WorldWideScience

Sample records for challenge erkp686 multi-scale

  1. Multi-scale biomedical systems: measurement challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, R.

    2016-11-01

    Multi-scale biomedical systems are those that represent interactions in materials, sensors, and systems from a holistic perspective. It is possible to view such multi-scale activity using measurement of spatial scale or time scale, though in this paper only the former is considered. The biomedical application paradigm comprises interactions that range from quantum biological phenomena at scales of 10-12 for one individual to epidemiological studies of disease spread in populations that in a pandemic lead to measurement at a scale of 10+7. It is clear that there are measurement challenges at either end of this spatial scale, but those challenges that relate to the use of new technologies that deal with big data and health service delivery at the point of care are also considered. The measurement challenges lead to the use, in many cases, of model-based measurement and the adoption of virtual engineering. It is these measurement challenges that will be uncovered in this paper.

  2. Role, Challenges, and Opportunities in Multi-scale Laboratory Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illangasekare, Tissa

    2017-04-01

    Fundamental to the distribution of water and effects on its quality are the processes of energy, mass, and momentum transfer in hydrologic systems. I will introduce a class of problems that offers special challenges when these processes occur either across physical interfaces or through transition zones with embedded interfaces. Some of the challenges are a result of hard to define interface topologies, abrupt transition of phase properties, contrasting phase flow and energy dynamics, difficult to characterize simultaneously occurring but different types of transfer processes, and modeling complexities. The data to study these processes cannot always be obtained from controlled field experiments where many factors contribute to the uncertainty of measurements and parameter estimates. The primary thesis of this talk is that laboratory experimentation at multiple test scales will continue to play an important and a useful role in hydrology and will provide new opportunities to improve fundamental process understanding. This knowledge will lead to increased accuracy of predictions and improved upscaling methods. However, performing such experiments pose many challenges such as acquisition of data at different observational scales and close to interfaces, capturing critical features of geologic heterogeneity, mimicking field specific pressure and temperature dependent phase interaction parameters under ambient laboratory conditions, and simulating climate drivers, among others. Through examples in multiphase systems and land/atmospheric interactions, I will show how to address some of these challenges through the design and implementation of theory-driven experiments.

  3. Advances and challenges in logical modeling of cell cycle regulation: perspective for multi-scale, integrative yeast cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberis, Matteo; Todd, Robert G; van der Zee, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell cycle is robustly designed, with interacting molecules organized within a definite topology that ensures temporal precision of its phase transitions. Its underlying dynamics are regulated by molecular switches, for which remarkable insights have been provided by genetic and molecular biology efforts. In a number of cases, this information has been made predictive, through computational models. These models have allowed for the identification of novel molecular mechanisms, later validated experimentally. Logical modeling represents one of the youngest approaches to address cell cycle regulation. We summarize the advances that this type of modeling has achieved to reproduce and predict cell cycle dynamics. Furthermore, we present the challenge that this type of modeling is now ready to tackle: its integration with intracellular networks, and its formalisms, to understand crosstalks underlying systems level properties, ultimate aim of multi-scale models. Specifically, we discuss and illustrate how such an integration may be realized, by integrating a minimal logical model of the cell cycle with a metabolic network. © FEMS 2016.

  4. EDF's experience with supercomputing and challenges ahead - towards multi-physics and multi-scale approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbecq, J.M.; Banner, D. [Electricite de France (EDF)- R and D Division, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2003-07-01

    Nuclear power plants are a major asset of the EDF company. To remain so, in particular in a context of deregulation, competitiveness, safety and public acceptance are three conditions. These stakes apply both to existing plants and to future reactors. The purpose of the presentation is to explain how supercomputing can help EDF to satisfy these requirements. Three examples are described in detail: ensuring optimal use of nuclear fuel under wholly safe conditions, understanding and simulating the material deterioration mechanisms and moving forward with numerical simulation for the performance of EDF's activities. In conclusion, a broader vision of EDF long term R and D in the field of numerical simulation is given and especially of five challenges taken up by EDF together with its industrial and scientific partners. (author)

  5. Multi-scale brain networks

    CERN Document Server

    Betzel, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    The network architecture of the human brain has become a feature of increasing interest to the neuroscientific community, largely because of its potential to illuminate human cognition, its variation over development and aging, and its alteration in disease or injury. Traditional tools and approaches to study this architecture have largely focused on single scales -- of topology, time, and space. Expanding beyond this narrow view, we focus this review on pertinent questions and novel methodological advances for the multi-scale brain. We separate our exposition into content related to multi-scale topological structure, multi-scale temporal structure, and multi-scale spatial structure. In each case, we recount empirical evidence for such structures, survey network-based methodological approaches to reveal these structures, and outline current frontiers and open questions. Although predominantly peppered with examples from human neuroimaging, we hope that this account will offer an accessible guide to any neuros...

  6. Multi-Scale Governance of Sustainable Natural Resource Use—Challenges and Opportunities for Monitoring and Institutional Development at the National and Global Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Bringezu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In a globalized economy, the use of natural resources is determined by the demand of modern production and consumption systems, and by infrastructure development. Sustainable natural resource use will require good governance and management based on sound scientific information, data and indicators. There is a rich literature on natural resource management, yet the national and global scale and macro-economic policy making has been underrepresented. We provide an overview of the scholarly literature on multi-scale governance of natural resources, focusing on the information required by relevant actors from local to global scale. Global natural resource use is largely determined by national, regional, and local policies. We observe that in recent decades, the development of public policies of natural resource use has been fostered by an “inspiration cycle” between the research, policy and statistics community, fostering social learning. Effective natural resource policies require adequate monitoring tools, in particular indicators for the use of materials, energy, land, and water as well as waste and GHG emissions of national economies. We summarize the state-of-the-art of the application of accounting methods and data sources for national material flow accounts and indicators, including territorial and product-life-cycle based approaches. We show how accounts on natural resource use can inform the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs and argue that information on natural resource use, and in particular footprint indicators, will be indispensable for a consistent implementation of the SDGs. We recognize that improving the knowledge base for global natural resource use will require further institutional development including at national and international levels, for which we outline options.

  7. Multi-scale brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzel, Richard F; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-11-11

    The network architecture of the human brain has become a feature of increasing interest to the neuroscientific community, largely because of its potential to illuminate human cognition, its variation over development and aging, and its alteration in disease or injury. Traditional tools and approaches to study this architecture have largely focused on single scales-of topology, time, and space. Expanding beyond this narrow view, we focus this review on pertinent questions and novel methodological advances for the multi-scale brain. We separate our exposition into content related to multi-scale topological structure, multi-scale temporal structure, and multi-scale spatial structure. In each case, we recount empirical evidence for such structures, survey network-based methodological approaches to reveal these structures, and outline current frontiers and open questions. Although predominantly peppered with examples from human neuroimaging, we hope that this account will offer an accessible guide to any neuroscientist aiming to measure, characterize, and understand the full richness of the brain's multiscale network structure-irrespective of species, imaging modality, or spatial resolution. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Simulating tidal turbines with multi-scale mesh optimisation techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abolghasemi, M.A.; Piggott, M.D.; Spinneken, J; Viré, A.C.; Cotter, CJ; Crammond, S.

    2016-01-01

    Embedding tidal turbines within simulations of realistic large-scale tidal flows is a highly multi-scale problem that poses significant computational challenges. Here this problem is tackled using actuator disc momentum (ADM) theory and Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) with, for the first

  9. Multi-scale Regions from Edge Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazmi, Wajahat; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    In this article we introduce a novel method for detecting multi-scale salient regions around edges using a graph based image compression algorithm. Images are recursively decomposed into triangles arranged into a binary tree using linear interpolation. The entropy of any local region of the image...... to estimate regions. Salient regions are thus formed as stable regions around edges. Tree hierarchy is then used to generate multi-scale regions. We evaluate our detector by performing image retrieval tests on our building database which shows that combined with Spin Images (Lazebnik et al., 2003...

  10. Multi-scale gravity and cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2013-12-01

    The gravitational dynamics and cosmological implications of three classes of recently introduced multi-scale spacetimes (with, respectively, ordinary, weighted and q-derivatives) are discussed. These spacetimes are non-Riemannian: the metric structure is accompanied by an independent measure-differential structure with the characteristics of a multi-fractal, namely, different dimensionality at different scales and, at ultra-short distances, a discrete symmetry known as discrete scale invariance. Under this minimal paradigm, five general features arise: (a) the big-bang singularity can be replaced by a finite bounce, (b) the cosmological constant problem is reinterpreted, since accelerating phases can be mimicked by the change of geometry with the time scale, without invoking a slowly rolling scalar field, (c) the discreteness of geometry at Planckian scales can leave an observable imprint of logarithmic oscillations in cosmological spectra and (d) give rise to an alternative mechanism to inflation or (e) to a fully analytic model of cyclic mild inflation, where near scale invariance of the perturbation spectrum can be produced without strong acceleration. Various properties of the models and exact dynamical solutions are discussed. In particular, the multi-scale geometry with weighted derivatives is shown to be a Weyl integrable spacetime.

  11. Multi-scale structural community organisation of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Rasha E; Tremblay, Nicolas; Arneodo, Alain; Borgnat, Pierre; Audit, Benjamin

    2017-04-11

    Structural interaction frequency matrices between all genome loci are now experimentally achievable thanks to high-throughput chromosome conformation capture technologies. This ensues a new methodological challenge for computational biology which consists in objectively extracting from these data the structural motifs characteristic of genome organisation. We deployed the fast multi-scale community mining algorithm based on spectral graph wavelets to characterise the networks of intra-chromosomal interactions in human cell lines. We observed that there exist structural domains of all sizes up to chromosome length and demonstrated that the set of structural communities forms a hierarchy of chromosome segments. Hence, at all scales, chromosome folding predominantly involves interactions between neighbouring sites rather than the formation of links between distant loci. Multi-scale structural decomposition of human chromosomes provides an original framework to question structural organisation and its relationship to functional regulation across the scales. By construction the proposed methodology is independent of the precise assembly of the reference genome and is thus directly applicable to genomes whose assembly is not fully determined.

  12. Multi-scale models for cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinghao; Chen, Jiawen; Xie, Zhong-Ru

    2014-03-01

    The interactions of membrane receptors during cell adhesion play pivotal roles in tissue morphogenesis during development. Our lab focuses on developing multi-scale models to decompose the mechanical and chemical complexity in cell adhesion. Recent experimental evidences show that clustering is a generic process for cell adhesive receptors. However, the physical basis of such receptor clustering is not understood. We introduced the effect of molecular flexibility to evaluate the dynamics of receptors. By delivering new theory to quantify the changes of binding free energy in different cellular environments, we revealed that restriction of molecular flexibility upon binding of membrane receptors from apposing cell surfaces (trans) causes large entropy loss, which dramatically increases their lateral interactions (cis). This provides a new molecular mechanism to initialize receptor clustering on the cell-cell interface. By using the subcellular simulations, we further found that clustering is a cooperative process requiring both trans and cis interactions. The detailed binding constants during these processes are calculated and compared with experimental data from our collaborator's lab.

  13. Transitions of the Multi-Scale Singularity Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somchaipeng, Kerawit; Sporring, Jon; Kreiborg, Sven

    2005-01-01

    Multi-Scale Singularity Trees(MSSTs) [10] are multi-scale image descriptors aimed at representing the deep structures of images. Changes in images are directly translated to changes in the deep structures; therefore transitions in MSSTs. Because MSSTs can be used to represent the deep structure o...

  14. Multi-scale salient feature extraction on mesh models

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yongliang

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method of extracting multi-scale salient features on meshes. It is based on robust estimation of curvature on multiple scales. The coincidence between salient feature and the scale of interest can be established straightforwardly, where detailed feature appears on small scale and feature with more global shape information shows up on large scale. We demonstrate this multi-scale description of features accords with human perception and can be further used for several applications as feature classification and viewpoint selection. Experiments exhibit that our method as a multi-scale analysis tool is very helpful for studying 3D shapes. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Multi-scale magnetic field intermittence in the plasma sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Vörös, Z.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Runov, A.; Zhang, T. L.; Volwerk, M.; Eichelberger, H. U.; Balogh, A.; Horbury, T. S.; Glaßmeier, K. -H.; Klecker, B.; Rème, H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that intermittent magnetic field fluctuations in the plasma sheet exhibit transitory, localized, and multi-scale features. We propose a multifractal-based algorithm, which quantifies intermittence on the basis of the statistical distribution of the "strength of burstiness", estimated within a sliding window. Interesting multi-scale phenomena observed by the Cluster spacecraft include large-scale motion of the current sheet and bursty bulk flow ...

  16. The Goddard multi-scale modeling system with unified physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-K. Tao

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1 a cloud-resolving model (CRM, (2 a regional-scale model, the NASA unified Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF, and (3 a coupled CRM-GCM (general circulation model, known as the Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework or MMF. The same cloud-microphysical processes, long- and short-wave radiative transfer and land-surface processes are applied in all of the models to study explicit cloud-radiation and cloud-surface interactive processes in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator for comparison and validation with NASA high-resolution satellite data.

    This paper reviews the development and presents some applications of the multi-scale modeling system, including results from using the multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, and aerosols. In addition, use of the multi-satellite simulator to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the model-simulated precipitation processes will be discussed as well as future model developments and applications.

  17. The Goddard multi-scale modeling system with unified physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-K. Tao

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1 a cloud-resolving model (CRM, (2 a regional-scale model, the NASA unified Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF, and (3 a coupled CRM-GCM (general circulation model, known as the Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework or MMF. The same cloud-microphysical processes, long- and short-wave radiative transfer and land-surface processes are applied in all of the models to study explicit cloud-radiation and cloud-surface interactive processes in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator for comparison and validation with NASA high-resolution satellite data. This paper reviews the development and presents some applications of the multi-scale modeling system, including results from using the multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, and aerosols. In addition, use of the multi-satellite simulator to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the model-simulated precipitation processes will be discussed as well as future model developments and applications.

  18. Microphysics in Multi-scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, a review of developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the microphysics development and its performance for the multi-scale modeling system will be presented.

  19. Multi-scale coding of genomic information: From DNA sequence to genome structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arneodo, Alain, E-mail: alain.arneodo@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Vaillant, Cedric, E-mail: cedric.vaillant@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Audit, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.audit@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Argoul, Francoise, E-mail: francoise.argoul@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); D' Aubenton-Carafa, Yves, E-mail: daubenton@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thermes, Claude, E-mail: claude.thermes@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-02-15

    Understanding how chromatin is spatially and dynamically organized in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and how this affects genome functions is one of the main challenges of cell biology. Since the different orders of packaging in the hierarchical organization of DNA condition the accessibility of DNA sequence elements to trans-acting factors that control the transcription and replication processes, there is actually a wealth of structural and dynamical information to learn in the primary DNA sequence. In this review, we show that when using concepts, methodologies, numerical and experimental techniques coming from statistical mechanics and nonlinear physics combined with wavelet-based multi-scale signal processing, we are able to decipher the multi-scale sequence encoding of chromatin condensation-decondensation mechanisms that play a fundamental role in regulating many molecular processes involved in nuclear functions.

  20. Algorithmic foundation of multi-scale spatial representation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhilin

    2006-01-01

    With the widespread use of GIS, multi-scale representation has become an important issue in the realm of spatial data handling. However, no book to date has systematically tackled the different aspects of this discipline. Emphasizing map generalization, Algorithmic Foundation of Multi-Scale Spatial Representation addresses the mathematical basis of multi-scale representation, specifically, the algorithmic foundation.Using easy-to-understand language, the author focuses on geometric transformations, with each chapter surveying a particular spatial feature. After an introduction to the essential operations required for geometric transformations as well as some mathematical and theoretical background, the book describes algorithms for a class of point features/clusters. It then examines algorithms for individual line features, such as the reduction of data points, smoothing (filtering), and scale-driven generalization, followed by a discussion of algorithms for a class of line features including contours, hydrog...

  1. Detail-Enhanced Multi-Scale Exposure Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengguo; Wei, Zhe; Wen, Changyun; Zheng, Jinghong

    2017-03-01

    Multi-scale exposure fusion is an effective image enhancement technique for a high dynamic range (HDR) scene. In this paper, a new multi-scale exposure fusion algorithm is proposed to merge differently exposed low dynamic range (LDR) images by using the weighted guided image filter to smooth the Gaussian pyramids of weight maps for all the LDR images. Details in the brightest and darkest regions of the HDR scene are preserved better by the proposed algorithm without relative brightness change in the fused image. In addition, a new weighted structure tensor is introduced to the differently exposed images and it is adopted to design a detail extraction component for the proposed fusion algorithm, such that users are allowed to manipulate fine details in the enhanced image according to their preference. The proposed multi-scale exposure fusion algorithm is also applied to design a simple single image brightening algorithm for both low-light imaging and back-light imaging.

  2. A Collaborative Informatics Infrastructure for Multi-scale Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, J D; Allison, T C; Bittner, S; Didier, B; Frenklach, M; Green, Jr., W H; Ho, Y; Hewson, J; Koegler, W; Lansing, C; Leahy, D; Lee, M; McCoy, R; Minkoff, M; Nijsure, S; von Laszewski, G; Montoya, D; Pancerella, C; Pinzon, R; Pitz, W J; Rahn, L A; Ruscis, B; Schuchardt, K; Stephan, E; Wagner, A; Windus, T; Yang, C

    2005-05-11

    The Collaboratory for Multi-scale Chemical Science (CMCS) is developing a powerful informatics-based approach to synthesizing multi-scale information to support a systems-based research approach and is applying it in support of combustion research. An open source multi-scale informatics toolkit is being developed that addresses a number of issues core to the emerging concept of knowledge grids including provenance tracking and lightweight federation of data and application resources into cross-scale information flows. The CMCS portal is currently in use by a number of high-profile pilot groups and is playing a significant role in enabling their efforts to improve and extend community maintained chemical reference information.

  3. Multi-scale magnetic field intermittence in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vörös

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that intermittent magnetic field fluctuations in the plasma sheet exhibit transitory, localized, and multi-scale features. We propose a multifractal-based algorithm, which quantifies intermittence on the basis of the statistical distribution of the "strength of burstiness", estimated within a sliding window. Interesting multi-scale phenomena observed by the Cluster spacecraft include large-scale motion of the current sheet and bursty bulk flow associated turbulence, interpreted as a cross-scale coupling (CSC process.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetotail; plasma sheet – Space plasma physics (turbulence

  4. Multi-scale magnetic field intermittence in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vörös

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that intermittent magnetic field fluctuations in the plasma sheet exhibit transitory, localized, and multi-scale features. We propose a multifractal-based algorithm, which quantifies intermittence on the basis of the statistical distribution of the "strength of burstiness", estimated within a sliding window. Interesting multi-scale phenomena observed by the Cluster spacecraft include large-scale motion of the current sheet and bursty bulk flow associated turbulence, interpreted as a cross-scale coupling (CSC process.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetotail; plasma sheet – Space plasma physics (turbulence

  5. Quantifying restoration effectiveness using multi-scale habitat models: Implications for sage-grouse in the Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert S. Arkle; David S. Pilliod; Steven E. Hanser; Matthew L. Brooks; Jeanne C. Chambers; James B. Grace; Kevin C. Knutson; David A. Pyke; Justin L. Welty; Troy A. Wirth

    2014-01-01

    A recurrent challenge in the conservation of wide-ranging, imperiled species is understanding which habitats to protect and whether we are capable of restoring degraded landscapes. For Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), a species of conservation concern in the western United States, we approached this problem by developing multi-scale empirical models of...

  6. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16

    -part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transfer—its rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long “tailing” behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to

  7. Multi-scale characterization of nanostructured sodium aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    NaraseGowda, Shathabish

    Complex metal hydrides are the most promising candidate materials for onboard hydrogen storage. The practicality of this class of materials is counter-poised on three critical attributes: reversible hydrogen storage capacity, high hydrogen uptake/release kinetics, and favorable hydrogen uptake/release thermodynamics. While a majority of modern metallic hydrides that are being considered are those that meet the criteria of high theoretical storage capacity, the challenges lie in addressing poor kinetics, thermodynamics, and reversibility. One emerging strategy to resolve these issues is via nanostructuring or nano-confinement of complex hydrides. By down-sizing and scaffolding them to retain their nano-dimensions, these materials are expected to improve in performance and reversibility. This area of research has garnered immense interest lately and there is active research being pursued to address various aspects of nanostructured complex hydrides. The research effort documented here is focused on a detailed investigation of the effects of nano-confinement on aspects such as the long range atomic hydrogen diffusivities, localized hydrogen dynamics, microstructure, and dehydrogenation mechanism of sodium alanate. A wide variety of microporous and mesoporous materials (metal organic frameworks, porous silica and alumina) were investigated as scaffolds and the synthesis routes to achieve maximum pore-loading are discussed. Wet solution infiltration technique was adopted using tetrahydrofuran as the medium and the precursor concentrations were found to have a major role in achieving maximum pore loading. These concentrations were optimized for each scaffold with varying pore sizes and confinement was quantitatively characterized by measuring the loss in specific surface area. This work is also aimed at utilizing neutron and synchrotron x-ray characterization techniques to study and correlate multi-scale material properties and phenomena. Some of the most advanced

  8. Crops In Silico: Generating Virtual Crops Using an Integrative and Multi-scale Modeling Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Colon, Amy; Long, Stephen P; Allen, Douglas K; Allen, Gabrielle; Beard, Daniel A; Benes, Bedrich; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Christensen, A J; Cox, Donna J; Hart, John C; Hirst, Peter M; Kannan, Kavya; Katz, Daniel S; Lynch, Jonathan P; Millar, Andrew J; Panneerselvam, Balaji; Price, Nathan D; Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw; Raila, David; Shekar, Rachel G; Shrivastava, Stuti; Shukla, Diwakar; Srinivasan, Venkatraman; Stitt, Mark; Turk, Matthew J; Voit, Eberhard O; Wang, Yu; Yin, Xinyou; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2017-01-01

    Multi-scale models can facilitate whole plant simulations by linking gene networks, protein synthesis, metabolic pathways, physiology, and growth. Whole plant models can be further integrated with ecosystem, weather, and climate models to predict how various interactions respond to environmental perturbations. These models have the potential to fill in missing mechanistic details and generate new hypotheses to prioritize directed engineering efforts. Outcomes will potentially accelerate improvement of crop yield, sustainability, and increase future food security. It is time for a paradigm shift in plant modeling, from largely isolated efforts to a connected community that takes advantage of advances in high performance computing and mechanistic understanding of plant processes. Tools for guiding future crop breeding and engineering, understanding the implications of discoveries at the molecular level for whole plant behavior, and improved prediction of plant and ecosystem responses to the environment are urgently needed. The purpose of this perspective is to introduce Crops in silico (cropsinsilico.org), an integrative and multi-scale modeling platform, as one solution that combines isolated modeling efforts toward the generation of virtual crops, which is open and accessible to the entire plant biology community. The major challenges involved both in the development and deployment of a shared, multi-scale modeling platform, which are summarized in this prospectus, were recently identified during the first Crops in silico Symposium and Workshop.

  9. Crops In Silico: Generating Virtual Crops Using an Integrative and Multi-scale Modeling Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Colon, Amy; Long, Stephen P.; Allen, Douglas K.; Allen, Gabrielle; Beard, Daniel A.; Benes, Bedrich; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Christensen, A. J.; Cox, Donna J.; Hart, John C.; Hirst, Peter M.; Kannan, Kavya; Katz, Daniel S.; Lynch, Jonathan P.; Millar, Andrew J.; Panneerselvam, Balaji; Price, Nathan D.; Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw; Raila, David; Shekar, Rachel G.; Shrivastava, Stuti; Shukla, Diwakar; Srinivasan, Venkatraman; Stitt, Mark; Turk, Matthew J.; Voit, Eberhard O.; Wang, Yu; Yin, Xinyou; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2017-01-01

    Multi-scale models can facilitate whole plant simulations by linking gene networks, protein synthesis, metabolic pathways, physiology, and growth. Whole plant models can be further integrated with ecosystem, weather, and climate models to predict how various interactions respond to environmental perturbations. These models have the potential to fill in missing mechanistic details and generate new hypotheses to prioritize directed engineering efforts. Outcomes will potentially accelerate improvement of crop yield, sustainability, and increase future food security. It is time for a paradigm shift in plant modeling, from largely isolated efforts to a connected community that takes advantage of advances in high performance computing and mechanistic understanding of plant processes. Tools for guiding future crop breeding and engineering, understanding the implications of discoveries at the molecular level for whole plant behavior, and improved prediction of plant and ecosystem responses to the environment are urgently needed. The purpose of this perspective is to introduce Crops in silico (cropsinsilico.org), an integrative and multi-scale modeling platform, as one solution that combines isolated modeling efforts toward the generation of virtual crops, which is open and accessible to the entire plant biology community. The major challenges involved both in the development and deployment of a shared, multi-scale modeling platform, which are summarized in this prospectus, were recently identified during the first Crops in silico Symposium and Workshop. PMID:28555150

  10. Crops In Silico: Generating Virtual Crops Using an Integrative and Multi-scale Modeling Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Marshall-Colon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-scale models can facilitate whole plant simulations by linking gene networks, protein synthesis, metabolic pathways, physiology, and growth. Whole plant models can be further integrated with ecosystem, weather, and climate models to predict how various interactions respond to environmental perturbations. These models have the potential to fill in missing mechanistic details and generate new hypotheses to prioritize directed engineering efforts. Outcomes will potentially accelerate improvement of crop yield, sustainability, and increase future food security. It is time for a paradigm shift in plant modeling, from largely isolated efforts to a connected community that takes advantage of advances in high performance computing and mechanistic understanding of plant processes. Tools for guiding future crop breeding and engineering, understanding the implications of discoveries at the molecular level for whole plant behavior, and improved prediction of plant and ecosystem responses to the environment are urgently needed. The purpose of this perspective is to introduce Crops in silico (cropsinsilico.org, an integrative and multi-scale modeling platform, as one solution that combines isolated modeling efforts toward the generation of virtual crops, which is open and accessible to the entire plant biology community. The major challenges involved both in the development and deployment of a shared, multi-scale modeling platform, which are summarized in this prospectus, were recently identified during the first Crops in silico Symposium and Workshop.

  11. Multi-scale methods for multi-component granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thornton, Anthony Richard; Weinhart, Thomas; Ogarko, V.; Luding, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we review recent progress made to understand granular chutes flow using multi-scale modeling techniques. We introduce the discrete particle method (DPM) and explain how to construct continuum fields from discrete data in a way that is consistent with the macroscopic concept of mass and

  12. Complexity of carbon market from multi-scale entropy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xinghua; Li, Shasha; Tian, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Complexity of carbon market is the consequence of economic dynamics and extreme social political events in global carbon markets. The multi-scale entropy can measure the long-term structures in the daily price return time series. By using multi-scale entropy analysis, we explore the complexity of carbon market and mean reversion trend of daily price return. The logarithmic difference of data Dec16 from August 6, 2010 to May 22, 2015 is selected as the sample. The entropy is higher in small time scale, while lower in large. The dependence of the entropy on the time scale reveals the mean reversion of carbon prices return in the long run. A relatively great fluctuation over some short time period indicates that the complexity of carbon market evolves consistently with economic development track and the events of international climate conferences.

  13. Multi-scale modeling for sustainable chemical production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Kai; Bakshi, Bhavik R.; Herrgard, Markus

    2013-01-01

    associated with the development and implementation of a su stainable biochemical industry. The temporal and spatial scales of modeling approaches for sustainable chemical production vary greatly, ranging from metabolic models that aid the design of fermentative microbial strains to material and monetary flow......, chemical industry, economy, and ecosystem. In addition, we propose a multi-scale approach for integrating the existing models into a cohesive framework. The major benefit of this proposed framework is that the design and decision-making at each scale can be informed, guided, and constrained by simulations...... and predictions at every other scale. In addition, the development of this multi-scale framework would promote cohesive collaborations across multiple traditionally disconnected modeling disciplines to achieve sustainable chemical production....

  14. Multi-Scale Computational Models for Electrical Brain Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyeon; Jun, Sung C.

    2017-01-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an appealing method to treat neurological disorders. To achieve optimal stimulation effects and a better understanding of the underlying brain mechanisms, neuroscientists have proposed computational modeling studies for a decade. Recently, multi-scale models that combine a volume conductor head model and multi-compartmental models of cortical neurons have been developed to predict stimulation effects on the macroscopic and microscopic levels more precisely. As the need for better computational models continues to increase, we overview here recent multi-scale modeling studies; we focused on approaches that coupled a simplified or high-resolution volume conductor head model and multi-compartmental models of cortical neurons, and constructed realistic fiber models using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Further implications for achieving better precision in estimating cellular responses are discussed. PMID:29123476

  15. Multi Scale Models for Flexure Deformation in Sheet Metal Forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pasquale Edmondo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of multi scale techniques to the simulation of sheet metal forming using the one-step method. When a blank flows over the die radius, it undergoes a complex cycle of bending and unbending. First, we describe an original model for the prediction of residual plastic deformation and stresses in the blank section. This model, working on a scale about one hundred times smaller than the element size, has been implemented in SIMEX, one-step sheet metal forming simulation code. The utilisation of this multi-scale modeling technique improves greatly the accuracy of the solution. Finally, we discuss the implications of this analysis on the prediction of springback in metal forming.

  16. Multi-scale hyperspectral imaging of cervical neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaojian; Zheng, Wenli; Bu, Yanggao; Chang, Shufang; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald X

    2016-06-01

    This preliminary study aimed at investigating the feasibility and effective of multi-scale hyperspectral imaging in detecting cervical neoplasia at both tissue and cellular levels. In this paper, we describe a noninvasive diagnosis method with a hyperspectral imager for detection and location of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) at multiple scales. At the macroscopic level, the hyperspectral imager was applied to capture the reflectance images of the entire cervix in vivo at a series of wavelengths. At the microscopic level, the hyperspectral imager was coupled with a microscope to collect the transmittance images of the pathological slide. The collected image data were calibrated. A wide-gap second derivative analysis was applied to differentiate CIN from other types of tissue. At both macroscopic and microscopic levels, hyperspectral imaging analysis results were consistent with those of histopathological analysis, indicating the technical feasibility of multi-scale hyperspectral imaging for cervical neoplasia detection with accuracy and efficacy. We propose a multi-scale hyperspectral imaging method for noninvasive detection of cervical neoplasia. Comparison of the imaging results with those of gold standard histologic measurements demonstrates that the hyperspectral diagnostic imaging system can distinguish CIN at both tissue and cellular levels.

  17. Multi-scale symbolic transfer entropy analysis of EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wenpo; Wang, Jun

    2017-10-01

    From both global and local perspectives, we symbolize two kinds of EEG and analyze their dynamic and asymmetrical information using multi-scale transfer entropy. Multi-scale process with scale factor from 1 to 199 and step size of 2 is applied to EEG of healthy people and epileptic patients, and then the permutation with embedding dimension of 3 and global approach are used to symbolize the sequences. The forward and reverse symbol sequences are taken as the inputs of transfer entropy. Scale factor intervals of permutation and global way are (37, 57) and (65, 85) where the two kinds of EEG have satisfied entropy distinctions. When scale factor is 67, transfer entropy of the healthy and epileptic subjects of permutation, 0.1137 and 0.1028, have biggest difference. And the corresponding values of the global symbolization is 0.0641 and 0.0601 which lies in the scale factor of 165. Research results show that permutation which takes contribution of local information has better distinction and is more effectively applied to our multi-scale transfer entropy analysis of EEG.

  18. Front-end vision and multi-scale image analysis multi-scale computer vision theory and applications, written in Mathematica

    CERN Document Server

    Romeny, Bart M Haar

    2008-01-01

    Front-End Vision and Multi-Scale Image Analysis is a tutorial in multi-scale methods for computer vision and image processing. It builds on the cross fertilization between human visual perception and multi-scale computer vision (`scale-space') theory and applications. The multi-scale strategies recognized in the first stages of the human visual system are carefully examined, and taken as inspiration for the many geometric methods discussed. All chapters are written in Mathematica, a spectacular high-level language for symbolic and numerical manipulations. The book presents a new and effective

  19. Fast Decentralized Averaging via Multi-scale Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsianos, Konstantinos I.; Rabbat, Michael G.

    We are interested in the problem of computing the average consensus in a distributed fashion on random geometric graphs. We describe a new algorithm called Multi-scale Gossip which employs a hierarchical decomposition of the graph to partition the computation into tractable sub-problems. Using only pairwise messages of fixed size that travel at most O(n^{1/3}) hops, our algorithm is robust and has communication cost of O(n loglogn logɛ - 1) transmissions, which is order-optimal up to the logarithmic factor in n. Simulated experiments verify the good expected performance on graphs of many thousands of nodes.

