WorldWideScience

Sample records for challenging nuclear structure

  1. Challenges in Nuclear Structure Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    2016-01-01

    The goal of nuclear structure theory is to build a comprehensive microscopic framework in which properties of nuclei and extended nuclear matter, and nuclear reactions and decays can all be consistently described. Due to novel theoretical concepts, breakthroughs in the experimentation with rare isotopes, increased exchange of ideas across different research areas, and the progress in computer technologies and numerical algorithms, nuclear theorists have been quite successful in solving various bits and pieces of the nuclear many-body puzzle and the prospects are exciting. This article contains a brief, personal perspective on the status of the field.

  2. Challenges in nuclear structure theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of nuclear structure theory is to build a comprehensive microscopic framework in which properties of nuclei and extended nuclear matter, and nuclear reactions and decays can all be consistently described. Due to novel theoretical concepts, breakthroughs in the experimentation with rare isotopes, increased exchange of ideas across different research areas, and the progress in computer technologies and numerical algorithms, nuclear theorists have been quite successful in solving various bits and pieces of the nuclear many-body puzzle and the prospects are exciting. This article contains a brief, personal perspective on the status of the field.

  3. Computational nuclear structure: Challenges, rewards, and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shell model Monte Carlo technique (SMMC) transforms the traditional nuclear shell model problem into a path-integral over auxiliary fields. Applications of the method to studies of various properties of fp-shell nuclei, including Gamow-Teller strengths and distributions, are reviewed. Part of the future of nuclear structure physics lies in the study of nuclei far from beta-stability. The author discusses preliminary work on proton deficient Xe isotopes, and on neutron rich nuclei in the sd-Jp shells

  4. Building nuclear structures : challenges and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliability and safety are factors of prime importance in construction of civil engineering structures of nuclear facilities. There cannot be any compromise in the strength and life of the structure. This involves rigorous control of: (1) quality of materials and end products, (2) time taken for construction, (3) cost, and also continuing innovation. India has now accumulated more than three decades of experience in nuclear civil engineering and the civil engineering fraternity of India and particularly of the Department of Atomic Energy is now fully capable of designing and construction of all types of structures involved in the nuclear field. Illustrative examples are given. Dome of the CIRUS reactor was constructed in steel plates, but then there was a switch over to reinforced concrete for containment structures and subsequently to prestressed concrete. The aspects taken into consideration of the design to ensure absolute leak tightness are: (1) earthquake safeguards, (2) concrete surface protection, and (3) minimization of cracking in concrete due to pressure loading and shrinkage. Coordination charts are prepared for monitoring time required for various operations and time and motion studies are employed to cut down on construction time. Close control over the cost is kept through internal and external audit, executing the work departmentally or employing an outside agency as the occasion demands and proper selection of materials. Some of the innovations in materials use and construction techniques are mentioned. (K.M.)

  5. Challenges in seismic design of civil structures for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent events have heightened the risk perception from natural as well as man-made disasters. The issues related to earthquake safety of nuclear installations have been recognized with renewed vigour than never before. The earthquake design of civil structures for nuclear facilities poses diverse challenges in terms of ensuring safety against seismic events, especially for the new generation reactors with their unique and complex systems. The constituent systems of a nuclear facility can be broadly classified into Structures, Systems (piping, electrical, control and instrumentation) and Components (SSC) of unique characteristics of their own. The structures, systems and components need to be designed for normal operating loads such as dead weight, weight of supporting systems and component, pressure, temperature, normal operating vibratory loads etc. and accidental loads caused due to both external and internal events. The severity of the external events is site specific and depends on the site where the facility is proposed to be set up. To address adequate safety of the facility, an appropriate site determined by the guidelines of nuclear plants siting criteria needs to be selected. This site has to be examined with respect to the frequency and severity of natural phenomena and man induced events. One of the accidental natural phenomena is earthquake. Since the SSCs are finally supported on the civil structures of the nuclear facility, the civil structures shall have adequate strength to counter various loading phenomena especially the seismic loading

  6. Challenges of structural materials for innovative nuclear systems in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New fusion and fission reactors for generation IV are envisaged to operate at conditions well above the actual ones for commercial fission reactors. This type of reactor combined a high operation temperature with a high neutron dose and an aggressive coolant, which imply new challenges for structural materials. One of the key issues to assure the safety and feasibility of these new nuclear systems is the selection of the structural materials, especially for in core components. Beside the differences between them, especially the amount of transmutation He in fusion reactors, similar structural materials have been selected. Some of the selected materials are well characterized at least at medium temperatures, as conventional ferritic/martensitic steels, but the qualification for higher temperatures is needed. For other materials, as ODS steels, there is a need for a complete characterization and qualification. In this paper a review of the operating conditions and selected structural materials for generation IV and fusion reactors within Europe is made. The needs for a complete characterization of these candidate materials are identified in terms of high temperature behaviour, radiation damage and coolant compatibility. (author)

  7. Nuclear structure physics at GSI - challenges and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present situation as well the perspectives for the exploration of exotic regions near and at the drip lines as well as at the upper end of the chart of nuclides will be discussed in the frame of recent experimental results and future plans. Selected issues are superheavy nuclei, light halo systems, nuclear skins, and shells far-off stability. Key experimental developments are in flight separation and single-atom decay studies, ultra sensitive gamma-spectroscopy, reaction studies at relativistic energies in complete kinematics, and mass measurements of highest precision in heavy ion storage rings. Characteristic examples of experimental results from superheavy elements, halo and skin-nuclei, and masses in the neutron deficient region below lead will be discussed in the light of currently used theories. A brief outlook on next generation facilities for structure research including high current heavy-ion accelerators and new experimental developments such as reaction studies in storage rings with high resolution and physics using low-energy heavy-ion-electron colliders will be given. (author)

  8. Regulatory challenges in the management of aging of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article discusses two major pathways by which a regulatory body, and in particular the CSN, may participate in the acquisition of the necessary knowledge on mechanisms of aging of nuclear structural materials: to participate in forums to share operational experience and R and R project, both nationally and internationally. It notes the importance of this participation to carry out its regulatory function based on the knowledge acquired and the unique challenge of transferring that knowledge to rules and guidelines for their application. The article discusses various R and D projects in which the CSN participates directly. It calls for the presence of regulatory bodies in R and D project funded by the EU and the transfer of the results of such projects to codes, standards or guidelines for feasible implementation. (Author)

  9. Nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on 'nuclear structure' is the Appendix to the Daresbury (United Kingdom) Annual Report 1985/86, and contains the research work carried out at the Nuclear Structure Facility, Daresbury, within that period. During the year a total of 74 experiments were scheduled covering the main areas of activity including: nuclear collective motion, nuclei far from stability, and nuclear collisions. The Appendix contains brief reports on these experiments and associated theory. (U.K.)

  10. The continuing nuclear challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that Declining threat perceptions in the superpower relationship make the need for compellent threats less pressing and reduce demands upon the credibility of extended deterrence. Nuclear arms control and reductions can create survivable forces forestalling all but irrational incentives for a first strike. Conventional arms control can restructure national armies to such an extent that crises can be weathered without recourse to arms, thus reducing the risk of nuclear escalation. The post-cold war era presents an opportunity to make meaningful progress in these areas and should serve to remind states that their security may not need to be based on the threat to use nuclear weapons. States that place a high status value on nuclear weapons and those at the nuclear threshold may not agree with this assessment. But if co-operative security structures can be found and acted upon, the allure of nuclear status may also decline. And, with an improving US-Soviet relationship, regional security problems that have led states to acquire nuclear weapons may become more amenable to solution by joint diplomatic initiatives. None of these measures are easily achievable not are they likely to be undertaken in a concerted fashion. However, unlike in the past, the post-cold war environment makes these steps feasible

  11. Nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarewicz, W

    1999-01-01

    Current developments in nuclear structure are discussed from a theoretical perspective. The studies of the nuclear many-body system provide us with invaluable information about the nature of the nuclear interaction, nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales, and the modes of the nucleonic matter.

  12. Technical and management challenges associated with structural materials degradation in nuclear reactors in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are active plans worldwide to increase nuclear power production by significant amounts. In the near term (i.e. by 2020) this will be accomplished by, (a) increasing the power output of the existing reactors and extending their life, and by, (b) constructing new reactors that are very similar to the current water-cooled designs. Beyond 2025-2030, it is possible that new reactors (i.e. the 'GEN IV' designs) will be very different from those currently in service. A full discussion of the technical and management concerns associated with materials degradation that might arise over the next 40 years would need to address a wide range of topics. Quite apart from discussing the structural integrity issues for the materials of construction and the fuel cladding, the debate would also need to cover, for example, fuel resources and the associated issues of fuel cycle management and waste disposal, manufacturing capacity, inspection capabilities, human reliability, etc., since these all impact to one degree or another on the choice of material and the reactor operating conditions. For brevity, the scope of this article is confined to the integrity of the materials of construction for passive components in the current water-cooled reactors and the evolutionary designs (which will dominate the near term new constructions), and the very different GEN IV reactor designs. In all cases the operating environments will be more aggressive than currently encountered. For instance, the concerns for flow accelerated corrosion and flow-induced vibration will be increased under extended power uprate conditions for the current water-cooled reactors. Of greater concern, the design life will be at least 60 years for all of the new reactors and for those current reactors operating with extended licenses. This automatically presents challenges with regard to managing both irradiation damage in metallic and non-metallic materials of construction, and environmentally assisted cracking. This

  13. Nuclear energy: meeting the challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Nuclear Energy - Meeting the Challenges' was the theme of the 25th Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, held in Toronto, Ontario on June 6-9, 2004. The theme has the implication of optimism - that we WILL meet the many challenges needed to overcome if nuclear power is to play a significant role in our energy future. The organizers succeeded in presenting a thorough discussion of the challenges facing the nuclear power industry in Canada with close to 300 delegates attending the three-day event

  14. The nuclear challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is given about the world-wide energy resources, with a particular accent on the part delivered by nuclear power plants. General trends of energetic needs and consumption and the participation of actually used energy sources are outlined. All the aspects of nuclear power production are considered: the fission and fusion process, the fuel cycle and a short description is given of the different reactor types. The pollution and contamination due to different energy sources, the effects of nuclear radiation on man and environment and the risk of accidents due to different human activities or natural events is reviewed. The Three Mile Island accident is analysed. The author analyses the economical aspects of the development of nuclear power plants, the cost of the electricity production and the Belgian and French nuclear programmes. A short reference to the non-proliferation treaty and possible diversion of nuclear materials is given. Finally the social implications of nuclear energy developments are reviewed. (MDC)

  15. Nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The appendix to the Daresbury Annual report contains detailed summaries of experiments carried out, or in progress, for the period 1983/84, using the Nuclear Structure Facility tandem accelerator. The experimental work is carried out by University groups from the UK and abroad, and Daresbury Staff. Developments in instrumentation, and a report on the first year of scheduled operation of the Facility, are also given. (U.K.)

  16. The nuclear disposal challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Germany, GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH is in charge of all operations regarding the management of waste and residual materials from nuclear power plants. Jointly with its subsidiaries, GNS is reliably ensuring the safe packaging, treatment, transport and interim storage of these materials. Moreover, as the inventor and manufacturer of the CASTOR registered casks, GNS is the global leader in the field of casks for HLW. At its locations in Essen, Muelheim, Duisburg, Juelich, Karlsruhe, Ahaus and Gorleben, the GNS group has more than 550 employees and achieves a yearly turnover of more than 200 million Euro. (orig.)

  17. Nuclear energy safety - new challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, Julio Cezar; Fonseca, Renato Alves da, E-mail: jrausch@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: rfonseca@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Fukushima accident in March this year, the second most serious nuclear accident in the world, put in evidence a discussion that in recent years with the advent of the 'nuclear renaissance' has been relegated in the background: what factors influence the use safe nuclear energy? Organizational precursor, latent errors, reduction in specific areas of competence and maintenance of nuclear programs is a scenario where the guarantee of a sustainable development of nuclear energy becomes a major challenge for society. A deep discussion of factors that influenced the major accidents despite the nuclear industry use of the so-called 'lessons learned' is needed. Major accidents continue to happen if a radical change is not implemented in the focus of safety culture. (author)

  18. Nuclear energy safety - new challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima accident in March this year, the second most serious nuclear accident in the world, put in evidence a discussion that in recent years with the advent of the 'nuclear renaissance' has been relegated in the background: what factors influence the use safe nuclear energy? Organizational precursor, latent errors, reduction in specific areas of competence and maintenance of nuclear programs is a scenario where the guarantee of a sustainable development of nuclear energy becomes a major challenge for society. A deep discussion of factors that influenced the major accidents despite the nuclear industry use of the so-called 'lessons learned' is needed. Major accidents continue to happen if a radical change is not implemented in the focus of safety culture. (author)

  19. Regulatory challenges in the management of aging of structural materials in nuclear power plants; Retos reguladores en la gestion del envejecimiento de los materiales estructurales de centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelo, C.; Mendoza, C.; Mas, E.; Conde, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The article discusses two major pathways by which a regulatory body, and in particular the CSN, may participate in the acquisition of the necessary knowledge on mechanisms of aging of nuclear structural materials: to participate in forums to share operational experience and R and R project, both nationally and internationally. It notes the importance of this participation to carry out its regulatory function based on the knowledge acquired and the unique challenge of transferring that knowledge to rules and guidelines for their application. The article discusses various R and D projects in which the CSN participates directly. It calls for the presence of regulatory bodies in R and D project funded by the EU and the transfer of the results of such projects to codes, standards or guidelines for feasible implementation. (Author)

  20. Managerial challenges in nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear personnel training programs have existed since the infancy of the commercial nuclear power industry. The scope and complexity of these programs have increased dramatically, especially since the Three Mile Island mishap in 1979. Whether voluntary or regulated, the changes of the past several years have greatly increased the responsibilities and roles of the nuclear training managers. Events and our own diligence have compounded two problems (or challenges) that have been with us all along. First, training managers have frequently been excluded from the change-making process, leaving them to react as best they can to new regulatory mandates and new utility innovations in a de facto fashion. Second, the additional resources needed to meet new requirements (personnel, equipment, facilities, and funds) have not been made available, or have been insufficient to accomplish new tasks. This paper discusses these challenges and considers several responses (including a national nuclear trainers association) that can go a long way to place nuclear training managers and their employees more in control of their own fate

  1. Challenges to nuclear export controls today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy and nuclear proliferation programs are potentially inter-twinned, which is a point to be taken into account when analysing the development of civil nuclear energy, both domestically and as foreign investment. International agreements ensure that the adhering countries fulfil their obligations and do not abuse civil nuclear programs for the production of nuclear weapons. Uranium enrichment is the process currently most focused on in this respect by recent news and recent technological and commercial developments. But also the so-called reactor-based pathway, with extraction of plutonium from spent nuclear fuel by reprocessing remains in the spotlight of inspectors. Two of the main and complementary pillars on which the prevention of such diversion relies, are Strategic Export Control and International Safeguards. Strategic export control is a key barrier against nuclear proliferation. In many countries including the EU, it is set by a legal framework, envisaging implementation, enforcement and prosecution. The goods that can exported only with authorisations are those identified by the international export control regimes; primarily the Nuclear Suppliers Group in the case of nuclear items. It is complemented by nuclear safeguards measures, and especially in the past few years, by the IAEA State Level concept, which looks at the overall country's potential, including its industrial structure to derive conclusions on the absence of undeclared activities. However, the strict control of goods and knowledge is a moving target, since technological developments, globalisation and the intensifying exchange of information via the worldwide web offer increasing opportunities to proliferators to acquire sensitive items and competencies, and create bigger challenges to enforcement, calling for new responses. Research and development programmes must be directed towards supporting the adaptation of current proliferation containment systems to these new

  2. Frontiers of Nuclear Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-12-31

    Current developments in nuclear structure at the `limits` are discussed. The studies of nuclear behavior at extreme conditions provide us with invaluable information about the nature of the nuclear interaction and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk frontiers of nuclear structure are briefly reviewed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  3. The Colombian nuclear scenario: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Isabel

    2016-07-01

    In Colombia, the absence of nuclear-oriented policies based on technical knowledge, the closing of the Nuclear Affairs Institute (1956-1998), the association of the word "nuclear" with weapons, plus the country's last six decades of internal conflict and narcotraffic have discourage the technical, social and environmental nuclear advance. However, there are technical, social and economic national challenges that could be faced by the present nuclear technical capacities.

  4. The challenges of nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author of this article first outlines that the Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is a tool of domination used by nuclear powers: they can keep and even develop their own nuclear arsenal, while other countries who sign this treaty commit themselves not to try to acquire nuclear weapons. The USA and USSR kept on persuading various countries to sign this treaty, but eventually let some countries develop their military nuclear programme (Israel, Pakistan, or India). He evokes technical difficulties in the application of the Treaty, notably for the control of centrifugation activities. He outlines that the USA have now a dominant position with respect to this Treaty and its application, but that the Treaty remains a major safety element for the world. He evokes more recent and negative evolutions: the withdrawal of North Korea from the Treaty, the destruction of an Iraqi nuclear reactor by Israel (i.e. the destruction of a nuclear installation belonging to a country who signed the NPT by a country who did not sign it). He proposes an overview of the Iranian issue (history of the Iranian nuclear programme, of the nuclear crisis, of the still going on negotiations), and describes what could be the worst possible scenario

  5. Nuclear power: the political challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief overview of the political and economical situation and nuclear energy problems in Europe is given. The author presented his opinion on topic such as need of nuclear power, Kozloduy NPP units 1-4 shutdown, climate change , energy security, environmental problems

  6. Nuclear security challenges: Japan's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001, the international community has reviewed and strengthened measures against terrorism in a wide range of areas with a sense of urgency. However, terrorist organizations are increasing their capabilities in carrying out activities such as crossing borders, acquisition of funds and weapons, propaganda campaigns, and making use of advanced science and technology. Strengthened nuclear security measures have particular importance in the fight against terrorism. Nuclear terrorism, should it happen, could cause immeasurable damage and psychological impact on our whole society. Therefore, we should make the utmost effort to take the necessary measures as extensively as possible in order to protect society from nuclear terrorism

  7. Economic challenges of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The costs of nuclear power is detailed. Concerning the construction costs, the mean value over the French fleet of reactors is 1,2 billions euros/GWe and 1.5 billions euros/GWe when the engineering and pre-exploitation costs are included. The construction costs of future reactors will be far higher than expected: 6 billion euros versus 3.5 billions euros for the EPR. The Audit Office has recently made public the real cost of today's nuclear electricity in France: 54 euros/MWh, this value is given by the CCE method and includes all the aspects of nuclear energy: construction, operation, dismantling, maintenance, upgrading works required for life extension, new safety requirements due to Fukushima feedback and long-term managing of wastes. The cost of nuclear accidents is not taken into account. The costs of dismantling can be estimated from the feedback experience from the dismantling of nuclear reactors in the Usa, the value obtained is consistent with the OECD rule that states that it represents 15% of the construction cost. The economic impact of decommissioning a plant after 40 years of operating life while its operating life could have been extended to reach 50 or even 60 years has a cost of losing 1 billion to 2 billion euros per reactor. Despite the fact that tomorrow's nuclear systems will be more expensive than today's, it will stay in a competitive range. (A.C.)

  8. Nuclear Forces and Nuclear Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Machleidt, R.

    1998-01-01

    After a historical review, I present the progress in the field of realistic NN potentials that we have seen in recent years. A new generation of very quantitative (high-quality/high-precision) NN potentials has emerged. These potentials will serve as reliable input for microscopic nuclear structure calculations and will allow for a systematic investigation of off-shell effects. The issue of three-nucleon forces is also discussed.

  9. Environmental and security challenges of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world population increase, the acceleration of global requirement for development and the need to expand energy production, have led to the depletion of natural resources. The international efforts are increasing to get clean, safe and economical energy sources . The electricity generated from nuclear energy considers less polluting and high economic competitiveness as well as reliability and efficiency. The nuclear power plants projects face significant challenges, especially after two major accidents, in Chernobyl 1986 and Fukushima 2011 including the fears of radiation effects, nuclear waste management and nuclear proliferation issues, as well as the lack of public acceptance. So those bodies interested in operating nuclear power plants work to increase nuclear safety standards, review the nuclear facilities safety, know the strict application of laws, seek to prove the economic competitiveness, maintain environmental security, assist in the nonproliferation regime and gain public acceptance. This article discusses the most important environmental and security challenges of nuclear power plants. It highlights the importance of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy as a source of sustainable development and environmental security. It also offers a number of recommendations to support the Arab countries trend towards the inclusion of nuclear energy option within their national programs to generate electricity. (author)

  10. Nuclear material management: challenges and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The articles in this dossier were derived from the papers of the yearly S.F.E.N. convention, which took place in Paris, 12-13 March 2008. They deal with the new challenges and prospects in the field of nuclear material management, throughout the nuclear whole fuel cycle, namely: the institutional frame of nuclear materials management, the recycling, the uranium market, the enrichment market, the different scenarios for the management of civil nuclear materials, the technical possibilities of spent fuels utilization, the option of thorium, the convention on the physical protection of nuclear materials and installations, the characterisation of nuclear materials by nondestructive nuclear measurements, the proliferation from civil installations, the use of plutonium ( from military origin) and the international agreements. (N.C.)

  11. Component nuclear containment structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention described is intended for use primarily as a nuclear containment structure. Such structures are required to surround the nuclear steam supply system and to contain the effects of breaks in the nuclear steam supply system, or i.e. loss of coolant accidents. Nuclear containment structures are required to withstand internal pressure and temperatures which result from loss of coolant accidents, and to provide for radiation shielding during operation and during the loss of coolant accident, as well as to resist all other applied loads, such as earthquakes. The nuclear containment structure described herein is a composite nuclear containment structure, and is one which structurally combines two previous systems; namely, a steel vessel, and a lined concrete structure. The steel vessel provides strength to resist internal pressure and accommodate temperature increases, the lined concrete structure provides resistance to internal pressure by having a liner which will prevent leakage, and which is in contact with the concrete structure which provides the strength to resist the pressure

  12. Challenges to nuclear suppliers : positioning for the nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With energy demand rising and the increasing recognition of the role of nuclear power as part of the energy mix, opportunities and challenges face the nuclear industry. The ability of nuclear industries to respond to utility requirements in terms of costs, schedule and quality will be determined by entire supplier base. The author speaks to the challenge of the entire infrastructure of suppliers to respond to these opportunities and challenges. Key issues are resource planning, procurement, risk management, supplier collaborations (such as teaming and partnerships); standardization of practices to minimize costs and time; and not least of which, the training, development and recruitment of labour. The author shares his perspective on the role of the supply chain to ensure it has the right resources to provide safe, cost-effective and reliable nuclear deliverables

  13. Current Challenges of Nuclear Security in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and implementation of clearly defined wide range of methods and techniques aiming at prevention and detection of, and response to theft, unauthorized access, illegal transfer or other malicious acts involving nuclear or other radioactive materials; techniques which include physical protection of such material at an installation or in transit, accountability, personnel reliability and training still present several and serious challenges to the nuclear security system in Tanzania at national scale. Several methods have been developed and implemented nationally to control and assure the security of nuclear and radioactive materials (from mining sites, industrial installation, research centers and hospitals) either at their location (being used or not) or in transit. This paper first present a brief but complete description of detection techniques used in Tanzania to identify nuclear and radioactive material not only at the points of entry but also within its borders. Secondly, the paper focuses on different types of challenges met by the protective measures of the nuclear security system that had been implemented and which solutions were developed to meet these challenges. And finally its maps a road forward on areas in the nuclear security system that need improvements and what future plans to use in order to achieve that purpose. (author)

  14. The challenge for nuclear in Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chairman of Scottish Nuclear Limited reviews his company's performance during 1992. The company operates two AGR stations at Hunterston and Torness and is responsible for the decommissioning of the Hunterston 'A' Magnox station. The turnaround in performance from a loss in 1989/1990 to a Pound 65.8m profit in 1992/1993, was accompanied by low costs to consumers, and better efficiency. Challenges ahead include competing with other energy producers in a free market without the premium price for nuclear power set under the Nuclear Energy Agreement. Other challenges to be met include public acceptance, working with other European countries (especially Eastern European countries) to improve their safety levels and technology use, maintaining environmental protection standards and dealing with decommissioning and waste. (UK)

  15. Ontario Hydro nuclear - challenges of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The challenges facing Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN), as understood at the time of the conference, are discussed. OHN had many strengths to build on in preparing for the competition ahead, including: extremely competitive production costs, strong technical capabilities, advantages of multiple units, environmental advantages favoring nuclear, strong public support, and improving station performance. Even with these advantages, OHN faced the difficult challenge of improving overall performance in the face of a large debt burden, coupled with the reinvestment demands of aging units at Pickering A and Bruce A. At the time of the conference, Bruce 2 had already been shut down, because the cost of retubing it and replacing its boilers could not be justified. The ''drive to nuclear excellence'' involves the simultaneous achievement of top performance in safety, reliability and cost; and to this end, changes were being made to reverse the trends indicated by disappointing ''peer reviews''

  16. Reliability of nuclear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reliability analysis of structural components as contributing factor to risk analyses of nuclear power plants is presented. In this context probabilistic models for the occurrence and effects of potential external loading conditions (i.e. earthquake and aircraft impact) are developed and utilized within a reliability concept. The concept is exemplified by applying to a containment structure

  17. High energy nuclear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear field theory has been applied to study nuclear matter as well as finite nuclei. Within the mean field approximation the known bulk properties of nuclei such as binding energy, density, and compressibility are well reproduced. Charge and matter distributions of closed shell nuclei are in good agreement with experimental results, so are rms radii and single-particle energy levels. In addition to the description of known nuclear structure the field theoretical approach may reveal entirely new nuclear phenomena, based on the explicite treatment of mesonic degrees of freedom. The existence of such abnormal nuclear states was proposed by Lee and Wick employing the sigma-model Lagrangian. There the non-linearity of the meson field equations allows for soliton solutions in the presence of nucleons, in particular the sigma-field may exhibit a kink. Some of these solutions are considered

  18. Computational Challenges in Nuclear Weapons Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillain, C F; Adams, T F; McCoy, M G; Christensen, R B; Pudliner, B S; Zika, M R; Brantley, P S; Vetter, J S; May, J M

    2003-08-29

    After a decade of experience, the Stockpile Stewardship Program continues to ensure the safety, security and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons. The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) program was established to provide leading edge, high-end simulation capabilities needed to meet the program's assessment and certification requirements. The great challenge of this program lies in developing the tools and resources necessary for the complex, highly coupled, multi-physics calculations required to simulate nuclear weapons. This paper describes the hardware and software environment we have applied to fulfill our nuclear weapons responsibilities. It also presents the characteristics of our algorithms and codes, especially as they relate to supercomputing resource capabilities and requirements. It then addresses impediments to the development and application of nuclear weapon simulation software and hardware and concludes with a summary of observations and recommendations on an approach for working with industry and government agencies to address these impediments.

  19. The challenge of financing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To date, more then 500 nuclear power reactors have been successfully financed and built. Experience in recent nuclear projects confirms that nuclear power will not cease to be a viable option due to a worldwide financing constraint. For financing nuclear plants there are special considerations: large investment; long lead and construction times; complex technology; regulatory risk and political risk. The principal preconditions to financing are a national policy supporting nuclear power; creditworthiness; economic competitiveness; project feasibility; assurance of adequate revenues; acceptability of risks; and no open-ended liabilities. Generally, nuclear power plants are financed conventionally through multi-sources, where a package covers the entire cost. The first source, the investor/owner/operator responsible for building and operating the plant, should cover a sizable portion of the overall investment. In addition, bond issues, domestic bank credits etc. and, in case of State-owned or controlled enterprises, donations and credits from public entities or the governmental budget, should complete the financing. A financially sound utility should be able to meet this challenge. For importing technology, bids are invited. Export credits should form the basis of foreign financing, because these have favorable terms and conditions. Suppliers from several countries may join in a consortium subdividing the scope of supply and involve several Export Credit Agencies (ECAs). There are also innovative financing approaches that could be applied to nuclear projects. Evolutionary Reactors with smaller overall investment, shorter construction times, reliance on proven technology, together with predictable regulatory regimes and reliable long-term national policies favorable to nuclear power, should make it easier to meet the future challenges of financing. (author)

  20. Nuclear structure research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Clark University research program in nuclear structure is a collaborative effort involving Clark University personnel, staff members from Brookhaven National Laboratory and an active participation of scientists from the US and other nations. The TRISTAN on-line isotope separator and the capture γ-ray facility at the High Flux Beam Reactor are the primary experimental foci of the program which has four principal research themes, three involving nuclear structure physics and one directed towards astrophysics. These themes are: (1) the manifestation of the proton-neutron interaction in the evolution of nuclear structure and its relation to collectivity, (2) the appearance and the role of symmetries and supersymmetries in nuclei, (3) the study of new regions of magic nuclei, and (4) the characterization of nuclei important in r-process stellar nucleosynthesis

  1. Regulatory challenges in using nuclear operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that nuclear utilities operate their plants in an acceptably safe manner at all times. Learning from experience has been a key element in meeting this objective. It is therefore very important for nuclear power plant operators to have an active programme for collecting, analysing and acting on the lessons of operating experience that could affect the safety of their plants. NEA experts have noted that almost all of the recent, significant events reported at international meetings have occurred earlier in one form or another. Counteractions are usually well-known, but information does not always seem to reach end users, or corrective action programmes are not always rigorously applied. Thus, one of the challenges that needs to be met in order to maintain good operational safety performance is to ensure that operating experience is promptly reported to established reporting systems, preferably international in order to benefit from a larger base of experience, and that the lessons from operating experience are actually used to promote safety. This report focuses on how regulatory bodies can ensure that operating experience is used effectively to promote the safety of nuclear power plants. While directed at nuclear power plants, the principles in this report may apply to other nuclear facilities as well. (author)

  2. Nuclear power and European Union enlargement challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the nuclear power sector, the main concern for the candidate countries entering the European Union, remains the nuclear safety. New standards and regulation will be issued for improving the general quality of life in a sound environment. For the candidate countries entering the European Union, this situation represents a real challenge. Their national legislation must be improved to meet the European standards. The conditions are different from country to country, and more difficult for those, which operate ''non west European reactor type''. The paper also present the actual status of the Romanian legislation related to nuclear power and environment. There are presented the principles, terms and responsibilities contained in this legislation. The authors discuss some aspects related to the possibilities to improve the national legislation to meet the actual European Commission or EURATOM standards. (author)

  3. Nuclear knowledge management - challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    how, and know why. At the know what level, there is sufficient knowledge of nuclear technology to know what needs to be done. This level is the minimum required for senior managers who make decisions and allocate resources. At the know how level, experts have the technical depth to apply their knowledge to nuclear systems and designs. At the know why level, experts have the fundamental understanding of basic phenomena required to generate new knowledge. Each of the three levels of knowledge is required and each has its own set of challenges to maintain. An additional set of challenges involves the infrastructure required for nuclear knowledge development and maintenance. This infrastructure has always been extensive and includes laboratories capable of handling a variety of nuclear materials, research reactors, hot cells, demonstration facilities, and all the supporting activities such as nuclear operations, health physics, active shops, and licensing. In recent years, the cost of this infrastructure has risen due to such drivers as improved waste management and operations practices, increased security, and evolving regulatory requirements. These trends mean that the only economic means to maintain the infrastructure is through large, centralized facilities that are open to, and serve, all the stakeholders. All the characteristics discussed above must be taken into consideration for a robust nuclear knowledge management system. Indeed, it is the responsibility of decision-makers to ensure that these characteristics are in place or accessible for the deployment of major nuclear facilities. This presentation provides an overview of these characteristics, and the challenges and opportunities associated with them. (author)

  4. Some major challenges: Nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear arms control and nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major challenge that is the focus of this symposium was ensuring an effective, universal and adequately financed system for the verification of nuclear non-proliferation. This involves effectiveness of the system, participation in the system, and financing of the system. The second major challenge is making progress in nuclear arms control, being the essential part of the mutual commitment made under the NPT. The third major challenge is the protection against nuclear terrorism

  5. Nuclear revival, nuclear safety: challenges for the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear revival is a fact, in Europe and the rest of the world. We are delighted at this. Today, all eyes are on the United Kingdom where the Government intends to do more than merely replace twenty-three aging power plants. The challenge facing them is considerable - Mr. Hutton, Britain's Minister for Trade and Industry, estimates that the work will generate 100,000 jobs. It is to be hoped that the soon-to-end Franco-British summit meeting will have strengthened understanding between the two countries. This would augur well for the French Presidency of the European Union which hopes to launch debate on a common energy policy within the European Council. Since the United Kingdom took the decision to re-launch the construction of nuclear reactors, France is no longer alone; it has a new ally in the nuclear debate. The British decision is also seen as encouraging by all the companies that wish to develop nuclear technology. This development is not only manifest in the United Kingdom; in Germany and a number of countries in Central and Eastern Europe, there is an obvious, if latent, desire to enter this sector. This document gathers the Proceedings of two symposiums: - the March 2008 conference on 'The Revival of Nuclear Energy, a challenge for the European Union' - and the November 2008 Conference on 'Nuclear safety: a worldwide Public Good'. Contents: Foreword by Claude Fischer; Introduction by Philippe Herzog. Part A: The revival of nuclear energy, a challenge for Europe: Partnerships, Speakers list, Synthesis for decision-makers by Andre Ferron and Michel Cruciani, 1 Address and 3 sessions, Opening Address by Dominique Ristori, First round table: Conditions to re-launch the nuclear industry in Europe, role of companies, banks and public institutions, Second round table: The need for a European energy mix and the necessity to improve the European common Market Model Last round table: The conditions for a European foreign energy policy, Speech of Anne Lauvergeon

  6. Nuclear fission and nuclear safeguards: Common technologies and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fission and nuclear safeguards have much in common, including the basic physical phenomena and technologies involved as well as the commitments and challenges posed by expanding nuclear programs in many countries around the world. The unique characteristics of the fission process -- such as prompt and delayed neutron and gamma ray emission -- not only provide the means of sustaining and controlling the fission chain reaction, but also provide unique ''signatures'' that are essential to quantitative measurement and effective safeguarding of key nuclear materials (notably 239Pu and 235U) against theft, loss, or diversion. In this paper, we trace briefly the historical emergence of safeguards as an essential component of the expansion of the nuclear enterprise worldwide. We then survey the major categories of passive and active nondestructive assay techniques that are currently in use or under development for rapid, accurate measurement and verification of safe-guarded nuclear materials in the many forms in which they occur throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. 23 refs., 14 figs

  7. Current challenges for education of nuclear engineers. Beyond nuclear basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, Christian [AREVA GmbH, Offenbach (Germany). Training Center

    2014-07-15

    In past decades, curricula for the education of nuclear engineers (either as a major or minor subject) have been well established all over the world. However, from the point of view of a nuclear supplier, recent experiences in large and complex new build as well as modernization projects have shown that important competences required in these projects were not addressed during the education of young graduates. Consequently, in the past nuclear industry has been obliged to either accept long periods for job familiarization, or to develop and implement various dedicated internal training measures. Although the topics normally addressed in nuclear engineering education (like neutron and reactor physics, nuclear materials or thermohydraulics and the associated calculation methods) build up important competences, this paper shows that the current status of nuclear applications requires adaptations of educational curricula. As a conclusion, when academic nuclear engineering curricula start taking into account current competence needs in nuclear industry, it will be for the benefit of the current and future generation of nuclear engineers. They will be better prepared for their future job positions and career perspectives, especially on an international level. The recommendations presented should not only be of importance for the nuclear fission field, but also for the fusion community. Here, the Horizon 2020 Roadmap to Fusion as published in 2012 now is focusing on ITER and on a longer-term development of fusion technology for a future demonstration reactor DEMO. The very challenging work program is leading to a strong need for exactly those skills that are described in this article.

  8. Current challenges for education of nuclear engineers. Beyond nuclear basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In past decades, curricula for the education of nuclear engineers (either as a major or minor subject) have been well established all over the world. However, from the point of view of a nuclear supplier, recent experiences in large and complex new build as well as modernization projects have shown that important competences required in these projects were not addressed during the education of young graduates. Consequently, in the past nuclear industry has been obliged to either accept long periods for job familiarization, or to develop and implement various dedicated internal training measures. Although the topics normally addressed in nuclear engineering education (like neutron and reactor physics, nuclear materials or thermohydraulics and the associated calculation methods) build up important competences, this paper shows that the current status of nuclear applications requires adaptations of educational curricula. As a conclusion, when academic nuclear engineering curricula start taking into account current competence needs in nuclear industry, it will be for the benefit of the current and future generation of nuclear engineers. They will be better prepared for their future job positions and career perspectives, especially on an international level. The recommendations presented should not only be of importance for the nuclear fission field, but also for the fusion community. Here, the Horizon 2020 Roadmap to Fusion as published in 2012 now is focusing on ITER and on a longer-term development of fusion technology for a future demonstration reactor DEMO. The very challenging work program is leading to a strong need for exactly those skills that are described in this article.

  9. Nuclear structure theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes progress during the past year in the following areas of research: Pion charge exchange reactions, including a theory of the contribution of pion absorption and correlated double scattering to double charge exchange, new coupled channel calculations for single and double charge exchange from 14C. Nuclear inelastic scattering, using quark models to calculate nuclear structure functions, and test for sensitivity to the substructure of nucleons in nuclei. Fluctuation-free statistical spectroscopy including the theory and computer programs for interacting-particle densities, spin cutoff factors, occupancies, strength sums, and other expectation values. Proposed research for the coming year in each area is presented

  10. Challenges faced by developing countries in nuclear power deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Analysis of future domestic electricity demand and supply conducted by official UAE entities has concluded that increasing demand for electricity is fast outstripping the growth in supply. Total electricity demand in the UAE is expected to rise from approximately 15,000 megawatts to 42,000 megawatts by 2020. Significant new generation capacity must be constructed and brought on-line. It was concluded that peaceful nuclear power-generation represents an environmentally promising and commercially competitive option which could make a significant contribution to the UAE's economy and future energy security. To make clear its intentions with regard to nuclear power, the Government of the UAE has prepared and formally endorsed its 'Policy on the Evaluation and Potential Implementation o Peaceful Nuclear Energy' as a reflection of its views on the potential establishment of a peaceful civilian nuclear energy program. The policy defines the framework under which the program will be developed and is based on principles of transparency, highest standards of safety, security and non-proliferation , and working directly with the IAEA and responsible nations of expertise. Many challenges face developing countries embarking on the development of a civil nuclear energy program. Challenges include initial questions such as where and when a nation should start planning. Other challenges are related to the development of required infrastructure in legislation, regulatory, human resources, and institutional structure. Further challenges are faced at the time of transforming guidance and recommendations into an implementation plan and the execution of such plan in an effective manner. The UAE has addressed many of these challenges by conventional and sometimes innovative ways in developing the required infrastructure and moving into the implementation phase of the program. Starting from almost no nuclear energy infrastructure, these plans are being conducted today in the

  11. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Challenges and Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sabharwall; S.B. Sitton; S.J. Yoon; C. Stoots

    2014-07-01

    With growing demand of energy and costs of the fossil fuels, coupled with the environmental concerns have resulted in an increased interest in alternative energy sources. Nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) are being considered which incorporates renewable energy sources such as solar and wind energy combined with nuclear reactor and energy storage to meet the peak hours demand imposed on the grid, along with providing process heat for other potential industrial applications. This concept could potentially satisfy various energy demands and improve reliability, robustness and resilience for the entire system as a whole, along with economic and net efficiency gains. This paper provides a brief understanding of potential NHES system and architecture along with the challenges

  12. Selected topics in nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fourth International Conference on selected topics in nuclear structure was held at Dubna in July 1994 on recent experimental and theoretical investigations in nuclear structure. Topics discussed were the following: nuclear structure at low-energy excitations (collective quasiparticle phenomena, proton-neutron interactions, microscopic and phenomenological theories of nuclear structure; nuclear structure studies with charged particles. heavy ions, neutrons and photons; nuclei at high angular momenta and superdeformation, structure and decay properties of giant resonances, charge-exchange resonances and β-decay; semiclassical approach of large amplitude collective motion and structure of hot nuclei

  13. Human Resources Development Challenges for Nuclear Newcomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conclusion and take away messages: • HRD solution is dependent upon country’s economical, societal, industrial situation and development strategy. • HRD to be integrated in the global HCB approach (education and training, KM, knowledge networks). • Maximum local benefit with national development. • International collaboration and partnership with competent and experienced partners is recommended (lever effect). • Anticipation is key. → HRD for a nuclear program is challenging but achievable. Countries already did it and are ready to build long term partnerships

  14. Nuclear industry - challenges in chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical engineering processes and operations are closely involved in every step of the nuclear fuel cycle. Starting from mining and milling of the ore through the production of fuel and other materials and their use in nuclear reactors, fuel reprocessing, fissile material recycle and treatment and disposal of fission product wastes, each step presents a challenge to the chemical engineer to evolve and innovate processes and techniques for more efficient utilization of the energy in the atom. The requirement of high recovery of the desired components at high purity levels is in itself a challenge. ''Nuclear Grade'' specifications for materials put a requirement which very few industries can satisfy. Recovery of uranium and thorium from low grade ores, of heavy water from raw water, etc. are examples. Economical and large scale separation of isotopes particularly those of heavy elements is a task for which processess are under various stages of development. Further design of chemical plants such as fuel reprocessing plants and high level waste treatment plants, which are to be operated and maintained remotely due to the high levels of radio-activity call for engineering skills which are being continually evolved. In the reactor, analysis of the fluid mechanics and optimum design of heat removal system are other examples where a chemical engineer can play a useful role. In addition to the above, the activities in the nuclear industry cover a very wide range of chemical engineering applications, such as desalination and other energy intensive processes, radioisotope and radiation applications in industry, medicine and agriculture. (auth.)

  15. Selected topics in nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection of abstracts on selected topics in nuclear structure are given. Special attention pays to collective excitations and high-spin states of nuclei, giant resonance structure, nuclear reaction mechanisms and so on

  16. Future nuclear fuel cycles: Prospects and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both in France and world wide, nuclear power has the potential to curtail the dependence on fossil fuels and thereby to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions while promoting energy independence. The global energy context pleads in favour of a sustainable development of nuclear energy since the demand for energy will likely increase, whereas resources will tend to get scarcer and the prospect of global warming will drive down the consumption of fossil fuel. Therefore, retaining nuclear power as a key piece of the nation's energy portfolio strengthens French energy security and environmental quality. How we deal with nuclear radioactive waste is crucial in this context. The public's concern regarding long-term waste management led the French government to prepare and pass the 1991 and 2006 Acts, requesting in particular the study of applicable solutions for further minimising the quantity and the hazardousness of final waste. This necessitates high active long-life element [such as the minor actinides (MA)] recycling, since the results of fuel cycle R and D could significantly change the challenges for the storage of nuclear waste. HALL recycling can reduce the heat load and the half-life of most of the waste to be buried to a couple of hundred years, overcoming the concerns of the public related to the long life of the waste thus aiding the 'burying approach' in securing a 'broadly agreed political consensus' of waste disposal in a geological repository. It appears clearly that long-lasting nuclear options will include actinide recycling. Within this framework, this paper presents the progress obtained at CEA Marcoule on the development of innovative actinide partitioning hydrometallurgical processes in support of their recycling under different still-open options, either in homogeneous mode (MA are recycled at low concentration in all the standard reactor fuel) or in heterogeneous mode (MA are recycled at higher concentration in specific targets, at the

  17. Nuclear power and European Union enlargement challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1991 through 1996 the European Union signed the Association Agreements with ten East European countries (EE10), namely: Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Poland, Slovenia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Bulgaria and Romania. In the period 1994-1996 European Union received membership applications from all ten countries. The paper analyzes the approach of complying the requirements and regulations for European Union accession in the field of the Romanian nuclear power based on the CANDU technology. In this process, the real challenge is represented by the preparation and implementation of new regulations aiming to improve the general business environment by introducing International Accounting Standards simplification of bankruptcy laws, reform of taxation procedures and secureness of financial instruments. A new stand-by agreement with the International Monetary Fund and World Bank was set out in late April 1999 for an one-year loan of 475 million dollars. (authors)

  18. Structural Materials: New Challenges, Manufacturing and Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Important criteria of innovative fast reactors and advanced fuel cycle initiatives are improved efficiency, economic competitiveness and reduction of waste. To reach these goals and keep high safety standards, at least at the level of currently operating nuclear reactors, key issues are the availability of suitable structural materials and their performance assessment. The authors, on the basis of the wealth of experience gained in the European Union, India and Japan, aim to define the challenges and current status of material development and set the agenda for R and D in the coming years and decades. It is hoped that the joint perspective would enable realizing the expected criteria of sustainability envisaged through sodium cooled fast reactors and closed fuel cycles. (author)

  19. Frontiers and challenges of nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two recent developments of the nuclear shell model are presented. One is a breakthrough in computational feasibility owing to the Monte Carlo Shell Model (MCSM). By the MCSM, the structure of low-lying states can be studied with realistic interactions for a wide, nearly unlimited basically, variety of nuclei. The magic numbers are the key concept of the shell model, and are shown to be different in exotic nuclei from those of stable nuclei. Its novel origin and robustness will be discussed. (orig.)

  20. Is chiral symmetry manifested in nuclear structure?

    OpenAIRE

    Furnstahl, R. J.; Schwenk, A

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneously broken chiral symmetry is an established property of low-energy quantum chromodynamics, but finding direct evidence for it from nuclear structure data is a difficult challenge. Indeed, phenomenologically successful energy-density functional approaches do not even have explicit pions. Are there smoking guns for chiral symmetry in nuclei?

  1. Scientific Solutions to Nuclear Waste Environmental Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Bradley R.

    2014-01-30

    The Hidden Cost of Nuclear Weapons The Cold War arms race drove an intense plutonium production program in the U.S. This campaign produced approximately 100 tons of plutonium over 40 years. The epicenter of plutonium production in the United States was the Hanford site, a 586 square mile reservation owned by the Department of Energy and located on the Colombia River in Southeastern Washington. Plutonium synthesis relied on nuclear reactors to convert uranium to plutonium within the reactor fuel rods. After a sufficient amount of conversion occurred, the rods were removed from the reactor and allowed to cool. They were then dissolved in an acid bath and chemically processed to separate and purify plutonium from the rest of the constituents in the used reactor fuel. The acidic waste was then neutralized using sodium hydroxide and the resulting mixture of liquids and precipitates (small insoluble particles) was stored in huge underground waste tanks. The byproducts of the U.S. plutonium production campaign include over 53 million gallons of high-level radioactive waste stored in 177 large underground tanks at Hanford and another 34 million gallons stored at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This legacy nuclear waste represents one of the largest environmental clean-up challenges facing the world today. The nuclear waste in the Hanford tanks is a mixture of liquids and precipitates that have settled into sludge. Some of these tanks are now over 60 years old and a small number of them are leaking radioactive waste into the ground and contaminating the environment. The solution to this nuclear waste challenge is to convert the mixture of solids and liquids into a durable material that won't disperse into the environment and create hazards to the biosphere. What makes this difficult is the fact that the radioactive half-lives of some of the radionuclides in the waste are thousands to millions of years long. (The half-life of a radioactive substance is the

  2. Regulatory challenges for nuclear energy in liberalized electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the liberalization of the national electricity markets in the European Union, the nuclear energy sector faces new challenges. The rise of renewable energy sources and their participation in the wholesale markets through power exchanges and bilateral contracts lead to lower prices and intermittency of the system loads. Liberalized markets tend to discriminate capital-intensive generation technologies such as nuclear energy and some of the renewables. This report explores the current challenges and outlines some new regulatory mechanisms for ensuring the availability of nuclear power through “contracts for differences” for new nuclear units as well as for existing nuclear power plants. Keywords: regulation nuclear energy, liberalization, markets

  3. Chiral EFT based nuclear forces: Achievements and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Machleidt, R

    2016-01-01

    During the past two decades, chiral effective field theory has become a popular tool to derive nuclear forces from first principles. Two-nucleon interactions have been worked out up to sixth order of chiral perturbation theory and three-nucleon forces up to fifth order. Applications of some of these forces have been conducted in nuclear few- and many-body systems---with a certain degree of success. But in spite of these achievements, we are still faced with great challenges. Among them is the issue of a proper uncertainty quantification of predictions obtained when applying these forces in {\\it ab initio} calculations of nuclear structure and reactions. A related problem is the order by order convergence of the chiral expansion. We start this review with a pedagogical introduction and then present the current status of the field of chiral nuclear forces. This is followed by a discussion of representative examples for the application of chiral two- and three-body forces in the nuclear many-body system includin...

  4. Chiral EFT based nuclear forces: achievements and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machleidt, R.; Sammarruca, F.

    2016-08-01

    During the past two decades, chiral effective field theory has become a popular tool to derive nuclear forces from first principles. Two-nucleon interactions have been worked out up to sixth order of chiral perturbation theory and three-nucleon forces up to fifth order. Applications of some of these forces have been conducted in nuclear few- and many-body systems—with a certain degree of success. But in spite of these achievements, we are still faced with great challenges. Among them is the issue of a proper uncertainty quantification of predictions obtained when applying these forces in ab initio calculations of nuclear structure and reactions. A related problem is the order by order convergence of the chiral expansion. We start this review with a pedagogical introduction and then present the current status of the field of chiral nuclear forces. This is followed by a discussion of representative examples for the application of chiral two- and three-body forces in the nuclear many-body system including convergence issues.

