度近视的有效性、安全性和稳定性.方法:高度近视患者43例,随机分为PPCIOL组和Lasik组,分别行可植入接触镜(Implantable Contact Lens,ICL)植入术和Laisk,随访并比较两组有效性和安全性指数,两年屈光度回退≤2 D的生存率,低对比度视力和眩光视力的改变.结果:PPCIOL组术前平均等效球面屈光度(-16.77±3.37)D(-11.75~-25.75 D);Lasik组术前平均等效球镜度(-13.8±2.71)D(-9.37~-23.75 D).术后1个月两组有效性无统计学差异,PPCIOL组安全性指数高于Lasik组(P<0.001),2 a时屈光度回退率分别为0、32.56%(P<0.001),术后3个月低对比视力和眩光视力PPCIOL组较术前提高比Lasik组明显(P<0.001).PPCIOL组有1例2眼术后6个月时有晶状体前囊混浊,两组未见其他并发症.结论:有晶状体眼后房型人工晶状体植入矫正超高度近视有效,安全性和稳定性较Lasik更好,并能获得良好的视觉质量.

  18. Combustion of Shock-Dispersed Fuels in a Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-23

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30 % of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and - by means of the hot detonation products - energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm3, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum powder, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or sucrose and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in three different chambers of 4-1, 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume. In general, the booster charge was sufficient to initiate burning of the fuel. This modifies the pressure signatures measured with a number of wall gages and increases the quasi-static overpressure level obtained in the chambers. On the one hand the time-scale and the yield of the pressure rise depend on the fuel and its characteristics. On the other hand they also depend on the flow dynamics in the chamber, which is dominated by shock reverberations, and thus on the chamber geometry and volume. The paper gives a survey of the experimental results and discusses the possible influences of some basic parameters.

  19. 30 CFR 77.305 - Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. 77.305 Section 77.305 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY... drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. Drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and all ductwork in which coal dust may accumulate shall be equipped with...

  20. Radiation-induced foil electret chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallone, B. G.; Podgorsak, E. B.

    1983-10-01

    Saturation current densities, extrapolated electric fields, and electret-charging and -discharging current-density profiles in an ionization electret chamber are discussed as a function of various chamber parameters, such as air-gap and polymer thickness, polarizing electrode material, exposure rate, etc. Both the saturation current density and the extrapolated electric field consist of two components; one is linear with the air-gap thickness and is attributed to primary ionization in air, and the other exhibits exponential saturation and is attributed to air ionization caused by photoelectrons backscattered into the chamber sensitive volume from the polarizing electrode.

  1. LEP vacuum chamber, cross-section

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Cross-section of the final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber. The elliptic main-opening is for the beam. The small channel to the left is for the cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchrotron radiation. The square channel to the right houses the Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) pump. The chamber is made from extruded aluminium. Its outside is clad with lead, to stop the synchrotron radiation emitted by the beam. For good adherence between Pb and Al, the Al chamber was coated with a thin layer of Ni. Ni being slightly magnetic, some resulting problems had to be overcome. See also 8301153.

  2. Bubble chamber: Omega production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This image is of real particle tracks taken from the CERN 2 m liquid hydrogen bubble chamber and shows the production and decay of a negative omega particle. A negative kaon enters the chamber which decays into many particles, including a negative omega that travels a short distance before decaying into more particles. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  3. Sample chambers with mother-daughter mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilk, P.A.; Gregorich, K.E.; Hoffman, D.C.

    2001-07-12

    A set of eight stand-alone sample chambers with a common interface were constructed at LBNL for improved detection of alpha and fission decay chains over currently used designs. The stainless steel chambers (see Figure 1 for a schematic and Figure 2 for a photograph of a completed chamber) were constructed to allow for low background detection of a daughter event by removal of the sample following the detection of a parent event. This mother-daughter mode of operation has been utilized successfully with our Merry-go-Round (MG) detection system [Gregorich 1994].

  4. Calibration of the borated ion chamber at NIST reactor thermal column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Hertel, N E; Lennox, A

    2007-01-01

    In boron neutron capture therapy and boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy, the absorbed dose of tissue due to the boron neutron capture reaction is difficult to measure directly. This dose can be computed from the measured thermal neutron fluence rate and the (10)B concentration at the site of interest. A borated tissue-equivalent (TE) ion chamber can be used to directly measure the boron dose in a phantom under irradiation by a neutron beam. Fermilab has two Exradin 0.5 cm(3) Spokas thimble TE ion chambers, one loaded with boron, available for such measurements. At the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility, these ion chambers are generally used with air as the filling gas. Since alpha particles and lithium ions from the (10)B(n,alpha)(7)Li reactions have very short ranges in air, the Bragg-Gray principle may not be satisfied for the borated TE ion chamber. A calibration method is described in this paper for the determination of boron capture dose using paired ion chambers. The two TE ion chambers were calibrated in the thermal column of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor. The borated TE ion chamber is loaded with 1,000 ppm of natural boron (184 ppm of (10)B). The NIST thermal column has a cadmium ratio of greater than 400 as determined by gold activation. The thermal neutron fluence rate during the calibration was determined using a NIST fission chamber to an accuracy of 5.1%. The chambers were calibrated at two different thermal neutron fluence rates: 5.11 x 10(6) and 4.46 x 10(7)n cm(-2) s(-1). The non-borated ion chamber reading was used to subtract collected charge not due to boron neutron capture reactions. An optically thick lithium slab was used to attenuate the thermal neutrons from the neutron beam port so the responses of the chambers could be corrected for fast neutrons and gamma rays in the beam. The calibration factor of the borated ion chamber was determined to be 1.83 x 10(9) +/- 5.5% (+/- 1sigma) n

  5. A comparative study of two types of implantable lenses for correcting high myopia: A posterior chamber phakic refractive lens and a collamer lens%两种有晶状体眼后房型人工晶状体矫正高度近视的远期疗效

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆勤义; 廖荣丰; 夏卫东; 喻珺琦; 夏春丽; 费孝庆

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical efficacy of two types of implantable lenses:a posterior chamber phakic refractive lens (PC-PRL) and a phakic posterior chamber implantable collamer lens (PPC-ICL) in two groups of patients with high myopia.Methods This was a retrospective study.Ninety-eight myopic eyes of 51 high myopia patients were enrolled.Eighteen patients (33 eyes) were implanted with PC-PRLs (PRL group),and the other 33 patients (65 eyes) were implanted with PPC-ICLs (ICL group).Visual acuity,mainfest refraction,intraocular pressure,endothelial cell density,the distance between the posterior surface of the cornea to the lens,and contrast sensitivity (CS) were measured at least 2 years after the surgery.The occurrence of complications was also observed in the patients.An independent samples t test and Wilcoxon rank sum test were used for statistical analysis.Results A comparison of uncorrected visual acuity after surgery between the PRL and ICL groups did not show a significant difference (Z=-1.871,P>0.05).Intraocular pressure was 12.03±2.61 mmHg in the PRL group and 13.35±3.37 mmHg in the ICL group (t=-1.197,P>0.05),while endothelial cell density was 2 185±516 cells/mm2 in the PRL group and 2 341±405 cells/mm2 in the ICL group (t=-1.168,P>0.05).There was no significant difference in a comparison of the distance between the posterior surface of the cornea to the lens,nor was there a significant difference between the arc height of 0.37±0.15 mm in the PRL group and 0.41±0.17 mm in the ICL group (t=-1.120,P>0.05).In addition,there was no significant difference in CS at all spatial frequencies.In terms of complications,in the PRL group,the lens deviated in 1 patient (1 eye) and cataract developed in 1 patient (1 eye); in the ICL group,a cataract developed in 1 patient (2 eyes) and posterior surface artificial crystals came in contact with the anterior surface of the lens which added to the opacity of the anterior capsule in 1 patient (2 eyes

  6. RADAR Anechoic Chamber/RCS Measurements Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The RF Anechoic Chamber is 56 feet long by 12 feet high by 13.5 feet wide, with an adjoining electronic computer control room. A double door entrance at one end of...

  7. Developing cloud chambers with high school students

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    2013-01-01

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry ice free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical detail of the chamber is presented. We also argue how the project affects student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project had been done in very similar way to those of professional researchers, i.e., planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we learn that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  8. MAN-IN-SIMULANT TEST (MIST) CHAMBER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The MIST chamber uses methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) vapor as a simulant for HD agent to conduct system level evaluations of chemical protective ensembles....

  9. High Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMTC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a High-Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMRE) to meet the demands of advanced chemical propulsion systems for deep-space mission...

  10. Developing Cloud Chambers with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Tan, Nobuaki; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry-ice-free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical details of the chamber are described. We also argue how the project have affected student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project has taken steps of professional researchers, i.e., in planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we have learnt that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  11. Electrostatic fields in an ionization chamber electret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallone, B. G.; Podgorsak, E. B.

    1983-09-01

    The theory of linear systems is used to derive the potential and electric field in distance space in a cylindrical polarization/depolarization electret chamber. General solutions for the near, intermediate, and far regions are given and their domains of convergence discussed. On the axis of the chamber the solutions for the electret surface are equal to those obtained from Gauss's and Kirchoff's laws, and at large distances from the surface to those obtained from the introduction of a dipole layer model.

  12. The drift chambers of the NOMAD experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anfreville, M.; Astier, P.; Authier, M.; Baldisseri, A.; Banner, M.; Besson, N.; Bouchez, J.; Castera, A.; Cloue, O.; Dumarchez, J. E-mail: jacques.dumarchez@cern.ch; Dumps, L.; Gangler, E.; Gosset, J.; Hagner, C.; Jollec, C.; Lachaud, C.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Meyer, J.-P.; Ouriet, J.-P.; Passerieux, J.-P.; Margaley, T.P.T. Pedrol; Placci, A.; Pluquet, A.; Poinsignon, J.; Popov, B.A.; Rathouit, P.; Schahmaneche, K.; Stolarczyk, T.; Uros, V.; Vannucci, F.; Vo, M.K.; Zaccone, H

    2002-04-01

    We present a detailed description of the drift chambers used as an active target and a tracking device in the NOMAD experiment at CERN. The main characteristics of these chambers are a large area (3{center_dot}3 m{sup 2}), a self-supporting structure made of light composite materials and a low cost. A spatial resolution of 150 {mu}m has been achieved with a single hit efficiency of 97%.

  13. The Gargamelle heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    This image shows the Gargamelle heavy liquid bubble chamber. It was used to detect particles in experiments at the PS between 1970 and 1976 before being moved to the SPS. In 1973, while working on the PS, it detected the first neutral current, an interaction vital to the electroweak theory. In 1978 a large fissure appeared in the body of the chamber and Gargamelle was stopped in 1979.