  20. Multi-scale structural similarity index for motion detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdel-Salam Nasr

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The most recent approach for measuring the image quality is the structural similarity index (SSI. This paper presents a novel algorithm based on the multi-scale structural similarity index for motion detection (MS-SSIM in videos. The MS-SSIM approach is based on modeling of image luminance, contrast and structure at multiple scales. The MS-SSIM has resulted in much better performance than the single scale SSI approach but at the cost of relatively lower processing speed. The major advantages of the presented algorithm are both: the higher detection accuracy and the quasi real-time processing speed.

  1. Enamel and dentin as multi-scale bio-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Benny; Daniel Wagner, H

    2012-08-01

    Dentin and enamel are viewed here as multi-scale composites comprising a staggered micro-structure made of stiff platelets embedded in a more compliant matrix, and further assembled into macroscopic composite-like structures. Mechanical models are formulated for both tissues and their effective moduli are evaluated analytically. The resulting predictions are in very good agreement with Finite Elements (FE) simulations and experimental data from the literature. The models developed in this study demonstrate the possibility, in certain cases, to generate special mechanical effects linked to the structural complexity of these tissues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Toward multi-scale computational modeling in developmental disability research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammann, O; Follett, P

    2011-06-01

    The field of theoretical neuroscience is gaining increasing recognition. Virtually all areas of neuroscience offer potential linkage points for computational work. In developmental neuroscience, main areas of research are neural development and connectivity, and connectionist modeling of cognitive development. In this paper, we suggest that computational models can be helpful tools for understanding the pathogenesis and consequences of perinatal brain damage and subsequent developmental disability. In particular, designing multi-scale computational models should be considered by developmental neuroscientists interested in helping reduce the risk for developmental disabilities. Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New york.

  3. Strong, Multi-Scale Heterogeneity in Earth's Lowermost Mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Young, Mallory; Muir, Jack B; Davies, D Rhodri; Mattesini, Maurizio

    2015-12-17

    The core mantle boundary (CMB) separates Earth's liquid iron outer core from the solid but slowly convecting mantle. The detailed structure and dynamics of the mantle within ~300 km of this interface remain enigmatic: it is a complex region, which exhibits thermal, compositional and phase-related heterogeneity, isolated pockets of partial melt and strong variations in seismic velocity and anisotropy. Nonetheless, characterising the structure of this region is crucial to a better understanding of the mantle's thermo-chemical evolution and the nature of core-mantle interactions. In this study, we examine the heterogeneity spectrum from a recent P-wave tomographic model, which is based upon trans-dimensional and hierarchical Bayesian imaging. Our tomographic technique avoids explicit model parameterization, smoothing and damping. Spectral analyses reveal a multi-scale wavelength content and a power of heterogeneity that is three times larger than previous estimates. Inter alia, the resulting heterogeneity spectrum gives a more complete picture of the lowermost mantle and provides a bridge between the long-wavelength features obtained in global S-wave models and the short-scale dimensions of seismic scatterers. The evidence that we present for strong, multi-scale lowermost mantle heterogeneity has important implications for the nature of lower mantle dynamics and prescribes complex boundary conditions for Earth's geodynamo.

  4. Multi-scale window specification over streaming trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas Patroumpas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Enormous amounts of positional information are collected by monitoring applications in domains such as fleet management, cargo transport, wildlife protection, etc. With the advent of modern location-based services, processing such data mostly focuses on providing real-time response to a variety of user requests in continuous and scalable fashion. An important class of such queries concerns evolving trajectories that continuously trace the streaming locations of moving objects, like GPS-equipped vehicles, commodities with RFID's, people with smartphones etc. In this work, we propose an advanced windowing operator that enables online, incremental examination of recent motion paths at multiple resolutions for numerous point entities. When applied against incoming positions, this window can abstract trajectories at coarser representations towards the past, while retaining progressively finer features closer to the present. We explain the semantics of such multi-scale sliding windows through parameterized functions that reflect the sequential nature of trajectories and can effectively capture their spatiotemporal properties. Such window specification goes beyond its usual role for non-blocking processing of multiple concurrent queries. Actually, it can offer concrete subsequences from each trajectory, thus preserving continuity in time and contiguity in space along the respective segments. Further, we suggest language extensions in order to express characteristic spatiotemporal queries using windows. Finally, we discuss algorithms for nested maintenance of multi-scale windows and evaluate their efficiency against streaming positional data, offering empirical evidence of their benefits to online trajectory processing.

  5. Multi-scale modeling for sustainable chemical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Kai; Bakshi, Bhavik R; Herrgård, Markus J

    2013-09-01

    With recent advances in metabolic engineering, it is now technically possible to produce a wide portfolio of existing petrochemical products from biomass feedstock. In recent years, a number of modeling approaches have been developed to support the engineering and decision-making processes associated with the development and implementation of a sustainable biochemical industry. The temporal and spatial scales of modeling approaches for sustainable chemical production vary greatly, ranging from metabolic models that aid the design of fermentative microbial strains to material and monetary flow models that explore the ecological impacts of all economic activities. Research efforts that attempt to connect the models at different scales have been limited. Here, we review a number of existing modeling approaches and their applications at the scales of metabolism, bioreactor, overall process, chemical industry, economy, and ecosystem. In addition, we propose a multi-scale approach for integrating the existing models into a cohesive framework. The major benefit of this proposed framework is that the design and decision-making at each scale can be informed, guided, and constrained by simulations and predictions at every other scale. In addition, the development of this multi-scale framework would promote cohesive collaborations across multiple traditionally disconnected modeling disciplines to achieve sustainable chemical production. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. COLLABORATIVE MULTI-SCALE 3D CITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE MODELING AND SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Breunig

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer-aided collaborative and multi-scale 3D planning are challenges for complex railway and subway track infrastructure projects in the built environment. Many legal, economic, environmental, and structural requirements have to be taken into account. The stringent use of 3D models in the different phases of the planning process facilitates communication and collaboration between the stake holders such as civil engineers, geological engineers, and decision makers. This paper presents concepts, developments, and experiences gained by an interdisciplinary research group coming from civil engineering informatics and geo-informatics banding together skills of both, the Building Information Modeling and the 3D GIS world. New approaches including the development of a collaborative platform and 3D multi-scale modelling are proposed for collaborative planning and simulation to improve the digital 3D planning of subway tracks and other infrastructures. Experiences during this research and lessons learned are presented as well as an outlook on future research focusing on Building Information Modeling and 3D GIS applications for cities of the future.

  7. Collaborative Multi-Scale 3d City and Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, M.; Borrmann, A.; Rank, E.; Hinz, S.; Kolbe, T.; Schilcher, M.; Mundani, R.-P.; Jubierre, J. R.; Flurl, M.; Thomsen, A.; Donaubauer, A.; Ji, Y.; Urban, S.; Laun, S.; Vilgertshofer, S.; Willenborg, B.; Menninghaus, M.; Steuer, H.; Wursthorn, S.; Leitloff, J.; Al-Doori, M.; Mazroobsemnani, N.

    2017-09-01

    Computer-aided collaborative and multi-scale 3D planning are challenges for complex railway and subway track infrastructure projects in the built environment. Many legal, economic, environmental, and structural requirements have to be taken into account. The stringent use of 3D models in the different phases of the planning process facilitates communication and collaboration between the stake holders such as civil engineers, geological engineers, and decision makers. This paper presents concepts, developments, and experiences gained by an interdisciplinary research group coming from civil engineering informatics and geo-informatics banding together skills of both, the Building Information Modeling and the 3D GIS world. New approaches including the development of a collaborative platform and 3D multi-scale modelling are proposed for collaborative planning and simulation to improve the digital 3D planning of subway tracks and other infrastructures. Experiences during this research and lessons learned are presented as well as an outlook on future research focusing on Building Information Modeling and 3D GIS applications for cities of the future.

  8. Computer-aided detection of human cone photoreceptor inner segments using multi-scale circular voting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianfei; Dubra, Alfredo; Tam, Johnny

    2016-03-01

    Cone photoreceptors are highly specialized cells responsible for the origin of vision in the human eye. Their inner segments can be noninvasively visualized using adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopes (AOSLOs) with nonconfocal split detection capabilities. Monitoring the number of cones can lead to more precise metrics for real-time diagnosis and assessment of disease progression. Cell identification in split detection AOSLO images is hindered by cell regions with heterogeneous intensity arising from shadowing effects and low contrast boundaries due to overlying blood vessels. Here, we present a multi-scale circular voting approach to overcome these challenges through the novel combination of: 1) iterative circular voting to identify candidate cells based on their circular structures, 2) a multi-scale strategy to identify the optimal circular voting response, and 3) clustering to improve robustness while removing false positives. We acquired images from three healthy subjects at various locations on the retina and manually labeled cell locations to create ground-truth for evaluating the detection accuracy. The images span a large range of cell densities. The overall recall, precision, and F1 score were 91±4%, 84±10%, and 87±7% (Mean±SD). Results showed that our method for the identification of cone photoreceptor inner segments performs well even with low contrast cell boundaries and vessel obscuration. These encouraging results demonstrate that the proposed approach can robustly and accurately identify cells in split detection AOSLO images.

  9. Multi-scale Dynamical Processes in Space and Astrophysical Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Vörös, Zoltán; IAFA 2011 - International Astrophysics Forum 2011 : Frontiers in Space Environment Research

    2012-01-01

    Magnetized plasmas in the universe exhibit complex dynamical behavior over a huge range of scales. The fundamental mechanisms of energy transport, redistribution and conversion occur at multiple scales. The driving mechanisms often include energy accumulation, free-energy-excited relaxation processes, dissipation and self-organization. The plasma processes associated with energy conversion, transport and self-organization, such as magnetic reconnection, instabilities, linear and nonlinear waves, wave-particle interactions, dynamo processes, turbulence, heating, diffusion and convection represent fundamental physical effects. They demonstrate similar dynamical behavior in near-Earth space, on the Sun, in the heliosphere and in astrophysical environments. 'Multi-scale Dynamical Processes in Space and Astrophysical Plasmas' presents the proceedings of the International Astrophysics Forum Alpbach 2011. The contributions discuss the latest advances in the exploration of dynamical behavior in space plasmas environm...

  10. Multi-scale evaluations of submarine groundwater discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Taniguchi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-scale evaluations of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD have been made in Saijo, Ehime Prefecture, Shikoku Island, Japan, by using seepage meters for point scale, 222Rn tracer for point and coastal scales, and a numerical groundwater model (SEAWAT for coastal and basin scales. Daily basis temporal changes in SGD are evaluated by continuous seepage meter and 222Rn mooring measurements, and depend on sea level changes. Spatial evaluations of SGD were also made by 222Rn along the coast in July 2010 and November 2011. The area with larger 222Rn concentration during both seasons agreed well with the area with larger SGD calculated by 3D groundwater numerical simulations.

  11. Multi-Scale Dissemination of Time Series Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qingsong; Zhou, Yongluan; Su, Li

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of continuous dissemination of time series data, such as sensor measurements, to a large number of subscribers. These subscribers fall into multiple subscription levels, where each subscription level is specified by the bandwidth constraint of a subscriber......, which is an abstract indicator for both the physical limits and the amount of data that the subscriber would like to handle. To handle this problem, we propose a system framework for multi-scale time series data dissemination that employs a typical tree-based dissemination network and existing time......-series compression models. Due to the bandwidth limits regarding to potentially sheer speed of data, it is inevitable to compress and re-compress data along the dissemination paths according to the subscription level of each node. Compression would caused the accuracy loss of data, thus we devise several algorithms...

  12. An efficient multi-scale Green's function reaction dynamics scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbailò, Luigi; Noé, Frank

    2017-11-14

    Molecular Dynamics-Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (MD-GFRD) is a multiscale simulation method for particle dynamics or particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics that is suited for systems involving low particle densities. Particles in a low-density region are just diffusing and not interacting. In this case, one can avoid the costly integration of microscopic equations of motion, such as molecular dynamics (MD), and instead turn to an event-based scheme in which the times to the next particle interaction and the new particle positions at that time can be sampled. At high (local) concentrations, however, e.g., when particles are interacting in a nontrivial way, particle positions must still be updated with small time steps of the microscopic dynamical equations. The efficiency of a multi-scale simulation that uses these two schemes largely depends on the coupling between them and the decisions when to switch between the two scales. Here we present an efficient scheme for multi-scale MD-GFRD simulations. It has been shown that MD-GFRD schemes are more efficient than brute-force molecular dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 102 μM. In this paper, we show that the choice of the propagation domains has a relevant impact on the computational performance. Domains are constructed using a local optimization of their sizes and a minimal domain size is proposed. The algorithm is shown to be more efficient than brute-force Brownian dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 103 μM and is up to an order of magnitude more efficient compared with previous MD-GFRD schemes.

  13. An efficient multi-scale Green's function reaction dynamics scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbailò, Luigi; Noé, Frank

    2017-11-01

    Molecular Dynamics-Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (MD-GFRD) is a multiscale simulation method for particle dynamics or particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics that is suited for systems involving low particle densities. Particles in a low-density region are just diffusing and not interacting. In this case, one can avoid the costly integration of microscopic equations of motion, such as molecular dynamics (MD), and instead turn to an event-based scheme in which the times to the next particle interaction and the new particle positions at that time can be sampled. At high (local) concentrations, however, e.g., when particles are interacting in a nontrivial way, particle positions must still be updated with small time steps of the microscopic dynamical equations. The efficiency of a multi-scale simulation that uses these two schemes largely depends on the coupling between them and the decisions when to switch between the two scales. Here we present an efficient scheme for multi-scale MD-GFRD simulations. It has been shown that MD-GFRD schemes are more efficient than brute-force molecular dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 102 μM. In this paper, we show that the choice of the propagation domains has a relevant impact on the computational performance. Domains are constructed using a local optimization of their sizes and a minimal domain size is proposed. The algorithm is shown to be more efficient than brute-force Brownian dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 103 μM and is up to an order of magnitude more efficient compared with previous MD-GFRD schemes.

  14. Multi-scale structures of turbulent magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T. K. M., E-mail: takuma.nakamura@oeaw.ac.at; Nakamura, R.; Narita, Y.; Baumjohann, W. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz 8042 (Austria); Daughton, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We have analyzed data from a series of 3D fully kinetic simulations of turbulent magnetic reconnection with a guide field. A new concept of the guide filed reconnection process has recently been proposed, in which the secondary tearing instability and the resulting formation of oblique, small scale flux ropes largely disturb the structure of the primary reconnection layer and lead to 3D turbulent features [W. Daughton et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 539 (2011)]. In this paper, we further investigate the multi-scale physics in this turbulent, guide field reconnection process by introducing a wave number band-pass filter (k-BPF) technique in which modes for the small scale (less than ion scale) fluctuations and the background large scale (more than ion scale) variations are separately reconstructed from the wave number domain to the spatial domain in the inverse Fourier transform process. Combining with the Fourier based analyses in the wave number domain, we successfully identify spatial and temporal development of the multi-scale structures in the turbulent reconnection process. When considering a strong guide field, the small scale tearing mode and the resulting flux ropes develop over a specific range of oblique angles mainly along the edge of the primary ion scale flux ropes and reconnection separatrix. The rapid merging of these small scale modes leads to a smooth energy spectrum connecting ion and electron scales. When the guide field is sufficiently weak, the background current sheet is strongly kinked and oblique angles for the small scale modes are widely scattered at the kinked regions. Similar approaches handling both the wave number and spatial domains will be applicable to the data from multipoint, high-resolution spacecraft observations such as the NASA magnetospheric multiscale (MMS) mission.

  15. Extremes and bursts in complex multi-scale plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, N. W.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2012-04-01

    Quantifying the spectrum of sizes and durations of large and/or long-lived fluctuations in complex, multi-scale, space plasmas is a topic of both theoretical and practical importance. The predictions of inherently multi-scale physical theories such as MHD turbulence have given one direct stimulus for its investigation. There are also space weather implications to an improved ability to assess the likelihood of an extreme fluctuation of a given size. Our intuition as scientists tends to be formed on the familiar Gaussian "normal" distribution, which has a very low likelihood of extreme fluctuations. Perhaps surprisingly, there is both theoretical and observational evidence that favours non-Gaussian, heavier-tailed, probability distributions for some space physics datasets. Additionally there is evidence for the existence of long-ranged memory between the values of fluctuations. In this talk I will show how such properties can be captured in a preliminary way by a self-similar, fractal model. I will show how such a fractal model can be used to make predictions for experimental accessible quantities like the size and duration of a buurst (a sequence of values that exceed a given threshold), or the survival probability of a burst [c.f. preliminary results in Watkins et al, PRE, 2009]. In real-world time series scaling behaviour need not be "mild" enough to be captured by a single self-similarity exponent H, but might instead require a "wild" multifractal spectrum of scaling exponents [e.g. Rypdal and Rypdal, JGR, 2011; Moloney and Davidsen, JGR, 2011] to give a complete description. I will discuss preliminary work on extending the burst approach into the multifractal domain [see also Watkins et al, chapter in press for AGU Chapman Conference on Complexity and Extreme Events in the Geosciences, Hyderabad].

  16. Multi-scale Mechanical Characterization of Highly Swollen Photo-activated Collagen Hydrogels

    CERN Document Server

    Tronci, Giuseppe; Thomson, Neil H; Russell, Stephen J; Wood, David J

    2014-01-01

    Biological hydrogels have been increasingly sought after as e.g. wound dressings or scaffolds for regenerative medicine, due to their inherent biofunctionality in biological environments. Especially in moist wound healing, the ideal material should absorb large amounts of wound exudate whilst remaining mechanically competent in-situ. Despite their large hydration, however, current biological hydrogels still leave much to be desired in terms of mechanical properties in physiological conditions. To address this challenge, a multi-scale approach is presented for the synthetic design of cyto-compatible collagen hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties (from nano- up to the macro-scale), uniquely high swelling ratios and retained (>70%) triple-helical features. Type I collagen was covalently functionalized with three different monomers, i.e. 4 vinylbenzyl chloride, glycidyl methacrylate and methacrylic anhydride, respectively. Backbone rigidity, hydrogen-bonding capability and degree of functionalization (F: 1...

  17. OBJECT-ORIENTED CHANGE DETECTION BASED ON MULTI-SCALE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Jia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The change detection of remote sensing images means analysing the change information quantitatively and recognizing the change types of the surface coverage data in different time phases. With the appearance of high resolution remote sensing image, object-oriented change detection method arises at this historic moment. In this paper, we research multi-scale approach for high resolution images, which includes multi-scale segmentation, multi-scale feature selection and multi-scale classification. Experimental results show that this method has a stronger advantage than the traditional single-scale method of high resolution remote sensing image change detection.

  18. Multi-scale atmospheric composition modelling for the Balkan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganev, Kostadin; Syrakov, Dimiter; Todorova, Angelina; Prodanova, Maria; Atanasov, Emanouil; Gurov, Todor; Karaivanova, Aneta; Miloshev, Nikolai; Gadzhev, Georgi; Jordanov, Georgi

    2010-05-01

    Overview The present work describes the progress in developing of an integrated, multi-scale Balkan region oriented modeling system. The main activities and achievements at this stage of the work are: Creating, enriching and updating the necessary physiographic, emission and meteorological data bases; Installation of the models for GRID application, model tuning and validation; Extensive numerical simulations on regional (Balkan Peninsula) and local (Bulgaria) scales. Objevtives: The present work describes the progress of an application developed by the Environmental VO of the 7FP project SEE-GRID eInfrastructure for regional eScience. The application aims at developing of an integrated, multi-scale Balkan region oriented modelling system, which would be able to: -Study the atmospheric pollution transport and transformation processes (accounting also for heterogeneous chemistry and the importance of aerosols for air quality and climate) from urban to local to regional (Balkan) scales; -Track and characterize the main pathways and processes that lead to atmospheric composition formation in different scales; -Account for the biosphere-atmosphere exchange as a source and receptor of atmospheric chemical species; -Provide high quality scientifically robust assessments of the air quality and its origin, thus facilitating formulation of pollution mitigation strategies at national and Balkan level. The application is based on US EPA Models-3 system. Description of work: The main activities and achievements at this still preparatory stage of the work are: 1.) Creating, enriching and updating the necessary physiographic, emission and meteorological data bases 2.) Installation of the models for GRID application, model tuning and validation, numerical experiments and interpretation of the results: The US EPA Models 3 system is installed; software for emission speciation and for introducing emission temporal profiles is created, a procedure for calculating biogenic VOC

  19. Multi-scale modeling of the CD8 immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarroux, Loic; Michel, Philippe; Adimy, Mostafa; Crauste, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    During the primary CD8 T-Cell immune response to an intracellular pathogen, CD8 T-Cells undergo exponential proliferation and continuous differentiation, acquiring cytotoxic capabilities to address the infection and memorize the corresponding antigen. After cleaning the organism, the only CD8 T-Cells left are antigen-specific memory cells whose role is to respond stronger and faster in case they are presented this very same antigen again. That is how vaccines work: a small quantity of a weakened pathogen is introduced in the organism to trigger the primary response, generating corresponding memory cells in the process, giving the organism a way to defend himself in case it encounters the same pathogen again. To investigate this process, we propose a non linear, multi-scale mathematical model of the CD8 T-Cells immune response due to vaccination using a maturity structured partial differential equation. At the intracellular scale, the level of expression of key proteins is modeled by a delay differential equation system, which gives the speeds of maturation for each cell. The population of cells is modeled by a maturity structured equation whose speeds are given by the intracellular model. We focus here on building the model, as well as its asymptotic study. Finally, we display numerical simulations showing the model can reproduce the biological dynamics of the cell population for both the primary response and the secondary responses.

  20. Multi-Scale Investigation of Sheared Flows In Magnetized Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward, Jr., Thomas [Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL (United States)

    2014-09-19

    Flows parallel and perpendicular to magnetic fields in a plasma are important phenomena in many areas of plasma science research. The presence of these spatially inhomogeneous flows is often associated with the stability of the plasma. In fusion plasmas, these sheared flows can be stabilizing while in space plasmas, these sheared flows can be destabilizing. Because of this, there is broad interest in understanding the coupling between plasma stability and plasma flows. This research project has engaged in a study of the plasma response to spatially inhomogeneous plasma flows using three different experimental devices: the Auburn Linear Experiment for Instability Studies (ALEXIS) and the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) stellarator devices at Auburn University, and the Space Plasma Simulation Chamber (SPSC) at the Naval Research Laboratory. This work has shown that there is a commonality of the plasma response to sheared flows across a wide range of plasma parameters and magnetic field geometries. The goal of this multi-device, multi-scale project is to understand how sheared flows established by the same underlying physical mechanisms lead to different plasma responses in fusion, laboratory, and space plasmas.

  1. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling system with unified physics has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The system consists of an MMF, the coupled NASA Goddard finite-volume GCM (fvGCM) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE, a CRM); the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the stand alone GCE. These models can share the same microphysical schemes, radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models that have been developed, improved and tested for different environments. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on the impact of the aerosol on deep precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications). We are also performing the inline tracer calculation to comprehend the physical processes (i.e., boundary layer and each quadrant in the boundary layer) related to the development and structure of hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems. In addition, high - resolution (spatial. 2km, and temporal, I minute) visualization showing the model results will be presented.

  2. Development of Multi-Scale Temporal Coupling Methods for XGC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdevant, Benjamin; Parker, Scott; Hager, Robert; Chang, Choong-Seock; Dominski, Julien; Ku, Seung-Hoe

    2017-10-01

    The development of multi-scale time integration methods for XGC is reported, including a recent implementation of an equation-free algorithm for XGCa. In this work, XGCa is used to evolve a 4D distribution function over short time intervals. The distribution function is then restricted to a set of low-order fluid moments, which are projected over a large time step. Finally, the fluid moments are transformed back to a fine-scale 4D distribution function to restart the simulation at the next time step. By enabling the use of a time step size much larger than in standard PIC methods, this algorithm has promise for large computational savings in transport time scale simulations. For the tokamak edge, however, the use of low-order fluid moments is inadequate, since the distribution function can be far from Maxwellian. In this case, coupling between a fine-scale kinetic code and a coarse-scale kinetic code is of interest. A key tool for accurate kinetic-kinetic coupling is particle resampling. Recent methods for particle resampling have been developed which accurately preserve low-order velocity moments and local features of a kinetic distribution function. We include plans to further develop this work for kinetic-kinetic coupling.

  3. Proximity graphs based multi-scale image segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skurikhin, Alexei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel multi-scale image segmentation approach based on irregular triangular and polygonal tessellations produced by proximity graphs. Our approach consists of two separate stages: polygonal seeds generation followed by an iterative bottom-up polygon agglomeration into larger chunks. We employ constrained Delaunay triangulation combined with the principles known from the visual perception to extract an initial ,irregular polygonal tessellation of the image. These initial polygons are built upon a triangular mesh composed of irregular sized triangles and their shapes are ad'apted to the image content. We then represent the image as a graph with vertices corresponding to the polygons and edges reflecting polygon relations. The segmentation problem is then formulated as Minimum Spanning Tree extraction. We build a successive fine-to-coarse hierarchy of irregular polygonal grids by an iterative graph contraction constructing Minimum Spanning Tree. The contraction uses local information and merges the polygons bottom-up based on local region-and edge-based characteristics.

  4. Intrinsic Multi-Scale Dynamic Behaviors of Complex Financial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Fang-Yan; Zheng, Bo; Jiang, Xiong-Fei

    2015-01-01

    The empirical mode decomposition is applied to analyze the intrinsic multi-scale dynamic behaviors of complex financial systems. In this approach, the time series of the price returns of each stock is decomposed into a small number of intrinsic mode functions, which represent the price motion from high frequency to low frequency. These intrinsic mode functions are then grouped into three modes, i.e., the fast mode, medium mode and slow mode. The probability distribution of returns and auto-correlation of volatilities for the fast and medium modes exhibit similar behaviors as those of the full time series, i.e., these characteristics are rather robust in multi time scale. However, the cross-correlation between individual stocks and the return-volatility correlation are time scale dependent. The structure of business sectors is mainly governed by the fast mode when returns are sampled at a couple of days, while by the medium mode when returns are sampled at dozens of days. More importantly, the leverage and anti-leverage effects are dominated by the medium mode. PMID:26427063

  5. A multi-scale strength model with phase transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, N.; Arsenlis, A.; Rhee, M.; Marian, J.; Bernier, J.; Tang, M.; Yang, L.

    2011-06-01

    We present a multi-scale strength model that includes phase transformation. In each phase, strength depends on pressure, strain rate, temperature, and evolving dislocation density descriptors. A donor cell type of approach is used for the transfer of dislocation density between phases. While the shear modulus can be modeled as smooth through the BCC to rhombohedral transformation in vanadium, the multi-phase strength model predicts abrupt changes in the material strength due to changes in dislocation kinetics. In the rhombohedral phase, the dislocation density is decomposed into populations associated with short and long Burgers vectors. Strength model construction employs an information passing paradigm to span from the atomistic level to the continuum level. Simulation methods in the overall hierarchy include density functional theory, molecular statics, molecular dynamics, dislocation dynamics, and continuum based approaches. We demonstrate the behavior of the model through simulations of Rayleigh Taylor instability growth experiments of the type used to assess material strength at high pressure and strain rate. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL-ABS-464695).

  6. Multi-scale modeling of the CD8 immune response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbarroux, Loic, E-mail: loic.barbarroux@doctorant.ec-lyon.fr [Inria, Université de Lyon, UMR 5208, Institut Camille Jordan (France); Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Michel, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.michel@ec-lyon.fr [Inria, Université de Lyon, UMR 5208, Institut Camille Jordan (France); Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Adimy, Mostafa, E-mail: mostafa.adimy@inria.fr [Inria, Université de Lyon, UMR 5208, Université Lyon 1, Institut Camille Jordan, 43 Bd. du 11 novembre 1918, F-69200 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Crauste, Fabien, E-mail: crauste@math.univ-lyon1.fr [Inria, Université de Lyon, UMR 5208, Université Lyon 1, Institut Camille Jordan, 43 Bd. du 11 novembre 1918, F-69200 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2016-06-08

    During the primary CD8 T-Cell immune response to an intracellular pathogen, CD8 T-Cells undergo exponential proliferation and continuous differentiation, acquiring cytotoxic capabilities to address the infection and memorize the corresponding antigen. After cleaning the organism, the only CD8 T-Cells left are antigen-specific memory cells whose role is to respond stronger and faster in case they are presented this very same antigen again. That is how vaccines work: a small quantity of a weakened pathogen is introduced in the organism to trigger the primary response, generating corresponding memory cells in the process, giving the organism a way to defend himself in case it encounters the same pathogen again. To investigate this process, we propose a non linear, multi-scale mathematical model of the CD8 T-Cells immune response due to vaccination using a maturity structured partial differential equation. At the intracellular scale, the level of expression of key proteins is modeled by a delay differential equation system, which gives the speeds of maturation for each cell. The population of cells is modeled by a maturity structured equation whose speeds are given by the intracellular model. We focus here on building the model, as well as its asymptotic study. Finally, we display numerical simulations showing the model can reproduce the biological dynamics of the cell population for both the primary response and the secondary responses.

  7. Biology meets physics: Reductionism and multi-scale modeling of morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sara; Batterman, Robert

    2017-02-01

    A common reductionist assumption is that macro-scale behaviors can be described "bottom-up" if only sufficient details about lower-scale processes are available. The view that an "ideal" or "fundamental" physics would be sufficient to explain all macro-scale phenomena has been met with criticism from philosophers of biology. Specifically, scholars have pointed to the impossibility of deducing biological explanations from physical ones, and to the irreducible nature of distinctively biological processes such as gene regulation and evolution. This paper takes a step back in asking whether bottom-up modeling is feasible even when modeling simple physical systems across scales. By comparing examples of multi-scale modeling in physics and biology, we argue that the "tyranny of scales" problem presents a challenge to reductive explanations in both physics and biology. The problem refers to the scale-dependency of physical and biological behaviors that forces researchers to combine different models relying on different scale-specific mathematical strategies and boundary conditions. Analyzing the ways in which different models are combined in multi-scale modeling also has implications for the relation between physics and biology. Contrary to the assumption that physical science approaches provide reductive explanations in biology, we exemplify how inputs from physics often reveal the importance of macro-scale models and explanations. We illustrate this through an examination of the role of biomechanical modeling in developmental biology. In such contexts, the relation between models at different scales and from different disciplines is neither reductive nor completely autonomous, but interdependent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multi scale Disaster Risk Reduction Systems Space and Community based Experiences over HKH Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, D. R.; Shrestha, M.; Shrestha, N.; Debnath, B.; Jishi, G.; Bajracharya, R.; Dhonju, H. K.; Pradhan, S.

    2014-11-01

    An increasing trend in the recurrence of natural disasters and associated impacts due to Floods, Glacier Lake out bursts, landslides and forest fire is reported over Hindu Kush Himalyan (HKH) region. Climate change and anthropogenic coupled factors are identified as primary factors for such increased vulnerability. The large degree of poverty, lack of infrastructure, poor accessibility and uncertainties involved in understanding high altitude land surface and climate dynamics poses serious challenges in reducing disaster vulnerability and mitigating disaster impacts. In this context effective development of Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) protocols and mechanisms have been realized as an urgent need. The paper presents the adoption and experiences of multi scale DRR systems across different Himalayan member countries ranging from community based indigenous early warning to space based emergency response and decision support systems. The Establishment of a Regional Flood Information System (HKH-HYCOS) over Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) and Indus river basins promoted the timely exchange of flood data and information for the reduction of flood vulnerability within and among the participating countries. Satellite based forest fire alert systems evoked significant response among diverse stakeholders to optimize fire incidence and control. Satellite rainfall estimation products, satellite altimetry based flood early warning systems, flood inundation modelling and products, model derived hydrology flow products from different global data-sharing networks constitutes diverse information to support multi scale DRR systems. Community-based Flood Early Warning System (FEWS) enabled by wireless technology established over the Singara and Jiadhal rivers in Assam also stands as one of the promising examples of minimizing flood risk. Disaster database and information system and decision support tools in Nepal serves as potential tool to support diverse stakeholders.