  5. Nuclear regulatory challenges arising from competition in electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years a world-wide trend has been developing to introduce competition in electricity markets. As market competition unfolds, it produces a wide range of safety challenges for nuclear power plant operators and regulators. Nuclear regulators must be aware of the potential safety challenges produced and consider whether new regulatory response strategies are warranted. This report describes many of these challenges, their implications and possible regulatory response strategies. The intended audience is primarily nuclear safety regulators, although government authorities, nuclear power plant operators and the general public may also be interested. (author)

  6. Nuclear Structure References (NSR) file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the Nuclear Structure References file by the Nuclear Data Project at ORNL is described. Much of the report concerns format information of interest only to those preparing input to the system or otherwise needing detailed knowledge of its internal structure. 17 figures

  7. Steel structures for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guide presents requirements on the design and manufacturing of steel structures for nuclear facilities as well as on documents to be submitted to Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). Inspection of steel structures during plant construction and operation is also described

  8. Decommissioning of the Wuergassen nuclear power plant, a commercial challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the inspection results which detected cracks in the core shroud, economic aspects have induced PreussenElektra to opt for decommissioning and dismantling of the Wuergassen reactor. As this shutdown of the nuclear power plant is not a planned shutdown, costs arising in addition to the original decommissioning framework studies have to be assessed, especially the expenditure for the adjusted plant manpower requirements, and the additional operating and phase-out costs. Experience has shown that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plants does not pose problems in terms of safety or technology, but still is a commercial challenge. Expense forecasts have to be adjusted in response to the unplanned shutdown. PreussenElektra therefore has set up a modified project and operating structure. The analysis and evaluation of the first decommissioning phase will show whether the cost assessment approaches are in agreement with reality. (orig.)

  9. Regulatory challenges for nuclear energy in liberalized electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the liberalization of the national electricity markets in the European Union, the nuclear energy sector faces new challenges. The rise of renewable energy sources and their participation in the wholesale markets through power exchanges and bilateral contracts lead to lower prices and intermittency of the system loads. Liberalized markets tend to discriminate capital-intensive generation technologies such as nuclear energy and some of the renewables. This report explores the current challenges and outlines some new regulatory mechanisms for ensuring the availability of nuclear power through “contracts for differences” for new nuclear units as well as for existing nuclear power plants.

  10. Structural materials challenges for advanced reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon, P.; Carré, F.

    2009-03-01

    Key technologies for advanced nuclear systems encompass high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistant core materials, and specific reactor and power conversion technologies (intermediate heat exchanger, turbo-machinery, high temperature electrolytic or thermo-chemical water splitting processes, etc.). The main requirements for the materials to be used in these reactor systems are dimensional stability under irradiation, whether under stress (irradiation creep or relaxation) or without stress (swelling, growth), an acceptable evolution under ageing of the mechanical properties (tensile strength, ductility, creep resistance, fracture toughness, resilience) and a good behavior in corrosive environments (reactor coolant or process fluid). Other criteria for the materials are their cost to fabricate and to assemble, and their composition could be optimized in order for instance to present low-activation (or rapid desactivation) features which facilitate maintenance and disposal. These requirements have to be met under normal operating conditions, as well as in incidental and accidental conditions. These challenging requirements imply that in most cases, the use of conventional nuclear materials is excluded, even after optimization and a new range of materials has to be developed and qualified for nuclear use. This paper gives a brief overview of various materials that are essential to establish advanced systems feasibility and performance for in pile and out of pile applications, such as ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr), nickel based alloys (Haynes 230, Inconel 617, etc.), oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels, and ceramics (SiC, TiC, etc.). This article gives also an insight into the various natures of R&D needed on advanced materials, including fundamental research to investigate basic physical and chemical phenomena occurring in normal and accidental operating conditions, lab-scale tests to characterize candidate materials

  11. Small nuclear power: challenges and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates show that, for remote localities difficult of access, nuclear power technologies offer a reasonable alternative to conventional power based on fossil fuels. Still, the deployment of nuclear power sources in the country's northern and eastern territories with hard climatic and complicated social conditions calls for novel designs that satisfy to the requirements beyond the scope of those for the conventional nuclear plant designs. A small nuclear power plant with a water-cooled water-moderated reactor facility, called Unitherm, is one of the most advanced autonomous nuclear heat and power supply designs that satisfies the best to the above requirements, based on the experience in design, manufacture and operation of nuclear propulsion systems. (author)

  12. Structural changes, roles and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statnett is facing great challenges in a Nordic and European integrated power market, with increasingly mighty commercial players. In a competing market there are conflicts between the socio-economic targets for Statkraft's activities and the commercial interests of Statnet's customers and other players in the power market. In the light of development, the connection lines between the customers and Statnett should be changed. Another problem is the legal competence problem that arises when the Oil and Energy Department (OED) works out the general policy at the same time as it owns Statkraft and Statnett and is the appellate body for the development decisions taken by the NVE (the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate). When comprehensive changes in Statkraft's company organisation and ownership are considered, special attention must be paid to the competence problem and to the risk of the commercial producers increasing their impact on how Statnett manages its role as a systems operator

  13. The regulatory challenges of decommissioning nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each nuclear power plant, fuel cycle facility and nuclear research and test facility that is operating today will eventually reach the end of its useful life and cease operation. During the period of its decommissioning, it is important to properly manage the health and environmental hazards and physical protection measures of the shutdown facility in order to protect the health and safety of the public and workers and to safeguard any nuclear materials. In this regard, the nuclear safety regulatory body is responsible for independently assuring that decommissioning activities are conducted safely, that radioactive materials and spent nuclear fuel are disposed of properly and that the site is in an acceptable end state. The purpose of this report is to describe the broad range of safety, environmental, organisational, human factors and public policy issues that may arise during the decommissioning of nuclear reactors and that the regulatory body should be prepared to deal with in the framework of its national regulatory system. The intended audience is primarily nuclear regulators, although the information and ideas may also be of interest to government authorities, environmental regulators, nuclear operating organisations, technical expert organisations and the general public. (author)

  14. France, Germany and the nuclear challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking into account the french and german relations concerning the nuclear activities, the nuclear phaseout decided by the german government in 1998 presents inevitable impacts in France. The author discusses the constraints bound to this project (industrial interests, energy dependence...), the short dated phaseout project and the consequences for the relations of the two countries, Germany and France. (A.L.B.)

  15. Meeting the challenge of regulating an expanding nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the structure and operations of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) and its role in regulating the nuclear industry. The mandate of the CNSC is to regulate the use of nuclear energy and materials, to protect health, safety, security, the environment and to respect Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy

  16. Addressing nuclear and hostile environmental challenges with intelligent automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed and continues to develop solutions to address the challenges associated with nuclear and hostile environments. The nuclear challenge and, in general, most hostile environments present unique conditions requiring new approaches and techniques. Solutions used in controlled or conventional environments are limited in the highly volatile nuclear environment. Engineers at LLNL have been actively involved in finding unique and creative intelligent automation solutions. We have made significant advances in automation control theory, nuclear material handling processes, robotics systems, and sensors technology

  17. Nuclear weapons: new threats, new challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a brief history of the Iranian nuclear crisis since 2003, the author discusses the four aspects of this crisis which make it a textbook case: a country which wants to control the whole nuclear process and therefore may reach the capacity to produce military-grade uranium (this raises the question of the relationship between nuclear energy and disarmament), the validity and efficiency of international controls is at stake, divergence may appear on the ways to have international treaties respected (different approaches between Europe and the USA), a country which is looking for nuclear weapon for matters of regional security and power (this raises the issue of a new approach to security). Then, the author describes the new nuclear threats: proliferating states, terrorist groups, and states with nuclear weapons (attitude of the USA, China, Russia, France and the United Kingdom, perspective of a nuclear disarmament of Europe). He gives an overview of the current status of disarmament and of treaties (START, NPT), and discusses the opportunities to save the non proliferation treaty from collapsing in 2005

  18. Nuclear power development: global challenges and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article highlights key factors that will determine today and tomorrow's optimal energy strategies. It addresses methods to utilize the high potential energy content of uranium. Plutonium used as fuel in a nuclear reactors is discussed as is the future potential of a thorium fuel cycle. Various strategies to increase the economic viability of nuclear power are brought out. Technological means to further minimize environmental impacts and to enhance safety are covered as they are a major factor in public acceptance. Also covered are advances anticipated by mid-century in nuclear reactor and fuel cycle technologies

  19. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the frontiers of today's nuclear science is the ''journey to the limits'': of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective

  20. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the frontiers of todays nuclear science is the journey to the limits of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena, but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this series of lectures, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei

  1. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-12-31

    One of the frontiers of today`s nuclear science is the ``journey to the limits``: of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective.

  2. Symmetries in nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Allaart, K; Dieperink, A

    1983-01-01

    The 1982 summer school on nuclear physics, organized by the Nuclear Physics Division of the Netherlands' Physical Society, was the fifth in a series that started in 1963. The number of students attending has always been about one hundred, coming from about thirty countries. The theme of this year's school was symmetry in nuclear physics. This book covers the material presented by the enthusi­ astic speakers, who were invited to lecture on this subject. We think they have succeeded in presenting us with clear and thorough introductory talks at graduate or higher level. The time schedule of the school and the location allowed the participants to make many informal contacts during many social activities, ranging from billiards to surf board sailing. We hope and expect that the combination of a relaxed atmosphere during part of the time and hard work during most of the time, has furthered the interest in, and understanding of, nuclear physics. The organization of the summer school was made possible by substantia...

  3. Harnessing thorium for nuclear power: challenges ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several barriers to rapid growth of nuclear power. These arise as a result of concerns related to possible disasters arising out of severe accidents like Chernobyl and Fukushima, nuclear weapons proliferation, long term radioactive waste disposal etc. It is well known that use of thorium can actually address several of these concerns in a significant way. With developments in nuclear fuel technology, it is now possible to realise these gains through the use of thorium-LEU mixed fuel even in existing reactor systems without losing out too much on energy output from mined uranium in comparison to contemporary uranium fuelled reactor systems. Thorium thus offers an opportunity to facilitate a more rapid growth even with existing proven nuclear reactor designs while evolution of more optimum specific thorium reactor designs takes place. India with its experience base with thorium, while moving ahead with her domestic programme to evolve thorium reactor technology, could do well to facilitate growth of nuclear power through the use of thorium in currently established nuclear reactor designs. The presentation would discuss some of these possibilities

  4. Regulatory Challenges for Indonesia in Embarking on Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indonesia has been planning to build Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) since the 1970's. Nevertheless, due to problems including some nuclear accidents abroad and monetary crisis, the program is immaterialized so far. In recent years, in anticipation of domestic energy crisis, nuclear program is revitalized. In the current situation, nuclear program is facing various challenges, primarily the regulatory challenges including public perception, political situation, brain drain, public confidence, and international confidence. In coping with these challenges, several efforts have been done. For instance, to deals with public perception, BATAN is making continuous effort in order to win confidence from the public and the decision makers toward nuclear energy. In order to prepare human resources, several programs related to nuclear science and technology is established in several higher education institutions. One of the most importance milestones in the effort of nuclear energy utilization was the enactment of Act No. 10 on Nuclear Energy. The Act demands the establishment of regulatory body and clear separation between regulatory body and promoting body. Nuclear program in Indonesia encountered the most unfavorable situation in the 1990's. Nowadays, due to the concerns in global energy crisis and dwindling of oil reserve in Indonesia, the national nuclear program is again brought into consideration. (author)

  5. Regulatory Challenges for Launching First Nuclear Power Programme in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internationally, it has been recognized that there is a need to adapt the regulatory systems and regulations in the countries being faced with introduction of new nuclear technologies and application, thus posing some challenges to the regulatory framework of such countries. Nuclear regulators should not actively take in issues concerning nuclear energy policy. Their essential function is to contribute as effectively as possible to nuclear safety with the development of nuclear power reactor being pursued by the country as one of its alternative energy sources, The Bangladeshi regulatory framework and licensing philosophy had to be adapted in terms of ensuring that a credible and effective licensing process be developed and implemented for the first nuclear reactor. This paper will present the major challenges which will be faced by Bangladeshi regulator in developing and implementing such licensing process and how these will be addressed. (author)

  6. Facing the challenges of the nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Renaissance is stumbling at the very same time it should speed up in order to help control the climate change and meet a fast growing energy need in a large part of the world. Rising costs of projects, uncertainties about their completion, rocketing safety requirements, and financial constraints are key factors which slow down the Nuclear Renaissance. Furthermore, the legal infrastructure required from any country to enter a commercial nuclear programme (safety authorities, fuel cycle, and waste disposal) is a major hurdle s which impedes consideration for small to mid size reactors, well suited for many countries. The paper prepared and presented by Alain Bugat (Chairman of NucAdvisor and former Head of the French Atomic Energy Commission), Dominique Vignon (CEO of NucAdvisor and former President and CEO of AREVA NP) and Michel Lecomte (Co-founder NucAdvisor) reviews the present status of the Nuclear Renaissance. Based on an analysis of initial versus actual plans for all projects announced during the last three years, it scrutinizes some key factors behind the postponements of start-up dates of construction, and cost increases. On each of the issues which jeopardize new projects, the paper will propose an adequate course of actions, to be taken by vendors, operators, governments and safety authorities as well as investors, financial institutions and banks. - Recommendations are developed with respect to: - A needed coordination between the Kyoto and post Kyoto mechanisms, and the nuclear industry; a financial assessment of the potential of such coordination will be presented; - A transformation of the national licensing processes, under a common International framework; it will take into consideration the experience of the Airspace industry, and a systematic mutual acceptance of licensing certificates; - An easier access for nuclear projects to the financial markets, based on the support of major Financial institutions (World Bank; BEI; etc

  7. Welding Challenges in the nuclear context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power forms an essential part of the strategies deployed to provide the future global energy demands whilst meeting the obligations on CO2 emission reduction targets. In the UK, plans across the political spectrum call for a substantial nuclear new-build (NNB) programme. This necessitates application of best practice design, fabrication and welding technology in the UK context as well as a consideration of current and future skill requirements. Existing nuclear technology covers a range of different designs, and many reactors have reached the end of their design life. The decommissioning of old plants and management of nuclear waste, especially high-level, long-life and spent fuel waste, therefore also requires ongoing attention. Welding is defined by ISO as a 'special process', as imperfections in welded/fabricated products, even after inspection, may become apparent only after the product is put in use or service. Thus, welding has a major influence on the quality and cost of the final product, as well as the operational and maintenance costs. Most current trends in welding process innovations focus on improving weld quality and productivity, or reducing the dependency on welder/operator skills. Materials research concentrates on improving the understanding of influence of the environment (irradiation, temperature, corrosion, fatigue) on long-term performance and on repair of existing plants or future designs that will require higher temperature materials. The ITER nuclear fusion and the Jules-Horowitz Research reactors also have unique demands on materials and welding processes. Through the Engineering the Future alliance, the UK has organised a review of the international lessons learnt during recent nuclear new-build projects, and welding has been identified as a critical area requiring particular attention for any future new-build activities. TWI chaired the group advising on welding issues resulting in recommendations for the UK NNB programme. Key

  8. Nuclear reactor internal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The upper internal structures of the reactor are connected to the closing head so as to be readily removed with the latter and a skirt connected to the lower portion of said upper structures so as to surround the latter, extends under the control rods when they are removed from the reactor core. Through such an arrangement the skirt protects the control rods and supports the vessel closing-head and the core upper structures, whenever the head is severed from the vessel and put beside the latter in order to discharge the reactor

  9. Nuclear energy challenges in this Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The past fifty years have witnessed the advent of a new energy source and the beginning of yet another in the series of energy-use transitions that have marked our history since the start of our technological development. Each of these transitions has been accompanied by adaptive challenges. Each unique set of challenges has been met. Today the world faces the need for another transition. This paper outlines some of the associated challenges that lie ahead of us all, as we adapt to this new and exciting environment. The first step in defining the challenges ahead is to make some form of prediction of the future energy supply and demand during the period. Herein, the future up to 2010 is presumed to include two major events -- first, a decline in the availability and a rise in price of petroleum, and second a need to reduce greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. Both of these events are taken to be imminent. Added to these expected events is the assumption that the total of wind, solar, and other such energy sources will be able to contribute, but only in a relatively small way, to the provision of needed energy to our ever-expanding human population. (author)

  10. Challenges for the aircraft structural integrity program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-six years ago the United States Air Force established the USAF Aircraft Structural Integrity Program (ASIP) because flight safety had been degraded by fatigue failures of operational aircraft. This initial program evolved, but has been stable since the issuance of MIL-STD-1530A in 1975. Today, the program faces new challenges because of a need to maintain aircraft longer in an environment of reduced funding levels. Also, there is increased pressure to reduce cost of the acquisition of new aircraft. It is the purpose of this paper to discuss the challenges for the ASIP and identify the changes in the program that will meet these challenges in the future.

  11. Nuclear Shell Structure Evolution Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhengda; Wang, Xiaobin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiaochun

    2012-01-01

    The Self-similar-structure shell model (SSM) comes from the evolution of the conventional shell model (SM) and keeps the energy level of SM single particle harmonic oscillation motion. In SM, single particle motion is the positive harmonic oscillation and in SSM, the single particle motion is the negative harmonic oscillation. In this paper a nuclear evolution equation (NEE) is proposed. NEE describes the nuclear evolution process from gas state to liquid state and reveals the relations among...

  12. Nuclear challenges in Asia, an industrial perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author first gives a brief overview of military programmes implemented by India, China, Pakistan and North Korea to develop and manufacture the various vectors of nuclear weapons (submarines, missiles, bombers), the objective being (not always reached) to possess a nuclear triad (intercontinental ground-based missiles, submarines, and bombers). In this respect, the author briefly comments the evolutions of defence budgets, discusses the evolutions of the Chinese defence industry since the end of World War II (strong relationship with USSR, emergence of other various trade relationships, a more independent production but with a search for new technological partnerships). The author then discusses whether China is a threatening military power, more particularly for some Asian countries like Japan and South Korea

  13. Nuclear energy and the energetic challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author analyses the papers presented by F. Spaak and A. Giraud at the Paris Conference on the maturity of nuclear energy. Isolating the essential characteristics of world energetic consumption, the author points out that the long-terme preservation of resources requires a slowing down of the present consumption rate. The spontaneous actions conducted within the framework of new international relations aiming at a better distribution of the world's weath between industrialized countries and poor countries should be substituted for the bare techniques of the market. By meeting these energetic requirements, nuclear power is called upon to take a predominant part during the new few decades. This is what emerges from the ''summaries'' established from the various hypotheses, which notably show that recourse, to breeders is necessary without further delay in order to cope with the problems posed by uranium supplies

  14. Cybersecurity: new challenge for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this protective strategy is to ensure ability to detect, contain, respond and recover digital systems for monitoring, control and protection and thus ensure business continuity. A defensive strategy that consists of multiple levels is implemented to protect digital systems from unauthorized access, modification erroneous, misuse or any threat that could pose a risk to the Nuclear Security, Physical Security of people and the Radiological Protection, and the Environment.

  15. Nuclear Technology in Israel - Challenges and goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel,where 100% of all energy sources are imported, and where more than 100% of the water potential is used, will have to rely in the future on nuclear power reactors and nuclear desalination. The total electric capacity of about 4,000 Mwe in 1985 will propably rise to about 8,000 Mwe in 1995 and to about 16,000 Mwe or more in 2005. It is likely that the 12,000 Mwe plants to be built and operated after 1985, will be largely nuclear, if possible, with maybe some capacity of alternate sources, now in development in the country, including hydro from a proposed Mediterranean-Dead Sea canal (about 400 m height difference), pumped storage, shale oil, solar ponds. In view of the acute water shortage in the country, it is likely that between one third and one half of the 12,0OO Mwe plants will have to be dual-purpose plants, for power production and water desalination. As a preparation for this stage, a 10 million gallon per day desalination unit, Israeli designed and built, the so-called Horizontal-Tube-Multi-Effect (H.T.M.E.) aluminum tube plant, will be attached to an existing 50 Mwe oil-fuelled turbine and scheduled to be in operation in 1981 at Ashdod on the Mediterranean Sea as a Joint Israel - U.S.A. project. Several identical 1O MGD modules will form in the future the desalination plant to be attached to nuclear dual-purpose reactors. Fuel fabrication, starting possibly with imported enriched UF6 of nuclear fuel following the first LOAD, is contemplated to be made in the country. The desalination plants are intended to be 1O0% locally made. It is besides conceivable that the day will come when it will be nessary to connect the Red Sea and the Mediterranean by another canal, so that by the year 2000 and in the third millenium the two seas will be connected by two waterways -the Suez canal and the Israeli canal. (B.G.)

  16. Nuclear structure. Volume II. Nuclear deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume II, together with Volume I, contains a systematic treatment of the basis that has been gradually established during the last decades for understanding the vast body of data on nuclear properties and reactions. The presentation involves partly a development of the theoretical concepts and mathematical tools and partly a critical analysis of experimental results in terms of these concepts. While the first volume is concerned with single-particle motion and the formulation of symmetries, the second volume deals with collective rotational and vibrational motion as well as with the coupling of single-particle motion to the collective degrees of freedom. The discussion exploits several different levels of presentation, and this has motivated the division of the material into text, illustrative examples, and appendices. The text represents an attempt at a systematic development of the subject, in which each section is based on the concepts explained in previous sections. The comparison of theoretical concepts with the experimental evidence is contained in the illustrative examples; these examples are worked out in considerable detail and involve the full arsenal of available theoretical tools. The appendices are devoted to the development of general tools of quantal theory and to the analysis of idealized models that provide useful insight into various aspects of nuclear structure. This division of material contributes to making the book self-contained and at the same time provides the opportunity to elucidate the problems from several different points of view without destroying the unity of the concept. The presentation reflects the authors' view of nuclear physics as part of the broad development of concepts describing quantal many-body systems ranging from atoms and condensed matter to the structure of elementary particles

  17. Advanced nuclear plants meet the economic challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants operated in the baseload regime are economically competitive even when compared with plants burning fossil fuels. As they do not produce emissions when operated, they do not pollute the environment. This is clearly reflected also in the internalized costs. After 2000, many new power plants are expected to be constructed in the USA and worldwide. An important role in this phase will be played by advanced light water reactors of the ABWR and SBWR types representing the future state of the art in technology and safety as well as in cost and plant operations management. (orig.)

  18. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses topics in the following areas: Hadronic structure; hadrons in nuclei; hot hadronic matter; relativistic nuclear physics and NN interaction; leptonic emissions from high-Z heavy ion collisions; theoretical studies of heavy ion dynamics; nuclear pre-equilibrium reactions; classical chaotic dynamics and nuclear structure; and, theory of nuclear fission

  19. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-01-12

    One of the frontiers of today�s nuclear science is the �journey to the limits� of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena, but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this series of lectures, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  20. Nuclear Structure Near the Drip Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments with beams of unstable nuclei will make it possible to look closely into many aspects of the nuclear many-body problem. Theoretically, exotic nuclei represent a formidable challenge for the nuclear many-body theories and their power to predict nuclear properties in nuclear terra incognita

  1. Changing Facets of Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covello, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    Section I. Exotic nuclear structure. Radioactive beams at TRIUMF / A. C. Shotter. Status of RI-beam factory project at RIKEN / H. Ueno. Population of neutron unbound states via two-proton knockout reactions / N. Frank ... [et al.]. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei using ISOL facilities at CERN and Jyväskylä / J. Äystö. Shell structure evolution far from stability: recent results from GANIL / F. Azaiez. Magnetic moment meaurements: pushing the limits / N. Benczer-Koller. Technique for measuring angular correlations and g-factors of excited states with large multi-detector arrays: an application to neutron rich nuclei produced in spontaneous fission / A. V. Ramayya ... [et al.]. Isospin symmetry and proton decay: identification of the 10+ isomer in [symbol]Ni / C. Fahlander ... [et al.]. Exploring the evolution of the shell structure by means of deep inelastic reactions / G. de Angelis. Studies on the exotic structure of [symbol]Al by measurements of [symbol] and P[symbol] / D. Q. Fang ... [et al.]. Extended cluster model for light and medium nuclei / M. Tomaselli ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure studies on exotic nuclei with radioactive beams - present status and future perspectives at FAIR / P. Egelhof. The SPES direct target project at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro / G. Prete ... [et al.] -- Section II. Nuclear structure and nuclear forces. Modern aspects of nuclear structure theory / J. Wambach. Correlations in nuclei: a review / R. Schiavilla. Correlated nucleons in k- and r-space / I. Sick. Roles of all-order core polarizations and Brown-Rho scaling in nucleon effective interactions / T. T. S. Kuo ... [et al.]. Ab initio and ab exitu no core shell model / J. P. Vary ... [et al.]. Ab-initio coupled cluster theory for open quantum systems / G. Hagen ... [et al.]. Symplectic no-core shell model / J. P. Draayer ... [et al.]. Role of deformed symplectic configurations in ab initio no-core shell model results / T. Dytrych ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure

  2. Seawater desalination using nuclear heat/electricity - Prospects and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The desalination of seawater using nuclear energy is a feasible option to meet the growing demand of potable water. Over 150 reactor-years of operating experience of nuclear desalination have been accumulated worldwide. Several demonstration programs of nuclear desalination are also in progress to confirm its technical and economic viability under country specific conditions, with technical co-ordination or support of IAEA. Recent techno-economic feasibility studies carried out by some Member States indicate the competitiveness of nuclear desalination. This paper presents the salient activities on nuclear desalination in the Agency and in the interested Member States. In particular, some data from the feasibility studies carried out in the two south Mediterranean countries - Egypt and Tunisia - for their nuclear power and desalination projects are presented. Economic research on further water cost reduction includes investigation on utilization of waste heat from different nuclear reactor types for thermal desalination, preheat reverse osmosis using condenser cooling water return as feed and hybrid MED-RO desalination systems. The details of these are discussed. The main challenge for the large-scale deployment of nuclear seawater desalination is the lack of infrastructure and resources in the countries affected by water scarcity problems which are, however, interested in adoption of nuclear desalination for the sustainable water resources in the coming years. Socioeconomic and environmental aspects and the public perception for the nuclear desalination projects are also important factors requiring greater information exchange. These aspects are discussed while considering an integrated nuclear desalination system. (author)

  3. Structural analysis of nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    THe report describes the activities accomplished in the project 'Structural Analysis Project of Nuclear Power Plant Components' during the years 1974-1982 in the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory at the Technical Research Centre of Finland. The objective of the project has been to develop Finnish expertise in structural mechanics related to nuclear engineering. The report describes the starting point of the research work, the organization of the project and the research activities on various subareas. Further the work done with computer codes is described and also the problems which the developed expertise has been applied to. Finally, the diploma works, publications and work reports, which are mainly in Finnish, are listed to give a view of the content of the project. (author)

  4. Selected topics in nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    19. winter school in Zakopane was devoted to selected topics in nuclear structure such as: production of spin resonances, heavy ions reactions and their applications to the investigation of high spin states, octupole deformations, excited states and production of new elements etc. The experimental data are ofen compared with theoretical predictions. Report contains 28 papers. (M.F.W.)

  5. Nuclear fuel performance: Trends, remedies and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is unacceptable to have nuclear power plants unavailable or power restricted due to fuel reliability issues. 'Fuel reliability' has a much broader definition than just maintaining mechanical integrity and being leaker free - fuel must fully meet the specifications, impose no adverse impacts on plant operation and safety, and maintain quantifiable margins within design and operational envelopes. The fuel performance trends over the last decade are discussed and the significant contributors to reduced reliability experienced with commercial PWR and BWR designs are identified and discussed including grid-to-rod fretting and debris fretting in PWR designs and accelerated corrosion, debris fretting and pellet-cladding interaction in BWR designs. In many of these cases, the impacts have included not only fuel failures but also plant operating restrictions, forced shutdowns, and/or enhanced licensing authority oversight. Design and operational remedies are noted. The more demanding operating regimes and the constant quest to improve fuel performance require enhancements to current designs and/or new design features. Fuel users must continue to and enhance interaction with fuel suppliers in such areas as oversight of supplier design functions, lead test assembly irradiation programs and quality assurance oversight and surveillance. With the implementation of new designs and/or features, such fuel user initiatives can help to minimize the potential for performance problems

  6. Challenges new entrant countries face in establishing a nuclear program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brister, J. [CH2M Hill, Engelwood, Colorado (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Challenges new entrant countries face in establishing a nuclear programme are distilled into four major categories: human resource development, financing, infrastructure and process. In implementing a successful nuclear programme role of the government is key to success. It requires clear and sustained policy support, international and bilateral agreements, developing the depth required of technical skills and infrastructure, proven delivery programme, management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, decommissioning and electricity market regulation.

  7. Challenges new entrant countries face in establishing a nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challenges new entrant countries face in establishing a nuclear programme are distilled into four major categories: human resource development, financing, infrastructure and process. In implementing a successful nuclear programme role of the government is key to success. It requires clear and sustained policy support, international and bilateral agreements, developing the depth required of technical skills and infrastructure, proven delivery programme, management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, decommissioning and electricity market regulation.

  8. RECENT ADVANCES AND CHALLENGES IN TV STRUCTURING

    OpenAIRE

    Gros, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    TV represents a huge source of data. Even if a TV stream exhibits a strong structure to the viewer, in terms of programs and breaks, this structure is completely implicit in the stream, which is a simple sequence of images and audio frames. This paper presents recent works achieved to recover the structure of such a stream. 4 categories of works are presented, as well as their results and respective requirements in term of annotation. The paper ends by outlining the challenges to be solved in...

  9. Nuclear tracks today: Strengths, weaknesses, challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper takes stock of the main successes and failures notched up by the SSNTD discipline over the past half-century or so since its inception. Its strengths stem chiefly from factors such as its simplicity, the small geometry of its detectors, the fact that many natural crystals have kept a record of the spontaneous fission of uranium and trans-uranic elements, as well as heavy cosmic rays, over some billions of years. The fact, additionally, that high temperatures can diminish the lengths of latent tracks in a systematic way leads to useful information that can be gleaned regarding the thermal history of rocks, etc. The weaknesses of SSNTD techniques, on the other hand, arise mainly from drawbacks such as a lack of capability for real-time data assessment, poor charge and energy spectrometry of incident particles, and lack of any penetrating understanding of the underlying mechanisms-which results in a lot of data being collected for its own sake, furnishing little insight to the research workers. The paper ends by examining areas where as-yet unexploited potential exists, in the reviewer's opinion, for further discoveries, continuing developments, and challenging opportunities for successful new or improved applications and breakthroughs. These include geological and environmental fields, earthquake prediction, medical and life-science studies, automation, and exotic phenomena, amongst others

  10. Global Energy Challenges of the 21. Century and Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper considers the world energy demand till the middle of the century, as well as possible forecasting solution for this challenge. On the base of the mathematical model developed in the Kurchatov Institute in 2003- 2006, the vision of the global nuclear energy system and its potential contribution in the energy mix was analyzed. The rate of rapprochement between specific energy consumptions in different countries of the world is a key parameter determining the energy market strain. It was shown that a continuation of the current world trends of this rapprochement would result in an energy resource deficit already in the nearest future. The energy mix picture would contain an 'unsatisfied demand' area of about 10 000 Mtoe of total energy to be consumed by the mid-century Supposing that the mankind has to meet the 'unsatisfied demand' by nuclear energy, the global energy challenges of the 21. century energy do not impose any upper limit on nuclear energy development, the scale of which would be determined by development opportunities. Russia, as one of the pioneers of the First Nuclear Era, possesses great experience of solving the key issues of nuclear energy of the 20. century, and is capable to play an important role in dealing with the challenges faced by nuclear in the 21. century. (authors)

  11. Problems of structural mechanics in nuclear design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very careful and detailed stress analysis of nuclear presure vessels and components is essential for ensuring the safety and integrity of nuclear power plants. The nuclear designer, therefore, relies heavily on structural mechanics for application of the most advanced stress analysis techniques to practical design problems. The paper reviews the inter-relation between structural mechanics and nuclear design and discusses a few of the specific structural mechanics problems faced by the nuclear designers in the Department of Atomic Energy, India. (author)

  12. Nuclear structure with coherent states

    CERN Document Server

    Raduta, Apolodor Aristotel

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the essential features of a large variety of nuclear structure properties, both collective and microscopic in nature. Most of results are given in an analytical form thus giving deep insight into the relevant phenomena. Using coherent states as variational states, which allows a description in the classical phase space, or provides the generating function for a boson basis, is an efficient tool to account, in a realistic fashion, for many complex properties. A detailed comparison with all existing nuclear structure models provides readers with a proper framework and, at the same time, demonstrates the prospects for new developments. The topics addressed are very much of current concern in the field. The book will appeal to practicing researchers and, due to its self-contained account, can also be successfully read and used by new graduate students.

  13. Overview of principles and challenges of fusion nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion offers very attractive features as a sustainable, broadly available energy source: no emissions of greenhouse gases, no risk of severe accident, and no long-lived radioactive waste. Significant advances in the science and technology of fusion have been realized in the past decades. Seven countries (EU, Japan, USA, Russia, S. Korea, China, and India) comprising about half the world population are constructing a major magnetic fusion facility, called ITER, in France. The objectives of ITER are to demonstrate self-sustaining burning fusion plasma and to test fusion technologies relevant to fusion reactor. Many challenges to the practical utilization of fusion energy remain ahead. Among these challenges is the successful development of Fusion Nuclear Technology (FNT). FNT includes those fusion system components circumscribing the plasma and responsible for tritium production and processing, heat removal at high temperature and power density, and high heat flux components. FNT components face a new and more challenging environment than experienced by any previous nuclear application. Beyond plasma physics, FNT has most of the remaining feasibility and attractiveness issues in the development of fusion as an energy source. The blanket, a key FNT component, determines the critical path to DEMO. The blanket is exposed to an intense radiation environment. Radioactivity and decay heat can be produced in the structure and other blanket elements. Hence, material choices have a large impact on safety and environmental attractiveness. The unique conditions of the fusion environment include high radiation flux, high surface heat flux, strong 3-D-component magnetic field with large gradients, and ultra-low vacuum. These conditions, together with the requirements for high-temperature operation and tritium self-sufficiency, make blanket design and development challenging tasks. The blanket concepts being considered worldwide can be classified into solid breeders and liquid

  14. Experimental data confronts nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical content of experimental data for a variety of excitation energies and angular momenta is summarized. The specific nuclear structure questions which these data address are considered. The specific regions discussed are: low-spin data near the particle separation thresholds; low-spin data at intermediate excitation energies; high-spin, near-yrast data and high-spin data at larger excitation energies. 63 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  15. Algebraic approaches to nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept and application of algebraic models to nuclear structure is surveyed with emphasis on interpretations in terms of traditional geometric models. Recent studies relating to the relationship between β and γ vibrations in deformed nuclei, to the rigidity or softness of axial asymmetry, to signature splitting in octupole excitations, to O(6) quantum numbers and multi-phonon excitations, and to pseudo-SU(3) are discussed. 31 refs., 9 figs

  16. An overview of nuclear desalination: History and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both nuclear and desalination technologies are mature and proven by experience, and are commercially available from a variety of suppliers. From the early days of the two technologies, it was realised that nuclear energy could be utilised to overcome two of the challenges to the development of humankind, namely the sustainable supply of electricity and water. As early as the 1960s, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and individual countries carried out several technical and economic feasibility studies to investigate the utilisation of nuclear energy for seawater desalination. The assessments performed for these studies indicated that nuclear desalination would be technically feasible and economically competitive with fossil and renewable energy in a range of situations. Coupling nuclear reactor and desalination processes involves a number of issues that have to be addressed. These include safety of the nuclear plant and prevention of radioactive contamination of product water, assurance of potable water supply during reactor shutdown, as well as economic and financing issues. This article presents the development of nuclear desalination, its current status and its prospects for implementation, through a comprehensive review of its historical development, recent studies and R and D activities, as well as the main issues confronting nuclear desalination and approaches to address them. (author)

  17. How changes in the environment of the nuclear community are challenging the regulators of nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A country introducing nuclear power in its energy strategy has a lifelong obligation. The obligation is not mainly a question of energy production. It is an obligation to maintain safety during the phase of construction, energy production and decommissioning, as well as to take care of all the waste streams from nuclear installations. In addition, a country introducing nuclear power has an obligation that nuclear sources, material and equipment is used solely for peaceful purposes. In order to protect individuals and the environment, society has decided on legal requirements for the operation of nuclear facilities and established national safety authorities to oversee that the licensees fulfil their obligation and responsibility for safety. The changing environment related to nuclear will most certainly challenge the regulator, thus influencing oversight strategies and inspection practices - change which has started already. The paper addresses some of the changes and regulatory challenges related to this changing environment. (author)

  18. Smart structure application for the Challenger aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, L.; Blaha, Franz A.

    1994-09-01

    The Challenger aircraft fleet of the Canadian Forces will fly demanding missions, requiring the implementation of a fatigue management program based on the monitoring of in-flight aircraft load conditions. Conventional sensing techniques experience problems arising from severe electromagnetic interference (EMI). This paper describes the development of an EMI- insensitive smart-structure sensing concept for loads monitoring. Fiber-optic strain sensors, incorporated at critical structural locations, are used to monitor the fatigue life of the aircraft wing, fuselage, and empennage. A fiber-optic accelerometer is also incorporated in the system. A long-term plan is presented for the development of an advanced smart-structure concept which can support the continuous monitoring of fatigue-prone components, and provide the aircraft with near real-time damage location and assessment.

  19. The renaissance of nuclear power. Causes and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillriches, Christian [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    An increase in the use of nuclear energy for power generation is predicted worldwide. Confirmation of this trend can already be found today in extensions to nuclear power plant operating licenses and projects for nuclear plant upgrading and uprating. Numerous countries have decided to build new nuclear power plants or are planning to do so, even countries that have not used nuclear energy in the past. The reasons for this global renaissance include a growing demand for electric power all over the world, awareness that our fossil resources are limited, the desire by many countries to reduce their dependence on energy imports, and the drive to combat climate change. The nuclear industry is rising to this challenge by offering advanced reactors of the 3rd generation, by consolidating and restructuring manufacturing capacities, by building up staffing levels and investing in production facilities and the fuel cycle. Standardizing technology, progressively harmonizing safety requirements across national borders and setting up long-term cooperation agreements between vendors and plant operators are options that can help turn the global renaissance of nuclear power into a sustainable success. (orig.)

  20. The renaissance of nuclear power. Causes and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increase in the use of nuclear energy for power generation is predicted worldwide. Confirmation of this trend can already be found today in extensions to nuclear power plant operating licenses and projects for nuclear plant upgrading and uprating. Numerous countries have decided to build new nuclear power plants or are planning to do so, even countries that have not used nuclear energy in the past. The reasons for this global renaissance include a growing demand for electric power all over the world, awareness that our fossil resources are limited, the desire by many countries to reduce their dependence on energy imports, and the drive to combat climate change. The nuclear industry is rising to this challenge by offering advanced reactors of the 3rd generation, by consolidating and restructuring manufacturing capacities, by building up staffing levels and investing in production facilities and the fuel cycle. Standardizing technology, progressively harmonizing safety requirements across national borders and setting up long-term cooperation agreements between vendors and plant operators are options that can help turn the global renaissance of nuclear power into a sustainable success. (orig.)

  1. Future challenge of nuclear power in the European community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of a single European Market in 1992 are described together with the harmonization of the energy supply system within the Common Market. A forecast of energy demand up to the year 2010 is given and showing France's leading role in nuclear electricity generation and export. A restructuring of the European Nuclear Industry is in progress, eg joint marketing of a common PWR and a challenge has been put to the reactor manufacturers to combine the various design concepts into a joint European Fast Reactor. Plant safety criteria and design features to assure containment integrity and to prevent a core meltdown are discussed. 15 refs., 22 figs

  2. Opportunities and challenges for emerging nuclear power states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy and reliable access to energy sources are essential to economic and social development and improved quality of life. However, limited access to modern energy still remains one of the major constraints to socio-economic development in many parts in the world. On the other hand, energy production, distribution and consumption may have many adverse effects on the local, regional and global environment including climate change. Production and consumption of fossil fuels constitutes the main source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs). Cleaner and affordable energy systems are therefore needed to address all of these effects and to contribute to environmental sustainability. Nuclear power is a proven technology with virtually no greenhouse gas emissions or emission of pollutants, and therefore is expected to play an increasing role in meeting this rapidly growing global requirements for clean and economic electricity. But, it is known that challenges and opportunities are polarities, and as opposite poles of the magnet, they do not exist separately. An opportunity for some can be a challenge for others, or a challenge today can become an opportunity tomorrow. The potential growth of nuclear power has increased, in some quarters, concern that nonproliferation should be given sufficient attention. In particular, since introduction of many new power reactors will require increased uranium enrichment services, with the potential proliferation risk of adding enrichment facilities in new countries. This has urged the international community to strongly support the development of safeguarded and well-regulated nuclear power around the world, with the aim to ensure that nuclear power is deployed through a commitment to the highest possible standards of nuclear safety, security, and non-proliferation. The keys issues and trends for nuclear power expansion include therefore problems related to (i) safety, security and reliability, (ii) public perception and acceptance, (iii

  3. Pion structure function in nuclear medium

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    1995-01-01

    We study the pion structure function in nuclear medium using the Nambu and Jona-Lasinio model, and its implication for the nuclear pion enhancement of the sea quark distribution in nuclei. By using the operator product expansion, medium effect of the nuclear matter is incorporated in calculations of the twist-2 operators. We find density dependence of the pion structure function is rather weak around the nuclear matter density. We also discuss how the medium modification of the pion structure...

  4. Internal structure for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description is given of an internal structure for a nuclear reactor of the type having inside a presssure vessel a core composed of a number of fuel assemblies and a number of mobile control components. It includes a bottom grid integral with the vessel on which are secured the fuel assemblies, an intermediate grid located above the assemblies and also integral with the vessel, an upper grid located at the upper part of the vessel and integral with it and multiple vertical maintenance devices, extending between the upper and intermediate grids

  5. 3D Printing: A Challenge to Nuclear Export Controls

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher, Grant

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the possibility of manufacturing critical nuclear-fuel cycle technology using 3D printers in order to circumvent export controls. In particular, it examines the possibility that it may soon be possible to 3D-print maraging steel for use in a centrifuge to enrich uranium. The paper finds that while significant technological challenges remain, an expert with access to an off-the-shelf 3D printer, advanced quality control technology and knowledge of centrifuges should be able...

  6. Nuclear safety culture in Finland and Sweden - Developments and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, T.; Pietikaeinen, E. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland)); Kahlbom, U. (RiskPilot AB (Sweden)); Rollenhagen, C. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2011-02-15

    The project aimed at studying the concept of nuclear safety culture and the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The project also aimed at looking how the power companies and the regulators view the current responsibilities and role of subcontractors in the Nordic nuclear safety culture as well as to inspect the special demands for safety culture in subcontracting chains. Interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16) during 2009. Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). Results gave insight into the nature and evaluation of safety culture in the nuclear industry. Results illustrated that there is a wide variety of views on matters that are considered important for nuclear safety within the Nordic nuclear community. However, the interviewees considered quite uniformly such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Results also gave insight into the characteristics of Nordic nuclear culture. Various differences in safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were uncovered. In addition to the differences, historical reasons for the development of the nuclear safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were pointed out. Finally, results gave implications that on the one hand subcontractors can bring new ideas and improvements to the plants' practices, but on the other hand the assurance of necessary safety attitudes and competence of the subcontracting companies and their employees is considered as a challenge. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide understanding of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as a willingness to continuously develop one's competence and understanding. An effective and resilient nuclear safety culture has to foster a constant

  7. Nuclear safety culture in Finland and Sweden - Developments and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project aimed at studying the concept of nuclear safety culture and the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The project also aimed at looking how the power companies and the regulators view the current responsibilities and role of subcontractors in the Nordic nuclear safety culture as well as to inspect the special demands for safety culture in subcontracting chains. Interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16) during 2009. Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). Results gave insight into the nature and evaluation of safety culture in the nuclear industry. Results illustrated that there is a wide variety of views on matters that are considered important for nuclear safety within the Nordic nuclear community. However, the interviewees considered quite uniformly such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Results also gave insight into the characteristics of Nordic nuclear culture. Various differences in safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were uncovered. In addition to the differences, historical reasons for the development of the nuclear safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were pointed out. Finally, results gave implications that on the one hand subcontractors can bring new ideas and improvements to the plants' practices, but on the other hand the assurance of necessary safety attitudes and competence of the subcontracting companies and their employees is considered as a challenge. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide understanding of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as a willingness to continuously develop one's competence and understanding. An effective and resilient nuclear safety culture has to foster a constant sense of

  8. The nuclear renaissance - Opportunities and challenges [Keynote address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy must be part of the solution to meet future electricity demand and it must be done cost effectively, without damaging our environment. The challenges presented by the new prospects for nuclear energy require the management of (a) closing the looming gap between uranium supply and demand (b) closing the technical and political challenges in exploration and mine development and (c) finding and developing innovations throughout the nuclear fuel cycle that make good economic and environmental sense. The talk elaborates on the increasing uranium consumption, the near time uranium supply challenges, identifies production expansion, and discusses world uranium exploration and advances in mining and milling. It is stressed that the IAEA should play an important role in collecting and disseminating up-to-date information concerning the latest technological advances - through periodic conferences and technical meetings. The organization should gather and compile accurate uranium supply information. In its existing compilation that forms the IAEA Red Book, the Estimated Additional Resources (EAR) categories have long been inconsistently reported by member countries, reducing reliability and in some cases overstating or understating the supply potential of important regions. The usefulness of IAEA's supply estimates would be improved by the development of a single, consistent approach to the estimation of uranium potential, which member countries would then be encouraged to adopt. Countries that have abundant resources should be encouraged by the agency to open up their lands to foreign investment for uranium exploration and development. The IAEA should present the case for improved investment climates, educating restrictive jurisdictions about current industry practices and standards, and lobbying for consistent and reasonable licencing processes that reflect science-based assessments of risk. The key note speaker encourages the IAEA to fill its role as an

  9. Nuclear Data for Astrophysics: Resources, Challenges, Strategies, and Software Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most exciting utilizations of nuclear data is to help unlock the mysteries of the Cosmos -- the creation of the chemical elements, the evolution and explosion of stars, and the origin and fate of the Universe. There are now many nuclear data sets, tools, and other resources online to help address these important questions. However, numerous serious challenges make it important to develop strategies now to ensure a sustainable future for this work. A number of strategies are advocated, including: enlisting additional manpower to evaluate the newest data; devising ways to streamline evaluation activities; and improving communication and coordination between existing efforts. Software projects are central to some of these strategies. Examples include: creating a virtual 'pipeline' leading from the nuclear laboratory to astrophysics simulations; improving data visualization and management to get the most science out of the existing datasets; and creating a nuclear astrophysics data virtual (online) community. Recent examples will be detailed, including the development of two first-generation software pipelines, the Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics for stellar astrophysics and the bigbangonline suite of codes for cosmology, and the coupling of nuclear data to sensitivity studies with astrophysical simulation codes to guide future research.

  10. Timeline Iraq: Challenges and lessons learned from nuclear inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under a dramatic and far-reaching global spotlight, the International Atomic Energy Agency's experience in Iraq reached a turning point in March 2003. Its nuclear inspection team - together with teams of the United Nations Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) and the rest of the UN organisations operating in Iraq - had to withdraw ahead of announced military operations. The diplomatic route to disarming Iraq had reached an impasse. Today, international inspection teams tracking weapons of mass destruction (WMD) programmes in Iraq work in the wings, ready to resume operations in Iraq at the UN Security Council's call. The mandate of international inspection stands, with the IAEA's Iraq Nuclear Verification Office (INVO) in Vienna in charge of the nuclear file. The IAEA's nuclear inspection and verification experience in Iraq stretches over a span of three decades, addressing activities from the mine to the weapon. Agency inspectors led the discovery and dismantlement of Iraq's secret nuclear weapons programme in the 1990s, and after the 1990s round of inspections had stopped, they had found no evidence, up to March 2003, that the programme had been revived since 1998. Since the first Iraq inspections under Security Council mandate in early 1991, the road of nuclear verification in Iraq has proved to be long and hard, and valuable lessons were learned that have benefited the international community and strengthened the IAEA inspectorate. This article highlights the IAEA's extensive experience in Iraq, the main challenges, and selected key lessons drawn from them

  11. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs

  12. The nuclear education and staffing challenge: Rebuilding critical skills in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of nuclear legacies, global security, nonproliferation, homeland security and national defense, radiobiology and nuclear energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. Current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs are presented. (author)

  13. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory were 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs

  14. Structural materials challenges for fusion power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Structural materials in a fusion power system must function in an extraordinarily demanding environment that includes various combinations of high temperatures, reactive chemicals, time-dependent thermal and mechanical stresses, and intense damaging radiation. The fusion neutron environment produces displacement damage equivalent to displacing every atom in the material about 150 times during its expected service life, and changes in chemical composition by transmutation reactions, which includes creation of reactive and insoluble gases. Fundamental materials challenges that must be resolved to effectively harness fusion power include (1) understanding the relationships between material strength, ductility and resistance to cracking, (2) development of materials with extraordinary phase stability, high-temperature strength and resistance to radiation damage, (3) establishment of the means to control corrosion of materials exposed to aggressive environments, (4) development of technologies for large-scale fabrication and joining, and (5) design of structural materials that provide for an economically attractive fusion power system while simultaneously achieving safety and environmental acceptability goals. The most effective approach to solve these challenges is a science-based effort that couples development of physics-based, predictive models of materials behavior with key experiments to validate the models. The U.S. Fusion Materials Sciences program is engaged in an integrated effort of theory, modeling and experiments to develop structural materials that will enable fusion to reach its safety, environmental and economic competitiveness goals. In this presentation, an overview of recent progress on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, nanocomposited ferritic alloys, and silicon carbide fiber reinforced composites for fusion applications will be given

  15. Nuclear disasters and health: lessons learned, challenges, and proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuru, Akira; Tanigawa, Koichi; Kumagai, Atsushi; Niwa, Ohtsura; Takamura, Noboru; Midorikawa, Sanae; Nollet, Kenneth; Yamashita, Shunichi; Ohto, Hitoshi; Chhem, Rethy K; Clarke, Mike

    2015-08-01

    Past nuclear disasters, such as the atomic bombings in 1945 and major accidents at nuclear power plants, have highlighted similarities in potential public health effects of radiation in both circumstances, including health issues unrelated to radiation exposure. Although the rarity of nuclear disasters limits opportunities to undertake rigorous research of evidence-based interventions and strategies, identification of lessons learned and development of an effective plan to protect the public, minimise negative effects, and protect emergency workers from exposure to high-dose radiation is important. Additionally, research is needed to help decision makers to avoid premature deaths among patients already in hospitals and other vulnerable groups during evacuation. Since nuclear disasters can affect hundreds of thousands of people, a substantial number of people are at risk of physical and mental harm in each disaster. During the recovery period after a nuclear disaster, physicians might need to screen for psychological burdens and provide general physical and mental health care for many affected residents who might experience long-term displacement. Reliable communication of personalised risks has emerged as a challenge for health-care professionals beyond the need to explain radiation protection. To overcome difficulties of risk communication and provide decision aids to protect workers, vulnerable people, and residents after a nuclear disaster, physicians should receive training in nuclear disaster response. This training should include evidence-based interventions, support decisions to balance potential harms and benefits, and take account of scientific uncertainty in provision of community health care. An open and joint learning process is essential to prepare for, and minimise the effects of, future nuclear disasters. PMID:26251394

  16. Selected topic in nuclear structure. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report of recent experiments performed in different laboratories and a review of fundamental problems of nuclear physics connected with study of nuclear structure, that had just been solved are presented. The proceedings contain 33 articles. (M.F.-W.)