  14. The world's largest time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Peter Glassel, the technical coordinator for the ALICE time projection chamber, is seen sitting inside the detector; the largest in the world at nearly 100 cubic metres. Thousands of wires are connected to read out electronic data produced as particles are created in lead-lead collisions at the centre of the detector. These particles will cause the medium within the time projection chamber to ionise along their tracks allowing the particle paths to be recreated.

  15. Tracking with wire chambers at high luminosities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, G.G. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (USA) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Radiation damage and rate limitations impose severe constraints on wire chambers at the SSC. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems that satisfy these constraints are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Using a ceramic chamber in kicker magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S.

    1993-05-01

    A ceramic chamber inside kicker magnets can provide the relevant field risetime. On the other hand, some metallic coating inside has to prevent static charge buildup and shield the beam from ceramic and ferrite at high frequencies to avoid possible resonances. The issues concerning the metallized ceramic chamber, such as coupling impedances and requirements on the coating, are studied to find a compromise solution for kickers of the Medium Energy Booster at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  17. Long term response stability of a well-type ionization chamber used in calibration of high dose rate brachytherapy sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Well-type ionization chamber is often used to measure strength of brachytherapy sources. This study aims to check long term response stability of High Dose Rate (HDR -1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR of a reference 137 Cs brachytherapy source and recommend an optimum frequency of recalibration. An HDR-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber, a reference 137 Cs brachytherapy source (CDCSJ5, and a MAX-4000 electrometer were used in this study. The HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was calibrated in terms of reference air kerma rate by the Standards Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, Vienna. The response of the chamber was verified at regular intervals over a period of eight years using the reference 137 Cs source. All required correction factors were applied in the calculation of the RAKR of the 137 Cs source. This study reveals that the response of the HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was well within ±0.5% for about three years after calibration/recalibration. However, it shows deviations larger than ±0.5% after three years of calibration/recalibration and the maximum variation in response of the chamber during an eight year period was 1.71%. The optimum frequency of recalibration of a high dose rate well-type chamber should be three years.

  18. Long term response stability of a well-type ionization chamber used in calibration of high dose rate brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandana, S; Sharma, S D

    2010-04-01

    Well-type ionization chamber is often used to measure strength of brachytherapy sources. This study aims to check long term response stability of High Dose Rate (HDR)-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of a reference (137)Cs brachytherapy source and recommend an optimum frequency of recalibration. An HDR-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber, a reference (137)Cs brachytherapy source (CDCSJ5), and a MAX-4000 electrometer were used in this study. The HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was calibrated in terms of reference air kerma rate by the Standards Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna. The response of the chamber was verified at regular intervals over a period of eight years using the reference (137)Cs source. All required correction factors were applied in the calculation of the RAKR of the (137)Cs source. This study reveals that the response of the HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was well within +/-0.5% for about three years after calibration/recalibration. However, it shows deviations larger than +/-0.5% after three years of calibration/recalibration and the maximum variation in response of the chamber during an eight year period was 1.71%. The optimum frequency of recalibration of a high dose rate well-type chamber should be three years.

  19. Optical advantages of astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, De Wet; Schöttl, Peter; Bern, Gregor; Heimsath, Anna; Nitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats adapt their shape in dependence of the incidence angle of the sun on the heliostat. Simulations show that this optical correction leads to a higher concentration ratio at the target and thus in a decrease in required receiver aperture in particular for smaller heliostat fields.

  20. In vitro penetration of bleaching agents into the pulp chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Valera, M C; Mancini, M N G

    2004-01-01

    To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures.......To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures....

  1. Expandable Purge Chambers Would Protect Cryogenic Fittings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ivan I., III

    2004-01-01

    Expandable ice-prevention and cleanliness-preservation (EIP-CP) chambers have been proposed to prevent the accumulation of ice or airborne particles on quick-disconnect (QD) fittings, or on ducts or tubes that contain cryogenic fluids. In the original application for which the EIP-CP chambers were conceived, there is a requirement to be able to disconnect and reconnect the QD fittings in rapid succession. If ice were to form on the fittings by condensation and freezing of airborne water vapor on the cold fitting surfaces, the ice could interfere with proper mating of the fittings, making it necessary to wait an unacceptably long time for the ice to thaw before attempting reconnection. By keeping water vapor away from the cold fitting surfaces, the EIP-CP chambers would prevent accumulation of ice, preserving the ability to reconnect as soon as required. Basically, the role of an EIP-CP chamber would be to serve as an enclosure for a flow of dry nitrogen gas that would keep ambient air away from QD cryogenic fittings. An EIP-CP chamber would be an inflatable device made of a fabriclike material. The chamber would be attached to an umbilical plate holding a cryogenic QD fitting.

  2. Temperature Studies for ATLAS MDT BOS Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Engl, A; Hertenberger, R; Mameghani, R; Merkl, D; Rauscher, F; Schaile, A D; Ströhmer, R

    2009-01-01

    Data sets with high statistics taken at the cosmic ray facility, equipped with 3 ATLAS BOS MDT chambers, in Garching (Munich) have been used to study temperature and pressure effects on gas gain and drifttime. The deformation of a thermally expanded chamber was reconstructed using the internal RasNik alignment monitoring system and the tracks from cosmic data. For these studies a heating system was designed to increase the temperature of the middle chamber by up to 20 Kelvins over room temperature. For comparison the temperature effects on gas properties have been simulated with Garfield. The maximum drifttime decreased under temperature raise by -2.21 +- 0.08 ns/K, in agreement with the results of pressure variations and the Garfield simulation. The increased temperatures led to a linear increase of the gas gain of about 2.1% 1/K. The chamber deformation has been analyzed with the help of reconstructed tracks. By the comparison of the tracks through the reference chambers with these through the test chamber ...

  3. The GODDESS ionization chamber: developing robust windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Rose; Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Pain, Steven; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Goddess Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Reaction studies of nuclei far from stability require high-efficiency arrays of detectors and the ability to identify beam-like particles, especially when the beam is a cocktail beam. The Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) is made up of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors for charged particles inside of the gamma-ray detector array Gammasphere. A high-rate ionization chamber is being developed to identify beam-like particles. Consisting of twenty-one alternating anode and cathode grids, the ionization chamber sits downstream of the target chamber and is used to measure the energy loss of recoiling ions. A critical component of the system is a thin and robust mylar window which serves to separate the gas-filled ionization chamber from the vacuum of the target chamber with minimal energy loss. After construction, windows were tested to assure that they would not break below the required pressure, causing harm to the wire grids. This presentation will summarize the status of the ionization chamber and the results of the first tests with beams. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  4. Chamber for Growing and Observing Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Molina, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    A chamber has been designed to enable growth and observation of microcolonies of fungi in isolation from the external environment. Unlike prior fungus-growing apparatuses, this chamber makes it possible to examine a fungus culture without disrupting it. Partly resembling a small picture frame, the chamber includes a metal plate having a rectangular through-thethickness opening with recesses for a top and a bottom cover glass, an inlet for air, and an inlet for water. The bottom cover glass is put in place and held there by clips, then a block of nutrient medium and a moisture pad are placed in the opening. The block is inoculated, then the top cover glass is put in place and held there by clips. Once growth is evident, the chamber can be sealed with tape. Little (if any) water evaporates past the edges of the cover glasses, and, hence there is little (if any) need to add water. A microscope can be used to observe the culture through either cover glass. Because the culture is sealed in the chamber, it is safe to examine the culture without risking contamination. The chamber can be sterilized and reused.

  5. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhilin; Chang, Ruiming; Mu, Long; Song, Guoyang; Wang, Heyi; Wu, Guanyin; Wei, Xiye

    2010-07-01

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of beta particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7x10(5) Bq/m(3).

  6. Techniques developed for the ATLAS Thin Gap Chambers mass production in Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, S; Ishii, K; Iwasaki, H; Arataki, Y; Bando, T; Homma, Y; Ishino, M; Kondo, T; Kobayashi, T; Kurashige, H; Mikenberg, G; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, Y; Nanjo, H; Ikeno, M; Nozaki, M; Ochi, A; Sasaki, O; Shoa, M; Sugimoto, T; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Yokoyama, C

    2004-01-01

    The Thin Gap Chambers (TGCs) are used for the muon trigger system in the end-cap regions of the ATLAS detector. The TGC mass production phase at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) started in January 2001. As the anode-cathode distance is small, 1.4 mm, chamber flatness is essential to achieve a uniform gas gain over the chamber. In order to perform a stable production with high quality we developed a chamber closing system. When we glue two half-chambers together, we sandwich them between a granite table and an aluminum honeycomb panel to keep the chamber flat from both sides. By using silk screens, we control the quantity of epoxy adhesive that affects the chamber thickness. Due to these developments, we can achieve the flatness of less than 100 µm. Uniformity of detection efficiency of the TGC is measured with a cosmic-ray test bench at Kobe University. So far we have tested 300 TGCs. Position dependence of the efficiency is measured with a granularity of 5mm-by-5mm. The average efficiency...

  7. Development of mass-production technique of the ATLAS thin gap chamber in Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, S; Ishii, K; Iwasaki, H; Arataki, Y; Bando, T; Homma, Y; Ishino, M; Kondo, T; Kobayashi, T; Kurashige, H; Mikenberg, G; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, Y; Nanjo, H; Ikeno, M; Nozaki, M; Ochi, A; Sasaki, O; Shoa, M; Sugimoto, T; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Yokoyama, C

    2004-01-01

    The thin gap chambers (TGCs) are used for the muon trigger system in the end-cap regions of the ATLAS detector. As the anode-cathode distance is small, 1.4 mm, chamber flatness is essential to achieve a uniform gas gain over the chamber. The TGC mass production phase at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) started in January 2001. In order to perform a stable production with high quality we developed a chamber closing system. When we glue two half- chambers together, we sandwich them with a granite table and an aluminum honeycomb panel that keep the chamber flat from both sides. By using silk screens, we also control the quantity of epoxy adhesive that affects the chamber thickness. Owing to these developments, we can achieve the flatness of less than 100 mu m. Uniformity of detection efficiency of the TGC is measured with a cosmic-ray test bench at Kobe University. We have tested 300 TGCs so far. Position dependence of the efficiency is measured with a granularity of 5 mm- by-5 mm. The average...

  8. Local Correction of Boolean Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Alon, Noga

    2011-01-01

    A Boolean function f over n variables is said to be q-locally correctable if, given a black-box access to a function g which is "close" to an isomorphism f_sigma of f, we can compute f_sigma(x) for any x in Z_2^n with good probability using q queries to g. We observe that any k-junta, that is, any function which depends only on k of its input variables, is O(2^k)-locally correctable. Moreover, we show that there are examples where this is essentially best possible, and locally correcting some k-juntas requires a number of queries which is exponential in k. These examples, however, are far from being typical, and indeed we prove that for almost every k-junta, O(k log k) queries suffice.