  9. Mapping transient hyperventilation induced alterations with estimates of the multi-scale dynamics of BOLD signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesa J Kiviniemi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporal blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD contrast signals in functional MRI during rest may be characterized by power spectral distribution (PSD trends of the form 1/f α. Trends with 1/f characteristics comprise fractal properties with repeating oscillation patterns in multiple time scales. Estimates of the fractal properties enable the quantification of phenomena that may otherwise be difficult to measure, such as transient, non-linear changes. In this study it was hypothesized that the fractal metrics of 1/f BOLD signal trends can map changes related to dynamic, multi-scale alterations in cerebral blood flow (CBF after a transient hyperventilation challenge. Twenty-three normal adults were imaged in a resting-state before and after hyperventilation. Different variables (1/f trend constant α, fractal dimension Df, and, Hurst exponent H characterizing the trends were measured from BOLD signals. The results show that fractal metrics of the BOLD signal follow the fractional Gaussian noise model, even during the dynamic CBF change that follows hyperventilation. The most dominant effect on the fractal metrics was detected in grey matter, in line with previous hyperventilation vaso-reactivity studies. The α was able to differentiate also blood vessels from grey matter changes. Df was most sensitive to grey matter. H correlated with default mode network areas before hyperventilation but this pattern vanished after hyperventilation due to a global increase in H. In the future, resting-state fMRI combined with fractal metrics of the BOLD signal may be used for analyzing multi-scale alterations of cerebral blood flow.

  10. Application of computer-aided multi-scale modelling framework - Aerosol case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitzig, Martina; Gregson, Christopher; Sin, Gürkan

    2011-01-01

    A computer-aided modelling tool for efficient multi-scale modelling has been developed and is applied to solve a multi-scale modelling problem related to design and evaluation of fragrance aerosol products. The developed modelling scenario spans three length scales and describes how droplets...

  11. Bridging the PSI Knowledge Gap: A Multi-Scale Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-01-08

    Plasma-surface interactions (PSI) pose an immense scientific hurdle in magnetic confinement fusion and our present understanding of PSI in confinement environments is highly inadequate; indeed, a recent Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee report found that 4 out of the 5 top five fusion knowledge gaps were related to PSI. The time is appropriate to develop a concentrated and synergistic science effort that would expand, exploit and integrate the wealth of laboratory ion-beam and plasma research, as well as exciting new computational tools, towards the goal of bridging the PSI knowledge gap. This effort would broadly advance plasma and material sciences, while providing critical knowledge towards progress in fusion PSI. This project involves the development of a Science Center focused on a new approach to PSI science; an approach that both exploits access to state-of-the-art PSI experiments and modeling, as well as confinement devices. The organizing principle is to develop synergistic experimental and modeling tools that treat the truly coupled multi-scale aspect of the PSI issues in confinement devices. This is motivated by the simple observation that while typical lab experiments and models allow independent manipulation of controlling variables, the confinement PSI environment is essentially self-determined with few outside controls. This means that processes that may be treated independently in laboratory experiments, because they involve vastly different physical and time scales, will now affect one another in the confinement environment. Also, lab experiments cannot simultaneously match all exposure conditions found in confinement devices typically forcing a linear extrapolation of lab results. At the same time programmatic limitations prevent confinement experiments alone from answering many key PSI questions. The resolution to this problem is to usefully exploit access to PSI science in lab devices, while retooling our thinking from a linear and de

  12. Multi-scale photoacoustic remote sensing (PARS) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji Reza, Parsin; Bell, Kevan; Shi, W.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a novel multi-scale photoacoustic remote sensing (PARS) imaging system. Our system can provide optical resolution details for superficial structures as well as acoustic resolution for deep-tissue imaging down to 5 cm, in a non-contact setting. PARS system does not require any contact with the sample or ultrasound coupling medium. The optical resolution PARS (OR-OARS) system uses optically focused pulsed excitation with optical detection of photoacoustic signatures using a long-coherence interrogation beam co-focused and co-scanned with the excitation spot. In the OR-PARS initial pressures are sampled right at their subsurface origin where acoustic pressures are largest. The Acoustic resolution PARS (AR-PARS) picks up the surface oscillation of the tissue caused by generated photoacoustic signal using a modified version of Michelson interferometry. By taking advantage of 4-meters polarization maintaining single-mode fiber and a green fiber laser we have generated a multi-wavelength source using stimulated Raman scattering. Remote functional imaging using this multi-wavelength excitation source and PARS detection mechanism has been demonstrated. The oxygen saturation estimations are shown for both phantom and in vivo studies. Images of blood vessel structures for an In vivo chicken embryo model is demonstrated. The Phantom studies indicates ~3µm and ~300µm lateral resolution for OR-PARS and AR-PARS respectively. To the best of our knowledge this is the first dual modality non-contact optical and acoustic resolution system used for in vivo imaging.

  13. Interactions of multi-scale heterogeneity in the lithosphere: Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, B. L. N.; Yoshizawa, K.; Furumura, T.

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the complex heterogeneity of the continental lithosphere involves a wide variety of spatial scales and the synthesis of multiple classes of information. Seismic surface waves and multiply reflected body waves provide the main constraints on broad-scale structure, and bounds on the extent of the lithosphere-asthenosphere transition (LAT) can be found from the vertical gradients of S wavespeed. Information on finer-scale structures comes through body wave studies, including detailed seismic tomography and P-wave reflectivity extracted from stacked autocorrelograms of continuous component records. With the inclusion of deterministic large-scale structure and realistic medium-scale stochastic features fine-scale variations are subdued. The resulting multi-scale heterogeneity model for the Australian region gives a good representation of the character of observed seismograms and their geographic variations and matches the observations of P-wave reflectivity. P reflections in the 0.5-3.0 Hz band in the uppermost mantle suggest variations on vertical scales of a few hundred metres with amplitudes of the order of 1%. Interference of waves reflected or converted at sequences of such modest variations in physical properties produce relatively simple behaviour for lower frequencies, which can suggest simpler structures than are actually present. Vertical changes in the character of fine-scale heterogeneity can produce apparent discontinuities. In Central Australia a 'mid-lithospheric discontinuity' can be tracked via changes in frequency content of station reflectivity, with links to the broad-scale pattern of wavespeed gradients and, in particular, the gradients of radial anisotropy. Comparisons with xenolith results from southeastern Australia indicate a strong tie between geochemical stratification and P-wave reflectivity.

  14. Multi-Scale Initial Conditions For Cosmological Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Oliver; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ZAH, Heidelberg /HITS, Heidelberg

    2011-11-04

    We discuss a new algorithm to generate multi-scale initial conditions with multiple levels of refinements for cosmological 'zoom-in' simulations. The method uses an adaptive convolution of Gaussian white noise with a real-space transfer function kernel together with an adaptive multi-grid Poisson solver to generate displacements and velocities following first- (1LPT) or second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). The new algorithm achieves rms relative errors of the order of 10{sup -4} for displacements and velocities in the refinement region and thus improves in terms of errors by about two orders of magnitude over previous approaches. In addition, errors are localized at coarse-fine boundaries and do not suffer from Fourier-space-induced interference ringing. An optional hybrid multi-grid and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based scheme is introduced which has identical Fourier-space behaviour as traditional approaches. Using a suite of re-simulations of a galaxy cluster halo our real-space-based approach is found to reproduce correlation functions, density profiles, key halo properties and subhalo abundances with per cent level accuracy. Finally, we generalize our approach for two-component baryon and dark-matter simulations and demonstrate that the power spectrum evolution is in excellent agreement with linear perturbation theory. For initial baryon density fields, it is suggested to use the local Lagrangian approximation in order to generate a density field for mesh-based codes that is consistent with the Lagrangian perturbation theory instead of the current practice of using the Eulerian linearly scaled densities.

  15. Multi-scale Modeling of Plasticity in Tantalum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carroll, Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boyce, Brad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weinberger, Christopher [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we present a multi-scale computational model to simulate plastic deformation of tantalum and validating experiments. In atomistic/ dislocation level, dislocation kink- pair theory is used to formulate temperature and strain rate dependent constitutive equations. The kink-pair theory is calibrated to available data from single crystal experiments to produce accurate and convenient constitutive laws. The model is then implemented into a BCC crystal plasticity finite element method (CP-FEM) model to predict temperature and strain rate dependent yield stresses of single and polycrystalline tantalum and compared with existing experimental data from the literature. Furthermore, classical continuum constitutive models describing temperature and strain rate dependent flow behaviors are fit to the yield stresses obtained from the CP-FEM polycrystal predictions. The model is then used to conduct hydro- dynamic simulations of Taylor cylinder impact test and compared with experiments. In order to validate the proposed tantalum CP-FEM model with experiments, we introduce a method for quantitative comparison of CP-FEM models with various experimental techniques. To mitigate the effects of unknown subsurface microstructure, tantalum tensile specimens with a pseudo-two-dimensional grain structure and grain sizes on the order of millimeters are used. A technique combining an electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and high resolution digital image correlation (HR-DIC) is used to measure the texture and sub-grain strain fields upon uniaxial tensile loading at various applied strains. Deformed specimens are also analyzed with optical profilometry measurements to obtain out-of- plane strain fields. These high resolution measurements are directly compared with large-scale CP-FEM predictions. This computational method directly links fundamental dislocation physics to plastic deformations in the grain-scale and to the engineering-scale applications. Furthermore, direct

  16. Multi-scale optical imaging of the delayed type hypersensitivity reaction attenuated by rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Meijie; Zhang, Zhihong; Li, Hui; Qiao, Sha; Liu, Zheng; Fu, Ling; Shen, Guanxin; Luo, Qingming

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages (MMs) play important roles in the development of cell-mediated delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH). However, the dynamics of neutrophils and MMs during the DTH reaction and how the immunosuppressant rapamycin modulates their behavior in vivo are rarely reported. Here, we take advantage of multi-scale optical imaging techniques and a footpad DTH reaction model to non-invasively investigate the dynamic behavior and properties of immune cells from the whole field of the footpad to the cellular level. During the classic elicitation phase of the DTH reaction, both neutrophils and MMs obviously accumulated at inflammatory foci at 24 h post-challenge. Rapamycin treatment resulted in advanced neutrophil recruitment and vascular hyperpermeability at an early stage (4 h), the reduced accumulation of neutrophils (> 50% inhibition ratio) at 48 h, and the delayed involvement of MMs in inflammatory foci. The motility parameters of immune cells in the rapamycin-treated reaction at 4 h post-challenge displayed similar mean velocities, arrest durations, mean displacements, and confinements as the classic DTH reaction at 24 h. These results indicate that rapamycin treatment shortened the initial preparation stage of the DTH reaction and attenuated its intensity, which may be due to the involvement of T helper type 2 cells or regulatory T cells.

  17. Multi-scale evolution of a derecho-producing MCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardet, Ligia Ribeiro

    1997-12-01

    In this dissertation we address one type of severe weather: strong straight-line winds. In particular, we focus on derechos, a type of wind storm caused by a convective system and characterized by its long duration and by the large area it covers. One interesting characteristic of these storms is that they develop at night, on the cold side of a thermal boundary. This region is not characterized by large convective instability. In fact, surface parcels are generally stable with respect to vertical displacements. To gain understanding of the physical processes involved in these storms, we focused on the case of a MCS that developed in eastern Colorado on 12-13 May, 1985. The system formed in the afternoon, was active until early morning, and caused strong winds during the night. A multi-scale full physics simulation of this case was performed using a non-hydrostatic mesoscale model. Four telescopically nested grids covering from the synoptic scale down to cloud scale circulations were used. A Lagrangian model was used to follow trajectories of parcels that took part in the updraft and in the downdraft, and balance of forces were computed along the trajectories. Our results show that the synoptic and mesoscale environment of the storm largely influences convective organization and cloud-scale circulations. During the day, when the boundary layer is well mixed, the source of air for the clouds is located within the boundary layer. At night, when the boundary layer becomes stable, the source of air shifts to the top of the boundary layer. It is composed of warm, moist air that is brought by the nocturnal low-level jet. The downdraft structure also changes from day to night. During the day, parcels acquire negative buoyancy because of cooling due to evaporation and melting. As they sink, they remain colder than the environment, and end up at the surface constituting the cold pool. During the night, downdrafts are stronger, generating the strong surface winds. The most

  18. Progression to multi-scale models and the application to food system intervention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröhn, Yrjö T

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss how the systems science approach can be used to optimize intervention strategies in food animal systems. It advocates the idea that the challenges of maintaining a safe food supply are best addressed by integrating modeling and mathematics with biological studies critical to formulation of public policy to address these challenges. Much information on the biology and epidemiology of food animal systems has been characterized through single-discipline methods, but until now this information has not been thoroughly utilized in a fully integrated manner. The examples are drawn from our current research. The first, explained in depth, uses clinical mastitis to introduce the concept of dynamic programming to optimize management decisions in dairy cows (also introducing the curse of dimensionality problem). In the second example, a compartmental epidemic model for Johne's disease with different intervention strategies is optimized. The goal of the optimization strategy depends on whether there is a relationship between Johne's and Crohn's disease. If so, optimization is based on eradication of infection; if not, it is based on the cow's performance only (i.e., economic optimization, similar to the mastitis example). The third example focuses on food safety to introduce risk assessment using Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium. The last example, practical interventions to effectively manage antibiotic resistance in beef and dairy cattle systems, introduces meta-population modeling that accounts for bacterial growth not only in the host (cow), but also in the cow's feed, drinking water and the housing environment. Each example stresses the need to progress toward multi-scale modeling. The article ends with examples of multi-scale systems, from food supply systems to Johne's disease. Reducing the consequences of foodborne illnesses (i.e., minimizing disease occurrence and associated costs) can only occur through an

  19. Fault diagnosis of wind bearing based on multi-scale wavelet kernel extreme learning machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Siwen; Jiao, Bin

    2017-08-01

    The principle of kernel Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) is demonstrated. On this basis, a multi - scale wavelet kernel extreme learning machine is proposed. The multi-scale wavelet kernel is used as the kernel function of the extreme learning machine. The test shows that it is an achievable extreme learning machine. Experiments show that, using the multi-scale wavelet kernel extreme learning machine in the wind turbine bearing fault diagnosis has higher classification accuracy and speed than the support vector machine classification algorithm, and has excellent application value.

  20. Heat and mass transfer intensification and shape optimization a multi-scale approach

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Is the heat and mass transfer intensification defined as a new paradigm of process engineering, or is it just a common and old idea, renamed and given the current taste? Where might intensification occur? How to achieve intensification? How the shape optimization of thermal and fluidic devices leads to intensified heat and mass transfers? To answer these questions, Heat & Mass Transfer Intensification and Shape Optimization: A Multi-scale Approach clarifies  the definition of the intensification by highlighting the potential role of the multi-scale structures, the specific interfacial area, the distribution of driving force, the modes of energy supply and the temporal aspects of processes.   A reflection on the methods of process intensification or heat and mass transfer enhancement in multi-scale structures is provided, including porous media, heat exchangers, fluid distributors, mixers and reactors. A multi-scale approach to achieve intensification and shape optimization is developed and clearly expla...

  1. Strain, nano-phase separation, multi-scale structures and function of advanced materials

    OpenAIRE

    Billinge, S. J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Recent atomic pair distribution function results from our group from manganites and cuprate systems are reviewed in light of the presence of multi-scale structures. These structures have a profound effect on the material properties

  2. Multi-scale Computational Electromagnetics for Phenomenology and Saliency Characterization in Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-15

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0068 Multi-scale Computational Electromagnetics for Phenomenology and Saliency Characterization in Remote Sensing Hean-Teik...SUBTITLE Multi-scale Computational Electromagnetics for Phenomenology and Saliency Characterization in Remote Sensing 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER... electromagnetics to the application in microwave remote sensing as well as extension of modelling capability with computational flexibility to study

  3. Training Systems Modelers through the Development of a Multi-scale Chagas Disease Risk Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, J.; Stevens-Goodnight, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Bustamante, D.; Fytilis, N.; Goff, P.; Monroy, C.; Morrissey, L. A.; Orantes, L.; Stevens, L.; Dorn, P.; Lucero, D.; Rios, J.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of our NSF-sponsored Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences grant is to create a multidisciplinary approach to develop spatially explicit models of vector-borne disease risk using Chagas disease as our model. Chagas disease is a parasitic disease endemic to Latin America that afflicts an estimated 10 million people. The causative agent (Trypanosoma cruzi) is most commonly transmitted to humans by blood feeding triatomine insect vectors. Our objectives are: (1) advance knowledge on the multiple interacting factors affecting the transmission of Chagas disease, and (2) provide next generation genomic and spatial analysis tools applicable to the study of other vector-borne diseases worldwide. This funding is a collaborative effort between the RSENR (UVM), the School of Engineering (UVM), the Department of Biology (UVM), the Department of Biological Sciences (Loyola (New Orleans)) and the Laboratory of Applied Entomology and Parasitology (Universidad de San Carlos). Throughout this five-year study, multi-educational groups (i.e., high school, undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral) will be trained in systems modeling. This systems approach challenges students to incorporate environmental, social, and economic as well as technical aspects and enables modelers to simulate and visualize topics that would either be too expensive, complex or difficult to study directly (Yasar and Landau 2003). We launch this research by developing a set of multi-scale, epidemiological models of Chagas disease risk using STELLA® software v.9.1.3 (isee systems, inc., Lebanon, NH). We use this particular system dynamics software as a starting point because of its simple graphical user interface (e.g., behavior-over-time graphs, stock/flow diagrams, and causal loops). To date, high school and undergraduate students have created a set of multi-scale (i.e., homestead, village, and regional) disease models. Modeling the system at multiple spatial scales forces recognition that

  4. Multi-scale simulation of heat and flow in geothermal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostermeyer, Georg-Peter; Srisupattarawanit, Tarin [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany) Inst. of Dynamics and Vibrations

    2013-03-15

    Geothermal power is a great potential source of energy for the future. Presently there are many projects dealing with geothermal energy worldwide, however exploration and development are generally coupled with high cost and risk, especially for deep geothermal reservoirs. For these reasons, geothermal energy projects require a reliable analysis and prediction of physical behavior. Typical CFD simulation tools could in a way be used, but the computational time is critical and the complexity of reservoirs consisting of fracture systems is strongly limiting. The challenge of geothermal reservoir computation are the multi-scale dynamics in space and time; the space scale may vary from mm to km, while the time scale may vary from milliseconds to say 100 years. From the mathematical point of view, the modeling of reservoirs in this article has been developed using the so-called Cellular Automata method (CA), providing fast computation with resulting acceptable accuracy. The physics of heat and flow modeling is realized in a multi-dimensional model including coupling algorithm techniques. The introduced Cellular Automata formulations are able to describe the dynamics of arbitrary types of reservoir, concerning their short-term and long-term physical behavior. (orig.)

  5. Face Verification with Multi-Task and Multi-Scale Feature Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Lu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Face verification for unrestricted faces in the wild is a challenging task. This paper proposes a method based on two deep convolutional neural networks (CNN for face verification. In this work, we explore using identification signals to supervise one CNN and the combination of semi-verification and identification to train the other one. In order to estimate semi-verification loss at a low computation cost, a circle, which is composed of all faces, is used for selecting face pairs from pairwise samples. In the process of face normalization, we propose using different landmarks of faces to solve the problems caused by poses. In addition, the final face representation is formed by the concatenating feature of each deep CNN after principal component analysis (PCA reduction. Furthermore, each feature is a combination of multi-scale representations through making use of auxiliary classifiers. For the final verification, we only adopt the face representation of one region and one resolution of a face jointing Joint Bayesian classifier. Experiments show that our method can extract effective face representation with a small training dataset and our algorithm achieves 99.71% verification accuracy on Labeled Faces in the Wild (LFW dataset.

  6. Contextual Multi-Scale Region Convolutional 3D Network for Activity Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Bai, Yancheng

    2018-01-28

    Activity detection is a fundamental problem in computer vision. Detecting activities of different temporal scales is particularly challenging. In this paper, we propose the contextual multi-scale region convolutional 3D network (CMS-RC3D) for activity detection. To deal with the inherent temporal scale variability of activity instances, the temporal feature pyramid is used to represent activities of different temporal scales. On each level of the temporal feature pyramid, an activity proposal detector and an activity classifier are learned to detect activities of specific temporal scales. Temporal contextual information is fused into activity classifiers for better recognition. More importantly, the entire model at all levels can be trained end-to-end. Our CMS-RC3D detector can deal with activities at all temporal scale ranges with only a single pass through the backbone network. We test our detector on two public activity detection benchmarks, THUMOS14 and ActivityNet. Extensive experiments show that the proposed CMS-RC3D detector outperforms state-of-the-art methods on THUMOS14 by a substantial margin and achieves comparable results on ActivityNet despite using a shallow feature extractor.

  7. Multi-scale, coupled T-H model for system studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danko, G.; Bahrami, D. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States); Frigyesiz, F. [Paks (Hungary)

    2005-07-01

    One of the most important issues in any high-level nuclear waste repository is the effect of heat that affects the safety and performance of the facility. Firstly, the heat is the main, lasting disturbance upon the natural system in addition to the fracturing of the host rock during the construction of the facility. The host formation may be restored after the waste is emplaced by sealing and backfilling the openings. However, the heat further generates a thermal pulse that lasts for several hundred years, causing thermally induced processes in the natural and engineered barrier systems. Secondly, the effect of heat, i.e., the resulting temperature rise is slow in development. The evolution of the maximum temperature may be delayed by hundreds of years. Errors in the model prediction of the thermal pulse may cause long-lasting and perhaps un-correctable consequences since remedial actions are nearly impossible after the repository is sealed. Thirdly, the long time period relates to large host rock volume and dimensions, much larger is size than that of the construction area. At the same time, the near-field areas close to the heat and potential emission source is the most affected by the temperature field. This multi-scale nature places great challenges to the modeling and prediction of the thermal responses. (author)

  8. SPARK: A Framework for Multi-Scale Agent-Based Biomedical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyev, Alexey; Mikheev, Maxim; Zhou, Leming; Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta; Ziraldo, Cordelia; An, Gary; Vodovotz, Yoram; Mi, Qi

    2010-01-01

    Multi-scale modeling of complex biological systems remains a central challenge in the systems biology community. A method of dynamic knowledge representation known as agent-based modeling enables the study of higher level behavior emerging from discrete events performed by individual components. With the advancement of computer technology, agent-based modeling has emerged as an innovative technique to model the complexities of systems biology. In this work, the authors describe SPARK (Simple Platform for Agent-based Representation of Knowledge), a framework for agent-based modeling specifically designed for systems-level biomedical model development. SPARK is a stand-alone application written in Java. It provides a user-friendly interface, and a simple programming language for developing Agent-Based Models (ABMs). SPARK has the following features specialized for modeling biomedical systems: 1) continuous space that can simulate real physical space; 2) flexible agent size and shape that can represent the relative proportions of various cell types; 3) multiple spaces that can concurrently simulate and visualize multiple scales in biomedical models; 4) a convenient graphical user interface. Existing ABMs of diabetic foot ulcers and acute inflammation were implemented in SPARK. Models of identical complexity were run in both NetLogo and SPARK; the SPARK-based models ran two to three times faster.

  9. Segmentation of phase contrast microscopy images based on multi-scale local Basic Image Features histograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, N; Szita, N; Griffin, L D

    2017-09-03

    Phase contrast microscopy (PCM) is routinely used for the inspection of adherent cell cultures in all fields of biology and biomedicine. Key decisions for experimental protocols are often taken by an operator based on typically qualitative observations. However, automated processing and analysis of PCM images remain challenging due to the low contrast between foreground objects (cells) and background as well as various imaging artefacts. We propose a trainable pixel-wise segmentation approach whereby image structures and symmetries are encoded in the form of multi-scale Basic Image Features local histograms, and classification of them is learned by random decision trees. This approach was validated for segmentation of cell versus background, and discrimination between two different cell types. Performance close to that of state-of-the-art specialised algorithms was achieved despite the general nature of the method. The low processing time ( < 4 s per 1280 × 960 pixel images) is suitable for batch processing of experimental data as well as for interactive segmentation applications.

  10. Multi-Scale Analysis of Very High Resolution Satellite Images Using Unsupervised Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Sublime

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with the use of unsupervised methods to process very high resolution satellite images with minimal or little human intervention. In a context where more and more complex and very high resolution satellite images are available, it has become increasingly difficult to propose learning sets for supervised algorithms to process such data and even more complicated to process them manually. Within this context, in this article we propose a fully unsupervised step by step method to process very high resolution images, making it possible to link clusters to the land cover classes of interest. For each step, we discuss the various challenges and state of the art algorithms to make the full process as efficient as possible. In particular, one of the main contributions of this article comes in the form of a multi-scale analysis clustering algorithm that we use during the processing of the image segments. Our proposed methods are tested on a very high resolution image (Pléiades of the urban area around the French city of Strasbourg and show relevant results at each step of the process.

  11. Multi-scale mechanical characterization of highly swollen photo-activated collagen hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronci, Giuseppe; Grant, Colin A.; Thomson, Neil H.; Russell, Stephen J.; Wood, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Biological hydrogels have been increasingly sought after as wound dressings or scaffolds for regenerative medicine, owing to their inherent biofunctionality in biological environments. Especially in moist wound healing, the ideal material should absorb large amounts of wound exudate while remaining mechanically competent in situ. Despite their large hydration, however, current biological hydrogels still leave much to be desired in terms of mechanical properties in physiological conditions. To address this challenge, a multi-scale approach is presented for the synthetic design of cyto-compatible collagen hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties (from the nano- up to the macro-scale), uniquely high swelling ratios and retained (more than 70%) triple helical features. Type I collagen was covalently functionalized with three different monomers, i.e. 4-vinylbenzyl chloride, glycidyl methacrylate and methacrylic anhydride, respectively. Backbone rigidity, hydrogen-bonding capability and degree of functionalization (F: 16 ± 12–91 ± 7 mol%) of introduced moieties governed the structure–property relationships in resulting collagen networks, so that the swelling ratio (SR: 707 ± 51–1996 ± 182 wt%), bulk compressive modulus (Ec: 30 ± 7–168 ± 40 kPa) and atomic force microscopy elastic modulus (EAFM: 16 ± 2–387 ± 66 kPa) were readily adjusted. Because of their remarkably high swelling and mechanical properties, these tunable collagen hydrogels may be further exploited for the design of advanced dressings for chronic wound care. PMID:25411409

  12. A multi-scale convolutional neural network for phenotyping high-content cellular images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, William J; Hossain, Imtiaz; Lazic, Stanley E; Davies, John W; Zhang, Xian

    2017-07-01

    Identifying phenotypes based on high-content cellular images is challenging. Conventional image analysis pipelines for phenotype identification comprise multiple independent steps, with each step requiring method customization and adjustment of multiple parameters. Here, we present an approach based on a multi-scale convolutional neural network (M-CNN) that classifies, in a single cohesive step, cellular images into phenotypes by using directly and solely the images' pixel intensity values. The only parameters in the approach are the weights of the neural network, which are automatically optimized based on training images. The approach requires no a priori knowledge or manual customization, and is applicable to single- or multi-channel images displaying single or multiple cells. We evaluated the classification performance of the approach on eight diverse benchmark datasets. The approach yielded overall a higher classification accuracy compared with state-of-the-art results, including those of other deep CNN architectures. In addition to using the network to simply obtain a yes-or-no prediction for a given phenotype, we use the probability outputs calculated by the network to quantitatively describe the phenotypes. This study shows that these probability values correlate with chemical treatment concentrations. This finding validates further our approach and enables chemical treatment potency estimation via CNNs. The network specifications and solver definitions are provided in Supplementary Software 1. william_jose.godinez_navarro@novartis.com or xian-1.zhang@novartis.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. Multi-scale process and supply chain modelling: from lignocellulosic feedstock to process and products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Shah, Nilay

    2011-01-01

    There is a large body of literature regarding the choice and optimization of different processes for converting feedstock to bioethanol and bio-commodities; moreover, there has been some reasonable technological development in bioconversion methods over the past decade. However, the eventual cost and other important metrics relating to sustainability of biofuel production will be determined not only by the performance of the conversion process, but also by the performance of the entire supply chain from feedstock production to consumption. Moreover, in order to ensure world-class biorefinery performance, both the network and the individual components must be designed appropriately, and allocation of resources over the resulting infrastructure must effectively be performed. The goal of this work is to describe the key challenges in bioenergy supply chain modelling and then to develop a framework and methodology to show how multi-scale modelling can pave the way to answer holistic supply chain questions, such as the prospects for second generation bioenergy crops. PMID:22482032

  14. Flexible fabrication of multi-scale integrated 3D periodic nanostructures with phase mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liang Leon

    Top-down fabrication of artificial nanostructures, especially three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures, that forms uniform and defect-free structures over large area with the advantages of high throughput and rapid processing and in a manner that can further monolithically integrate into multi-scale and multi-functional devices is long-desired but remains a considerable challenge. This thesis study advances diffractive optical element (DOE) based 3D laser holographic nanofabrication of 3D periodic nanostructures and develops new kinds of DOEs for advanced diffracted-beam control during the fabrication. Phase masks, as one particular kind of DOE, are a promising direction for simple and rapid fabrication of 3D periodic nanostructures by means of Fresnel diffraction interference lithography. When incident with a coherent beam of light, a suitable phase mask (e.g. with 2D nano-grating) can create multiple diffraction orders that are inherently phase-locked and overlap to form a 3D light interference pattern in the proximity of the DOE. This light pattern is typically recorded in photosensitive materials including photoresist to develop into 3D photonic crystal nanostructure templates. Two kinds of advanced phase masks were developed that enable delicate phase control of multiple diffraction beams. The first exploits femtosecond laser direct writing inside fused silica to assemble multiple (up to nine) orthogonally crossed (2D) grating layers, spaced on Talbot planes to overcome the inherent weak diffraction efficiency otherwise found in low-contrast volume gratings. A systematic offsetting of orthogonal grating layers to establish phase offsets over 0 to pi/2 range provided precise means for controlling the 3D photonic crystal structure symmetry between body centered tetragonal (BCT) and woodpile-like tetragonal (wTTR). The second phase mask consisted of two-layered nanogratings with small sub-wavelength grating periods and phase offset control. That was

  15. Multi-scale modeling of phase explosion in high fluence nanosecond laser ablation and clarification of ablation depth prediction criterion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yunfeng; Shin, Yung C., E-mail: shin@purdue.edu

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • ns laser ablation of aluminum and copper with phase explosion is investigated. • Melt ejection behavior is successfully predicted through a HD/MD/SPH model. • 0.9T{sub c} does not always work for all materials for ablation depth prediction. • 0.75–0.8T{sub c} works better for copper in predicting ablation depth. - Abstract: When phase explosion occurs, accurate prediction of the ablation behavior in the high energy nanosecond laser ablation process still remains a difficult challenge. In this paper, nanosecond laser ablation of aluminum and copper with phase explosion is investigated through a multi-scale model and experimental verification. The melt ejection behavior during phase explosion is successfully predicted by combined molecular dynamics (MD) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations and validated against the experiments. The commonly adopted 0.9T{sub c} (critical temperature) criterion for phase explosion boundary is also assessed with the prediction of the ablation depth for both aluminum and copper, and it is found that the 0.9T{sub c} criterion does not always work. The multi-scale model developed in this work is shown to have better capability in predicting the ablation behavior when phase explosion is involved.

  16. Multi-scale modeling of Arabidopsis thaliana response to different CO2 conditions: From gene expression to metabolic flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Shen, Fangzhou; Xin, Changpeng; Wang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Multi-scale investigation from gene transcript level to metabolic activity is important to uncover plant response to environment perturbation. Here we integrated a genome-scale constraint-based metabolic model with transcriptome data to explore Arabidopsis thaliana response to both elevated and low CO2 conditions. The four condition-specific models from low to high CO2 concentrations show differences in active reaction sets, enriched pathways for increased/decreased fluxes, and putative post-transcriptional regulation, which indicates that condition-specific models are necessary to reflect physiological metabolic states. The simulated CO2 fixation flux at different CO2 concentrations is consistent with the measured Assimilation-CO2intercellular curve. Interestingly, we found that reactions in primary metabolism are affected most significantly by CO2 perturbation, whereas secondary metabolic reactions are not influenced a lot. The changes predicted in key pathways are consistent with existing knowledge. Another interesting point is that Arabidopsis is required to make stronger adjustment on metabolism to adapt to the more severe low CO2 stress than elevated CO2 . The challenges of identifying post-transcriptional regulation could also be addressed by the integrative model. In conclusion, this innovative application of multi-scale modeling in plants demonstrates potential to uncover the mechanisms of metabolic response to different conditions. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  17. Wearable Wireless Sensor for Multi-Scale Physiological Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Since AF can be paroxysmal and asymptomatic in its nature [1], the major challenge is to detect paroxysmal and asymptomatic AF in an efficient way...phone. Considering that significant number of AF episodes can be paroxysmal and asymptomatic, arrhythmia discrimination algorithms, which are accurate

  18. An iteratively adaptive multi-scale finite element method for elliptic PDEs with rough coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Thomas Y.; Hwang, Feng-Nan; Liu, Pengfei; Yao, Chien-Chou

    2017-05-01

    We propose an iteratively adaptive Multi-scale Finite Element Method (MsFEM) for elliptic PDEs with rough coefficients. The choice of the local boundary conditions for the multi-sale basis functions determines the accuracy of the MsFEM numerical solution, and one needs to incorporate the global information of the elliptic equation into the local boundary conditions of the multi-scale basis functions to recover the underlying fine-mesh solution of the equation. In our proposed iteratively adaptive method, we achieve this global-to-local information transfer through the combination of coarse-mesh solving using adaptive multi-scale basis functions and fine-mesh smoothing operations. In each iteration step, we first update the multi-scale basis functions based on the approximate numerical solutions of the previous iteration steps, and obtain the coarse-mesh approximate solution using a Galerkin projection. Then we apply several steps of smoothing operations to the coarse-mesh approximate solution on the underlying fine mesh to get the updated approximate numerical solution. The proposed algorithm can be viewed as a nonlinear two-level multi-grid method with the restriction and prolongation operators adapted to the approximate numerical solutions of the previous iteration steps. Convergence analysis of the proposed algorithm is carried out under the framework of two-level multi-grid method, and the harmonic coordinates are employed to establish the approximation property of the adaptive multi-scale basis functions. We demonstrate the efficiency of our proposed multi-scale methods through several numerical examples including a multi-scale coefficient problem, a high-contrast interface problem, and a convection-dominated diffusion problem.