  17. Interprofessional education – structural and didactical challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handgraaf Marietta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available After five years of experience in interprofessional education (IPE in the Bachelor programs occupational therapy, midwifery, nursing, speech therapy, and physiotherapy at the University of Applied Sciences in Bochum (Germany, we have systematically evaluated and substantially revised our IPE concept in 2014/15. The structural and curricular embedding of IPE throughout the course of the five Bachelor programs requires the development and ongoing evolution of a binding concept for the interprofessional competence development. This concept needs to be based on a systematic reflection of current practice and sound scientific knowledge concerning interprofessional topics. Furthermore, it needs to address the promotion of competencies to act inter- and transprofessionally to enable a high quality of care (Wissenschaftsrat, 2012; Walkenhorst, 2012. Results of narrative literature reviews, structured internal discussions, interviews of experts and various internal and external evaluations have been incorporated into a new conceptual framework for IPE. It has been shown that a revision of the structure, the temporal sequences of modules and the framework to facilitate interprofessional practice are essential steps for continuous development of interprofessional education. In addition, barriers and challenges are identified and discussed. Overall, the process of development has been coordinated and accompanied continuously and successfully by an IPE committee involving different groups of representative members from the Department of Applied Health Sciences.

  18. Challenges in Capacity Building for VARANS' TSO for Nuclear Power Plant Development in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vietnam is currently planning to build its first nuclear power plant to address its increasing energy needs. Recognizing the importance of the 19 issues laid out in the IAEA publication Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power, Vietnam is considering how to address these issues and how to mould its current legal and regulatory structure to accommodate a nuclear power programme. This structure has undergone major changes in the past several years and continues to do so. The Vietnam Agency for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (VARANS), which regulates all nuclear and radiological activities in Vietnam, was established as a regulatory agency in 2003. The Law on Atomic Energy passed by the National Assembly in June 2008 specifies the requirements for Vietnam's future nuclear power programme, and VARANS is an important player in developing Vietnam's plans for regulating the programme. As the nuclear power programme is moving ahead quickly, VARANS is facing many challenges, including staffing, expertise and especially technical support for its regulatory activities in order to ensure a safe, secure and peaceful nuclear power programme. (author)

  19. Opportunities and challenges for materials innovation in nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials performance is central to the satisfactory operation of current and future nuclear energy systems. For example, the remarkable improvement in the operation and reliability of Generation-II light water reactors (LWRs) over the past 25 years has been largely associated with improvements in steam generator materials, fuel cladding technology (composition and fabrication), and improved understanding of water chemistry impacts on corrosion and deposition. Future fission and proposed fusion energy systems will be increasingly dependent on advanced structural materials to reliably deliver high performance with favorable safety attributes and acceptable economic cost. In many cases, the proposed operating temperatures are significantly higher than the experience base for light water reactors. This motivates development of structural materials with improved high temperature strength for prolonged operating periods and engineered corrosion resistance for the candidate coolants and other materials in the system. The high radiation fluxes in future nuclear energy systems will require the structural materials to have superior radiation resistance compared to currently available materials. The material performance demands are particularly challenging for the fuel cladding and wrapper of next-generation sodium-cooled fast reactors, where simultaneous resistance to high temperature thermal creep and radiation-induced property degradation up to doses of ∼100-150 dpa is required. Several strategies can be utilized to develop structural materials with simultaneous high radiation resistance, high strength, good toughness and corrosion resistance, and moderate fabrication cost. There are three general approaches for designing radiation resistance: Nano-scale precipitates or interfaces to produce high point defect sink strength (e.g., oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) and next-generation ferritic/martensitic steels with high particle densities); purposeful utilization of

  20. Teaching nuclear energy: the challenges of interdisciplinarity in the classroom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drs. Bratt and McCollum teach a third year undergraduate course entitled 'The Science and Politics of Nuclear Energy' at Mount Royal University in Calgary. To the best of our knowledge this is the only course of its kind offered in Canada that combines science and politics of nuclear energy in the same course and taught by specialists in both of those areas. The presentation would cover the following key points: Why was the course conceived? What was the role of MRU's focus on General Education? How was the course conceived? What is unique about it? What is the course content? How is the material delivered? What is the student profile? Explaining the success of the course. From Winter 2011 when there were only 5 registered students in a 30 seat course, to 31 registered students in a 30 seat course in Winter 2012. Challenges of a multi-disciplinary course, ie., science students who are afraid of writing long political papers, social science students who are afraid of the periodic table and math. Challenges of teaching such a course in Calgary, ie., lack of a nuclear industry, lack of guest speakers, etc. The methodology for the course includes: Demographic statistics from student enrolments; Content analysis of course documents Instructor's views on the course; and, A student survey.

  1. Teaching nuclear energy: the challenges of interdisciplinarity in the classroom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratt, D. [Mount Royal Univ., Dept. of Policy Studies, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); McCollum, B. [Mount Royal Univ. Dept. of Chemical and Biological Sciences, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Drs. Bratt and McCollum teach a third year undergraduate course entitled 'The Science and Politics of Nuclear Energy' at Mount Royal University in Calgary. To the best of our knowledge this is the only course of its kind offered in Canada that combines science and politics of nuclear energy in the same course and taught by specialists in both of those areas. The presentation would cover the following key points: Why was the course conceived? What was the role of MRU's focus on General Education? How was the course conceived? What is unique about it? What is the course content? How is the material delivered? What is the student profile? Explaining the success of the course. From Winter 2011 when there were only 5 registered students in a 30 seat course, to 31 registered students in a 30 seat course in Winter 2012. Challenges of a multi-disciplinary course, ie., science students who are afraid of writing long political papers, social science students who are afraid of the periodic table and math. Challenges of teaching such a course in Calgary, ie., lack of a nuclear industry, lack of guest speakers, etc. The methodology for the course includes: Demographic statistics from student enrolments; Content analysis of course documents Instructor's views on the course; and, A student survey.

  2. Thailand: Infrastructure Development and Challenges to Launch Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 2007, the cabinet passed a resolution for Thailand's Power Development Plan (PDP 2007). It was mentioned in the plan that Thailand will have 2 x 1,000 MWe nuclear power plants in 2020 and another 2 x 1,000 MWe in 2021. The PDP 2007 was revised in March 2009 and it was agreed to change the nuclear power generation to only 1 x 1,000 MWe in 2020 and 2021 respectively due to the large excess capacity at present. Many activities related to development of infrastructures in order to support electricity generation using nuclear power are being executed. Milestones for nuclear power program implementation has been developed using the IAEA document 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' with some amendment/additions to suit the country situation. According to the schedule, a lot of activities related to infrastructure establishment, feasibility study, utility preparation and public education and participation are being performed. Within the year 2011, various issues such as legal and regulatory systems and international commitment, industrial and commercial infrastructure, technology transfer and human resource development, safety and environmental protection, public information and public acceptance, preparation of the nuclear power utility establishment, etc. must be solved out and undertaken to assure the cabinet to make final decision to go nuclear. There are many challenges for Thailand embarking of the nuclear power programme. It is essential to plan for the establishment of a regulatory body at the national level to support and regulate the nuclear power plant industry. Currently, the application for a license and the monitoring of a power plant are administered by the authorities of various agencies under different ministries; hence the process is very time-consuming and overlaps with one another. The approach that the regulatory body and the authorities to issue licenses relevant to the nuclear power plant operation

  3. Capacity building support for nuclear nonproliferation and nuclear security. Challenges and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capacity building support is critical for the enhancement of international nuclear nonproliferation and security regimes. In this regard the Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security (ISCN) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is promoting capacity building support internationally in the areas of nuclear nonproliferation and security. Similarly, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and European Commission's Joint Research Centre (EC/JRC) are providing capacity building support for international partners in these fields. While this kind of capacity building support is accelerating, it is increasingly recognized that many challenges exist to achieve effective capacity building support, such as gaps between needs and support contents and possible redundancies in various support activities. As a result, the effectiveness of capacity building support is seriously questioned, and greater importance is now attached to the harmonization among support activities. With this situation in mind, this paper will introduce the concepts and approach of ISCN's capacity building support, discuss the challenges for this support to serve for enduring efforts toward the enhancement of nuclear nonproliferation and security and possible ways to overcome these challenges. (author)

  4. Proceeding of the Fourth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Technology of Nuclear Fuel Cycle facing the Challenge of Energy Need on the 21-st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceeding contains papers presented in the Fourth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Fuel Element Cycle with theme of Technology of Nuclear Fuel Cycle facing the Challenge of Energy Need on the 21st Century, held on 1-2 December in Jakarta, Indonesia. These papers were divided by three groups that are technology of exploration, processing, purification and analysis of nuclear materials; technology of nuclear fuel elements and structures; and technology of waste management, safety and management of nuclear fuel cycle. There are 36 papers indexed individually. (ID)

  5. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technologies: Current Challenges and Future Plans - 12558

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Office of Nuclear Energy's Fuel Cycle Technologies office (FCT program) is to provide options for possible future changes in national nuclear energy programs. While the recent draft report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future stressed the need for organization changes, interim waste storage and the establishment of a permanent repository for nuclear waste management, it also recognized the potential value of alternate fuel cycles and recommended continued research and development in that area. With constrained budgets and great expectations, the current challenges are significant. The FCT program now performs R and D covering the entire fuel cycle. This broad R and D scope is a result of the assignment of new research and development (R and D) responsibilities to the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), as well as reorganization within NE. This scope includes uranium extraction from seawater and uranium enrichment R and D, used nuclear fuel recycling technology, advanced fuel development, and a fresh look at a range of disposal geologies. Additionally, the FCT program performs the necessary systems analysis and screening of fuel cycle alternatives that will identify the most promising approaches and areas of technology gaps. Finally, the FCT program is responsible for a focused effort to consider features of fuel cycle technology in a way that promotes nonproliferation and security, such as Safeguards and Security by Design, and advanced monitoring and predictive modeling capabilities. This paper and presentation will provide an overview of the FCT program R and D scope and discuss plans to analyze fuel cycle options and support identified R and D priorities into the future. The FCT program is making progress in implanting a science based, engineering driven research and development program that is evaluating options for a sustainable fuel cycle in the U.S. Responding to the BRC recommendations, any resulting legislative changes

  6. Future nuclear regulatory challenges. A report by the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future challenges are considered that may arise from technical, socio-economic and political issues; organizational, management and human aspects; and international issues. The perceived challenges have been grouped into four categories, each covered by a chapter. Technical issues are addressed that many present regulatory challenges in the future: ageing nuclear power plants. External changes to industry are considered next that have an effect on regulators, privatization, cost reduction consequences, commercialization etc. It is followed by the impacts of internal changes: organizational, managerial, human-resources, licensing, staff training etc. Finally, international issues are discussed with potential regulatory impact. (R.P.)

  7. StarCore Nuclear - response to a unique challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The provision of clean energy at remote off-grid communities in the far North of Canada - above the 60th parallel - is a difficult challenge; with no grid connectivity the options are limited to some form of carbon-based fuel shipped to the site or the use of 'renewables' - wind, solar, or hydro-electric power. It might seem that this 'renewable power' would be ideal for these communities, but there is always the problem of the reserve power need to support the community needs when the renewable power fails. In the past this has always been provided by diesel or natural gas, but in the face of global warming this is not an attractive - or morally acceptable - long-term solution. StarCore Nuclear is a Canadian start-up nuclear power company with the specific goal of providing clean power, potable water and thermal energy to these remote communities. (author)

  8. Nuclear Power Plant NDE Challenges - Past, Present, and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operating fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants was built to fossil plant standards (of workmanship, not fitness for service) and with good engineering judgment. Fortuitously, those nuclear power plants were designed using defense-in-depth concepts, with nondestructive examination (NDE) an important layer, so they can tolerate almost any component failure and still continue to operate safely. In the 30+ years of reactor operation, many material failures have occurred. Unfortunately, NDE has not provided the reliability to detect degradation prior to initial failure (breaching the pressure boundary). However, NDE programs have been improved by moving from prescriptive procedures to performance demonstrations that quantify inspection effectiveness for flaw detection probability and sizing accuracy. Other improvements include the use of risk-informed strategies to ensure that reactor components contributing the most risk receive the best and most frequent inspections. Another challenge is the recent surge of interest in building new nuclear power plants in the United States to meet increasing domestic energy demand. New construction will increase the demand for NDE but also offers the opportunity for more proactive inspections. This paper reviews the inception and evolution of NDE for nuclear power plants over the past 40 years, recounts lessons learned, and describes the needs remaining as existing plants continue operation and new construction is contemplated

  9. Structural materials: New challenges, manufacturing and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full texct: This paper reviews international perspectives on materials, manufacturing and performance on structural materials for fast reactors. It is recognized that fast reactors with closed fuel cycle shall play an eminent and major role to realize energy sustainability. Large scale exploitation of fast reactors shall require meeting of sustainability requirements such as economic competitiveness, safe and optimized waste management, increased proliferation resistance, improved use of uranium and thorium and enhanced efficiency. The designers of these reactors along with material specialists have a key role in meeting the above mentioned criteria of sustainability. The paper shall describe features of advanced sodium cooled fast reactors and the resulting requirements on the performance of the structural materials. The choice of the fuel governs the cladding material for these reactors. Considering the choice as oxide, carbide, metallic with or without minor actinides; cladding materials are chosen based on performance modeling, available experience and expertise. Improved varieties of 316 austenitic stainless steels and oxide dispersion ferritice-martensitic steels emerge as front runners to meet the requirements. The developments in Ti modified 316 austenitic stainless steels give enough confidence to take these fuels to burn-up of 120,000 MWd/t. It is inferred that the target burn-up of 250,000 MWd/t would only be achieved with oxide dispersion strengthened iron- chromium base steels. Research and development of modified austenitic stainless steels and ODS alloys in Japan, Europe and India would be described in the paper. For achieving high burn-up of 250,000 MWd/t, ferritic-martensitic steel has emerged as the choice for the wrapper material. The current status of development and the challenges shall be described in the paper. In particular, the European contribution to this paper addresses the development and performance assessment of the preferred

  10. Nuclear materials - fissile, fertile and dual-use structural materials involved in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article presents a brief account of nuclear materials, with special emphasis on fissile, fertile and some important dual-use structural materials generally involved in nuclear reactors. The dual-use structural materials utilized in nuclear reactors have got important applications in both nuclear and non-nuclear fields. In the hostile environment, the important phenomena such as interactions between fission products and the surrounding elemental species, radiation-induced effects, corrosion, generation of gases, swelling and so forth, become increasingly complex and the performance of a nuclear reactor system thus becomes very much dependent on the physicochemical stability and nuclear compatibility of the dual-use structural materials used in fuel sub-assembly towards the fuel elements. In this context, the dual-use structural materials like stainless steel, zirconium alloys, etc. as claddings; water, liquid sodium or gases, etc. as coolants and water, boron, etc. as moderators, having good reliability and appropriate nuclear compatibility with the fuels, are of prime importance in reactor technology. In advanced designed reactors, development of novel fuels coupled with efficient dual-use structural materials may mitigate the challenges involved in optimizing the efficiency of the power reactors under specific experimental conditions. (author)

  11. Challenges faced by nuclear research centres in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear research centres in Indonesia are mainly owned and operated by the National Nuclear Energy Agency, covering basically various research and development facilities for non-energy and energy related activities. The research and development activities cover a broad spectrum of basic, applied, and developmental research involving nuclear science and technology in supporting various fields ranging from basic human needs, e.g. food and health; natural resources and nuclear and environmental safety; as well as industry. Recent economic crisis, triggered by monetary turmoil, has dictated the IAEA to face new challenges and to give more efforts on the application of the so called 'instant technology' i.e. the technology which has been developed and is ready for implementation, especially on food and health, to be better utilized to overcome various problems in the society. Various short and medium term programmes on the application of isotopes, radiation, and nuclear techniques for non-energy related activities have emerged in accord with these efforts. In this regard, besides the intensification of the instant technology implementation on food and health, the nuclear research and development on food plant mutation, fertilizers, radio-vaccines, production of meat and milk, production processes of various radiopharmaceuticals, and radioisotopes as well as radiation processing related to agro-industry have to be intensified using the available laboratories processing facilities. The possibility of the construction of irradiators for post harvesting processes in some provinces is being studied, while the designing and manufacturing of various prototypes of devices, equipment, and instruments for nuclear techniques in health and industry are continued. Considering the wide applications of accelerators for non-energy and energy related research and development, construction of accelerator-based laboratories is being studied. In energy related research the feasibility of

  12. The Eurosafe Forum 2003: Nuclear expertise and challenges of the enlargement of the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EUROSAFE is an international forum for discussions among experts from technical safety organisations, research institutes, safety authorities, utilities, the industry, public authorities and non-governmental organisations concerning the status of and recent achievements in nuclear installation safety, waste management, radiation safety and nuclear material security. The Eurosafe Forum 2003 - the fifth of its kind - was held at the Palais Brongniart in Paris on November 25 and 26, 2003. This year's theme was: 'Nuclear expertise and challenges of the enlargement of the European Union: speakers in the various European countries about the environmental scan before enlargement, development and structuring perspectives within the enlarged Europe'. The event brought together 445 experts and researchers from around the world (including 124 from Germany, 184 from France, 88 from Eastern Europe, as well as representatives from Korea, Japan, the United States, Canada, Cuba, and Armenia. The proceedings of the symposium can now be consulted online. The fifth edition of the forum focused on nuclear expertise and the challenge of EU-enlargement and the latest work carried out by GRS, IRSN and their partners from the European Union, Switzerland and Eastern Europe. Nuclear energy contributes approximately one third of European electricity production. A high level of nuclear safety is a priority for the countries of Europe. The technical safety organisations play an important role in contributing to that objective through appropriate approaches to major safety issues as part of their assessments and research activities. The challenges to nuclear safety are increasingly international. Changes in underlying technologies such as instrumentation and control, the impact of electricity market deregulation, demands for improved safety, the ageing of nuclear facilities, waste management, maintaining and improving scientific and technical knowledge and the need for greater transparency

  13. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon's mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e+e- problem and heavy ion dynamics

  14. Many-body interactions and nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hjorth-Jensen, M; Hagen, G; Kvaal, S

    2010-01-01

    This article presents several challenges to nuclear many-body theory and our understanding of the stability of nuclear matte r. In order to achieve this, we present five different cases, starting with an idealized toy model. These cases expose problems that need to be understood in order to match recent advances in nuclear theory with current experimental programs in low-energy nuclear physics. In particular, we focus on our current understanding, or lack thereof, of many-body forces, and how they evolve as functions of the number of particles . We provide examples of discrepancies between theory and experiment and outline some selected perspectives for future research directions.

  15. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a brief description of the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Network in response to a request from the Advisory Group Meeting on ''Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators'' (IAEA, Vienna, 14-17 December 1998, report IAEA(NDS)-399 (1999)). This report supersedes the special issue of the Nuclear Data Newsletter No. 20 published in November 1994. (author)

  16. Nuclear structure of 172Yb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed angular distributions of the 173Yb(d,t)172Yb and 171Yb(t,d)172Yb reactions have been measured, using 15 MeV beams of deuterons and tritons, and reaction products were analysed with a magnetic spectrograph. The angular distribution for each peak was compared with DWBA predictions to extract spectroscopic strengths for components of different l-values. These strengths were compared with values calculated from the microscopic compositions of states predicted by the Quasiparticle-Phonon Nuclear Model (QPNM). For this purpose, new QPNM calculations using an extended set of base states were performed and are reported. Techniques were developed for performing Coriolis mixing calculations on single-phonon states (i.e., superpositions of two-quasiparticle components). For the first time a good understanding has been obtained for the microscopic structures of the Kπ = 2+ band at 1608 keV and Kπ = 3+ band at 1663 keV, which are strongly mixed. Sixteen rotational bands up to 2.6 MeV are interpreted, in addition to many states above 2 MeV which have strong (t,d) populations associated with severely fragmented configurations. The QPNM is very successful in providing a detailed description of the large set of strengths measured. An exception is that for some Kπ = 0+ bands above the first excited one at 1043 keV, more strength is predicted than observed

  17. Nuclear structure - classic and exotic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of the lecture covered some of the most exciting areas of the nuclear structure domain, both from experimental and theoretical point of view. These concern mainly lifetime measurements for nuclear excited states and study of structure and decay modes of the nuclei far from the stability valley. Nuclear structure studies by in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy constituted a continuous component of the work of our group even before the first delivery of the heavy-ion beam by the Van de Graaff tandem of our institute. We have systematically measured lifetimes of excited states in different nuclei where such data were very scarce. During the last few years we have used the Doppler shift attenuation method (DSAM) for excited states populated with the (p,nγ) reaction. Although the recoil velocity in such a reaction is very small, which implies the measurement of very low γ-ray energy shifts with the detection angle, there are nevertheless some advantages in using such a reaction. One of them is that the measurements can be performed reasonably close to the threshold of the state(s) of interest, which results in recoiling the nuclei in the forward direction and avoiding the feeding from the higher lying levels. Another advantage is the rather non-selective population of practically all the low spin states. We have thus measured lifetimes of low-lying, low-spin states in nuclei such as 115,117 Sb, 111 In, 73 As and 71Ge. In all these cases, by using all the spectroscopic data available, quite extensive checks could be made for the Interacting Boson-Fermion model (IBFM). Here we shall illustrate these measurements with the 73 As case. We have studied a series of nuclei in the region in the A ∼ 80 - 90 region, on the neutron deficient side (Sr, Y, Zr) as well as in the higher mass region (Tc, Ru, Rh). The Sr to Zr isotopes have been reached by reactions of 14 N, 16 O and 19 F beams on Ge and Se isotopically enriched targets, and medium high-spin states in these nuclei

  18. Nuclear structure and neutrino-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent years have witnessed an intense experimental and theoretical activity oriented towards a better comprehension of neutrino nucleus interaction. While the main motivation for this task is the demand coming from oscillation experiments in their search for a precise determination of neutrino properties, the relevance of neutrino interaction with matter is more wide-ranging. It is imperative for astrophysics, hadronic and nuclear physics, and physics beyond the standard model. The experimental information on neutrino induced reactions is rapidly growing, and the corresponding theoretical description is a challenging proposition, since the energy scales of interest span a vast region, going from few MeV for solar neutrinos, to tens of MeV for the interpretation of experiments with the muon and pion decay at rest and the detection of neutrinos coming from the core collapse of supernova, and to hundreds of MeV or few GeV for the detection of atmospheric neutrinos, and for the neutrino oscillation program of the MiniBooNE experiment. The presence of neutrinos, being chargeless particles, can only be inferred by detecting the secondary particles created in colliding and interacting with the matter. Nuclei are often used as neutrino detectors, and in particular 12C which is a component of many scintillator detectors. Thus, the interpretation of neutrino data heavily relies on detailed and quantitative knowledge of the features of the neutrino-nucleus interaction. The nuclear structure methods used in the evaluation of the neutrino-nucleus cross section are reviewed. Detailed comparison between the experimental and theoretical results establishes benchmarks needed for verification and/or parameter adjustment of the nuclear models. Having a reliable tool for such calculation is of great importance in a variety of applications, such as the description of the r-process nucleosynthesis. (author)

  19. Experiments with radioactive nuclear beams for nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive Nuclear Beams (RNBs) are opening new regions of the nuclear landscape to nuclear structure studies. Early experiments with RNBs rely on reactions with large cross sections, inverse kinematics, and very efficient detector geometries in order to measure observables that are very sensitive to structural features. A Coulomb excitation experiment extracted the B(E2;01+ → 21+) values of the neutron rich RNBs 132,134Te at the HRIBF with the GRAFIK through-well NaI(Tl) detector. In addition, other experiments with RNBs, such as Coulomb excitation of octupole states and reorientation experiments, inelastic scattering, and single-particle transfer, will be discussed

  20. Vibration problems in nuclear power plants - challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through specific examples like the Dhruva fuel vibration problems, it is shown that in different stages of a plant construction and operation that the vibration problems provide many challenging opportunities for innovative solutions to be applied. These examples also show that in-depth understanding of the dynamics of structures and equipment and general engineering skill could be used profitably to solve the different vibration problems and also to use the vibration signals effectively to monitor the health of the equipment and structures. Considering the safety and economic implications it can be concluded that the scope for application of these techniques is rather limitless. (author). 7 refs., 10 figs

  1. Future nuclear fuel cycles: Prospect and challenges for actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global energy context pleads in favour of a sustainable development of nuclear energy since the demand for energy will likely increase, whereas resources will tend to get scarcer and the prospect of global warming will drive down the consumption of fossil fuel. In this context, nuclear power has the worldwide potential to curtail the dependence on fossil fuels and thereby to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions while promoting energy independence. How we deal with nuclear radioactive waste is crucial in this context. In France, the public's concern regarding the long-term waste management made the French Governments to prepare and pass the 1991 and 2006 Acts, requesting in particular the study of applicable solutions for still minimizing the quantity and the hazardousness of final waste. This necessitates High Active Long Life element (such as the Minor Actinides MA) recycling, since the results of fuel cycle R and D could significantly change the challenges for the storage of nuclear waste. HALL recycling can reduce the heat load and the half-life of most of the waste to be buried to a couple of hundred years, overcoming the concerns of the public related to the long-life of the waste and thus aiding the 'burying approach' in securing a 'broadly agreed political consensus' of waste disposal in a geological repository. This paper presents an overview of the recent R and D results obtained at the CEA Atalante facility on innovative actinide partitioning hydrometallurgical processes. For americium and curium partitioning, these results concern improvements and possible simplifications of the Diamex-Sanex process, whose technical feasibility was already demonstrated in 2005. Results on the first tests of the Ganex process (grouped actinide separation for homogeneous recycling) are also discussed. In the coming years, next steps will involve both better in-depth understanding of the basis of these actinide partitioning processes and, for the new promising

  2. Nuclear Structure by Laser Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report illustrates the contribution of laser spectroscopy to our knowledge about variations of nuclear charge radii in long isotopic and isotonic chains comprising stable and short lived isotopes. The recent results obtained experimentally in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, are presented and discussed. (author). 32 refs.; 9 figs

  3. Global nuclear-structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The revival of interest in nuclear ground-state octupole deformations that occurred in the 1980's was stimulated by observations in 1980 of particularly large deviations between calculated and experimental masses in the Ra region, in a global calculation of nuclear ground-state masses. By minimizing the total potential energy with respect to octupole shape degrees of freedom in addition to ε2 and ε4 used originally, a vastly improved agreement between calculated and experimental masses was obtained. To study the global behavior and interrelationships between other nuclear properties, we calculate nuclear ground-state masses, spins, pairing gaps and Β-decay and half-lives and compare the results to experimental qualities. The calculations are based on the macroscopic-microscopic approach, with the microscopic contributions calculated in a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential

  4. Nuclear challenges and progress in designing stellarator power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an alternate to the mainline magnetic fusion tokamaks, the stellarator concept offers a steady state operation without external driven current, eliminating the risk of plasma irruptions. Over the past 2-3 decades, stellarator power plants have been studied in the U.S., Japan, and Europe to enhance the physics and engineering aspects and optimize the design parameters that are subject to numerous constraints. The earlier 1980's studies delivered large stellarators with an average major radius exceeding 20 m. The most recent development of the compact stellarator concept has led to the construction of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) in the U.S. and the 3 years power plant study of ARIES-CS, a compact stellarator with 7.75 m average major radius, approaching that of tokamaks. The ARIES-CS first wall configuration deviates from the standard practice of uniform toroidal shape in order to achieve compactness. Modeling such a complex geometry for 3-D nuclear analysis was a challenging engineering task. A novel approach based on coupling the CAD model with the MCNP Monte Carlo code was developed to model, for the first time ever, the complex stellarator geometry for nuclear assessments. The most important parameter that determines the stellarator size and cost is the minimum distance between the plasma boundary and mid-coil. Accommodating the breeding blanket and necessary shield to protect the superconducting magnet represented another challenging task. An innovative approach utilizing a non-uniform blanket combined with a highly efficient WC shield for this highly constrained area reduced the radial standoff (and machine size and cost) by 25- 30%, which is significant. As stellarators generate more radwaste than tokamaks, managing ARIES-CS active materials during operation and after plant decommissioning was essential for the environmental attractiveness of the machine. The geological disposal option could be replaced with more attractive scenarios

  5. Challenges for Early Responders to a Nuclear / Radiological Terrorism Incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even in the best of circumstances, most municipalities would face severe challenges in providing effective incident response to a large scale radiation release caused by nuclear terrorism or accident. Compounding obvious complexities, the effectiveness of first and early responders to a radiological emergency may also be hampered by an insufficient distribution of radiation detection and monitoring equipment, local policies concerning triage and field decontamination of critical victims, malfunctioning communications, inadequate inter-agency agility, and the psychological 'fear' impact on early responders. This paper examines several issues impeding the early response to nuclear terrorism incidents with specific consideration given to the on-going and forward-thinking preparedness efforts currently being developed in the Sacramento, California region. Specific recommendations are provided addressing hot zone protocols, radiation detection and monitoring equipment, hasty patient packaging techniques, vertically and horizontally integrated pre-event training, mitigating psychological fear, and protocols for the effective 'hand-off' from first responders to subsequent early response-recovery teams. (authors)

  6. Preface: International workshop on nuclear structure physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An International Workshop on Nuclear Structure Physics was held in June 1-7, 2008, in Shanghai. The purpose of this Workshop is to review the achievements of a few selected topics, to exchange ideas, and look to the future along these lines. The topics included the properties of low-lying states of medium and heavy nuclei, approximations of the nuclear shell model and applications, structures of atomic nuclei under random interactions, and algebraic approaches in nuclear structure theory. There are 33 talks and 43 participants in this workshop.

  7. Overview of nuclear structure with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a broad summary of the author's view of nuclear structure in 1974, he will discuss the key elements they have learned in the past 25 years from the research at the M.I.T. Bates Linear Accelerator center and its sister electron accelerator laboratories. Electron scattering has provided the essential measurements for most of the progress. The future is bright for nuclear structure research as their ability to realistically calculate nuclear structure observables has dramatically advanced and they are increasingly able to incorporate an understanding of quantum chromodynamics into their picture of the nucleus

  8. Training Solutions to the Global Challenges of a Nuclear Renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From East Asia to the United States and all over Europe, the nuclear re-birth is generating demands the training simulation vendors had not faced before. Companies involved in the planning, design, construction and operation of new plants increasingly require simulation tools to satisfy very different needs, all of them on a large scale: education and support of inexperienced newcomer staff, human factors analysis and control room design, e-learning, verification and validation of I and C systems or training and licensing of crews before the actual installations are complete. There is a full set of applications already available to the whole industry to satisfy these needs. End-user friendly Thunder Real-Time Executive (T-REX), poised to become the standard simulation platform for U.S. plants, makes it possible to provide full-scope simulator and simulator exercises to students and others on a memory stick or over the internet. AREVA EPR full-scope training simulator, based on the ALICES integrated object-oriented simulation environment, becomes an engineering simulator for the Flamanville 3 plant under construction in Normandy; the same will happen to the Taishan 1 and 2 simulators in Guangdong (China) while UniStar plans to apply this approach to the future EPR's to be built in the United States. SIREP PWR Basic Principle Simulator, with simplified models which can run on an ordinary PC, is used at GDF SUEZ offices in Brussels to implement their Nuclear Trainees Program. EDF Training Department chooses On-line Micro Simulation (MicroSel), which can be managed with Learning Management Systems, for classroom and stand-alone learning of the basic characteristics of French reactors. All these are examples of how extensive R and D and innovation programs implemented by the simulator providers, some of them under way here in Spain, will help to overcome some of the challenges of the current nuclear expansion.

  9. Training Solutions to the Global Challenges of a Nuclear Renaissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garces, M.; Chan, S.; Leo, C.; Garcia, S.; Vidal, B.

    2010-07-01

    From East Asia to the United States and all over Europe, the nuclear re-birth is generating demands the training simulation vendors had not faced before. Companies involved in the planning, design, construction and operation of new plants increasingly require simulation tools to satisfy very different needs, all of them on a large scale: education and support of inexperienced newcomer staff, human factors analysis and control room design, e-learning, verification and validation of I and C systems or training and licensing of crews before the actual installations are complete. There is a full set of applications already available to the whole industry to satisfy these needs. End-user friendly Thunder Real-Time Executive (T-REX), poised to become the standard simulation platform for U.S. plants, makes it possible to provide full-scope simulator and simulator exercises to students and others on a memory stick or over the internet. AREVA EPR full-scope training simulator, based on the ALICES integrated object-oriented simulation environment, becomes an engineering simulator for the Flamanville 3 plant under construction in Normandy; the same will happen to the Taishan 1 and 2 simulators in Guangdong (China) while UniStar plans to apply this approach to the future EPR's to be built in the United States. SIREP PWR Basic Principle Simulator, with simplified models which can run on an ordinary PC, is used at GDF SUEZ offices in Brussels to implement their Nuclear Trainees Program. EDF Training Department chooses On-line Micro Simulation (MicroSel), which can be managed with Learning Management Systems, for classroom and stand-alone learning of the basic characteristics of French reactors. All these are examples of how extensive R and D and innovation programs implemented by the simulator providers, some of them under way here in Spain, will help to overcome some of the challenges of the current nuclear expansion.

  10. Frontiers and challenges of the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two recent developments of the nuclear shell model are presented. One is a breakthrough in computational feasibility owing to the Monte Carlo Shell Model (MCSM). By the MCSM, the structure of low-lying states can be studied with realistic interactions for a wide, nearly unlimited basically, variety of nuclei. The magic numbers are the key concept of the shell model, and are shown to be different in exotic nuclei from those of stable nuclei. Its novel origin and robustness will be discussed. (orig.)

  11. Challenges in structural materials for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of nuclear power plants is critically dependent on good performance of materials. Material selection is one of the most important steps in the design of the engineering components. Functional requirements and operating conditions such as stress, temperature and environment dictate the choice of materials and their properties. Criteria for selection of materials for non-nuclear components include mechanical properties (strength-ductility-toughness), corrosion properties (resistance to uniform and localized corrosion), fabricability (forming-welding-heat treatment) and cost. Additional considerations for nuclear components include neutron absorption, induced radioactivity and resistance to radiation damage. Nuclear core components are continuously subjected to bombardment by fast neutrons. Important effects of fast neutron irradiation on properties of materials are : (i) change in mechanical properties by irradiation hardening and irradiation embrittlement (ii) dimensional changes by irradiation growth, irradiation creep and void swelling and (iii) change in corrosion properties like increase in corrosion rate and introduction of new corrosion mode. There are 2 types of thermal power reactors viz., Pressure Vessel Type (BWRs and PWRs) and Pressure Tube Type (PHWRs). A very wide range of materials are used for nuclear reactor components. These include carbon and low alloy steels, stainless steels (austenitic, martensitic, precipitation hardenable), nickel-base alloys (inconels, incoloys), zirconium base alloys, etc. Three most important classes of materials are : (1) Low alloy steels for Reactor Pressure Vessel : the main concerns are increase in Ductile-Brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and decrease in toughness due to neutron irradiation. (2) Zirconium Alloys for Reactor Core Components : main concerns are Delayed Hydride cracking (DHC) and change in dimensions due to Irradiation Creep and Growth. (3) Stainless Steels

  12. Microscopic calculations of nuclear structure and nuclear correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major goal in nuclear physics is to understand how nuclear structure comes about from the underlying interactions between nucleons. This requires modelling nuclei as collections of strongly interacting particles. Using realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, supplemented with consistent three-nucleon potentials and two-body electroweak current operators, variational Monte Carlo methods are used to calculate nuclear ground-state properties, such as the binding energy, electromagnetic form factors, and momentum distributions. Other properties such as excited states and low-energy reactions are also calculable with these methods

  13. Perspectives in electron scattering and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses theoretically nuclear-structure studies by elastic electron scattering. He discusses the nuclear form factor and meson-exchange currents. Finally he considers the tensor analyzing power in elastic eD scattering, the neutron electric form factor, and parity violating electron scattering in the framework of the Weinberg-Salam theory. (HSI)

  14. Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure, related topics. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics are considered. P, T-breaking, neutron beta decay, neutron radiative capture and neutron polarizability are discussed. Reaction with fast neutrons, methodical aspect low-energy fission are considered too

  15. Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains papers on the following topics: giant resonance studies; deep inelastic scattering studies; high resolution nuclear structure work; and relativistic RPA; and field theory in the Schroedinger Representation

  16. Nuclear effects in the structure functions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Marco; E Oset; S K Singh

    2003-11-01

    By using a relativistic framework and accurate nuclear spectral function the structure functions 2 and 3 of deep inelastic charged lepton and neutrino scattering are calculated in nuclei and results are presented.

  17. Progress on nuclear modifications of structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kumano, S

    2016-01-01

    We report progress on nuclear structure functions, especially on their nuclear modifications and a new tensor structure function for the deuteron. To understand nuclear structure functions is an important step toward describing nuclei and QCD matters from low to high densities and from low to high energies in terms of fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom beyond conventional hadron and nuclear physics. It is also practically important for understanding new phenomena in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, since systematic errors of current neutrino-oscillation experiments are dominated by uncertainties of neutrino-nucleus interactions, such studies are valuable for finding new physics beyond current framework. Next, a new tensor-polarized structure function $b_1$ is discussed for the deuteron. There was a measurement by HERMES; however, its data are inconsistent with the conventional convolution estimate based on the standard deuteron model with D-state admixture. This fact ...

  18. Regularity and chaos in nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BSC pairing gap, obtained from nuclear masses, shows large structural effects. A periodic orbit theory for the pairing gap has been developed, and generic expressions for the pairing gap fluctuations are derived, stressing the role of regularity/chaos. Results from the theory are compared to pairing gaps obtained from nuclear masses, calculated as well as measured. The comparison provides another quality control of nuclear mass formula, and gives additional insight in the nuclear pairing phenomenon. The theory can be applied to pairing fluctuations in other finite-size Fermi systems, as ultracold atomic gases or small metallic grains

  19. Reactor Structure Materials: Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress and achievements in 1999 in SCK-CEN's programme on applied and fundamental nuclear fuel research in 1999 are reported. Particular emphasis is on thermochemical fuel research, the modelling of fission gas release in LWR fuel as well as on integral experiments

  20. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Imperatives, Prospects, and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    certainly not new, renewed interest in more tightly coupled energy product plants (such as HES) that meet the objectives outline above have gained additional interest recently, an interest likely sparked by sharpening energy security concerns. Studies have shown that non-nuclear integrated (hybrid) energy systems can have appealing attributes in terms of overall process efficiency, enhanced electric grid stability, renewable energy integration, and economic performance, and lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. These attributes seem to be sufficiently compelling that several significant commercial investments in fossil-renewable HES are being made in the United States while the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has openly solicited information regarding nuclear energy integration schemes. The challenges of nuclear energy integration include myriad issues associated with the following RD and D areas, or 'platforms': (1) feedstock processing (e.g. bio-feedstock integration with coal, carbon feedstock extraction using nuclear energy); (2) heat/energy management (e.g. advanced heat exchangers, process design); (3) energy storage (e.g. H2 production, liquid fuels synthesis); (4) byproduct management (e.g. CO2 recycle approaches); (5) systems dynamics, integration and control (e.g. process dynamics analyses and optimization, advanced prognostics, diagnostics, variable time scale control and flow sheet optimization).

  1. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Imperatives, Prospects, and Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven E. Aumeier

    2010-10-01

    applications is certainly not new, renewed interest in more tightly coupled energy product plants (such as HES) that meet the objectives outline above have gained additional interest recently, an interest likely sparked by sharpening energy security concerns. Studies have shown that non-nuclear integrated (hybrid) energy systems can have appealing attributes in terms of overall process efficiency, enhanced electric grid stability, renewable energy integration, and economic performance, and lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. These attributes seem to be sufficiently compelling that several significant commercial investments in fossil-renewable HES are being made in the United States while the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has openly solicited information regarding nuclear energy integration schemes. The challenges of nuclear energy integration include myriad issues associated with the following RD&D areas, or “platforms”: • feedstock processing (e.g. bio-feedstock integration with coal, carbon feedstock extraction using nuclear energy); • heat / energy management (e.g. advanced heat exchangers, process design); • energy storage (e.g. H2 production, liquid fuels synthesis); • byproduct management (e.g. CO2 recycle approaches); • systems dynamics, integration and control (e.g. process dynamics analyses and optimization, advanced prognostics, diagnostics, variable time scale control and flow sheet optimization).

  2. The Challenge of Producing Ubiquitinated Proteins for Structural Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Faggiano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitination is an important post-translational modification involved in several essential signalling pathways. It has different effects on the target protein substrate, i.e., it can trigger the degradation of the protein in the proteasome, change the interactions of the modified protein with its partners, or affect its localization and activity. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the consequences of protein ubiquitination, scientists have to face the challenging task of producing ubiquitinated proteins for structural characterization with X-ray crystallography and/or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. These techniques require milligrams of homogeneous samples of high purity. The strategies proposed so far for the production of ubiquitinated proteins can be divided into two groups, i.e., chemical (or non-enzymatic and enzymatic methodologies. In this review, we summarize the still very sparse examples available in the literature that describe successful production of ubiquitinated proteins amenable for biochemical and structural studies, and discuss advantages and disadvantages of the techniques proposed. We also give a perspective of the direction in which the field might evolve.

  3. Nuclear structure in deep-inelastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper concentrates on recent deep inelastic experiments conducted at Argonne National Laboratory and the nuclear structure effects evident in reactions between super heavy nuclei. Experiments indicate that these reactions evolve gradually from simple transfer processes which have been studied extensively for lighter nuclei such as 16O, suggesting a theoretical approach connecting the one-step DWBA theory to the multistep statistical models of nuclear reactions. This transition between quasi-elastic and deep inelastic reactions is achieved by a simple random walk model. Some typical examples of nuclear structure effects are shown. 24 refs., 9 figs

  4. Clustering aspects in nuclear structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, M; Saito, K; Watanabe, T

    2010-01-01

    For understanding an anomalous nuclear effect experimentally observed for the beryllium-9 nucleus at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), clustering aspects are studied in structure functions of deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering by using momentum distributions calculated in antisymmetrized (or fermionic) molecular dynamics (AMD) and also in a simple shell model for comparison. According to the AMD, the Be-9 nucleus consists of two alpha-like clusters with a surrounding neutron. The clustering produces high-momentum components in nuclear wave functions, which affects nuclear modifications of the structure functions. We investigated whether clustering features could appear in the structure function F_2 of Be-9 along with studies for other light nuclei. We found that nuclear modifications of F_2 are similar in both AMD and shell models within our simple convolution description although there are slight differences in Be-9. It indicates that the anomalous Be-9 result should be explain...

  5. Nuclear Structure of the Noble Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Nakyeong

    Modern physics usually pictures the nuclear structure as about sphere and treats various detailed situation as perturbative, which may be obscured. In addition, the explanation why 235U undergoes nuclear fission and 238U does not is too difficult and unclear for the people to understand. However, in this paper, we introduce a new approach on the nuclear structure of the noble gas, which simultaneously can explain several phenomena that is obscurely elucidated by modern physics. We consider a 1:1 ratio between protons and neutrons and need the concept of the symmetry of the nuclear structure, because the electron's shell of the noble gas is fully occupied. From these, we can predict the number of neutrons of each noble gas exactly

  6. Shell structure from nuclear observables

    CERN Document Server

    Bentley, I; Cunningham, S; Aprahamian, A

    2016-01-01

    The appearance and disappearance of shells and subshells are determined using a previously introduced method of structural analysis. This work extends the approach and applies it to protons, in addition to neutrons, in an attempt to provide a more complete understanding of shell structure in nuclei. Experimental observables including the mean-square charge radius, as well as other spectroscopic and mass related quantities are analyzed for extrema. This analysis also uses differential observables among adjacent even-even nuclei to serve as the derivatives for these quantities of interest. Local extrema in these quantities indicate shell structure and the lack of local extrema indicate missing shell closures. The shell structure of low-mass nuclei is inconsistent likely as a consequence of the single-particle structure. Additionally, multiple shell features occurring in midshell regions are determined by combining information from two or more observables. Our results near stability complement previous observati...

  7. Shell structure from nuclear observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, I.; Rodríguez, Y. Colón; Cunningham, S.; Aprahamian, A.

    2016-04-01

    The appearance and disappearance of shells and subshells are determined using a previously introduced method of structural analysis. This work extends the approach and applies it to protons, in addition to neutrons, in an attempt to provide a more complete understanding of shell structure in nuclei. Experimental observables including the mean-square charge radius, as well as other spectroscopic and mass related quantities are analyzed for extrema. This analysis also uses differential observables among adjacent even-even nuclei to serve as the derivatives for these quantities of interest. Local extrema in these quantities indicate shell structure and the lack of local extrema indicate missing shell closures. The shell structure of low-mass nuclei is inconsistent likely as a consequence of the single-particle structure. Additionally, multiple shell features occurring in midshell regions are determined by combining information from two or more observables. Our results near stability complement previous observations further out.

  8. The European project STRUCTURES: challenges and results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van de Stefan; Dawson, John; Dawson, Linda; Flintoft, Ian; Garbe, Heyno; Leferink, Frank; Menssen, Benjamin; Mora, Nicolas; Rachidi, Farhad; Righero, Marco; Rubinstein, Marcos; Stojilovic, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    The project STRUCTURES, funded by the European Union, started in July 2012 to study problems related to the emerging threats of electromagnetic attacks to critical infrastructures. Partners of the team have worked to list possible threats, identify the main characteristics of the critical infrastruc

  9. Nuclear Structure Research at Richmond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals for the final year were; (1) to continue ongoing efforts to develop and enhance GRETINA and work towards GRETA; (2) to investigate the structure of non-yrast states in shape transitional Sm and Gd nuclei; (3) to investigate the structure of selected light Cd nuclei; (4) to exploit the surrogate reaction technique to extract (n,f) cross sections for actinide nuclei, particularly the first measurement of the 236Pu and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections.