  9. SU-E-T-561: Development of Depth Dose Measurement Technique Using the Multilayer Ionization Chamber for Spot Scanning Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayanagi, T; Fujitaka, S; Umezawa, M [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Ito, Y; Nakashima, C; Matsuda, K [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Works, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a measurement technique which suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and with a water phantom. Methods: The developed technique multiplies the raw MLIC data by a correction factor that depends on the initial beam range and water equivalent depth. The correction factor is derived based on a Bragg curve calculation formula considering range straggling and fluence loss caused by nuclear reactions. Furthermore, the correction factor is adjusted based on several integrated depth doses measured with a water phantom and the MLIC. The measured depth dose profiles along the central axis of the proton field with a nominal field size of 10 by 10 cm were compared between the MLIC using the new technique and the water phantom. The spread out Bragg peak was 20 cm for fields with a range of 30.6 cm and 6.9 cm. Raw MLIC data were obtained with each energy layer, and integrated after multiplying by the correction factor. The measurements were performed by a spot scanning nozzle at Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Japan. Results: The profile measured with the MLIC using the new technique is consistent with that of the water phantom. Moreover, 97% of the points passed the 1% dose /1mm distance agreement criterion of the gamma index. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the new technique suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with the MLIC and with the water phantom. It was concluded that this technique is useful for depth dose measurement in proton spot scanning method.

  10. Improvement of time resolution in large area single gap Resistive Plate Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, A. D.; Majumder, G.; Mondal, N. K.; Pathaleswar; Satyanarayana, B.

    2017-02-01

    The intrinsic gain of a single gap Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) is affected by several factors, e.g., variation in the thicknesses of glass electrode, button and side spacer, different composition of gas due to improper flow, leaks in the detector volume, etc. The position dependent gain is one of the dominant components of the time resolution of a large area single gap RPC. Besides, strip multiplicity as well as lateral position of the trajectory of the charged particle in RPC strip also result in variation of timing information. The observation of large signals produced by the charged particles passing close to the button spacers also has some repercussion on the overall timing resolution of an RPC. A new offline correction technique to achieve time resolution below 1 ns is reported in this paper. This technique is validated using an RPC cosmic ray telescope (1 × 1m2) at TIFR. We also suggest a few alternative solutions to improve the time resolution during the operational phase of the INO-ICAL experiment. The techniques presented here are useful not only for ICAL, but also for any detector deploying RPCs in large scale.

  11. Buildings Research using Infrared Imaging Radiometers with Laboratory Thermal Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Brent; Arasteh, Dariush

    1999-01-12

    Infrared thermal imagers are used at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to study heat transfer through components of building thermal envelopes. Two thermal chambers maintain steady-state heat flow through test specimens under environmental conditions for winter heating design. Infrared thermography is used to map surface temperatures on the specimens' warm side. Features of the quantitative thermography process include use of external reference emitters, complex background corrections, and spatial location markers. Typical uncertainties in the data are {+-} 0.5 C and 3 mm. Temperature controlled and directly measured external reference emitters are used to correct data from each thermal image. Complex background corrections use arrays of values for background thermal radiation in calculating temperatures of self-viewing surfaces. Temperature results are used to validate computer programs that predict heat flow including Finite-Element Analysis (FEA) conduction simulations and conjugate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. Results are also used to study natural convection surface heat transfer. Example data show the distribution of temperatures down the center line of an insulated window.

  12. NWS Corrections to Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Form B-14 is the National Weather Service form entitled 'Notice of Corrections to Weather Records.' The forms are used to make corrections to observations on forms...

  13. Error Correction in Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dr. Grace Zhang

    2000-01-01

    Error correction is an important issue in foreign language acquisition. This paper investigates how students feel about the way in which error correction should take place in a Chinese-as-a foreign-language classroom, based on empirical data of a large scale. The study shows that there is a general consensus that error correction is necessary. In terms of correction strategy, the students preferred a combination of direct and indirect corrections, or a direct only correction. The former choice indicates that students would be happy to take either so long as the correction gets done.Most students didn't mind peer correcting provided it is conducted in a constructive way. More than halfofthe students would feel uncomfortable ifthe same error they make in class is corrected consecutively more than three times. Taking these findings into consideration, we may want to cncourage peer correcting, use a combination of correction strategies (direct only if suitable) and do it in a non-threatening and sensitive way. It is hoped that this study would contribute to the effectiveness of error correction in a Chinese language classroom and it may also have a wider implication on other languages.

  14. Theoretical prediction of stationary positions in the rectangular chamber during asymmetric electroosmotic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Most microscopic cell electrophoretic work depends on the theortical prediction of stationary positions by Smoluchowski and Komagata. Their theoretical solutions are based on the assumption that the electroosmotic flow in a chamber is symmetric. Because experiences with the rectangular chamber indicate that symmetric flow occurs during less than 8% of the experiments, the existing theory for stationary position determination is expanded to include the more general case of asymmetric flow. Smoluchowski's equation for symmetric electroosmotic flow in a rectangular chamber having a width much smaller than its height or length is examined. Smoluchowski's approach is used to approximate stationary positions in rectangular chambers with height/width ratios greater than 40. Support for the theoretical prediction of stationary positions using is given by three types of experimental evidence.

  15. COUPP - a search for dark matter with a continuously sensitive bubble chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collar, Juan,; Crum, Keith; Mishra, Smriti; Nakazawa, Dante; Odom, Brian; Rasmussen, Julia; Riley, Nathan; Szydagis, Matthew; /Chicago U.; Behnke, Ed; Levine, Ilan; Vander Werf, Nate; /Indiana U., South Bend; Cooper, Peter; Crisler, Mike; Hu, Martin; Ramberg, Erik; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Tschirhart, Robert; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    We propose to construct and operate a 60-kg room temperature CF{sub 3}I bubble chamber as a prototype dark matter (WIMP) detector. Operating in weakly-superheated mode, the chamber will be sensitive to WIMP induced nuclear recoils above 10 keV, while rejecting background electron recoils at a level approaching 10{sup 10}. We would first commission and operate this chamber in the MINOS near detector hall with the goal to demonstrate stable operation and measure internal contamination and any other backgrounds. This chamber, or an improved version, would then be relocated to an appropriate deep underground site such as the Soudan Mine. This detector will have unique sensitivity to spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon couplings, and even in this early stage of development will attain competitive sensitivity to spin-independent couplings.

  16. A metal aerosol holding chamber devised for young children with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    1995-01-01

    The low tidal volume and flow in preschool children may reduce the efficiency of aerosol delivery from a pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) through a traditional holding chamber. A prototype small-volume steel holding chamber with two one-way valves was devised to prolong aerosol availability...... children less than 8 yrs of age. In vitro, the half life of aerosol disappearance in the steel prototype and the plastic Nebuhaler was > 30 s and 9 s, respectively. In vivo, the prototype delivered an age-independent mean dose of 38% of the nominal dose, and the Nebuhaler delivered an age-dependent mean...... be achieved by pMDI aerosol inhaled through a small-volume metal holding chamber with separate inlet and outlet valves and minimized dead space. This holding chamber would improve the possibilities of aerosol therapy for young children....

  17. A Global Correction to PPMXL Proper Motions

    CERN Document Server

    Vickers, John J; Grebel, Eva K

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we notice that extragalactic sources seem to have non-zero proper motions in the PPMXL proper motion catalog. We collect a large, all-sky sample of extragalactic objects and fit their reported PPMXL proper motions to an ensemble of spherical harmonics in magnitude shells. A magnitude dependent proper motion correction is thus constructed. This correction is applied to a set of fundamental radio sources, quasars, and is compared to similar corrections to assess its utility. We publish, along with this paper, code which may be used to correct proper motions in the PPMXL catalog over the full sky which have 2 Micron All Sky Survey photometry.

  18. Final report for NIF chamber dynamics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A; Peterson, P F; Scott, J M

    1998-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8 MJ, 192 laser beam facility, will have anticipated fusion yields of up to 20 MJ from D-T pellets encased in a gold hohlraum target. The energy emitted from the target in the form of x rays, neutrons, target debris kinetic energy, and target shrapnel will be contained in a 5 m. radius spherical target chamber. various diagnostics will be stationed around the target at varying distances from the target. During each shot, the target will emit x rays that will vaporize nearby target facing surfaces including those of the diagnostics, the target positioner, and other chamber structures. This ablated vapor will be transported throughout the chamber, and will eventually condense and deposit on surfaces in the chamber, including the final optics debris shields. The research at the University of California at Berkeley relates primarily to the NIF chamber dynamics. The key design issues are the ablation of the chamber structures, transport of the vapor through the chamber and the condensation or deposition processes of those vaporized materials. An understanding of these processes is essential in developing a concept for protecting the fina optics debris shields from an excessive coating (> 10 A) of target debris and ablated material, thereby prolonging their lifetime between change-outs. At Berkeley, we have studied the physical issues of the ablation process and the effects of varying materials, the condensation process of the vaporized material, and design schemes that can lower the threat posed to the debris shields by these processes. The work or portions of the work completed this year have been published in several papers and a dissertation [l-5].

  19. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  20. On gravitational and thermal corrections to vacuum decay

    CERN Document Server

    Salvio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We reconsider gravitational corrections to vacuum decay, confirming and simplifying earlier results and extending them allowing for a non-minimal coupling of the Higgs to gravity, finding that leading-order gravitational corrections suppress the vacuum decay rate. Furthermore, we find minor corrections to thermal vacuum decay in the SM adding one-loop corrections to the Higgs kinetic term, two-loop corrections to the Higgs potential and allowing for time-dependent bounces.

  1. Small field detector correction factors: effects of the flattening filter for Elekta and Varian linear accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Madelaine K; Liu, Paul Z Y; Lee, Christopher; McKenzie, David R; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2016-05-08

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams are becoming the preferred beam type for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), as they enable an increase in dose rate and a decrease in treatment time. This work assesses the effects of the flattening filter on small field output factors for 6 MV beams generated by both Elekta and Varian linear accelerators, and determines differences between detector response in flattened (FF) and FFF beams. Relative output factors were measured with a range of detectors (diodes, ionization cham-bers, radiochromic film, and microDiamond) and referenced to the relative output factors measured with an air core fiber optic dosimeter (FOD), a scintillation dosimeter developed at Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Sydney. Small field correction factors were generated for both FF and FFF beams. Diode measured detector response was compared with a recently published mathematical relation to predict diode response corrections in small fields. The effect of flattening filter removal on detector response was quantified using a ratio of relative detector responses in FFF and FF fields for the same field size. The removal of the flattening filter was found to have a small but measurable effect on ionization chamber response with maximum deviations of less than ± 0.9% across all field sizes measured. Solid-state detectors showed an increased dependence on the flattening filter of up to ± 1.6%. Measured diode response was within ± 1.1% of the published mathematical relation for all fields up to 30 mm, independent of linac type and presence or absence of a flattening filter. For 6 MV beams, detector correction factors between FFF and FF beams are interchangeable for a linac between FF and FFF modes, providing that an additional uncertainty of up to ± 1.6% is accepted.