  19. Implementation of Grid-computing Framework for Simulation in Multi-scale Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Data Iranata

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A new grid-computing framework for simulation in multi-scale structural analysis is presented. Two levels of parallel processing will be involved in this framework: multiple local distributed computing environments connected by local network to form a grid-based cluster-to-cluster distributed computing environment. To successfully perform the simulation, a large-scale structural system task is decomposed into the simulations of a simplified global model and several detailed component models using various scales. These correlated multi-scale structural system tasks are distributed among clusters and connected together in a multi-level hierarchy and then coordinated over the internet. The software framework for supporting the multi-scale structural simulation approach is also presented. The program architecture design allows the integration of several multi-scale models as clients and servers under a single platform. To check its feasibility, a prototype software system has been designed and implemented to perform the proposed concept. The simulation results show that the software framework can increase the speedup performance of the structural analysis. Based on this result, the proposed grid-computing framework is suitable to perform the simulation of the multi-scale structural analysis.

  20. Parallelization and High-Performance Computing Enables Automated Statistical Inference of Multi-scale Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagiella, Nick; Rickert, Dennis; Theis, Fabian J; Hasenauer, Jan

    2017-02-22

    Mechanistic understanding of multi-scale biological processes, such as cell proliferation in a changing biological tissue, is readily facilitated by computational models. While tools exist to construct and simulate multi-scale models, the statistical inference of the unknown model parameters remains an open problem. Here, we present and benchmark a parallel approximate Bayesian computation sequential Monte Carlo (pABC SMC) algorithm, tailored for high-performance computing clusters. pABC SMC is fully automated and returns reliable parameter estimates and confidence intervals. By running the pABC SMC algorithm for ∼10(6) hr, we parameterize multi-scale models that accurately describe quantitative growth curves and histological data obtained in vivo from individual tumor spheroid growth in media droplets. The models capture the hybrid deterministic-stochastic behaviors of 10(5)-10(6) of cells growing in a 3D dynamically changing nutrient environment. The pABC SMC algorithm reliably converges to a consistent set of parameters. Our study demonstrates a proof of principle for robust, data-driven modeling of multi-scale biological systems and the feasibility of multi-scale model parameterization through statistical inference. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Multi-scale Characterization of Improved Algae Strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Taraka T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report relays the important role biofuels such as algae could have in the energy market. The report cites that problem of crude oil becoming less abundant while the demand for energy continues to rise. There are many benefits of producing energy with biofuels such as fewer carbon emissions as well as less land area to produce the same amount of energy compared to other sources of renewable fuels. One challenge that faces biofuels right now is the cost to produce it is high.

  2. Multi-scale and multi-domain computational astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elteren, Arjen; Pelupessy, Inti; Zwart, Simon Portegies

    2014-08-06

    Astronomical phenomena are governed by processes on all spatial and temporal scales, ranging from days to the age of the Universe (13.8 Gyr) as well as from kilometre size up to the size of the Universe. This enormous range in scales is contrived, but as long as there is a physical connection between the smallest and largest scales it is important to be able to resolve them all, and for the study of many astronomical phenomena this governance is present. Although covering all these scales is a challenge for numerical modellers, the most challenging aspect is the equally broad and complex range in physics, and the way in which these processes propagate through all scales. In our recent effort to cover all scales and all relevant physical processes on these scales, we have designed the Astrophysics Multipurpose Software Environment (AMUSE). AMUSE is a Python-based framework with production quality community codes and provides a specialized environment to connect this plethora of solvers to a homogeneous problem-solving environment. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Multi-scale and multi-domain computational astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elteren, A.; Pelupessy, I.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2014-06-01

    Astronomical phenomena are governed by processes on all spatial and temporal scales, ranging from days to the age of the Universe (13.8,Gyr) as well as from km size up to the size of the Universe. This enormous range in scales is contrived, but as long as there is a physical connection between the smallest and largest scales it is important to be able to resolve them all, and for the study of many astronomical phenomena this governance is present. Although covering all these scales is a challenge for numerical modelers, the most challenging aspect is the equally broad and complex range in physics, and the way in which these processes propagate through all scales. In our recent effort to cover all scales and all relevant physical processes on these scales we have designed the Astrophysics Multipurpose Software Environment (AMUSE). AMUSE is a Python-based framework with production quality community codes and provides a specialized environment to connect this plethora of solvers to a homogeneous problem solving environment.

  4. Quantifying the multi-scale performance of network inference algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Chris J; Amos, Richard; Spencer, Simon E F

    2014-10-01

    Graphical models are widely used to study complex multivariate biological systems. Network inference algorithms aim to reverse-engineer such models from noisy experimental data. It is common to assess such algorithms using techniques from classifier analysis. These metrics, based on ability to correctly infer individual edges, possess a number of appealing features including invariance to rank-preserving transformation. However, regulation in biological systems occurs on multiple scales and existing metrics do not take into account the correctness of higher-order network structure. In this paper novel performance scores are presented that share the appealing properties of existing scores, whilst capturing ability to uncover regulation on multiple scales. Theoretical results confirm that performance of a network inference algorithm depends crucially on the scale at which inferences are to be made; in particular strong local performance does not guarantee accurate reconstruction of higher-order topology. Applying these scores to a large corpus of data from the DREAM5 challenge, we undertake a data-driven assessment of estimator performance. We find that the "wisdom of crowds" network, that demonstrated superior local performance in the DREAM5 challenge, is also among the best performing methodologies for inference of regulation on multiple length scales.

  5. Modelling catchment non-stationarity - multi-scale modelling and data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheater, H. S.; Bulygina, N.; Ballard, C. E.; Jackson, B. M.; McIntyre, N.

    2012-12-01

    Modelling environmental change is in many senses a 'Grand Challenge' for hydrology, but poses major methodological challenges for hydrological models. Conceptual models represent complex processes in a simplified and spatially aggregated manner; typically parameters have no direct relationship to measurable physical properties. Calibration using observed data results in parameter equifinality, unless highly parsimonious model structures are employed. Use of such models to simulate effects of catchment non-stationarity is essentially speculative, unless attention is given to the analysis of parameter temporal variability in a non-stationary observation record. Black-box models are similarly constrained by the information content of the observational data. In contrast, distributed physics-based models provide a stronger theoretical basis for the prediction of change. However, while such models have parameters that are in principle measurable, in practice, for catchment-scale application, the measurement scale is inconsistent with the scale of model representation, the costs associated with such an exercise are high, and key properties are spatially variable, often strongly non-linear, and highly uncertain. In this paper we present a framework for modelling catchment non-stationarity that integrates information (with uncertainty) from multiple models and data sources. The context is the need to model the effects of agricultural land use change at multiple scales. A detailed UK multi-scale and multi-site experimental programme has provided data to support high resolution physics-based models of runoff processes that can, for example, represent the effects of soil structural change (due to grazing densities or trafficking), localised tree planting and drainage. Such models necessarily have high spatial resolution (1m in the horizontal plane, 1 cm in the vertical in this case), and hence can be applied at the scale of a field or hillslope element, but would be

  6. Multi-scale probabilistic seismic imaging with the USArray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olugboji, T. M.; Lekic, V.; Burdick, S.; Gao, C.

    2016-12-01

    Seismological imaging of the structure of Earth's interior is essential to our understanding of the dynamics and evolution of our planet. Although some fundamental challenges in this imaging problem exist, e.g. lack of stations in the oceans and uneven earthquake distribution, other challenges can now be addressed by the emergence of high performance computing capabilities. These include the assumptions made a-priori about the parameterization and explicit regularization - damping and smoothing - of the Earth model, the inadequate accounting for observational and modeling uncertainty, and the subjectivity often imposed when deciding on the manner in which to combine seismic data with varying sensitivity to different properties in the earth model. In this talk, we present extensions of traditional seismic imaging techniques to crustal and upper mantle structure using a probabilistic (Bayesian) approach. We illustrate various benefits to this approach by analyzing Love and Rayleigh phase velocity and P-wave travel time measurements made using the USArray. We show that the probabilistic approach can: (1) Aid geophysical inference by assessing parameter uncertainty and trade-offs in seismic images (tomograms); (2) Recover multiple scales of heterogeneity by avoiding explicit regularization, even when data coverage is uniform; (3) Yield multi-modal distributions on velocities in regions of rapid velocity variations; and, (4) Quantify improvements in seismic images attributable to new data or new acquisition methods and techniques. We emphasize the central role of high performance computing and the philosophy of open software development and exchange to the success of these techniques, which explore large parameter space and generate large ensembles solutions. Finally, we describe novel approaches to exploring, presenting and understanding the large quantity of information that is contained in the ensemble solutions.

  7. Flows in polymers, reinforced polymers and composites a multi-scale approach

    CERN Document Server

    Binetruy, Christophe; Keunings, Roland

    2015-01-01

    This book gives a detailed and practical introduction to complex flows of polymers and reinforced polymers as well as the flow of simple fluids in complex microstructures. Over the last decades, an increasing number of functional and structural parts, made so far with metals, has been progressively reengineered by replacing metallic materials by polymers, reinforced polymers and composites. The motivation for this substitution may be the weight reduction, the simpler, cheaper or faster forming process, or the ability to exploit additional functionalities. The present Brief surveys modern developments related to the multi-scale modeling and simulation of polymers, reinforced polymers, that involve a flowing microstructure and continuous fiber-reinforced composites, wherein the fluid flows inside a nearly stationary multi-scale microstructure. These developments concern both multi-scale modeling, defining bridges between the micro and macro scales - with special emphasis on the mesoscopic scale at which kinetic...

  8. Scene Classification of Remote Sensing Image Based on Multi-scale Feature and Deep Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Suhui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at low precision of remote sensing image scene classification owing to small sample sizes, a new classification approach is proposed based on multi-scale deep convolutional neural network (MS-DCNN, which is composed of nonsubsampled Contourlet transform (NSCT, deep convolutional neural network (DCNN, and multiple-kernel support vector machine (MKSVM. Firstly, remote sensing image multi-scale decomposition is conducted via NSCT. Secondly, the decomposing high frequency and low frequency subbands are trained by DCNN to obtain image features in different scales. Finally, MKSVM is adopted to integrate multi-scale image features and implement remote sensing image scene classification. The experiment results in the standard image classification data sets indicate that the proposed approach obtains great classification effect due to combining the recognition superiority to different scenes of low frequency and high frequency subbands.

  9. Correlations of stock price fluctuations under multi-scale and multi-threshold scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Guo; Li, Huajiao; Feng, Sida; Liu, Xueyong; Jiang, Meihui

    2018-01-01

    The multi-scale method is widely used in analyzing time series of financial markets and it can provide market information for different economic entities who focus on different periods. Through constructing multi-scale networks of price fluctuation correlation in the stock market, we can detect the topological relationship between each time series. Previous research has not addressed the problem that the original fluctuation correlation networks are fully connected networks and more information exists within these networks that is currently being utilized. Here we use listed coal companies as a case study. First, we decompose the original stock price fluctuation series into different time scales. Second, we construct the stock price fluctuation correlation networks at different time scales. Third, we delete the edges of the network based on thresholds and analyze the network indicators. Through combining the multi-scale method with the multi-threshold method, we bring to light the implicit information of fully connected networks.

  10. Crops in silico: A community wide multi-scale computational modeling framework of plant canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, V.; Christensen, A.; Borkiewic, K.; Yiwen, X.; Ellis, A.; Panneerselvam, B.; Kannan, K.; Shrivastava, S.; Cox, D.; Hart, J.; Marshall-Colon, A.; Long, S.

    2016-12-01

    Current crop models predict a looming gap between supply and demand for primary foodstuffs over the next 100 years. While significant yield increases were achieved in major food crops during the early years of the green revolution, the current rates of yield increases are insufficient to meet future projected food demand. Furthermore, with projected reduction in arable land, decrease in water availability, and increasing impacts of climate change on future food production, innovative technologies are required to sustainably improve crop yield. To meet these challenges, we are developing Crops in silico (Cis), a biologically informed, multi-scale, computational modeling framework that can facilitate whole plant simulations of crop systems. The Cis framework is capable of linking models of gene networks, protein synthesis, metabolic pathways, physiology, growth, and development in order to investigate crop response to different climate scenarios and resource constraints. This modeling framework will provide the mechanistic details to generate testable hypotheses toward accelerating directed breeding and engineering efforts to increase future food security. A primary objective for building such a framework is to create synergy among an inter-connected community of biologists and modelers to create a realistic virtual plant. This framework advantageously casts the detailed mechanistic understanding of individual plant processes across various scales in a common scalable framework that makes use of current advances in high performance and parallel computing. We are currently designing a user friendly interface that will make this tool equally accessible to biologists and computer scientists. Critically, this framework will provide the community with much needed tools for guiding future crop breeding and engineering, understanding the emergent implications of discoveries at the molecular level for whole plant behavior, and improved prediction of plant and ecosystem

  11. Perspective: Differential dynamic microscopy extracts multi-scale activity in complex fluids and biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbino, Roberto; Cicuta, Pietro

    2017-09-01

    Differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) is a technique that exploits optical microscopy to obtain local, multi-scale quantitative information about dynamic samples, in most cases without user intervention. It is proving extremely useful in understanding dynamics in liquid suspensions, soft materials, cells, and tissues. In DDM, image sequences are analyzed via a combination of image differences and spatial Fourier transforms to obtain information equivalent to that obtained by means of light scattering techniques. Compared to light scattering, DDM offers obvious advantages, principally (a) simplicity of the setup; (b) possibility of removing static contributions along the optical path; (c) power of simultaneous different microscopy contrast mechanisms; and (d) flexibility of choosing an analysis region, analogous to a scattering volume. For many questions, DDM has also advantages compared to segmentation/tracking approaches and to correlation techniques like particle image velocimetry. The very straightforward DDM approach, originally demonstrated with bright field microscopy of aqueous colloids, has lately been used to probe a variety of other complex fluids and biological systems with many different imaging methods, including dark-field, differential interference contrast, wide-field, light-sheet, and confocal microscopy. The number of adopting groups is rapidly increasing and so are the applications. Here, we briefly recall the working principles of DDM, we highlight its advantages and limitations, we outline recent experimental breakthroughs, and we provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. DDM can become a standard primary tool in every laboratory equipped with a microscope, at the very least as a first bias-free automated evaluation of the dynamics in a system.

  12. Multi-scale Gaussian representation and outline-learning based cell image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Muhammad; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Emmenlauer, Mario; Rämö, Pauli; Dehio, Christoph; Yli-Harja, Olli

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput genome-wide screening to study gene-specific functions, e.g. for drug discovery, demands fast automated image analysis methods to assist in unraveling the full potential of such studies. Image segmentation is typically at the forefront of such analysis as the performance of the subsequent steps, for example, cell classification, cell tracking etc., often relies on the results of segmentation. We present a cell cytoplasm segmentation framework which first separates cell cytoplasm from image background using novel approach of image enhancement and coefficient of variation of multi-scale Gaussian scale-space representation. A novel outline-learning based classification method is developed using regularized logistic regression with embedded feature selection which classifies image pixels as outline/non-outline to give cytoplasm outlines. Refinement of the detected outlines to separate cells from each other is performed in a post-processing step where the nuclei segmentation is used as contextual information. We evaluate the proposed segmentation methodology using two challenging test cases, presenting images with completely different characteristics, with cells of varying size, shape, texture and degrees of overlap. The feature selection and classification framework for outline detection produces very simple sparse models which use only a small subset of the large, generic feature set, that is, only 7 and 5 features for the two cases. Quantitative comparison of the results for the two test cases against state-of-the-art methods show that our methodology outperforms them with an increase of 4-9% in segmentation accuracy with maximum accuracy of 93%. Finally, the results obtained for diverse datasets demonstrate that our framework not only produces accurate segmentation but also generalizes well to different segmentation tasks.

  13. A versatile pipeline for the multi-scale digital reconstruction and quantitative analysis of 3D tissue architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Navarrete, Hernán; Segovia-Miranda, Fabián; Klukowski, Piotr; Meyer, Kirstin; Nonaka, Hidenori; Marsico, Giovanni; Chernykh, Mikhail; Kalaidzidis, Alexander; Zerial, Marino; Kalaidzidis, Yannis

    2015-12-27

    A prerequisite for the systems biology analysis of tissues is an accurate digital three-dimensional reconstruction of tissue structure based on images of markers covering multiple scales. Here, we designed a flexible pipeline for the multi-scale reconstruction and quantitative morphological analysis of tissue architecture from microscopy images. Our pipeline includes newly developed algorithms that address specific challenges of thick dense tissue reconstruction. Our implementation allows for a flexible workflow, scalable to high-throughput analysis and applicable to various mammalian tissues. We applied it to the analysis of liver tissue and extracted quantitative parameters of sinusoids, bile canaliculi and cell shapes, recognizing different liver cell types with high accuracy. Using our platform, we uncovered an unexpected zonation pattern of hepatocytes with different size, nuclei and DNA content, thus revealing new features of liver tissue organization. The pipeline also proved effective to analyse lung and kidney tissue, demonstrating its generality and robustness.

  14. A multi-scale approach to lung nodule detection in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gori, I. [Ist. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2007-06-15

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of lung internal nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical computed tomography (CT) images was developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian collaboration. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, a multi-scale dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a multi-scale neural technique for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The results obtained on a dataset of 39 low-dose thin-slice CT scans containing 75 internal nodules are shown in terms of free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curves and discussed. (orig.)

  15. Biomimic design of multi-scale fabric with efficient heat transfer property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wool fiber has a complex hierarchic structure. The multi-scale fibrils are assembled to form a tree-like channel net in wool fiber, providing an efficient heat transfer property. The optimal inner configuration of wool fiber can also be invited to biomimic design of textile fabrics to improve the thermal comfort of cloth. A heat transfer model of biomimic multi-scale fabric using the fractal derivative is established. Theoretical analysis indicates that the heat flux efficiency in the biomimic fabric can be 2 orders of magnitude comparing with that of the continuous medium.

  16. Multi-scale approach for simulating time-delay biochemical reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yuanling; Burrage, Kevin; Zhang, Chengjian

    2015-02-01

    This study presents a multi-scale approach for simulating time-delay biochemical reaction systems when there are wide ranges of molecular numbers. The authors construct a new efficient approach based on partitioning into slow and fast subsets in conjunction with predictor-corrector methods. This multi-scale approach is shown to be much more efficient than existing methods such as the delay stochastic simulation algorithm and the modified next reaction method. Numerical testing on several important problems in systems biology confirms the accuracy and computational efficiency of this approach.

  17. Multi-scale modelling for HEDP experiments on Orion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircombe, N. J.; Ramsay, M. G.; Hughes, S. J.; Hoarty, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    The Orion laser at AWE couples high energy long-pulse lasers with high intensity short-pulses, allowing material to be compressed beyond solid density and heated isochorically. This experimental capability has been demonstrated as a platform for conducting High Energy Density Physics material properties experiments. A clear understanding of the physics in experiments at this scale, combined with a robust, flexible and predictive modelling capability, is an important step towards more complex experimental platforms and ICF schemes which rely on high power lasers to achieve ignition. These experiments present a significant modelling challenge, the system is characterised by hydrodynamic effects over nanoseconds, driven by long-pulse lasers or the pre-pulse of the petawatt beams, and fast electron generation, transport, and heating effects over picoseconds, driven by short-pulse high intensity lasers. We describe the approach taken at AWE; to integrate a number of codes which capture the detailed physics for each spatial and temporal scale. Simulations of the heating of buried aluminium microdot targets are discussed and we consider the role such tools can play in understanding the impact of changes to the laser parameters, such as frequency and pre-pulse, as well as understanding effects which are difficult to observe experimentally.

  18. Multi-scale sensitivity analysis of pile installation using DEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Ricardo Gurevitz; Velloso, Raquel Quadros; , Eurípedes do Amaral Vargas, Jr.; Danziger, Bernadete Ragoni

    2017-12-01

    The disturbances experienced by the soil due to the pile installation and dynamic soil-structure interaction still present major challenges to foundation engineers. These phenomena exhibit complex behaviors, difficult to measure in physical tests and to reproduce in numerical models. Due to the simplified approach used by the discrete element method (DEM) to simulate large deformations and nonlinear stress-dilatancy behavior of granular soils, the DEM consists of an excellent tool to investigate these processes. This study presents a sensitivity analysis of the effects of introducing a single pile using the PFC2D software developed by Itasca Co. The different scales investigated in these simulations include point and shaft resistance, alterations in porosity and stress fields and particles displacement. Several simulations were conducted in order to investigate the effects of different numerical approaches showing indications that the method of installation and particle rotation could influence greatly in the conditions around the numerical pile. Minor effects were also noted due to change in penetration velocity and pile-soil friction. The difference in behavior of a moving and a stationary pile shows good qualitative agreement with previous experimental results indicating the necessity of realizing a force equilibrium process prior to any load-test to be simulated.

  19. Challenges and Development of a Multi-Scale Computational Model for Photosystem I Decoupled Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    was performed at the RHF -INDO level, started from the experimental X-ray crystal structure and expanded to a series of models of varying sophistication...Ab initio calculation of UV-Vis absorption spectra of a single molecule chlorophyll a: Comparison study between RHF /CIS, TDDFT, and semi-empirical

  20. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David [US Geological Survey, Storrs, CT (United States); Singha, Kamini [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Johnson, Timothy C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haggerty, Roy [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Binley, Andrew [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Lane, John W. [US Geological Survey, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2014-11-25

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  1. GPS Navigation for the Magnetospheric Multi-Scale Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, William; Mitchell, Jason; Southward, Michael; Baldwin, Philip; Winternitz, Luke; Heckler, Gregory; Kurichh, Rishi; Sirotzky, Steve

    2009-01-01

    In 2014. NASA is scheduled to launch the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS), a four-satellite formation designed to monitor fluctuations in the Earth's magnetosphere. This mission has two planned phases with different orbits (1? x 12Re and 1.2 x 25Re) to allow for varying science regions of interest. To minimize ground resources and to mitigate the probability of collisions between formation members, an on-board orbit determination system consisting of a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver and crosslink transceiver was desired. Candidate sensors would be required to acquire GPS signals both below and above the constellation while spinning at three revolutions-per-minute (RPM) and exchanging state and science information among the constellation. The Intersatellite Ranging and Alarm System (IRAS), developed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) was selected to meet this challenge. IRAS leverages the eight years of development GSFC has invested in the Navigator GPS receiver and its spacecraft communication expertise, culminating in a sensor capable of absolute and relative navigation as well as intersatellite communication. The Navigator is a state-of-the-art receiver designed to acquire and track weak GPS signals down to -147dBm. This innovation allows the receiver to track both the main lobe and the much weaker side lobe signals. The Navigator's four antenna inputs and 24 tracking channels, together with customized hardware and software, allow it to seamlessly maintain visibility while rotating. Additionally, an extended Kalman filter provides autonomous, near real-time, absolute state and time estimates. The Navigator made its maiden voyage on the Space Shuttle during the Hubble Servicing Mission, and is scheduled to fly on MMS as well as the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM). Additionally, Navigator's acquisition engine will be featured in the receiver being developed for the Orion vehicle. The crosslink transceiver is a 1/4 Watt transmitter

  2. EPOS Multi-Scale Laboratory platform: a long-term reference tool for experimental Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippanera, Daniele; Tesei, Telemaco; Funiciello, Francesca; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Rosenau, Matthias; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Lange, Otto; Calignano, Elisa; Spiers, Chris; Drury, Martin; Willingshofer, Ernst; Winkler, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    With continuous progress on scientific research, a large amount of datasets has been and will be produced. The data access and sharing along with their storage and homogenization within a unique and coherent framework is a new challenge for the whole scientific community. This is particularly emphasized for geo-scientific laboratories, encompassing the most diverse Earth Science disciplines and typology of data. To this aim the "Multiscale Laboratories" Work Package (WP16), operating in the framework of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS), is developing a virtual platform of geo-scientific data and services for the worldwide community of laboratories. This long-term project aims at merging the top class multidisciplinary laboratories in Geoscience into a coherent and collaborative network, facilitating the standardization of virtual access to data, data products and software. This will help our community to evolve beyond the stage in which most of data produced by the different laboratories are available only within the related scholarly publications (often as print-version only) or they remain unpublished and inaccessible on local devices. The EPOS multi-scale laboratory platform will provide the possibility to easily share and discover data by means of open access, DOI-referenced, online data publication including long-term storage, managing and curation services and to set up a cohesive community of laboratories. The WP16 is starting with three pilot cases laboratories: (1) rock physics, (2) palaeomagnetic, and (3) analogue modelling. As a proof of concept, first analogue modelling datasets have been published via GFZ Data Services (http://doidb.wdc-terra.org/search/public/ui?&sort=updated+desc&q=epos). The datasets include rock analogue material properties (e.g. friction data, rheology data, SEM imagery), as well as supplementary figures, images and movies from experiments on tectonic processes. A metadata catalogue tailored to the specific communities

  3. A Unified Multi-scale Model for Cross-Scale Evaluation and Integration of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Yang, X.; Bailey, V. L.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Hinkle, C.

    2013-12-01

    Mathematical representations of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in soil, plant, aquatic, and atmospheric systems vary with scale. Process-rich models are typically used to describe hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the pore and small scales, while empirical, correlation approaches are often used at the watershed and regional scales. A major challenge for multi-scale modeling is that water flow, biogeochemical processes, and reactive transport are described using different physical laws and/or expressions at the different scales. For example, the flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations at the pore-scale in soils, by the Darcy law in soil columns and aquifer, and by the Navier-Stokes equations again in open water bodies (ponds, lake, river) and atmosphere surface layer. This research explores whether the physical laws at the different scales and in different physical domains can be unified to form a unified multi-scale model (UMSM) to systematically investigate the cross-scale, cross-domain behavior of fundamental processes at different scales. This presentation will discuss our research on the concept, mathematical equations, and numerical execution of the UMSM. Three-dimensional, multi-scale hydrological processes at the Disney Wilderness Preservation (DWP) site, Florida will be used as an example for demonstrating the application of the UMSM. In this research, the UMSM was used to simulate hydrological processes in rooting zones at the pore and small scales including water migration in soils under saturated and unsaturated conditions, root-induced hydrological redistribution, and role of rooting zone biogeochemical properties (e.g., root exudates and microbial mucilage) on water storage and wetting/draining. The small scale simulation results were used to estimate effective water retention properties in soil columns that were superimposed on the bulk soil water retention properties at the DWP site. The UMSM parameterized from smaller

  4. Multi-Scale Modeling, Surrogate-Based Analysis, and Optimization of Lithium-Ion Batteries for Vehicle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenbo

    A common attribute of electric-powered aerospace vehicles and systems such as unmanned aerial vehicles, hybrid- and fully-electric aircraft, and satellites is that their performance is usually limited by the energy density of their batteries. Although lithium-ion batteries offer distinct advantages such as high voltage and low weight over other battery technologies, they are a relatively new development, and thus significant gaps in the understanding of the physical phenomena that govern battery performance remain. As a result of this limited understanding, batteries must often undergo a cumbersome design process involving many manual iterations based on rules of thumb and ad-hoc design principles. A systematic study of the relationship between operational, geometric, morphological, and material-dependent properties and performance metrics such as energy and power density is non-trivial due to the multiphysics, multiphase, and multiscale nature of the battery system. To address these challenges, two numerical frameworks are established in this dissertation: a process for analyzing and optimizing several key design variables using surrogate modeling tools and gradient-based optimizers, and a multi-scale model that incorporates more detailed microstructural information into the computationally efficient but limited macro-homogeneous model. In the surrogate modeling process, multi-dimensional maps for the cell energy density with respect to design variables such as the particle size, ion diffusivity, and electron conductivity of the porous cathode material are created. A combined surrogate- and gradient-based approach is employed to identify optimal values for cathode thickness and porosity under various operating conditions, and quantify the uncertainty in the surrogate model. The performance of multiple cathode materials is also compared by defining dimensionless transport parameters. The multi-scale model makes use of detailed 3-D FEM simulations conducted at the

  5. The onset of type 2 diabetes: Proposal for a multi-scale model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castiglione, F.; Tieri, P.; Graaf, A.A. de; Franceschi, C.; Liò, P.; Ommen, B. van; Mazzà, C.; Tuchel, A.; Bernaschi, M.; Samson, C.; Colombo, T.; Castellani, G.C.; Capri, M.; Garagnani, P.; Salvioli, S.; Nguyen, V.A.; Bobeldijk-Pastorova, I.; Krishnan, S.; Cappozzo, A.; Sacchetti, M.; Morettini, M.; Ernst, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a common age-related disease, and is a major health concern, particularly in developed countries where the population is aging, including Europe. The multi-scale immune system simulator for the onset of type 2 diabetes (MISSION-T2D) is a European

  6. High resolution multi-scale air quality modelling for all streets in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steen Solvang; Ketzel, Matthias; Becker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The annual concentrations of NO2, PM2.5 and PM10 in 2012 have for the first time been modelled for all 2.4 million addresses in Denmark based on a multi-scale air quality modelling approach. All addresses include residential, industrial, institutional, shop, school, restaurant addresses etc...

  7. A real-time multi-scale 2D Gaussian filter based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haibo; Gai, Xingqin; Chang, Zheng; Hui, Bin

    2014-11-01

    Multi-scale 2-D Gaussian filter has been widely used in feature extraction (e.g. SIFT, edge etc.), image segmentation, image enhancement, image noise removing, multi-scale shape description etc. However, their computational complexity remains an issue for real-time image processing systems. Aimed at this problem, we propose a framework of multi-scale 2-D Gaussian filter based on FPGA in this paper. Firstly, a full-hardware architecture based on parallel pipeline was designed to achieve high throughput rate. Secondly, in order to save some multiplier, the 2-D convolution is separated into two 1-D convolutions. Thirdly, a dedicate first in first out memory named as CAFIFO (Column Addressing FIFO) was designed to avoid the error propagating induced by spark on clock. Finally, a shared memory framework was designed to reduce memory costs. As a demonstration, we realized a 3 scales 2-D Gaussian filter on a single ALTERA Cyclone III FPGA chip. Experimental results show that, the proposed framework can computing a Multi-scales 2-D Gaussian filtering within one pixel clock period, is further suitable for real-time image processing. Moreover, the main principle can be popularized to the other operators based on convolution, such as Gabor filter, Sobel operator and so on.

  8. A rate-dependent multi-scale crack model for concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karamnejad, A.; Nguyen, V.P.; Sluys, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-scale numerical approach for modeling cracking in heterogeneous quasi-brittle materials under dynamic loading is presented. In the model, a discontinuous crack model is used at macro-scale to simulate fracture and a gradient-enhanced damage model has been used at meso-scale to simulate

  9. Multi-Scale Modelling of Fatigue of Wind Turbine Rotor Blade Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qian, C.

    2013-01-01

    In this research, extensive fatigue tests were performed on single glass fibres and composite coupons. Comparison of the test results shows that there is a significant difference between the fibre and composite fatigue behaviour. In order to clarify this difference, a multi-scale micro-mechanical

  10. Multi-scale methods for the solution of the radiative transfer equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Pedro J.; Crouseilles, Nicolas; Pereira, Pedro; Roger, Maxime

    2016-03-01

    Various methods have been developed and tested over the years to solve the radiative transfer equation (RTE) with different results and trade-offs. Although the RTE is extensively used, the approximate diffusion equation is sometimes preferred, particularly in optically thick media, due to the lower computational requirements. Recently, multi-scale models, namely the domain decomposition methods, the micro-macro model and the hybrid transport-diffusion model, have been proposed as an alternative to the RTE. In domain decomposition methods, the domain is split into two subdomains, namely a mesoscopic subdomain where the RTE is solved and a macroscopic subdomain where the diffusion equation is solved. In the micro-macro and hybrid transport-diffusion models, the radiation intensity is decomposed into a macroscopic component and a mesoscopic one. In both cases, the aim is to reduce the computational requirements, while maintaining the accuracy, or to improve the accuracy for similar computational requirements. In this paper, these multi-scale methods are described, and the application of the micro-macro and hybrid transport-diffusion models to three-dimensional transient problems is reported. It is shown that when the diffusion approximation is accurate, but not over the entire domain, the multi-scale methods may improve the solution accuracy in comparison with the solution of the RTE. The order of accuracy of the numerical schemes and the radiative properties of the medium play a key role in the performance of the multi-scale methods.