  10. Managing Nuclear Knowledge: a challenge for SCK-CEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All innovation in nuclear science and nuclear technology for either power or non-power applications relies on knowledge. Preserving and enhancing nuclear knowledge accumulated in the past has become a timely subject of strategic importance. In recent years, political, economical and societal trends urged the need for an efficient management of nuclear knowledge. Foremost, the Belgian government has decided to phase-out nuclear power plants. Privatisation and deregulation rules of the energy market in the European Union drives the nuclear industry to compete in the immediate and near term with other sources of electrical energy. This might result in a reduction of work force and budgets allocated to research and development. These two decisions have as a side effect that fewer young people are attracted by studying nuclear science and nuclear engineering, making the issue of the replacement of the aging nuclear workforce even worse. This changing environment requires therefore the pro-active retention and preservation of our comprehensive nuclear knowledge base and the sustainment of our nuclear education and training efforts. SCK-CEN's initiatives concerning preserving and sharing Nuclear Knowledge and sustaining nuclear education and training are discussed

  11. Theoretical nuclear structure. Progress report for 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research effort is directed toward theoretical support and guidance for the fields of radioactive ion beam physics, gamma-ray spectroscopy, and the interface between nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The authors report substantial progress in all these areas. One measure of progress is publications and invited material. The research described here has led to more than 25 papers that are published, accepted, or submitted to refereed journals, and to 25 invited presentations at conferences and workshops

  12. The Eurosafe Forum 2003: Nuclear expertise and challenges of the enlargement of the European Union

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacronique, Jean-Francois; Repussard, Jacques (eds.) [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, B.P. 17, F - 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Hahn, Lothar (ed.) [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH, GRS, Schwertnergasse 1, D - 50667 Koeln (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    EUROSAFE is an international forum for discussions among experts from technical safety organisations, research institutes, safety authorities, utilities, the industry, public authorities and non-governmental organisations concerning the status of and recent achievements in nuclear installation safety, waste management, radiation safety and nuclear material security. The Eurosafe Forum 2003 - the fifth of its kind - was held at the Palais Brongniart in Paris on November 25 and 26, 2003. This year's theme was: 'Nuclear expertise and challenges of the enlargement of the European Union: speakers in the various European countries about the environmental scan before enlargement, development and structuring perspectives within the enlarged Europe'. The event brought together 445 experts and researchers from around the world (including 124 from Germany, 184 from France, 88 from Eastern Europe, as well as representatives from Korea, Japan, the United States, Canada, Cuba, and Armenia. The proceedings of the symposium can now be consulted online. The fifth edition of the forum focused on nuclear expertise and the challenge of EU-enlargement and the latest work carried out by GRS, IRSN and their partners from the European Union, Switzerland and Eastern Europe. Nuclear energy contributes approximately one third of European electricity production. A high level of nuclear safety is a priority for the countries of Europe. The technical safety organisations play an important role in contributing to that objective through appropriate approaches to major safety issues as part of their assessments and research activities. The challenges to nuclear safety are increasingly international. Changes in underlying technologies such as instrumentation and control, the impact of electricity market deregulation, demands for improved safety, the ageing of nuclear facilities, waste management, maintaining and improving scientific and technical knowledge and the need for greater

  13. Flexblue: an immersed SMR with a new and challenging nuclear paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NucAdvisor gives advice and provides DCNS with studies related to the Flexblue project since the beginning of the project. The present paper will summarize the main results out of technical aspects. The important potential market of SMRs after 2020 has been put in evidence by several studies around the world and also in France. The development of the whole Flexblue system requires an innovative approach which appears to be more stringent and important than the reactor by itself. The interests of an immersed module for nuclear safety will be discussed as well as some challenges related to public acceptance. Flexblue shows also an LCOE in the range of 100 Euro/MWh which structure will be presented and discussed. The licensing process for such a system requires a challenging new approach to be defined at a multinational level. Lastly we will give a brief status of the Flexblue project. (authors)

  14. Survey of past base isolation applications in nuclear power plants and challenges to industry/regulatory acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seismic base isolation provides many benefits that can facilitate the standardization of future nuclear power plant structures and equipment while reducing the initial/life-cycle cost and construction schedule. This paper presents a survey of past seismic base isolation applications and studies related to nuclear applications and provides a discussion of the challenges that need to be overcome to gain industry and regulatory acceptance for deployment in future US nuclear power plants. Issues related to design, codes/standards/regulations, procurement, and construction, have been identified. (authors)

  15. Nuclear structure at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonner, B.E.; Mutchler, G.S.

    1991-09-30

    The theme that unites the sometimes seemingly disparate experiments undertaken by the Bonner Lab Medium Energy Group is a determination to understand in detail the many facets and manifestations of the strong interaction, that which is now referred to as nonperturbative QCD. Whether we are investigating the question of just what does carry the spin of baryons, or the extent of the validity of the SU(6) wavefunctions for the excited hyperons (as will be measured in their radiative decays in our CEBAF experiment), or questions associated with the formation of a new state of matter predicted by QCD (the subject of our BNL experiments E810, E854, as well as our approved experiment at RHIC), -- all these projects share this common goal. Our other experiments represent different approaches to the same broad undertaking. LAMPF E1097 will provide definitive answers to the question of the spin dependence of the inelastic channel of pion production in the n-p interaction. FNAL E683 may well open a new field of investigation in nuclear physics: that of just how quarks and gluons interact with nuclear matter as they transverse nuclei of different sizes. In most all of the experiments mentioned above, the Bonner Lab Group is playing major leadership roles as well as doing a big fraction of the hard work that such experiments require. We use many of the facilities that are unavailable to the intermediate energy physics community and we use our expertise to design and fabricate the detectors and instrumentation that are required to perform the measurements which we decide to do.

  16. Challenges for development and provision of metrological quality control tools in nuclear safeguards, nuclear forensics and nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joint advancements in quality control tools and measurement sciences of international reference and safeguards laboratories include: -) successful integration of the Modified Total Evaporation technique (MTE) as a new tool for routine thermal ionization mass spectrometry in nuclear safeguards and security, -) research and feasibility studies for the development of new materials standard, particularly for nuclear forensics (Certified Reference Materials - CRMs for age-dating), -) quality control tools to support the additional protocol and nuclear security (particle CRMs, NUSIMEP (inter-laboratory comparisons for U particle analysis), and -) scientific/technical advice, training and knowledge transfer. The European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) and the CETAMA Commission from the French Commission of Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies (CEA/CETAMA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Meetings are the platforms to exchange views on the needs and challenges for new Quality Control tools for nuclear safeguards and security. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation

  17. Nuclear Structure Research at Richmond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beausang, Cornelius W. [Univ. of Richmond, VA (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The goals for the final year were; (1) to continue ongoing efforts to develop and enhance GRETINA and work towards GRETA; (2) to investigate the structure of non-yrast states in shape transitional Sm and Gd nuclei; (3) to investigate the structure of selected light Cd nuclei; (4) to exploit the surrogate reaction technique to extract (n,f) cross sections for actinide nuclei, particularly the first measurement of the 236Pu and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections.

  18. Nuclear structure from radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important aspect of the wind-up of UNISOR-based research is completion of student theses. Analysis is proceeding on extensive studies in the neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes with N 50 open shell region and shape coexistence in the N ∼ 104, Z ≤ 82 region, respectively. The main ongoing topics are shape coexistence in nuclei and the microscopic structure of collective motion in nuclei from a phenomenological point of view. New topics this year focus on the structure of nuclei near the N = Z line. Two topics have been chosen for detailed study: shape coexistence and electric monopole transition strengths

  19. Achieving competitive excellence in nuclear energy: The threat of proliferation; the challenge of inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy will have an expanding role in meeting the twenty-first-century challenges of population and economic growth, energy demand, and global warming. These great challenges are non-linearly coupled and incompletely understood. In the complex global system, achieving competitive excellence for nuclear energy is a multi-dimensional challenge. The growth of nuclear energy will be driven by its margin of economic advantage, as well as by threats to energy security and by growing evidence of global warming. At the same time, the deployment of nuclear energy will be inhibited by concerns about nuclear weapons proliferation, nuclear waste and nuclear reactor safety. These drivers and inhibitors are coupled: for example, in the foreseeable future, proliferation in the Middle East may undermine energy security and increase demand for nuclear energy. The Department of Energy's nuclear weapons laboratories are addressing many of these challenges, including nuclear weapons builddown and nonproliferation, nuclear waste storage and burnup, reactor safety and fuel enrichment, global warming, and the long-range development of fusion energy. Today I will focus on two major program areas at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the development of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) energy

  20. Forging the Link between Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Dickhoff, W H

    2015-01-01

    A review of the recent applications of the dispersive optical model (DOM) is presented. Emphasis is on the nonlocal implementation of the DOM that is capable of describing ground-state properties accurately when data like the nuclear charge density are available. The DOM, conceived by Claude Mahaux, provides a unified description of both elastic nucleon scattering and structure information related to single-particle properties below the Fermi energy. We have recently introduced a nonlocal dispersive optical potential for both the real and imaginary part. Nonlocal absorptive potentials yield equivalent elastic differential cross sections for ${}^{40}$Ca as compared to local ones but change the $\\ell$-dependent absorption profile suggesting important consequences for the analysis of nuclear reactions. Below the Fermi energy, nonlocality is essential for an accurate representation of particle number and the nuclear charge density. Spectral properties implied by $(e,e'p)$ and $(p,2p)$ reactions are correctly desc...

  1. Band structure and nuclear dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relation between the Variable Moment of Inertia model and the Interacting Boson Model are discussed from a phenomenological viewpoint. New results on ground state mean-square radii in nuclei far from stability are reported, and a discussion of band structure extending to high angular momentum states and methods of extracting information on the underlying dynamics is given

  2. Reliability assessment of nuclear structural systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliability assessment of nuclear structural systems has been receiving more emphasis over the last few years. This paper deals with the recent progress made by the Structural Analysis Division of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), in the development of a probability-based reliability analysis methodology for safety evaluation of reactor containments and other seismic category I structures. An important feature of this methodology is the incorporation of finite element analysis and random vibration theory. By utilizing this method, it is possible to evaluate the safety of nuclear structures under various static and dynamic loads in terms of limit state probability. Progress in other related areas, such as the establishment of probabilistic characteristics for various loads and structural resistance, are also described. Results of an application of the methodology to a realistic reinforced concrete containment subjected to dead and live loads, accidental internal pressures and earthquake ground accelerations are presented

  3. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations. PMID:26416747

  4. Nuclear emergencies and behavior of the people: a challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , the groups responding positively would also be over 80 %, but the fractions responding because of obligation or because of conviction have similar size. Few people don't have an opinion (less than 10 %); the group saying not wanting to respond is also of the order of a few percent, except for changing food habits, where this rises to 10-12 %. lt is clear that these groups may dramatically perturb emergency actions, or even give rise to an increase of non obeisance by the other people. Suitable information prior to and during crisis periods seems indispensable; an efficient start-up of all plans is essential. Even then, one should be aware that unconformity with expected behaviour will persist, and it should be decided an beforehand whether this will be tolerated (within some limits) or oppressed by all means. The final goal of all emergency actions, both in preparation and during crises, is to protect the population. Whatever the level of competence of experts, advisors, decision makers, and whatever the quality of the emergency staff or their technical equipment, an optimal result can only be obtained with the cooperation of the population itself. lt is reassuring that large majorities of the population seem to agree to the most important countermeasures. However, the signs of a lack of trust in the nuclear technology and the capabilities of the authorities, the poor appreciation of the information obtained so far, the problems related to the availability of stable iodine and the minority stating not to respond to the countermeasures show that the challenge remains. (author)

  5. Nuclear structure of $^{231}$Ac

    CERN Document Server

    Boutami, R; Mach, H; Kurcewicz, W; Fraile, L M; Gulda, K; Aas, A J; García-Raffi, L M; Løvhøiden, G; Martínez, T; Rubio, B; Taín, J L; Tengblad, O

    2008-01-01

    The low-energy structure of 231Ac has been investigated by means of gamma ray spectroscopy following the beta-decay of 231Ra. Multipolarities of 28 transitions have been established by measuring conversion electrons with a mini-orange electron spectrometer. The decay scheme of 231Ra --> 231Ac has been constructed for the first time. The Advanced Time Delayed beta-gamma-gamma(t) method has been used to measure the half-lives of five levels. The moderately fast B(E1) transition rates derived suggest that the octupole effects, albeit weak, are still present in this exotic nucleus.

  6. Nuclear submarines in the Royal Navy - the design challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the early years of the century, submarines have been among the most potent contributors to naval power. Nuclear-powered submarines, with the ability to stay continuously submerged for months and capable of the high sustained speeds previously only achieved by surface warships, now vie with aircraft carriers as the capital ships of the major navies of the world. Indeed, their unsurpassed stealth has made them the prime choice for deploying a nuclear deterrent capability. After a brief historical survey, this paper reviews the current status of the Royal Navy's nuclear submarine fleet then describes the design and construction process for a nuclear submarine. The design of any submarine is a complex and highly integrated process and the particular and far-reaching effects of incorporating nuclear steam-raising plant are discussed, along with the key safety considerations involved in nuclear submarine design and operation. The paper concludes with some thoughts on the future development of submarines. (author)

  7. Emerging nuclear energy systems: Economic challenge: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future nuclear energy systems may achieve substantially lower energy costs than those of existing fossil energy systems and comparable capital costs. Such low cost nuclear energy would provide a strong economic incentive to minimize the use of fossil fuels. If these low cost nuclear energy systems emerge in the next few decades, 21st century civilization may be able to avert potentially disastrous CO2 induced global climate changes. 12 refs., 1 fig

  8. Sustainability and acceptance - new challenges for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the concept of sustainability in relation to acceptance of nuclear energy. Acceptance is viewed in terms of public acceptance, industrial acceptance, and internal acceptance/consensus within the nuclear community. It addresses sustainability criteria, the need for innovation, and the different levels of acceptability. The mechanisms of risk perception are discussed along with the technological consequences from risk perception mechanisms leading to specific objections against nuclear energy. (author)

  9. Nuclear dismantling and asbestos elimination: the same challenge?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALARA principle constitutes a powerful tool for workers dosimetry management in the nuclear field. A consequence of the application of this principle could be an accentuation of the nuclear risk face to the industrial risk. Using works of asbestos elimination in nuclear medium, the present article examines how a generalization of the utilization of the ALARA principle is conceivable and how the existing obstacles could be removed. (N.C.)

  10. Challenges and opportunities to launch nuclear power programme in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Republic of Belarus, as a part of the former Soviet Union, having highly energy-intensive economy and few indigenous fuel and energy resources has been initially oriented towards nuclear power. Four nuclear power plants with total capacity of about 12 GW have been constructed near the borders of the Republic. In Belarus the constructing of nuclear CHP not far from Minsk and the planning of NPP construction in Vitebsk region have been begun. The Chernobyl NPP accident has stopped this Program. On the other side the Republic of Belarus has been suffered from the Chernobyl accident most of all other countries including Russia and the Ukraine. About a quarter of its territory and population had turned out in the radioactively contaminated zone. The attitude of a considerable part of the Belarus population towards the nuclear energy is aggravated with the consequences of this accident. Nevertheless recently the political decision about nuclear power development has been accepted again. It is decided to construct two units with total capacity about 2000 MW. The commissioning of the first unit is planning in 2016, the second- in 2018. The necessity of nuclear power development has been grounded in Concept of Energy Security of the Republic of Belarus which was approved by the President of the Republic of Belarus in 2005 and in new version in 2007. The Programme of Preparatory Works for the construction of NPP has been accepted by the Government and is under implementation. Among another works in frameworks of the this Program it should be mentioned the following: - site selections for nuclear facilities; - assessment of human resource needs and availability; - preparation for bid specification development; - studying of nuclear technologies available and suitable for domestic application; - developing of the Program of education and training of personal for future NPP, regulatory body and other governmental authorities, research and design institutes. The Law

  11. Nuclear power in the 21st century : Challenges and possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath, Akos; Rachlew (Källne), Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    The current situation and possible future developments for nuclear power—including fission and fusion processes—is presented. The fission nuclear power continues to be an essential part of the low-carbon electricity generation in the world for decades to come. There are breakthrough possibilities in the development of new generation nuclear reactors where the life-time of the nuclear waste can be reduced to some hundreds of years instead of the present time-scales of hundred thousand of years...

  12. Avoidable challenges of a nuclear medicine facility in a developing nation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of nuclear medicine in disease management in a developing nation is as impactful as it is in other regions of the world. However, in the developing world, the practice of nuclear medicine is faced with a myriad of challenges, which can be easily avoided. In this review, we examine the many avoidable challenges to the practice of nuclear medicine in a developing nation. The review is largely based on personal experiences of the authors who are the pioneers and current practitioners of nuclear medicine in a typical developing nation. If the challenges examined in this review are avoided, the practice of nuclear medicine in such a nation will be more effective and practitioners will be more efficient in service delivery. Hence, the huge benefits of nuclear medicine will be made available to patients in such a developing nation

  13. Shield structure for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved nuclear reactor shield structure is described for use where there are significant amounts of fast neutron flux above an energy level of approximately 70 keV. The shield includes structural supports and neutron moderator and absorber systems. A portion at least of the neutron moderator material is magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron. (U.K.)

  14. Challenging today's nuclear industry to be competitive in a changing tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the millennium approaches, the future of the nuclear power generation appears desolate. Today's nuclear executives are facing challenges resulting from worldwide change and have forced utilities to reevaluate their corporation's future directions. The nuclear industry must be competitive more than ever to address today's rapid changing marketplace and pressures exerted from: regulatory reformation; increased competition; changes in technology; customer evolution; and globalization. These factors have compelled nuclear executives to address questions such as: What impact will these changes have on today's marketplace, and on my corporation? What will characterize tomorrow's successful nuclear facility? How can today's nuclear corporation compete in tomorrow's marketplace? Will my corporation survive? (author)

  15. Nuclear fuel structure and fuel behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the research has been to produce information on structural properties of nuclear fuel and their effects on the fuel behaviour. The research subjects were new fuel fabrication and quality control methods, the effects of as-fabricated pellets properties on the behaviour of fuel rods, behaviour of cladding materials and irradiated cladding and structural materials. At the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) the nuclear fuel structure and behaviour programme has produced data which have been utilized in procurement, behavioural analysis and surveillance of the fuel used in the Finnish nuclear power stations. In addition to our own research, data on fuel behaviour have been received by participating in the international cooperation projects, such as OECD/Halden, Studsvik-Ramp-programmes, IAEA/BEFAST II and VVER-fuel research projects. The volume of the research work financed by the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM) and the Technical Research Centre of Finland in the years 1987-1989 has been about 8 man years. The report is the summary report of the research work conducted in the KTM-financed nuclear fuel structure and fuel behaviour programme in the years 1987-1989

  16. Nuclear structure models: Applications and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Studies of superdeformed States; Signature Inversion in Odd-Odd Nuclei: A fingerprint of Triaxiality; Signature Inversion in 120Cs - Evidence for a Residual p-n Interaction; Signatures of γ Deformation in Nuclei and an Application to 125Xe; Nuclear Spins and Moments: Fundamental Structural Information; and Electromagnetic Properties of 181Ir: Evidence of β Stretching

  17. Pion double charge exchange and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pion double charge exchange to both the double-analog state and the ground state is studied for medium weight nuclei. The relative cross section of these two transitions and the importance of nuclear structure as a function of pion kinetic energy is examined. 16 figs., 5 tabs

  18. Progress on nuclear modifications of structure functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumano S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report progress on nuclear structure functions, especially on their nuclear modifications and a new tensor structure function for the deuteron. To understand nuclear structure functions is an important step toward describing nuclei and QCD matters from low to high densities and from low to high energies in terms of fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom beyond conventional hadron and nuclear physics. It is also practically important for understanding new phenomena in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, since systematic errors of current neutrinooscillation experiments are dominated by uncertainties of neutrino-nucleus interactions, such studies are valuable for finding new physics beyond current framework. Next, a new tensor-polarized structure function b1 is discussed for the deuteron. There was a measurement by HERMES; however, its data are inconsistent with the conventional convolution estimate based on the standard deuteron model with D-state admixture. This fact suggests that a new hadronic phenomenon should exist in the tensor-polarized deuteron at high energies, and it will be experimentally investigated at JLab from the end of 2010’s.

  19. Principal component analysis within nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Sayed, A

    2015-01-01

    The principal component analysis (PCA) of different parameters affecting collectivity of nuclei predicted to be candidate of the interacting boson model dynamical symmetries are performed. The results show that, the use of PCA within nuclear structure can give us a simple way to identify collectivity together with the parameters simultaneously affecting it.

  20. Nuclear structure studies at intermediate energies:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses progress on studies on nuclear structure at the University of Minnesota. Some of the topics discussed are: nucleon-nucleon interactions, high spin stretched states, deformed and transition nuclei, giant resonances, measurement of spin observables, pion scattering, delta resonances, and electron scattering

  1. Next nuclear challenge - how do we dispose of the excess nuclear materials?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ''Cold War'' was not fought only by soldiers but by scientists and engineers in Laboratories and plants located throughout the world. With the fall of the Berlin Wall, the ''Cold War'' was effectively over, but the weapons of nuclear war remained. Following signing of START 2 (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty) in 1993, up to 100 tonnes of weapons usable plutonium is expected to be declared excess by the Super Powers. Steps must be taken to address the proliferation risks associated with this plutonium. Again the scientist and engineers, who were the ''Cold War'' warriors, are being asked to develop methods to disposition this plutonium such that it can never again be used for weapons. Will we burn the plutonium in reactors or immobilize the plutonium either in a glass or ceramic matrix? Interesting challenges face chemists and chemical engineers developing immobilization techniques to render the plutonium both environmentally benign, and proliferation resistant

  2. New Challenges in nuclear science: Recent activities at ITU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Universities in Europe are feeling a declining interest of students in pursuing scientific and technical studies. This is due to a number of reasons, ranging from the focus on specific disciplines at secondary school level to the negative public assessment of some fields of study. This development may entail considerable negative consequences to society as a whole, above and beyond the university disciplines affected. The OECD-NEA study, 'Nuclear Education and Training - Causes for Concern?' and the Nuclear Competence Pool within the framework of the HGF Nuclear Technology Research Pool draw attention to these problems, dealing especially with the nuclear sciences which suffer most from this development. Also in the future, there will be a need for qualified personnel with a background of competent training to operate existing nuclear facilities and address problems arising in the future. Beyond the utilization of nuclear power for electricity generation, these disciplines of the nuclear sciences are also very important to the life sciences, medicine, materials research and development, and other industrial applications. The Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) performs work in these areas of fundamental and applied research, among others: nuclear reactors with ultra-intense lasers; condensed phases of americium under high pressure; criticality aspects of thin layers; photo emission of thin actinide films; alpha immunotherapy in cancer treatment; ITU's Chart of the Nuclides with a decay module. (orig.)

  3. Challenges and chances of the nuclear energy development in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been a renaissance in developing nuclear energy in both developed and developing countries in recent years. However, the most impressive region of the nuclear power capacity expansion occurs in Asia. A number of countries in East and South Asia are planning and building new reactors. China, Japan, Republic of Korea and India expected to experience the strongest growth in the region. Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand, the Philippines and Malaysia are also expressing strong interest in nuclear power. At the end of 2009, 20 reactors were being built in China, 6 in Korea, 5 in India, 2 in Chinese Taipei, for a worldwide total of 55 reactors being built. The entire process of planning, licensing and building new nuclear power plants takes typically at 7 to 15 years, so most nuclear capacity that will be in operation by 2020 are already in the planning and licensing processes. The shortening of the licensing process is needed to reduce delays and costs. The development of nuclear power requires governments to set clear and consistent policies on nuclear energy. This government commitment requires the establishment of a sustainable national infrastructure that provides governmental, legal, regulatory, technological, human and industrial support for the nuclear program throughout its whole life cycle

  4. The decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities. Status, approaches, challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As nuclear facilities around the world continue to age, many countries will be increasingly faced with the task of taking them out of service (decommissioning) and dismantling them. In particular, they will also have to address the related issues of the release and/or reuse of materials, buildings and sites, and of radioactive waste management. Appropriate provisions will have to be made in terms of policy, financing and management. Depending on the path chosen, decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) of nuclear facilities may take a few years or several decades, especially for the larger ones. This range of possible timescales entails specific issues for decision making, and also has a wider impact by way of such issues as the sustainability of nuclear power and preservation of the well-being of local communities. This report is intended to provide, in non-specialist terminology, a concise overview of the status of D and D of nuclear facilities and associated issues in NEA Member countries. The report draws upon a database of fact sheets produced to a standard format by individual Member countries that can be accessed online from the NEA web site. In the context of this report, the term 'nuclear facility' includes all facilities associated with the production of nuclear power, from mining of uranium, through fabrication of nuclear fuel, nuclear power plant operation, fuel reprocessing and waste management, including related R and D facilities, and research and demonstration reactors. (authors)

  5. Future challenges for nuclear data research in fission (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, Mark B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    I describe some high priority research areas in nuclear fission, where applications in nuclear reactor technologies and in modeling criticality in general are demanding higher accuracies in our databases. We focus on fission cross sections, fission neutron spectra, and fission product data.

  6. Turkey and the Iranian Nuclear Program. Challenges and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Fiedler, Radosław

    2014-01-01

    In the article was analyzed Turkish policy to Iran. In the last decade Turkey established regular relations with increasing trade exchange volume. In 2010 Turkey and Brazil proposed a plan for solution Iran’s nuclear deadlock. Although, a plan was not accepted by the Western powers at present in dealing with Iranian nuclear crisis Turkish role as a reliable mediator should be greater.

  7. Nuclear energy between the demand and the challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear energy has many benefits for mankind, most importantly the production of electricity. It is the primary application for nuclear energy to acquire electricity by power reactors. There are many other uses of nuclear energy, for example in archaeology, medicine, industry and agriculture. Nuclear energy presently is considered as one of the most important sources of energy, contributing of about 15% of the energy requirements of the world. It is considered a clean nonpolluting source of energy for the environment despite the waste products it generates in contrast to fossil fuel. It is less expensive compared to the other energy sources, for example solar energy, wind energy as well as fossil fuel. From the economic point of view, the price for the kilowatt per hour produced from a power station running on petrol or coal is 35% more expensive than the kilowatt per hour produced from nuclear power station. (author)

  8. Nuclear hybrid energy systems: imperatives, prospects, and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In less than 60 years we have witnessed the transition of nuclear electricity production from an experiment on the high desert of the western United States to more than 430 commercial nuclear power reactors deployed in 31 countries, supplying nearly 14% of all global electricity consumed. The speed at which this transition took place was stunning, as has been the evolution of the technology, business management and operations approach to civil nuclear electricity production. Even as the United States took a two-decade hiatus from the construction of new nuclear electricity plants, other nations embraced the technology and continue to do so. Today, there are 53 nuclear power reactors under construction, 142 planned and 327 proposed for development, including a number in the United States

  9. In front of a new challenge: nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation sources utilising either radioactive materials or radiation generators have been widely used throughout the world in medicine, research, industry and education for decades. There are both, legal and governmental responsibilities in respect of the safe use of ionising radiation sources, radiation protection, the safe management of radioactive waste and the safe transport of radioactive material. The attacks of 11 September 2001 brought a new dimension to the actions against terrorism. There are not enough legal instruments to control this phenomenon. Potential threat: acquisition of a nuclear weapon, acquisition of nuclear material to construct a nuclear weapon or to cause a radiological hazard, violent acts against nuclear facilities to cause a radiological hazard, acquisition of other radioactive materials to construct a dirty bomb to cause a radiological hazard. 'The Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material', IAEA, 1980 obliges Parties to apply established levels of physical protection to nuclear material used for peaceful purposes in international transport. It also requires Parties to criminalize under their respective laws various acts such as theft, illegal acquisition, possession and use, and to establish jurisdiction over those offences to enable the prosecution or extradition of alleged offenders. This is the only international legal instrument in the area of physical protection. Conclusion: At present the threat is not only of a nuclear accident but of a nuclear terrorism attack which could affect any country in the world and the lack of effective legal instruments to respond to that situation. It shows the need for the international community to work together in order to reinforce coordinated and integrated nuclear security and safeguards measures. States shall create appropriated regulatory infrastructures to ensure that the radioactive sources are appropriately regulated and adequately secured at all times. Stronger and

  10. Managing key capabilities: A challenge for nuclear plant building companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear plant building industry faces a paradoxical situation. The use of nuclear reactors to produce energy for civil purposes is both a promising technology, with potentially huge outlets, and a technology facing declining demand. One of the key problems is then: how to maintain the capabilities necessary to benefit from the potential recovery? The resource-based view of strategic management has shown the importance of different types of resources and capabilities in gaining a sustainable competitive advantage. Successful incumbents in the market of nuclear station building have built those kinds of distinctive capabilities that give them a competitive advantage over potential new entrants. But we show that, without a permanent activity in plant building, preserving those capabilities necessitates specific strategic action. We firstly develop the argument that the nuclear plant building industry is in a paradoxical situation in terms of demand and technical performance trends. Secondly, we try to identify the key capabilities of the incumbents. We show that companies in that field use mainly three types of distinctive capabilities: pure technical and scientific knowledge in direct relation to the use of nuclear as an energy generator, competences in risk management and competences in large project management, including financing. Thirdly, we show that although some of those capabilities are used through other nuclear-related activities such as plant maintenance or fuel supply, some of them necessitate taking strategic actions in order to be preserved. We argue that this should be a priority of nuclear equipment company managers in the next few years. (author)

  11. Nuclear death: an unprecedented challenge to psychiatry and religion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing danger of a nuclear holocaust has intensified two aspects of the human predicament that concern both religion and psychiatry: the inevitability of death and the disastrous consequences of the characteristic termed pride by theologians and narcissism by psychiatrists. For the first time, humans have power to exterminate themselves and death threatens all ages equally. Pride of power causes leaders to exaggerate their ability to control nuclear weapons; moral pride leads to demonizing enemies. The author considers implications for psychiatrists and clergy, with special reference to preventing a nuclear holocaust

  12. Nuclear death: an unprecedented challenge to psychiatry and religion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, J.D.

    1984-11-01

    The growing danger of a nuclear holocaust has intensified two aspects of the human predicament that concern both religion and psychiatry: the inevitability of death and the disastrous consequences of the characteristic termed pride by theologians and narcissism by psychiatrists. For the first time, humans have power to exterminate themselves and death threatens all ages equally. Pride of power causes leaders to exaggerate their ability to control nuclear weapons; moral pride leads to demonizing enemies. The author considers implications for psychiatrists and clergy, with special reference to preventing a nuclear holocaust.

  13. Nuclear power the challenges of non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The revival of the civil nuclear power industry rekindles the debate on proliferation, in other words, on the increase in the number of States likely to achieve nuclear weapon capability. The history of the past thirty years shows that none of the known attempts at proliferation has occurred within the scope of civil nuclear program development. No country that has decided to 'proliferate' has done so by diverting materials or installations governed by the commitment to peaceful utilization and under IAEA control. The only borderline case is India, which did not sign the NPT, and which in 1974 cleverly played on the clauses imposed on it by Canada without violating them in the strictest sense of the word. The exporters of civil nuclear technologies subsequently got organized to control the export of sensitive materials by creating the Club of London, since renamed the Nuclear Suppliers Group. Another crisis occurred in 1991 following the first Gulf war, with the discovery of an extensive covert nuclear program in Iraq (an NPT signatory country); this caused a shock similar to that of 1974 and resulted in the strengthening of the IAEA's powers and inspection resources. India subsequently carried out several nuclear tests in 1998, at least one of which was a thermonuclear device. Pakistan, India's rival since the 1948 partition, crossed the 'nuclear threshold' in 1999. Proliferation also made headlines in 2003. First of all with Libya which, having decided to sign the NPT, revealed the existence of what is called the 'Nuke AQ Khan Bazaar'. In the presumed ignorance of his government, Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan had stolen an uranium enrichment technology, becoming the 'father' of the Pakistani bomb, and had organized the traffic of military nuclear technologies, namely with Libya, North Korea and Iran. Again in 2003, North Korea announced its withdrawal from the NPT. This retreat raises the question of what will become of the possible transfers of nuclear technologies that

  14. Hirschegg '03: Nuclear structure and dynamics at the limits. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics were dealt with: Nuclear structure ans symmetries, nuclei near the drip line, halo nuclei and nuclear resonances, superheavy elements and fission, fragmentation and multifragmentation, nuclear astrophysics. (HSI)

  15. Energy policy and challenges: which part for the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides many data and charts on the energy domain: energy consumption, energy demand, the reserves, the climatic changes, the renewable energies, the energy cost, the radioactive wastes management, the new nuclear technology. (A.L.B.)

  16. Astrophysical Reaction Rates as a Challenge for Nuclear Reaction Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Rauscher, T.

    2010-01-01

    The relevant energy ranges for stellar nuclear reactions are introduced. Low-energy compound and direct reactions are discussed. Stellar modifications of the cross sections are presented. Implications for experiments are outlined.

  17. Nuclear power in the 21st century: Challenges and possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Akos; Rachlew, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    The current situation and possible future developments for nuclear power--including fission and fusion processes--is presented. The fission nuclear power continues to be an essential part of the low-carbon electricity generation in the world for decades to come. There are breakthrough possibilities in the development of new generation nuclear reactors where the life-time of the nuclear waste can be reduced to some hundreds of years instead of the present time-scales of hundred thousand of years. Research on the fourth generation reactors is needed for the realisation of this development. For the fast nuclear reactors, a substantial research and development effort is required in many fields--from material sciences to safety demonstration--to attain the envisaged goals. Fusion provides a long-term vision for an efficient energy production. The fusion option for a nuclear reactor for efficient production of electricity has been set out in a focussed European programme including the international project of ITER after which a fusion electricity DEMO reactor is envisaged. PMID:26667059

  18. Future goals and challenges of the IAEA nuclear security programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It would be difficult to overstate the urgency of intensifying our collective efforts to secure nuclear material worldwide. The graphic images of 11 September 2001 make abundantly clear the willingness of terrorists to inflict unthinkable destruction and pain. Imagine what the consequences would be if terrorists were to acquire and use dangerous nuclear material to attack any one of us. The quality and scope of nuclear material security must be enhanced if we are to prevent nuclear terrorism. It must be a high priority for all of us. It was this awareness that prompted initiation of the IAEA's nuclear security programme, the subject of my remarks. Immediately after the tragedy of 11 September 2001, several IAEA Member States approached the Director General about the need to strengthen the IAEA's ability to assist Member States in protecting their nuclear and radioactive material against the emerging threat of terrorism. The IAEA responded with alacrity. At the March 2002 IAEA Board of Governors meeting, the Secretariat presented its comprehensive, cross-cutting Nuclear Security Action Plan. The plan has, since then, served as the foundation for the implementation of all IAEA nuclear security activities. To facilitate implementation of the plan, organizational changes were needed. In 2002 the Office of Physical Protection and Material Security was removed from the Department of Safeguards, renamed the Office of Nuclear Security, and relocated to the newly created Department of Nuclear Safety and Security. When this reorganization began, the Office of Physical Protection and Material Security had fewer than ten staff members. Currently, the Office of Nuclear Security has quadrupled to more than 40 staff members engaged in full time or part time capacities. Since its inception in 2002, the IAEA's nuclear security programme has provided direct assistance to over 75 countries, in the form of assessment missions, training courses or support for development of national

  19. Nuclear moments as a probe of electronic structure in material, exotic nuclear structure and fundamental symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuta, K., E-mail: matsuta@vg.phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Minamisono, T.; Mihara, M.; Fukuda, M. [Osaka Univ., Dept. of Physics (Japan); Zhu, Shengyun [CIAE (China); Masuda, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) (Japan); Hatanaka, K. [Osaka Univ., RCNP (Japan); Yuan Daqing; Zheng Yongnan; Zuo Yi; Fang Ping; Zhou Dongmei [CIAE (China); Ohtsubo, T. [Niigata Univ., Dept. of Physics (Japan); Izumikawa, T. [Niigata Univ., RI Center (Japan); Momota, S. [Kochi Univ. of Technology (Japan); Nishimura, D. [Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Matsumiya, R. [Osaka Univ., RCNP (Japan); Kitagawa, A.; Sato, S.; Kanazawa, M. [Nat. Inst. Radiological Sciences (Japan); Collaboration: Osaka-CIAE-NIRS-Niigata-Kochi-LBL Collaboration; and others

    2013-05-15

    We report our studies in various fields of Physics through nuclear moments utilizing the {beta}-NMR technique, including material sciences, nuclear structures and fundamental symmetries. Especially, we focus on the recent progress in the studies on the electronic structure in Pt through Knight shifts of various impurities, lattice locations of impurities, electric field gradients, the analysis of nuclear spin in terms of its components, anomaly in the spin expectation value for {sup 9}C-{sup 9}Li mirror pair, the G-parity conservation law, and the Ramsey resonance on UCN for future neutron EDM measurements.

  20. Nuclear moments as a probe of electronic structure in material, exotic nuclear structure and fundamental symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report our studies in various fields of Physics through nuclear moments utilizing the β-NMR technique, including material sciences, nuclear structures and fundamental symmetries. Especially, we focus on the recent progress in the studies on the electronic structure in Pt through Knight shifts of various impurities, lattice locations of impurities, electric field gradients, the analysis of nuclear spin in terms of its components, anomaly in the spin expectation value for 9C-9Li mirror pair, the G-parity conservation law, and the Ramsey resonance on UCN for future neutron EDM measurements.

  1. Challenges to implementation of knowledge management on drafting of nuclear regulation in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although Indonesia still reviewing its nuclear power options, in anticipation of the possible introduction of a NPP in the near future, and in order to contribute to the global nuclear safety culture, the Indonesia Government enacted, on 10 April 1997, Act No. 10 of 1997 on Nuclear Energy. With reference to Article 14 of Act No 10 of 1997, BAPETEN (Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency) is empowered to control on the use of any nuclear energy utilization through regulations, licensing, and inspections. In conducting its tasks, as one of non departmental government agencies, BAPETEN is under and directly responsible to the President of Republic of Indonesia Pursuant to Presidential Decree No 103 year 2001 on Status, Function, Authority, Form and Organization Structure of Non-Departmental Government Agencies. The basic principles of nuclear energy regulate on practice in Indonesia set out in the law provide that control of any nuclear energy application is aimed to: a. Assure the welfare, the security and the peace of people; b. Assure the safety and the health of workers and public, and the environmental protection; c. Maintain the legal order in implementing the use of nuclear energy; d. Increase the legal awareness of nuclear energy user to develop a safety culture in nuclear field; e. Prevent the diversion of the purpose of the nuclear material utilization; and f. Assure for maintaining and increasing the worker discipline on the implementation of nuclear energy utilization. Nuclear energy act enacted in 10 April 1997 and promulgated in state Gazette of Republic Indonesia Year 1997 No 23 Supplementary Gazette 36765 contains of elucidation thereto is the principal and primary law governing all related aspects in the use of nuclear energy i.e. institutions, research and development, exploration, regulatory authority, radioactive waste management, liability for nuclear damage and penal provisions. In order to implement the act comprehensively requires more detailed

  2. Compilations and evaluations of nuclear structure and decay date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The material contained in this compilation is sorted according to eight subject categories: 1. General Compilations; 2. Basic Isotopic Properties; 3. Nuclear Structure Properties; 4. Nuclear Decay Processes: Half-lives, Energies and Spectra; 5. Nuclear Decay Processes: Gamma-rays; 6. Nuclear Decay Processes: Fission Products; 7. Nuclear Decay Processes: (Others); 8. Atomic Processes

  3. Proceedings of the conference on nuclear structure at the limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the papers from the Proceedings of the Conference on Nuclear Structure at the Limits. Some of the areas covered by these papers are: nuclear deformation; nuclear decay; nuclear spectroscopy; radioactive ion beams; nuclear models; high spin states; and heavy ion reactions. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  4. New Challenges in nuclear science: Recent activities at ITU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magill, J.; Schenkel, R. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2001-12-01

    Universities in Europe are feeling a declining interest of students in pursuing scientific and technical studies. This is due to a number of reasons, ranging from the focus on specific disciplines at secondary school level to the negative public assessment of some fields of study. This development may entail considerable negative consequences to society as a whole, above and beyond the university disciplines affected. The OECD-NEA study, 'Nuclear Education and Training - Causes for Concern?' and the Nuclear Competence Pool within the framework of the HGF Nuclear Technology Research Pool draw attention to these problems, dealing especially with the nuclear sciences which suffer most from this development. Also in the future, there will be a need for qualified personnel with a background of competent training to operate existing nuclear facilities and address problems arising in the future. Beyond the utilization of nuclear power for electricity generation, these disciplines of the nuclear sciences are also very important to the life sciences, medicine, materials research and development, and other industrial applications. The Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) performs work in these areas of fundamental and applied research, among others: nuclear reactors with ultra-intense lasers; condensed phases of americium under high pressure; criticality aspects of thin layers; photo emission of thin actinide films; alpha immunotherapy in cancer treatment; ITU's Chart of the Nuclides with a decay module. (orig.) [German] An den Universitaeten in Europa ist ein abnehmendes Interesse der Studenten an den naturwissenschaftlich-technischen Studiengaengen festzustellen. Die Ursachen liegen in einer Reihe von Faktoren. Sie reichen von der Ausrichtung schulischer Schwerpunkte bis hin zur negativen oeffentlichen Bewertung einzelner Fachrichtungen. Diese Entwicklung kann ueber die betroffenen Fachbereiche hinaus mit erheblichen negativen Konsequenzen fuer die

  5. Nuclear Data Covariances in the Indian Context – Progress, Challenges, Excitement and Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a brief overview of progress, challenges, excitement and perspectives in developing nuclear data covariances in the Indian context in relation to target accuracies and sensitivity studies that are of great importance to Bhabha's 3-stage nuclear programme for energy and non-energy applications

  6. Clustering aspects in nuclear structure and collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four topics on nuclear clustering are discussed. The first subject is about the cluster formation in dilute matter which we think is now observed in heavy ion collisions at hundreds MeV/nucleon. The second subject is about our new proposal of the existence of alpha condensed states in light nuclei. Two other subjects are both about the clustering in neutron-rich nuclei. One is the cluster structures in neutron-rich Be and B isotopes. In these isotopes, the clustering prevails as fundamental characters of nuclear structure. The other is the report of our recent study about the possible relation of the clustering with the breaking of the neutron magic number N=20 in 32Mg and 30Ne. (author)

  7. Clustering Aspects in Nuclear Structure and Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, H.

    Four topics on nuclear clustering are discussed. The first subject is about the cluster formation in dilute matter which we think is now observed in heavy ion collisions at hundreds MeV/nucleon. The second subject is about our new proposal of the existense of alpha condensed states in light nuclei. Two other subjects are both about the clustering in neutron-rich nuclei. One is the cluster structures in neutron-rich Be and B isotopes. In these isotopes, the clustering prevails as fundamental characters of nuclear structure. The other is the report of our recent study about the possible relation of the clustering with the breaking of the neutron magic number N=20 in 32Mg and 30Ne.

  8. Canada's nuclear industry: Maturity, confidence and a continuing challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the CANDU system, based on heavy water and natural uranium, Canada has developed an integrated high-technology product that is world scale in concept and that competes successfully in the international arena. This is a great achievement by any standard. The joint effort over many decades by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Onatario Hydro and others, has brought a remarkable record of safe, reliable and cost-effective nuclear generation. Electricity is a Canadian advantage, as the country has abundant hydro, coal and nuclear supplies, and its costs are the lowest among the major Western industrial countries. It is also significant that its nuclear electricity costs are among the lowest in the world

  9. Strength of structural materials of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monography reviews the phenomenon of stress-corrosion craving of zirconium-alloy fuel cans in the nuclear fuel fission products and ways of its prevention. Equations of creep and limiting state of FBR core materials were derived on the basis of the concept of deformation processes unity taking into account the degree of structural stability of alloys, temperature, nonstationary loading and aggressive media effects. Equations of durability under joint quasistatic and cyclic loading are developed. 146 refs.; 91 figs.; 16 tabs

  10. Nuclear structure and Indian Clover array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H C Jain

    2001-07-01

    A brief description of the nuclear structure studies performed with the 14-UD pelletron at TIFR has been presented. The experimental facilities developed for these studies are described. Some of the interesting results obtained for mass 70 to 80 nuclei are presented. The development of a recoil mass spectrometer and an Indian clover array for the study of high spin states in nuclei near drip lines is discussed.

  11. Nuclear security - New challenge to the safety of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety of nuclear power plants involves two aspects: one is to prevent nuclear accidents resulted from systems and equipments failure or human errors; the other is to refrain nuclear accidents from external intended attack. From this point of view, nuclear security is an organic part of the nuclear safety of power plants since they have basically the same goals and concrete measures with each other. In order to prevent malicious attacks; the concept of physical protection of nuclear facilities has been put forward. In many years, a series of codes and regulations as well as technical standard systems on physical protection had been developed at international level. The United Nations passed No. 1540 resolution as well as 'Convention on the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear terrorism', and revised 'Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials', which has enhanced a higher level capacity of preparedness by international community to deal with security issues of nuclear facilities. In China, in order to improve the capability of nuclear power plants on preventing and suppressing the external attacks, the Chinese government consecutively developed the related codes and standards as well as technical documents based on the existing laws and regulations, including 'Guide for the Nuclear Security of Nuclear Power Plants' and 'Guide for the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials', so as to upgrade the legislative requirements for nuclear security in power plants. The government also made greater efforts to support the scientific research and staff training on physical protection, and satisfying the physical protection standards for newly-built nuclear facilities such as large scale nuclear power plants to meet requirement at international level. At the same time old facilities were renovated and the Chinese government established a nuclear emergency preparedness coordination mechanism, developed corresponding emergency preparedness plans, intensified the

  12. The Challenges and Countermeasures of Human Resources on Nuclear Power in the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper addresses the situations of nuclear power development and nuclear industry human resources and points out that the development and supply of human resources are becoming the big challenges in the effective and sustainable development of nuclear power. At the same time, the paper analyzes the root causes of human resources shortage and recommends several countermeasures to confront human resources problems. At last, the paper introduces what SNPTC and SNERDI do to overcome the human resources problem and give conclusions. (author)

  13. IAEA activities in manpower development for nuclear power - moving to meet challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Need for excellence in human performance in all activities involved in nuclear power - The challenge of providing qualified manpower when required - Planning and preparing nuclear power programmes and projects - Design, construction and commissioning of nuclear power plants - Operation and maintenance, plant performance - Safe, reliable and economic operation - the national manpower development effort - Role of foreign assistance and of the IAEA - The Agency's comprehensive programme, objectives, means - Experience - Training courses, guidebooks, standards - Current trends - Examples. (orig.)

  14. Multilateral Approaches to the Back-end of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Challenges and Possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle have been proposed in order to suppress the expansion of sensitive fuel cycle technology. In order to prepare for the future multilaterallization of the nuclear fuel cycle, existing multilateral spent fuel management programs are analyzed. A trial multilateralization of a domestic R and D facility for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle is proposed and its challenges, possibilities and implementation strategy are discussed

  15. Progress and challenges of nuclear power plant radioactive waste management in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper, the status of nuclear power plant radioactive waste management in China is analyzed. Challenges facing the nuclear power plant radioactive waste management are pointed out. And countermeasures for strengthening radioactive waste management are put forward, including further improving relevant codes and standards, improving radiation management system, strengthening the radioactive waste management of nuclear power plant fleet, encouraging technological innovation and combination of production, education and research. (authors)

  16. Exotic nuclear structures and decays: new nuclear collective phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of the properties of exotic nuclei have revealed a surprising richness and diversity in their shapes, structures, and decay modes far exceeding our understandings and expectations of even a decay ago. From studies of far-off-stability exotic nuclei have come evidence for the coexistence of different nuclear shapes in the same nucleus, new regions of unusually large deformation, new ground-state phase transitions from one shape to another, new magic numbers but now for deformed shapes, and for the importance of reinforcing shell gaps. New exotic decay modes include a wide variety of beta delayed particle emission and heavy cluster emissions such as 14C and 24Ne. The new deformed magic numbers of 38 and 60 seen far off stability clearly support that there are likely other ''magic'' numbers for protons and neutrons which give stability to different deformed shapes. Perhaps these other new magic shell gap numbers at large deformation could influence the sticking of two very heavy nuclei in collisions such as U on Cm. Finally, another area which could have a bearing on the formation, motions, and structures of giant nuclear systems involves the recent observation of very energetic, light particle (proton, alpha) emission with up to 50% and more of the total incoming energy in a collision, for example in 300 MeV 32S on Ta. 43 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  17. A Structured Career Intervention Program for Academically Challenged Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Amla; Abdullah, Syed Mohamad; Mahmud, Zuria; Ghavifekr, Simin; Ishak, Noriah

    2013-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the effects of a 2-week structured intervention program on academically challenged students' career development. A quasi-experimental study was designed using pre-tests, post-tests, and a control group approach to examine the effects of the intervention program. Data were collected from both the experimental…

  18. Evolution of nuclear reactor containments in India: Addressing the present day challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indigenously developed Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) that form the backbone of current stage of nuclear power development in India have seen continuous evolution of their containment systems. This evolution that has taken place over implementation of 18 PHWRs (200/220/540 MWe) has encompassed all aspects of containment design, viz. the structural system, energy management system, radio-activity management and hydrogen management system. As a part of ongoing efforts toward strengthening of safety performance, India is also ready with the design of Advance Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR), which represents a technology demonstrator for advanced reactor systems and for thorium utilization. This reactor has a number of improved passive safety features and it is capable of meeting the demanding safety challenges that future reactor system would be expected to meet as a result of emerging expectations in the background of accidents over the past three decades viz. those at Three Mile Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) and most recently at Fukushima (2011). In this lecture I shall focus on the evolution of nuclear reactor containments in India and highlight the design, associated structural and thermal hydraulics safety assessment made over the years for the improvement of containment performance

  19. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses topics in nuclear theory. These general topics are: Quark physics, Quantum field theory, Relativistic nuclear physics, Nuclear dynamics, and Few-body problems and nonrelativistic methods

  20. Structural Engineering Managers - Innovation Challenges for their Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkeschová, D.; Tichá, A.

    2015-11-01

    The profession of a structural engineer is highly responsible, because the consequences of a structural engineer's errors result not only in economic damage to the property and often irreversible damage to the environment, they can also lead to direct loss of lives. In the current turbulent, dynamically developing society the managerial methods of structural engineers should not stagnate at the level of the last century applications. This paper deals with the challenges which the ongoing century poses to structural engineers and managers. It compares the results of research regarding the current state of managerial skills of structural engineers in Czech building companies to the defined skills of the 21st century's managers according to the global research programme ITL Research and according to the Vision for the Future of Structural Engineering, drawn up by Structural Engineering Institute - SEI ASCE.

  1. Risks and challenges associated with the design and construction of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of a nuclear power plant project, considering the period prior to the operation of the plant, requires a very strict risk control to ensure compliance with a series of challenges. The present paper identifying the most important challenges facing the construct ability and license requirements of the process, identifying the interfaces and proposing a methodology of construction to meet the challenge of a construction process in 5 years.