  2. Investigation of Swirling Flows in Mixing Chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh Jian Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation analyzed the three-dimensional momentum and mass transfer characteristics arising from multiple inlets and a single outlet in micromixing chamber. The chamber consists of a right square prism, an octagonal prism, or a cylinder. Numerical results which were presented in terms of velocity vector plots and concentration distributions indicated that the swirling flows inside the chamber dominate the mixing index. Particle trajectories were utilized to demonstrate the rotational and extensional local flows which produce steady stirring, and the configuration of colored particles at the outlet section expressed at different Re represented the mixing performance qualitatively. The combination of the Taylor dispersion and the vorticity was first introduced and made the mixing successful. The effects of various geometric parameters and Reynolds numbers on the mixing characteristics were investigated. An optimal design of the cylindrical chamber with 4 inlets can be found. At larger Reynolds number, Re>15, more inertia caused the powerful swirling flows in the chamber, and more damping effect on diffusion was diminished, which then increased the mixing performance.

  3. Improved climatic chamber for desiccation simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozada Catalina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The climatic chamber at the Universidad de Los Andes was improved for modeling desiccation in soil layers. This chamber allows the measurement of different environmental variables. In this research, evaporation tests were conducted in water imposing boundary conditions for drying, and then these tests were performed in a soil layer. The soil was prepared from a slurry state and was drying controlling the temperature, the infrared radiation, the wind velocity, and the relative humidity. In the first part of this paper, a description of the climatic chamber, operation ranges and theoretical work principles of the climatic chamber are presented. Then, the second part shows the results for desiccation in water and soil. The desiccation tests performed with the climatic chamber allow simulating all environmental conditions accurately during drying coupling the effect of all environmental variables. As a result, the evaporation rate increases with infrared radiation in soil and water. The rate at the beginning of the desiccation tests in clays is the same as in water. However, this evaporation rate decreases as the soil becomes desiccated.

  4. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  5. Correct Linearization of Einstein's Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Regularly Einstein's equations can be reduced to a wave form (linearly dependent from the second derivatives of the space metric in the absence of gravitation, the space rotation and Christoffel's symbols. As shown here, the origin of the problem is that one uses the general covariant theory of measurement. Here the wave form of Einstein's equations is obtained in the terms of Zelmanov's chronometric invariants (physically observable projections on the observer's time line and spatial section. The obtained equations depend on solely the second derivatives even if gravitation, the space rotation and Christoffel's symbols. The correct linearization proves: the Einstein equations are completely compatible with weak waves of the metric.

  6. High intensity electromagnetic field gerenation using a transportable reverberation chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank

    2008-01-01

    A reverberation chamber can create very high field strength with moderate input power. Existing chambers are making use of a paddle wheel to change the resonant modes in the chamber. A transportable reverberation chamber with vibrating walls will be presented. Inside this Vibrating Intrinsic Reverbe

  7. Ozone deposition to an oat crop ( Avena sativa L.) grown in open-top chambers and in the ambient air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleijel, H.; Wallin, G.; Karlsson, P. E.; Skarby, L.; Sellden, G.

    Fluxes and deposition velocities for ozone were determined for open-top chambers with and without an oat crop, and for the adjacent field, using a resistance analogue model and the aerodynamic wind-profile method, respectively. During a period when the canopy was green and the ambient wind speeds modest, the fluxes and deposition velocities were higher in the chamber with plants than in the field crop. The deposition to chamber walls and soil in the chamber only accounted for part of that difference. The deposition velocity for ozone to the crop was light-dependent both in the chamber with plants and in the ambient air. With increasing plant senescence, the deposition velocity declined and the light dependence disappeared. Fluctuations in deposition velocity superimposed on the overall declining trend followed the same temporal pattern in the chambers with and without plants. These fluctuations in deposition velocity may partly be explained by variations in surface wetness. Differences in boundary layer conductance between chamber and ambient, which under certain conditions may significantly influence the validity of the chamber as a test system, were observed.

  8. Thermal vacuum chamber repressurization with instrument purging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.

    2016-09-01

    At the conclusion of cryogenic vacuum testing of the James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Integrated Science Instrument Module (JWST-OTIS) in NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSCs) thermal vacuum (TV) Chamber A, contamination control (CC) engineers are postulating that chamber particulate material stirred up by the repressurization process may be kept from falling into the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) interior to some degree by activating instrument purge flows over some initial period before opening the chamber valves. This manuscript describes development of a series of models designed to describe this process. The models are strung together in tandem with a fictitious set of conditions to estimate overpressure evolution from which net outflow velocity behavior may be obtained. Creeping flow assumptions are then used to determine the maximum particle size that may be kept suspended above the ISIM aperture, keeping smaller particles from settling within the instrument module.

  9. Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber, details

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Parts of the hydraulic expansion system of the Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber (RCBC). RCBC was the largest of 3 rapid-cycling bubble-chambers (the others were LEBC and HOLEBC), used as target- and vertex-detectors within the European Hybrid Spectrometer (EHS) in the SPS North Area (EHN1). RCBC contained 250 l of liquid hydrogen and was located inside a 3 T superconducting magnet. It was designed for 30 expansions/s (100 times faster than BEBC), the system shown here allowed 50 expansions/s. RCBC operated from 1981 to 1983 for experiments NA21, NA22 and NA23 at a rate of 15 expansions/s, clocking up a total of over 4 million. In the rear, at left, is bearded Lucien Veillet; Augustin Didona is at the right. See also 8001009. The installation of the piston assembly in the RCBC chamber body is shown in the Annual Report 1980, p.65.

  10. Classification of the LHC BLM Ionization Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Stockner, M; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Holzer, E B; Kramer, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system must prevent the super conducting magnets from quenching and protect the machine components from damage. The main monitor type is an ionization chamber. About 4000 of them will be installed around the ring. The lost beam particles initiate hadronic showers through the magnets and other machine components. These shower particles are measured by the monitors installed on the outside of the accelerator equipment. For the calibration of the BLM system the signal response of the ionization chamber is simulated in GEANT4 for all relevant particle types and energies (keV to TeV range). For validation, the simulations are compared to measurements using protons, neutrons, photons and mixed radiation fields at various energies and intensities. This paper will focus on the signal response of the ionization chamber to various particle types and energies including space charge effects at high ionization densities.

  11. Posing the first LEAR vacuum chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    The photo shows one of the four bending magnets of LEAR. They were of C-type with the opening ('mouth') to the outside of the ring (yoke to the inside). Last preparations are made before the vacuum chamber is slid through the mouth into the magnet. Stochastic cooling pickups/kickers were installed inside the chamber. One can distinguish a large number of feed-throughs on the chamber (leading to the pickup/kicker gaps). The free space in the middle of the block was left to offer room for an internal target in the magnet. This possibility was never exploited. Instead it is used here, to accommodate a pumping port for the high vacuum system. Michel Chanel (left) and Pierre Lefevre admire the mechanics at work.

  12. Synchronization of the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Raknessa, G; Wang, D

    2007-01-01

    The synchronization of the trigger and data acquisition systems for the Cathode Strip Chambers (CSCs) in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at CERN is described. The CSC trigger system is designed to trigger CMS on muons with high efficiency (~99% per chamber) and is able to accurately identify its 25ns proton bunch crossing. To date, asynchronous cosmic ray data have been used to define the protocol and to refine timing algorithms, allowing synchronization to be realized within and between chambers to within ±10 ns. Final synchronization of the CSCs requires timing parameters to be accurate to 2 ns. This goal will be readily achieved from the cosmic ray baseline using data taken with the synchronous beam structure of the Large Hadron Collider.

  13. Performance of a Roos ionization chamber in gamma radiation beams ({sup 60}Co)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio P.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Among the different types of dosimetry instruments, the ionization chambers are the most practical and and important radiation measurement devices due to their high sensitivity and relatively constant response within a wide range of energies. A commercial PTW ionization chamber (Roos electron chamber) usually utilized in X-ray beams, was tested to verify the possibility of its dosimetric application in {sup 60}Co beams. The main tests in this work were: short- and long-term stability, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, leakage current and angular dependence. The characterization tests were performed using a Gammatron {sup 60}Co irradiator and a special goniometer made of PMMA. All results were within international recommendations. The reproducibility test presented results within the recommended limit of {+-}1%, and all coefficients of variation observed in the repeatability test were lower than {+-}0.07%. The ion collection efficiency was better than 99.9% for both polarities. For all pairs of polarity evaluated during the saturation test, the polarity effect was lower than the recommended limit. The maximum variation obtained for angular dependence test was only 0.5%. The chamber tested in this work achieved the expected results in the case of all pre-operational tests realized: stability, leakage current, angular dependence, saturation, ion collection and polarity effect. Evaluating the satisfactory results obtained, it is possible to indicate the usefulness of this ionization chamber for dosimetry in {sup 60}Co gamma radiation beams. (author)

  14. Calibration of ionization chambers in IAEA water phantom; Kalibrering av ionekamre i IAEA-vannfantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerke, H.; Mikkelborg, O.

    1995-11-01

    The calibration in a water phantom is realised at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory in Norway. The method is valid for chambers used in high energy radiation therapy. The method, setup and corrections in the calibration are described. The absorbed dose to air calibration factor, N{sub D}, will have an uncertainty of {approx}0.8% (k=1). 15 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Calibration of a pencil ionization chamber with and without preamplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Maia, Ana Figueiredo

    2004-01-01

    The pencil ionization chamber is a cylindrical dosimeter developed for computed tomography beams. Many kinds of ionization chambers have a preamplifier connected to the chamber to make it electrically more stable, specially for field instruments. In this study, the performance of a Victoreen pencil ionization chamber with the original preamplifier and after its removal was compared. The objective of the preamplifier removal was to enable connecting the chamber to other kinds of electromete...

  16. Radiation induced currents in parallel plate ionization chambers: measurement and Monte Carlo simulation for megavoltage photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Seuntjens, Jan P; Verhaegen, Frank; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2006-09-01

    Polarity effects in ionization chambers are caused by a radiation induced current, also known as Compton current, which arises as a charge imbalance due to charge deposition in electrodes of ionization chambers. We used a phantom-embedded extrapolation chamber (PEEC) for measurements of Compton current in megavoltage photon and electron beams. Electron contamination of photon beams and photon contamination of electron beams have a negligible effect on the measured Compton current. To allow for a theoretical understanding of the Compton current produced in the PEEC effect we carried out Monte Carlo calculations with a modified user code, the COMPTON/ EGSnrc. The Monte Carlo calculated COMPTON currents agree well with measured data for both photon and electron beams; the calculated polarity correction factors, on the other hand, do not agree with measurement results. The conclusions reached for the PEEC can be extended to parallel-plate ionization chambers in general.