  11. Medical image classification based on multi-scale non-negative sparse coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruijie; Shen, Jian; Wei, Fushan; Li, Xiong; Sangaiah, Arun Kumar

    2017-05-27

    With the rapid development of modern medical imaging technology, medical image classification has become more and more important in medical diagnosis and clinical practice. Conventional medical image classification algorithms usually neglect the semantic gap problem between low-level features and high-level image semantic, which will largely degrade the classification performance. To solve this problem, we propose a multi-scale non-negative sparse coding based medical image classification algorithm. Firstly, Medical images are decomposed into multiple scale layers, thus diverse visual details can be extracted from different scale layers. Secondly, for each scale layer, the non-negative sparse coding model with fisher discriminative analysis is constructed to obtain the discriminative sparse representation of medical images. Then, the obtained multi-scale non-negative sparse coding features are combined to form a multi-scale feature histogram as the final representation for a medical image. Finally, SVM classifier is combined to conduct medical image classification. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed algorithm can effectively utilize multi-scale and contextual spatial information of medical images, reduce the semantic gap in a large degree and improve medical image classification performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Multi-scale modeling with cellular automata: The complex automata approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.G.; Falcone, J.-L.; Caiazzo, A.; Chopard, B.

    2008-01-01

    Cellular Automata are commonly used to describe complex natural phenomena. In many cases it is required to capture the multi-scale nature of these phenomena. A single Cellular Automata model may not be able to efficiently simulate a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. It is our goal to

  13. A novel analytical solution for gas diffusion in multi-scale fuel cell porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Qiu, Shuxia; Cai, Jianchao; Li, Cuihong; Liu, Haicheng

    2017-09-01

    Gas diffusion in multi-scale fuel cell porous media such as gas diffusion layer, microporous layer and catalyst layer affects the power performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The effective gas diffusivity is one of the key parameters for gas diffusion in multi-scale fuel cell porous media, which has attracted broad interests from science and engineering. A new analytical model is presented and solved for gas diffusion in fuel cell porous media based on fractal geometry. Due to its multi-scale characteristics and existence of microscale and nanoscale pores in most fuel cell porous media, both molecular and Knudsen diffusion mechanisms are taken into account. An expression for the effective gas diffusivity of multi-scale porous media is derived, expressed in terms of bulk diffusion, pore structure as well as the Knudsen number. The proposed fractal model is validated by comparison with available experimental data and empirical correlations. The model shows that the effective gas diffusivity increases with increase of porosity and pore fractal dimension, while it decreases with increased tortuosity fractal dimension. It is believed that the current work may shed light on the gas diffusion mechanism in fuel cell porous media.

  14. Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process Modeling and Manufacturing-Informed Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-04-01

    This factsheet describes a project that developed and demonstrated a new manufacturing-informed design framework that utilizes advanced multi-scale, physics-based process modeling to dramatically improve manufacturing productivity and quality in machining operations while reducing the cost of machined components.

  15. Multi-scale streamflow variability responses to precipitation over the headwater catchments in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jun; Chen, Ji; Wang, Keyi; Sivakumar, Bellie

    2017-08-01

    This paper examines the multi-scale streamflow variability responses to precipitation over 16 headwater catchments in the Pearl River basin, South China. The long-term daily streamflow data (1952-2000), obtained using a macro-scale hydrological model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, and a routing scheme, are studied. Temporal features of streamflow variability at 10 different timescales, ranging from 6 days to 8.4 years, are revealed with the Haar wavelet transform. The principal component analysis (PCA) is performed to categorize the headwater catchments with the coherent modes of multi-scale wavelet spectra. The results indicate that three distinct modes, with different variability distributions at small timescales and seasonal scales, can explain 95% of the streamflow variability. A large majority of the catchments (i.e. 12 out of 16) exhibit consistent mode feature on multi-scale variability throughout three sub-periods (1952-1968, 1969-1984, and 1985-2000). The multi-scale streamflow variability responses to precipitation are identified to be associated with the regional flood and drought tendency over the headwater catchments in southern China.

  16. Application of multi-scale segmentation algorithms for high resolution remote sensing image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tingting; Gu, Lingjia; Ren, Ruizhi

    2017-09-01

    In recent decades, with the rapid development of remote sensing technology, high resolution remote sensing images have been widely used in various fields due to their characteristics, such as rich spectral information and complex texture information. As a key step in the feature extraction, multi-scale image segmentation algorithm has been a hotspot currently. The traditional image segmentation is based on pixels, which only takes the spectral information of pixel into account, and ignores the texture, spatial information and contextual relation of the objects in the image. The experimental high resolution remote sensing images are from GF-2 and the features of the experimental data are obvious, the edges are clear. By using the statistical region merging (SRM) algorithm, the fractal net evolution approach (FNEA) algorithm and the unsupervised multi-scale segmentation of color images (UMSC) algorithm, this paper analyzes the segmentation effects of three multi-scale segmentation algorithms on the optimal scale and on the same segmentation scale respectively. The experimental results under the optimal scale and the same segmentation scale show that the SRM algorithm outperforms the UMSC algorithm, and UMSC algorithm outperforms the FENA algorithm in multi-scale segmentation.

  17. Multi-scale calculation based on dual domain material point method combined with molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Tilak Raj [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-27

    This dissertation combines the dual domain material point method (DDMP) with molecular dynamics (MD) in an attempt to create a multi-scale numerical method to simulate materials undergoing large deformations with high strain rates. In these types of problems, the material is often in a thermodynamically non-equilibrium state, and conventional constitutive relations are often not available. In this method, the closure quantities, such as stress, at each material point are calculated from a MD simulation of a group of atoms surrounding the material point. Rather than restricting the multi-scale simulation in a small spatial region, such as phase interfaces, or crack tips, this multi-scale method can be used to consider non-equilibrium thermodynamic e ects in a macroscopic domain. This method takes advantage that the material points only communicate with mesh nodes, not among themselves; therefore MD simulations for material points can be performed independently in parallel. First, using a one-dimensional shock problem as an example, the numerical properties of the original material point method (MPM), the generalized interpolation material point (GIMP) method, the convected particle domain interpolation (CPDI) method, and the DDMP method are investigated. Among these methods, only the DDMP method converges as the number of particles increases, but the large number of particles needed for convergence makes the method very expensive especially in our multi-scale method where we calculate stress in each material point using MD simulation. To improve DDMP, the sub-point method is introduced in this dissertation, which provides high quality numerical solutions with a very small number of particles. The multi-scale method based on DDMP with sub-points is successfully implemented for a one dimensional problem of shock wave propagation in a cerium crystal. The MD simulation to calculate stress in each material point is performed in GPU using CUDA to accelerate the

  18. Microphysics in the Multi-Scale Modeling Systems with Unified Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, J.; Lamg, S.; Matsui, T.; Shen, B.; Zeng, X.; Shi, R.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, exponentially increasing computer power has extended Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) integrations from hours to months, the number of computational grid points from less than a thousand to close to ten million. Three-dimensional models are now more prevalent. Much attention is devoted to precipitating cloud systems where the crucial 1-km scales are resolved in horizontal domains as large as 10,000 km in two-dimensions, and 1,000 x 1,000 km2 in three-dimensions. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that NWP and mesoscale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique. Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (l) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, the microphysics developments of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the results from using multi-scale modeling system to study the heavy precipitation processes will be presented.

  19. Using Multi-Scale Modeling Systems to Study the Precipitation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, exponentially increasing computer power has extended Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) integrations from hours to months, the number of computational grid points from less than a thousand to close to ten million. Three-dimensional models are now more prevalent. Much attention is devoted to precipitating cloud systems where the crucial 1-km scales are resolved in horizontal domains as large as 10,000 km in two-dimensions, and 1,000 x 1,000 km2 in three-dimensions. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that NWP and mesoscale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique. Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, a review of developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the results from using multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, and aerosols will be presented. Also how to use of the multi-satellite simulator to improve precipitation processes will be discussed.

  20. Addressing the multi-scale lapsus of landscape : multi-scale landscape process modelling to support sustainable land use : a case study for the Lower Guadalhorce valley South Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoorl, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    "Addressing the Multi-scale Lapsus of Landscape" with the sub-title "Multi-scale landscape process modelling to support sustainable land use: A case study for the Lower Guadalhorce valley South Spain" focuses on the role of

  1. Multi-scale diffuse interface modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2016-05-10

    In this paper, we introduce a diffuse interface model to simulate multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility based on a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state). Because of partial miscibility, thermodynamic relations are used to model not only interfacial properties but also bulk properties, including density, composition, pressure, and realistic viscosity. As far as we know, this effort is the first time to use diffuse interface modeling based on equation of state for modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility. In numerical simulation, the key issue is to resolve the high contrast of scales from the microscopic interface composition to macroscale bulk fluid motion since the interface has a nanoscale thickness only. To efficiently solve this challenging problem, we develop a multi-scale simulation method. At the microscopic scale, we deduce a reduced interfacial equation under reasonable assumptions, and then we propose a formulation of capillary pressure, which is consistent with macroscale flow equations. Moreover, we show that Young-Laplace equation is an approximation of this capillarity formulation, and this formulation is also consistent with the concept of Tolman length, which is a correction of Young-Laplace equation. At the macroscopical scale, the interfaces are treated as discontinuous surfaces separating two phases of fluids. Our approach differs from conventional sharp-interface two-phase flow model in that we use the capillary pressure directly instead of a combination of surface tension and Young-Laplace equation because capillarity can be calculated from our proposed capillarity formulation. A compatible condition is also derived for the pressure in flow equations. Furthermore, based on the proposed capillarity formulation, we design an efficient numerical method for directly computing the capillary pressure between two fluids composed of multiple components. Finally, numerical tests

  2. Multi-scale graphene patterns on arbitrary substrates via laser-assisted transfer-printing process

    KAUST Repository

    Park, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    A laser-assisted transfer-printing process is developed for multi-scale graphene patterns on arbitrary substrates using femtosecond laser scanning on a graphene/metal substrate and transfer techniques without using multi-step patterning processes. The short pulse nature of a femtosecond laser on a graphene/copper sheet enables fabrication of high-resolution graphene patterns. Thanks to the scale up, fast, direct writing, multi-scale with high resolution, and reliable process characteristics, it can be an alternative pathway to the multi-step photolithography methods for printing arbitrary graphene patterns on desired substrates. We also demonstrate transparent strain devices without expensive photomasks and multi-step patterning process. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  3. FEM × DEM: a new efficient multi-scale approach for geotechnical problems with strain localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Trung Kien

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a multi-scale modeling of Boundary Value Problem (BVP approach involving cohesive-frictional granular materials in the FEM × DEM multi-scale framework. On the DEM side, a 3D model is defined based on the interactions of spherical particles. This DEM model is built through a numerical homogenization process applied to a Volume Element (VE. It is then paired with a Finite Element code. Using this numerical tool that combines two scales within the same framework, we conducted simulations of biaxial and pressuremeter tests on a cohesive-frictional granular medium. In these cases, it is known that strain localization does occur at the macroscopic level, but since FEMs suffer from severe mesh dependency as soon as shear band starts to develop, the second gradient regularization technique has been used. As a consequence, the objectivity of the computation with respect to mesh dependency is restored.

  4. Phase diagrams of vortex matter with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions in layered superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingyou; Varney, Christopher N; Fangohr, Hans; Babaev, Egor

    2017-01-25

    It was recently proposed to use the stray magnetic fields of superconducting vortex lattices to trap ultracold atoms for building quantum emulators. This calls for new methods for engineering and manipulating of the vortex states. One of the possible routes utilizes type-1.5 superconducting layered systems with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions. In order to explore the possible vortex states that can be engineered, we present two phase diagrams of phenomenological vortex matter models with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions featuring several attractive and repulsive length scales. The phase diagrams exhibit a plethora of phases, including conventional 2D lattice phases, five stripe phases, dimer, trimer, and tetramer phases, void phases, and stable low-temperature disordered phases. The transitions between these states can be controlled by the value of an applied external field.

  5. Application of multi-scale feature extraction to surface defect classification of hot-rolled steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Ai, Yong-hao; Wu, Xiu-yong

    2013-01-01

    Feature extraction is essential to the classification of surface defect images. The defects of hot-rolled steels distribute in different directions. Therefore, the methods of multi-scale geometric analysis (MGA) were employed to decompose the image into several directional subbands at several scales. Then, the statistical features of each subband were calculated to produce a high-dimensional feature vector, which was reduced to a lower-dimensional vector by graph embedding algorithms. Finally, support vector machine (SVM) was used for defect classification. The multi-scale feature extraction method was implemented via curvelet transform and kernel locality preserving projections (KLPP). Experiment results show that the proposed method is effective for classifying the surface defects of hot-rolled steels and the total classification rate is up to 97.33%.

  6. eDNAoccupancy: An R package for multi-scale occupancy modeling of environmental DNA data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorazio, Robert; Erickson, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    In this article we describe eDNAoccupancy, an R package for fitting Bayesian, multi-scale occupancy models. These models are appropriate for occupancy surveys that include three, nested levels of sampling: primary sample units within a study area, secondary sample units collected from each primary unit, and replicates of each secondary sample unit. This design is commonly used in occupancy surveys of environmental DNA (eDNA). eDNAoccupancy allows users to specify and fit multi-scale occupancy models with or without covariates, to estimate posterior summaries of occurrence and detection probabilities, and to compare different models using Bayesian model-selection criteria. We illustrate these features by analyzing two published data sets: eDNA surveys of a fungal pathogen of amphibians and eDNA surveys of an endangered fish species.

  7. Multi-scale random sets: from morphology to effective properties and to fracture statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeulin, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.jeulin@mines-paristech.fr [Centre de Morphologie Mathematique, Mathematiques et Systemes, Mines ParisTech 35 rue Saint-Honore, F77300 Fontainebleau (France)

    2011-09-15

    Complex microstructures in materials often involve multi-scale heterogeneous textures, modelled by random sets derived from Mathematical Morphology. Starting from 2D or 3D images, a complete morphological characterization by image analysis is performed, and used for the identification of a model of random structure. From morphological models, simulations of realistic microstructures are introduced in a numerical solver to compute appropriate fields (electric, elastic stress or strain, ...) and to estimate the effective properties by numerical homogenization, accounting for scale dependent statistical fluctuations of the fields. Our approach is illustrated by various examples of multi-scale models: Boolean random sets based on Cox point processes and various random grains (spheres, cylinders), showing a very low percolation threshold, and therefore a high conductivity or high elastic moduli for a low volume fraction of a second phase. Multiscale Cox point processes are also a source of instructive models of fracture statistics, such as multiscale weakest link models.

  8. An Investigation of Wavelet Bases for Grid-Based Multi-Scale Simulations Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baty, R.S.; Burns, S.P.; Christon, M.A.; Roach, D.W.; Trucano, T.G.; Voth, T.E.; Weatherby, J.R.; Womble, D.E.

    1998-11-01

    The research summarized in this report is the result of a two-year effort that has focused on evaluating the viability of wavelet bases for the solution of partial differential equations. The primary objective for this work has been to establish a foundation for hierarchical/wavelet simulation methods based upon numerical performance, computational efficiency, and the ability to exploit the hierarchical adaptive nature of wavelets. This work has demonstrated that hierarchical bases can be effective for problems with a dominant elliptic character. However, the strict enforcement of orthogonality was found to be less desirable than weaker semi-orthogonality or bi-orthogonality for solving partial differential equations. This conclusion has led to the development of a multi-scale linear finite element based on a hierarchical change of basis. The reproducing kernel particle method has been found to yield extremely accurate phase characteristics for hyperbolic problems while providing a convenient framework for multi-scale analyses.

  9. Multi-scale structure, pasting and digestibility of heat moisture treated red adzuki bean starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Zhaoyuan; Li, Xiaoxi; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Binjia

    2017-09-01

    The pasting and digestibility of a red adzuki bean starch were simultaneously modulated by heat-moisture treatment (HMT) through altering the multi-scale structure. HMT, especially at high moisture content, could disrupt the granule integrity, semicrystalline lamellae, molecular order (crystallites) and molecular chains. Also, certain rearrangement of starch molecules occurred to form ordered structures with increased thermal stability as shown by DSC. This concomitant disordering and reassembly in the multi-scale structure converted the fractions of resistant starch (RS) and rapidly digestible starch (RDS) into that of slowly digestible starch (SDS). Furthermore, the emergence of thermally-stable orders increased the pasting temperature but suppressed the swelling of granules during heating. Hence, HMT-modified red adzuki starch may serve as a potential thickener/gelling agent with slow digestion rate for various foods. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. FEM × DEM: a new efficient multi-scale approach for geotechnical problems with strain localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Kien; Claramunt, Albert Argilaga; Caillerie, Denis; Combe, Gaël; Dal Pont, Stefano; Desrues, Jacques; Richefeu, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents a multi-scale modeling of Boundary Value Problem (BVP) approach involving cohesive-frictional granular materials in the FEM × DEM multi-scale framework. On the DEM side, a 3D model is defined based on the interactions of spherical particles. This DEM model is built through a numerical homogenization process applied to a Volume Element (VE). It is then paired with a Finite Element code. Using this numerical tool that combines two scales within the same framework, we conducted simulations of biaxial and pressuremeter tests on a cohesive-frictional granular medium. In these cases, it is known that strain localization does occur at the macroscopic level, but since FEMs suffer from severe mesh dependency as soon as shear band starts to develop, the second gradient regularization technique has been used. As a consequence, the objectivity of the computation with respect to mesh dependency is restored.

  11. Multi-scale retinex with color restoration image enhancement based on Gaussian filtering and guided filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinxiang; Fan, Xinnan; Ni, Jianjun; Zhu, Xifang; Xiong, Chao

    2017-07-01

    In order to restore image color and enhance contrast of remote sensing image without suffering from color cast and insufficient detail enhancement, a novel improved multi-scale retinex with color restoration (MSRCR) image enhancement algorithm based on Gaussian filtering and guided filtering was proposed in this paper. Firstly, multi-scale Gaussian filtering functions were used to deal with the original image to obtain the rough illumination components. Secondly, accurate illumination components were acquired by using the guided filtering functions. Then, combining with four-direction Sobel edge detector, a self-adaptive weight selection nonlinear image enhancement was carried out. Finally, a series of evaluate metrics such as mean, MSE, PSNR, contrast and information entropy were used to assess the enhancement algorithm. The results showed that the proposed algorithm can suppress effectively noise interference, enhance the image quality and restore image color effectively.

  12. Simulation of Left Atrial Function Using a Multi-Scale Model of the Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pironet, Antoine; Dauby, Pierre C.; Paeme, Sabine; Kosta, Sarah; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Desaive, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    During a full cardiac cycle, the left atrium successively behaves as a reservoir, a conduit and a pump. This complex behavior makes it unrealistic to apply the time-varying elastance theory to characterize the left atrium, first, because this theory has known limitations, and second, because it is still uncertain whether the load independence hypothesis holds. In this study, we aim to bypass this uncertainty by relying on another kind of mathematical model of the cardiac chambers. In the present work, we describe both the left atrium and the left ventricle with a multi-scale model. The multi-scale property of this model comes from the fact that pressure inside a cardiac chamber is derived from a model of the sarcomere behavior. Macroscopic model parameters are identified from reference dog hemodynamic data. The multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including the left atrium is then simulated to show that the physiological roles of the left atrium are correctly reproduced. This include a biphasic pressure wave and an eight-shaped pressure-volume loop. We also test the validity of our model in non basal conditions by reproducing a preload reduction experiment by inferior vena cava occlusion with the model. We compute the variation of eight indices before and after this experiment and obtain the same variation as experimentally observed for seven out of the eight indices. In summary, the multi-scale mathematical model presented in this work is able to correctly account for the three roles of the left atrium and also exhibits a realistic left atrial pressure-volume loop. Furthermore, the model has been previously presented and validated for the left ventricle. This makes it a proper alternative to the time-varying elastance theory if the focus is set on precisely representing the left atrial and left ventricular behaviors. PMID:23755183

  13. Multi-scale modeling of shape distortions during sintering of bi-layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye; Bjørk, Rasmus; Olevsky, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Models for deformational behaviors of porous bodies during sintering often rely on limited number of internal variables as they are formulated based on simplified or ideal microstructures. Considering realistic microstructures can improve the predictive capabilities of the already established...... theories like the continuum theory of sintering. A new multi-scale numerical approach for modeling of shape distortions during sintering of macroscopically inhomogeneous structures combined with a microstructure model is developed. The microstructures of the porous body are described by unit cells based...

  14. Rapid prototyping of multi-scale biomedical microdevices by combining additive manufacturing technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Hengsbach, Stefan; Diaz Lantada, Andres

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of designing and manufacturing biomedical microdevices with multiple length-scale geometries can help to promote special interactions both with their environment and with surrounding biological systems. These interactions aim to enhance biocompatibility and overall performance by using biomimetic approaches. In this paper, we present a design and manufacturing procedure for obtaining multi-scale biomedical microsystems based on the combination of two additive manufacturing pro...

  15. Simulation of left atrial function using a multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Pironet

    Full Text Available During a full cardiac cycle, the left atrium successively behaves as a reservoir, a conduit and a pump. This complex behavior makes it unrealistic to apply the time-varying elastance theory to characterize the left atrium, first, because this theory has known limitations, and second, because it is still uncertain whether the load independence hypothesis holds. In this study, we aim to bypass this uncertainty by relying on another kind of mathematical model of the cardiac chambers. In the present work, we describe both the left atrium and the left ventricle with a multi-scale model. The multi-scale property of this model comes from the fact that pressure inside a cardiac chamber is derived from a model of the sarcomere behavior. Macroscopic model parameters are identified from reference dog hemodynamic data. The multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including the left atrium is then simulated to show that the physiological roles of the left atrium are correctly reproduced. This include a biphasic pressure wave and an eight-shaped pressure-volume loop. We also test the validity of our model in non basal conditions by reproducing a preload reduction experiment by inferior vena cava occlusion with the model. We compute the variation of eight indices before and after this experiment and obtain the same variation as experimentally observed for seven out of the eight indices. In summary, the multi-scale mathematical model presented in this work is able to correctly account for the three roles of the left atrium and also exhibits a realistic left atrial pressure-volume loop. Furthermore, the model has been previously presented and validated for the left ventricle. This makes it a proper alternative to the time-varying elastance theory if the focus is set on precisely representing the left atrial and left ventricular behaviors.

  16. Simulation of left atrial function using a multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pironet, Antoine; Dauby, Pierre C; Paeme, Sabine; Kosta, Sarah; Chase, J Geoffrey; Desaive, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    During a full cardiac cycle, the left atrium successively behaves as a reservoir, a conduit and a pump. This complex behavior makes it unrealistic to apply the time-varying elastance theory to characterize the left atrium, first, because this theory has known limitations, and second, because it is still uncertain whether the load independence hypothesis holds. In this study, we aim to bypass this uncertainty by relying on another kind of mathematical model of the cardiac chambers. In the present work, we describe both the left atrium and the left ventricle with a multi-scale model. The multi-scale property of this model comes from the fact that pressure inside a cardiac chamber is derived from a model of the sarcomere behavior. Macroscopic model parameters are identified from reference dog hemodynamic data. The multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including the left atrium is then simulated to show that the physiological roles of the left atrium are correctly reproduced. This include a biphasic pressure wave and an eight-shaped pressure-volume loop. We also test the validity of our model in non basal conditions by reproducing a preload reduction experiment by inferior vena cava occlusion with the model. We compute the variation of eight indices before and after this experiment and obtain the same variation as experimentally observed for seven out of the eight indices. In summary, the multi-scale mathematical model presented in this work is able to correctly account for the three roles of the left atrium and also exhibits a realistic left atrial pressure-volume loop. Furthermore, the model has been previously presented and validated for the left ventricle. This makes it a proper alternative to the time-varying elastance theory if the focus is set on precisely representing the left atrial and left ventricular behaviors.

  17. Multi-Physics and Multi-Scale Deterioration Modelling of Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik; Lepech, M.

    2016-01-01

    , methods and tools for modelling decades-long deterioration and maintenance are much less developed. In this paper, a multi-physics and multi-scale modelling approach for structural deterioration of reinforced concrete components due to reinforcement corrosion is presented. The multi-disciplinary modelling...... approach includes physical, chemical, electrochemical, and fracture mechanical processes at the material and meso-scale, which are further coupled with mechanical deterioration processes at the structural scale....

  18. Variational Multi-Scale method with spectral approximation of the sub-scales.

    KAUST Repository

    Dia, Ben Mansour

    2015-01-07

    A variational multi-scale method where the sub-grid scales are computed by spectral approximations is presented. It is based upon an extension of the spectral theorem to non necessarily self-adjoint elliptic operators that have an associated base of eigenfunctions which are orthonormal in weighted L2 spaces. We propose a feasible VMS-spectral method by truncation of this spectral expansion to a nite number of modes.

  19. Maritime Semantic Labeling of Optical Remote Sensing Images with Multi-Scale Fully Convolutional Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoning Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In current remote sensing literature, the problems of sea-land segmentation and ship detection (including in-dock ships are investigated separately despite the high correlation between them. This inhibits joint optimization and makes the implementation of the methods highly complicated. In this paper, we propose a novel fully convolutional network to accomplish the two tasks simultaneously, in a semantic labeling fashion, i.e., to label every pixel of the image into 3 classes, sea, land and ships. A multi-scale structure for the network is proposed to address the huge scale gap between different classes of targets, i.e., sea/land and ships. Conventional multi-scale structure utilizes shortcuts to connect low level, fine scale feature maps to high level ones to increase the network’s ability to produce finer results. In contrast, our proposed multi-scale structure focuses on increasing the receptive field of the network while maintaining the ability towards fine scale details. The multi-scale convolution network accommodates the huge scale difference between sea-land and ships and provides comprehensive features, and is able to accomplish the tasks in an end-to-end manner that is easy for implementation and feasible for joint optimization. In the network, the input forks into fine-scale and coarse-scale paths, which share the same convolution layers to minimize network parameter increase, and then are joined together to produce the final result. The experiments show that the network tackles the semantic labeling problem with improved performance.

  20. Low-carbon building assessment and multi-scale input-output analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G. Q.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Zhang, Bo; Shao, L.; Guo, S.; Zhou, S. Y.; Jiang, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Presented as a low-carbon building evaluation framework in this paper are detailed carbon emission account procedures for the life cycle of buildings in terms of nine stages as building construction, fitment, outdoor facility construction, transportation, operation, waste treatment, property management, demolition, and disposal for buildings, supported by integrated carbon intensity databases based on multi-scale input-output analysis, essential for low-carbon planning, procurement and supply chain design, and logistics management.

  1. a Mapping Method of Integrating Multi-Scale River Thematic Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Yue, C.; Cui, C.; Meng, L.

    2017-09-01

    Small-scale maps are generally used in spatial analysis for fast calculation, but part of important features are missing due to its generalization level, which makes the analysis results less accurate. Therefore, it is necessary to improve feature completeness of smallscale maps. The goal of this paper is to put forward a mapping method of integrating the existing multi-scale river thematic maps. In order to achieve this goal, this paper proposed an algorithm for multi-scale line features matching by calculating the distance from node to polyline and an integrating algorithm by simplifying, shortening and merging the features from the original multi-scale thematic maps. The experimental results proved that the new map produced by the method proposed in this paper keeps the same scale as the original small-scale map and it is consistent with the original large-scale map in terms of feature completeness. The strategy proposed in this paper can be used to produce a new river thematic map concluding all the features that users need; moreover, the new map not only expresses features completely but also takes up less storage.

  2. MULTI-SCALE SEGMENTATION OF HIGH RESOLUTION REMOTE SENSING IMAGES BY INTEGRATING MULTIPLE FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Di

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of multi-scale segmentation algorithms are not aiming at high resolution remote sensing images and have difficulty to communicate and use layers’ information. In view of them, we proposes a method of multi-scale segmentation of high resolution remote sensing images by integrating multiple features. First, Canny operator is used to extract edge information, and then band weighted distance function is built to obtain the edge weight. According to the criterion, the initial segmentation objects of color images can be gained by Kruskal minimum spanning tree algorithm. Finally segmentation images are got by the adaptive rule of Mumford–Shah region merging combination with spectral and texture information. The proposed method is evaluated precisely using analog images and ZY-3 satellite images through quantitative and qualitative analysis. The experimental results show that the multi-scale segmentation of high resolution remote sensing images by integrating multiple features outperformed the software eCognition fractal network evolution algorithm (highest-resolution network evolution that FNEA on the accuracy and slightly inferior to FNEA on the efficiency.

  3. Remote Sensing Images Super Resolution Reconstruction Based on Multi-scale Detail Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Hong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The existing methods are hard to highlight the details after super resolution reconstruction, so it is proposed a super-resolution model frame to enhance the multi-scale details. Firstly, the sequence images are multi-scale deposed to keep the edge structure and the deposed multi-scale image information are differenced. Then, the smoothing information and detail information are interpolated, and a texture detail enhancement function is built to improve the scope of small details. Finally, the coarse-scale image information and small-medium-scale information are confused to get the premier super-resolution reconstruction result, and a local optimizing model is built to further promote the premier image quality. The experiments on the same period and different period remote sensing images show that the objective evaluation index are both largely improved comparing with the interpolation method, traditional total variation(TVmethod,and maximum a posterior(MAP method. The details of the reconstruction image are improved distinctly. The reconstruction image produced using the proposed method provides more high frequency details, and the method proves to be robust and universal for different kinds of satellite remote sensing images.

  4. Data fusion of multi-scale representations for structural damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tian; Xu, Zili

    2018-01-01

    Despite extensive researches into structural health monitoring (SHM) in the past decades, there are few methods that can detect multiple slight damage in noisy environments. Here, we introduce a new hybrid method that utilizes multi-scale space theory and data fusion approach for multiple damage detection in beams and plates. A cascade filtering approach provides multi-scale space for noisy mode shapes and filters the fluctuations caused by measurement noise. In multi-scale space, a series of amplification and data fusion algorithms are utilized to search the damage features across all possible scales. We verify the effectiveness of the method by numerical simulation using damaged beams and plates with various types of boundary conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to illustrate the effectiveness and noise immunity of the proposed method. The applicability is further validated via laboratory cases studies focusing on different damage scenarios. Both results demonstrate that the proposed method has a superior noise tolerant ability, as well as damage sensitivity, without knowing material properties or boundary conditions.

  5. Multi-Scale Modeling the Mechanical Properties of Biaxial Weft Knitted Fabrics for Composite Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abghary, Mohammad Javad; Nedoushan, Reza Jafari; Hasani, Hossein

    2017-08-01

    In this paper a multi-scale numerical model for simulating the mechanical behavior of biaxial weft knitted fabrics produced based on 1×1 rib structure is presented. Fabrics were produced on a modern flat knitting machine using polyester as stitch yarns and nylon as straight yarns. A macro constitutive equation was presented to model the fabric mechanical behavior as a continuum material. User defined material subroutines were provided to implement the constitutive behavior in Abaqus software. The constitutive equation needs remarkable tensile tests on the fabric as the inputs. To solve this drawbacks meso scale modeling of the fabric was used to predict stress-strain curves of the fabric in three different directions (course, wale and 45°). In these simulations only the yarn properties are needed. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed macro and meso models, fabric tensile behavior in 22.5 and 67.5° directions were simulated by the calibrated macro model and compared with experimental results. Spherical deformation was also simulated by the multi scale model and compared with experimental results. The results showed that the multi-scale modeling can successfully predict the tensile and spherical deformation of the biaxial weft knitted fabric with least required experiments. This model will be useful for composite applications.

  6. Complexity in earthquake sequences controlled by multi-scale heterogeneity in fault fracture energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aochi, H.; Ide, S.