  2. Electromagnetic studies of nucleon and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Important objectives of the group are the study of subatomic structure through experimental measurements and the interpretation of the data through modeling. The common theme that unifies the studies of strong interactions and hadronic systems is the effort to determine the electromagnetic response as completely as possible. The general approach is coincidence detection of exclusive final states and determination of the dependence on the spin variables using polarized beams and targets and outgoing nucleon polarimetry. Direct reaction and giant resonance studies of electron quasi-elastic scattering on 12C and 16O are reported, as well as work on nuclear structure models and instrumentation development

  3. Structural integrity of nuclear struts and snubbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear struts and snubbers are beam-column structures with variable cross sectional and material properties. Traditionally, the design of their major beam-column components, the threaded rod end and the extension piece pipe, has been based on the interaction equations of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. These equations, based in part on test results of rolled wide-flange sections, should be modified when used to determine the adequacy of solid round sections such as the threaded rod ends. An analysis approach is developed employing the necessary modifications. Using these modified interaction equations an assessment of the structural integrity of existing struts and snubbers is presented

  4. Challenges to fire protection measures at Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New regulatory standards for fire protection at nuclear power plants have been established by the Nuclear Regulation Authority. This paper introduces the measures taken by the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station for the following four items, which were especially big changes. (1) To install a combination of sensors of different types or instruments with equivalent functions so as to be able to emit unique signals to inform a fire in the early stage. (2) To conduct 'UL vertical burn test' as the demonstration test for self-extinguishing performance as the condition for flame-retardant cable. (3) To install automatic fire-extinguishers or fixed fire-extinguishing devices of manual type at the spots where fire-fighting is difficult due to the filling of smoke in a fire or the effect of radiation. (4) To separate the system for purpose of ensuring safety function to attain the high-temperature shutdown and cold-temperature shutdown of a reactor whatever fire may happen at the nuclear facilities. The examples of the installation of fire-extinguishers as the measures for the above Item (3) are as follows; (A) as for the devices containing oil, a foam-extinguishing agent is released against each target device from the nozzle, and (B) for large vertical pump motors indoors and relatively small pump motors, IA type automatic foam extinguishing systems are installed. (A.O.)

  5. Future of Nuclear Structure Studies. Proceedings of a Panel on the Future of Nuclear Structure Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the world enters an age in which nuclear electric power is a reality and man increasingly benefits from nuclear applications in medicine, agriculture and industry, it is useful to re-examine the basic sciences that underlie these important developments. In many ways modern nuclear technology is built on, or derived from, basic research on the atomic nucleus. Today, nuclear physics studies are a fundamental part of the national atomic energy programs in many of the Member States, now more than 100, of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The purpose of the IAEA Panel on the Future of Nuclear Structure Studies, held at Dubna on 1-3 July 1968, was to provide an appraisal of the present status of our knowledge of nuclear structure, to point out the open problems, and to suggest the most promising directions for future research. To reflect the needs of many of the IAEA member nations, special consideration was given to the problems of smaller institutes and developing countries. The major recommendation of the panel concerned the question of regional centres for low- and medium-energy nuclear physics research. The panel supported the organization of regional centres formed by three or more developing countries and equipped with apparatus of intermediate cost and sophistication. The text of the resolution appears at the end of this book, which contains the papers presented to the panel and a record of the discussions. The panel was held in conjunction with the Dubna-sponsored International Symposium on Nuclear Structure, which took place immediately after the panel, on 4-11 July 1968. The invited papers from this symposium, all in English, were published by the Agency in 1968 under the title ''Nuclear Structure: Dubna Symposium 1968''

  6. Opportunities and challenges for nuclear power development: the IAEA view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than fifty years ago, the International Atomic Energy Agency was established with the mission to accelerate and enlarge the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to ensure that it was not used for military purposes. Dr. Homi Bhabha, who chaired the preparatory meetings of the IAEA, shaped a carefully balanced mandate for the IAEA in 1956. Security and development were brought together as two aspects of the same ideal: 'Atoms for Peace'. However, not only 50 years ago, but even today humanity still faces the pressing need for development and the desire for a more effective system of international security. Energy is essential for development. Every aspect of development, such as poverty, hunger, health care and environment, requires energy. When these needs remain unaddressed, conflicts, violence, regional and global insecurity can occur.Technological innovation as a key factor in ensuring the long term sustainability of nuclear power has to be considered in conjunction with the institutional innovations that can help nuclear power introduction in developing countries. The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) works to ensure that the future needs of all countries and developing countries in particular-are understood and taken into account when innovative nuclear systems such as small and medium-size reactor designs are evaluated and developed. These designs allow a more incremental investment and provide a better match to grid capacity and easily adapted to applications such as district heating and seawater desalination. Innovations in institutional area like regional cooperation in construction and operation, and new approaches as leasing, financing, taking-back policy, build-own-operate, need to be addressed

  7. 15th National Conference on Nuclear Structure in China

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ning; Zhou, Shan-Gui; Nuclear Structure in China 2014; NSC2014

    2016-01-01

    This volume is a collection of the contributions to the 15th National Conference on Nuclear Structure in China (NSC2014), held on October 25-28, 2014 in Guilin, China and hosted by Guangxi Normal University. It provides an important updated resource in the nuclear physics literature for researchers and graduate students studying nuclear structure and related topics. Recent progress made in the study of nuclear spectroscopy of high-spin states, nuclear mass and half-life, nuclear astrophysics, super-heavy nuclei, unstable nuclei, density functional theory, neutron star and symmetry energy, nuclear matter, and nuclear shell model are covered.

  8. Pile foundation of nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of pile foundation used for nuclear power plant structures, considering the experience gained by the designers of the Angra Nuclear Power Plant, Units 2 and 3 in Brazil is dealt with. The general concept of the pile foundations, including types and execution of the piles, is described briefly. Then the two basic models, i.e. the static model and the dynamic one, used in the design are shown, and the pertinent design assumptions as related to the Angra project are mentioned. The criteria which established the loading capacity of the piles are discussed and the geological conditions of the Angra site are also explained briefly, justifying the reasons why pile foundations are necessary in this project. After that, the design procedures and particularly the tools - i.e. the computer programs - are described. It is noted that the relatively simple but always time consuming job of loading determination calculations can be computerized too, as it was done on this project through the computer program SEASA. The interesting aspects of soil/structure interaction, applicable to static models, are covered in detail, showing the theoretical base wich was used in the program PILMAT. Then the advantage resulting from computerizing of the job of pile reinforcement design are mentioned, describing briefly the jobs done by the two special programs PILDES and PILTAB. The point is stressed that the effort computerizing the structural design of this project was not so much due to the required accuracy of the calculations, but mainly due to the need to save on the design time, as to allow to perform the design task within the relatively tight time schedule. A conclusion can be drawn that design of pile foundations for nuclear power plant structures is a more complex task than the design of bearing type of foundation for the same structures, but that the task can be always made easier when the design process can be computerized. (Author)

  9. The challenge and countermeasures for human resources development on nuclear power in 21. century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full-text: Most IAEA member states have set up nuclear power development program as national policy and energy strategy with the technical progress and successful demonstration of nuclear power to be a safe clean, ecological and economic energy. The development and supply of Human Resources (HR) is becoming the big challenge in the effective and sustainable development of nuclear power as all countries in the world are in short of professional nuclear engineers and skilled technician at present. The problem is resulting from firstly many universities have closed or reduced nuclear power related faculty after two main severe nuclear power accidents, secondly the existing nuclear power engineers and technicians are going to retire and we have difficulties in finding replacement timely, thirdly the training period for nuclear power professionals is much longer than those of the other industries. The HR bottleneck situation should be seriously considered for the safe and economic development of nuclear power. How to confront and find a practical solution to the challenge? I suggest member states firstly to formulate an appropriate HR training program before drawing up any nuclear power development plan; secondly to make nuclear power technology education network or set up nuclear power university in different stages and regions thus to provide distance learning and further study for the existing professional and skilled technician; thirdly to promote international cooperation for nuclear power peaceful utilization in a win-win strategy; fourthly to organize international nuclear expert forum and communication platform to maximize their talent and speed up the development in nuclear power manpower supply as well as establish a world-wide nuclear power HR foundation. SNERDI/SNPTC of China has adopted various countermeasures to face the challenge of nuclear power manpower by establishing and implementing the nuclear power human resource program. The main points are as

  10. Next nuclear challenge - how do we dispose of the excess nuclear materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L W

    1997-04-03

    The ''Cold War'' was not fought only by soldiers but by scientists and engineers in Laboratories and plants located throughout the world. With the fall of the Berlin Wall, the ''Cold War'' was effectively over, but the weapons of nuclear war remained. Following signing of START 2 (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty) in 1993, up to 100 tonnes of weapons usable plutonium is expected to be declared excess by the Super Powers. Steps must be taken to address the proliferation risks associated with this plutonium. Again the scientist and engineers, who were the ''Cold War'' warriors, are being asked to develop methods to disposition this plutonium such that it can never again be used for weapons. Will we burn the plutonium in reactors or immobilize the plutonium either in a glass or ceramic matrix? Interesting challenges face chemists and chemical engineers developing immobilization techniques to render the plutonium both environmentally benign, and proliferation resistant.

  11. Marginalization and challenge: the production of knowledge and landscape in Canadian nuclear waste management policy making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboriginal peoples have recently become politically significant in Canadian nuclear fuel waste (NFW) management policy making. Their newfound significance comes on the heels of an important challenge to the knowledge and authority of the nuclear industry with respect to its plans for NFW lead by a number of public groups and Aboriginal peoples from across Canada, including the Serpent River First Nation. This dissertation examines the relationships between the discourses of the Serpent River First Nation (SRFN) about their experiences of the nuclear fuel chain and the discourses of the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) about the management of NFW. Two trends are found to characterize these relationships: marginalization and challenge. The discourses of the NWMO marginalize the SRFN, excluding their experiences of the nuclear fuel chain, radioactivity, and the effects of nuclear industries from the policy making process. The discourses of the SRFN challenge the claims of the NWMO about the effects of nuclear wastes and radioactivity, as well as about the safe and beneficial development of the nuclear fuel chain. I identify discourses of 'modern risk' and 'citizenship' found in the work of the NWMO as instrumental for maintaining the nuclear industry's control over the production of knowledge about NFW and its effects and subjugating the knowledge of the SRFN. I also identify discourses of identity, oppression, and 'situated knowledge' as important challenges to the content, method and premises of the claims of the nuclear industry about the management of NFW. While I conclude that the NWMO's discourses of risk and citizenship constitute a colonial politics of exclusion, I note that their discourses are contingent on the exclusion of the experiences of the SRFN with the fuel chain. For their accounts to be coherent, the NWMO need to maintain a strategic silence on the overwhelming implication Aboriginal peoples, as a category, in the nuclear fuel chain

  12. Paris and Vienna nuclear liability conventions: challenges for insurers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insurers have actively contributed to the negotiations on the revision of the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage and the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy. In the course of these negotiations they have pointed out that some of the proposals for revision may have consequences for insurers and could prove incapable of finding insurance support. This paper aims at explaining the revision related points, which could cause problems in respect of insurability. Furthermore, the writer takes the liberty to expand its scope to more generally include developments, which have the potential to influence the availability of insurance capacity. Therefore, also the insurance implications of terrorist acts combined with share market developments of recent years will be dealt with.(author)

  13. Nuclear Power for Electricity Generation in Ghana: Issues and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghana's electricity demand has been estimated to be growing at a high rate of about 7% per annum over the last ten years. This is due to the relatively high population growth, economic aspiration of the country and the extension of electricity to rural areas. Electricity supply, on the contrary, has been unable to meet the demand due to high dependency on rain-fed hydropower plants, which started operating in 1965 and currently account for about 68% of the total installed capacity. Within the last 28 years, climatic changes and draughts have caused the nation to experience three major power crises. These climate changes resulted in low inflows and thus reduced power generation from hydropower systems. To complement the hydropower systems, the Government in 1997 installed thermal plants based on light crude oil. However, due to the high crude oil prices on the international market in recent times have made the operation of these plants very expensive. Ghana's crude oil find can boost its energy supply when the oil exploration begins somewhere in 2010. For rural cooking, domestic biomass is employed. Ghana has no domestic coal resources. The Government of Ghana is concerned with: limited further growth potential of domestic hydro; high cost of imported oil and gas and environmental issues associated with use of imported coal. Small Solar and wind generation exist in some sectors, but potential large-scale development is not envisioned for the near future. With these in mind, the President of Ghana set up a Committee involving Stakeholder Institutions to formulate the Nuclear Power Policy and develop the basic elements of Nuclear Infrastructure and to assess the viability of introducing the nuclear power option in Ghana's energy mix. Cabinet took a decision to include the nuclear power for electricity generation after the Committee submitted his report to the President in 2008. (author)

  14. Organizing the Canadian nuclear industry to meet the challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU reactor is struggling for a share of the dwindling reactor market against formidable and well-established competition. The Canadian nuclear industry has historically depended upon two crown corporations, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. and Ontario Hydro, which have taken the lead in designing and engineering the reactor. Crown corporations are not notably successful in marketing, however, and the time has come for the industry to organize itself in preparation for an aggressive export drive

  15. An ecological challenge to nuclear energy in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emission of fossil fuels have led to world-wide ecological problems making limiting measures necessary, especially for CO2 emissions. In the future, CO2 free fuels must be given a growing priority because, from an economical point of view, it is not possible to eliminate CO2 emissions from fossil fuel power plants. The limits of economically usable water power and other regenerable sources of energy, such as solar and wind power which are as yet and in the foreseeable future uneconomical, make it impossible to abstain from the use of nuclear energy now and in the future. The present nuclear acceptance problem, especially through loss of trust after the Chernobyl accident, makes it necessary to improve the world-wide safety standards of a coming reactor generation so that consequences of an accident for the population can be avoided. To this end, the safety concepts of two water reactors are described, namely the 'revolutionary' version of the AP-600 and the 'evolutionary' new developments of well-tested light water reactors. Both developments have the purpose of making hypothetical accidents even less probable and, by means of accident management measures, of limiting the effects of such events to the power plant. On this basis, the energy-political consensus must be won which is necessary to enable nuclear energy to adequately meet future ecological demands. (author) 3 refs., 11 figs

  16. Advanced nuclear fuel cycles - Main challenges and strategic choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A graphical conceptual model of the uranium fuel cycles has been developed to capture the present, anticipated, and potential (future) nuclear fuel cycle elements. The once-through cycle and plutonium recycle in fast reactors represent two basic approaches that bound classical options for nuclear fuel cycles. Chief among these other options are mono-recycling of plutonium in thermal reactors and recycling of minor actinides in fast reactors. Mono-recycling of plutonium in thermal reactors offers modest savings in natural uranium, provides an alternative approach for present-day interim management of used fuel, and offers a potential bridging technology to development and deployment of future fuel cycles. In addition to breeder reactors' obvious fuel sustainability advantages, recycling of minor actinides in fast reactors offers an attractive concept for long-term management of the wastes, but its ultimate value is uncertain in view of the added complexity in doing so,. Ultimately, there are no simple choices for nuclear fuel cycle options, as the selection of a fuel cycle option must reflect strategic criteria and priorities that vary with national policy and market perspectives. For example, fuel cycle decision-making driven primarily by national strategic interests will likely favor energy security or proliferation resistance issues, whereas decisions driven primarily by commercial or market influences will focus on economic competitiveness

  17. Nuclear Structure: Dubna Symposium 1968. Invited Papers from the International Symposium on Nuclear Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Invited papers of a Symposium organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, supported by IUPAP and IAEA, and held in Dubna from 4 to 11 July 1968. The meeting was attended by about 450 scientists from 30 countries. The volume contains the invited papers, all by distinguished scientists, and the discussions and short contributions that followed the presentation of these papers. Contents: I. Nuclear structure at low excitations (15 papers) ; II. Nuclear structure at high excitations (6 papers): III. Open problems in nuclear physics (3 papers); IV. Equilibrium deformations (6 papers); V. General properties of nuclei (6 papers); VI. Closing remarks; List of contributions; List of seminar papers; List of participants; Author index. All papers, discussions and short contributions are in English; the abstracts are in English and Russian, which were the working languages of the Symposium. (author)

  18. Parquet theory in nuclear structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis concerns a numerical implementation of the Parquet summation of diagrams within Green's functions theory applied to calculations of nuclear systems. The main motivation has been to investigate whether it is possible to develop this approach to a level comparable in accuracy and reliability to other ab initio nuclear structure methods. The Green's functions approach is theoretically well-established in many-body theory, but to our knowledge, no actual application to nuclear systems has been previously published. It has a number of desirable properties, foremost the gently scaling with system size compared to direct diagonalization and the closeness to experimentally accessible quantities. The main drawback is the numerical instabilities due to the pole structure of the one-particle propagator, leading to convergence difficulties. This issue is one of the main focal points of the work presented in this thesis, and strategies to improve the convergence properties are described and investigated. We have applied the method both to a simple model which can be solved by exact diagonalization and to the more realistic 4He system. The results shows that our implementation is close to the exact solution in the simple model as long as the interaction strengths are small. As the number of particles increases, convergence is increasingly hard to obtain. In the 4He case, we obtain results in the vicinity of the results from comparable approaches. The numerical in-stabilities in the current implementation still prevents the desired accuracy and stability necessary to achieve the current benchmark standards. (Author)

  19. Forging the link between nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhoff, W. H.

    2016-06-01

    A review of the recent applications of the dispersive optical model (DOM) is presented. Emphasis is on the nonlocal implementation of the DOM that is capable of describing ground-state properties accurately when data like the nuclear charge density are available. The present understanding of the role of short- and long-range physics in determining proton properties near the Fermi energy for stable closed-shell nuclei has relied mostly on data from the (e, e' p) reaction. Hadronic tools to extract such spectroscopic information have been hampered by the lack of a consistent reaction description that provides unambiguous and undisputed results. The DOM, conceived by Claude Mahaux, provides a unified description of both elastic nucleon scattering and structure information related to single-particle properties below the Fermi energy. We have recently introduced a nonlocal dispersive optical potential for both the real and imaginary part. Nonlocal absorptive potentials yield equivalent elastic differential cross sections for 40Ca as compared to local ones but change the l-dependent absorption profile suggesting important consequences for the analysis of nuclear reactions. Below the Fermi energy, nonlocality is essential for an accurate representation of particle number and the nuclear charge density. Spectral properties implied by (e, e' p) and (p, 2p) reactions are correctly described, including the energy distribution of about 10% high-momentum protons obtained at Jefferson Lab. The nonlocal DOM allows a complete description of experimental data both above (up to 200 MeV) and below the Fermi energy in 40Ca. It is further demonstrated that elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering data constrain the spectral strength in the continuum of orbits that are nominally bound in the independent-particle model. Extension of this analysis to 48Ca allows a prediction of the neutron skin of this nucleus that is larger than most predictions made so far.

  20. Phonons as building blocks in nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of a nuclear system in terms of eigenmodes (phonons) of subsystems is investigated in three different approaches. In the frame of nuclear field theory the three identical particle system is analysed and the elimination of spurious states due to the violation of the Pauli principle is emphasized. In terms of weak coupling, a new approach of the shell model is proposed which is shown to be rapidly convergent with the number of basis vectors. Applications of three particle systems in the lead region are made. Lastly, a microscopic multiphonon theorie of collective K=0 states in deformed nuclei based on a Tamm Dancoff phonon is developed. The role of the Pauli principle as well as comparisons with boson expansion methods are deeply analysed

  1. Nuclear structure calculations for astrophysical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we present calculated results on such diverse properties as nuclear energy levels, ground-state masses and shapes, β-decay properties and fission-barrier heights. Our approach to these calculations is to use a unified theoretical framework within which the above properties can all be studied. The results are obtained in the macroscopic-microscopic approach in which a microscopic nuclear-structure single-particle model with extensions is combined with a macroscopic model, such as the liquid drop model. In this model the total potential energy of the nucleus may be calculated as a function of shape. The maxima and minima in this function correspond to such features as the ground state, fission saddle points and shape-isomeric states. Various transition rate matrix elements are determined from wave-functions calculated in the single-particle model with pairing and other relevant residual interactions taken into account

  2. Nuclear structure studies with medium energy probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in the continuing program of experimental research in nuclear structure with medium-energy probes during the year 1979-1980 is reviewed, and the research activities planned for the year 1980-1981 are discussed. In the study of pion-induced reactions emphasis is placed on investigation of isovector characteristics of nuclear excitations and on double charge exchange reactions. Pion production studies form the major part of the program of experiments with proton beams of 400 to 800 MeV at LAMPF. Current emphasis is on the bearing of these investigations on di-baryon existence. The study of high-spin states and magnetic scattering constitute the main goals of the electron scattering program at Bates. Representative results are presented; completed work is reported in the usual publications

  3. 'A la carte' in advanced nuclear energy. Challenges in the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here was introduced some parts of advanced efforts in the nuclear energy field recently carried out at universities and institutes in Japan. They have 100 items on summarized advanced nuclear informations, containing 1) new nuclear power generation system and its back-end technologies, 2) nuclear fuels and upgrading on thermal flow technology in reactors, 3) advancement on structural engineering and maintenance engineering of power plants, 4) technical innovation in human man-machine system and robots, 5) advancement of quantum beam engineering and efforts onto realization of nuclear fusion reactors, and 6) safety security on radiation and nuclear energy and their countermeasure to social and environmental problems. (G.K.)

  4. The national system of nuclear material control development and challenges. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the major factors which may affect the implementation of the National System of Nuclear Material Accounting and Safeguards in Egypt. Developments of this National System-being a division of the Nuclear Regulatory Body in the country-are discussed. Also, recent requirements of the International Atomic Energy Agency within the policy of strengthening its regime of international nuclear control are reviewed. The challenges facing the National System are indicated taking in consideration the anticipated growth in the nuclear field in Egypt by the year 2000 and after. 2 figs

  5. Meeting the challenges to nuclear safety of phasing out the commercial use of nuclear power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decision of the German Government to phase out nuclear power is based on the nuclear and radiation risks that inevitably are associated with the operation of nuclear power plants. These risks are socially not accepted. The nuclear sector in Germany has therefore been affected since more than a decade by the erosion of the staffing, technical and knowledge bases. The consensus based phase out policy is an efficient approach to cope with these and other internationally discussed external factors challenging nuclear safety. The further use of nuclear power is limited and can be adapted to the availability of needed infrastructure. During phasing out, safety has to be maintained and improved in accordance with the law. To this end, the German nuclear regulatory body has taken the following actions that are also described in the paper: (i) regulatory approaches to power operators' organizational changes and staff development; (ii) establishment of a safety culture, safety management systems and performance indicators; (iii) modernization of the safety related regulations to the current state of the art in science and technology; (iv) maintenance of strong nuclear regulatory supervision and effective periodic safety reviews; (v) measures to preserve competence and infrastructure for the plants' residual operating lives and for overcoming the consequences of the use of nuclear power. (author)

  6. Technical Session: China. Seizing Opportunities to Meet the Challenges and Promote the Healthy Development of Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past 30 years of reform and opening, China has made outstanding achievements in its fast- growing economy and society. But at the same time, China's environmental problems have become increasingly prominent, especially as a result of the irrational energy structure. In order to promote the coordinated and sustainable development of the economy, society and the environment, and to build a resource-saving and environmentally friendly society, there is an urgent need for China to strengthen its environmental protection measures, implement energy saving and emission reduction measures, and vigorously develop and use clean energy. To this end, China has adopted a policy of actively pursuing the construction of nuclear power infrastructure and has recently initiated or is about to initiate the construction of a series of nuclear power plants, which will lead to the swift and vigorous development of nuclear power. Under these circumstances, what challenges will China face during the further development of its nuclear power infrastructure? And what actions will China need to take in response to these challenges? These are questions that require serious consideration. Nuclear power is the logical choice for China to strengthen environmental protection and build an ecological civilization. In order to effectively protect public life and health, take better care of the Earth, which is the common home for mankind, and achieve sustainable development, the Chinese Government has adopted environmental protection as a basic national policy and will energetically promote the building of an ecological civilization by forming an industry structure and a growth and consumption pattern that saves energy resources and protects the environment. Nuclear power is a safe, economical and clean form of energy, and is the most realistic alternative source of energy that can currently be developed on a large scale. There is no doubt as to the importance and necessity of developing

  7. Institutional Strain and Precarious Values in Meeting Future Nuclear Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Matthews; Todd R. LaPorte

    1998-11-01

    This paper explores the implications of moderately expanding plutonium "pit" production capability within the strongly R&D culture of Los Alamos National Laboratory, especially in terms of the lab's current capacity or "fitness for the future" in which institutional stewardship of the nation's nuclear deterrent capability becomes a primary objective. The institutional properties needed to assure "future fitness" includes the organizational requisites highly reliable operations and sustained institutional constancy in a manner that evokes deep public trust and confidence. Estimates are made of the degree to which the key Division and most relevant Program office in this evolution already exhibits them.

  8. Evaluation of communication structures for nuclear-specific applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates various implementations of communication structures associated with nuclear-specific applications. Establishing numerous network structures currently used in nuclear industry, this projects analyzes the functionality and reliability of different structures. The communication structures studied in this paper include Object Linking and Embedding process control (OPC), Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) and Modbus Communication Protocol. The experimental aspect of this project includes development and implementation of each network structure for NPP control and shutdown systems. The results of the experimentations are used to identify the potential problems of applying such structures to nuclear industry, in order to introduce nuclear-specific network structures. (author)

  9. Long term operation of nuclear power plants - economic challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lifetime extension of nuclear power plants is an open issue in a lot of countries. At the international scale, the costs of upgrading the plant equipment were assessed in 2012 to be between 500 and 1000 dollars per kWe. The post-Fukushima measures taken for increasing the safety standard of the plant reach around 15% of the bill. In almost all countries the lifetime extension strategy appears to be economical if the extension time is for 10 years at least. For France the lifetime extension strategy is also economical: a recent report of the 'French Court of Auditors' concludes that the complete cost of nuclear energy in 2013 is 59.8 euros/MWh and is estimated to reach 62 euros/MWh in the case of a lifetime extension to 50 years of operation which is still very competitive. Another advantage of the life extension strategy is to allow a smoothing of the investment needs and of the industrial loads: the replacement of reactors would take place on a broader period. (A.C.)

  10. Aging management of nuclear fuel pool structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term operations of a nuclear power plant (NPP) are currently impacted by the utility's capabilities with respect to spent fuel storage. Available options for the safe, long-term storage of spent fuel are quite limited; as such, maximized usage of existing on-site storage capacity (NPP) is quite important. The service life of existing fuel pool structures may be determined by a number of operations or age-related events. Management of these events is often critical to the structure's integrity and durability. From an operations vantage point, aging management relates to such characteristics as storage capacity, performance of pool water treatment systems, and physical liner damage. Primary issues related to structural integrity include materials degradation and environmental enclosure factors. The development of an effective aging management program should address both operational and structural issues. The goal of this paper is to provide recommendations for pool structure aging management, with benefits to both short and long-term, or extended life, operations. Because of their critical nature, the report will focus on spent fuel pools. Many of the concepts generated in this report may also be applied to other NPP pool structures (i.e., new fuel pools, reactor internals pits and transfer canals) because of similar physical/environmental effects

  11. The Challenges and Potential of Nuclear Energy for Addressing Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response to climate change and the stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations has major implications for the global energy system. Stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations requires a peak and an indefinite decline of global CO2 emissions. Nuclear energy, along with other technologies, has the potential to contribute to the growing demand for energy without emitting CO2. Nuclear energy is of particular interest because of its global prevalence and its current significant contribution, nearly 20%, to the world's electricity supply. We have investigated the value of nuclear energy in addressing climate change, and have explored the potential challenges for the rapid and large-scale expansion of nuclear energy as a response to climate change. The scope of this study is long-term and the modeling time frame extends out a century because the nature of nuclear energy and climate change dictate that perspective. Our results indicate that the value of the nuclear technology option for addressing climate change is denominated in trillions of dollars. Several-fold increases to the value of the nuclear option can be expected if there is limited availability of competing carbon-free technologies, particularly fossil-fuel based technologies that can capture and sequester carbon. Challenges for the expanded global use of nuclear energy include the global capacity for nuclear construction, proliferation, uranium availability, and waste disposal. While the economic costs of nuclear fuel and power are important, non-economic issues transcend the issues of costs. In this regard, advanced nuclear technologies and new vision for the global use of nuclear energy are important considerations for the future of nuclear power and climate change.

  12. The Challenges and Potential of Nuclear Energy for Addressing Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Son H.; Edmonds, James A.

    2007-10-24

    The response to climate change and the stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations has major implications for the global energy system. Stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations requires a peak and an indefinite decline of global CO2 emissions. Nuclear energy, along with other technologies, has the potential to contribute to the growing demand for energy without emitting CO2. Nuclear energy is of particular interest because of its global prevalence and its current significant contribution, nearly 20%, to the world’s electricity supply. We have investigated the value of nuclear energy in addressing climate change, and have explored the potential challenges for the rapid and large-scale expansion of nuclear energy as a response to climate change. The scope of this study is long-term and the modeling time frame extends out a century because the nature of nuclear energy and climate change dictate that perspective. Our results indicate that the value of the nuclear technology option for addressing climate change is denominated in trillions of dollars. Several-fold increases to the value of the nuclear option can be expected if there is limited availability of competing carbon-free technologies, particularly fossil-fuel based technologies that can capture and sequester carbon. Challenges for the expanded global use of nuclear energy include the global capacity for nuclear construction, proliferation, uranium availability, and waste disposal. While the economic costs of nuclear fuel and power are important, non-economic issues transcend the issues of costs. In this regard, advanced nuclear technologies and new vision for the global use of nuclear energy are important considerations for the future of nuclear power and climate change.

  13. Isomeric target for nuclear structure studies

    CERN Document Server

    Maunoury, L; Aubert, P; Aupiais, J; Baudin, M; Blier, G; Bonnereau, B; Boulin, Y; Pointurier, F; Sauvestre, J E; Sigaud, J; Szmigiel, M

    2002-01-01

    The experimental studies on nuclear structure and reactions dealing with nuclei in their isomeric state are, actually, mainly constrained by the difficulty of producing isomeric targets. The CEA/Bruyeres-le-Chatel laboratory has initiated the production of a sup 1 sup 7 sup 7 Lu sup m isomeric target. We plan to reach a 45% isomeric purity associated with a number of isomeric nuclei about 10 sup 1 sup 5. This target will be available for experiments at the end of the year 2000. The method performed to produce such targets will be discussed.

  14. Meeting the challenge of competition through structured entrepreneurship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, N R

    1987-01-01

    The growth of the health care industry within the last several decades has changed the very nature of health care facilities. Where once these facilities were only concerned with health-related issues, they are now concerned with their status as businesses. These facilities now utilize business functions such as marketing, advertising, sales, and strategic planning. This article explains how health care facilities can use structural entrepreneurship in order to meet the business-related challenges of the future. PMID:10285382

  15. Chiral nucleon-nucleon forces in nuclear structure calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coraggio L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Realistic nuclear potentials, derived within chiral perturbation theory, are a major breakthrough in modern nuclear structure theory, since they provide a direct link between nuclear physics and its underlying theory, namely the QCD. As a matter of fact, chiral potentials are tailored on the low-energy regime of nuclear structure physics, and chiral perturbation theory provides on the same footing two-nucleon forces as well as many-body ones. This feature fits well with modern advances in ab-initio methods and realistic shell-model. Here, we will review recent nuclear structure calculations, based on realistic chiral potentials, for both finite nuclei and infinite nuclear matter.

  16. Chiral nucleon-nucleon forces in nuclear structure calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Coraggio, L; Holt, J W; Itaco, N; Machleidt, R; Marcucci, L E; Sammarruca, F

    2016-01-01

    Realistic nuclear potentials, derived within chiral perturbation theory, are a major breakthrough in modern nuclear structure theory, since they provide a direct link between nuclear physics and its underlying theory, namely the QCD. As a matter of fact, chiral potentials are tailored on the low-energy regime of nuclear structure physics, and chiral perturbation theory provides on the same footing two-nucleon forces as well as many-body ones. This feature fits well with modern advances in ab-initio methods and realistic shell-model. Here, we will review recent nuclear structure calculations, based on realistic chiral potentials, for both finite nuclei and infinite nuclear matter.

  17. Impact of structural aging on seismic risk assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Structural Aging Program is addressing the potential for degradation of concrete structural components and systems in nuclear power plants over time due to aging and aggressive environmental stressors. Structures are passive under normal operating conditions but play a key role in mitigating design-basis events, particularly those arising from external challenges such as earthquakes, extreme winds, fires and floods. Structures are plant-specific and unique, often are difficult to inspect, and are virtually impossible to replace. The importance of structural failures in accident mitigation is amplified because such failures may lead to common-cause failures of other components. Structural condition assessment and service life prediction must focus on a few critical components and systems within the plant. Components and systems that are dominant contributors to risk and that require particular attention can be identified through the mathematical formalism of a probabilistic risk assessment, or PRA. To illustrate, the role of structural degradation due to aging on plant risk is examined through the framework of a Level 1 seismic PRA of a nuclear power plant. Plausible mechanisms of structural degradation are found to increase the core damage probability by approximately a factor of two

  18. The Structural Engineering Challenges Following the Wenchuan Earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GRUNDY Paul

    2009-01-01

    Ihe 5 · 12 Wenchuan Larthquake presents two challenges-reconstruction of the devastated areas and building adequate seismic resistance into the rest of China. The stages in recovery include structural condition assessment , identification of seismic weaknesses, appreciation of the variable seismicity of PR China, the development of a seismic performance index to aid the decision to relocate, rebuild or retrofit, development and application of the principles of retrofitting which recycles rubble and waste from Wenchuan "5 ? 12" , with an emphasis on integrating masonry construction into seismic resistance. The recovery and resilience achieved through structural engineering must be integrated into a broader community involvement in disaster risk reduction.

  19. Key issues in space nuclear power challenges for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future appears rich in missions that will extend the frontiers of knowledge, human presence in space, and opportunities for profitable commerce. Key to success of these ventures is the availability of plentiful, cost effective electric power and assured, low cost access to space. While forecasts of space power needs are problematic, an assessment of future needs based on terrestrial experience has been made. These needs fall into three broad categories: survival, self sufficiency and industrialization. The cost of delivering payloads to orbital locations from LEO to Mars has been determined and future launch cost reductions projected. From these factors, then, projections of the performance necessary for future solar and nuclear space power options has been made. These goals are largely dependent upon orbital location and energy storage needs. Finally the cost of present space power systems has been determined and projections made for future systems

  20. From proliferation to arms race. Nuclear challenges in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If there is a region in the world where the 21. Century will be defined, it is Asia. When the rise of powers meets with old rivalries, competition for regional leadership and pending territorial disputes, the risk of conflict resurfaces and the balance of powers shifts. With changes come new trends, and with new trends come new dynamics. The nuclear realm is one of those where the changes are the most significant, the future the most uncertain, and where ongoing evolutions warrant the most scrutiny. What are these evolutions' main characteristics and what are their consequences for security, deterrence, non-proliferation and disarmament? Five major trends are currently shaping the strategic landscape and one of them has the potential for global ramifications: the advent of a regional arms race. (author)

  1. The international nuclear non-proliferation system: Challenges and choices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J.; McGrew, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    When a topic has been under discussion for almost 40 years there is a danger that the literature will become excessively esoteric and that, as Philip Grummett suggests, '...a new scholasticism will arise' (p.79). Originating in a November l982 seminar co-sponsored by the British International Studies Association and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, this volume is a refreshing, well conceived, and well written antidote to that trend. It is also well timed for the 1985 NPT Review Conference. The eight chapters of the volume are divided into three sections. Following an introduction by Anthony McGrew that touches on all the major themes of the volume, the first section deals with the existing non-proliferation system. In three chapters the historical, institutional and policy-making elements of the present system are outlined. There is a vignette on the Nuclear Suppliers Group in Wilmshurst's chapter one (pp. 28-33). Fischer's informative chapter on the IAEA is followed by Gummett's examination of policy options, including, for example, the linking of conventional weapons transfer to non-proliferation policies. The second section, also of three chapters, examines current issues: the state of the international nuclear industry, and the non-proliferation policies of the United States and Britain. Walker's chapter focuses chiefly on change in the industry-from monopoly to pluralism in suppliers, the effect of the economic recession, and the combined effect of these two factors on international politics. Devine's American non-proliferation chapter is a statement of the State Department view, whilst Keohane's chapter on Britain attempts to put the Trident procurement into a proliferation context. The British chapter is present because of ethnocentric considerations.

  2. The international nuclear non-proliferation system: Challenges and choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a topic has been under discussion for almost 40 years there is a danger that the literature will become excessively esoteric and that, as Philip Grummett suggests, '...a new scholasticism will arise' (p.79). Originating in a November l982 seminar co-sponsored by the British International Studies Association and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, this volume is a refreshing, well conceived, and well written antidote to that trend. It is also well timed for the 1985 NPT Review Conference. The eight chapters of the volume are divided into three sections. Following an introduction by Anthony McGrew that touches on all the major themes of the volume, the first section deals with the existing non-proliferation system. In three chapters the historical, institutional and policy-making elements of the present system are outlined. There is a vignette on the Nuclear Suppliers Group in Wilmshurst's chapter one (pp. 28-33). Fischer's informative chapter on the IAEA is followed by Gummett's examination of policy options, including, for example, the linking of conventional weapons transfer to non-proliferation policies. The second section, also of three chapters, examines current issues: the state of the international nuclear industry, and the non-proliferation policies of the United States and Britain. Walker's chapter focuses chiefly on change in the industry-from monopoly to pluralism in suppliers, the effect of the economic recession, and the combined effect of these two factors on international politics. Devine's American non-proliferation chapter is a statement of the State Department view, whilst Keohane's chapter on Britain attempts to put the Trident procurement into a proliferation context. The British chapter is present because of ethnocentric considerations

  3. Challenges of Carboy Security For Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwangjo [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) become one of the most important infrastructures in providing efficient and non-interrupted electricity in a country using radioactive elements due to global warming and shortage of fossil resources. To provide the higher reliability and better performance with additional diagnostic capabilities in operating NPPs, digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems have been introduced to replace the analog I and C system. However, the digitalized I and C systems bring us new vulnerabilities and threats over the cyber space. In this paper, we discus that the trends of cyber security for legacy IT system and its countermeasure have been developed for last three decades from the security point of view. We found that the nuclear industry has an inherently conservative approach to safety and substantial effort is required to provide the necessary evidence and analysis to assure that digital I and C systems can be used in safety-critical and safety-related applications. NPP I and C systems are generally isolated from external communication systems. This cannot provide 100% cyber attack-free operation for NPP lessoned from an attack using stuxnet. Experience gained from cyber security in other sensitive fields, such as the military, national security, banking, and air-traffic control, etc. is valuable both for improving cyber security at NPPs with digital I and C systems and for demonstrating that cyber defenses can consistently stay ahead of cyber attacks. But as with safety and other areas of security, cyber security is an area where no-one can rest on his laurels. Continued success requires continuous vigilance and continuous improvement.

  4. Challenges of Carboy Security For Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) become one of the most important infrastructures in providing efficient and non-interrupted electricity in a country using radioactive elements due to global warming and shortage of fossil resources. To provide the higher reliability and better performance with additional diagnostic capabilities in operating NPPs, digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems have been introduced to replace the analog I and C system. However, the digitalized I and C systems bring us new vulnerabilities and threats over the cyber space. In this paper, we discus that the trends of cyber security for legacy IT system and its countermeasure have been developed for last three decades from the security point of view. We found that the nuclear industry has an inherently conservative approach to safety and substantial effort is required to provide the necessary evidence and analysis to assure that digital I and C systems can be used in safety-critical and safety-related applications. NPP I and C systems are generally isolated from external communication systems. This cannot provide 100% cyber attack-free operation for NPP lessoned from an attack using stuxnet. Experience gained from cyber security in other sensitive fields, such as the military, national security, banking, and air-traffic control, etc. is valuable both for improving cyber security at NPPs with digital I and C systems and for demonstrating that cyber defenses can consistently stay ahead of cyber attacks. But as with safety and other areas of security, cyber security is an area where no-one can rest on his laurels. Continued success requires continuous vigilance and continuous improvement

  5. Spent Fuel Challenges Facing Small and New Nuclear Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to ensure that the radioactive wastes in any country are managed safely, it is necessary to have an established legislative and regulatory framework and also to create the necessary organizations for implementation and for oversight of waste management operations and facility development. Guidance on these issues is given in the Joint Convention and a number of other IAEA documents. The IAEA, and also the EC, have in addition published key overarching strategic advisory documents for new nuclear programmes. These tend to imply that all nuclear programmes, however large or small, should be pressing ahead urgently towards early implementation of geological repositories. In practice, however, in small programmes there are neither economic nor technical drivers for early implementation of deep geological repositories; constructing simpler facilities for the disposal of the larger volume of low-level waste has higher priority. Nevertheless, in all countries political decisions have to be taken and policies set in place to ensure that geological disposal will implemented without unjustified delay. This paper distils out a set of key messages for small programmes. Amongst the most critical are the following. Even if disposal is far off, planning and organization should begin at the initiation of the programme; this can help with technical and economic optimization and (importantly) also with public and political acceptance. Important lessons can be learned from advanced programmes — but these must be adapted to allow for the different boundary conditions of new and small programmes. The key differences relate to the timescales involved, and the resources available. There is a range of waste management and waste disposal options open to new programmes. It is not necessary to choose definitive solutions at the outset; options can be kept open, but a minimum level of engagement is required for all open options. (author)

  6. Opting out of the commercial use of nuclear power in Germany and challenges arising to nuclear supervision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The governing majority in Germany has decided to opt out of the commercial use of nuclear power and to terminate this use in a safe and managed way. In the opinion of the federal government, the reasons for this decision include the potential for severe accidents, which is considered intolerable in the long run even though the probability of occurrence is low. In addition, there are the problems of final storage of radioactive waste, issues associated with the risk of proliferation, and the need to end a deep-seated societal conflict in Germany. In its function as the Top Regulator, the department responsible for nuclear matters of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety (BMU) has two important functions: It acts as the federal supervisor of the federal states which execute the Atomic Energy Act on behalf of the federal government, and it exercises the duty of preparing the nuclear policy outlined in the norms established by the federal government. After lengthy discussions with the operators of nuclear power plants an agreement was elaborated in preparation of a solution acceptable to all participants, which essentially defines an electricity quota for nuclear power plant operation and deals with spent fuel and nuclear waste management problems. This implies a number of challenges arising to the BMU as a consequence of the need to further ensure a high safety standard. It also means international efforts as well as the need to counteract the impending loss of competence in the nuclear field. (orig.)

  7. Structural considerations in nuclear life extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodson, W.B.; McHale, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    The ability to extend the licensed life of a nuclear power plant requires that technical, economic, and regulatory criteria be satisfied. Two ongoing Electric Power Research Institute/US Department of Energy funded pilot studies are looking at the technical and economic aspects from a plant wide viewpoint to life extension. In each, structures have been identified to have a potentially strong effect on the viability for extended life because of the possible major cost, schedule, and person-rem factors should major refurbishment, modifications, or replacement be required. This paper reviews the degradation mechanisms and counterbalancing design features for one of these pilot plants in the studies. It further reviews the recommended ongoing practices to be followed to better ensure that life extension for the structures remains a future option.

  8. Structural considerations in nuclear life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to extend the licensed life of a nuclear power plant requires that technical, economic, and regulatory criteria be satisfied. Two ongoing Electric Power Research Institute/US Department of Energy funded pilot studies are looking at the technical and economic aspects from a plant wide viewpoint to life extension. In each, structures have been identified to have a potentially strong effect on the viability for extended life because of the possible major cost, schedule, and person-rem factors should major refurbishment, modifications, or replacement be required. This paper reviews the degradation mechanisms and counterbalancing design features for one of these pilot plants in the studies. It further reviews the recommended ongoing practices to be followed to better ensure that life extension for the structures remains a future option

  9. Ab initio nuclear structure - the large sparse matrix eigenvalue problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and reactions of light nuclei represent fundamental and formidable challenges for microscopic theory based on realistic strong interaction potentials. Several ab initio methods have now emerged that provide nearly exact solutions for some nuclear properties. The ab initio no core shell model (NCSM) and the no core full configuration (NCFC) method, frame this quantum many-particle problem as a large sparse matrix eigenvalue problem where one evaluates the Hamiltonian matrix in a basis space consisting of many-fermion Slater determinants and then solves for a set of the lowest eigenvalues and their associated eigenvectors. The resulting eigenvectors are employed to evaluate a set of experimental quantities to test the underlying potential. For fundamental problems of interest, the matrix dimension often exceeds 1010 and the number of nonzero matrix elements may saturate available storage on present-day leadership class facilities. We survey recent results and advances in solving this large sparse matrix eigenvalue problem. We also outline the challenges that lie ahead for achieving further breakthroughs in fundamental nuclear theory using these ab initio approaches.

  10. Development of analysis methods for seismically isolated nuclear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAERI's contributions to the project entitled Development of Analysis Methods for Seismically Isolated Nuclear Structures under IAEA CRP of the intercomparison of analysis methods for predicting the behaviour of seismically isolated nuclear structures during 1996-1999 in effort to develop the numerical analysis methods and to compare the analysis results with the benchmark test results of seismic isolation bearings and isolated nuclear structures provided by participating countries are briefly described. Certain progress in the analysis procedures for isolation bearings and isolated nuclear structures has been made throughout the IAEA CRPs and the analysis methods developed can be improved for future nuclear facility applications. (author)

  11. Development of structural steels for nuclear application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To established the bases of nuclear structural material technologies, this study was focused on the localization and improvement of nuclear structural steels, the production of material property data, and technology developments for integrity evaluation. The important test and analysis technologies for material integrity assessment were developed, and the materials properties of the pressure vessel steels were evaluated systematically on the basis of those technologies, they are microstructural characteristics, tensile and indentation deformation properties, impact properties, and static and dynamic fracture toughness, fatigue and corrosion fatigue etc. Irradiation tests in the research reactors were prepared or completed to obtain the mechanical properties of irradiated materials. The improvement of low alloy steel was also attempted through the comparative study on the manufacturing processes, computer assisted alloy and process design, and application of the inter critical heat treatment. On the other hand, type 304 stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and tested successfully. High strength type 316LN stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and the microstructural characteristics, corrosion resistance, mechanical properties at high temperatures, low cycle fatigue property etc. were tested and analyzed in the view point of the effect of nitrogen. Type 347 stainless steels with high corrosion resistance and toughness for pipings and tubes and low-activated Cr-Mn steels were also developed and their basic properties were evaluated. Finally, the martensitic stainless steels for turbine blade were developed and tests. (author). 242 refs., 100 tabs., 304 figs

  12. Nuclear structure research. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most significant development this year has been the outcome of a survey of EO transition strength, ρ2(EO), in heavy nuclei. The systematics of ρ2(EO) reveals that the strongest EO's are between pairs of excited states with the same spin and parity. This is observed in the regions Z,N = 38,60; 48,66; 64,88; and 80,106. Unlike other multipoles it is rare that nuclear ground states are strongly connected to excited states by monopole transitions. Another significant finding is in the results of the experimental study of levels in 187Au. Two bands of states are observed with identical spin sequences, very similar excitation energies, and EO transitions between the favored band members but not between the unfavored band members. This is interpreted in terms of nearly identical diabatic structures. Experimental data sets for the radioactive decays of 183Pt and 186Au to 183Ir and 186Pt, respectively, have been under analysis. The studies are aimed at elucidating shape coexistence and triaxiality in the A = 185 region. An extensive program of systematics for nuclei at and near N = Z has been continued in preparation for the planned nuclear structure research program using the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge. A considerable effort has been devoted to HRIBF target development

  13. Development of structural steels for nuclear application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Chi, S. H.; Ryu, W. S.; Lee, B. S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, Y. J.; Byun, T. S.; Yoon, J. H.; Park, D. K.; Oh, J. M.; Cho, H. D.; Kim, H.; Kim, H. D.; Kang, S. S.; Kim, J. W.; Ahn, S. B.

    1997-08-01

    To established the bases of nuclear structural material technologies, this study was focused on the localization and improvement of nuclear structural steels, the production of material property data, and technology developments for integrity evaluation. The important test and analysis technologies for material integrity assessment were developed, and the materials properties of the pressure vessel steels were evaluated systematically on the basis of those technologies, they are microstructural characteristics, tensile and indentation deformation properties, impact properties, and static and dynamic fracture toughness, fatigue and corrosion fatigue etc. Irradiation tests in the research reactors were prepared or completed to obtain the mechanical properties of irradiated materials. The improvement of low alloy steel was also attempted through the comparative study on the manufacturing processes, computer assisted alloy and process design, and application of the inter critical heat treatment. On the other hand, type 304 stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and tested successfully. High strength type 316LN stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and the microstructural characteristics, corrosion resistance, mechanical properties at high temperatures, low cycle fatigue property etc. were tested and analyzed in the view point of the effect of nitrogen. Type 347 stainless steels with high corrosion resistance and toughness for pipings and tubes and low-activated Cr-Mn steels were also developed and their basic properties were evaluated. Finally, the martensitic stainless steels for turbine blade were developed and tests. (author). 242 refs., 100 tabs., 304 figs.