  17. Ultra-low mass drift chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assiro, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Cappelli, L. [Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale (Italy); Cascella, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento Matematica e Fisica, Università del Salento (Italy); De Lorenzis, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Università del Salento (Italy); Grancagnolo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Ignatov, F. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); L' Erario, A.; Maffezzoli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Università del Salento (Italy); Miccoli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Onorato, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Università G. Marconi, Roma (Italy); Perillo, M. [EnginSoft S.p.a., Trento (Italy); Piacentino, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Università G. Marconi, Roma (Italy); Rella, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Università del Salento (Italy); Rossetti, F. [EnginSoft S.p.a., Trento (Italy); Spedicato, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Tassielli, G., E-mail: giovanni.tassielli@le.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Università G. Marconi, Roma (Italy); and others

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel low mass drift chamber concept, developed in order to fulfill the stringent requirements imposed by the experiments for extremely rare processes, which require high resolutions (order of 100–200 keV/c) for particle momenta in a range (50–100 MeV/c) totally dominated by the multiple scattering contribution. We describe a geometry optimization procedure and a new wiring strategy with a feed-through-less wire anchoring system developed and tested on a drift chamber prototype under completion at INFN-Lecce.

  18. A view inside the Gargamelle bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    Gargamelle was the name given to a big bubble chamber built at the Saclay Laboratory in France during the late 1960s. It was designed principally for the detection at CERN of the elusive particles called neutrinos. A bubble chamber contains a liquid under pressure, which reveals the tracks of electrically charged particles as trails of tiny bubbles when the pressure is reduced. Neutrinos have no charge, and so leave no tracks, but the aim with Gargamelle was "see neutrinos" by making visible any charged particles set in motion by the interaction of neutrinos in the liquid

  19. Cosmic Muon Detector Using Proportional Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Varga, Dezső; Hamar, Gergő; Molnár, Janka Sára; Oláh, Éva; Pázmándi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    A set of classical multi-wire proportional chambers were designed and constructed with the main purpose of efficient cosmic muon detection. These detectors are relatively simple to construct, and at the same time are low cost, making them ideal for educational purposes. The detector layers have efficiencies above 99% for minimum ionizing cosmic muons, and their position resolution is about 1 cm, that is, particle trajectories are clearly observable. Visualization of straight tracks is possible using an LED array, with the discriminated and latched signal driving the display. Due to the exceptional operating stability of the chambers, the design can also be used for cosmic muon telescopes.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Chun [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan County, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tseng-Te, E-mail: huangtt@iner.gov.tw [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan County, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yuan-Hao [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wei-Lin [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Fu [Atomic Energy Council, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Wu, Shu-Wei [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Nievaart, Sander [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Petten (Netherlands); Jiang, Shiang-Huei [Dept. of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary {sup 60}Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations

  1. Consequences of air around an ionization chamber : Are existing solid phantoms suitable for reference dosimetry on an MR-linac?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hackett, S. L.; Van Asselen, B.; Wolthaus, J. W H; Kok, J. G M; Woodings, S. J.; Lagendijk, J. J W; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A protocol for reference dosimetry for the MR-linac is under development. The 1.5 T magnetic field changes the mean path length of electrons in an air-filled ionization chamber but has little effect on the electron trajectories in a surrounding phantom. It is therefore necessary to correct

  2. Diophantine Correct Open Induction

    CERN Document Server

    Raffer, Sidney

    2010-01-01

    We give an induction-free axiom system for diophantine correct open induction. We relate the problem of whether a finitely generated ring of Puiseux polynomials is diophantine correct to a problem about the value-distribution of a tuple of semialgebraic functions with integer arguments. We use this result, and a theorem of Bergelson and Leibman on generalized polynomials, to identify a class of diophantine correct subrings of the field of descending Puiseux series with real coefficients.

  3. Source geometry factors for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, D R; Sander, T; Nutbrown, R F

    2015-03-21

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated (192)Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR (192)Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, k(sg), is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR (192)Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR (192)Ir Flexisource k(sg) was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  4. Performance of a serial-connection multi-chamber piezoelectric micropump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KAN Jun-wu; XUAN Ming; LIU Guo-jun; YANG Zhi-gang; WU Yi-hui

    2005-01-01

    The concept and structure of serial-connection multi-chamber (SCMC) micropumps with cantilever valves is introduced. The SCMC micropump, which can be manufactured using conventional production techniques and materials, has a multi-layer circular planar structure. The border-upon piezoelectric actuators of a SCMC micropump work in anti-phase, as a result the pumping performance is similar to that of several single-chamber pumps running in series. The theoretical analysis shows that the pumping performance of a SCMC micropump depends not only on the characteristic and geometrical parameters of the piezoelectric actuators, but also on the number of pump chambers. Both flowrate and pressure of a SCMC pump can be enhanced to a certain extent. Four piezoelectric micropumps with different chambers were fabricated and tested. The testing results show that the enhancing extents of the flowrate and pressure of a SCMC piezoelectric micropump are different. The maximum flowrate and pressure of the four-chamber pump achieved are 2.5 times and 3.6 times those of the single-chamber pump achieved.

  5. Does scaling or addition provide the correct frequency dependence of β(-ωσ; ω1, ω2) at the correlated level? An investigation for six molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalskov, Erik K.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Oddershede, Jens

    1997-01-01

    The frequency dependent polarizability α(-ωσ; ω1) and the frequency dependent first hyperpolarizability β(-ωσ; ω1, ω2) have been calculated using both self consistent field (SCF) and multiconfigurational SCF (MCSCF) linear and quadratic response functions for six small molecules: BH, CO, HF, H2O...... an underestimation of the frequency dependence if scaling or addition is applied. There does not seem to be a simple way to infer anything about the validity of scaling or addition for β∥ from either the lower lying excitations and their intensities or from the frequency dependence of the dipole polarizability....

  6. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  7. A mathematical model of aerosol holding chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Madsen, J; Berg, E

    1999-01-01

    , Ontario, Canada), NebuChamber (Astra, Södirtälje, Sweden) and Nebuhaler (Astra) adapted for babies. The dose of fluticasone proportionate delivered by the Babyhaler (Glaxco Wellcome, Oxbridge, Middlesex, UK) was 80% of that predicted, probably because of incomplete priming of this spacer. Of the above...

  8. Acoustical-Levitation Chamber for Metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Trinh, E.; Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Sample moved to different positions for heating and quenching. Acoustical levitation chamber selectively excited in fundamental and second-harmonic longitudinal modes to hold sample at one of three stable postions: A, B, or C. Levitated object quickly moved from one of these positions to another by changing modes. Object rapidly quenched at A or C after heating in furnace region at B.

  9. Prototype Vacuum Chamber for ISR Intersection Region

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The vacuum chambers at the ISR interaction region had to be as transparent as possible to the secondary particles emerging from the collision points. Made from stainless steel or titanium, only a fraction of a millimeter thick, they were most delicate to handle.

  10. Multiphysics Nuclear Thermal Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this effort is t o develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical thrust chamber design and analysis. The current task scope is to perform multidimensional, multiphysics analysis of thrust performance and heat transfer analysis for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine including thrust chamber and nozzle. The multiphysics aspects of the model include: real fluid dynamics, chemical reactivity, turbulent flow, and conjugate heat transfer. The model will be designed to identify thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments in all flow paths and materials. This model would then be used to perform non- nuclear reproduction of the flow element failures demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA testing, investigate performance of specific configurations and assess potential issues and enhancements. A two-pronged approach will be employed in this effort: a detailed analysis of a multi-channel, flow-element, and global modeling of the entire thrust chamber assembly with a porosity modeling technique. It is expected that the detailed analysis of a single flow element would provide detailed fluid, thermal, and hydrogen environments for stress analysis, while the global thrust chamber assembly analysis would promote understanding of the effects of hydrogen dissociation and heat transfer on thrust performance. These modeling activities will be validated as much as possible by testing performed by other related efforts.

  11. IKAR, a ionization chamber for WA9

    CERN Document Server

    1976-01-01

    This ionization chamber arrived at CERN from Leningrad for a high precision study of hadron elastic scattering by a CERN-Clermont-Ferrand-Leningrad-Lyon-Uppsala Collaboration in the H3 beam (WA9). G.A. Korolev (third from right) looks at the drawings.

  12. Heat-barrier coatings for combustion chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, H. W.

    1970-01-01

    Arc-plasma-sprayed layered coating of graded Inconel and zirconia protects film-coolant ring below injector plate of rocket engine combustion chamber. Interfacial temperature is designed for minimum buildup of stress and to avoid melting of the metal phase in the graded layers.

  13. Using reverberation chambers for EM measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation chambers (RC) are being used for several decades. The main advantage is the high field strength which can be generated, with only modest power. In the last few years the use of RCs became much popular, for testing multi-path propagation for communication links, or testing the coupling

  14. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Craig L., E-mail: clolson66@msn.com

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  15. Anterior Chamber Live Loa loa: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagmeni, G; Cheuteu, R; Bilong, Y; Wiedemann, P

    2016-01-01

    We reported a case of unusual intraocular Loa loa in a 27-year-old patient who presented with painful red eye. Biomicroscopy revealed a living and active adult worm in the anterior chamber of the right eye. After surgical extraction under local anesthesia, parasitological identification confirmed L. loa filariasis.

  16. Precision electronics for ionization chamber measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santry, D.C.; Bowes, G.C.; Munzenmayer, K.

    1987-01-01

    By using commercially available units, an electrometer and an IBM personal computer, it was relatively inexpensive and simple to assemble a system which permits ..gamma..-ray-emitting radionuclide activities to be measured in an ionization chamber with an uncertainty of + - 0.5% and a reproducibility of + - 0.05%.

  17. Isolation of Drosophila egg chambers for imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an important model for basic research into the molecular mechanisms underlying cell function and development, as well as a major biomedical research tool. A significant advantage of Drosophila is the ability to apply live cell imaging to a variety of living tissues that can be dissected and imaged in vivo, ex vivo, or in vitro. Drosophila egg chambers, for example, have proven to be a useful model system for studying border cell migration, Golgi unit transport, the rapid movement of mRNA and protein particles, and the role of microtubules in meiosis and oocyte differentiation. A crucial first step before imaging is preparation of the experimental material to ensure physiological relevance and to achieve the best conditions for image quality. Early- to mid-stage egg chambers cannot be mounted in an aqueous-based medium, because this causes a change in microtubule organization and follicle cell morphology. Such egg chambers survive better in Halocarbon oil, which allows free diffusion of oxygen, has low viscosity, and thus prevents dehydration and hypoxia. With a refractive index similar to glycerol, Halocarbon oil also has good optical properties for imaging. It also provides a good environment for injection and is particularly useful for long-term imaging of embryos. However, unlike with aqueous solutions, changes in the medium are not possible. This protocol describes the isolation of Drosophila egg chambers.