    2008-12-01

    A series of dynamic rupture events under constant tectonic loading is simulated on a fault with multi-scale heterogeneity and a stochastic rupture initiation process. The fracture energy of the fault plane is assumed to have multi-scale heterogeneous distribution using fractal circular patches. The stochastic rupture initiation process with a function of the accumulated stress is introduced in order to take account for unknown smaller- scale heterogeneity and incertitude. Five realizations of a statistical spatial distribution of fracture energy (fault heterogeneity maps) are tested for the simulations of earthquake sequences during a few seismic cycles. The diversity of earthquake sequences is principally controlled by the spatial distribution of the patches. The effect of dynamic rupture appears in the residual stress after the characteristic events due to their directivity and this localizes the subsequent sequences. Although the characteristic earthquakes occur rather regularly in time and similarly in different seismic cycles, some irregular behaviors are found, based on the heterogeneity maps and the randomness of the preceding earthquake sequence, leading to a visible anomaly in the seismicity. Such anomaly is not predicable, but understandable through the analysis of the concerned earthquakes during the cycle. The similarity and the diversity simulated in this study, governed by the structure of an inherent distribution of multi-scale heterogeneity, suggests the importance of pre-existing heterogeneity field along the fault for the appearance of earthquake sequences, including those that are characteristic.

  7. Multi-Scale Modeling of an Integrated 3D Braided Composite with Applications to Helicopter Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Diantang; Chen, Li; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Yifan; Qian, Kun

    2017-10-01

    A study is conducted with the aim of developing multi-scale analytical method for designing the composite helicopter arm with three-dimensional (3D) five-directional braided structure. Based on the analysis of 3D braided microstructure, the multi-scale finite element modeling is developed. Finite element analysis on the load capacity of 3D five-directional braided composites helicopter arm is carried out using the software ABAQUS/Standard. The influences of the braiding angle and loading condition on the stress and strain distribution of the helicopter arm are simulated. The results show that the proposed multi-scale method is capable of accurately predicting the mechanical properties of 3D braided composites, validated by the comparison the stress-strain curves of meso-scale RVCs. Furthermore, it is found that the braiding angle is an important factor affecting the mechanical properties of 3D five-directional braided composite helicopter arm. Based on the optimized structure parameters, the nearly net-shaped composite helicopter arm is fabricated using a novel resin transfer mould (RTM) process.

  8. Multi-Scale Microstructural Thermoelectric Materials: Transport Behavior, Non-Equilibrium Preparation, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xianli; Wei, Ping; Li, Han; Liu, Wei; Yan, Yonggao; Li, Peng; Su, Chuqi; Xie, Changjun; Zhao, Wenyu; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie; Tang, Xinfeng; Uher, Ctirad

    2017-05-01

    Considering only about one third of the world's energy consumption is effectively utilized for functional uses, and the remaining is dissipated as waste heat, thermoelectric (TE) materials, which offer a direct and clean thermal-to-electric conversion pathway, have generated a tremendous worldwide interest. The last two decades have witnessed a remarkable development in TE materials. This Review summarizes the efforts devoted to the study of non-equilibrium synthesis of TE materials with multi-scale structures, their transport behavior, and areas of applications. Studies that work towards the ultimate goal of developing highly efficient TE materials possessing multi-scale architectures are highlighted, encompassing the optimization of TE performance via engineering the structures with different dimensional aspects spanning from the atomic and molecular scales, to nanometer sizes, and to the mesoscale. In consideration of the practical applications of high-performance TE materials, the non-equilibrium approaches offer a fast and controllable fabrication of multi-scale microstructures, and their scale up to industrial-size manufacturing is emphasized here. Finally, the design of two integrated power generating TE systems are described-a solar thermoelectric-photovoltaic hybrid system and a vehicle waste heat harvesting system-that represent perhaps the most important applications of thermoelectricity in the energy conversion area. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Exploring a multi-scale method for molecular simulation in continuum solvent model: Explicit simulation of continuum solvent as an incompressible fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Li; Luo, Ray

    2017-12-01

    We explored a multi-scale algorithm for the Poisson-Boltzmann continuum solvent model for more robust simulations of biomolecules. In this method, the continuum solvent/solute interface is explicitly simulated with a numerical fluid dynamics procedure, which is tightly coupled to the solute molecular dynamics simulation. There are multiple benefits to adopt such a strategy as presented below. At this stage of the development, only nonelectrostatic interactions, i.e., van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions, are included in the algorithm to assess the quality of the solvent-solute interface generated by the new method. Nevertheless, numerical challenges exist in accurately interpolating the highly nonlinear van der Waals term when solving the finite-difference fluid dynamics equations. We were able to bypass the challenge rigorously by merging the van der Waals potential and pressure together when solving the fluid dynamics equations and by considering its contribution in the free-boundary condition analytically. The multi-scale simulation method was first validated by reproducing the solute-solvent interface of a single atom with analytical solution. Next, we performed the relaxation simulation of a restrained symmetrical monomer and observed a symmetrical solvent interface at equilibrium with detailed surface features resembling those found on the solvent excluded surface. Four typical small molecular complexes were then tested, both volume and force balancing analyses showing that these simple complexes can reach equilibrium within the simulation time window. Finally, we studied the quality of the multi-scale solute-solvent interfaces for the four tested dimer complexes and found that they agree well with the boundaries as sampled in the explicit water simulations.

  10. Automatic Craniomaxillofacial Landmark Digitization via Segmentation-guided Partially-joint Regression Forest Model and Multi-scale Statistical Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Gao, Yaozong; Wang, Li; Tang, Zhen; Xia, James J.; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of this paper is to automatically digitize craniomaxillofacial (CMF) landmarks efficiently and accurately from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, by addressing the challenge caused by large morphological variations across patients and image artifacts of CBCT images. Methods We propose a Segmentation-guided Partially-joint Regression Forest (S-PRF) model to automatically digitize CMF landmarks. In this model, a regression voting strategy is first adopted to localize each landmark by aggregating evidences from context locations, thus potentially relieving the problem caused by image artifacts near the landmark. Second, CBCT image segmentation is utilized to remove uninformative voxels caused by morphological variations across patients. Third, a partially-joint model is further proposed to separately localize landmarks based on the coherence of landmark positions to improve the digitization reliability. In addition, we propose a fast vector quantization (VQ) method to extract high-level multi-scale statistical features to describe a voxel's appearance, which has low dimensionality, high efficiency, and is also invariant to the local inhomogeneity caused by artifacts. Results Mean digitization errors for 15 landmarks, in comparison to the ground truth, are all less than 2mm. Conclusion Our model has addressed challenges of both inter-patient morphological variations and imaging artifacts. Experiments on a CBCT dataset show that our approach achieves clinically acceptable accuracy for landmark digitalization. Significance Our automatic landmark digitization method can be used clinically to reduce the labor cost and also improve digitalization consistency. PMID:26625402

  11. The multi-scale aerosol-climate model PNNL-MMF: model description and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic aerosol effects on climate produce one of the largest uncertainties in estimates of radiative forcing of past and future climate change. Much of this uncertainty arises from the multi-scale nature of the interactions between aerosols, clouds and large-scale dynamics, which are difficult to represent in conventional general circulation models (GCMs. In this study, we develop a multi-scale aerosol-climate model that treats aerosols and clouds across different scales, and evaluate the model performance, with a focus on aerosol treatment. This new model is an extension of a multi-scale modeling framework (MMF model that embeds a cloud-resolving model (CRM within each grid column of a GCM. In this extension, the effects of clouds on aerosols are treated by using an explicit-cloud parameterized-pollutant (ECPP approach that links aerosol and chemical processes on the large-scale grid with statistics of cloud properties and processes resolved by the CRM. A two-moment cloud microphysics scheme replaces the simple bulk microphysics scheme in the CRM, and a modal aerosol treatment is included in the GCM. With these extensions, this multi-scale aerosol-climate model allows the explicit simulation of aerosol and chemical processes in both stratiform and convective clouds on a global scale.

    Simulated aerosol budgets in this new model are in the ranges of other model studies. Simulated gas and aerosol concentrations are in reasonable agreement with observations (within a factor of 2 in most cases, although the model underestimates black carbon concentrations at the surface by a factor of 2–4. Simulated aerosol size distributions are in reasonable agreement with observations in the marine boundary layer and in the free troposphere, while the model underestimates the accumulation mode number concentrations near the surface, and overestimates the accumulation mode number concentrations in the middle and upper free troposphere by a factor

  12. Using Multi-Scale Modeling Systems and Satellite Data to Study the Precipitation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, J.; Lamg, S.; Matsui, T.; Shen, B.; Zeng, X.; Shi, R.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, exponentially increasing computer power has extended Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) integrations from hours to months, the number of computational grid points from less than a thousand to close to ten million. Three-dimensional models are now more prevalent. Much attention is devoted to precipitating cloud systems where the crucial 1-km scales are resolved in horizontal domains as large as 10,000 km in two-dimensions, and 1,000 x 1,000 km2 in three-dimensions. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that NWP and mesoscale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique. Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (l) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, the recent developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the results from using multi-scale modeling system to study the precipitating systems and hurricanes/typhoons will be presented. The high-resolution spatial and temporal visualization will be utilized to show the evolution of precipitation processes. Also how to

  13. Introduction of an agent-based multi-scale modular architecture for dynamic knowledge representation of acute inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Gary

    2008-01-01

    . The ABMs all utilize cell-level agents that encapsulate specific mechanistic knowledge extracted from in vitro experiments. The execution of the ABMs results in a dynamic representation of the multi-scale conceptual models derived from those experiments. These models represent a qualitative means of integrating basic scientific information on acute inflammation in a multi-scale, modular architecture as a means of conceptual model verification that can potentially be used to concatenate, communicate and advance community-wide knowledge. PMID:18505587

  14. Multi-scale Material Parameter Identification Using LS-DYNA® and LS-OPT®

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stander, Nielen; Basudhar, Anirban; Basu, Ushnish; Gandikota, Imtiaz; Savic, Vesna; Sun, Xin; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Hu, Xiaohua; Pourboghrat, F.; Park, Taejoon; Mapar, Aboozar; Kumar, Shavan; Ghassemi-Armaki, Hassan; Abu-Farha, Fadi

    2015-09-14

    Ever-tightening regulations on fuel economy, and the likely future regulation of carbon emissions, demand persistent innovation in vehicle design to reduce vehicle mass. Classical methods for computational mass reduction include sizing, shape and topology optimization. One of the few remaining options for weight reduction can be found in materials engineering and material design optimization. Apart from considering different types of materials, by adding material diversity and composite materials, an appealing option in automotive design is to engineer steel alloys for the purpose of reducing plate thickness while retaining sufficient strength and ductility required for durability and safety. A project to develop computational material models for advanced high strength steel is currently being executed under the auspices of the United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) funded by the US Department of Energy. Under this program, new Third Generation Advanced High Strength Steel (i.e., 3GAHSS) are being designed, tested and integrated with the remaining design variables of a benchmark vehicle Finite Element model. The objectives of the project are to integrate atomistic, microstructural, forming and performance models to create an integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) toolkit for 3GAHSS. The mechanical properties of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are controlled by many factors, including phase composition and distribution in the overall microstructure, volume fraction, size and morphology of phase constituents as well as stability of the metastable retained austenite phase. The complex phase transformation and deformation mechanisms in these steels make the well-established traditional techniques obsolete, and a multi-scale microstructure-based modeling approach following the ICME [0]strategy was therefore chosen in this project. Multi-scale modeling as a major area of research and development is an outgrowth of the Comprehensive

  15. An integrated multi-scale risk analysis procedure for pluvial flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tader, Andreas; Mergili, Martin; Jäger, Stefan; Glade, Thomas; Neuhold, Clemens; Stiefelmeyer, Heinz

    2016-04-01

    Mitigation of or adaptation to the negative impacts of natural processes on society requires a better understanding of the spatio-temporal distribution not only of the processes themselves, but also of the elements at risk. Information on their values, exposures and vulnerabilities towards the expected impact magnitudes/intensities of the relevant processes is needed. GIS-supported methods are particularly useful for integrated spatio-temporal analyses of natural processes and their potential consequences. Hereby, pluvial floods are of particular concern for many parts of Austria. The overall aim of the present study is to calculate the hazards emanating from pluvial floods, to determine the exposure of given elements at risk, to determine their vulnerabilities towards given pluvial flood hazards and to analyze potential consequences in terms of monetary losses. The whole approach builds on data available on a national scale. We introduce an integrated, multi-scale risk analysis procedure with regard to pluvial flooding. Focusing on the risk to buildings, we firstly exemplify this procedure with a well-documented event in the city of Graz (Austria), in order to highlight the associated potentials and limitations. Secondly, we attempt to predict the possible consequences of pluvial flooding triggered by rainfall events with recurrence intervals of 30, 100 and 300 years. (i) We compute spatially distributed inundation depths using the software FloodArea. Infiltration capacity and surface roughness are estimated from the land cover units given by the official cadastre. Various assumptions are tested with regard to the inflow to the urban sewer system. (ii) Based on the inundation depths and the official building register, we employ a set of rules and functions to deduce the exposure, vulnerability and risk for each building. A risk indicator for each building, expressed as the expected damage associated to a given event, is derived by combining the building value and

  16. Turbulent Flow Structure Inside a Canopy with Complex Multi-Scale Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Kunlun; Katz, Joseph; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Particle image velocimetry laboratory measurements are carried out to study mean flow distributions and turbulent statistics inside a canopy with complex geometry and multiple scales consisting of fractal, tree-like objects. Matching the optical refractive indices of the tree elements with those of the working fluid provides unobstructed optical paths for both illuminations and image acquisition. As a result, the flow fields between tree branches can be resolved in great detail, without optical interference. Statistical distributions of mean velocity, turbulence stresses, and components of dispersive fluxes are documented and discussed. The results show that the trees leave their signatures in the flow by imprinting wake structures with shapes similar to the trees. The velocities in both wake and non-wake regions significantly deviate from the spatially-averaged values. These local deviations result in strong dispersive fluxes, which are important to account for in canopy-flow modelling. In fact, we find that the streamwise normal dispersive flux inside the canopy has a larger magnitude (by up to four times) than the corresponding Reynolds normal stress. Turbulent transport in horizontal planes is studied in the framework of the eddy viscosity model. Scatter plots comparing the Reynolds shear stress and mean velocity gradient are indicative of a linear trend, from which one can calculate the eddy viscosity and mixing length. Similar to earlier results from the wake of a single tree, here we find that inside the canopy the mean mixing length decreases with increasing elevation. This trend cannot be scaled based on a single length scale, but can be described well by a model, which considers the coexistence of multi-scale branches. This agreement indicates that the multi-scale information and the clustering properties of the fractal objects should be taken into consideration in flows inside multi-scale canopies.

  17. Using CellML with OpenCMISS to simulate multi-scale physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Phillip Nickerson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OpenCMISS is an open-source modeling environment aimed, in particular, at the solution of bioengineering problems. OpenCMISS consists of two main parts: a computational library (OpenCMISS-Iron and a field manipulation and visualisation library (OpenCMISS-Zinc. OpenCMISS is designed for the solution of coupled multi-scale, multi-physics problems in a general-purpose parallel environment.CellML is an XML format designed to encode biophysically based systems of ordinary differential equations and both linear and non-linear algebraic equations. A primary design goal of CellML is to allow mathematical models to be encoded in a modular and reusable format to aide reproducibility and interoperability of modeling studies.In OpenCMISS we make use of CellML models to enable users to configure various aspects of their multi-scale physiological models. This avoids the need for users to be familiar with the OpenCMISS internal code in order to perform customised computational experiments. Examples of this are: cellular electrophysiology models embedded in tissue electrical propagation models; material constitutive relationships for mechanical growth and deformation simulations; time-varying boundary conditions for various problem domains; fluid constitutive relationships and lumped parameter models. In this paper we provide implementation details describing how CellML models are integrated into multi-scale physiological models in OpenCMISS. The external interface OpenCMISS presents to users will also be described, including specific examples exemplifying the extensibility and usability these tools provide the physiological modelling and simulation community. We conclude with some thoughts on future extension of OpenCMISS to make use other community developed information standards, such as FieldML, SED-ML, and BioSignalML. Plans for the integration of accelerator code (GPU and FPGA generated from CellML models is also discussed.

  18. Exploring Multi-Scale Spatiotemporal Twitter User Mobility Patterns with a Visual-Analytics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Yin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding human mobility patterns is of great importance for urban planning, traffic management, and even marketing campaign. However, the capability of capturing detailed human movements with fine-grained spatial and temporal granularity is still limited. In this study, we extracted high-resolution mobility data from a collection of over 1.3 billion geo-located Twitter messages. Regarding the concerns of infringement on individual privacy, such as the mobile phone call records with restricted access, the dataset is collected from publicly accessible Twitter data streams. In this paper, we employed a visual-analytics approach to studying multi-scale spatiotemporal Twitter user mobility patterns in the contiguous United States during the year 2014. Our approach included a scalable visual-analytics framework to deliver efficiency and scalability in filtering large volume of geo-located tweets, modeling and extracting Twitter user movements, generating space-time user trajectories, and summarizing multi-scale spatiotemporal user mobility patterns. We performed a set of statistical analysis to understand Twitter user mobility patterns across multi-level spatial scales and temporal ranges. In particular, Twitter user mobility patterns measured by the displacements and radius of gyrations of individuals revealed multi-scale or multi-modal Twitter user mobility patterns. By further studying such mobility patterns in different temporal ranges, we identified both consistency and seasonal fluctuations regarding the distance decay effects in the corresponding mobility patterns. At the same time, our approach provides a geo-visualization unit with an interactive 3D virtual globe web mapping interface for exploratory geo-visual analytics of the multi-level spatiotemporal Twitter user movements.

  19. Evaluating and Improving Cloud Processes in the Multi-Scale Modeling Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, Thomas P. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The research performed under this grant was intended to improve the embedded cloud model in the Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) for convective clouds by using a 2-moment microphysics scheme rather than the single moment scheme used in all the MMF runs to date. The technical report and associated documents describe the results of testing the cloud resolving model with fixed boundary conditions and evaluation of model results with data. The overarching conclusion is that such model evaluations are problematic because errors in the forcing fields control the results so strongly that variations in parameterization values cannot be usefully constrained

  20. Multi-scale modeling of follicular ovulation as a reachability problem

    CERN Document Server

    Echenim, Nki; Sorine, Michel

    2007-01-01

    During each ovarian cycle, only a definite number of follicles ovulate, while the others undergo a degeneration process called atresia. We have designed a multi-scale mathematical model where ovulation and atresia result from a hormonal controlled selection process. A 2D-conservation law describes the age and maturity structuration of the follicular cell population. In this paper, we focus on the operating mode of the control, through the study of the characteristics of the conservation law. We describe in particular the set of microscopic initial conditions leading to the macroscopic phenomenon of either ovulation or atresia, in the framework of backwards reachable sets theory.

  1. Multi-level and multi-scale integrative approach to the understanding of human blastocyst implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Jayasree; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    Implantation is a complex process which results in fixation of zona pellucida free blastocyst to the maternal uterine endometrium. In the human, it involves progesterone mediated preparation of endometrium, age- and stage-matched development of pre-implantation embryo, and interaction between embryo and endometrium. In the present essay, we present the case to explain why there is a necessity of undertaking multi-level, multi-scale integrative approach to deconstruct the succession process of endometrial development to the climax of implantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cerebellum segmentation in MRI using atlas registration and local multi-scale image descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Lijn, F.; de Bruijne, M.; Hoogendam, Y.Y.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a novel cerebellum segmentation method for MRI, based on a combination of statistical models of the structure's expected location in the brain and its local appearance. The appearance model is obtained from a k-nearest-neighbor classifier, which uses a set of multi-scale local image....... The experiment showed that the method produces accurate segmentations. The mean Dice similarity index compared to the manual reference was 0.953 for left and right, and the mean surface distance was 0.49 mm for left and 0.50 mm for right. The combined atlas- and appearance-based method was found to be more...

  3. Replication of Non-Trivial Directional Motion in Multi-Scales Observed by the Runs Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Yamada, Kenta; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    Non-trivial autocorrelation in up-down statistics in financial market price fluctuation is revealed by a multi-scale runs test(Wald-Wolfowitz test). We apply two models, a stochastic price model and dealer model to understand this property. In both approaches we successfully reproduce the non-stationary directional price motions consistent with the runs test by tuning parameters in the models. We find that two types of dealers exist in the markets, a short-time-scale trend-follower and an extended-time-scale contrarian who are active in different time periods.

  4. Modeling Impact-induced Failure of Polysilicon MEMS: A Multi-scale Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Mariani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of packaged polysilicon micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS subjected to impacts involves phenomena occurring at several length-scales. In this paper we present a multi-scale finite element approach to properly allow for: (i the propagation of stress waves inside the package; (ii the dynamics of the whole MEMS; (iii the spreading of micro-cracking in the failing part(s of the sensor. Through Monte Carlo simulations, some effects of polysilicon micro-structure on the failure mode are elucidated.

  5. Multi-scale kinetic description of granular clusters: invariance, balance, and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriz, Gianfranco; Mariano, Paolo Maria

    2017-12-01

    We discuss a multi-scale continuum representation of bodies made of several mass particles flowing independently each other. From an invariance procedure and a nonstandard balance of inertial actions, we derive the balance equations introduced in earlier work directly in pointwise form, essentially on the basis of physical plausibility. In this way, we analyze their foundations. Then, we propose a Boltzmann-type equation for the distribution of kinetic energies within control volumes in space and indicate how such a distribution allows us to propose a definition of (granular) temperature along processes far from equilibrium.

  6. Multi-scale semi-ideal magnetohydrodynamics of a tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazdenkov, S.; Sato, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kunihiko

    1995-09-01

    An analytical model of fast spatial flattening of the toroidal current density and q-profile at the nonlinear stage of (m = 1/n = 1) kink instability of a tokamak plasma is presented. The flattening is shown to be an essentially multi-scale phenomenon which is characterized by, at least, two magnetic Reynolds numbers. The ordinary one, R{sub m}, is related with a characteristic radial scale-length, while the other, R{sub m}{sup *}, corresponds to a characteristic scale-length of plasma inhomogeneity along the magnetic field line. In a highly conducting plasma inside the q = 1 magnetic surface, where q value does not much differ from unity, plasma evolution is governed by a multi-scale non-ideal dynamics characterized by two well-separated magnetic Reynolds numbers, R{sub m} and R{sub m}{sup *} {identical_to} (1 - q) R{sub m}, where R{sub m}{sup *} - O(1) and R{sub m} >> 1. This dynamics consistently explains two seemingly contradictory features recently observed in a numerical simulation [Watanabe et al., 1995]: (i) the current profile (q-profile) is flattened in the magnetohydrodynamic time scale within the q = 1 rational surface; (ii) the magnetic surface keeps its initial circular shape during this evolution. (author).

  7. Multi-Scale Factor Analysis of High-Dimensional Brain Signals

    KAUST Repository

    Ting, Chee-Ming

    2017-05-18

    In this paper, we develop an approach to modeling high-dimensional networks with a large number of nodes arranged in a hierarchical and modular structure. We propose a novel multi-scale factor analysis (MSFA) model which partitions the massive spatio-temporal data defined over the complex networks into a finite set of regional clusters. To achieve further dimension reduction, we represent the signals in each cluster by a small number of latent factors. The correlation matrix for all nodes in the network are approximated by lower-dimensional sub-structures derived from the cluster-specific factors. To estimate regional connectivity between numerous nodes (within each cluster), we apply principal components analysis (PCA) to produce factors which are derived as the optimal reconstruction of the observed signals under the squared loss. Then, we estimate global connectivity (between clusters or sub-networks) based on the factors across regions using the RV-coefficient as the cross-dependence measure. This gives a reliable and computationally efficient multi-scale analysis of both regional and global dependencies of the large networks. The proposed novel approach is applied to estimate brain connectivity networks using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Results on resting-state fMRI reveal interesting modular and hierarchical organization of human brain networks during rest.

  8. Multi-scale MHD analysis incorporating pressure transport equation for beta-increasing LHD plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiguchi, Katsuji; Carreras, Benjamin A.

    2011-05-01

    A multi-scale MHD numerical scheme is developed for analysis of nonlinear evolution of a beta-increasing plasma. The scheme is based on iterative calculations of nonlinear dynamics based on the reduced MHD (RMHD) equations and three-dimensional static equilibrium. The equation for average pressure in the RMHD equations plays the role of a transport equation that involves a heat source term and background pressure diffusion terms. The heat source term is controlled so that the beta value should be increased at a constant rate. The scheme is applied to a Large Helical Device (LHD) plasma up to average beta of 1.05%, which is unstable against linear ideal interchange modes while beta values much higher than the stability limit are obtained in the experiments. The result with the multi-scale scheme indicates that many local flat regions are generated in the background pressure profile in the nonlinear evolution of the interchange modes. This structure of the pressure profile suppresses disruptive phenomena because it reduces the driving force of the modes at higher beta value. Such self-organization in the pressure profile is considered to be the stabilizing mechanism in the plasma.

  9. A novel multi-scale Hessian based spot enhancement filter for two dimensional gel electrophoresis images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamekhi, Sina; Miran Baygi, Mohammad Hossein; Azarian, Bahareh; Gooya, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) is a useful method for studying proteins in a wide variety of applications including identifying post-translation modification (PTM), biomarker discovery, and protein purification. Computerized segmentation and detection of the proteins are the two main processes that are carried out on the scanned image of the gel. Due to the complexities of 2DGE images and the presence of artifacts, the segmentation and detection of protein spots in these images are non-trivial, and involve supervised and time consuming processes. This paper introduces a new spot filter for enhancing, and separating the closely overlapping spots of protein in 2DGE images based on the multi-scale eigenvalue analysis of the image Hessian. Using a Gaussian spot model, we have derived closed form equations to compute the eigen components of the image Hessian of two overlapping spots in a multi-scale fashion. Based on this analysis, we have proposed a novel filter that suppresses the overlapping area and results in a better spot separation. The performance of the proposed filter has been evaluated on the synthetic and real 2DGE images. The comparison with three conventional techniques and a commercial software package reveals the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed filter. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Multi-scales region segmentation for ROI separation in digital mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dapeng; Zhang, Di; Li, Yue; Wang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Mammography is currently the most effective imaging modality used by radiologists for the screening of breast cancer. Segmentation is one of the key steps in the process of developing anatomical models for calculation of safe medical dose of radiation. This paper explores the potential of the statistical region merging segmentation technique for Breast segmentation in digital mammograms. First, the mammograms are pre-processing for regions enhancement, then the enhanced images are segmented using SRM with multi scales, finally these segmentations are combined for region of interest (ROI) separation and edge detection. The proposed algorithm uses multi-scales region segmentation in order to: separate breast region from background region, region edge detection and ROIs separation. The experiments are performed using a data set of mammograms from different patients, demonstrating the validity of the proposed criterion. Results show that, the statistical region merging segmentation algorithm actually can work on the segmentation of medical image and more accurate than another methods. And the outcome shows that the technique has a great potential to become a method of choice for segmentation of mammograms.

  11. A White Beam Far-field Neutron Interferometer for Multi-scale Resolution of Porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, D. S.; Miao, H.; Anovitz, L. M.; Jacobson, D. L.; LaManna, J.; Wen, H.

    2016-12-01

    The pore structure of geological formations spans many decades of length scales, from the Angstrom to the kilometer. There are few probes which can assess characterize these structures simultaneously. We will present a demonstration of a new neutron phase imaging method that can provide quantitative, multi-scale images, addressing length scales from the nanometer to the centimeter. The phase imaging method is based on a far field interferometer that produces phase gradient and small-angle scattering images using a polychromatic neutron beam. The interferometer is based on the Moiré pattern of two phase modulating gratings which was previously realized in hard x-ray and visible light experiments. An important aspect of the method is the ability to tune the auto-correlation length of the interferometer by changing the separation of the two gratings, and thereby provides a measure of the real-space pair-correlation function, G(z), of the sample. As has been shown for other scattering methods, measures of G(z) can incorporate multiple scattering permitting the study of thick samples. As well, the method has the potential to enable tomographic reconstruction so that a fully 3D distribution of the microstructure can be measured. Multi-scale data from several core specimens will be presented showing the quantitative ability of the method.

  12. Retrieving the intracellular topology from multi-scale protein mobility mapping in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Michael; Erdel, Fabian; Wachsmuth, Malte; Rippe, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    In living cells, most proteins diffuse over distances of micrometres within seconds. Protein translocation is constrained due to the cellular organization into subcompartments that impose diffusion barriers and guide enzymatic activities to their targets. Here, we introduce an approach to retrieve structural features from the scale-dependent mobility of green fluorescent protein monomer and multimers in human cells. We measure protein transport simultaneously between hundreds of positions by multi-scale fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy using a line-illuminating confocal microscope. From these data we derive a quantitative model of the intracellular architecture that resembles a random obstacle network for diffusing proteins. This topology partitions the cellular content and increases the dwell time of proteins in their local environment. The accessibility of obstacle surfaces depends on protein size. Our method links multi-scale mobility measurements with a quantitative description of intracellular structure that can be applied to evaluate how drug-induced perturbations affect protein transport and interactions. PMID:25058002

  13. A multi-scale model for correlation in B cell VDJ usage of zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-10-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals used for the study of immunology because the dynamics in the adaptive immune system of zebrafish are similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a multi-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in the primary and secondary immune responses of zebrafish. We use this model to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in individual zebrafish. We use a delay ordinary differential equation (ODE) system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of a zebrafish. This mean field theory gives the number of high-affinity B cells as a function of time during an infection. The sequences of those B cells are then taken from a distribution calculated by a 'microscopic' random energy model. This generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen largely possess a single VDJ recombination. The model allows first-principle calculation of the probability, p, that two zebrafish responding to the same antigen will select the same VDJ recombination. This probability p increases with the B cell population size and the B cell selection intensity. The probability p decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The multi-scale model predicts correlations in the immune system of the zebrafish that are highly similar to that from experiment.

  14. [Multi-scale correlation analysis of soil organic carbon with its influence factors using wavelet transform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chun; Qian, Le-Xiang; Wu, Zhi-Feng; Wen, Ya; Deng, Nan-Rong

    2013-12-01

    Based on GIS, this paper chose the soil organic carbon (SOC) density in soil surface layer (0-20 cm) and its influence factors (NDVI, elevation, slope and aspect) as research objects, one-dimensional discrete wavelet transform (DWT) was used as the multi-scale decomposition tool to quantitatively revealed the multi-scale correlation relationships among SOC density and its influence factors on the grid scale along 4 transects of the mountainous area of Guangdong Province. The results showed that the correlation among SOC density and its influence factors was scale-dependent with varying degree. The influence of NDVI was strongest at the scales of 2, 8 and 16 km, while elevation showed its greatest influence at the scales of 8 and 16 km. The control action of slope was rather weak, with a less significant correlation depending on scale. The negative effect of aspect became stronger with increasing scale at > 2 km scale. The SOC density of the different transects was affected by various factors, of which NDVI and elevation were the main factors, and slope and aspect only reacted with individual transects at larger scales.

  15. Individual-specific multi-scale finite element simulation of cortical bone of human proximal femur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Kawas, Neal P.; Lutz, Andre; Kardas, Dieter; Nackenhorst, Udo; Keyak, Joyce H.

    2013-07-01

    We present an innovative method to perform multi-scale finite element analyses of the cortical component of the femur using the individual's (1) computed tomography scan; and (2) a bone specimen obtained in conjunction with orthopedic surgery. The method enables study of micro-structural characteristics regulating strains and stresses under physiological loading conditions. The analysis of the micro-structural scenarios that cause variation of strain and stress is the first step in understanding the elevated strains and stresses in bone tissue, which are indicative of higher likelihood of micro-crack formation in bone, implicated in consequent remodeling or macroscopic bone fracture. Evidence that micro-structure varies with clinical history and contributes in significant, but poorly understood, ways to bone function, motivates the method's development, as does need for software tools to investigate relationships between macroscopic loading and micro-structure. Three applications - varying region of interest, bone mineral density, and orientation of collagen type I, illustrate the method. We show, in comparison between physiological loading and simple compression of a patient's femur, that strains computed at the multi-scale model's micro-level: (i) differ; and (ii) depend on local collagen-apatite orientation and degree of calcification. Our findings confirm the strain concentration role of osteocyte lacunae, important for mechano-transduction. We hypothesize occurrence of micro-crack formation, leading either to remodeling or macroscopic fracture, when the computed strains exceed the elastic range observed in micro-structural testing.