  14. Regulatory challenges for independent organization and licensing procedures for Egypt first nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In March 2010 the Government of Egypt issued an Ordinance creating an independent regulatory body the Egypt Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA) reporting directly to the Prime Minister and responsible for matters dealing with protection of the radiation worker, public and environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. A little more than 2 years have elapsed since this date. Some of the challenges faced by NRRA to its regulatory independence are given below. This paper will discuss the major challenges relating to Egyptian nuclear power program and specially the regulatory effectiveness and licensing procedures compared to international comparison.

  15. MDEP: producing results in a challenging time for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) continues to pool the resources of its ten member countries for the purposes of 1) co-operating on safety reviews of designs of nuclear reactors under construction and undergoing licensing in several countries, and 2) exploring opportunities and potential for harmonisation of regulatory requirements and practices. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is closely involved in MDEP activities to ensure consistency with international requirements and practices. Over several years of activities, the MDEP has fostered close and important relations among the MDEP regulators participating in the working group activities, and the programme is meeting its expected outcome of enhancing co-operation among regulators involved in safety reviews of new reactor designs. The MDEP has reached some maturity and is making products available to key stakeholders, including non-MDEP regulators, so that these products, such as common positions, may be used to enhance safety reviews and to promote standardisation to benefit safety. Since the first MDEP conference in September 2009, there have been numerous interactions among MDEP representatives and other regulators and industry representatives which have helped the production of MDEP documents. The Fukushima Daiichi accident further highlights the need to increase the safety of new reactors, and the need for regulators to work closely with other stakeholders to ensure the safety of the new reactor fleet worldwide

  16. After a nuclear year of mixed fortunes, let's embrace the challenges of 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, John [nuclear 24, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    As we usher in the new year, it is worth taking time to reflect on the key developments for the world's nuclear energy industry in 2015. The past year was certainly one of mixed fortunes for the industry. Looking ahead into 2016, key challenges will include the need to recruit and train the skilled workforce that will be needed to support extended operations of nuclear plants, in addition to new-build and decommissioning projects.

  17. After a nuclear year of mixed fortunes, let's embrace the challenges of 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As we usher in the new year, it is worth taking time to reflect on the key developments for the world's nuclear energy industry in 2015. The past year was certainly one of mixed fortunes for the industry. Looking ahead into 2016, key challenges will include the need to recruit and train the skilled workforce that will be needed to support extended operations of nuclear plants, in addition to new-build and decommissioning projects.

  18. Control of hot particles challenges GPU Nuclear and the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past 4 yr, a number of nuclear generating stations, including GPU Nuclear, have reported occurrences of hot particles that are small and, in most cases, microscopic particles of radioactive contamination with relatively high specific activity. A survey conducted by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) indicated that ∼70% of the nuclear power plants indicated that they have some problem with hot particles. Both pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs) have found hot-particle contamination in the plant environment and, occasionally, on radiation workers. A hot particle on the skin produces a very steep dose gradient; the dose drops off very rapidly as the distance from the particle increases. The local absorbed dose produced from a hot particle on the skin may exceed the administrative limit established by the utility and on occasion exceeds the regulatory limit, which results in an overexposure reportable to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In an effort to contain these particles nuclear plant operators and management must be committed to the control of hot particles. The nuclear plant operators and the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) cleanup team are implementing new procedures, training programs, and more rigid contamination control techniques in order to control hot particles in the work environment. This paper briefly discusses the nuclear industries' experience, GPU Nuclear's experience, hot-particle detection, dosimetry, control measures, and costs associated with GPU Nuclear's hot-particle-control program

  19. Nuclear data for structural materials of fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document presents the status of nuclear reaction theory concerning optical model development, level density models and pre-equilibrium and direct processes used in calculation of neutron nuclear data for structural materials of fission and fusion reactors. 6 refs

  20. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-01-01

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  1. Trends and challenges toward efficient water management in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Water requirements for nuclear power exceed those of fossil fuel power stations by 20–25% on average. ► Innovation led to new strategies in design and operation of NPP to improve water use and consumption. ► Implementation of new cooling technologies that reduce water consumption, comes at a cost which is a matter of tradeoff. - Abstract: Nuclear power plants (NPPs) consume large amounts of water varying between 20% and 83% more than coal-fired plants of the same capacity. Water scarcity could limit the possibility for deployment of nuclear power plants in some areas. This translates to a huge incentive to enhance the efforts for introducing innovative water use and management practices and technologies related to design, construction and operation of a nuclear power plant. Reducing the water use and consumption for nuclear power plants is likely to help developing countries in introducing nuclear power in their energy supply mix. The bulk of the countries considering introduction of nuclear power are in water scarce regions. Hence, efficient water management in nuclear power plants is an important subject during the entire phases of construction, operation and maintenance of any nuclear power plant. This paper discusses global challenges for cooling systems as the need for nuclear power increases. The issues and possible solutions for these cooling systems are also addressed.

  2. Nuclear energy development in China: A study of opportunities and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With rapid economic development, China faces a great challenge to meet its increasing energy demand. Currently, China's energy supply is dominated by coal consumption, while natural gas and oil are in relative short supply. At the same time, nuclear energy is a relatively clean energy without green-house gas emissions. Considering the growing cost of fossil energy and the limited resources in China, oil supply security, coal mining disasters, the domestic environment pressure, and global climate warming, nuclear energy is an inevitable strategic option. Generally speaking, nuclear energy development has a promising future in China. Its driving factors include the brisk electricity demand, environment impact pressure, oil supply security, and positive public acceptance. Meanwhile, the question still remains whether nuclear energy development in China is sustainable. Just like in other parts of the world, China is also bewildered by the problems of reactor safety, nuclear waste treatment, and risk of proliferation of weapons material. In addition, nuclear technology diversity, shortage of uranium resources, and weak market competitiveness of nuclear power in the short term are certain barriers that China's nuclear energy development also faces. There are also other worrying issues such as: whether public acceptance in the future will change? Whether the current approaches to nuclear waste disposal are still acceptable when nuclear plants gains scale? In this paper, some suggestions and recommendations are put forward on the measures to be followed to 1) enhance domestic nuclear technology development and imported technology localization; 2) reduce the cost of nuclear power and enhance its market competitiveness; 3) accelerate the process of cleanly developing nuclear technology; 4) accelerate the process of developing more efficient reactor and nuclear fuel cycle; and 5) conduct effective publicity work to uphold public acceptance.

  3. Nuclear energy development in China: A study of opportunities and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With rapid economic development, China faces a great challenge to meet its increasing energy demand. Currently, China's energy supply is dominated by coal consumption, while natural gas and oil are in relative short supply. At the same time, nuclear energy is a relatively clean energy without green-house gas emissions. Considering the growing cost of fossil energy and the limited resources in China, oil supply security, coal mining disasters, the domestic environment pressure, and global climate warming, nuclear energy is an inevitable strategic option. Generally speaking, nuclear energy development has a promising future in China. Its driving factors include the brisk electricity demand, environment impact pressure, oil supply security, and positive public acceptance. Meanwhile, the question still remains whether nuclear energy development in China is sustainable. Just like in other parts of the world, China is also bewildered by the problems of reactor safety, nuclear waste treatment, and risk of proliferation of weapons material. In addition, nuclear technology diversity, shortage of uranium resources, and weak market competitiveness of nuclear power in the short term are certain barriers that China's nuclear energy development also faces. There are also other worrying issues such as: whether public acceptance in the future will change? Whether the current approaches to nuclear waste disposal are still acceptable when nuclear plants gains scale? In this paper, some suggestions and recommendations are put forward on the measures to be followed to 1) enhance domestic nuclear technology development and imported technology localization; 2) reduce the cost of nuclear power and enhance its market competitiveness; 3) accelerate the process of cleanly developing nuclear technology; 4) accelerate the process of developing more efficient reactor and nuclear fuel cycle; and 5) conduct effective publicity work to uphold public acceptance. (author)

  4. Lung Structure and the Intrinsic Challenges of Gas Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Connie C W; Hyde, Dallas M; Weibel, Ewald R

    2016-01-01

    Structural and functional complexities of the mammalian lung evolved to meet a unique set of challenges, namely, the provision of efficient delivery of inspired air to all lung units within a confined thoracic space, to build a large gas exchange surface associated with minimal barrier thickness and a microvascular network to accommodate the entire right ventricular cardiac output while withstanding cyclic mechanical stresses that increase several folds from rest to exercise. Intricate regulatory mechanisms at every level ensure that the dynamic capacities of ventilation, perfusion, diffusion, and chemical binding to hemoglobin are commensurate with usual metabolic demands and periodic extreme needs for activity and survival. This article reviews the structural design of mammalian and human lung, its functional challenges, limitations, and potential for adaptation. We discuss (i) the evolutionary origin of alveolar lungs and its advantages and compromises, (ii) structural determinants of alveolar gas exchange, including architecture of conducting bronchovascular trees that converge in gas exchange units, (iii) the challenges of matching ventilation, perfusion, and diffusion and tissue-erythrocyte and thoracopulmonary interactions. The notion of erythrocytes as an integral component of the gas exchanger is emphasized. We further discuss the signals, sources, and limits of structural plasticity of the lung in alveolar hypoxia and following a loss of lung units, and the promise and caveats of interventions aimed at augmenting endogenous adaptive responses. Our objective is to understand how individual components are matched at multiple levels to optimize organ function in the face of physiological demands or pathological constraints. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:827-895, 2016. PMID:27065169

  5. Nuclear modification of structure functions in lepton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Kumano, S.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss nuclear structure functions in lepton scattering including neutrino reactions. First, the determination of nuclear parton distribution functions is explained by using the data of electron and muon deep inelastic scattering and those of Drell-Yan processes. Second, NuTeV sin^2 theta_W anomaly is discussed by focusing on nuclear corrections in the iron target. Third, we show that the HERMES effect, which indicates nuclear modification of the longitudinal-transverse structure function...

  6. Challenges in developing human resources for nuclear safety in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challenges in developing Human Resources for nuclear safety in South Africa ESKOM Holding Limited which is the South African Government owned utility, operates over 10 power stations. The total installed is about 40 GW, and nuclear contributes only 6 percent. The existing nuclear power station, Koeberg NPP, is comprised of two 900 MW(e) units at the South African west coast near Cape Town. The South African Government has a policy to increase the share of nuclear in the generation mix from 6 percent to 15 percent before the year 2020. The challenge is that there have been a 'greying' of nuclear experts and a shrinking of nuclear engineering and science departments. As a consequence of this, ESKOM has realized that a large number of young engineers and scientists would have to be recruited and then trained in South Africa and abroad. Some people, especially high performers in the industry are continually looking for new challenges and opportunities and though it is important in the nuclear industry to retain these key staff members it have proved to be a serious challenge. The nuclear industry had to consider their national training infrastructures and the South African government in partnership with ESKOM, NECSA and PBMR has started a process of funding university chairs in reactor engineering and allied subjects. These departments undertake research and provide training for the South African nuclear industry. The recruitment process has initially involved the transfer of personnel from ESKOM, NECSA as well as direct recruitment from the market. The primary recruitment process going forward will be from universities and other Further Education Training (FET) institutions with a focus on ESKOM and PBMR providing the specific nuclear training. In this regard, both ESKOM and PBMR provide bursaries, project work and other assistance to selected candidates. Upon completion of studies, the specific training is provided both in-house and with partner national and

  7. The control of nuclear proliferation: future challenges. Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Stockholm, 23 April 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs in Stockholm on 23 April 1998. After a short presentation of the Agency's current verification activities, particularly in Iraq and Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the Director General focuses on the present and future role of the IAEA in the control of nuclear proliferation through its strengthened safeguards system, in the prevention of nuclear terrorism, and future challenges of controlling nuclear proliferation from both political and technical point of view

  8. The worldwide energy demand. A key challenge for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reappraisal of nuclear power is currently underway worldwide, with an increase in the use of nuclear energy for power generation predicted. The reasons for this global renaissance include a growing demand for electric power throughout the world, awareness that our fossil resources are limited, protection of the environment and the need for further development of various renewable energy technologies to ensure their competitiveness and base-load capability. The nuclear industry is rising to this challenge by offering advanced Generation III+ reactors, by building up staffing levels and investing in production facilities and the fuel cycle. (orig.)

  9. The future of the civil nuclear industry: the challenge of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis first gives an overview of the nuclear waste processing and storage in France (reasons and future of this political choice, legal framework, storage means and sites, weaknesses of waste storage). Then it comments various aspects of the processing of foreign nuclear wastes in France: economy and media impact, law and contracts, waste transport, temporary storage in France

  10. Global nuclear renaissance - today's issues, challenges and differences relative to the first wave of nuclear plant projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and negotiation of an Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) contract is a multi-disciplined and time consuming process. Relative to the first wave on new nuclear build projects of the 1950's - 1970's, today's EPC contracts are more complex for a variety of reasons including more demanding regulatory and environmental requirements, global supply chain versus localization issues and different world wide economic considerations. This paper discusses the impacts of some of these challenges on developing an EPC contract in today's Nuclear Renaissance. (authors)

  11. Membrane proteins structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Sergey; Lorigan, Gary A

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins represent a challenging class of biological systems to study. They are extremely difficult to crystallize and in most cases they retain their structure and functions only in membrane environments. Therefore, commonly used diffraction methods fail to give detailed molecular structure and other approaches have to be utilized to obtain biologically relevant information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, however, can provide powerful structural and dynamical constraints on these complicated systems. Solution- and solid-state NMR are powerful methods for investigating membrane proteins studies. In this work, we briefly review both solution and solid-state NMR techniques for membrane protein studies and illustrate the applications of these methods to elucidate proteins structure, conformation, topology, dynamics, and function. Recent advances in electronics, biological sample preparation, and spectral processing provided opportunities for complex biological systems, such as membrane proteins inside lipid vesicles, to be studied faster and with outstanding quality. New analysis methods therefore have emerged, that benefit from the combination of sample preparation and corresponding specific high-end NMR techniques, which give access to more structural and dynamic information. PMID:23733702

  12. International conference: Features of nuclear excitation states and mechanisms of nuclear reactions. 51. Meeting on nuclear spectroscopy and nuclear structure. The book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the LI Meeting on Nuclear Spectroscopy and Nuclear Structure are presented. Properties of excited states of atomic nuclei and mechanisms of nuclear reactions are considered. Studies on the theory of nucleus and fundamental interactions pertinent to experimental study of nuclei properties and mechanisms of nuclear reactions, technique and methods of experiment, application of nuclear-physical method, are provided

  13. Nuclear structure research. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most significant development this year has been the realization that EO transition strength is a fundamental manifestation of nuclear mean-square charge radius differences. Thus, EO transitions provide a fundamental signature for shape coexistence in nuclei. In this sense, EO transitions are second only to E2 transitions for signaling (quadrupole) shapes in nuclei and do so when shape differences occur. A major effort has been devoted to the review of EO transitions in nuclei. Experiments have been carried out or are scheduled at: ATLAS/FMA (α decay of very neutron-deficient Bi isotopes); MSU/NSCL (β decay of 56Cu); and HRIBF/RMS (commissioning of tape collector, internal conversion/internal-pair spectrometer; β decay of 58Cu). A considerable effort has been devoted to planning the nuclear structure physics that will be pursued using HRIBF. Theoretical investigations have continued in collaboration with Prof. K. Heyde, Prof. D.J. Rowe, Prof. J.O. Rasmussen, and Prof. P.B. Semmes. These studies focus on shape coexistence and particle-core coupling

  14. Nuclear Energy In Switzerland: It's going ahead. Challenges For The Swiss Nuclear Society Young Generation Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiss energy policy is focused on generating domestic electric power without combusting fossil fuels for already four decades. Roughly 60% of the electricity is generated in hydroelectric plants, which is possible due to the country's favourable topography; the remaining 40% are produced by the country's five nuclear power plants (NPPs). As in any other country nuclear power has its enemies in Switzerland. Due to the direct democracy system in Switzerland the nuclear opposition has a lot of possibilities to disturb the energy policy. Since 1969, when the first Swiss nuclear power plant went online, four plebiscites were held on the issue of civil use of nuclear energy. Four times Swiss citizens voted in favour of further operation of the existing plants also in the latest battle for nuclear energy, which was won in 2003. In 2005 and 2006 several Swiss studies about the future energy situation, especially the electricity situation, have been published. All off them show clearly that there will be a big gab around the year 2020 when the oldest three nuclear power plants will fade out. A public debate was started, how to solve the problem. Beside others, building new nuclear power plants was mentioned and discussed rationally. In 2007 the energy police of the Swiss government changed into a more nuclear friendly position and at the end of the same year some electricity companies lunched a new build program. Hosting the International Youth Nuclear Congress 2008 (IYNC 2008) in Switzerland seems to be just the right moment for the nuclear industry in our country. The slightly changed surroundings effected the organization of Swiss Nuclear Society (SNS) and SNS Young Generation Group (SNSYG) and enlarged the fields of activities for SNSYG. Those activities mentioned in the previous chapters will be developed in the future. The discussion about new builds in Switzerland has started and because of that more nuclear activities in Switzerland will occur. And surely there will

  15. Accelerating the global nuclear renaissance: the central challenge of sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rebirth of nuclear energy has become an unmistakable reality that is gathering speed and momentum on the full world stage. All around the world, old-school anti-nuclear environmentalism is being eclipsed by a new realism that recognises nuclear energy's essential virtue: its capacity to deliver cleanly generated power safely, reliably, and on a massive scale. For serious environmentalists, the real challenge is that nuclear energy is not yet growing fast enough to play its needed role in the clean-energy revolution our world so desperately needs. A fair assessment shows that not one of the commonly cited ''public concerns'' poses a reasonable obstacle to a global expansion of nuclear power: Proliferation, Operational Safety, Cost Reduction, Waste Management. In three areas, governments must take decisive action to grow the nuclear industry: (1) Construct a comprehensive global regime to curtail greenhouse emissions; (2) Elevate nuclear investment to a national and international policy priority; and (3) Support educational development of the nuclear profession for an expanded global role. The global nuclear industry will be indispensable if humanity is to preserve the environment that enabled civilisation to evolve. Governments must emerge from postures of timidity and equivocation to act decisively in support of that industry. Our world is in dire peril, and we have no time to lose

  16. Well funneled nuclear structure landscape: renormalization

    CERN Document Server

    Idini, A; Barranco, F; Vigezzi, E; Broglia, R A

    2015-01-01

    A complete characterization of the structure of nuclei can be obtained by combining information arising from inelastic scattering, Coulomb excitation and $\\gamma-$decay, together with one- and two-particle transfer reactions. In this way it is possible to probe the single-particle and collective components of the nuclear many-body wavefunction resulting from their mutual coupling and diagonalising the low-energy Hamiltonian. We address the question of how accurately such a description can account for experimental observations. It is concluded that renormalizing empirically and on equal footing bare single-particle and collective motion in terms of self-energy (mass) and vertex corrections (screening), as well as particle-hole and pairing interactions through particle-vibration coupling allows theory to provide an overall, quantitative account of the data.

  17. Aging of nuclear safety related concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of aging processes in nuclear-safety-related concrete structures (NSRCS) is presented. The major environmental stressor and aging factors affecting the performance of NSRCS are summarized, as are drying and plastic shrinkage, expansion of water during the freeze-thaw cycle, water passing through cracks dissolving or leaching the soluble calcium hydroxide, attack of acid rain and ground water, chemical reactions between particular aggregates and the alkaline solution within cement paste, reaction of calcium hydroxide in cement paste hydration products with atmospheric carbon dioxide, and physical radiation effects of neutrons and gamma radiation. The current methods for aging management in NSRCS are analyzed and evaluated. A new treatment is presented for the monitoring, evaluation and prediction of aging processes, consisting in a combination of theoretical methods, laboratory experiments, in-situ measurements and numerical simulations. 24 refs

  18. The TRIUMF nuclear structure program and TIGRESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility located at the TRIUMF laboratory in Vancouver, Canada, is one of the world's most advanced ISOL-type radioactive ion beam facilities. An extensive γ-ray spectroscopy program at ISAC is centered around two major research facilities: (1) the 8π γ-ray spectrometer for β-delayed γ-ray spectroscopy experiments with the low-energy beams from ISAC-I, and (2) the next-generation TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS) for in-beam experiments with the accelerated radioactive ion beams. An overview of these facilities and recent results from the diverse program of nuclear structure and fundamental interaction studies they support is presented

  19. Regulatory challenges in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UK nuclear industry has, since the 1940s, worked extensively on the development of nuclear technology, both civil and military, and this activity has left a significant legacy of ageing nuclear liabilities for the present generation of operators to manage safely. On the older nuclear sites these liabilities include hazardous quantities of radioactive waste, and other material, stored within a decaying building infrastructure. As time passes more of the older commercial nuclear power stations are ending production and adding to the overall decommissioning task. The safe decommissioning of this historic legacy is presenting a unique challenge to operators and regulators alike. The Health and Safety Executive's Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) is responsible for the regulation of safety and radioactive waste management for the UK's 40 licensed nuclear sites. The nuclear licences the NII grants place responsibilities on the operators that continue, throughout operation and decommissioning, until a site is cleaned up to the extent that it can be delicensed and released for unrestricted use. In the last few months the UK Government has outlined its intention to make radical changes to current arrangements through the formation of a new body, the Liabilities Management Authority, which will take ownership of the bulk of the UK's nuclear liabilities and manage the decommissioning programme. The programme for decommissioning will run for more than 50 years and will need the provision of a very large amount of public money. It will also require effective strategic planning and project management if it is to be carried out successfully. At the same time there will be changes in the industry's organization and workforce, and different skills will be needed. The paper describes the nature of the challenge these changes are presenting to the NII, and how it is responding. Above all the NII recognizes that it must work together with the other organizations, and

  20. Nuclear power and the global challenges of energy security, 6 September 2007, London, England, World Nuclear Association Annual Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Atoms for Peace speech given by US President Eisenhower in 1953 - the speech that paved the way for the creation of the IAEA - he declared that a special purpose of Atoms for Peace would be 'to provide abundant electrical energy in the power-starved areas of the world'. That vision has yet to be realized. And it should not be taken to mean that nuclear power is the solution for all countries, or for all developing countries. But I would reiterate what I said at the outset - that the global challenges of security and development are interlinked, and that addressing the energy security needs of all countries will be a key to progress on both fronts. It is incumbent upon us to see to it that nuclear power will fulfil its potential in addressing these challenges

  1. [Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental goals are focused on developing an understanding of strong interactions and the structure of hadronic systems by determination of the electromagnetic response; these goals will be accomplished through coincidence detection of final states. Nuclear modeling objectives are to organize and interpret the data through a consistent description of a broad spectrum of reaction observables; calculations are performed in a nonrelativistic diagrammatic framework as well as a relativistic QHD approach. Work is described according to the following arrangement: direct knockout reactions (completion of 16O(e,e'p), 12C(e,e'pp) progress, large acceptance detector physics simulations), giant resonance studies (intermediate-energy experiments with solid-state detectors, the third response function in 12C(e,e'p0) and 16O(e,e'p0), comparison of the 12C(e, e'p0) and 16O(e,e'p3) reactions, quadrupole strength in the 16O(e,e'α0) reaction, quadrupole strength in the 12C(e,e'α) reaction, analysis of the 12C(e,e'p1) and 16O(e,e'p3) angular distributions, analysis of the 40Ca(e,e'x) reaction at low q, analysis of the higher-q 12C(e,e'x) data from Bates), models of nuclear structure (experimental work, Hartree-Fock calculations, phonon excitations in spherical nuclei, shell model calculations, variational methods for relativistic fields), and instrumentation development efforts (developments at CEBAF, CLAS contracts, BLAST developments)

  2. Nuclear structure and heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of lectures is presented on experimental studies of heavy-ion fusion reactions with emphasis on the role of nuclear structure in the fusion mechanism. The experiments considered are of three types: the fusion of lighter heavy ions at subcoulomb energies is studied with in-beam γ-ray techniques; the subbarrier fusion of 16O and 40Ar with the isotopes of samarium is detected out of beam by x-radiation from delayed activity; and measurements at very high energies, again for the lighter ions, employ direct particle identification of evaporation residues. The experimental data are compared with predictions based on the fusion of two spheres with the only degree of freedom being the separation of the centers, and which interact via potentials that vary smoothly with changes in the mass and charge of the projectile and target. The data exhibit with the isotopes of samarium, a portion of these deviations can be understood in terms of the changing deformation of the target nucleus, but an additional degree of freedom such as neck formation appears necessary. The results on 10B + 16O and 12C + 14N → 26Al at high bombarding energies indicate a maximum limiting angular momentum characteristic of the compound nucleus. At lower energies the nuclear structure of the colliding ion seems to affect strongly the cross section for fusion. Measurements made at subbarrier energies for a variety of projectile-target combinations in the 1p and 2s - 1d shell also indicate that the valence nucleons can affect the energy dependence for fusion. About half the systems studied so far have structureless excitation functions which follow a standard prediction. The other half exhibit large variations from this prediction. The possible importance of neutron transfer is discussed. The two-center shell model appears as a promising approach for gaining a qualitative understanding of these phenomena. 95 references, 52 figures, 1 table

  3. From nuclear stagnation to renaissance: The challenge of transferring regulatory knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Around 20 years ago there was a de facto nuclear stagnation of the peaceful uses of atomic energy in the West. At the time, governmental institutions for nuclear research and regulation, as well as the nuclear industry, had a nuclear 'intelligentsia' and many well qualified specialists available. Moreover, universities were ready and able to educate the next generation of professionals. The decline of the nuclear industry was therefore damaging both for individuals and the schools educating them. The options were few: for the workers, to restart a working life in other industries or to try to hang on until retirement; for the educational institutions, to abandon researching and teaching nuclear subjects. Now, however, an emerging energy crisis and growing environmental concerns about the burning of fossil fuels are inducing Western politicians to rethink the soundness of the decision to curtail the nuclear power industry. It therefore seems that there will be a nuclear renaissance, but that the qualified personnel to carry this out are no longer available, since in the intervening years they have changed jobs, retired or died. Put simply, the plentiful workforce responsible for last century's nuclear miracle is no longer there. Moreover, a cultural gap exists between the past and present generations, and such a lack of cultural continuity creates a difficult challenge for the traditional inter-generational knowledge transfer that has enabled development in the past. There are many reasons for this situation, and it will be for historians to explain them, but it is obvious that the Chernobyl accident and the public belief that nuclear installations were not safely regulated played a crucial role. At the time, nuclear regulatory authorities were less demanding, and in many countries they simply did not exist. Concepts such as regulatory independence and strengthening and safety culture are generally post-Chernobyl phenomena. Moreover, over the past decades

  4. Challenges for the nuclear safety of the deregulation of electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eurosafe 2000 was organised around two round tables on the first day and four seminars on the second day. The first round table dealt with general aspects of deregulation including the economic constraints and the special challenges arising during transition from regulated to deregulated structures. The second round table focussed on technical and organisational safety issues which are directly or indirectly related to the changes introduced by deregulation. The four seminars hold in order to provide opportunities for comparing experiences and learning about recent activities of IPSN, GRS and their partners in the European Union and Eastern Europe: Seminar 1 (Nuclear installation safety, assessment and analysis): assessment of the flooding incident at the Blayais nuclear power plant; PSA data base, comparison of the French and German approach; assessment of the Balakovo fire probabilistic study and elaboration of a guide for reviewing fire PSA; comprehensive technical assessment of an advanced German PWR by PSA - objectives and main results; PSA approach for the safety assessment of low-power and shutdown states; correlation of initiating events with the PSA level-2 results; safety assessment for fission products tests in the Phebus reactor; use of NPP simulators for applied human factor studies; assessment of the 'deterministic realistic method' applied to large LOCA analysis; assessment of the feasibility of an improvement programme enabling operation of units 3 and 4 of Kozloduy nuclear power plant. Seminar 2 (nuclear installation safety, research): PHEBUS 2K project on severe accidents; current status of the COCOSYS development; fission product modeling in ASTEC; Euratom Framework Programme (FP) research in reactor safety: main achievements of FP- 4 (1994-1998), some preliminary results of FP-5 (1998-2002) and prospects for beyond 2002; development of coupled systems of 3D neutronics and fluid-dynamic system codes and their application for safety analyses

  5. Nuclear enhanced power corrections to DIS structure functions

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Qiu, Jianwei; Zhu, Wei

    2001-01-01

    We calculate nuclear enhanced power corrections to structure functions measured in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We find that the nuclear medium enhanced power corrections at order of $O(\\alpha_s/Q^2)$ enhance the longitudinal structure function $F_L$, and suppress the transverse structure function $F_1$. We demonstrate that strong nuclear effects in $\\sigma_A/\\sigma_D$ and $R_A/R_D$, recently observed by HERMES Collaboration, can be explained in ...

  6. Challenges for Insertion of Structural Nanomaterials in Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochi, Emilie J.

    2012-01-01

    In the two decades since Iijima's report on carbon nanotubes (CNT), there has been great interest in realizing the benefits of mechanical properties observed at the nanoscale in large-scale structures. The weight savings possible due to dramatic improvements in mechanical properties relative to state-of-the-art material systems can be game changing for applications like aerospace vehicles. While there has been significant progress in commercial production of CNTs, major aerospace applications that take advantage of properties offered by this material have yet to be realized. This paper provides a perspective on the technical challenges and barriers for insertion of CNTs as an emerging material technology in aerospace applications and proposes approaches that may reduce the typical timeframe for technology maturation and insertion into aerospace structures.

  7. Nuclear test - The French nuclear strike force in the 21. century: challenges, ambitions and strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliographical note presents a book in which the author, after having recalled the history of the French nuclear force since the first nuclear test in 1960, and outlined the fact that France has been living under the protection of its own nuclear deterrence force since that date, presents the components of this nuclear strike force with its four nuclear submarines equipped to launch new generation missiles, its fifty fighter bomber aircraft equipped with the ASMP-A missile. He presents and discusses the mission of this nuclear force, discusses the relevancy of the deterrence strategy in the present context, and the significance of such a strategy for a European country like France. He wanders whether this strike force is still affordable for our country, which can be its benefits, whether this arsenal remains useful as it has been designed in the Cold War context. He also discusses the disarmament perspectives in an unsteady international environment where power and arms race logics prevail again

  8. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  9. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chockie, Alan [Chockie Group International, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2005-09-15

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  10. Organizational factors and the safety of nuclear power plants: a challenge to the nuclear industry and regulatory authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety has been, and it is, an outstanding characteristic of nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the world. In more than twenty-five years of NPP operation in Latin America safety performance is remarkable which is again a noteworthy achievement, the more so as technology needed to be transferred, learned and adapted to national idiosyncrasies. The operation of NPPs at worldwide level reached maturity but we are facing changes. The generation of nuclear pioneers is leaving and a new generation is taking over but expertise and corporate memory need to be preserved. In the context of deregulated markets, organizational factors became a challenge to the nuclear industry and regulatory authorities. As the potentiality of adverse effects related to such factors becomes crucial for excellence in the safe operation of NPPs, the Committee considers that it is opportune to issue this Position Paper. (author)

  11. Aging of concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Structural Aging (SAG) Program, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), had the overall objective of providing the USNRC with an improved basis for evaluating nuclear power plant structures for continued service. The program consists of three technical tasks: materials property data base, structural component assessment/repair technology, and quantitative methodology for continued service determinations. Major accomplishments under the SAG Program during the first two years of its planned five-year duration have included: development of a Structural Materials Information Center and formulation of a Structural Aging Assessment Methodology for Concrete Structures in Nuclear Power Plants. 9 refs

  12. Tornado-resistance design for the nuclear safety structure of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary design consideration of anti-tornado of the nuclear safety structure of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant is briefly presented. It mainly includes estimating the probability of tornado arising in the site, ascertaining the design requirments of the anti-tornado structures and deciding the tornado load acted on the structures

  13. [Studies of nuclear structure using neutrons and charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains brief discussions on nuclear research done at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. The major categories covered are: Fundamental symmetries in the nucleus; Dynamics in very light nuclei; D states in light nuclei; Nucleon-nucleus interactions; Nuclear structure and reactions; and Instrumentation and development

  14. LXIV International conference NUCLEUS 2014. Fundamental problems of nuclear physics, atomic power engineering and nuclear technologies (LXIV Meeting on nuclear spectroscopy and nuclear structure). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scientific program of the conference covers almost all problems in nuclear physics and its applications in atomic power engineering and nuclear technologies. The recent results of experimental investigations of atomic nuclear structure and nuclear properties as well as nuclear reaction mechanisms are analyzed. The theoretical problems of atomic nuclei, fundamental interactions and nuclear reactions are considered. The new instrumentation and methods of nuclear-physical experiments are presented. The interaction of nuclear radiation with matter is discussed. The particular attention is given to fundamental problems of nuclear power engineering

  15. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: nuclear structure; fusion reactions near and below the barrier; incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and instrumentation and analysis. (LSP).

  16. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses research in the following areas: nuclear structure; fusion reactions near and below the barrier; incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and instrumentation and analysis. (LSP)

  17. Nuclear weapons, scientists, and the post-Cold War challenge selected papers on arms control

    CERN Document Server

    Drell, Sidney D

    2007-01-01

    This volume includes a representative selection of Sidney Drell's recent writings and speeches (circa 1993 to the present) on public policy issues with substantial scientific components. Most of the writings deal with national security, nuclear weapons, and arms control and reflect the author's personal involvement in such issues dating back to 1960. Fifteen years after the demise of the Soviet Union, the gravest danger presented by nuclear weapons is the spread of advanced technology that may result in the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Of most concern would be their acquisition by hostile governments and terrorists who are unconstrained by accepted norms of civilized behavior. The current challenges are to prevent this from happening and, at the same time, to pursue aggressively the opportunity to escape from an outdated nuclear deterrence trap.

  18. On the introduction of nuclear power in Middle East countries: Promise, strategies, vision and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middle eastern countries have been experiencing economical growth at an annual rate of more than 5% and some of the highest population growth rates in the world. Many (>13) have recently expressed interest in nuclear power for meeting future demands of electricity and fresh water. A challenging, but possible goal, particularly for the states of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) and for the countries in North Africa, would be to secure 30% of future needs of electricity and process heat for industrial applications and seawater desalination from nuclear power by 2030. For the GCC states alone, this would be equivalent to building two new, 1500 MWe nuclear power plants each year starting in 2016. Some of the challenges and important consideration include: (a) stimulating private investments, (b) establishing education and training programs that are among the world's best; (c) maintaining close cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and countries with advanced nuclear technology and fuel cycle capabilities to ensure safety and compliance at all levels, (c) establishing viable indigence heavy industry and international alliances on all aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle; (d) coordinating with other countries in the region on the development of a common electric grid; (e) investing in uranium mining and exploration to secure future resources, (f) identifying and licensing suitable sites for future construction of nuclear plants; (g) establishing a regulatory and safety board with government oversight and sound regulations that would make it possible to build and operate new nuclear power plants within 40-50 months, (h) investing in high technology and R and D infrastructure, and (i) investigating the options of standardization versus diversification in the nuclear reactor types

  19. Structural Design Challenges in Design Certification Applications for New Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, M.; Braverman, J.; Wei, X.; Hofmayer, C.; Xu, J.

    2011-07-17

    The licensing framework established by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 52, “Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants,” provides requirements for standard design certifications (DCs) and combined license (COL) applications. The intent of this process is the early reso- lution of safety issues at the DC application stage. Subsequent COL applications may incorporate a DC by reference. Thus, the COL review will not reconsider safety issues resolved during the DC process. However, a COL application that incorporates a DC by reference must demonstrate that relevant site-specific de- sign parameters are confined within the bounds postulated by the DC, and any departures from the DC need to be justified. This paper provides an overview of structural design chal- lenges encountered in recent DC applications under the 10 CFR Part 52 process, in which the authors have participated as part of the safety review effort.

  20. Challenge of sustainable development in the nuclear field: Research as a vital component of nuclear safety and radioprotection policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The challenge of sustainable development also applies to the nuclear field: the careful management of natural resources, the preservation of the environment, and the response to society's expectations for increased transparency, and for the efficient control of risks associated with nuclear technologies are certainly key issues for this sector. Risk oriented R and D and associated scientific expertise are a key element of defence in depth for optimal nuclear safety and radioprotection. As such, a capacity to maintain worldwide the critical mass of research needed to address the main security related issues in support of public policies is vital for the continuing acceptance of nuclear activities, and of their development where needed. These issues concern both existing and future technologies. They are related to operational safety and radioprotection, to environmental protection and to public health issues, particularly with respect to nuclear waste management. They also concern security, at a time when the risk of terrorism in all its potential forms must be addressed. Nuclear and radiological R and D is characterized by the high cost and sophistication of experimental facilities, and by the high degree of knowledge and experience required to run such research programmes. Pooling of resources at the international and European level, and increasing cooperation between research organizations on the basis of an active policy towards scientific excellence and exemplary human resource management are essential, because research resources are growing scarce, in order to keep risk related research abreast of evolving technologies and industry practice, and of society's expectations for the control of nuclear and radiological risks. This is particularly true for the maintaining of key reference experimental platforms, such as safety dedicated research reactors, and for the development of complex safety related computer codes. The 'networks of excellence' promoted through

  1. Covariant Effective Field Theory for Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Currents

    CERN Document Server

    Serot, B D

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress in Lorentz-covariant quantum field theories of the nuclear many-body problem (quantum hadrodynamics or QHD) is discussed. The effective field theory studied here contains nucleons, pions, isoscalar scalar (\\sigma) and vector (\\omega) fields, and isovector vector (\\rho) fields. The theory exhibits a nonlinear realization of spontaneously broken SU(2)_L \\times SU(2)_R chiral symmetry and has three desirable features: it uses the same degrees of freedom to describe the nuclear currents and the strong-interaction dynamics, it satisfies the symmetries of the underlying theory of QCD, and its parameters can be calibrated using strong-interaction phenomena, like hadron scattering or the empirical properties of finite nuclei. Moreover, it has recently been verified that for normal nuclear systems, it is possible to expand the effective Lagrangian systematically in powers of the meson fields (and their derivatives) and to truncate the expansion reliably after the first few orders. Using a mean-field ve...

  2. Radiation and physical protection challenges at advanced nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The purpose of this study is to examine challenges and opportunities for radiation protection in advanced nuclear reactors and fuel facilities proposed under the Generation IV (GEN IV) initiative which is examining and pursuing the exploration and development of advanced nuclear science and technology; and the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), which seeks to develop worldwide consensus on enabling expanded use of economical, carbon-free nuclear energy to meet growing energy demand. The International Energy Agency projects nuclear power to increase at a rate of 1.3 to 1.5 percent a year over the next 20 years, depending on economic growth. Much of this growth will be in Asia, which, as a whole, currently has plans for 40 new nuclear power plants. Given this increase in demand for new nuclear power facilities, ranging from light water reactors to advanced fuel processing and fabrication facilities, it is necessary for radiation protection and physical protection technologies to keep pace to ensure both worker and public health. This paper is based on a review of current initiatives and the proposed reactors and facilities, primarily the nuclear fuel cycle facilities proposed under the GEN IV and GNEP initiatives. Drawing on the Technology Road map developed under GEN IV, this work examines the potential radiation detection and protection challenges and issues at advanced reactors, including thermal neutron spectrum systems, fast neutron spectrum systems and nuclear fuel recycle facilities. The thermal neutron systems look to improve the efficiency of production of hydrogen or electricity, while the fast neutron systems aim to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel. While there are components of these advanced systems that can draw on the current and well-developed radiation protection practices, there will inevitably be opportunities to improve the overall quality of radiation

  3. An overlook of the new global nuclear scenario and the emergent challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to make a short overlook of the world nuclear renaissance and point out some emergent challenges. The presentation covers different subjects in which the nuclear energy shows great advantage to face concerns about climate change, energy demand growth, and relative cost of competing technologies in a global scenario. Additionally nuclear technology can deploy in a middle term an important potential development oriented to improve even more that nuclear design, safety, environment protection, economic and sustainability of the present nuclear reactors generation. The world nuclear energy scenario reveals a renaissance after a long period of lethargy. Now is the focus of considerable attention and debate about the risks and benefits of its expansion. Many countries are again planning ambitious nuclear programs. In the case of Argentina, a decision was taken to end the construction of Atucha 750 MWe power plant (NPP) and to begin the construction of another two NPP in the next decade. In the middle term and expansion of 60 % of the present world nuclear capabilities is foreseen. For the long term there could be much more if today's performance data is maintained or improved. It would require the nuclear industry to return immediately to the most rapid period of growth experienced in the past. The training of the young people is also an important challenge. But some countries are still reluctant due to the adverse local public opinion. In spite of the great accessibility and availability of the NPP confirmed by the global experience of the 350 operating nuclear power plants, the public acceptability is not confirmed. Some sectors of the society -with the support in some case of the media- are against the use of the nuclear energy. In this paper some reasons of the public concerns is explained and actions are mentioned to change its perceptions. At the end, the global society in front of the real means available to fulfill the growing energy

  4. Reinforcement course 2013. Challenges at the operation end of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reinforcement course 2013 of the Nuclear Forum in Switzerland dedicated itself to the question, of which challenges are implicated by decommissioning and dismantling nuclear power plants. The course has been divided into 4 blocks, discussing concepts regarding decommissioning, special points such as organisational or psychological aspects as well as juridical and practical questions. Around 140 persons accepted the invitation of the committee for educational questions under the patronage of Urs Weidmann, head of the nuclear power plant Beznau. Altogether 17 presentations dealt with the following topics: 'Strategies and Steps of Decommissioning' by Roger Lundmark, 'Decommissioning from the Perspective of the Swiss Regulatory Authority' by Hannes Haenggi, 'Operating Period Management Using the Example of the Nuclear Power Plant Leibstadt' by Johannis Noeggerath, 'Questions and Concepts from the Perspective of a Nuclear Power Plant Operator' by Roland Schmidiger, 'Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the UK' by Andrew Munro, 'Practical experiences of transferring nuclear power plants from operating to out of operation' by Gerd Reinstrom, 'Dismantling of Nuclear Facilities: From the Pilot Scheme to Industrialized Disassembling' by Anke Traichel and Thomas Seipolt, 'Organisational challenges: From Decommissioning Strategy to Decommissioning Targets' by Michael Kruse, Anton von Gunten, Julia Heizinger, Joerg Sokoll, 'Knowing That and Knowing How - Motivational Aspects of Safety-Related Knowledge Management for the Post-Operational phase and dismantling' by Frank Ritz, 'The Juridical Frame of Decommissioning' by Peter Koch, 'The Path to the Decommissioning Order and its Guidelines Ensi-G17' by Torsten Krietsch, 'Requirements for a Safe and Economical Decommissioning From the Perspective of the Operator' by Anton Von Gunten, Michael Kruse, Thomas Herren, Erwin Neukaeter, Mario Radke and Anton Schegg, 'Evaluation of Activation Distribution in a Nuclear Power Plant

  5. Scientific Grand Challenges: Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-01

    This report is an account of the deliberations and conclusions of the workshop on "Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing" held January 26-28, 2009, co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP) and the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing (ASCR). Representatives from the national and international nuclear physics communities, as well as from the high performance computing community, participated. The purpose of this workshop was to 1) identify forefront scientific challenges in nuclear physics and then determine which-if any-of these could be aided by high performance computing at the extreme scale; 2) establish how and why new high performance computing capabilities could address issues at the frontiers of nuclear science; 3) provide nuclear physicists the opportunity to influence the development of high performance computing; and 4) provide the nuclear physics community with plans for development of future high performance computing capability by DOE ASCR.

  6. Challenges in education and qualification of human resources for next nuclear generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general goal of this paper is to present an overview of Higher Education and personnel qualification for Nuclear Field by the perspective of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), also by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD and by the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). On the other hand to present the challenge of the Brazilian Government in redesigning, since 2003, the role of the state in order to make it active for younger generations, while promoting growth and social justice, has guided in all actions carried out under the Policy of Human Resources Management of public personnel. The government should be able to formulate and implement public policies and decide among various options, what is the most appropriate for its Human Resources. For this, they require the strengthening of strategic intelligence and government adoption of new ways of interaction and participation. The role played by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) in looking forward to replace and qualify its nuclear staff, as soon as up, since that the qualification of a human resource in this field demands more than one decade. Last but not least the proactive work of IPEN-CNEN/SP to encourage young generation to enter nuclear area, and the efforts of the Brazilian government to implement an integrated Nuclear Programme to form human resources, to attract and retain students in nuclear engineering and related specialized fields, and how this problem should attract the attention of the entire nuclear community, government and industry. (author)

  7. The Structure of Communication as a Challenge for Theology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Soukup

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Even more than any content of communication, its structures influence theology by forming the framework for thinking about and sharing reflections on religious experience. This essay examines three characteristic, but often overlooked, communication structures: oral vs. written and printed communication and the contemporary move to "secondary oral" styles; communication technology's sense of place; and the uses of visual space as guides to the interpretation of experience. Since each of these structures shapes theology, a more conscious awareness of them challenges theology to take the role of communication more seriously.Aun más que cualquier contenido de la comunicación, sus estructuras influyen en la teología puesto que proporcionan el marco para el pensamiento y la reflexión de la experiencia religiosa. Este ensayo examina tres estructuras características de la comunicacion, que son a menudo pasadas por alto: la comunicación oral v/s la escrita e impresa y la tendencia contemporánea hacia los estilos "orales secundarios"; el sentido del lugar en la comunicación tecnológica; y los usos de espacio visual como guías de la interpretación de la experiencia. Puesto que cada una de estas estructuras moldean la teología, esta debiera asumir el desafío de tomar mayor conciencia de ellas y asumir el rol de la comunicación más seriamente.

  8. Nuclear structure research. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most significant development this year has been the realization of a method for estimating EO transition strength in nuclei and the prediction that the de-excitation (draining) of superdeformed bands must take place, at least in some cases, by strong EO transitions. A considerable effort has been devoted to planning the nuclear structure physics that will be pursued using the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge. A significant effort has been devoted to HRIBF target development. This is a critical component of the HRIBF project. Exhaustive literature searches have been made for a variety of target materials with emphasis on thermodynamic properties. Vapor pressure measurements have been carried out. Experimental data sets for radioactive decays in the very neutron-deficient Pr-Eu and Ir-Tl regions have been under analysis. These decay schemes constitute parts of student Ph.D. theses. These studies are aimed at elucidating the onset of deformation in the Pr-Sm region and the characteristics of shape coexistence in the Ir-Bi region. Further experiments on shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Ir-Bi region are planned using α decay studies at the FMA at ATLAS. The first experiment is scheduled for later this year

  9. International safeguards challenges in the 1990's for controlling nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world in which we live during the 1990's is certainly more complex than it was before the breakup of the Soviet Union. We all have major challenges before us. Faced with shrinking budgets and competing priorities, we must keep nuclear nonproliferation in the foreground. It will require all of us in the international community to work together to make our plans to assure nonproliferation a reality, and to counter the increasing threat of nuclear proliferation through the decade of the 1990's and well into the 21st Century. (J.P.N.)