  18. The arrival of the CLOUD chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN AVC

    2009-01-01

    The team from the CLOUD experiment - the world’s first experiment using a high-energy particle accelerator to study the climate - were on cloud nine after the arrival of their new three-metre diameter cloud chamber. This marks the end of three years’ R&D; and design, and the start of preparations for data taking later this year.

  19. Development of Master Chamber Software for Data Acquisition of Ionization Chamber for Indus 2 RRCAT

    OpenAIRE

    Priyesh Soni; Mrs. B. Harita; Nawaz Ali Sayed

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this paper was to Develop Master control software for DAQ of ionization chamber for INDUS-2 beam lines for detection of X-ray flux by an Ionization chamber that will remotely control and monitor the ultra low current signal detection analog module precisely. This application will be useful to measure the intensity of X-ray flux through ionization chamber in a beam line of synchrotron radiation source which is mounted in INDUS-2. It is one of new technique of detection. Beam l...

  20. CORRECTING WRITTEN WORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Introduction During the teaching and learning process, teachers often check how much students have understood through written assignments. In this article I’d like to describe one method of correcting students’ written work by using a variety of symbols to indicate where students have gone wrong, then asking students to correct their work themselves.

  1. Anterior chamber fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens: A novel technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sahap Kükner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the implantation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL in the anterior chamber (AC with the haptics passing through two iridectomies to the posterior chamber. A total of 33 eyes of 33 patients with inadequate posterior capsular support due to either previous aphakia or posterior capsular rupture during cataract extraction were included in the study. A double iridectomy was performed on all patients using a vitrectomy probe on the midperiphery of the iris. IOLs were implanted in the AC, and the haptics were passed through the iridectomies to the posterior chamber. The mean follow-up time was 25.3 months. AC hemorrhage occurred in five patients during the iridectomy procedure. Corneal edema was detected in eight of 14 patients with primary IOL insertions. Haptic dislocation was detected in only one patient. This technique may be a good alternative to scleral-fixated IOL implantation in eyes with aphakia.

  2. Correct end use during end joining of multiple chromosomal double strand breaks is influenced by repair protein RAD50, DNA-dependent protein kinase DNA-PKcs, and transcription context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Amanda; Bennardo, Nicole; Cheng, Anita; Stark, Jeremy M

    2011-12-09

    During repair of multiple chromosomal double strand breaks (DSBs), matching the correct DSB ends is essential to limit rearrangements. To investigate the maintenance of correct end use, we examined repair of two tandem noncohesive DSBs generated by endonuclease I-SceI and the 3' nonprocessive exonuclease Trex2, which can be expressed as an I-SceI-Trex2 fusion. We examined end joining (EJ) repair that maintains correct ends (proximal-EJ) versus using incorrect ends (distal-EJ), which provides a relative measure of incorrect end use (distal end use). Previous studies showed that ATM is important to limit distal end use. Here we show that DNA-PKcs kinase activity and RAD50 are also important to limit distal end use, but that H2AX is dispensable. In contrast, we find that ATM, DNA-PKcs, and RAD50 have distinct effects on repair events requiring end processing. Furthermore, we developed reporters to examine the effects of the transcription context on DSB repair, using an inducible promoter. We find that a DSB downstream from an active promoter shows a higher frequency of distal end use, and a greater reliance on ATM for limiting incorrect end use. Conversely, DSB transcription context does not affect end processing during EJ, the frequency of homology-directed repair, or the role of RAD50 and DNA-PKcs in limiting distal end use. We suggest that RAD50, DNA-PKcs kinase activity, and transcription context are each important to limit incorrect end use during EJ repair of multiple DSBs, but that these factors and conditions have distinct roles during repair events requiring end processing.

  3. Achievable field strength in reverberation chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Eulig

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Feldvariable Kammern (FVK, engl.: modestirred- chamber werden unter anderem für EMV-Störfestigkeitsprüfungen verwendet. Ein häufig genanntes Argument, das die Einführung dieser Kammern als normgerechte Prüfumgebung vorantreiben soll, ist eine hohe Feldstärke, die im Vergleich zu anderen Testumgebungen mit relativ moderaten HF-Leistungen erreicht werden kann. Besonders für sicherheitskritische Geräte, wie Komponenten aus der Avionik- oder KFZ-Industrie, sind heutzutage Testfeldstärken von mehreren 100 V/m notwendig. Derart hohe Feldstärken können in Umgebungen, die ein ebenes Wellenfeld erzeugen oder nachbilden, nur mit großen HFLeistungen generiert werden. Durch die Resonanzeigenschaften einer FVK können demgegenüber mit sehr viel weniger Leistung und damit Verstärkeraufwand vergleichbare Werte der Feldstärke erzeugt werden. Allerdings sinkt mit zunehmendem Volumen die erreichbare Feldstärke bei gleicher Speiseleistung. Idealerweise sollen Feldvariable Kammern bei möglichst niedrigen Frequenzen für EMVTests nutzbar sein, was jedoch ein großes Kammervolumen erfordert. Das Problem, bei niedrigen Frequenzen hohe Feldstärken erzeugen zu können, relativiert deshalb den Vorteil von FVKn gegenüber bekannten Testumgebungen bei niedrigen Testfrequenzen. Der Posterbeitrag erläutert, welche Feldstärken in verschieden großen Feldvariablen Kammern beim Einspeisen einer bestimmten hochfrequenten Leistung erreicht werden können. Anhand dieser Ergebnisse wird aufgezeigt, oberhalb welcher Grenzfrequenz eine Anwendung von FVKn nur sinnvoll erscheint. Mode-stirred chambers (MSCs can be used for radiated immunity tests in EMC testing. Advantageous compared to conventional test methods is the high field strength which can here be generated with less RF-Power. This point is often the main argument for pushing the standardization of MSCs as an other EMC testing environment. Especially for safety-critical electronic equipment like avionic or

  4. Fission Product Yield Study of 235U, 238U and 239Pu Using Dual-Fission Ionization Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C.; Tornow, W.; Gooden, M.; Kelley, J.; Arnold, C.; Bond, E.; Bredeweg, T.; Fowler, M.; Moody, W.; Rundberg, R.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J.; Becker, J.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M.; Tonchev, A.

    2014-05-01

    To resolve long-standing differences between LANL and LLNL regarding the correct fission basis for analysis of nuclear test data [M.B. Chadwick et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010); H. Selby et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010)], a collaboration between TUNL/LANL/LLNL has been established to perform high-precision measurements of neutron induced fission product yields. The main goal is to make a definitive statement about the energy dependence of the fission yields to an accuracy better than 2-3% between 1 and 15 MeV, where experimental data are very scarce. At TUNL, we have completed the design, fabrication and testing of three dual-fission chambers dedicated to 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. The dual-fission chambers were used to make measurements of the fission product activity relative to the total fission rate, as well as for high-precision absolute fission yield measurements. The activation method was employed, utilizing the mono-energetic neutron beams available at TUNL. Neutrons of 4.6, 9.0, and 14.5 MeV were produced via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction, and for neutrons at 14.8 MeV, the 3H(d,n)4He reaction was used. After activation, the induced γ-ray activity of the fission products was measured for two months using high-resolution HPGe detectors in a low-background environment. Results for the yield of seven fission fragments of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu and a comparison to available data at other energies are reported. For the first time results are available for neutron energies between 2 and 14 MeV.

  5. Simulation of the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber currents by different Monte Carlo codes in benchmark gamma fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Chun [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yuan-Hao, E-mail: yhl.taiwan@gmail.com [Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Center, Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu City 30013, Taiwan (China); Nievaart, Sander [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Petten (Netherlands); Chen, Yen-Fu [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Wu, Shu-Wei; Chou, Wen-Tsae [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Shiang-Huei [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-01

    High energy photon (over 10 MeV) and neutron beams adopted in radiobiology and radiotherapy always produce mixed neutron/gamma-ray fields. The Mg(Ar) ionization chambers are commonly applied to determine the gamma-ray dose because of its neutron insensitive characteristic. Nowadays, many perturbation corrections for accurate dose estimation and lots of treatment planning systems are based on Monte Carlo technique. The Monte Carlo codes EGSnrc, FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP5, and MCNPX were used to evaluate energy dependent response functions of the Exradin M2 Mg(Ar) ionization chamber to a parallel photon beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV. For the sake of validation, measurements were carefully performed in well-defined (a) primary M-100 X-ray calibration field, (b) primary {sup 60}Co calibration beam, (c) 6-MV, and (d) 10-MV therapeutic beams in hospital. At energy region below 100 keV, MCNP5 and MCNPX both had lower responses than other codes. For energies above 1 MeV, the MCNP ITS-mode greatly resembled other three codes and the differences were within 5%. Comparing to the measured currents, MCNP5 and MCNPX using ITS-mode had perfect agreement with the {sup 60}Co, and 10-MV beams. But at X-ray energy region, the derivations reached 17%. This work shows us a better insight into the performance of different Monte Carlo codes in photon-electron transport calculation. Regarding the application of the mixed field dosimetry like BNCT, MCNP with ITS-mode is recognized as the most suitable tool by this work.

  6. The Octavius1500 2D ion chamber array and its associated phantoms: Dosimetric characterization of a new prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Esch, Ann, E-mail: ann.vanesch@7sigma.be; Huyskens, Dominique P. [7Sigma, QA-team in radiotherapy physics, Kasteeldreef 2, 3150 Tildonk (Belgium); Radiotherapy Association, Centre Hospitalier Mouscron – Ste Elisabeth Namur, 7700 Mouscron – 5000 Namur (Belgium); Basta, Katarzyna; Evrard, Marie; Ghislain, Michel; Sergent, Francois [Radiotherapy Association, Centre Hospitalier Mouscron – Ste Elisabeth Namur, 7700 Mouscron – 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to characterize the prototype of the new Octavius1500 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) 2D ion chamber array, covering its use in different phantom setups, from the most basic solid water sandwich setup to the more complex cylindrical Octavius{sup ®} 4D (Oct4D) (PTW) phantom/detector combination. The new detector houses nearly twice the amount of ion chambers as its predecessors (Seven29 and Octavius729), thereby tackling one of the most important limitations of ion chamber (or diode) arrays, namely the limited detector density. The 0.06 cm{sup 3} cubic ion chambers are now arranged in a checkerboard pattern, leaving no lines (neither longitudinally nor laterally) without detectors. Methods: All measurements were performed on a dual energy (6 MV and 18 MV) iX Clinac (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and all calculations were done in the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian) with the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm. First, the basic characteristics of the 2D array, such as measurement stability, dose rate dependence and dose linearity were investigated in the solid water sandwich setup. Second, the directional dependence was assessed to allow the evaluation of the new Octavius2D phantom (Oct2D{sup 1500}) for planar verification measurements of composite plans. Third, measurements were performed in the Oct4D phantom to evaluate the impact of the increased detector density on the accuracy of the volumetric dose reconstruction. Results: While showing equally good dose linearity and dose rate independence, the Octavius1500 outperforms the previous models because of its instantaneous measurement stability and its twofold active area coverage. Orthogonal field-by-field measurements immediately benefit from the increased detector density. The 3.9 cm wide compensation cavity in the new Oct2D{sup 1500} phantom prototype adequately corrects for directional dependence from the rear, resulting in good agreement within the target dose

  7. Threshold corrections in heterotic flux compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Angelantonj, Carlo; Sarkis, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    We compute the one-loop threshold corrections to the gauge and gravitational couplings for a large class of N=2 non-K\\"ahler heterotic compactifications with three-form flux, consisting in principal two-torus bundles over K3 surfaces. We obtain the results as sums of BPS-states contributions, depending on the topological data of the bundle. We analyse also the worldsheet non-perturbative corrections coming from instantons wrapping the torus fiber, that are mapped under S-duality to D-instanton corrections in type I flux compactifications.