  16. Multi-scale event synchronization analysis for unravelling climate processes: a wavelet-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ankit; Marwan, Norbert; Rathinasamy, Maheswaran; Merz, Bruno; Kurths, Jürgen

    2017-10-01

    The temporal dynamics of climate processes are spread across different timescales and, as such, the study of these processes at only one selected timescale might not reveal the complete mechanisms and interactions within and between the (sub-)processes. To capture the non-linear interactions between climatic events, the method of event synchronization has found increasing attention recently. The main drawback with the present estimation of event synchronization is its restriction to analysing the time series at one reference timescale only. The study of event synchronization at multiple scales would be of great interest to comprehend the dynamics of the investigated climate processes. In this paper, the wavelet-based multi-scale event synchronization (MSES) method is proposed by combining the wavelet transform and event synchronization. Wavelets are used extensively to comprehend multi-scale processes and the dynamics of processes across various timescales. The proposed method allows the study of spatio-temporal patterns across different timescales. The method is tested on synthetic and real-world time series in order to check its replicability and applicability. The results indicate that MSES is able to capture relationships that exist between processes at different timescales.

  17. Multi-scale theoretical investigation of hydrogen storage in covalent organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylianakis, Emmanuel; Klontzas, Emmanouel; Froudakis, George E

    2011-03-01

    The quest for efficient hydrogen storage materials has been the limiting step towards the commercialization of hydrogen as an energy carrier and has attracted a lot of attention from the scientific community. Sophisticated multi-scale theoretical techniques have been considered as a valuable tool for the prediction of materials storage properties. Such techniques have also been used for the investigation of hydrogen storage in a novel category of porous materials known as Covalent Organic Frameworks (COFs). These framework materials are consisted of light elements and are characterized by exceptional physicochemical properties such as large surface areas and pore volumes. Combinations of ab initio, Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Grand Canonical Monte-Carlo (GCMC) calculations have been performed to investigate the hydrogen adsorption in these ultra-light materials. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the theoretical hydrogen storage studies that have been published after the discovery of COFs. Experimental and theoretical studies have proven that COFs have comparable or better hydrogen storage abilities than other competitive materials such as MOF. The key factors that can lead to the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of COFs are highlighted, accompanied with some recently presented theoretical multi-scale studies concerning these factors.

  18. Multi-scale Simulations of DIII-D near-edge L-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiser, T.; Jenko, F.; Carter, T.; Schmitz, L.; Told, D.; Navarro, A. Banon; McKee, G.; Yan, Z.

    2016-10-01

    In order to self-consistently describe the L-H transition we have to be able to quantitatively characterize near-edge L-mode plasmas (ρ=0.8). Instructed by a linear analysis, we perform nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of a DIII-D L-mode discharge. Comparison between single-scale and multi-scale simulations reveals that stability of ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence affects cross-scale coupling. When ion transport is stabilized by zonal flows, electron temperature gradient (ETG) streamer amplitude is reduced but persists at sub-ion-scales, causing radial electron heat transport to dominate. When ITG modes are unstable, we find that ion heat transport dominates, in agreement with experimental data. Moreover, nonlinear de-stabilization of ion transport occurs at higher critical gradients for multi-scale than for single-scale simulations, showing an enhanced Dimits shift. All simulations are performed with the GENE code (genecode.org). Experimental and computational work supported by the U.S. DOE, DE-FG02-08ER54984, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  19. Learning Dual Multi-Scale Manifold Ranking for Semantic Segmentation of High-Resolution Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Semantic image segmentation has recently witnessed considerable progress by training deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs. The core issue of this technique is the limited capacity of CNNs to depict visual objects. Existing approaches tend to utilize approximate inference in a discrete domain or additional aides and do not have a global optimum guarantee. We propose the use of the multi-label manifold ranking (MR method in solving the linear objective energy function in a continuous domain to delineate visual objects and solve these problems. We present a novel embedded single stream optimization method based on the MR model to avoid approximations without sacrificing expressive power. In addition, we propose a novel network, which we refer to as dual multi-scale manifold ranking (DMSMR network, that combines the dilated, multi-scale strategies with the single stream MR optimization method in the deep learning architecture to further improve the performance. Experiments on high resolution images, including close-range and remote sensing datasets, demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve competitive accuracy without additional aides in an end-to-end manner.

  20. Intrinsic multi-scale analysis: a multi-variate empirical mode decomposition framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, David; Hemakom, Apit; Mandic, Danilo P

    2015-01-08

    A novel multi-scale approach for quantifying both inter- and intra-component dependence of a complex system is introduced. This is achieved using empirical mode decomposition (EMD), which, unlike conventional scale-estimation methods, obtains a set of scales reflecting the underlying oscillations at the intrinsic scale level. This enables the data-driven operation of several standard data-association measures (intrinsic correlation, intrinsic sample entropy (SE), intrinsic phase synchrony) and, at the same time, preserves the physical meaning of the analysis. The utility of multi-variate extensions of EMD is highlighted, both in terms of robust scale alignment between system components, a pre-requisite for inter-component measures, and in the estimation of feature relevance. We also illuminate that the properties of EMD scales can be used to decouple amplitude and phase information, a necessary step in order to accurately quantify signal dynamics through correlation and SE analysis which are otherwise not possible. Finally, the proposed multi-scale framework is applied to detect directionality, and higher order features such as coupling and regularity, in both synthetic and biological systems.

  1. Prediction of Coal Face Gas Concentration by Multi-Scale Selective Ensemble Hybrid Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Xiang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A selective ensemble hybrid modeling prediction method based on wavelet transformation is proposed to improve the fitting and generalization capability of the existing prediction models of the coal face gas concentration, which has a strong stochastic volatility. Mallat algorithm was employed for the multi-scale decomposition and single-scale reconstruction of the gas concentration time series. Then, it predicted every subsequence by sparsely weighted multi unstable ELM(extreme learning machine predictor within method SERELM(sparse ensemble regressors of ELM. At last, it superimposed the predicted values of these models to obtain the predicted values of the original sequence. The proposed method takes advantage of characteristics of multi scale analysis of wavelet transformation, accuracy and fast characteristics of ELM prediction and the generalization ability of L1 regularized selective ensemble learning method. The results show that the forecast accuracy has large increase by using the proposed method. The average relative error is 0.65%, the maximum relative error is 4.16% and the probability of relative error less than 1% reaches 0.785.

  2. A multi-scale framework to link remotely sensed metrics with socioeconomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmough, Gary; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Palm, Cheryl; Sullivan, Clare; Danylo, Olha; McCallum, Ian

    2017-04-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of remotely sensed satellite data for estimating human poverty as it can bridge data gaps that prevent fine scale monitoring of development goals across large areas. The ways in which metrics derived from satellite imagery are linked with socioeconomic data are crucial for accurate estimation of poverty. Yet, to date, approaches in the literature linking satellite metrics with socioeconomic data are poorly characterized. Typically, approaches use a GIS approach such as circular buffer zones around a village or household or an administrative boundary such as a district or census enumeration area. These polygons are then used to extract environmental data from satellite imagery and related to the socioeconomic data in statistical analyses. The use of a single polygon to link environment and socioeconomic data is inappropriate in coupled human-natural systems as processes operate over multiple scales. Human interactions with the environment occur at multiple levels from individual (household) access to agricultural plots adjacent to homes, to communal access to common pool resources (CPR) such as forests at the village level. Here, we present a multi-scale framework that explicitly considers how people use the landscape. The framework is presented along with a case study example in Kenya. The multi-scale approach could enhance the modelling of human-environment interactions which will have important consequences for monitoring the sustainable development goals for human livelihoods and biodiversity conservation.

  3. Multi-scale structural changes of starch-based material during microwave and conventional heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Li, Lin; Zhang, Shuyan; Li, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Binjia

    2016-11-01

    This work revealed the influence of thermal processing on the microstructural, mesoscopic and molecular scale structures and thus the plasticizer migration of the starch ester films. Thermal processing promoted the permeation of water molecules to hinder the shrink of the amorphous macromolecules. That is, the swelling of the amorphous macromolecules diminished the ordered regions to a certain degree, resulting in the enlarged amorphous regions. Along with slight degradation of the macromolecules, the crystallites were partially disorganized, as indicated by a reduced relative crystallinity. These multi-scale structural changes of the films and the thermally enhanced mobility of plasticizer molecules synergistically enhanced the plasticizer migration. This study not only enables a well understanding of how thermal treatment alters the plasticizer migration of starch-based films from a multi-scale structural view, but also hints to our future work that rationally modulating the structural features of starch-based film may effectively control the migration of chemicals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-31

    The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

  5. The adaptive value of habitat preferences from a multi-scale spatial perspective: insights from marsh-nesting avian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlikowski, Jan; Brambilla, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    Habitat selection and its adaptive outcomes are crucial features for animal life-history strategies. Nevertheless, congruence between habitat preferences and breeding success has been rarely demonstrated, which may result from the single-scale evaluation of animal choices. As habitat selection is a complex multi-scale process in many groups of animal species, investigating adaptiveness of habitat selection in a multi-scale framework is crucial. In this study, we explore whether habitat preferences acting at different spatial scales enhance the fitness of bird species, and check the appropriateness of single vs. multi-scale models. We expected that variables found to be more important for habitat selection at individual scale(s), would coherently play a major role in affecting nest survival at the same scale(s). We considered habitat preferences of two Rallidae species, little crake (Zapornia parva) and water rail (Rallus aquaticus), at three spatial scales (landscape, territory, and nest-site) and related them to nest survival. Single-scale versus multi-scale models (GLS and glmmPQL) were compared to check which model better described adaptiveness of habitat preferences. Consistency between the effect of variables on habitat selection and on nest survival was checked to investigate their adaptive value. In both species, multi-scale models for nest survival were more supported than single-scale ones. In little crake, the multi-scale model indicated vegetation density and water depth at the territory scale, as well as vegetation height at nest-site scale, as the most important variables. The first two variables were among the most important for nest survival and habitat selection, and the coherent effects suggested the adaptive value of habitat preferences. In water rail, the multi-scale model of nest survival showed vegetation density at territory scale and extent of emergent vegetation within landscape scale as the most important ones, although we found a

  6. Aerosol indirect effects in a multi-scale aerosol-climate model PNNL-MMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Much of the large uncertainty in estimates of anthropogenic aerosol effects on climate arises from the multi-scale nature of the interactions between aerosols, clouds and dynamics, which are difficult to represent in conventional general circulation models (GCMs. In this study, we use a multi-scale aerosol-climate model that treats aerosols and clouds across multiple scales to study aerosol indirect effects. This multi-scale aerosol-climate model is an extension of a multi-scale modeling framework (MMF model that embeds a cloud-resolving model (CRM within each vertical column of a GCM grid. The extension allows a more physically-based treatment of aerosol-cloud interactions in both stratiform and convective clouds on the global scale in a computationally feasible way. Simulated model fields, including liquid water path (LWP, ice water path, cloud fraction, shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, precipitation, water vapor, and cloud droplet number concentration are in reasonable agreement with observations. The new model performs quantitatively similar to the previous version of the MMF model in terms of simulated cloud fraction and precipitation. The simulated change in shortwave cloud forcing from anthropogenic aerosols is −0.77 W m−2, which is less than half of that (−1.79 W m−2 calculated by the host GCM (NCAR CAM5 with traditional cloud parameterizations and is also at the low end of the estimates of other conventional global aerosol-climate models. The smaller forcing in the MMF model is attributed to a smaller (3.9 % increase in LWP from preindustrial conditions (PI to present day (PD compared with 15.6 % increase in LWP in stratiform clouds in CAM5. The difference is caused by a much smaller response in LWP to a given perturbation in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations from PI to PD in the MMF (about one-third of that in CAM5, and, to a lesser extent, by a smaller relative increase in CCN

  7. Multi-scale modeling of soft fibrous tissues based on proteoglycan mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linka, Kevin; Khiêm, Vu Ngoc; Itskov, Mikhail

    2016-08-16

    Collagen in the form of fibers or fibrils is an essential source of strength and structural integrity in most organs of the human body. Recently, with the help of complex experimental setups, a paradigm change concerning the mechanical contribution of proteoglycans (PGs) took place. Accordingly, PG connections protect the surrounding collagen fibrils from over-stretching rather than transmitting load between them. In this paper, we describe the reported PG mechanics and incorporate it into a multi-scale model of soft fibrous tissues. To this end, a nano-to-micro model of a single collagen fiber is developed by taking the entropic-energetic transition on the collagen molecule level into account. The microscopic damage occurring inside the collagen fiber is elucidated by sliding of PGs as well as by over-stretched collagen molecules. Predictions of this two-constituent-damage model are compared to experimental data available in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multi-Scale Modeling of Liquid Phase Sintering Affected by Gravity: Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olevsky, Eugene; German, Randall M.

    2012-01-01

    A multi-scale simulation concept taking into account impact of gravity on liquid phase sintering is described. The gravity influence can be included at both the micro- and macro-scales. At the micro-scale, the diffusion mass-transport is directionally modified in the framework of kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations to include the impact of gravity. The micro-scale simulations can provide the values of the constitutive parameters for macroscopic sintering simulations. At the macro-scale, we are attempting to embed a continuum model of sintering into a finite-element framework that includes the gravity forces and substrate friction. If successful, the finite elements analysis will enable predictions relevant to space-based processing, including size and shape and property predictions. Model experiments are underway to support the models via extraction of viscosity moduli versus composition, particle size, heating rate, temperature and time.

  9. Modelling an industrial anaerobic granular reactor using a multi-scale approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldman, Hannah; Flores Alsina, Xavier; Ramin, Pedram

    2017-01-01

    of methane, carbon dioxide and sulfide and the potential formation of precipitates within the bulk (average deviation between computer simulations and measurements for both #D1, #D2 is around 10%). Model predictions suggest a stratified structure within the granule which is the result of: 1) applied loading......The objective of this paper is to show the results of an industrial project dealing with modelling of anaerobic digesters. A multi-scale mathematical approach is developed to describe reactor hydrodynamics, granule growth/distribution and microbial competition/inhibition for substrate/space within...... the biofilm. The main biochemical and physico-chemical processes in the model are based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No 1 (ADM1) extended with the fate of phosphorus (P), sulfur (S) and ethanol (Et-OH). Wastewater dynamic conditions are reproduced and data frequency increased using the Benchmark...

  10. A multi-scale study of the adsorption of lanthanum on the (110) surface of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samin, Adib J.; Zhang, Jinsuo [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, 201W 19th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    In this study, we utilize a multi-scale approach to studying lanthanum adsorption on the (110) plane of tungsten. The energy of the system is described from density functional theory calculations within the framework of the cluster expansion method. It is found that including two-body figures up to the sixth nearest neighbor yielded a reasonable agreement with density functional theory calculations as evidenced by the reported cross validation score. The results indicate that the interaction between the adsorbate atoms in the adlayer is important and cannot be ignored. The parameterized cluster expansion expression is used in a lattice gas Monte Carlo simulation in the grand canonical ensemble at 773 K and the adsorption isotherm is recorded. Implications of the obtained results for the pyroprocessing application are discussed.

  11. Multi-scale modeling of inter-granular fracture in UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, Michael R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, S. Bulent [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    A hierarchical multi-scale approach is pursued in this work to investigate the influence of porosity, pore and grain size on the intergranular brittle fracture in UO2. In this approach, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to obtain the fracture properties for different grain boundary types. A phase-field model is then utilized to perform intergranular fracture simulations of representative microstructures with different porosities, pore and grain sizes. In these simulations the grain boundary fracture properties obtained from molecular dynamics simulations are used. The responses from the phase-field fracture simulations are then fitted with a stress-based brittle fracture model usable at the engineering scale. This approach encapsulates three different length and time scales, and allows the development of microstructurally informed engineering scale model from properties evaluated at the atomistic scale.

  12. Multi-scale MHD analysis of LHD plasma with background field changing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiguchi, K.; Sakakibara, S.; Ohdachi, S.; Carreras, B. A.

    2015-04-01

    The mechanism of the partial collapse observed in the experiment with the background magnetic field changing in the Large Helical Device (LHD) is numerically investigated with a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation. Since the different timescales of the perturbations and the background field changing have to be treated simultaneously for the analysis of this plasma, a multi-scale simulation scheme is developed. The effect of the perturbation dynamics on the equilibrium pressure and rotational transform is taken into account in this scheme. The result indicates that the collapse is caused by the destabilization of an infernal-like mode due to the magnetic hill enhanced by the change of the background field. The mechanism of the reduction of the central beta observed after the partial collapse in the experiment is also analysed in relation to the effect of the background field changing.

  13. Pricing credit default swaps under a multi-scale stochastic volatility model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenting; He, Xinjiang

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider the pricing of credit default swaps (CDSs) with the reference asset driven by a geometric Brownian motion with a multi-scale stochastic volatility (SV), which is a two-factor volatility process with one factor controlling the fast time scale and the other representing the slow time scale. A key feature of the current methodology is to establish an equivalence relationship between the CDS and the down-and-out binary option through the discussion of "no default" probability, while balancing the two SV processes with the perturbation method. An approximate but closed-form pricing formula for the CDS contract is finally obtained, whose accuracy is in the order of O(ɛ + δ +√{ ɛδ }) .

  14. High resolution multi-scale air quality modelling for all streets in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steen Solvang; Ketzel, Matthias; Becker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The annual concentrations of NO2, PM2.5 and PM10 in 2012 have for the first time been modelled for all 2.4 million addresses in Denmark based on a multi-scale air quality modelling approach. All addresses include residential, industrial, institutional, shop, school, restaurant addresses etc.......70) and fairly good agreement in Aalborg (r2 = 0.60). The target groups for the air quality mapping of all Danish addresses are the general public for information and awareness about air quality, and local and national authorities whom may use the information as a screening tool for air quality assessment....... The air quality map has been provided on a WebGIS platform on the internet in September 2016 (http://luftenpaadinvej.au.dk). The air quality map is named AirStreet for Air Quality at Your Street....

  15. Time asynchronous relative dimension in space method for multi-scale problems in fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markesteijn, A. P.; Karabasov, S. A.

    2014-02-01

    A novel computational method is presented for solving fluid dynamics equations in the multi-scale framework when the system size is an important parameter of the governing equations. The method (TARDIS) is based on a concurrent transformation of the governing equations in space and time and solving the transformed equations on a uniform Cartesian grid with the corresponding causality conditions at the grid interfaces. For implementation in the framework of TARDIS, the second-order CABARET scheme of Karabasov and Goloviznin [1] is selected for it provides a good combination of numerical accuracy, computational efficiency and simplicity of realisation. Numerical examples are first provided for several isothermal gas dynamics test problems and then for modelling of molecular fluctuations inside a microscopic flow channel and ultrasound wave propagation through a nano-scale region of molecular fluctuations.

  16. Improved anomaly detection using multi-scale PLS and generalized likelihood ratio test

    KAUST Repository

    Madakyaru, Muddu

    2017-02-16

    Process monitoring has a central role in the process industry to enhance productivity, efficiency, and safety, and to avoid expensive maintenance. In this paper, a statistical approach that exploit the advantages of multiscale PLS models (MSPLS) and those of a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test to better detect anomalies is proposed. Specifically, to consider the multivariate and multi-scale nature of process dynamics, a MSPLS algorithm combining PLS and wavelet analysis is used as modeling framework. Then, GLR hypothesis testing is applied using the uncorrelated residuals obtained from MSPLS model to improve the anomaly detection abilities of these latent variable based fault detection methods even further. Applications to a simulated distillation column data are used to evaluate the proposed MSPLS-GLR algorithm.

  17. A multi-scale residual-based anti-hourglass control for compatible staggered Lagrangian hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharik, M.; Scovazzi, G.; Shashkov, M.; Loubère, R.

    2018-02-01

    Hourglassing is a well-known pathological numerical artifact affecting the robustness and accuracy of Lagrangian methods. There exist a large number of hourglass control/suppression strategies. In the community of the staggered compatible Lagrangian methods, the approach of sub-zonal pressure forces is among the most widely used. However, this approach is known to add numerical strength to the solution, which can cause potential problems in certain types of simulations, for instance in simulations of various instabilities. To avoid this complication, we have adapted the multi-scale residual-based stabilization typically used in the finite element approach for staggered compatible framework. In this paper, we describe two discretizations of the new approach and demonstrate their properties and compare with the method of sub-zonal pressure forces on selected numerical problems.

  18. Multi-scale high-performance fluid flow: Simulations through porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Perović, Nevena

    2016-08-03

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations on geometrically complex domains such as porous media require high geometric discretisation for accurately capturing the tested physical phenomena. Moreover, when considering a large area and analysing local effects, it is necessary to deploy a multi-scale approach that is both memory-intensive and time-consuming. Hence, this type of analysis must be conducted on a high-performance parallel computing infrastructure. In this paper, the coupling of two different scales based on the Navier–Stokes equations and Darcy\\'s law is described followed by the generation of complex geometries, and their discretisation and numerical treatment. Subsequently, the necessary parallelisation techniques and a rather specific tool, which is capable of retrieving data from the supercomputing servers and visualising them during the computation runtime (i.e. in situ) are described. All advantages and possible drawbacks of this approach, together with the preliminary results and sensitivity analyses are discussed in detail.

  19. Multi-scale computation methods: Their applications in lithium-ion battery research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqi, Shi; Jian, Gao; Yue, Liu; Yan, Zhao; Qu, Wu; Wangwei, Ju; Chuying, Ouyang; Ruijuan, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Based upon advances in theoretical algorithms, modeling and simulations, and computer technologies, the rational design of materials, cells, devices, and packs in the field of lithium-ion batteries is being realized incrementally and will at some point trigger a paradigm revolution by combining calculations and experiments linked by a big shared database, enabling accelerated development of the whole industrial chain. Theory and multi-scale modeling and simulation, as supplements to experimental efforts, can help greatly to close some of the current experimental and technological gaps, as well as predict path-independent properties and help to fundamentally understand path-independent performance in multiple spatial and temporal scales. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51372228 and 11234013), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA034201), and Shanghai Pujiang Program, China (Grant No. 14PJ1403900).

  20. Multi-scaling mix and non-universality between population and facility density

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, J H; Han, D D; Ma, Y G; 10.1016/j.physa.2012.05.038

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of facilities is closely related to our social economic activities. Recent studies have reported a scaling relation between population and facility density with the exponent depending on the type of facility. In this paper, we show that generally this exponent is not universal for a specific type of facility. Instead by using Chinese data we find that it increases with Per Capital GDP. Thus our observed scaling law is actually a mixture of some multi-scaling relations. This result indicates that facilities may change their public or commercial attributes according to the outside environment. We argue that this phenomenon results from the unbalanced regional economic level and suggest a modification for previous model by introducing consuming capacity. The modified model reproduces most of our observed properties.

  1. Wake characteristics of a porous square cylinder formed by a multi-scale array of obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Daniel J.; Avoustin, Pauline; Cassadour, Martin; Brevis, Wernher

    2015-11-01

    The characteristics of the flow developed behind arrays of square cylinders are investigated through Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) measurements in an open-channel water flume. Four arrangements of cylinders are examined: three are multi-scale arrays of cylinders based on the Sierpinski carpet fractal, and the fourth is a regular aligned array of single length-scale cylinders. The porosity, frontal area and external length scale is the same for each cylinder array, while the internal geometry is changed. The relative effect on the dynamics of the wake of the fractal parameters defining the array geometry, such as lacunarity and succolarity is quantified. Special focus is given to the effect of these parameters on the extension and properties of the separated shear layers and on the low-velocity zone developed downstream the cylinders.

  2. Action recognition using multi-scale histograms of oriented gradients based depth motion trail Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanxi; Tie, Yun; Qi, Lin

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach based on Depth Maps and compute Multi-Scale Histograms of Oriented Gradient (MSHOG) from sequences of depth maps to recognize actions. Each depth frame in a depth video sequence is projected onto three orthogonal Cartesian planes. Under each projection view, the absolute difference between two consecutive projected maps is accumulated through a depth video sequence to form a Depth Map, which is called Depth Motion Trail Images (DMTI). The MSHOG is then computed from the Depth Maps for the representation of an action. In addition, we apply L2-Regularized Collaborative Representation (L2-CRC) to classify actions. We evaluate the proposed approach on MSR Action3D dataset and MSRGesture3D dataset. Promising experimental result demonstrates the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  3. MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2013-08-01

    MREG V1.1 is the sixth generation SAR image registration algorithm developed by the Signal Processing&Technology Department for Synthetic Aperture Radar applications. Like its predecessor algorithm REGI, it employs a powerful iterative multi-scale paradigm to achieve the competing goals of sub-pixel registration accuracy and the ability to handle large initial offsets. Since it is not model based, it allows for high fidelity tracking of spatially varying terrain-induced misregistration. Since it does not rely on image domain phase, it is equally adept at coherent and noncoherent image registration. This document provides a brief history of the registration processors developed by Dept. 5962 leading up to MREG V1.1, a full description of the signal processing steps involved in the algorithm, and a user's manual with application specific recommendations for CCD, TwoColor MultiView, and SAR stereoscopy.

  4. Understanding Prairie Fen Hydrology - a Hierarchical Multi-Scale Groundwater Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, P.; Liao, H.; Abbas, H.; Ma, L.; Li, S.

    2012-12-01

    Prairie fens provide critical habitat to more than 50 rare species and significantly contribute to the biodiversity of the upper Great Lakes region. The sustainability of these globally unique ecosystems, however, requires that they be fed by a steady supply of pristine, calcareous groundwater. Understanding the hydrology that supports the existence of such fens is essential in preserving these valuable habitats. This research uses process-based multi-scale groundwater modeling for this purpose. Two fen-sites, MacCready Fen and Ives Road Fen, in Southern Michigan were systematically studied. A hierarchy of nested steady-state models was built for each fen-site to capture the system's dynamics at spatial scales ranging from the regional groundwater-shed to the local fens. The models utilize high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEM), National Hydrologic Datasets (NHD), a recently-assembled water-well database, and results from a state-wide groundwater mapping project to represent the complex hydro-geological and stress framework. The modeling system simulates both shallow glacial and deep bedrock aquifers as well as the interaction between surface water and groundwater. Aquifer heterogeneities were explicitly simulated with multi-scale transition probability geo-statistics. A two-way hydraulic head feedback mechanism was set up between the nested models, such that the parent models provided boundary conditions to the child models, and in turn the child models provided local information to the parent models. A hierarchical mass budget analysis was performed to estimate the seepage fluxes at the surface water/groundwater interfaces and to assess the relative importance of the processes at multiple scales that contribute water to the fens. The models were calibrated using observed base-flows at stream gauging stations and/or static water levels at wells. Three-dimensional particle tracking was used to predict the sources of water to the fens. We observed from the

  5. From seconds to months: multi-scale dynamics of mobile telephone calls

    CERN Document Server

    Saramaki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Big Data on electronic records of social interactions allow approaching human behaviour and sociality from a quantitative point of view with unforeseen statistical power. Mobile telephone Call Detail Records (CDRs), automatically collected by telecom operators for billing purposes, have proven especially fruitful for understanding one-to-one communication patterns as well as the dynamics of social networks that are reflected in such patterns. We present an overview of empirical results on the multi-scale dynamics of social dynamics and networks inferred from mobile telephone calls. We begin with the shortest timescales and fastest dynamics, such as burstiness of call sequences between individuals, and "zoom out" towards longer temporal and larger structural scales, from temporal motifs formed by correlated calls between multiple individuals to long-term dynamics of social groups. We conclude this overview with a future outlook.

  6. MCF: a tool to find multi-scale community profiles in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shang; Chen, Alan; Rahmani, Ali; Jarada, Tamer; Alhajj, Reda; Demetrick, Doug; Zeng, Jia

    2013-12-01

    Recent developments of complex graph clustering methods have implicated the practical applications with biological networks in different settings. Multi-scale Community Finder (MCF) is a tool to profile network communities (i.e., clusters of nodes) with the control of community sizes. The controlling parameter is referred to as the scale of the network community profile. MCF is able to find communities in all major types of networks including directed, signed, bipartite, and multi-slice networks. The fast computation promotes the practicability of the tool for large-scaled analysis (e.g., protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression networks). MCF is distributed as an open-source C++ package for academic use with both command line and user interface options, and can be downloaded at http://bsdxd.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/MCF. Detailed user manual and sample data sets are also available at the project website. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Multi-Scale, Multi-Physics Optimization Framework for Additively Manufactured Structural Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Wardany, Tahany; Lynch, Mathew; Gu, Wenjiong; Hsu, Arthur; Klecka, Michael; Nardi, Aaron; Viens, Daniel

    This paper proposes an optimization framework enabling the integration of multi-scale / multi-physics simulation codes to perform structural optimization design for additively manufactured components. Cold spray was selected as the additive manufacturing (AM) process and its constraints were identified and included in the optimization scheme. The developed framework first utilizes topology optimization to maximize stiffness for conceptual design. The subsequent step applies shape optimization to refine the design for stress-life fatigue. The component weight was reduced by 20% while stresses were reduced by 75% and the rigidity was improved by 37%. The framework and analysis codes were implemented using Altair software as well as an in-house loading code. The optimized design was subsequently produced by the cold spray process.

  8. Numerical methods for simulating blood flow at macro, micro, and multi scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yohsuke; Omori, Toshihiro; Shimogonya, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-07-26

    In the past decade, numerical methods for the computational biomechanics of blood flow have progressed to overcome difficulties in diverse applications from cellular to organ scales. Such numerical methods may be classified by the type of computational mesh used for the fluid domain, into fixed mesh methods, moving mesh (boundary-fitted mesh) methods, and mesh-free methods. The type of computational mesh used is closely related to the characteristics of each method. We herein provide an overview of numerical methods recently used to simulate blood flow at macro and micro scales, with a focus on computational meshes. We also discuss recent progress in the multi-scale modeling of blood flow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Multi-scale mechanical characterization of scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argento, G; Simonet, M; Oomens, C W J; Baaijens, F P T

    2012-11-15

    Electrospinning is a promising technology to produce scaffolds for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Each electrospun scaffold is characterized by a complex micro-scale structure that is responsible for its macroscopic mechanical behavior. In this study, we focus on the development and the validation of a computational micro-scale model that takes into account the structural features of the electrospun material, and is suitable for studying the multi-scale scaffold mechanics. We show that the computational tool developed is able to describe and predict the mechanical behavior of electrospun scaffolds characterized by different microstructures. Moreover, we explore the global mechanical properties of valve-shaped scaffolds with different microstructural features, and compare the deformation of these scaffolds when submitted to diastolic pressures with a tissue engineered and a native valve. It is shown that a pronounced degree of anisotropy is necessary to reproduce the deformation patterns observed in the native heart valve. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced inertia from lossy effective fluids using multi-scale sonic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Guild

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a recent theoretically predicted phenomenon of enhanced permittivity with electromagnetic waves using lossy materials is investigated for the analogous case of mass density and acoustic waves, which represents inertial enhancement. Starting from fundamental relationships for the homogenized quasi-static effective density of a fluid host with fluid inclusions, theoretical expressions are developed for the conditions on the real and imaginary parts of the constitutive fluids to have inertial enhancement, which are verified with numerical simulations. Realizable structures are designed to demonstrate this phenomenon using multi-scale sonic crystals, which are fabricated using a 3D printer and tested in an acoustic impedance tube, yielding good agreement with the theoretical predictions and demonstrating enhanced inertia.

  11. Multi-scale spatial modeling of human exposure from local sources to global intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wannaz, Cedric; Fantke, Peter; Jolliet, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Exposure studies, used in human health risk and impact assessments of chemicals are largely performed locally or regionally. It is usually not known how global impacts resulting from exposure to point source emissions compare to local impacts. To address this problem, we introduce Pangea......, an innovative multi-scale, spatial multimedia fate and exposure assessment model. We study local to global population exposure associated with emissions from 126 point sources matching locations of waste-to-energy plants across France. Results for three chemicals with distinct physicochemical properties...... are expressed as the evolution of the population intake fraction through inhalation and ingestion as a function of the distance from sources. For substances with atmospheric half-lives longer than a week, less than 20% of the global population intake through inhalation (median of 126 emission scenarios) can...

  12. A Framework for Parallel Numerical Simulations on Multi-Scale Geometries

    KAUST Repository

    Varduhn, Vasco

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, an approach on performing numerical multi-scale simulations on fine detailed geometries is presented. In particular, the focus lies on the generation of sufficient fine mesh representations, whereas a resolution of dozens of millions of voxels is inevitable in order to sufficiently represent the geometry. Furthermore, the propagation of boundary conditions is investigated by using simulation results on the coarser simulation scale as input boundary conditions on the next finer scale. Finally, the applicability of our approach is shown on a two-phase simulation for flooding scenarios in urban structures running from a city wide scale to a fine detailed in-door scale on feature rich building geometries. © 2012 IEEE.