  10. Nuclear Research Institute Rez: Its past and present and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper gives an overview of the history of the Nuclear Research Institute Rez development over forty years of its existence. Its present activities are discussed in some detail. These historical and present activities represent the basis for discussing: challenges faced by the NRI; interactions of NRI with their environment; collaboration and co-operation. Nuclear research centres would continue to be the main source of expertise for power plant operation, radiation and isotope applications, regulatory practices and waste management. Future developments should ensure viability of these centres. (author)

  11. Safety classification of nuclear power plant systems, structures and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safety Classification principles used for the systems, structures and components of a nuclear power plant are detailed in the guide. For classification, the nuclear power plant is divided into structural and operational units called systems. Every structure and component under control is included into some system. The Safety Classes are 1, 2 and 3 and the Class EYT (non-nuclear). Instructions how to assign each system, structure and component to an appropriate safety class are given in the guide. The guide applies to new nuclear power plants and to the safety classification of systems, structures and components designed for the refitting of old nuclear power plants. The classification principles and procedures applying to the classification document are also given

  12. Nuclear data newsletter. No. 20. Nuclear structure and decay data network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This special issue of the Nuclear Data Newsletter dated November 1994 gives information on the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Network established in 1974 under the auspices of the IAEA and comprising 17 laboratories and universities in 10 countries. The procedures for online access to US National Nuclear Data Center, NEA Data Bank in Paris and IAEA Nuclear Data Section in Vienna are presented

  13. Nuclear security towards the adequate answers to the new challenge of nuclear and radiological terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The globalization phenomenon and the process of regional integration have generated new and defiant characteristics in the criminal activation, the one that has acquired growing trans national dimension. After September 11, 2001 it should to have bigger international initiative to reinforce the safety of materials and facilities in the entire world and to apply the international recommendations for to assure that all the nuclear materials of not used bombs are registered and secure of sabotage. Thousands of radioactive sources exist in the world. Possibility that the terrorists use radioactive sources as attack instruments since its are more easily available and its are more easy too to obtain in comparison with the uranium or plutonium classified for weapons. Dirty bomb. Effects of the Radiations. The Goiania accident. 'Orphans' sources Illicit traffic of radioactive material. Security. Measures of Physical Protection. Security of the radioactive sources. Role of the IAEA and other international organisms and regional CAN-MERCOSUR. Nuclear security and Legal frame. International and national instruments against the nuclear and radiological terrorism. Study from a proposal to Pan-American level to make in front of the problem. (Author)

  14. NKS - The Nordic region's cooperative network for addressing challenges in nuclear safety and emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the foundation of a common cultural and historical heritage and a long tradition of collaboration, NKS aims to facilitate a common Nordic view on nuclear and radiation safety. A common understanding of rules, practice and measures, and national differences in this context, is here an essential requirement. Problems can generally be tackled quicker, more efficiently, more consistently and at a lower cost through collaboration, bearing in mind that key competencies are not equally distributed in the different Nordic countries. For instance common Nordic challenges emerge in relation to nuclear installations, where nuclear power plants are in operation in Finland and Sweden, and research reactors have been operated in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. There is an obvious benefit in exchanging ideas and technologies in relation to plant operation, and since a number of reactors in different Nordic countries are under decommissioning, a collaborative benefit can also be realised in that context. Sweden also has a nuclear fuel production plant, and its collaboration with other Nordic nuclear installations can also be beneficial. Further, a number of large radiological installations are projected in Nordic areas (e.g., the MAX-LAB/MAX IV synchrotron radiation source and the European spallation source ESS), where Nordic organisations are collaborating in addressing, e.g., potential environmental implications. On the emergency preparedness side, the Fukushima accident in March 2011 was a reminder that large accidents at nuclear installations can lead to widespread radioactive contamination in the environment. In order to respond to nuclear or radiological emergencies, should they affect Nordic populations, it is necessary to maintain an operational emergency preparedness. By continuously improving detection, response and decision aiding tools while maintaining an informal collaborative network between relevant stakeholders in the Nordic countries (including

  15. Design of concrete structures important to safety of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civil engineering structures in nuclear installations form an important feature having implications to safety performance of these installations. The objective and minimum requirements for the design of civil engineering buildings/structures to be fulfilled to provide adequate assurance for safety of nuclear installations in India (such as pressurised heavy water reactor and related systems) are specified in the Safety standard for civil engineering structures important to safety of nuclear facilities. This standard is written by AERB to specify guidelines for implementation of the above civil engineering safety standard in the design of concrete structures important to safety

  16. CSNI Technical Opinion Papers No. 14 - Nuclear Licensee Organisational Structures, Resources and Competencies: Determining their Suitability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The way in which nuclear licensees' organisations are structured and resourced clearly has a potential impact on nuclear safety. As experience has continually demonstrated, operating organisations with a strong training programme for personnel, adequate resourcing and overall effective leadership and management perform more effectively in times of crisis than those lacking in one or more of these areas. In parallel, the nuclear industry is developing new resource deployment strategies which are making increased use of contractors and leading to changes in organisational structure, which in turn create challenges for the continued safe operation of nuclear facilities. This technical opinion paper represents the consensus among human and organisational factor specialists in NEA member and associated countries on the methods, approaches and good practices to be followed in designing an organisation with a strong safety focus while meeting business needs. It also considers some of the attributes that an organisation which is effectively managing its resources and capabilities might demonstrate

  17. When the weak challenge the strong: the North Korean nuclear crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Cheon, Jaeho

    1996-01-01

    This thesis examines the political behavior of weak states in crises through a detailed case study of the recent North Korean nuclear crisis. In the early 1990s, North Korea initiated a politcal challenge that threatened both U.S. nonproliferaiton and South Korean defense interests. North Korea manipulated the shared risks of the ensuing crisis to achieve political objectives rather than military victory, which was unobtainable due to U.S. and South korean defense efforts. It is puzzling how ...

  18. Metrology challenges for high-rate nanomanufacturing of polymer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Joey; Barry, Carol; Busnaina, Ahmed; Isaacs, Jacqueline

    2012-10-01

    The transfer of nanoscience accomplishments into commercial products is hindered by the lack of understanding of barriers to nanoscale manufacturing. We have developed a number of nanomanufacturing processes that leverage available high-rate plastics fabrication technologies. These processes include directed assembly of a variety of nanoelements, such as nanoparticles and nanotubes, which are then transferred onto a polymer substrate for the fabrication of conformal/flexible electronic materials, among other applications. These assembly processes utilize both electric fields and/or chemical functionalization. Conducting polymers and carbon nanotubes have been successfully transferred to a polymer substrate in times less than 5 minutes, which is commercially relevant and can be utilized in a continuous (reel to reel/roll to roll) process. Other processes include continuous high volume mixing of nanoelements (CNTs, etc) into polymers, multi-layer extrusion and 3D injection molding of polymer structures. These nanomanufacturing processes can be used for wide range of applications, including EMI shielding, flexible electronics, structural materials, and novel sensors (specifically for chem/bio detection). Current techniques to characterize the quality and efficacy of the processes are quite slow. Moreover, the instrumentation and metrology needs for these manufacturing processes are varied and challenging. Novel, rapid, in-line metrology to enable the commercialization of these processes is critically needed. This talk will explore the necessary measurement needs for polymer based nanomanufacturing processes for both step and continuous (reel to reel/roll to roll) processes.

  19. Forging the link between nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Mahzoon, M H; Dickhoff, W H; Dussan, H; Waldecker, S J

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive description of all single-particle properties associated with the nucleus ${}^{40}$Ca is generated by employing a nonlocal dispersive optical potential capable of simultaneously reproducing all relevant data above and below the Fermi energy. The introduction of nonlocality in the absorptive potentials yields equivalent elastic differential cross sections as compared to local versions but changes the absorption profile as a function of angular momentum suggesting important consequences for the analysis of nuclear reactions. Below the Fermi energy, nonlocality is essential to allow for an accurate representation of particle number and the nuclear charge density. Spectral properties implied by $(e,e'p)$ and $(p,2p)$ reactions are correctly incorporated, including the energy distribution of about 10% high-momentum nucleons, as experimentally determined by data from Jefferson Lab. These high-momentum nucleons provide a substantial contribution to the energy of the ground state, indicating a residua...

  20. Nuclear safeguards challenges from the point of view of a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A. Djaloeis addressed safeguards challenges from the point of view of a developing country. IAEA safeguards are vital for stopping the proliferation of nuclear weapons, as stipulated in the NPT. However, success depends on the willingness of States to sign the NPT, to conclude a comprehensive safeguards agreement and an additional protocol with the IAEA, and to cooperate with the IAEA in safeguards implementation. The history of nuclear energy, from the weapons use in 1945 and especially the Atoms for Peace speech of 1953, led to the foundation of the IAEA in 1957 and has led to the development of peaceful nuclear applications. The NPT included provisions that have not been followed up on, especially the disarmament provision. This continues to cause animosity among States party to the NPT who have made non-proliferation commitments under the treaty and expect the nuclear weapons States to follow through on their commitments. The NPT review conferences have repeatedly emphasized that the nuclear weapon States are not disarming. In particular, the NPT review conference in 2000 laid down a supposedly agreed upon route to the elimination of nuclear weapons. Developing countries see this as an unfair divergence between developed countries and others. This issue strengthens the hand of those opposed to international cooperation and development

  1. The challenge of developing structural materials for fusion power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fusion can be one of the most attractive sources of energy from the viewpoint of safety and minimal environmental impact. Central in the goal of designing a safe, environmentally benign, and economically competitive fusion power system is the requirement for high performance, low activation materials. The general performance requirements for such materials have been defined and it is clear that materials developed for other applications (e.g. aerospace, nuclear fission, fossil energy systems) will not fully meet the needs of fusion. Advanced materials, with composition and microstructure tailored to yield properties that will satisfy the specific requirements of fusion must be developed. The international fusion programs have made significant progress towards this goal. Compositional requirements for low activation lead to a focus of development efforts on silicon carbide composites, vanadium alloys, and advanced martensitic steels as candidate structural material systems. Control of impurities will be critically important in actually achieving low activation but this appears possible. Neutron irradiation produces significant changes in the mechanical and physical properties of each of these material systems raising feasibility questions and design limitations. A focus of the research and development effort is to understand these effects, and through the development of specific compositions and microstructures, produce materials with improved and adequate performance. Other areas of research that are synergistic with the development of radiation resistant materials include fabrication, joining technology, chemical compatibility with coolants and tritium breeders and specific questions relating to the unique characteristics of a given material (e.g. coatings to reduce gas permeation in SiC composites) or design concept (e.g. electrical insulator coatings for liquid metal concepts). (orig.)

  2. Challenges to maintain the safety level of nuclear power plants in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One possible tool to identify new challenges is the evaluation of operating experience. For example, the evaluation of operating experience has resulted in the further development of safety standards and regulations. Also, it is highly useful in connection with the identification of generic weak points. The development of safety management systems in German nuclear power plants was initiated in the wake of two events with high safety significance. As a result, the Fundamentals of Safety Management Systems were published by the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety in 2004. Another important challenge is the need for an ageing management system in nuclear power plants. In 2004, the German Reactor Safety Commission submitted a comprehensive recommendation on the control of ageing processes. The aim was to include all possible ageing mechanisms. Finally, a further challenge is the increasing tendency to perform realistic or so-called best estimate calculations. Improved analyses increase the degree of certainty associated with calculated safety margins of acceptance criteria. Once this increased margin has been identified, the best possible uses of this gain of margin have to be identified. One of them might be to improve the plant's performance. The lessons learned from these examples can be summarized in the following statement: to maintain safety under changing boundary conditions, progress is necessary. (author)

  3. Three-dimensional structure of low-density nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Minoru, E-mail: okamoto@nucl.ph.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Maruyama, Toshiki, E-mail: maruyama.toshiki@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Yabana, Kazuhiro, E-mail: yabana@nucl.ph.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Center of Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Tatsumi, Toshitaka, E-mail: tatsumi@ruby.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2012-07-09

    We numerically explore the pasta structures and properties of low-density nuclear matter without any assumption on the geometry. We observe conventional pasta structures, while a mixture of the pasta structures appears as a metastable state at some transient densities. We also discuss the lattice structure of droplets.

  4. Proton capture reactions and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies are described of the structure of 40Ca and 42Sc with measurements at proton-capture of (p, gamma) reactions. Where possible, an attempt has been made to interpret the results of the measurements in termsof existing models. The 40Ca and 42Sc nuclides were excited by bombarding 39K and 41Ca targets, respectively with low energy protons (Ep = 0.3-3.0 MeV), that were produced by the Utrecht 3MV van de Graaff accelerator. From the measured energy and intensity of the gamma-rays created in the subsequent decay of the cuclei, information was obtained on the existence and properties of their excited states. In addition properties of two T = 3/2 levels at high excitation energy of the 9Be nucleus were investigated. These levels were excited by the resonant absorption of gamma-rays from the 11B(p, gamma)12C reaction. The results of the measurements are interpreted by a comparison to the analoque β-decay of 9Li and to shell model calculations. The total decay energy of the superallowed O+ → O+ transition between the ground states of 42Sc and 42Ca was determined by measurements in Utrecht of the proton separation energy Sp of 42Sc and in Oak Ridge of Sn of 42Sc and 42Ca. The results were used for verification of the conserved vector current hypothesis, which implies that the ft values of all superallowed O+ → O+ β-decays are the same. An attempt was made to describe properties of odd-parity states of A = 37-41 nuclei with a variant of the Warburton, Becker, Millener and Brown (WBMB) interaction.Finally a new method for the assignment of nuclear spins by a simple statistical analysis of spectroscopic information is proposed. (author). 169 refs.; 22 figs.; 24 schemes; 29 tabs

  5. Radii and Binding Energies in Oxygen Isotopes: A Challenge for Nuclear Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapoux, V; Somà, V; Barbieri, C; Hergert, H; Holt, J D; Stroberg, S R

    2016-07-29

    We present a systematic study of both nuclear radii and binding energies in (even) oxygen isotopes from the valley of stability to the neutron drip line. Both charge and matter radii are compared to state-of-the-art ab initio calculations along with binding energy systematics. Experimental matter radii are obtained through a complete evaluation of the available elastic proton scattering data of oxygen isotopes. We show that, in spite of a good reproduction of binding energies, ab initio calculations with conventional nuclear interactions derived within chiral effective field theory fail to provide a realistic description of charge and matter radii. A novel version of two- and three-nucleon forces leads to considerable improvement of the simultaneous description of the three observables for stable isotopes but shows deficiencies for the most neutron-rich systems. Thus, crucial challenges related to the development of nuclear interactions remain. PMID:27517768

  6. Growing from a local into an international nuclear services provider - challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apart from nuclear power plants' (NPPs) internally staffed expert resources, the support of qualified external nuclear maintenance and modification services providers (NSPs) is extremely important. The postponement of the nuclear power renaissance along with an aging workforce is pushing the industry to search for different approaches to maintain and improve the required level of expertise and quality. Operating in a domestic market with only one NPP unit, the leading Slovenian NSP has been partnering with complimentary companies to jointly satisfy the needs of the domestic, US and EU customers. By remaining competitive in quality and price and sharing resources, global experience and good practices, results in added value to all of the interested parties is achieved. In addition to supporting peak outage season shortages of qualified resources, the concept also aids in load-levelling the resource needs throughout the year. The challenges and the opportunities related to the concept are discussed in the paper. (authors)

  7. Energy Research Advisory Board, Civilian Nuclear Power Panel: Subpanel 3 report, Institutional challenges: Volume IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institutional Challenges Subpanel of the Energy Research Advisory Board's Civilian Nuclear Power Panel was charged with the task of addressing the institutional issues that affect the future of nuclear power in the United States. Barriers created by non-technical issues are generally considered to be primary obstacles to revitalizing the nuclear fission option as part of a robust supply for future electrical generation. The Subpanel examined the following categories of institutional issues: (1) Administration Policy and Leadership, (2) Licensing Reform, (3) Standardized Designs, (4) Shared Financial Risk, (5) State and Economic Regulation, (6) Waste Disposal, and (7) Public Perception. The Subpanel concluded that the Administration and Congress have the opportunity and responsibility to provide leadership in resolving these difficulties. The main report provides information on the background and current situation for each institutional issue and concludes with the set of recommendations for action

  8. Special symposium for the IAEA 50th anniversary: Global challenges for the future of nuclear energy and the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the symposium was to review the 50 years history of the activities of the IAEA and the current status of nuclear power and fuel cycle in the world and discuss the future vision regarding development and safety of nuclear power and fuel cycle and international cooperation. Topics covered were nuclear power and fuel cycle, nuclear safety and security, non proliferation, and national, regional, and IAEA's challenges for the future

  9. Involvement of nuclear phospholipids in nuclear structure and functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yildirim, Sukriye; Sobol, Margaryta; Filimonenko, Vlada; Castano, Enrique; Filimonenko, Anatolij; Hozák, Pavel

    Debrecen : University of Debrecen, 2013. s. 25-25. [Wilhelm Bernard Workshop on the cell nucleus /23./. 19.08.2013-24.08.2013, Debrecen] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk LD12063; GA MŠk LH12143 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : cell nucleus * chromatin * nucleolus * nuclear myosin * PIP2 * 3D electron tomography * super-resolution microscopy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. A dependence of nuclear structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that clustering of nucleons, with confinement-size changes, naturally explains and accurately describes recent data on the A dependence of deep-inelastic nuclear cross sections. Predictions for gluon distributions in nuclei are given

  11. Nuclear structure studies of F-24

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Caceres, L.; Lepailleur, A.; Sorlin, O.; Stanoiu, M.; Grévy, S.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Negoita, F.; Oliveira de Santos, F.; Penionzhkevich, Y. E.; Rotaru, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 1 (2015), 014327. ISSN 0556-2813 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : spectrometer * GANIL * forces Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear , Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.733, year: 2014

  12. Nuclear energy density optimization: Shell structure

    OpenAIRE

    Kortelainen, M.; McDonnell, J.; W. Nazarewicz; Olsen, E; Reinhard, P. -G.; Sarich, J.; Schunck, N.; Wild, S. M.; Davesne, D.; Erler, J.; Pastore, A.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear density functional theory is the only microscopical theory that can be applied throughout the entire nuclear landscape. Its key ingredient is the energy density functional. In this work, we propose a new parameterization UNEDF2 of the Skyrme energy density functional. The functional optimization is carried out using the POUNDerS optimization algorithm within the framework of the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. Compared to the previous parameterization UNEDF1, restrictions on th...

  13. Aging management of containment structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research is being conducted by ORNL under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of nuclear power plant containment and other safety-related structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Accomplishments include development of a Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, evaluation of models for potential concrete containment degradation factors, development of a procedure to identify critical structures and degradation factors important to aging management, evaluations of nondestructive evaluation techniques. assessments of European and North American repair practices for concrete, review of parameters affecting corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and development of methodologies for making current condition assessments and service life predictions of new or existing reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants

  14. International Nuclear Conference: a new era in Nuclear Science and Technology - the challenge of the 21st century: welcoming speech

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The address discusses the following issues: Globalisation and the advent of new technologies and knowledge necessitate countries to depend on one another for progress and development; the need for international co-operation ; roles of nuclear science and technology in facing the challenges of the 2l st Century; food and energy supply as the greatest challenges facing many countries in the future, along with the provision of cheap and good health care, safe industrial development, and clean environment; the contribution of nuclear science and technology i.e In food production, techniques using radiation and isotopes are used to improve crop and animal production through soil fertilisation, plant and animal breeding, insect and pest control, and food preservation; In health and medical care, the use of radiation and isotopes for diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes; In industry, activities in radiography, nondestructive testing, control systems and radioactive tracers, analytical techniques and quality control, radiation processing to enhance the properties of materials; In the environmental sector, the use of isotopes and the development of analytical tools, including radioactive tracer methods, neutron activation analysis, x-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption in the investigation and detection of environmental pollutants such as pesticides and toxic materials. Other issues also discussed were safety ; public awareness and acceptance of the technology

  15. International Nuclear Conference: a new era in Nuclear Science and Technology - the challenge of the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The part of address discusses the following issue: new era in science and technology: the challenge of the 21st century. Indeed it is in this part of the world that nuclear technology is making the most rapid and effective progress and will dramatically contribute to a new era of social progress and increased standards of living. Nuclear technology can offer the world limitless amounts of clean, economical, environmentally-benign electricity. It can also offer methods for medical diagnoses and treatments to save lives; provide a way to preserve our food supply and prevent foodborne diseases; provide accurate industrial measurements, leak detectors , and corrosion measurements; and literally hundreds of other applications. The challenge is to use this technology wisely and make sure the public understands that, while there are problems and difficulties commensurate with this technology (as there would be with any other technology), these problems can be solved and enormous benefits to humanity accrue when they are solved. It is worth the effort and one must have the courage and wisdom to proceed

  16. Procedures manual for the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual is a collection of various notes, memoranda and instructions on procedures for the evaluation of data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). They were distributed at different times over the past few years to the evaluators of nuclear structure data and some of them were not readily avaialble. Hence, they have been collected in this manual for ease of reference by the evaluators of the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) network contribute mass-chains to the ENSDF. Some new articles were written specifically for this manual and others are reivsions of earlier versions

  17. Regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication and nuclear structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUJIARUI

    1999-01-01

    In eukaryote,nuclear structure is a key component for the functions of eukaryotic cells.More and more evidences show that the nuclear structure plays important role in regulating DNA replication.The nuclear structure provides a physical barrier for the replication licensing,participates in the decision where DNA replication initiates,and organizes replication proteins as replication factory for DNA replication.Through these works,new concepts on the regulation of DNA replication have emerged,which will be discussed in this minireview.

  18. Nuclear shell structures in terms of classical periodic orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Arita, Ken-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Semiclassical periodic-orbit theory (POT) is applied to the physics of nuclear structures, with the use of a realistic nuclear mean-field model given by the radial power-law potential. Evolution of deformed shell structures, which are responsible for various nuclear deformations, are clearly understood from the contribution of short classical periodic orbits (POs). Bifurcations of short POs, which imply underlying local dynamical symmetry, play significant role there. The effect of the spin degree of freedom is also investigated in relevance to the pseudospin symmetry in spherical nuclei and the prolate-oblate asymmetry in shell structures of nuclei with quadrupole-type deformations.

  19. Nuclear shell structures in terms of classical periodic orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Ken-ichiro

    2016-06-01

    Semiclassical periodic-orbit theory (POT) theory is applied to the physics of nuclear structures, with the use of a realistic nuclear mean-field model given by the radial power-law potential. Evolution of deformed shell structures, which are responsible for various nuclear deformations, are clearly understood from the contribution of short classical periodic orbits (POs). Bifurcations of short POs, which imply underlying local dynamical symmetry, play significant role there. The effect of the spin degree of freedom is also investigated in relevance to the pseudospin symmetry in spherical nuclei and the prolate–oblate asymmetry in shell structures of nuclei with quadrupole-type deformations.

  20. Changes in attitude structure toward nuclear power in the nuclear power plant locations of Tohoku district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This survey was examined the changes in structure of attitude toward nuclear power and the influence of environmental value on the attitude structure before and after the accident at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant. With residents of Aomori, Miyagi, and Fukushima prefectures as participants, we conducted online surveys in November 2009 and October 2011. Comparing the results before and after the accident, we found that trust in the management of nuclear power plants had a stronger influence on the perceived risk and benefit regarding nuclear power after the accident than before the accident. The value of concern about environmental destruction resulted in reduced trust in the management. (author)

  1. Nuclear structure insight from exactly solvable pairing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a brief description of how pairing models can be solved exactly, we discuss two examples in which this exact solvability has been used to provide interesting insight into issues of importance in nuclear structure physics. One concerns the development of a new mechanism for sd dominance in interacting boson models of nuclei and the other concerns a mapping of nuclear pairing onto a classical electrostatic problem and the insight it provides into nuclear superconductivity. (Author)

  2. Coulomb screening effect on the nuclear-pasta structure

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Tatsumi, Toshitaka; Voskresensky, Dmitri N.; Tanigawa, Tomonori; Chiba, Satoshi; Maruyama, Tomoyuki

    2004-01-01

    Using the density functional theory (DFT) with the relativistic mean field (RMF) model, we study the non-uniform state of nuclear matter, ``nuclear pasta''. We self-consistently include the Coulomb interaction together with other interactions. It is found that the Coulomb screening effect is significant for each pasta structure but not for the bulk equation of state (EOS) of the nuclear pasta phase.

  3. The challenges and importance of structural variation detection in livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek M Bickhart

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in humans and other model organisms have demonstrated that structural variants (SVs comprise a substantial proportion of variation among individuals of each species. Many of these variants have been linked to debilitating diseases in humans, thereby cementing the importance of refining methods for their detection. Despite progress in the field, reliable detection of SVs still remains a problem even for human subjects. Many of the underlying problems that make SVs difficult to detect in humans are amplified in livestock species, whose lower quality genome assemblies and incomplete gene annotation can often give rise to false positive SV discoveries. Regardless of the challenges, SV detection is just as important for livestock researchers as it is for human researchers, given that several productive traits and diseases have been linked to Copy Number Variations (CNVs in cattle, sheep and pig. Already, there is evidence that many beneficial SVs have been artificially selected in livestock such as a duplication of the ASIP gene that causes white coat color in sheep. In this review, we will list current SV and CNV discoveries in livestock and discuss the problems that hinder routine discovery and tracking of these polymorphisms. We will also discuss the impacts of selective breeding on CNV and SV frequencies and mention how SV genotyping could be used in the future to improve genetic selection.

  4. The RA nuclear research reactor at VINCA Institute as an engineering and scientific challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RA nuclear research at the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences is the largest nuclear research facility in Yugoslavia and belongs to that generation of research reactors which have had an important contribution to nuclear technology development. As these older reactors were generally not built to specific nuclear standards, new safety systems had to be installed at the RA reactor for a renewal of its operating licence in 1984 and it was shut down, after 25 years of operation. Although all the required and several additional systems were built for the restart of the RA reactor, a disruption of foreign delivery of new control equipment caused its conversion to a 'dormant' facility, and it is still out of operation. Therefore, the future status of the RA reactor presents an engineering and scientific challenge to the engineers and scientists from Yugoslavia and other countries that may be interested to participate. To attract their attention on the subject, principal features of the RA reactor and its present status are described in detail, based on a recent engineering economic and safety evaluation. A comparative review of the world research reactors is also presented.(author)

  5. A New Light Weight Structural Material for Nuclear Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiei, Afsaneh [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Radiation shielding materials are commonly used in nuclear facilities to attenuate the background ionization radiations to a minimum level for creating a safer workplace, meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining high quality performance. The conventional radiation shielding materials have a number of drawbacks: heavy concrete contains a high amount of elements that are not desirable for an effective shielding such as oxygen, silicon, and calcium; a well known limitation of lead is its low machinability and toxicity, which is causing a major environmental concern. Therefore, an effective and environmentally friendly shielding material with increased attenuation and low mass density is desirable. Close-cell composite metal foams (CMFs) and open-cell Al foam with fillers are light-weight candidate materials that we have studied in this project. Close-cell CMFs possess several suitable properties that are unattainable by conventional radiation shielding materials such as low density and high strength for structural applications, high surface area to volume ratio for excellent thermal isolation with an extraordinary energy absorption capability. Open-cell foam is made up of a network of interconnected solid struts, which allows gas or fluid media to pass through it. This unique structure provided a further motive to investigate its application as radiation shields by infiltrating original empty pores with high hydrogen or boron compounds, which are well known for their excellent neutron shielding capability. The resulting open-cell foam with fillers will not only exhibit light weight and high specific surface area, but also possess excellent radiation shielding capability and good processability. In this study, all the foams were investigated for their radiation shielding efficiency in terms of X-ray, gamma ray and neutron. X-ray transmission measurements were carried out on a high-resolution microcomputed tomography (microCT) system. Gamma-emitting sources: 3.0m

  6. A New Light Weight Structural Material for Nuclear Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation shielding materials are commonly used in nuclear facilities to attenuate the background ionization radiations to a minimum level for creating a safer workplace, meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining high quality performance. The conventional radiation shielding materials have a number of drawbacks: heavy concrete contains a high amount of elements that are not desirable for an effective shielding such as oxygen, silicon, and calcium; a well known limitation of lead is its low machinability and toxicity, which is causing a major environmental concern. Therefore, an effective and environmentally friendly shielding material with increased attenuation and low mass density is desirable. Close-cell composite metal foams (CMFs) and open-cell Al foam with fillers are light-weight candidate materials that we have studied in this project. Close-cell CMFs possess several suitable properties that are unattainable by conventional radiation shielding materials such as low density and high strength for structural applications, high surface area to volume ratio for excellent thermal isolation with an extraordinary energy absorption capability. Open-cell foam is made up of a network of interconnected solid struts, which allows gas or fluid media to pass through it. This unique structure provided a further motive to investigate its application as radiation shields by infiltrating original empty pores with high hydrogen or boron compounds, which are well known for their excellent neutron shielding capability. The resulting open-cell foam with fillers will not only exhibit light weight and high specific surface area, but also possess excellent radiation shielding capability and good processability. In this study, all the foams were investigated for their radiation shielding efficiency in terms of X-ray, gamma ray and neutron. X-ray transmission measurements were carried out on a high-resolution microcomputed tomography (microCT) system. Gamma-emitting sources: 3.0m

  7. Challenges facing the insurance industry since the modernisation of the international nuclear third party liability regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    events illustrate some of the challenges facing the world of insurance following the modernisation of the international nuclear third party liability regime: - Will the insurance industry be able to find funds corresponding to the new amounts that have been set? - Do the additional damages covered by the revised conventions provide adequate cover for existing risks and will private insurance be able and willing to cover such risks? Nevertheless, the insurance world has changed a great deal since 2004 and there are many additional issues that have arisen since that time. For example, the economic crisis and the introduction of the European Solvency II Directive require insurers to take a more stringent line with their commitments. Moreover, after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, a number of questions have resurfaced: are the new insurance amounts sufficient? The age of 'nuclear renaissance' has long gone and some countries are distancing themselves from nuclear power in light of its questionable costs; are operators paying a fair price in light of the risks incurred? Finally, Europe is keen to play its part and impose its own rules; what will be the consequences of this development? This article reconsiders these challenges in light of the 2004 Protocol (which has not entered into force), by focusing in particular on the situation in Europe. Section I looks back at the history behind the conventions and the key principles they set down. Section II highlights the changes made to the Paris Convention as amended by the 2004 Protocol and the problems facing the insurance industry. Section III provides an overview of the various actors involved in the insurance industry and redefines the necessary insurance foundations to cover the challenges described in Section IV. Finally, Section IV covers all the challenges facing the insurance industry since the modernisation of the international nuclear third party liability regime. (author)

  8. Nuclear cooperation targets global challenges. States back main pillars of the IAEA's work to strengthen nuclear safety, verification and technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    States meeting at the 44th IAEA General Conference in Vienna have set a challenging agenda for international nuclear cooperation into the 21st century that targets issues of global safety, security, and sustainable development. They adopted resolutions endorsing the Agency's programmes for strengthening activities under its three main pillars of work - nuclear verification, safety, and technology - that are closely linked to major challenges before the world. The document presents the main actions taken during the conference

  9. Experimental test of nuclear magnetization distribution and nuclear structure models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Models exist that ascribe the nuclear magnetic fields to the presence of a single nucleon whose spin is not neutralized by pairing it up with that of another nucleon; other models assume that the generation of the magnetic field is shared among some or all nucleons throughout the nucleus. All models predict the same magnetic field external to the nucleus since this is an anchor provided by experiments. The models differ, however, in their predictions of the magnetic field arrangement within the nucleus for which no data exist. The only way to distinguish which model gives the correct description of the nucleus would be to use a probe inserted into the nucleus. The goal of our project was to develop exactly such a probe and to use it to measure fundamental nuclear quantities that have eluded experimental scrutiny. The need for accurately knowing such quantities extends far beyond nuclear physics and has ramifications in parity violation experiments on atomic traps and the testing of the standard model in elementary particle physics. Unlike scattering experiments that employ streams of free particles, our technique to probe the internal magnetic field distribution of the nucleus rests on using a single bound electron. Quantum mechanics shows that an electron in the innermost orbital surrounding the nucleus constantly dives into the nucleus and thus samples the fields that exist inside. This sampling of the nucleus usually results in only minute shifts in the electron s average orbital, which would be difficult to detect. By studying two particular energy states of the electron, we can, however, dramatically enhance the effects of the distribution of the magnetic fields in the nucleus. In fact about 2% of the energy difference between the two states, dubbed the hyperfine splitting, is determined by the effects related to the distribution of magnetic fields in the nucleus, A precise measurement of this energy difference (better than 0.01%) would then allow us to place

  10. Nuclear structure research at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of fundamental symmetries by the TRIPLE collaboration using the unique capabilities at LAMTF have found unexpected systematics in the parity-violating amplitudes for epithermal-neutron scattering. Tests to lower the present limits on time-reversal-invariance violation in the strong interaction are being made at in experiments on the scattering of polarized fast neutrons from aligned holmium targets. Studies of few-nucleon systems have received increasing emphasis over the past year, involving a broad program for testing the low- to medium-energy internucleon interactions, from the tensor component in n-p scattering and the n-n scattering lengths, through three-nucleon systems and the alpha particle, on up to 8Be. Of particular interest are three-nucleon systems, both in elastic scattering and in three-body breakup. Beam requirements range from production of intense and highly-polarized neutron beams to tensor-polarized beams for measurements at both very low energies (25--80 keV) and at tandem energies for definitive measurements of D-state components of the triton, 3He, and 4He obtained from transfer reactions. The program in nuclear astrophysics expanded during 1991--1992. Several facets of the nuclear many-body problem and of excitation mechanisms of the nucleus are being elucidated, including measurements and analyses to elucidate the neutron--nucleus elastic-scattering interaction over a wide range of nuclei and energies. Several projects involved developments in electronuclear physics, instrumentation, rf-transition units, and low-temperature bolometric particle detectors

  11. A workshop report on nuclear reaction and cluster structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A work shop was held in June 1984 at RCNP (Research Center for Nuclear Physics), Osaka University, to discuss theory of nuclear reactions based on studies from microscopic or cluster structure viewpoints. About forty researchers participated in this work shop and 27 paperes were presented. All these papers with English abstracts are gathered in this collective report. (Aoki, K.)

  12. Coordinate-space picture of nuclear structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss quark mobility distributions Q (y+) defined as Fourier transformations of momentum-space structure functions F2(xBj). We find that nuclear effects in coordinate space are negligible for light-cone distances y+ (Ioffe times) up to 5 fm. At large y+, nuclear shadowing sets in. (author)

  13. Particle production from nuclear targets and the structure of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production processes from nuclear targets allow studying interactions of elementary hadronic constituents in nuclear matter. The information thus obtained on the structure of hadrons and on the properties of hadronic constituents is presented. Both soft (low momentum transfer) and hard (high momentum transfer) processes are discussed. (author)

  14. The structure of proton rich nuclei in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of exotic proton rich nuclei are of great importance for nuclear astrophysics models. In the present work, we show how to address many nuclear structure properties of these nuclei at the extremes of stability, from the analysis of proton radioactivity

  15. Nuclear energy density optimization: Shell structure

    CERN Document Server

    Kortelainen, M; Nazarewicz, W; Olsen, E; Reinhard, P -G; Sarich, J; Schunck, N; Wild, S M; Davesne, D; Erler, J; Pastore, A

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear density functional theory is the only microscopical theory that can be applied throughout the entire nuclear landscape. Its key ingredient is the energy density functional. In this work, we propose a new parameterization UNEDF2 of the local Skyrme energy density functional. The functional optimization is carried out using the POUNDerS optimization algorithm within the framework of the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. Compared to the previous parameterization UNEDF1, restrictions on the tensor term of the energy density have been lifted, yielding the most general form of the Skyrme energy density functional up to second order in derivatives of the one-body local density. In order to impose constraints on all the parameters of the functional, selected data on single-particle splittings in spherical doubly-magic nuclei have been included into the experimental dataset. The agreement with both bulk and spectroscopic nuclear properties achieved by the resulting UNEDF2 parameterization is comparable wi...

  16. Methodology for rehabilitation of aged nuclear safety related concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phenomena of ageing of concrete structures are discussed along with procedure for rehabilitation of aged structures. Different activities of rehabilitation of aged concrete structures like condition survey, testing, data analysis, interpretation of data, appraisal of structural integrity, and assessment of durability including confirmatory studies are presented. Aspects related to safety in rehabilitation of nuclear safety related concrete structures are discussed and approach to implement requirements of safety is presented along with quality assurance programme. (author). 26 refs., 3 figs

  17. The b1 structure function and nuclear pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The b1 structure function is measurable in deep inelastic scattering from polarized nuclei with unpolarized beams. The contributions of nuclear pions are evaluated and found to be small, about 2%. 8 refs

  18. Impact of the structural changes on the nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation author deals with impact of the structural changes (privatization of the Slovenske Elektrarne, a.s.) and new Atomic law (541/2004 Coll. Laws) on the nuclear safety in the Slovak Republic.

  19. Infrastructure development and challenges to launch nuclear power programme in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 2007, the cabinet passed a resolution for Thailand's Power Development Plan (PDP 2007). It was mentioned in the plan that Thailand will have 2 x 1,000 MWe nuclear power plants in 2020 and another 2 x 1,000 MWe in 2021. The PDP 2007 was revised in March 2009 and it was agreed to change the nuclear power generation to only 1 x 1,000 MWe in 2020 and 2021 respectively due to the large excess capacity at present. Many activities related to development of infrastructures in order to support electricity generation using nuclear power are being executed. Milestones for nuclear power program implementation has been developed using the IAEA document 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' with some amendments to suit country situation. According to the schedule, a lot of activities related to infrastructure establishment, feasibility study, utility preparation and public education and participation are being performed. Within the year 2011, various issues such as legal and regulatory systems and international commitment, industrial and commercial infrastructure, technology transfer and human resource development, safety and environmental protection, public information and public acceptance, preparation of the nuclear power utility establishment, etc. must be solved out and undertaken to assure the cabinet to make final decision to go nuclear. The action plan for the first three years (2008-2010) is shown. There are many challenges for Thailand embarking of the nuclear power programme. For example, it is essential to plan for the establishment of a regulatory body at the national level to support and regulate the nuclear power plant industry. Currently, the application for a license and the monitoring of a power plant are administered by the authorities of various agencies under different ministries; hence the process is very time-consuming and overlaps with one another. The approach that the regulatory body and the authorities

  20. Hollow fiber membrane based technology and pressure driven membrane processes in nuclear fuel cycle: current status and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major challenges in the nuclear energy programme has, however, been the radioactive waste management in a manner which allays apprehension about its adverse impact on the environment. Innovative approaches are being devised internationally to treat spent nuclear fuel as a source of valuables. Separation of long-lived radionuclides such as actinides and fission products from high level radioactive waste is a challenging task for the chemists and engineers working on the nuclear spent fuel reprocessing and subsequent waste management processes involved at the tail end of nuclear fuel cycle. The nuclear engineering community is already paying significant attention to the quest for technologies that would lead us to the goal of technological sustainability. The growth of membrane science is largely due to the impressive developments in the field of membrane material science and the evolution of different membrane related equipments. Amongst the various separation techniques, membrane based separation methods are getting increasingly popular due to factors such as high efficiency, low power consumption and easy scale-up due to a compact design etc. Also, membrane contactors have proved to be efficient contacting devices, due to their high area per unit volume that results in high mass transfer rates. They are not only compact but also eliminate several of the problems faced in conventional processes such as ion exchange, solvent extraction, and precipitation. Membrane contactor processes, in which phase contacting is performed or facilitated by the structure and shape of the porous membrane, provide a new dimension to the growth of membrane science and technology and also satisfy the requirements for process intensification. In the field of analytical applications, these techniques exhibit high selectivity, and they concentrate analytes during the separation process. For this reason, these techniques have undergone significant development in the last decade

  1. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past year, research in theoretical nuclear physics at the University of Maryland attained a number of exciting and important results. These are described in some detail throughout the report, but some of the highlights are as follows: large Nc QCD has been shown to place strong constraints on vacuum effects of hadronic field theories; color dielectric models of hadrons have been understood in terms of lattice QCD; we have completed a relativistic analysis of proton scattering to test virtual pair contributions; we have also re-derived the Mandelzweig-Wallace two-body Dirac equation in covariant form, and applied it to the atomic two-body bound states: hydrogen, muonium and positronium; we have carried out the first calculation of the triton binding energy with a realistic quark-based nucleon-nucleon interaction and have learned that new kinds of nonlocalities in the tensor force may produce unexpected results; and we have shown that the Quadronium Conjecture can lead to spontaneous creation of the atom with low momentum as required by the observations, and are constructing a model to quantify the Quadronium phenomenology of the e+e- Puzzle

  2. Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure, related topics. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of the third international seminar on interaction of neutrons with nuclei are given. The special attention is paid to study of fundamental properties of the neutron and fundamental interactions and symmetries in neutron induced reactions. Properties of nuclear excited states and fission are considered

  3. Nuclear Structures Surrounding Internal Lamin Invaginations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Legartová, Soňa; Stixová, Lenka; Laur, O.; Kozubek, Stanislav; Sehnalová, Petra; Bártová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 3 (2014), s. 476-487. ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD11020 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : LAMINS * NUCLEAR PORES * CHROMATIN Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.263, year: 2014

  4. Report of seminar on relativistic approach to nuclear reaction and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A seminar on 'Relativistic Approach to Nuclear Reaction and Nuclear Structure' was held in 1985 at Osaka University. This booklet includes twenty-four reports given at the seminar, which deal with: Conventional Nonrelativistic Description of Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Spin-Orbit Interactions; Relativistic Approach to Nuclear Structure; Atomic and Molecular Structure Calculations; Electromagnetic Interaction in Nucleus and Relativistic Effect; Nuclear Magnetic Moment in the Relativistic Mean Field Theory, Effective Mass and Particle-Vibration Coupling in the Relativistic σ-ω Model; Gauge Invariance in Relativistic Many-Body Theory; Relativistic Description of Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction in Review; σ-Particle in NN Interaction; Nuclear Optical Potentials Based on the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock Approach; Elastic Backscattering and Optical Potential; Description of Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Reactions; Dirac Phenomenology at E(p) = 65 MeV; Relativistic Impulse Approximation; Reaction Studies with Intermediate Energy Deuterons at SATURNE; Folding Model for Intermediate-Energy Deutron Scattering; Folding Model for Polarized Deutron Scattering at 700 MeV; Dirac Approach Problems and a Different Viewpoint; Relativistic Approach and EMC Effect; Quasielastic Electron Scattering; Response Function of Quasielastic Electron Scattering; Relativistic Hartree Response Function for Quasielastic Electron Scattering on 12C and 40Ca; Backflow-, Retardation- and Relativistic Effects on the Longitudinal Response Function of Nuclear Matter; Pion-Photoproduction in the σ-ω Model. (Nogami, K.)

  5. ICNC2003: Proceedings of the seventh international conference on nuclear criticality safety. Challenges in the pursuit of global nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proceedings contain (technical, oral and poster papers) presented papers at the Seventh International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety ICNC2003 held on 20-24 October 2003, in Tokai, Ibaraki, Japan, following ICNC'99 in Versailles, France. The theme of this conference is 'Challenges in the Pursuit of Global Nuclear Criticality Safety'. This proceedings represent the current status of nuclear criticality safety research throughout the world. The 79 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. ICNC2003: Proceedings of the seventh international conference on nuclear criticality safety. Challenges in the pursuit of global nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proceedings contain (technical, oral and poster papers) presented papers at the Seventh International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety ICNC2003 held on 20-24 October 2003, in Tokai, Ibaraki, Japan, following ICNC'99 in Versailles, France. The theme of this conference is 'Challenges in the Pursuit of Global Nuclear Criticality Safety'. This proceedings represent the current status of nuclear criticality safety research throughout the world. The 81 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  7. Dealing with the regional challenge of physical protection of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The problem of protecting sensitive fissile and fissionable nuclear materials of misuses by governments has been the subject of the convention on physical protection of nuclear material (CPPNM), which entered into force on February 8, 1987. However, in May 2001 the final report of the expert meeting had already recognized 'a clear need to strengthen the international physical protection regime'. The board of governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) decided then to convene a group, which would meet in Vienna from 3 to 7 December 2001, to draft on amendment to the CPPNM. The tragic occurrences of September 11, 2001, however, changed the then generally accepted view on the problem of physical protection, because nuclear materials had to be protected from falling into the hands of terrorists rather than of governments thirst of nuclear sensitive materials. Moreover, crude explosive devices could be made by terrorists, or hired scientists, using readily available radioactive materials, like 226Ra or 137Cs to inflict damage to civilians. Thus physical protection of those and other radioactive materials became an instant challenge for national and international authorities to prevent the use of such materials in terrorist actions. The prevention of illicit trafficking of radioactive materials is now in the priority list of these authorities. Fortunately; an international conference on 'Measures to Detect, Intercept and Respond to the Illicit Uses of Nuclear Materials and Radioactive Sources' was held in Stockholm, Sweden, in May 2001. An IAEA document - GOV/2001/37-GC(45)/20 - recommended in its plan of activities a series of projects to be implemented between 2002 and 2005, which included developing and providing assistance for the application of: (i) standards for physical protection of nuclear materials and nuclear facilities in member states; (ii) norms and guidelines for nuclear material accounting and control in member states; (iii

  8. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  9. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs

  10. Nuclear data for radiation damage estimates for reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Nuclear Data for Radiation Damage Estimates for Reactor Structural Materials was convened by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA from 20-22 May 1985. The meeting was attended by 17 participants from 10 countries and 2 international organizations. The main objectives of the meeting were to review the status of displacement cross sections and the requirements for nuclear data needed for radiation damage estimates in reactor structural materials, and to develop recommendations for future activities in this field. This publication contains the text of all the papers prepared especially for this meeting including the conclusions and recommendations worked out during the meeting

  11. Towards new horizons in ab initio nuclear structure theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review recent advances in ab initio nuclear structure theory, which have changed the horizons of this field. Starting from chiral effective field theory to construct the nuclear Hamiltonian and the similarity renormalization group to further soften it, we address several many-body approaches that have seen major developments over the past few years. We show that the domain of ab initio nuclear structure theory has been pushed well beyond the p-shell and that quantitative QCD-based predictions are becoming possible all the way from the proton to the neutron drip line up into the medium-mass regime. (authors)

  12. A-dependence of weak nuclear structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of nuclear medium on the weak structure functions F2A(x, Q2) and F3A(x, Q2) have been studied using charged current (anti)neutrino deep inelastic scattering on various nuclear targets. Relativistic nuclear spectral function which incorporate Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations are used for the calculations. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions calculated from a microscopic model for meson-nucleus self-energies. Using these structure functions, FiA/Fiproton and FiA/Fideuteron(i=2,3, A=12C, 16O, CH and H2O) are obtained

  13. Operational Challenges of Extended Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel - 12550

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain used fuel repository program and a continuing climate of uncertainty in the national policy for nuclear fuel disposition, the likelihood has increased that extended storage, defined as more than 60 years, and subsequent transportation of used nuclear fuel after periods of extended storage may become necessary. Whether at the nation's 104 nuclear energy facilities, or at one or more consolidated interim storage facilities, the operational challenges of extended storage and transportation will depend upon the future US policy for Used Fuel Management and the future Regulatory Framework for EST, both of which should be developed with consideration of their operational impacts. Risk insights into the regulatory framework may conclude that dry storage and transportation operations should focus primarily on ensuring canister integrity. Assurance of cladding integrity may not be beneficial from an overall risk perspective. If assurance of canister integrity becomes more important, then mitigation techniques for potential canister degradation mechanisms will be the primary source of operational focus. If cladding integrity remains as an important focus, then operational challenges to assure it would require much more effort. Fundamental shifts in the approach to design a repository and optimize the back-end of the fuel cycle will need to occur in order to address the realities of the changes that have taken place over the last 30 years. Direct disposal of existing dual purpose storage and transportation casks will be essential to optimizing the back end of the fuel cycle. The federal used fuel management should focus on siting and designing a repository that meets this objective along with the development of CIS, and possibly recycling. An integrated approach to developing US policy and the regulatory framework must consider the potential operational challenges that they would create. Therefore, it should be integral to

  14. The r-process nucleosynthesis: a continued challenge for nuclear physics and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Goriely, S; Janka, H T; Pearson, J M; Samyn, M

    2004-01-01

    The identification of the astrophysical site and the specific conditions in which r-process nucleosynthesis takes place remain unsolved mysteries of astrophysics. The present paper emphasizes some important future challenges faced by nuclear physics in this problem, particularly in the determination of the radiative neutron capture rates by exotic nuclei close to the neutron drip line and the fission probabilities of heavy neutron-rich nuclei. These quantities are particularly relevant to determine the composition of the matter resulting from the decompression of initially cold neutron star matter. New detailed r-process calculations are performed and the final composition of ejected inner and outer neutron star crust material is estimated. We discuss the impact of the many uncertainties in the astrophysics and nuclear physics on the final composition of the ejected matter. The similarity between the predicted and the solar abundance pattern for A > 140 nuclei as well as the robustness of the prediction with ...

  15. Force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance: recent advances and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review recent efforts to detect small numbers of nuclear spins using magnetic resonance force microscopy. Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a scanning probe technique that relies on the mechanical measurement of the weak magnetic force between a microscopic magnet and the magnetic moments in a sample. Spurred by the recent progress in fabricating ultrasensitive force detectors, MRFM has rapidly improved its capability over the last decade. Today it boasts a spin sensitivity that surpasses conventional, inductive nuclear magnetic resonance detectors by about eight orders of magnitude. In this review we touch on the origins of this technique and focus on its recent application to nanoscale nuclear spin ensembles, in particular on the imaging of nanoscale objects with a three-dimensional (3D) spatial resolution better than 10 nm. We consider the experimental advances driving this work and highlight the underlying physical principles and limitations of the method. Finally, we discuss the challenges that must be met in order to advance the technique towards single nuclear spin sensitivity-and perhaps-to 3D microscopy of molecules with atomic resolution. (topical review)

  16. Study on lifting of large structure module in AP1000 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Modularization is one of characteristics of AP1000 nuclear power plant, however, the challenge of large module lifting should be met. Purpose: An analysis method for large module lifting has been studied in this paper: Methods: Based on ANSYS software and steel design code of America, the finite element analysis of CA01 structure module in AP1000 nuclear power plant was conducted. Results: The analysis results show that stress and deformation meet the requirements of codes and construction when the temporary brace is properly set in CA01 module. The maximum stress can be found in the juncture of wall, and maximum deformation occurs at the corner of CA01 module. Conclusions: Proper temporary brace is important to the lifting of structure and maximum stress or deformation usually occurs at irregular locations of structure. And it is necessary to perform detail analysis before structure lifted. (authors)

  17. Nuclear power plant life management - Challenges and proposals for a unified model integrating safety and economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    systems calls for a research effort 'to underpin the continued safe operation of all relevant types of existing reactor systems (including fuel cycle facilities), taking into account new challenges such as life-time extension and development of new advanced safety assessment methodologies (both the technical and human element)'. The need for harmonised PLIM models at least at the European level (where the energy market is rather unified and regulated by general rules) has been recently raised, supported by two main reasons: A reliable PLIM model needs to be supported by a consistent analysis of feedback from plant operation, which could be available only at over-national scale (only exceptions are the large nuclear energy suppliers); Effective PLIM models need sharing of resources, suppliers, spare parts, O and M techniques among different plants, which therefore must have the same or very similar characteristics to foster such exchanges. The program structure described in the paper is shown, where the integration of the existing programs at the plant is highlighted. This paper provides a short summary of selected results obtained at the JRC/IE in the development of a UE model for PLIM, explicitly addressing program management issues (organisation, contractor management, and program indicators), maintenance optimisation issues, ageing management of selected components and structures, and human reliability issues, as suggested by the review of some examples of PLIM programs in the EU

  18. Nuclear shapes and nuclear structure at low excitation energies. Abstracts of contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    103 papers are presented on recent theoretical and experimental results on nuclear structure investigation. Short communications were published in this volume, all of which were indexed separately for the INIS database. (R.P.)