  8. Probabilistic quantum error correction

    CERN Document Server

    Fern, J; Fern, Jesse; Terilla, John

    2002-01-01

    There are well known necessary and sufficient conditions for a quantum code to correct a set of errors. We study weaker conditions under which a quantum code may correct errors with probabilities that may be less than one. We work with stabilizer codes and as an application study how the nine qubit code, the seven qubit code, and the five qubit code perform when there are errors on more than one qubit. As a second application, we discuss the concept of syndrome quality and use it to suggest a way that quantum error correction can be practically improved.

  9. Holographic Thermalization with Weyl Corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Anshuman; Sarkar, Tapobrata

    2015-01-01

    We consider holographic thermalization in the presence of a Weyl correction in five dimensional AdS space. We numerically analyze the time dependence of the two point correlation functions and the expectation values of rectangular Wilson loops in the boundary field theory. The subtle interplay between the Weyl coupling constant and the chemical potential is studied in detail. An outcome of our analysis is the appearance of a swallow tail behaviour in the thermalization curve, and we give evidence that this might indicate distinct physical situations relating to different length scales in the problem.

  10. Case Study: Learner Attitudes Towards the Correction of Mistakes

    OpenAIRE

    Galina Kavaliauskienė; Lilija Anusienė

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the research is to explore learner attitudes to correction of mistakes or feedback as a language learning tool in oral, electronically- and paper-written work as well as peer correction of mistakes.Feedback is a method used in the teaching of languages to improve performance by sharing observations, concerns and suggestions with regard to written work or oral presentation. It includes not only correcting learners, but also assessing them. Both correction and assessment depend...

  11. Radiative Corrections to Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, A B; Kalinovskaya, L V

    2005-01-01

    Radiative corrections to neutrino deep inelastic scattering are revisited. One-loop electroweak corrections are re-calculated within the automatic SANC system. Terms with mass singularities are treated including higher order leading logarithmic corrections. Scheme dependence of corrections due to weak interactions is investigated. The results are implemented into the data analysis of the NOMAD experiment. The present theoretical accuracy in description of the process is discussed.

  12. Reproducibility of the chamber scarification test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1996-01-01

    The chamber scarification test is a predictive human skin irritation test developed to rank the irritation potential of products and ingredients meant for repeated use on normal and diseased skin. 12 products or ingredients can be tested simultaneously on the forearm skin of each volunteer....... The test combines with the procedure scratching of the skin at each test site and subsequent closed patch tests with the products, repeated daily for 3 days. The test is performed on groups of human volunteers: a skin irritant substance or products is included in each test as a positive control......, and a compound with low irritant potential as a negative control, to obtain relative characterization of the irritant potential of the unknown products. The outcome of tests with a positive and negative control product used repeatedly in 13 chamber scarification tests over a 7-year period is reported, and shows...

  13. The KLOE drift chamber VCI 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervell, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; De Lucia, E. E-mail: erika.delucia@roma1.infn.it; De Robertis, G.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; De Zorzi, G.; Dell' Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Falco, S.; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U. von.; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y

    2002-02-01

    The main goal of the KLOE experiment at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory is the study CP violation in kaon decays. The tracking device of the experiment is a drift chamber whose dimensions, 4 m of diameter and 3.3 m length, provide a large acceptance volume for the decay products of low momentum K{sub L} ({lambda}{sub L}=3.4 m). A complete stereo geometry with 12.582 cells arranged in 58 layers guarantees a high and uniform efficiency in the reconstruction of the charged K{sub L} decays. Very light materials have been chosen both for the drift medium, a helium-based gas mixture, and for the mechanical structure, made of carbon fiber, to minimize multiple scattering and conversion of low-energy photons. The design requirements, the adopted solutions together with the calibration procedure and the tracking performances of the drift chamber are discussed.

  14. The KLOE drift chamber VCI 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervell, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; De Sangro, R; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Murtas, F; Müller, S; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Panareo, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Von Hagel, U; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2002-01-01

    The main goal of the KLOE experiment at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory is the study CP violation in kaon decays. The tracking device of the experiment is a drift chamber whose dimensions, 4 m of diameter and 3.3 m length, provide a large acceptance volume for the decay products of low momentum K sub L (lambda sub L =3.4 m). A complete stereo geometry with 12.582 cells arranged in 58 layers guarantees a high and uniform efficiency in the reconstruction of the charged K sub L decays. Very light materials have been chosen both for the drift medium, a helium-based gas mixture, and for the mechanical structure, made of carbon fiber, to minimize multiple scattering and conversion of low-energy photons. The design requirements, the adopted solutions together with the calibration procedure and the tracking performances of the drift chamber are discussed.

  15. Beam-loss monitoring system with free-air ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, H.; Shibata, S.; Hiramatsu, S.; Uchino, K.; Takashima, T.

    1980-08-01

    A monitoring system for proton beam losses was installed in the proton synchrotron at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan (KEK). The system consists of 56 air ionization chambers (AIC) for radiation detectors, 56 integrators, 56 variable gain amplifiers, two multiplexers, a computer interface circuit, a manual controller and a high tension power supply. The characteristics of the AIC, time resolution, radiation measurement upper limit saturation, kinetic energy dependence of the sensitivity, chamber activation effect, the beam loss detection system and the results of observations with the monitoring system are described.

  16. Aligning the CMS Muon Chambers with the Muon Alignment System during an Extended Cosmic Ray Run

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; 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Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; 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Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The alignment system for the muon spectrometer of the CMS detector comprises three independent subsystems of optical and analog position sensors. It aligns muon chambers with respect to each other and to the central silicon tracker. System commissioning at full magnetic field began in 2008 during an extended cosmic ray run. The system succeeded in tracking muon detector movements of up to 18 mm and rotations of several milliradians under magnetic forces. Depending on coordinate and subsystem, the system achieved chamber alignment precisions of 140-350 microns and 30-200 microradians. Systematic errors on displacements are estimated to be 340-590 microns based on comparisons with independent photogrammetry measurements.

  17. RF Anechoic Chambers, Tri-Service Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In collaboration with the Navy, there are 12 RF Anechoic and static free exposure chambers located at TSRL. These chambers cover the majority of the RF spectrum and...

  18. Vacuum Chamber for the Booster Bending Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    To minimise eddy currents, induced by the rising magnetic field, the chamber was made from thin stainless steel of high specific electric resistance. For mechanical strength, it was corrugated in a hydro-forming process. The cross-section was designed for maximum strength and maximum aperture. To accept particles with simultaneous large amplitudes in both planes, the cross-section approaches a rectangular shape (see also 7402463).

  19. Improvement of a New Gas Ionization Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to identify heavier elements, we have developed a new longitudinal field gas ionization chamber (IC)with an angle of 30° of plate (as shown in Fig.1). The IC is operated in flowing iso-butane gas at a pressure of 10kPa. After testing by using a 3- component α particle source and comparing with the old longitudinal field

  20. Sequential Notch activation regulates ventricular chamber development

    OpenAIRE

    D'Amato, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita, leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Bioquímica. Fecha de lectura: 15 de enero de 2016 Ventricular chamber morphogenesis is a beautiful example of tissue interactions orchestrating a precise gene regulatory network essential for tissue patterning, cellular proliferation and differentiation that ultimately lead to a fully compacted and functional adult ventricle. The Notch signaling pathway is a crucial regulator ...

  1. Development and progress in resistive plate chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong-Fang; WU Jian

    2004-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) is a robust and low cost gas detector, which is extensively used in high-energy physics, cosmic and astroparticle physics experiments. Over the past twenty years, as a particle detector,RPC has made remarkable progress. The main achievements, features and results of experiemantal tests including R&D and production of the RPCs by several Chinese groups in recent years are reported in this article.

  2. Angular resolution of stacked resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Samuel, Deepak; Murgod, Lakshmi P

    2016-01-01

    We present here detailed derivations of mathematical expressions for the angular resolution of a set of stacked resistive plate chambers (RPCs). The expressions are validated against experimental results using data collected from the prototype detectors (without magnet) of the upcoming India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). In principle, these expressions can be used for any other detector with an architecture similar to that of RPCs.

  3. Bubble chamber: D meson production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    This event shows real particle tracks from the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC), which was used to observe neutrino and hadron beams between 1973 and 1984 from the PS and SPS accelerators. In this event a neutrino interacts with a proton producing an excited D meson. A labeled diagram is seen on the right as the particles spiral in the magnetic field of the detector.

  4. Wire chambers with their magnetostrictive readout

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    This set of wire chamber planes shaped as a cylinder sector was installed inside the magnet of a polarized spin target modified to allow as well momentum analysis of the produced particles. The experiment (S126) was set up by the CERN-Trieste Collaboration in the PS beam m9 to measure spin effects in the associated production of of a positive kaon and a positive Sigma by interaction of a positive pion with polarized protons.

  5. Update on Scroll Compressor Chamber Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Ian; Groll, Eckhard; Braun, James; King, Galen

    2010-01-01

    The geometry of the scroll compressor determines the efficiency of the scroll compressor and controls all elements of its operation. It is therefore critical to be able to accurately model the volumes of the compressor over the course of a revolution. This paper proposes a novel quasi-analytic formulation of the suction, compression and discharge chambers based on a change of variables from involute angle to polar integration angle. This solution has been compared against a reference polyg...

  6. The Bern Infinitesimal Bubble Chamber (BIBC)

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The chamber body was machined from a block of aluminium. The visible volume was cylindrical with 65 mm diameter and 35 mm depth. It was filled with propane or freon. It was meant as vertex detector in the search of short-lived particles. It was also used with in-line holography resulting in 8 µm bubble size and 9 cm depth of the field. See E. Ramseyer, B. Hahn and E. Hugentobler, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 201 (1982) 335.

  7. Visual-Inspection Probe For Cryogenic Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Steve; Valenzuela, James; Yoshinaga, Jay

    1990-01-01

    Visual-inspection probe that resembles borescope enables observer at ambient temperature to view objects immersed in turbulent flow of liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen, or other cryogenic fluid. Design of probe fairly conventional, except special consideration given to selection of materials and to thermal expansion to provide for expected range of operating temperatures. Penetrates wall of cryogenic chamber to provide view of interior. Similar probe illuminates scene. View displayed on video monitor.

  8. Corrected Age for Preemies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Corrected Age For Preemies Page Content Article Body If your ...

  9. Sperm Cell Dynamics in Shallow Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condat, Carlos; Marconi, Veronica; Guidobaldi, Alejandro; Giojalas, Laura; Silhanek, Alejandro; Jeyaram, Yogesh; Moshchalkov, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Self-propelled microorganisms are attracted to surfaces. This makes their dynamic behavior in restricted geometries very different from that observed in the bulk. Here we analyze the motion of spermatozoids confined to shallow chambers, investigating the nature of the cell trajectories and their accumulation near the side boundaries. Observed cell trajectories are composed of a succession of quasi-circular and quasi-linear segments. This suggests that the cells follow a path of intermittent trappings near the top and down surfaces separated by stretches of quasi-free motion near the center of the gap. Use of microstructured petal-shaped edges limits accumulation near the borders and contributes to increase the concentration in the chamber interior. System stabilization occurs over times of the order of minutes, which agrees well with a theoretical estimate that assumes that the cell mean-square displacement is largely due to the quasi-linear segments. Pure quasi-circular trajectories would require several hours to stabilize. Our estimates also indicate that stabilization proceeds 2.5 times faster in the rosette geometries than in the smooth-edged chambers, which is another practical reason to prefer the former.

  10. Posterior Chamber Hemorrhage during Fluorescein Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A. P. Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the first reported case of acute posterior chamber hemorrhage during fluorescein angiography (FA. This is a case review with serial color photographs of the anterior segment. A 76-year-old male was referred for angiographic control of age-related macular degeneration. He was pseudophakic OU, BCVA 20/40 OU. He had mild hypertension, but not diabetes. He had had two previous angiograms without adverse effects. Difficulty was experienced in obtaining the images owing to a progressive reduction in the transparency of the media. A dense hemorrhage in the posterior chamber of the right eye was found, involving the visual axis. Thorough biomicroscopy, gonioscopy, and ultrasonic biomicroscopy showed that part of one of the haptics of the right intraocular lens (IOL was touching and tearing the posterior face of the iris, without any visible synechiae, iris, or angle neovascularization. Anterior segment FA and posterior ultrasonography were normal. No similar case has been described in the literature involving dense progressive bleeding located in the capsular bag and posterior chamber, without any detectable triggering ocular event other than mydriasis and fluorescein injection. Contact of the iris or sulcus with part of the intraocular lens, aggravated by the intense use of mydriatics during the FA procedure, probably caused bleeding to happen.

  11. Performance parameters of a liquid filled ionization chamber array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poppe, B.; Stelljes, T. S.; Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen 37073 (Germany); Willborn, K. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: In this work, the properties of the two-dimensional liquid filled ionization chamber array Octavius 1000SRS (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) for use in clinical photon-beam dosimetry are investigated.Methods: Measurements were carried out at an Elekta Synergy and Siemens Primus accelerator. For measurements of stability, linearity, and saturation effects of the 1000SRS array a Semiflex 31013 ionization chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used as a reference. The effective point of measurement was determined by TPR measurements of the array in comparison with a Roos chamber (type 31004, PTW-Freiburg, Germany). The response of the array with varying field size and depth of measurement was evaluated using a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber as a reference. Output factor measurements were carried out with a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber, a diode (type 60012, PTW-Freiburg, Germany), and the detector array under investigation. The dose response function for a single detector of the array was determined by measuring 1 cm wide slit-beam dose profiles and comparing them against diode-measured profiles. Theoretical aspects of the low pass properties and of the sampling frequency of the detector array were evaluated. Dose profiles measured with the array and the diode detector were compared, and an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) field was verified using the Gamma-Index method and the visualization of line dose profiles.Results: The array showed a short and long term stability better than 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively. Fluctuations in linearity were found to be within ±0.2% for the vendor specified dose range. Saturation effects were found to be similar to those reported in other studies for liquid-filled ionization chambers. The detector's relative response varied with field size and depth of measurement, showing a small energy dependence accounting for maximum signal deviations of ±2.6% from the reference condition for the setup used. The σ-values of

  12. Adaptable DC offset correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golusky, John M. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for adaptable DC offset correction are provided. An exemplary adaptable DC offset correction system evaluates an incoming baseband signal to determine an appropriate DC offset removal scheme; removes a DC offset from the incoming baseband signal based on the appropriate DC offset scheme in response to the evaluated incoming baseband signal; and outputs a reduced DC baseband signal in response to the DC offset removed from the incoming baseband signal.

  13. Correctness is not enough

    CERN Document Server

    Pryor, Louise

    2008-01-01

    The usual aim of spreadsheet audit is to verify correctness. There are two problems with this: first, it is often difficult to tell whether the spreadsheets in question are correct, and second, even if they are, they may still give the wrong results. These problems are explained in this paper, which presents the key criteria for judging a spreadsheet and discusses how those criteria can be achieved

  14. Smart ionization chamber for gamma-ray monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Drndarević Vujo R.; Jevtić Nenad J.; Rajović Vladimir M.; Stanković Srboljub J.

    2014-01-01

    A design and implementation of a smart ionization chamber suitable for connection into gamma radiation monitoring networks is presented in this paper. The smart ionization chamber consists of air-equivalent one liter ionization chamber with associated electronics and a built-in memory for storage of electronic data specifications. Generally, operating and measurement characteristics of the used ionization chamber are written into the memory chip attached to...

  15. Proton beam dosimetry: a comparison between a plastic scintillator, ionization chamber and Faraday cup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergherehchi, Mitra; Afarideh, Hossein; Ghannadi, Mohammad; Mohammadzadeh, Ahmad; Aslani, Golam Reza; Boghrati, Behzad

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a comparison was made between a plastic scintillator (BC400), a Faraday Cup (FC) and an ionization chamber (IC) used for routine proton dosimetry. Thin scintillators can be applied to proton dosimetry and consequently to proton therapy as relative dosimeters because of their water-equivalent nature, high energy-light conversion efficiency, low dimensions and good proportionality to the absorbed dose at low stopping powers. To employ such scintillators as relative dosimeters in proton therapy, the corrective factors must be applied to correct the quenching luminescence at the Bragg peak. A fine linear proportionality between the luminescence light yield Y and the proton flux in a thin (0.5 mm) scintillator for the 20 and 30 MeV proton beams were observed. The experimental peak/plateau ratios of Bragg Curve for 2, 1 and 0.5 mm scintillators with an accuracy of 0.5% were obtained to be 1.87, 1.91 and 2.30, respectively. With combination of the Markus chamber and the CR-39 detector, the peak/plateau ratio was improved to 3.26. The obtained data of the luminescence yield as a function of the specific energy loss is in agreement with the Craun-Birk's theory. Results show that the FC and Markus ionization chamber are in agreement within 4%, while the FC gives a lower dose evaluation. For a defined beam, the data for the fluence measurements are reproducible within a good accuracy.

  16. Air-kerma determination using a variable-volume cavity ionization chamber standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, D T; Kessler, C; Roger, P

    2007-12-01

    A graphite-walled cavity ionization chamber of modular design and variable volume has been used to determine the air-kerma rate in the reference 60Co field at the BIPM. The chamber can be configured in five sizes. High-accuracy mechanical measurements of the volume of the air cavity were made for each configuration using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Ionization current measurements were made for each configuration and corrected for the effects of ion recombination and diffusion, stem scatter and chamber orientation. Monte Carlo calculations of cavity dose were made to evaluate the correction factors kwall and kan. A reproducibility of the ionization current per mass of 1.5 parts in 10(4) was achieved on the repeated assembly of each configuration. The results show an air-kerma rate determination that increases with volume, the total change being around 8 parts in 10(4). When analysed differentially, the air-kerma rate relative to the BIPM standard is Kdiff/KBIPM = 1.0026(6). A detailed uncertainty budget is presented. Possible reasons for the observed behaviour are discussed that might have consequences for all existing standards for air-kerma.

  17. Anechoic chamber in industrial plants. [construction materials and structural design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, E.; Juncu, O.; Lorian, R.; Marfievici, D.; Mararu, I.

    1974-01-01

    A light anechoic chamber for routine acoustical measurements in the machine building industry is reported. The outer housing of the chamber consists of modules cast in glass fiber reinforced polyester resin; the inner housing consists of pyramidal modules cut out of sound absorbing slates. The parameters of this anechoic chamber facilitate acoustical measurements according to ISO and CAEM recommendations.

  18. Test of an undulated vacuum chamber for the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This picture shows mechanical tests of an undulated vacuum chamber for downstream arms of ISR intersections. This chamber, made of 0.3 mm thick inconel, had inner dimensions of 150 mm by 50 mm. The deflection under vacuum is measured by dial gauges. On the left one sees the large vessel where vacuum chambers were tested at pressures above atmospheric pressure.

  19. Bi-cone vacuum chamber in the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The "bi-cone" vacuum chamber in ISR intersection I-7, for experiment R702. Made from 0.28 mm thick titanium, it was at its time the most transparent chamber ever built. Ian Wilson is standing next to the chamber. See also 7609219.

  20. Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Dissipation within a Euthanasia Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoufack-Momo, Shelly M; Amparan, Ashlee A; Grunden, Beverly; Boivin, Gregory P

    2014-01-01

    CO2 euthanasia is used widely for small laboratory animals, such as rodents. A common necessity in many animal research facilities is to euthanize mice in sequential batches. We assessed the effects of several variables on the time it took for CO2 to dissipate within a chamber. Using standard euthanasia time, changes in flow rate were compared between a slow 15% fill rate for 7 min, and a slow 15% followed by a rapid 50% filling for a total of 5 min. Additional variables assessed included the effects of opening the lid after the completion of chamber filling, turning the chamber over after completion of filling, and the use and removal of a cage from within the chamber. For all trials, CO2 levels in the chambers peaked between 50% and 80%. After the gas was turned off, the concentration of CO2 dropped to below 10% CO2 within 2 min, except when the lid was left on the chamber, where concentration levels remained above 10% after 20 min. CO2 dissipation was significantly faster when the chamber was turned upside down after filling. Significant interaction effects occurred among the factors of cage presence within the chamber, flow rate, and chamber position. Only leaving the lid on the chamber had any practical implication for delaying CO2 dissipation. We recommend that users allow 2 min for CO2 to clear from the chamber before subsequent euthanasia procedures, unless the chamber is manipulated to increase the dissipation rate. PMID:25199098