  19. International Workshop on Exotic hadronic atoms, deeply bound kaonic nuclear states and antihydrogen: present results, future challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E; Curceanu, C; Trento 2006; Trento06

    2006-01-01

    These are the miniproceedings of the workshop "Exotic hadronic atoms, deeply bound kaonic nuclear states and antihydrogen: present results, future challenges," which was held at the European Centre for Theoretical Nuclear Physics and Related Studies (ECT*), Trento (Italy), June 19-24, 2006. The document includes a short presentation of the topics, the list of participants, and a short contribution from each speaker.

  20. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear structure investigations on spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: electron scattering studies on spherical nuclei; electron scattering from collective states in deformed nuclei; proton and pion scattering studies; 12C(e,e'p) and 16O(e,e'p); 12C(e,e'α) and 16O(e,e'α); studies at high q at Bates; measurements with rvec e at Bates; 12C(γ,p); future directions in giant resonance studies; proton knockout from 16O; quasielastic studies at Bates; triple coincidence studies of nuclear correlations; contributions to (e,e'2p) at KIKHEF; contributions to instrumentation at CEBAF; instrumentation development at UNH; the Bates large acceptance spectrometer toroid; shell model and core polarization calculations; and the relativistic nuclear model

  2. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research program of our group touches five areas of nuclear physics: (1) Nuclear structure studies at high spin; (2) Studies at the interface between structure and reactions; (3) Production and study of hot nuclei; (4) Incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and (5) Development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. The papers from these areas are discussed in this report

  3. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The research program of our group touches five areas of nuclear physics: (1) Nuclear structure studies at high spin; (2) Studies at the interface between structure and reactions; (3) Production and study of hot nuclei; (4) Incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and (5) Development and use of novel techniques and instrumentation in the above areas of research. The papers from these areas are discussed in this report.

  4. International symposium on exotic nuclear structures. Book of abstracst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics were discussed at the meeting: Physics of weakly bound nuclei, neutron skin and halo; Evolution of shell structures for neutron-rich nuclei; Collective excitations in nuclei with exotic nuclear shapes; Cluster structures; Super- and hyperdeformed nuclei, exotic structures in the actinides; Superheavy elements; Towards understanding the structure of nucleons; New experimental techniques, facilities for radioactive beams. All abstracts (75 items) were submitted as full text to the INIS database. (R.P.)

  5. The Challenge and Countermeasure of Human Resources on Nuclear Power for China in the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper addresses the situations of nuclear power development and nuclear industry human resources and points out that the development and supply of human resources are becoming the big challenges in the effective and sustainable development of nuclear power. At the same time, the paper analyzes the root causes of human resources shortage and recommends several countermeasures to confront human resources problems. At last, the paper introduces what SNPTC and SNERDI do to overcome the human resources problem and give conclusions. (author)

  6. Ab initio Nuclear structure Theory with chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-energy nuclear theory has entered an era of ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations based on input from QCD. One of the most promising paths from QCD to nuclear observables employs Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory as consistent starting point for precise ab initio nuclear structure and reaction studies. However, the full inclusion of chiral two- plus three-nucleon (NN+3N) interactions in exact and approximate many-body calculations still poses a formidable challenge. We discuss recent developments towards this goal, ranging from consistent Similarity Renormalization Group evolutions of NN+3N Hamiltonians to large-scale ab initio calculations for ground states and spectra in the Importance-Truncated No-Core Shell Model with full 3N interactions. We highlight recent achievements and discuss open issues and future perspectives for nuclear structure theory with QCD-based interactions. Moreover, we discuss successful steps towards merging ab initio structure and reaction theory and show applications to low-energy reactions in the p-shell relevant for astrophysics.

  7. Nuclear structure far off stability and implications for nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shell structure of 100Sn as inferred from prompt and delayed γ-ray spectroscopy with multidetector γ-arrays in-beam and at ISOL and in-flight separators shows close resemblance to 56Ni one major shell lower. The results of large-scale shell model calculations employing realistic interactions derived from effective NN potentials by G-matrix theory will be confronted with experimental evidence from β-decay and in-beam data with emphasis on seniority and spin-gap isomers, highlighting the role of core excitations. Key examples from recent experiments are 94,95Ag and 98Cd. The dominant monopole interaction of the spin-flip partners πg9/2 - νg7/2 in N = 50,51 isotones below 100Sn is echoed in the πf5/2 - νg9/2 pair of nucleons, which is decisive for the N = 50 shell gap in 78Ni. The persistence of the N = 50 shell and the weakness and extreme locality of the N = 40 shell in 68Ni can be traced back to monopole driven migration of selected single particle orbits. Recent experimental data on 70,72,76Ni, 78Zn and 67Fe give evidence for this scenario. The implication of these strong monopole shifts for the shell quenching in neutron-rich N = 50,82 isotones as invoked to explain astrophysical r-path abundances is discussed. (author)

  8. You Can't be Too Careful: The Challenges of Cybersecurity in the Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of computers people use and interact with is growing every year, creating more opportunities for cyberattacks. For example, contemporary automobiles contain no fewer than 12 digital input/output channels to control the engine, transmission, radio, antilock braking, keyless entry, anti-theft, telematics, etc. All of these potentially contain vulnerabilities susceptible to being 'hacked'. Computer and information technology are evolving very quickly, at times outpacing our awareness of possible sources of cyber-vulnerabilities and ultimate attack. Additionally, cyberattacks are not limited to the workplace, but can also target the private lives of individuals. One of the IAEA's main aims in improving cybersecurity is to enhance nuclear security culture, to change how people think, and change how they evaluate not just the adoption, but also the use, of technology. ''If nuclear professionals and their families are more aware of not just their physical space, but their digital space, they will be more cautious with regard to online information sharing and the use of technology. Information that seems innocuous can be combined with other information found elsewhere online and can prove to be very damaging. Google and similar Internet search engines are often the first tool hackers use in developing an attack plan,'' says Dudenhoeffer. Project Officer for the National Coordinator for Counterterrorism and Security of the Netherlands, Ben Govers says, understanding of the threat is slowly permeating the nuclear industry. ''The nuclear industry is facing the challenge of having to both broaden and deepen its existing defences in computer and information networks set against cyberthreats. The industry is - more or less - at the starting point of developing, implementing and expanding robust measures for protecting the information and control systems of nuclear facilities''. ''The IAEA can play a leading role in this dynamic development,'' says Govers

  9. Global nuclear structure aspects of tensor interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A direct fit of the isoscalar spin-orbit and both isoscalar and isovector tensor coupling constants to the f5/2 - f7/2 SO splittings in 40Ca, 56Ni, and 48Ca requires (i) a significant reduction of the standard isoscalar spin-orbit strength and (ii) strong attractive tensor coupling constants. The aim of this paper is to address the consequences of these strong attractive tensor and weak spin-orbit fields on total binding energies, two-neutron separation energies and nuclear deformability. (author)

  10. Grid structure for nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described is a nuclear fuel element support system comprising an egg-crate-type grid made up of slotted vertical portions interconnected at right angles to each other, the vertical portions being interconnected by means of cross straps which are dimpled midway between their ends to engage fuel elements disposed within openings formed in the egg-crate assembly. The cross straps are disposed at an angle, other than a right angle, to the vertical portions of the assembly whereby their lengths are increased for a given span, and the total elastic deflection capability of the cell is increased. The assembly is particularly adapted for computer design and automated machine tool fabrication

  11. Component design challenges for the ground-based SP-100 nuclear assembly test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SP-100 ground engineering system (GES) program involves a ground test of the nuclear subsystems to demonstrate their design. The GES nuclear assembly test (NAT) will be performed in a simulated space environment within a vessel maintained at ultrahigh vacuum. The NAT employs a radiation shielding system that is comprised of both prototypical and nonprototypical shield subsystems to attenuate the reactor radiation leakage and also nonprototypical heat transport subsystems to remove the heat generated by the reactor. The reactor is cooled by liquid lithium, which will operate at temperatures prototypical of the flight system. In designing the components for these systems, a number of design challenges were encountered in meeting the operational requirements of the simulated space environment (and where necessary, prototypical requirements) while also accommodating the restrictions of a ground-based test facility with its limited available space. This paper presents a discussion of the design challenges associated with the radiation shield subsystem components and key components of the heat transport systems

  12. Development of advanced nuclear fuels in the Indian context: advantages and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ever increasing demand on power requirement in the country has opened up need for exploring use of nuclear fuels that could meet such demands. This makes the mission of the department to shift from the first stage of nuclear programme employing natural uranium in PHWRs to the second stage of deploying a large number of fast reactors with plutonium based fuels capable of realising high breeding ratios in addition to energy production. The transition to fast reactors with advanced fuels, capable of higher breeding ratio, opens up a number of scientific and technological challenges in design and operation of such fast reactors. In the Indian context, after successful demonstration of natural uranium based PHWRs, the performance of U-Pu based carbide fuel, as a unique experience in the world, has been demonstrated in FBTR at Kalpakkam. This paper deals with the performance of carbide fuel in FBTR and the programme on development of metallic fuels with appreciably high breeding ratio that would result in considerable reduction in doubling time thereby addressing the increasing demands of power production as well as pave way for introduction of a large number of such fast reactors to provide energy security to the country. The advantages of introduction of metallic fuels as well as the scientific and technological challenges to be faced in doing so and the ongoing efforts towards metallic fuel development are also described in the paper. (author)

  13. QCD and a New Paradigm for Nuclear Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, A W

    2016-01-01

    We review the reasons why one might choose to seriously re-examine the traditional approach to nuclear theory where nucleons are treated as immutable. This examination leads us to argue that the modification of the structure of the nucleon when immersed in a nuclear medium is fundamental to how atomic nuclei are built. Consistent with this approach we suggest key experiments which should tell us unambiguously whether there is such a change in the structure of a bound nucleon. We also briefly report on extremely promising recent calculations of the structure of nuclei across the periodic table based upon this idea.

  14. Generalized Nuclear Data: A New Structure (with Supporting Infrastructure) for Handling Nuclear Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) format was designed in the 1960s to accommodate neutron reaction data to support nuclear engineering applications in power, national security and criticality safety. Over the years, the scope of the format has been extended to handle many other kinds of data including charged particle, decay, atomic, photo-nuclear and thermal neutron scattering. Although ENDF has wide acceptance and support for many data types, its limited support for correlated particle emission, limited numeric precision, and general lack of extensibility mean that the nuclear data community cannot take advantage of many emerging opportunities. More generally, the ENDF format provides an unfriendly environment that makes it difficult for new data evaluators and users to create and access nuclear data. The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) has begun the design of a new Generalized Nuclear Data (or 'GND') structure, meant to replace older formats with a hierarchy that mirrors the underlying physics, and is aligned with modern coding and database practices. In support of this new structure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has updated its nuclear data/reactions management package Fudge to handle GND structured nuclear data. Fudge provides tools for converting both the latest ENDF format (ENDF-6) and the LLNL Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) format to and from GND, as well as for visualizing, modifying and processing (i.e., converting evaluated nuclear data into a form more suitable to transport codes) GND structured nuclear data. GND defines the structure needed for storing nuclear data evaluations and the type of data that needs to be stored. But unlike ENDF and ENDL, GND does not define how the data are to be stored in a file. Currently, Fudge writes the structured GND data to a file using the eXtensible Markup Language (XML), as it is ASCII based and can be viewed with any text editor. XML is a meta-language, meaning that it

  15. Bremsstrahlung photons - an ideal tool in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Bremsstrahlung photons, produced by decelerating electrons, are a very useful probe to investigate current topics in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The photon scattering facility of the superconducting electron accelerator S-DALINAC at the Darmstadt University of Technology allows for high resolution Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) experiments up to 10 MeV. One current topic of interest in nuclear structure is the investigation of Pygmy Dipole Resonances (PDR), which are located near the particle threshold. Recently, experiments have been carried out on Ca isotopes [1] as well as on several N=82 nuclei [2] in order to understand the structure of the PDR. Moreover, important astrophysical questions can be investigated using real photons (g,n) reaction rates, which play a major role in nucleosynthesis, can be measured at the S-DALINAC by simulating a quasi-stellar photon bath with variable temperature [3,4

  16. Dynamic testing of nuclear power plant structures: an evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) evaluated the applications of system identification techniques to the dynamic testing of nuclear power plant structures and subsystems. These experimental techniques involve exciting a structure and measuring, digitizing, and processing the time-history motions that result. The data can be compared to parameters calculated using finite element or other models of the test systems to validate the model and to verify the seismic analysis. This report summarizes work in three main areas: (1) analytical qualification of a set of computer programs developed at LLL to extract model parameters from the time histories; (2) examination of the feasibility of safely exciting nuclear power plant structures and accurately recording the resulting time-history motions; (3) study of how the model parameters that are extracted from the data be used best to evaluate structural integrity and analyze nuclear power plants

  17. The structure of nuclear safeguards systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safeguards systems for facilities that handle special nuclear material combine procedural, protective, and materials accounting elements to prevent and/or detect sabotage and diversion or theft of material. Because most of the discussion in this course is devoted to materials accounting topics only, this chapter provides a brief introduction to some of the procedural and protective elements of safeguards systems, placing the materials accounting system in its proper context. The chapter begins by reviewing certain pertinent DOE definitions and then surveys some protection requirements and technology - protective personnel, personnel identification systems, barriers, detectors, and communication systems. Considered next are the procedures of personnel selection and monitoring, definition and division of job functions, and operation. The chapter then describes the way the procedural, protective, and materials accounting elements can be combined, becoming a total safeguards system. Although such a system necessarily requires elements of procedure, protection, and materials accounting, only the materials accounting gives positive assurance that nuclear material is not diverted or stolen

  18. PREFACE: Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Michio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Aoi, Nori

    2006-11-01

    The International Symposium on `Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces' was held at The Koshiba Hall, University of Tokyo, on 9 - 12 March 2006. This symposium was organized as an activity of the Grant-in-Aid for the specially promoted area `Monte Carlo Shell Model' from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture (MEXT) of Japan. The symposium was sponsored by the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) and by RIKEN. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the study of the structure of exotic nuclei and its relationship with nuclear forces. There has been much progress recently in our understanding of what the structure of exotic nuclei is and how it can be linked to nuclear forces, with emerging intriguing perspectives. The following subjects were covered in this symposium Present status and future of the shell model Effective interaction theories Experimental results and perspectives Few-body methods including ab initio calculations Advancements of mean-fieeld models Transition between shell and cluster structure Nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure Particle physics and the shell model Emphasis was placed on the interplay between many-body structures and nuclear forces, and on the experimental clarification of these topics. Around 80 participants attended the symposium and we enjoyed 34 excellent and lively invited talks and 26 oral presentations. The organizing committee consisted of B A Brown (MSU), S Fujii (CNS), M Honma (Aizu), T Kajino (NAO), T Mizusaki (Senshu), T Motobayashi (RIKEN), K Muto (TIT), T Otsuka (Chair, Tokyo/CNS/RIKEN), P Ring (TMU), N Shimizu (Scientific Secretary, Tokyo), S Shimoura (CNS), Y Utsuno (Scientific Secretary, JAEA). Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers and the participants as well as the other organizers for their contributions which made the symposium so successful.

  19. Probing nuclear bubble structure via neutron star asteroseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Sotani, Hajime; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We consider torsional oscillations that are trapped in a layer of spherical-hole (bubble) nuclear structure, which is expected to occur in the deepest region of the inner crust of a neutron star. Because this layer intervenes between the phase of slab nuclei and the outer core of uniform nuclear matter, torsional oscillations in the bubble phase can be excited separately from usual crustal torsional oscillations. We find from eigenmode analyses for various models of the equation of state of uniform nuclear matter that the fundamental frequencies of such oscillations are almost independent of the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter, but strongly depend on the slope parameter of the nuclear symmetry energy $L$. Although the frequencies are also sensitive to the entrainment effect, i.e., what portion of nucleons outside bubbles contribute to the oscillations, by having such a portion fixed, we can successfully fit the calculated fundamental frequencies of torsional oscillations in the bubble phase insi...

  20. Lessons of TEPCO's Fukushima accident from human and organizational aspects and challenge for nuclear safety reform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author participated in international experts' meeting held by IAEA on May 21, 2013 and presented the paper focusing on human and organizational aspects of the Fukushima nuclear accident. It clarified TEPCO's basic recognition: 'The cause of the accident should not be treated merely as a natural disaster due to an enormous tsunami being something difficult to anticipate and we believe it is necessary to seriously acknowledge the result that TEPCO failed to avoid an accident which might have been avoided if ample preparations had been made in advance with thorough use of human intellect' and then reconsidered the Fukushima nuclear accident: 'could we predict an enormous tsunami and take whatever countermeasures?' and 'could we respond to the accident better?' for the worldwide operators to avoid such an accident, which moved meeting's participants deeply. Presentation's contents followed 'Reassessment of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Nuclear Safety Reform Plan' published by TEPCO on March 29. This article described outline of the presentation. Though the only way to explore the possibility to save Unit 1 was that operators could bravely go up to the 4th floor of reactor building and open the isolation valves to start IC, it was given up without any clear communication among key decision makers for confirming the IC operational status. As for Unit 3, operators could not achieve thorough focus on ensuring core cooling such that proactive transfer from RCIC/HPCI to low pressure water injection was not challenged, mainly because of low trust on Diesel/Driven Fire Protection Pump (DDFP). During the design stage and afterward, ample consideration was not given to common cause failures originating in external events, which led to a severe situation where almost all the power supplies and safety system functions were lost. Continuous efforts to reduce risks were not ample, including the collection, analysis and utilization of information on safety enhancement

  1. Charge-exchange giant resonances as probes of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giant resonances populated in charge-exchange reactions can reveal detailed information about nuclear structure properties, in spite of their apparent featurelessness. The (p,n) and (n,p) reactions - as well as their analog reactions - proceed via the same nuclear matrix element as beta decay. Thereby, they are useful for probing electroweak properties in nuclei, especially for those not accessible to beta decay. The nuclear physics aspects of double beta decay might be investigated in double charge-exchange reactions. detailed nuclear structure information, such as the presence of ground-state correlations, can be revealed via identification of 'first-forbidden' transitions. In addition, astrophysics aspects and halo properties of nuclei have been investigated in charge exchange. Finally, these experiments have questioned our knowledge of the absolute strength of the strong interaction

  2. Charge-exchange giant resonances as probes of nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomgren, J. [Uppsala Univ., (Sweden). Dept. of Neutron Research

    2001-09-01

    Giant resonances populated in charge-exchange reactions can reveal detailed information about nuclear structure properties, in spite of their apparent featurelessness. The (p,n) and (n,p) reactions - as well as their analog reactions - proceed via the same nuclear matrix element as beta decay. Thereby, they are useful for probing electroweak properties in nuclei, especially for those not accessible to beta decay. The nuclear physics aspects of double beta decay might be investigated in double charge-exchange reactions. detailed nuclear structure information, such as the presence of ground-state correlations, can be revealed via identification of 'first-forbidden' transitions. In addition, astrophysics aspects and halo properties of nuclei have been investigated in charge exchange. Finally, these experiments have questioned our knowledge of the absolute strength of the strong interaction.

  3. ISINN-2. Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain the materials presented at the Second International Seminar on Neutron-Nucleus Interactions (ISINN-2) dealing with the problems of neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics. The Seminar took place in Dubna on April 26-28, 1994. Over 120 scientists from Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Germany, Holland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Mexico, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Ukraine, US and about 10 Russian research institutes took part in the Seminar. The main problems discussed are the following: P-odd and P-even angular correlation and T-reversal invariance in neutron reactions, nuclear structure investigations by neutron capture, the mechanism of neutron reactions, nuclear fission processes, as well as neutron data for nuclear astrophysics

  4. ICT as an enabler in supporting Knowledge Management in Nuclear Malaysia: Issues, challenges and best practises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the notion that ICT (Information and Communication Technology) is an enabler to KM (Knowledge Management) and how ICT can help to support KMS (KM Systems) in the context of Nuclear Malaysia. It starts by taking an academic tour and looking at the meanings and definitions of ICT and KM or KMS from various perspectives. Coincidently, ICT and KM carries a variety of meanings when view from different angles by different groups of people, as described in the following sections. The paper also discusses the issues and challenges in building ICT systems and applications such as that for the KMS. It also provides strategies, actions plans or best practises done by various sectors of the ICT industry that can also be applied to Nuclear Malaysia in its pursuit of building a KMS. As an R and D organization in which knowledge creation, preservation, storage and retrieval are its daily diet, a KMS is something that Nuclear Malaysia cannot afford to live without. (Author)

  5. I and C and control room challenges and opportunities for maintaining and modernizing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems and capabilities affect all areas of plant operation and can profoundly impact plant reliability, efficiency, and operating costs. Nuclear power plants are having problems with aging and obsolete equipment. These problems will get worse as plants age. The longer life resulting from license extension just increases the problems. Work is being done in the industry to optimize or extend the useful life and reliability of existing equipment and systems. However; long-term maintenance of aging and obsolete equipment is often not a viable option and modernization must also be considered. The Electric Power Research Inst. I and C Program has been working with its member utilities and other stakeholders in the nuclear power industry to: 1) enable nuclear power plants to support existing components and systems, 2) make improvements via component upgrades, 3) make system level improvements, and 4) plan for and initiate large scale upgrades to I and C systems and control rooms. Considerable progress has been made in both technical and regulatory areas to enable more cost-effective operation and maintenance and to take advantage of improvements possible with digital technology. However, there are still several challenges that must be addressed and several beneficial opportunities that are possible. Some are these areas are currently being addressed in the EPRI I and C Program. For many of the areas, the issues and solutions apply to new plants as well. (authors)

  6. Challenges in the management of decommission waste of nuclear facilities in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is inevitable that every nuclear facility must one day be safely decommissioned. When considering decommissioning, large amounts of radioactive and non-radioactive waste have to be taken into account. Disposal of such materials can have large economic impact on the overall decommissioning cost. In developing countries like Ghana, the perception of environmental protection through waste management, is often not very high as compared to many other pressing needs. Therefore limited resources are allocated for environmental problems. Ghana operates a tank-in- pool type research reactor, 30kW output for research in neutron activation analysis, radioisotope preparation, education and training, a radiotherapy unit that utilizes a 185TBq Co-60 radioactive sources for the treatment of cancer and a gamma irradiation facility which utilizes 1.85PBq Co-60 radioactive source for the irradiation of various materials. All these facilities are operating without designed decommissioning in mind, an inadequate waste management infrastructure as well as a lack of a repository to handling the resulting waste. It is today's beneficials of the nuclear facility that has to deal with the legacies of the future decommissioning activities. The paper outlines some of the challenges and issues to be expected in the management of waste from future decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Ghana with the absence of a waste management infrastructure and inadequate financial resources. The paper puts forth a concept to perform meaningful and significant plans whilst the facilities are still operating. (author)

  7. Analysis of Challenges for Management Education in India Using Total Interpretive Structural Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Ritika; Agrawal, Rajat; Sharma, Vinay; Nangia, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify challenges for management education in India and explain their nature, significance and interrelations using total interpretive structural modelling (TISM), an innovative version of Warfield's interpretive structural modelling (ISM). Design/methodology/approach: The challenges have been drawn from…

  8. Talking my language [As the nuclear industry goes global, communication becomes a bigger challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    future and existing managers to improve their cross-cultural competence, while learning about the various facets of nuclear energy, is to participate in one of the World Nuclear University (WNU) programmes. For example, the six week Summer Institute (SI) in Daejeon, South Korea in July- August 2007 will be attended by over a hundred young nuclear professionals and graduate students from over 35 countries. This is in addition to the 163 WNU 'Fellows' from 40 countries who have attended previous institutes in Idaho Falls and Stockholm. The WNU-SI comprises lectures by some of the world's foremost experts from the IAEA and industry, along with challenging leadership development tasks and technical tours. Other events being organized by the WNU Coordinating Centre in London for 2007 and 2008 also emphasize participation by a wide cross-section of learners from both developed and developing countries. They include forums for nuclear policy-makers and scientific advisers, and induction courses for executives joining the nuclear industry from other areas

  9. Electoral structure of building foundations in nuclear fuel element plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant structures of nuclear fuel elements have a substantial burden. This requires analysis of the selection of the proper foundation for building support for a variety of different soil conditions found in two locations, first at a location near the nuclear power plant in Jepara and the second location BATAN Serpong area. Expected to know the location of soil conditions, we can determined the type of foundation that will be used based on the criteria requirements of the building. (author)

  10. Analysis of statistical model properties from discrete nuclear structure data

    OpenAIRE

    Firestone Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental M1, E1, and E2 photon strengths have been compiled from experimental data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF). Over 20,000 Weisskopf reduced transition probabilities were recovered from the ENSDF and EGAF databases. These transition strengths have been analyzed for their dependence on transition energies, initial and final level energies, spin/parity dependence, and nuclear deformation. ENSDF BE1W values were fou...

  11. Structural integrity of materials in nuclear service: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains 679 abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) computer file dated 1973 through 1976 covering material properties with respect to structural integrity. All materials important to the nuclear industry (except concrete) are covered for mechanical properties, chemical properties, corrosion, fracture or failure, radiation damage, creep, cracking, and swelling. Keyword, author, and permuted-title indexes are included for the convenience of the user

  12. Structural integrity of materials in nuclear service: a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heddleson, F.A.

    1977-06-07

    This report contains 679 abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) computer file dated 1973 through 1976 covering material properties with respect to structural integrity. All materials important to the nuclear industry (except concrete) are covered for mechanical properties, chemical properties, corrosion, fracture or failure, radiation damage, creep, cracking, and swelling. Keyword, author, and permuted-title indexes are included for the convenience of the user.

  13. Nuclear structure studies with RI beams and cooler rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selected topics in present days nuclear structure physics studied by reactions of RI beams are presented. They are change in nuclear radii, single particle orbitals, and shapes. Dynamical changes are shown for nuclei far from the stability line in particular in p-sd shell. Among the future reaction study, a thick target method for a storage ring is presented. A possibility to obtain the highest luminosity for an internal target experiment is proposed

  14. Nuclear structure studies at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: inelastic scattering of 650 MeV protons from 194,196Pt; search for recoil free Δ-production in the (p,3He) reaction at 650 MeV; search for low lying magnetic states in 48Ti; E451 inelastic proton cross sections-low spin states in 28Si; E601, collective form factor analysis of 208Pb(π,π') at Tπ = 180 MeV; E855, collective form factor analysis of 206,207,208Pb(p,p') at Tp = 650 MeV; proton-nucleus scattering and swelling of nucleons in nuclei; strength of tensor force in medium and mixing of high spin stretched states; Fermilab E581, Coulomb-nuclear polarimeter; Fermilab E704, p + p and bar p + p spin parameters; and density dependent interaction applied to low multipole (p,p') and (p,n) transitions in light nuclei

  15. From nuclear structure to neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress in quantum Monte-Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron-rich matter. As a demonstration, we show that the agreement between theoretical calculations of the charge form factor of 12C and the experimental data is excellent. Applying similar methods to isospin-asymmetric systems allows one to describe neutrons confined in an external potential and homogeneous neutron-rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy. (authors)

  16. RATU - Nuclear power plant structural safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation group is of the opinion that the work performed under the RATU programme is generally of high quality, in some areas, especially those related to water chemistry of excellent quality. The personnel gives the impression of being dedicated and enthusiastic, and the administration seems to be very effective. It is obvious that the RATU programme has taken advantage of related contracts and projects funded by different sources. It is the opinion of the valuation group that the investment and human capital have been brought to work very efficiently in all projects. The objectives of the programme and the different projects are formulated in a broad sense. The areas selected for work are however of high relevance to nuclear safety. In some projects not all aspects are addressed by the ongoing work, and further activities may be necessary to meet with the requirements of the authorities. (orig.)

  17. Nuclear medium modification of the F2 structure function

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2009-01-01

    We study the nuclear effects in the electromagnetic structure function $F_{2}(x, Q^2)$ in nuclei in the deep inelastic lepton nucleus scattering process by taking into account Fermi motion, binding, pion and rho meson cloud contributions. Calculations have been done in a local density approximation using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations for nuclear matter. The ratios $R_{F2}^A(x,Q^2)=\\frac{2F_2^A(x,Q^2)}{AF_{2}^{Deut}(x,Q^2)}$ are obtained and compared with the recent JLAB results for light nuclei that show a non trivial A dependence.

  18. The policy structure of the Dutch nuclear energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this study has been to indicate the principle structures through which much of governmental nuclear policy is formed and to develop a model for the analysis of policy communication networks. The first chapter begins with a general outline of the international development of nuclear energy and gives an impression of the Dutch nuclear energy sector with special emphasis on the institutional aspects. In chapter II the author elaborates on the place of structural analysis in public policy analysis and argues that it is one of the indispensable elements of public policy analysis. Relations are treated in chapter III. Personal interlocks are given special attention because these are interrelated with financial, informational and other dependency relations and have a special communicative function in public policy-making. The different functions of the interlocks are 'translated' in graph theoretical concepts. Chapter IV introduces a method derived from graph analysis to analyse public policy networks. Several structural configurations are distinguished. In the same chapter an outline of the empirical research on the nuclear energy network will be given. In chapters V and VI the nuclear energy network is analysed, and in chapter VII the decision-making concerning some nuclear items is described in a general way. (Auth.)

  19. Nuclear structure studies far east and out west on the nuclear chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear potential and resulting shell structure are well established for the valley of stability, however, dramatic modifications to the familiar ordering of single-particle orbitals in rare isotopes have been found: new shell gaps emerge, some conventional magic numbers are no longer valid, and theoretical models that extrapolate from stability to describe observables in exotic nuclei can fail. Current efforts in nuclear structure physics are aimed at unraveling the driving forces behind this structural evolution, which was found most dramatic in neutron-rich species. This manuscript will outline some of the recent efforts at NSCL aimed at shedding light on the evolution of nuclear structure around neutron number N = 40 in neutron-rich Ti isotopes and in neutron-deficient Sn nuclei approaching 100Sn

  20. Structure Determination of the Nuclear Pore Complex with Three-Dimensional Cryo electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Appen, Alexander; Beck, Martin

    2016-05-22

    Determining the structure of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) imposes an enormous challenge due to its size, intricate composition and membrane-embedded nature. In vertebrates, about 1000 protein building blocks assemble into a 110-MDa complex that fuses the inner and outer membranes of a cell's nucleus. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the in situ architecture of the NPC with a specific focus on approaches using three-dimensional cryo electron microscopy. We discuss technological benefits and limitations and give an outlook toward obtaining a high-resolution structure of the NPC. PMID:26791760

  1. Development of deterioration models and tests of structural materials for nuclear containment structures(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Byung Hwan [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    The nuclear containment structures are very important infrastructures which require much cost for construction and maintenance. If these structures lose their functions and do not ensure their safety, great losses of human lives and properties will result. Therefore, the nuclear containment structures should secure appropriate safety and functions during these service lives. The nuclear concrete structures start to experience deterioration due to severe environmental condition, even though the concrete structures exhibit generally superior durability. It is, therefore, necessary to take appropriate actions at each stage of planning, design and construction to secure safety and functionability. Thorough examination of deterioration mechanism and comprehensive tests have been conducted to explore the durability characteristics of nuclear concrete structures. 88 refs., 70 figs., 12 tabs. (Author)

  2. Tagged nuclear structure functions with $HERMES$

    OpenAIRE

    Silvano SimulaINFN - Sezione Sanita'

    2014-01-01

    The production of slow nucleons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering off nuclei, $A(e, e'N)X$, is analyzed for kinematical conditions accessible at $HERA$ with the $HERMES$ detector. The sensitivity of the semi-inclusive cross section to possible medium-dependent modifications of the nucleon structure function is illustrated.

  3. Alpha-cluster model of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The approach based on the α-cluster model proposes some formulas to calculate the binding energies and the charge radii of the nuclei of the β-stability valley and around it [1]. The formulas have been derived on the basis of the idea of isospin independence of inter-nucleon interactions. The approach implies that the nucleus is a dense package of alpha-clusters. The inter-cluster distances are determined by the charge radii of the clusters, so the radius of the nucleus R is defined by their number. Some amount of excess neutrons fill in the gap between the matter bodies of the -clusters of the core [2]. Then the radius Rm of a β - stable isotope can be estimated by the volume occupied by the matter of the core and the volume of the charge of a few peripheral clusters. It has been shown that the condition Rm = R determines the amount of excess neutrons. The energy of these excess neutrons is described by a smooth function on the number of the neutron pairs. The formula to calculate the binding energy proper for the nucleus with five α-clusters turned out to be good for the other nuclei up to the most heavy ones. The formula to calculate the nuclear binding energy is evidently different from the well known Weizsacker formula. These two approaches give different estimations of the total Coulomb energy and the energy due to all inter-nucleon interactions, but the values of the total binding energies of these approaches are close. To calculate the charge radii both the approaches propose successful but different formulas, one is R ∼A1/3 and the other R∼Z1/3. A few useful phenomenological formulas have been found in the approach. These are the formulas to calculate the root mean square charge radius, the Coulomb radius and the radius of the last proton's position in dependence on the number of α-clusters. Besides, the empirical values of the Coulomb energy and the surface tension energy with a good accuracy have been obtained for the nuclei with N

  4. Nuclear structure at intermediate energies. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here oil the progress that we made for the nine months beginning October 1, 1991 for DOE Grant No. DE-FG05-87ER40309. The report covers the third year of a three year grant. Since we are submitting an accompanying Grant Renewal Proposal, we provide in this report more background information than usual for the different projects. The theme that unites the experiments undertaken by the Bonner Lab Medium Energy Group is a determination to understand in detail the many facets and manifestations of the strong interaction, that which is now referred to as nonperturbative QCD. Whether we are investigating the question of just what does carry the spin of baryons, or the extent of the validity of the SU(6) wavefunctions for the excited hyperons (as will be measured in our CEBAF experiment), or questions associated with the formation of a new state of matter predicted by QCD (the subject of AGS bar p experiment E854, AGS heavy ion experiment E810, as-well as the approved STAR experiment at RHIC), - all these projects share this common goal. FNAL E683 may well open a new field of investigation in nuclear physics: That of just how colored quarks and gluons interact with nuclear matter as they traverse nuclei of different-sizes. In most all of the experiments mentioned, above, the Bonner Lab Group is playing major leadership roles as well as doing a big fraction of the hard work that such experiments require. We use many of the facilities that are available to the intermediate energy physics community and we use our expertise to design and fabricate the detectors and instrumentation that are required to perform the measurements which we decide to do. The format we follow in the Progress Report is,to provide a concise, but fairly complete write-up on each project. The publications listed in Section In give much greater detail on many of the projects. The aim in this report is to focus on the physics goals, the results, and their significance

  5. Nuclear power for future electricity generation in Ghana: Issues and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IAEA TC project GHA/0/011: 'Evaluating the Role of Nuclear Power in Future Options for Electricity Generation' which commenced in 2009. The question is, what are the challenges facing Ghana's Nuclear Power Programme? (author)

  6. Facing the challenge of stakeholders involvement: the Argentine nuclear regulatory case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina (ARN) is an autonomous body reporting to the Presidency of Argentina, empowered to regulate and control the nuclear activity with regards to radiation and nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear non-proliferation issues. Under the executive decree 1172/2003, which makes reference to the accessibility of public information to increase transparency of government actions and specially to promote public involvement, ARN has the legal obligation to inform of its activities in an accurate, comprehensive and understandable manner. The re-launching of the nuclear plan in 2006 and the repercussions this provoked on society highlighted the need to reinforce the legitimacy of the regulatory role and the promotion of confidence on its works to ensure the safety of the people. Therefore it was considered necessary to involve the society further in this programme by achieving greater public understanding and awareness of the nuclear regulatory activities. The more the public is conscious of the role of the regulator, conceiving it as a trustworthy and autonomous authority, the easier it is for the regulator to fulfil its obligations. As ARN has a strong commitment with society and considering that communication with the general public, as an external stakeholder, is a means to establishing and maintaining public trust and confidence, the implementation of a new communication programme became a key issue. In this scenario, ARN faced a challenge it was not prepared to handle and thus created a Division to deal with institutional communication and allow and ease the interaction with society. Within this Division, one of the methods chosen to achieve a better interaction with society was the use of a technological tool to attend possible inquiries, increasing and facilitating a greater involvement of the stakeholders. With this in mind a 'Mail-Info' was established because it allows a fast, accessible, easy and informal way of

  7. The quest for nuclear technology and the challenges of knowledge management in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    major challenge arising from this development, is the collection, harvest and disseminating of the widest possible information and knowledge accumulated over the years. The resolution on nuclear knowledge by the IAEA General Conference in 2002 and 2003 and the recommendations and new guidelines by an INIS external evaluation panel, has given us the impetus to evaluate our activities and reposition the INIS center toward responding to this challenge and the emerging trend in knowledge management. In doing so we refocus our mind on two key areas of INIS operation in our Centre; Collection of relevant material and preparation of input; Our membership obliged us to make contribution commensurate with the level of activities within our borders. INIS has developed over the years as the World's leading information system in nuclear science and technology through the coordination of IAEA and the cooperation of member states. Promotional Activities are fashioned out to facilitate the attainment of the goals set for nuclear energy in the national energy policy within the framework of our National Development Objectives, through the establishment of an information resource capable of meetings the needs of our scientists and engineers. A necessary step toward this end is to build a network of universities and research institutes in nuclear science, that will be use to pool, analyze and share national nuclear knowledge and experience, address preservation and promotion of knowledge, maintain competence and avoid duplication wherever necessary. Target sets for 2004 on the two key areas are: Contribute 0.5-1.0% of the total input to INIS as against 0.0159% in 2003; Reach out to 5000 potentials users; Digitization of Environmental Impact Assessment Report on Energy Project (1995-2003). Steps taken so far: Assignment of 4 staff, 3 workstations and a scanner with OCR capability for the INIS center; Capacity building for input preparation using available resources from INIS secretariat

  8. Automatic Dismantling Challenges in the Structural Design of LCD TVs

    OpenAIRE

    Elo, Kristofer; Sundin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Many liquid crystal display television sets (LCD TVs) end up in the waste stream today. The combination of hazardous materials such as mercury and liquid crystal, and the labor-intensive disassembly of LCD TVs, make the recycling process interesting to automate. However, since there are so many manufacturers the variation of LCD TVs is high, making automation a challenge. Todays most common automatic process utilizes shredders, resulting in degradation of recycled material and possible decont...

  9. Effective nuclear regulatory systems: Facing safety and security challenges. Proceedings of an international conference. Contributed papers and presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 16 years, the IAEA has conducted a series of major conferences that have addressed topical issues and strategies critical to nuclear safety, for consideration by the world's nuclear regulators. This series was initiated in 1991 with the International Conference on the Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future. The conference marked the beginning of a global safety regime based on international conventions and legal instruments that was supported by a set of nuclear and radiation safety standards and related review services. The very successful Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS) resulted from this effort and now has 56 Contracting Parties. Currently, regulatory authorities and the nuclear industry are facing significant new challenges, which require new strategies and oversight. The key challenges are the result of the following factors: Renewed global interest in the use of nuclear energy for electricity generation and, consequently, its likely expansion; - Increased threats to the security of nuclear installations and the need to link closely security and safety issues and response capabilities; - Increased global use of radioactive materials and the need to ensure their safety and security, similar to the issues faced with the use of nuclear energy; - New safety and security challenges from existing nuclear facilities associated with ageing and extensions of their operating lifetimes. To address these challenges, the International Conference on Effective Nuclear Regulatory Systems: Facing Safety and Security Challenges, was held in Moscow, Russian Federation, from 27 February to 3 March 2006. The IAEA invited global leaders to this conference, including both government regulators and industry representatives, to share their perspectives and experience in addressing these challenges that transcend national boundaries. Participants were asked to make their contributions in the context of global safety and security standards and methods by which

  10. Nuclear Structure of the Heaviest Elements – Investigated at SHIP-GSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heßberger Fritz Peter

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The quest for the heaviest nuclei that can exist is a basic topic in natural science as their stability is characterized by a delicate interplay of short range nuclear forces acting between the nucleons (protons and neutrons and long-range Coulomb forces acting solely between charged particles, i.e. the protons. As the stability of a nucleus is strongly correlated to its structure, understanding the nuclear structure of heaviest nuclei is presently a main challenge of experimental and theoretical investigations concerning the field of Superheavy Elements. At the velocity filter SHIP at GSI Darmstadt an extensive program on nuclear structure investigations has been started about a decade ago. The project covered both as well systematic investigations of single particle levels in odd-mass isotopes populated by α-decay as investigation of two- or fourquasi-particle states forming K isomers and was supplemented by direct mass measurements at SHIPTRAP and investigation of spontaneous fission properties. Recent experimental studies allowed to extend the systematics of low lying levels in N = 151 and N = 153 up to 255Rf and 259Sg, investigation of possible relations between nuclear structure and fission properties of odd-mass nuclei and investigation of shell strengths at N = 152 and towards N = 162.

  11. Nuclear structure of the heaviest elements - investigated at SHIP-GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quest for the heaviest nuclei that can exist is a basic topic in natural science as their stability is characterized by a delicate interplay of short range nuclear forces acting between the nucleons (protons and neutrons) and long-range Coulomb forces acting solely between charged particles, i.e. the protons. As the stability of a nucleus is strongly correlated to its structure, understanding the nuclear structure of heaviest nuclei is presently a main challenge of experimental and theoretical investigations concerning the field of Superheavy Elements. At the velocity filter SHIP at GSI Darmstadt, an extensive program on nuclear structure investigations started about a decade ago. The project covered both as well systematic investigations of single particle levels in odd-mass isotopes populated by a-decay as investigation of two- or four-quasi-particle states forming K isomers and was supplemented by direct mass measurements at SHIPTRAP and investigation of spontaneous fission properties. Recent experimental studies allowed us to extend the systematics of low lying levels in N = 151 and N = 153 up to 255Rf and 259Sg, investigation of possible relations between nuclear structure and fission properties of odd-mass nuclei and investigation of shell strengths at N = 152 and towards N = 162. (authors)

  12. Durability and safety of concrete structures in the nuclear context. The case of the containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The durability of structures, because of its economic and environmental implications, is one of the actual hot topics in civil engineering. In the field of nuclear energy, we are facing very challenging problems like: how could we prolong the service life of actual nuclear containments and how can we assure the durability of a radioactive storage on the very long term (several centuries)? These already difficult questions in a classical civil engineering view are even more complicated in the field of nuclear energy where the structures are massive and the safety of the installations has to be considered. For the containment of nuclear power plants, these stakes will be lit with some examples of research concerning the mechanical behaviour of concrete and concrete structures (at early age, in service on long scales of time and in the event of an accident), the durability of the concrete structures (leaching, swelling due to delayed ettringite formation - DEF -) and the couplings between mechanics and durability. Finally, the importance of probabilistic aspects and the inherent difficulties will be shown. (authors)

  13. Challenge in the public acceptance and cooperation in the verge of building the first nuclear power plant in Indonesia - 59119

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Indonesia plans to build the first nuclear power plant (NPP) to solve the country's energy problems. One of the challenges that must be handled before establishing the first NPP is the presence of anti-nuclear groups that have successfully made the government postpone its plan several times since the first nuclear research reactor was established in Bandung (1972). The basis for the groups' dissent is the presence, and handling of radioactive waste. Further, the general public perception - even among educated Indonesians - is that Indonesia's experts lack knowledge about nuclear technology, even though nuclear technology has been studied in Indonesia since 1954. So, the problem is one of disseminating information about nuclear technology. To address this challenge, the National Atomic Energy Board (BATAN) of Indonesia has to redesign its public outreach strategy by collaborating with the educational institutions and communications organizations. Gadjah Mada University is the only university in Indonesia offering a nuclear-engineering curriculum. Therefore, a teaming arrangement with this institution seems appropriate to help improve the public's general knowledge about nuclear technology. There are several strategies that could be designed within the frame work of collaboration. The first strategy is to introduce nuclear technology into Indonesia's elementary and secondary schools. These youngsters are still in their formative years and are absorbing science and technology with great attention. (authors)

  14. Organization, structure, and performance in the US nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several propositions are advanced concerning the effects of industry organization and structure on the economic performance of the American commercial nuclear power industry. Both the electric utility industry and the nuclear power plant supply industry are relatively high degree of horizontal disaggregation. The latter is also characterized by an absence of vertical integration. The impact of each of these factors on construction and operating performance is discussed. Evidence is presented suggesting that the combination of horizontal and vertical disaggregation in the industry has had a significant adverse effect on economic performance. The relationship between industrial structure and regulatory behavior is also discussed. 43 references, 4 figures, 9 tables

  15. Nuclear Effects on the Spin-Dependent Structure Functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We address the question how the spin-dependent nucleon structure function g1(x,Q2) gets modified when the nucleon is bound inside a nucleus. We analyze the influence of nuclear interactions using the Δ - π model, known to describe well the unpolarized effect, and the free polarized parton distributions. The results for the neutron in 3He and proton in 3H,7Li and 19F are presented, showing significant changes in the parton spin distributions and in their moments. Scattering processes off polarized 7Li are suggested which could justify these theoretical calculations and shed more light on both nuclear spin structure and short distance QCD. (author)

  16. Impact loads on nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first step in evaluation of a NPP design for protection against impact loading, is to identify those events that may be credible for a particular site. In connection with external, man-made events IAEA Safety Series No.50-SG-S5 provides a methodology for selecting the events that need to be considered. This presentation deals with modelling of interface forces in projectile impact against unyielding structures, vibrations induced by impact, penetration, scabbing and perforation effects

  17. Algebraic fermion models and nuclear structure physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experimental and theoretical developments are generating renewed interest in the nuclear SU(3) shell model, and this extends to the symplectic model, with its Sp(6,R) symmetry, which is a natural multi-(ℎ/2π)ω extension of the SU(3) theory. First and foremost, an understanding of how the dynamics of a quantum rotor is embedded in the shell model has established it as the model of choice for describing strongly deformed systems. Second, the symplectic model extension of the 0-(ℎ/2π)ω theory can be used to probe additional degrees of freedom, like core polarization and vorticity modes that play a key role in providing a full description of quadrupole collectivity. Third, the discovery and understanding of pseudo-spin has allowed for an extension of the theory from light (A≤40) to heavy (A≥100) nuclei. Fourth, a user-friendly computer code for calculating reduced matrix elements of operators that couple SU(3) representations is now available. And finally, since the theory is designed to cope with deformation in a natural way, microscopic features of deformed systems can be probed; for example, the theory is now being employed to study double beta decay and thereby serves to probe the validity of the standard model of particles and their interactions. A subset of these topics will be considered in this course--examples cited include: a consideration of the origin of pseudo-spin symmetry; a SU(3)-based interpretation of the coupled-rotor model, early results of double beta decay studies; and some recent developments on the pseudo-SU(3) theory. Nothing will be said about other fermion-based theories; students are referred to reviews in the literature for reports on developments in these related areas

  18. Aging management of containment structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research is being conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsorship to address aging management of nuclear power plant containment and other safety-related structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the US-NRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Accomplishments include development of a Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, evaluation of models for potential concrete containment degradation factors, development of a procedure to identify critical structures and degradation factors important to aging management, evaluations of nondestructive evaluation techniques, assessments of European and North American repair practices for concrete, review of parameters affecting corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and development of methodologies for making current condition assessments and service life predictions of new or existing reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants. (author). 29 refs., 2 figs

  19. Computer Automation for Structural Design of Domestic Nuclear Shelters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural design of nuclear shelters is different according to the types of these shelters (domestic or public-above ground or underground – shallow buried or deeply buried-reinforced concrete or glass reinforced plastic or thin metal sheets... etc.). UK and USA performed a calculation using a manual method to calculate the structural design for any domestic nuclear shelter, which may protect the people in it from air blast, thermal and nuclear radiation (gamma rays emanating from fall-out). The manual calculation method is very complex which is very difficult to use, in the present work, a simplified method is prepared, this involves a visual basic computer program to calculate the structural designs for the different domestic nuclear shelters. The program aims to provide the missing time in the calculation processes to calculate the structural design for any domestic shelter through entering specifications data for any domestic shelter. The program will calculate the structural design in a very short time which will save the effort and time in comparison with the manual calculation. Also, the computer program gives more accurate results than the manual method

  20. Nuclear structure of quasars at 329 megahertz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents studies of compact quasars using Very Long Baseline Interferometry at 329 MHz. Chapter 1 presents hybrid maps of 3C147 and 3C286, made at 329 MHz from VLBI observations taken in 1975 with three stations. These are the first maps of compact radio structure at this frequency. Both objects have an unresolved core; an extended, asymmetric jet; and an even larger, completely resolved halo. For 3C147 it is possible to decompose the spectrum into individual component spectra; at 329 MHz the core of 3C147 is self-absorbed. For both sources the spectral index decreases monotonically from core to jet to halo. Chapter 2 presents further 329 MHz VLBI observations. Seven stations were used to map the quasars 3C48, 3C147, 3C309.1, 3C380, and 3C454.3. These are the first reliable, high dynamic range maps at this frequency, and reveal complex structure in four of these sources. All five quasars are seen to have asymmetric structure that can be interpreted in the ''core-jet'' picture of compact extragalactic radio sources. Chapter 3 analyzes the two maps of 3C147 presented in chapters 1 and 2. Those maps reveal that the core of 3C147 is a low-frequency variable radio source which has brightened by a factor of two in six years. In combination with X-ray observations, this is used to demonstrate that bulk relativistic motion is taking place within the core, and leads the prediction that 3C147 is a ''superluminal'' radio source. In chapter 4, the observations presented in chapter 2 are analyzed using standard synchrotron theory to discover conditions occurring in these objects