  13. A Unified Gas Kinetic Scheme for Multi-scale Plasma Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    A unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for multi-scale and multi-component plasma transport is constructed. The current scheme is a direct modeling method, where the time evolution solutions from the Vlasov-BGK equations for both electron and ion, and the Maxwell equations are used to construct the scale-dependent plasma simulation. As a result, based on the modeling scales of mesh size and time step, the discretized governing equations for the whole plasma regimes are obtained. The UGKS takes into account the electron inertia, full electromagnetic field equations, and separate electron and ion evolution. The physics recovered in UGKS ranges from the kinetic Vlasov equation to the hydrodynamic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, with a unified treatment in all scales from the collisionless particle transport to the hydrodynamic wave interactions. The UGKS presents a plasma description which is more general than the Vlasov equation in the kinetic scale and all kinds of MHD equations in the hydrodynamic scale, su...

  14. Experimental study of Nonlinear, Multi-Scale Turbulence in the HSX stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, S.; Deng, C. B.; Wilcox, R. S.; Nishizawa, T.; Almagri, A. F.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Sarff, S. R.

    2017-10-01

    Micro scale turbulence depends on parameters such as local magnetic shear and curvature, and also excitation and damping mechanisms of zonal flows relate to the topology of the configuration. In the HSX stellarator, the Langmuir probe measurements indicate that a nonlinear interaction exists among a zonal flow like mode in the frequency range up to 5 kHz, a coherent mode at 20 kHz, and broadband turbulence. These two coherent modes are interacting with broadband fluctuation, and moreover these modes couples with each other. Interestingly, the nonlinear interaction appears differently depending on the location on the flux surface, which demonstrates a toroidal asymmetry, attributed to three dimensional configurations, exists on the multi-scale interactions. The detail of the analysis results and a new dedicated experiment for zonal flow physics in HSX using a newly designed capacitive probe will be discussed in this poster.

  15. Delineation of Urban Active Faults Using Multi-scale Gravity Analysis in Shenzhen, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Liu, X.

    2015-12-01

    In fact, many cities in the world are established on the active faults. As the rapid urban development, thousands of large facilities, such as ultrahigh buildings, supersized bridges, railway, and so on, are built near or on the faults, which may change the balance of faults and induce urban earthquake. Therefore, it is significant to delineate effectively the faults for urban planning construction and social sustainable development. Due to dense buildings in urban area, the ordinary approaches to identify active faults, like geological survey, artificial seismic exploration and electromagnetic exploration, are not convenient to be carried out. Gravity, reflecting the mass distribution of the Earth's interior, provides a more efficient and convenient method to delineate urban faults. The present study is an attempt to propose a novel gravity method, multi-scale gravity analysis, for identifying urban active faults and determining their stability. Firstly, the gravity anomalies are decomposed by wavelet multi-scale analysis. Secondly, based on the decomposed gravity anomalies, the crust is layered and the multilayer horizontal tectonic stress is inverted. Lastly, the decomposed anomalies and the inverted horizontal tectonic stress are used to infer the distribution and stability of main active faults. For validating our method, a case study on active faults in Shenzhen City is processed. The results show that the distribution of decomposed gravity anomalies and multilayer horizontal tectonic stress are controlled significantly by the strike of the main faults and can be used to infer depths of the faults. The main faults in Shenzhen may range from 4km to 20km in the depth. Each layer of the crust is nearly equipressure since the horizontal tectonic stress has small amplitude. It indicates that the main faults in Shenzhen are relatively stable and have no serious impact on planning and construction of the city.

  16. A physiologically based, multi-scale model of skeletal muscle structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrle, O; Davidson, J B; Pullan, A J

    2012-01-01

    Models of skeletal muscle can be classified as phenomenological or biophysical. Phenomenological models predict the muscle's response to a specified input based on experimental measurements. Prominent phenomenological models are the Hill-type muscle models, which have been incorporated into rigid-body modeling frameworks, and three-dimensional continuum-mechanical models. Biophysically based models attempt to predict the muscle's response as emerging from the underlying physiology of the system. In this contribution, the conventional biophysically based modeling methodology is extended to include several structural and functional characteristics of skeletal muscle. The result is a physiologically based, multi-scale skeletal muscle finite element model that is capable of representing detailed, geometrical descriptions of skeletal muscle fibers and their grouping. Together with a well-established model of motor-unit recruitment, the electro-physiological behavior of single muscle fibers within motor units is computed and linked to a continuum-mechanical constitutive law. The bridging between the cellular level and the organ level has been achieved via a multi-scale constitutive law and homogenization. The effect of homogenization has been investigated by varying the number of embedded skeletal muscle fibers and/or motor units and computing the resulting exerted muscle forces while applying the same excitatory input. All simulations were conducted using an anatomically realistic finite element model of the tibialis anterior muscle. Given the fact that the underlying electro-physiological cellular muscle model is capable of modeling metabolic fatigue effects such as potassium accumulation in the T-tubular space and inorganic phosphate build-up, the proposed framework provides a novel simulation-based way to investigate muscle behavior ranging from motor-unit recruitment to force generation and fatigue.

  17. Leveraging unsupervised training sets for multi-scale compartmentalization in renal pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutnick, Brendon; Tomaszewski, John E.; Sarder, Pinaki

    2017-03-01

    Clinical pathology relies on manual compartmentalization and quantification of biological structures, which is time consuming and often error-prone. Application of computer vision segmentation algorithms to histopathological image analysis, in contrast, can offer fast, reproducible, and accurate quantitative analysis to aid pathologists. Algorithms tunable to different biologically relevant structures can allow accurate, precise, and reproducible estimates of disease states. In this direction, we have developed a fast, unsupervised computational method for simultaneously separating all biologically relevant structures from histopathological images in multi-scale. Segmentation is achieved by solving an energy optimization problem. Representing the image as a graph, nodes (pixels) are grouped by minimizing a Potts model Hamiltonian, adopted from theoretical physics, modeling interacting electron spins. Pixel relationships (modeled as edges) are used to update the energy of the partitioned graph. By iteratively improving the clustering, the optimal number of segments is revealed. To reduce computational time, the graph is simplified using a Cantor pairing function to intelligently reduce the number of included nodes. The classified nodes are then used to train a multiclass support vector machine to apply the segmentation over the full image. Accurate segmentations of images with as many as 106 pixels can be completed only in 5 sec, allowing for attainable multi-scale visualization. To establish clinical potential, we employed our method in renal biopsies to quantitatively visualize for the first time scale variant compartments of heterogeneous intra- and extraglomerular structures simultaneously. Implications of the utility of our method extend to fields such as oncology, genomics, and non-biological problems.

  18. Concussion As a Multi-Scale Complex System: An Interdisciplinary Synthesis of Current Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzie, Erin S.; Parks, Elle L.; Bigler, Erin D.; Lim, Miranda M.; Chesnutt, James C.; Wakeland, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been called “the most complicated disease of the most complex organ of the body” and is an increasingly high-profile public health issue. Many patients report long-term impairments following even “mild” injuries, but reliable criteria for diagnosis and prognosis are lacking. Every clinical trial for TBI treatment to date has failed to demonstrate reliable and safe improvement in outcomes, and the existing body of literature is insufficient to support the creation of a new classification system. Concussion, or mild TBI, is a highly heterogeneous phenomenon, and numerous factors interact dynamically to influence an individual’s recovery trajectory. Many of the obstacles faced in research and clinical practice related to TBI and concussion, including observed heterogeneity, arguably stem from the complexity of the condition itself. To improve understanding of this complexity, we review the current state of research through the lens provided by the interdisciplinary field of systems science, which has been increasingly applied to biomedical issues. The review was conducted iteratively, through multiple phases of literature review, expert interviews, and systems diagramming and represents the first phase in an effort to develop systems models of concussion. The primary focus of this work was to examine concepts and ways of thinking about concussion that currently impede research design and block advancements in care of TBI. Results are presented in the form of a multi-scale conceptual framework intended to synthesize knowledge across disciplines, improve research design, and provide a broader, multi-scale model for understanding concussion pathophysiology, classification, and treatment. PMID:29033888

  19. Multi-scale analysis to uncover habitat use of red-crowned cranes: Implications for conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyue LIU, Hongxing JIANG, Shuqing ZHANG, Chunrong LI,Yunqiu HOU, Fawen QIAN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A multi-scale approach is essential to assess the factors that limit avian habitat use. Numerous studies have examined habitat use by the red-crowned crane, but integrated multi-scale habitat use information is lacking. We evaluated the effects of several habitat variables quantified across many spatial scales on crane use and abundance in two periods (2000 and 2009 at Yancheng National Nature Reserve, China. The natural wetlands decreased in area by 30,601 ha (-6.9% from 2000 to 2009, predominantly as a result of conversion to aquaculture ponds and farmland, and the remaining was under degradation due to expansion of the exotic smooth cordgrass. The cranes are focusing in on either larger patches or those that are in close proximity to each other in both years, but occupied patches had smaller size, less proximity and more regular boundaries in 2009. At landscape scales, the area percentage of common seepweed, reed ponds and paddy fields had a greater positive impact on crane presence than the area percentage of aquaculture ponds. The cranes were more abundant in patches that had a greater percent area of common seepweed and reed ponds, while the percent area of paddy fields was inversely related to crane abundance in 2009 due to changing agricultural practices. In 2009, cranes tended to use less fragmented plots in natural wetlands and more fragmented plots in anthropogenic paddy fields, which were largely associated with the huge loss and degradation of natural habitats between the two years. Management should focus on restoration of large patches of natural wetlands, and formation of a relatively stable area of large paddy field and reed pond to mitigate the loss of natural wetlands [Current Zoology 59 (5: 604–617, 2013].

  20. Multi-scale finite element modeling of Eustachian tube function: influence of mucosal adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, J E; Swarts, J D; Ghadiali, S N

    2016-12-01

    The inability to open the collapsible Eustachian tube (ET) leads to the development of chronic Otitis Media (OM). Although mucosal inflammation during OM leads to increased mucin gene expression and elevated adhesion forces within the ET lumen, it is not known how changes in mucosal adhesion alter the biomechanical mechanisms of ET function. In this study, we developed a novel multi-scale finite element model of ET function in adults that utilizes adhesion spring elements to simulate changes in mucosal adhesion. Models were created for six adult subjects, and dynamic patterns in muscle contraction were used to simulate the wave-like opening of the ET that occurs during swallowing. Results indicate that ET opening is highly sensitive to the level of mucosal adhesion and that exceeding a critical value of adhesion leads to rapid ET dysfunction. Parameter variation studies and sensitivity analysis indicate that increased mucosal adhesion alters the relative importance of several tissue biomechanical properties. For example, increases in mucosal adhesion reduced the sensitivity of ET function to tensor veli palatini muscle forces but did not alter the insensitivity of ET function to levator veli palatini muscle forces. Interestingly, although changes in cartilage stiffness did not significantly influence ET opening under low adhesion conditions, ET opening was highly sensitive to changes in cartilage stiffness under high adhesion conditions. Therefore, our multi-scale computational models indicate that changes in mucosal adhesion as would occur during inflammatory OM alter the biomechanical mechanisms of ET function. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Concussion As a Multi-Scale Complex System: An Interdisciplinary Synthesis of Current Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin S. Kenzie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI has been called “the most complicated disease of the most complex organ of the body” and is an increasingly high-profile public health issue. Many patients report long-term impairments following even “mild” injuries, but reliable criteria for diagnosis and prognosis are lacking. Every clinical trial for TBI treatment to date has failed to demonstrate reliable and safe improvement in outcomes, and the existing body of literature is insufficient to support the creation of a new classification system. Concussion, or mild TBI, is a highly heterogeneous phenomenon, and numerous factors interact dynamically to influence an individual’s recovery trajectory. Many of the obstacles faced in research and clinical practice related to TBI and concussion, including observed heterogeneity, arguably stem from the complexity of the condition itself. To improve understanding of this complexity, we review the current state of research through the lens provided by the interdisciplinary field of systems science, which has been increasingly applied to biomedical issues. The review was conducted iteratively, through multiple phases of literature review, expert interviews, and systems diagramming and represents the first phase in an effort to develop systems models of concussion. The primary focus of this work was to examine concepts and ways of thinking about concussion that currently impede research design and block advancements in care of TBI. Results are presented in the form of a multi-scale conceptual framework intended to synthesize knowledge across disciplines, improve research design, and provide a broader, multi-scale model for understanding concussion pathophysiology, classification, and treatment.

  2. Individual-specific multi-scale finite element simulation of cortical bone of human proximal femur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia, E-mail: mgascenzi@mednet.ucla.edu [UCLA/Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rehabilitation Bldg, Room 22-69, 1000 Veteran Avenue, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Kawas, Neal P., E-mail: nealkawas@ucla.edu [UCLA/Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rehabilitation Bldg, Room 22-69, 1000 Veteran Avenue, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Lutz, Andre, E-mail: andre.lutz@hotmail.de [Institute of Biomechanics and Numerical Mechanics, Leibniz University Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Kardas, Dieter, E-mail: kardas@ibnm.uni-hannover.de [ContiTech Vibration Control, Jaedekamp 30 None, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Nackenhorst, Udo, E-mail: nackenhorst@ibnm.uni-hannover.de [Institute of Biomechanics and Numerical Mechanics, Leibniz University Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Keyak, Joyce H., E-mail: jhkeyak@uci.edu [Department of Radiological Sciences, Medical Sciences I, Bldg 811, Room B140, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-5000 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    We present an innovative method to perform multi-scale finite element analyses of the cortical component of the femur using the individual’s (1) computed tomography scan; and (2) a bone specimen obtained in conjunction with orthopedic surgery. The method enables study of micro-structural characteristics regulating strains and stresses under physiological loading conditions. The analysis of the micro-structural scenarios that cause variation of strain and stress is the first step in understanding the elevated strains and stresses in bone tissue, which are indicative of higher likelihood of micro-crack formation in bone, implicated in consequent remodeling or macroscopic bone fracture. Evidence that micro-structure varies with clinical history and contributes in significant, but poorly understood, ways to bone function, motivates the method’s development, as does need for software tools to investigate relationships between macroscopic loading and micro-structure. Three applications – varying region of interest, bone mineral density, and orientation of collagen type I, illustrate the method. We show, in comparison between physiological loading and simple compression of a patient’s femur, that strains computed at the multi-scale model’s micro-level: (i) differ; and (ii) depend on local collagen-apatite orientation and degree of calcification. Our findings confirm the strain concentration role of osteocyte lacunae, important for mechano-transduction. We hypothesize occurrence of micro-crack formation, leading either to remodeling or macroscopic fracture, when the computed strains exceed the elastic range observed in micro-structural testing.

  3. Multi-scale measures of rugosity, slope and aspect from benthic stereo image reconstructions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariell Friedman

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates how multi-scale measures of rugosity, slope and aspect can be derived from fine-scale bathymetric reconstructions created from geo-referenced stereo imagery. We generate three-dimensional reconstructions over large spatial scales using data collected by Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs, Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs, manned submersibles and diver-held imaging systems. We propose a new method for calculating rugosity in a Delaunay triangulated surface mesh by projecting areas onto the plane of best fit using Principal Component Analysis (PCA. Slope and aspect can be calculated with very little extra effort, and fitting a plane serves to decouple rugosity from slope. We compare the results of the virtual terrain complexity calculations with experimental results using conventional in-situ measurement methods. We show that performing calculations over a digital terrain reconstruction is more flexible, robust and easily repeatable. In addition, the method is non-contact and provides much less environmental impact compared to traditional survey techniques. For diver-based surveys, the time underwater needed to collect rugosity data is significantly reduced and, being a technique based on images, it is possible to use robotic platforms that can operate beyond diver depths. Measurements can be calculated exhaustively at multiple scales for surveys with tens of thousands of images covering thousands of square metres. The technique is demonstrated on data gathered by a diver-rig and an AUV, on small single-transect surveys and on a larger, dense survey that covers over [Formula: see text]. Stereo images provide 3D structure as well as visual appearance, which could potentially feed into automated classification techniques. Our multi-scale rugosity, slope and aspect measures have already been adopted in a number of marine science studies. This paper presents a detailed description of the method and thoroughly validates it

  4. Multi-scale measures of rugosity, slope and aspect from benthic stereo image reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Ariell; Pizarro, Oscar; Williams, Stefan B; Johnson-Roberson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how multi-scale measures of rugosity, slope and aspect can be derived from fine-scale bathymetric reconstructions created from geo-referenced stereo imagery. We generate three-dimensional reconstructions over large spatial scales using data collected by Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs), manned submersibles and diver-held imaging systems. We propose a new method for calculating rugosity in a Delaunay triangulated surface mesh by projecting areas onto the plane of best fit using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Slope and aspect can be calculated with very little extra effort, and fitting a plane serves to decouple rugosity from slope. We compare the results of the virtual terrain complexity calculations with experimental results using conventional in-situ measurement methods. We show that performing calculations over a digital terrain reconstruction is more flexible, robust and easily repeatable. In addition, the method is non-contact and provides much less environmental impact compared to traditional survey techniques. For diver-based surveys, the time underwater needed to collect rugosity data is significantly reduced and, being a technique based on images, it is possible to use robotic platforms that can operate beyond diver depths. Measurements can be calculated exhaustively at multiple scales for surveys with tens of thousands of images covering thousands of square metres. The technique is demonstrated on data gathered by a diver-rig and an AUV, on small single-transect surveys and on a larger, dense survey that covers over [Formula: see text]. Stereo images provide 3D structure as well as visual appearance, which could potentially feed into automated classification techniques. Our multi-scale rugosity, slope and aspect measures have already been adopted in a number of marine science studies. This paper presents a detailed description of the method and thoroughly validates it against traditional

  5. Multi-scale visual analysis of time-varying electrocorticography data via clustering of brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Sugeerth; Bouchard, Kristofer; Chang, Edward; Dougherty, Max; Hamann, Bernd; Weber, Gunther H

    2017-06-06

    There exists a need for effective and easy-to-use software tools supporting the analysis of complex Electrocorticography (ECoG) data. Understanding how epileptic seizures develop or identifying diagnostic indicators for neurological diseases require the in-depth analysis of neural activity data from ECoG. Such data is multi-scale and is of high spatio-temporal resolution. Comprehensive analysis of this data should be supported by interactive visual analysis methods that allow a scientist to understand functional patterns at varying levels of granularity and comprehend its time-varying behavior. We introduce a novel multi-scale visual analysis system, ECoG ClusterFlow, for the detailed exploration of ECoG data. Our system detects and visualizes dynamic high-level structures, such as communities, derived from the time-varying connectivity network. The system supports two major views: 1) an overview summarizing the evolution of clusters over time and 2) an electrode view using hierarchical glyph-based design to visualize the propagation of clusters in their spatial, anatomical context. We present case studies that were performed in collaboration with neuroscientists and neurosurgeons using simulated and recorded epileptic seizure data to demonstrate our system's effectiveness. ECoG ClusterFlow supports the comparison of spatio-temporal patterns for specific time intervals and allows a user to utilize various clustering algorithms. Neuroscientists can identify the site of seizure genesis and its spatial progression during various the stages of a seizure. Our system serves as a fast and powerful means for the generation of preliminary hypotheses that can be used as a basis for subsequent application of rigorous statistical methods, with the ultimate goal being the clinical treatment of epileptogenic zones.

  6. Multi-scale approach for predicting fish species distributions across coral reef seascapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Pittman

    Full Text Available Two of the major limitations to effective management of coral reef ecosystems are a lack of information on the spatial distribution of marine species and a paucity of data on the interacting environmental variables that drive distributional patterns. Advances in marine remote sensing, together with the novel integration of landscape ecology and advanced niche modelling techniques provide an unprecedented opportunity to reliably model and map marine species distributions across many kilometres of coral reef ecosystems. We developed a multi-scale approach using three-dimensional seafloor morphology and across-shelf location to predict spatial distributions for five common Caribbean fish species. Seascape topography was quantified from high resolution bathymetry at five spatial scales (5-300 m radii surrounding fish survey sites. Model performance and map accuracy was assessed for two high performing machine-learning algorithms: Boosted Regression Trees (BRT and Maximum Entropy Species Distribution Modelling (MaxEnt. The three most important predictors were geographical location across the shelf, followed by a measure of topographic complexity. Predictor contribution differed among species, yet rarely changed across spatial scales. BRT provided 'outstanding' model predictions (AUC = >0.9 for three of five fish species. MaxEnt provided 'outstanding' model predictions for two of five species, with the remaining three models considered 'excellent' (AUC = 0.8-0.9. In contrast, MaxEnt spatial predictions were markedly more accurate (92% map accuracy than BRT (68% map accuracy. We demonstrate that reliable spatial predictions for a range of key fish species can be achieved by modelling the interaction between the geographical location across the shelf and the topographic heterogeneity of seafloor structure. This multi-scale, analytic approach is an important new cost-effective tool to accurately delineate essential fish habitat and support

  7. A physiologically based, multi-scale model of skeletal muscle structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eRöhrle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Models of skeletal muscle can be classified as phenomenological or biophysical. Phenomenological models predict the muscle's response to a specified input based on experimental measurements. Prominent phenomenological models are the Hill-type muscle models, which have been incorporated into rigid-body modelling frameworks, and three-dimensional continuum-mechanical models. Biophysically based models attempt to predict the muscle's response as emerging from the underlying physiology of the system. In this contribution, the conventional biophysically based modelling methodology is extended to include several structural and functional characteristics of skeletal muscle. The result is a physiologically based, multi-scale skeletal muscle finite element model that is capable of representing detailed, geometrical descriptions of skeletal muscle fibres and their grouping. Together with a well-established model of motor unit recruitment, the electro-physiological behaviour of single muscle fibres within motor units is computed and linked to a continuum-mechanical constitutive law. The bridging between the cellular level and the organ level has been achieved via a multi-scale constitutive law and homogenisation. The effect of homogenisation has been investigated by varying the number of embedded skeletal muscle fibres and/or motor units and computing the resulting exerted muscle forces while applying the same excitatory input. All simulations were conducted using an anatomically realistic finite element model of the Tibialis Anterior muscle. Given the fact that the underlying electro-physiological cellular muscle model is capable of modelling metabolic fatigue effects such as potassium accumulation in the T-tubular space and inorganic phosphate build-up, the proposed framework provides a novel simulation-based way to investigate muscle behaviour ranging from motor unit recruitment to force generation and fatigue.

  8. Multi-scaling Properties of EUV Intensity Fluctuations and Models for Impulsive Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Rivera, Y.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J.; Jennings, P.; Rappazzo, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    There is wide agreement on the importance of impulsive processes ("nanoflares") to explain coronal heating. Diagnostics of observational data are necessary to uncover signatures of the underlying mechanisms, and, by comparing to those of simulated data, to determine whether a model explains the observations. We have investigated the multi-scaling properties that characterize the intermittency of AIA/SDO radiance fluctuations. Lags between pairs of wavebands were used to distinguish coronal from transition region (TR) signals. Noise degrades the signals, so the 171Å emission, with the highest signal-to-noise ratio, provides the best information. In an active region core, for both loops and for diffuse emission, the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the increments of both TR and coronal signals are "quasi-Gaussian" for large temporal scales and "leptokurtic" (peaked with heavy tails) for small time increments, as expected for turbulent systems. Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MF-DFA) shows that the variance of the fluctuations obeys a power law as a function of temporal scales in the range 15-45 min. The value of the scaling exponent indicates that, on average, the time series are nonstationary and anti-persistent with small fluctuations following large fluctuations and vice versa. Other moments of the fluctuations obey corresponding power laws and the multi-scaling exponents quantify the degree of the intermittency in the context of multifractality. The variation in the scaling exponents results from long term correlation in the time series. The multiscaling of the EUV data agrees qualitatively with simulated intensity from a simple model of impulsive bursts plus noise, and also with the ohmic dissipation in a Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) model for coronal loop heating. However, the observational data were found to disagree with the modeled PDFs of increments. There is indication that the multifractal properties in the observations

  9. A scenario framework to explore the future migration and adaptation in deltas: A multi-scale and participatory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Abiy S.; Nicholls, Robert J.; Allan, Andrew; Arto, Inaki; Cazcarro, Ignacio; Fernandes, Jose A.; Hill, Chris T.; Hutton, Craig W.; Kay, Susan; Lawn, Jon; Lazar, Attila N.; Whitehead, Paul W.

    2017-04-01

    Coastal deltas are home for over 500 million people globally, and they have been identified as one of the most vulnerable coastal environments during the 21st century. They are susceptible to multiple climatic (e.g., sea-level rise, storm surges, change in temperature and precipitation) and socio-economic (e.g., human-induced subsidence, population and urbanisation changes, GDP growth) drivers of change. These drivers also operate at multiple scales, ranging from local to global and short- to long-term. This highlights the complex challenges deltas face in terms of both their long-term sustainability as well as the well-being of their residents and the health of ecosystems that support the livelihood of large (often very poor) population under uncertain changing conditions. A holistic understanding of these challenges and the potential impacts of future climate and socio-economic changes is central for devising robust adaptation policies. Scenario analysis has long been identified as a strategic management tool to explore future climate change and its impacts for supporting robust decision-making under uncertainty. This work presents the overall scenario framework, methodology, and processes adopted for the development of scenarios in the DECCMA* project. DECCMA is analysing the future of three deltas in South Asia and West Africa: (i) the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) delta (Bangladesh/India), (ii) the Mahanadi delta (India), and (iii) the Volta delta (Ghana). This includes comparisons between these three deltas. Hence, the scenario framework comprises a multi-scale hybrid approach, with six levels of scenario considerations: (i) global (climate change, e.g., sea-level rise, temperature change; and socio-economic assumptions, e.g., population and urbanisation changes, GDP growth); (ii) regional catchments (e.g., river flow modelling), (iii) regional seas (e.g., fisheries modelling), (iv) regional politics (e.g., transboundary disputes), (v) national (e.g., socio

  10. Dorsal hand vein recognition based on Gabor multi-orientation fusion and multi-scale HOG features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tuo; Wang, Zhiyong; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-10-01

    Kinds of factors such as illumination and hand gestures would reduce the accuracy of dorsal hand vein recognition. Aiming at single hand vein image with low contrast and simple structure, an algorithm combining Gabor multi-orientation features fusion with Multi-scale Histogram of Oriented Gradient (MS-HOG) is proposed in this paper. With this method, more features will be extracted to improve the recognition accuracy. Firstly, diagrams of multi-scale and multi-orientation are acquired using Gabor transformation, then the Gabor features of the same scale and multi-orientation will be fused, and the features of the correspondent fusion diagrams will be extracted with a HOG operator of a certain scale. Finally the multi-scale cascaded histograms will be obtained for hand vein recognition. The experimental results show that our method not only improve the recognition accuracy but has good robustness in dorsal hand vein recognition.

  11. Multi-scale lines and edges in V1 and beyond: brightness, object categorization and recognition, and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João; du Buf, J M Hans

    2009-03-01

    In this paper we present an improved model for line and edge detection in cortical area V1. This model is based on responses of simple and complex cells, and it is multi-scale with no free parameters. We illustrate the use of the multi-scale line/edge representation in different processes: visual reconstruction or brightness perception, automatic scale selection and object segregation. A two-level object categorization scenario is tested in which pre-categorization is based on coarse scales only and final categorization on coarse plus fine scales. We also present a multi-scale object and face recognition model. Processing schemes are discussed in the framework of a complete cortical architecture. The fact that brightness perception and object recognition may be based on the same symbolic image representation is an indication that the entire (visual) cortex is involved in consciousness.

  12. A multi-scale hybrid neural network retrieval model for dust storm detection, a study in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Man Sing; Xiao, Fei; Nichol, Janet; Fung, Jimmy; Kim, Jhoon; Campbell, James; Chan, P. W.

    2015-05-01

    Dust storms are known to have adverse effects on human health and significant impact on weather, air quality, hydrological cycle, and ecosystem. Atmospheric dust loading is also one of the large uncertainties in global climate modeling, due to its significant impact on the radiation budget and atmospheric stability. Observations of dust storms in humid tropical south China (e.g. Hong Kong), are challenging due to high industrial pollution from the nearby Pearl River Delta region. This study develops a method for dust storm detection by combining ground station observations (PM10 concentration, AERONET data), geostationary satellite images (MTSAT), and numerical weather and climatic forecasting products (WRF/Chem). The method is based on a hybrid neural network (NN) retrieval model for two scales: (i) a NN model for near real-time detection of dust storms at broader regional scale; (ii) a NN model for detailed dust storm mapping for Hong Kong and Taiwan. A feed-forward multilayer perceptron (MLP) NN, trained using back propagation (BP) algorithm, was developed and validated by the k-fold cross validation approach. The accuracy of the near real-time detection MLP-BP network is 96.6%, and the accuracies for the detailed MLP-BP neural network for Hong Kong and Taiwan is 74.8%. This newly automated multi-scale hybrid method can be used to give advance near real-time mapping of dust storms for environmental authorities and the public. It is also beneficial for identifying spatial locations of adverse air quality conditions, and estimates of low visibility associated with dust events for port and airport authorities.

  13. Multi-scale exploration of the technical, economic, and environmental dimensions of bio-based chemical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Kai H; Herrgård, Markus J

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, bio-based chemicals have gained traction as a sustainable alternative to petrochemicals. However, despite rapid advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology, there remain significant economic and environmental challenges. In order to maximize the impact of research investment in a new bio-based chemical industry, there is a need for assessing the technological, economic, and environmental potentials of combinations of biomass feedstocks, biochemical products, bioprocess technologies, and metabolic engineering approaches in the early phase of development of cell factories. To address this issue, we have developed a comprehensive Multi-scale framework for modeling Sustainable Industrial Chemicals production (MuSIC), which integrates modeling approaches for cellular metabolism, bioreactor design, upstream/downstream processes and economic impact assessment. We demonstrate the use of the MuSIC framework in a case study where two major polymer precursors (1,3-propanediol and 3-hydroxypropionic acid) are produced from two biomass feedstocks (corn-based glucose and soy-based glycerol) through 66 proposed biosynthetic pathways in two host organisms (Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The MuSIC framework allows exploration of tradeoffs and interactions between economy-scale objectives (e.g. profit maximization, emission minimization), constraints (e.g. land-use constraints) and process- and cell-scale technology choices (e.g. strain design or oxygenation conditions). We demonstrate that economy-scale assessment can be used to guide specific strain design decisions in metabolic engineering, and that these design decisions can be affected by non-intuitive dependencies across multiple scales. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Shingle 2.0: generalising self-consistent and automated domain discretisation for multi-scale geophysical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, Adam S.; Pietrzak, Julie D.

    2018-01-01

    The approaches taken to describe and develop spatial discretisations of the domains required for geophysical simulation models are commonly ad hoc, model- or application-specific, and under-documented. This is particularly acute for simulation models that are flexible in their use of multi-scale, anisotropic, fully unstructured meshes where a relatively large number of heterogeneous parameters are required to constrain their full description. As a consequence, it can be difficult to reproduce simulations, to ensure a provenance in model data handling and initialisation, and a challenge to conduct model intercomparisons rigorously. This paper takes a novel approach to spatial discretisation, considering it much like a numerical simulation model problem of its own. It introduces a generalised, extensible, self-documenting approach to carefully describe, and necessarily fully, the constraints over the heterogeneous parameter space that determine how a domain is spatially discretised. This additionally provides a method to accurately record these constraints, using high-level natural language based abstractions that enable full accounts of provenance, sharing, and distribution. Together with this description, a generalised consistent approach to unstructured mesh generation for geophysical models is developed that is automated, robust and repeatable, quick-to-draft, rigorously verified, and consistent with the source data throughout. This interprets the description above to execute a self-consistent spatial discretisation process, which is automatically validated to expected discrete characteristics and metrics. Library code, verification tests, and examples available in the repository at https://github.com/shingleproject/Shingle. Further details of the project presented at http://shingleproject.org.

  15. INTEGRATING MULTI-SCALE BLOB/CURVILINEAR DETECTOR TECHNIQUES AND MULTI-LEVEL SETS FOR AUTOMATED SEGMENTATION OF STEM CELL IMAGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huiming; Zhou, Xiaobo; Li, Fuhai; Xia, Xiaofeng; Wong, Stephen T C

    2009-01-01

    Studies of differentiation abilities of stem cells have been attracting a lot of attention over the last years. Microscopy can be used to record details of the differentiation process of stem cells under different perturbations and is an important tool for studying stem cell differentiation. Since it is infeasible to quantitatively analyze a huge amount of image data manually, automated image analysis systems are urgently needed. However, the complicated morphological appearances of stem cells are challenging to the existing segmentation methods. Herein, we propose a new, automated scheme for stem cell segmentation. This scheme first uses the multi-scale blob and curvilinear structure detectors to delineate the skeletons of stem cells quickly and then segment out stem cells by refining the skeletons to the cell boundaries using multi-level sets. The initial experimental results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  16. Building a multi-scaled geospatial temporal ecology database from disparate data sources: fostering open science and data reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soranno, Patricia A; Bissell, Edward G; Cheruvelil, Kendra S; Christel, Samuel T; Collins, Sarah M; Fergus, C Emi; Filstrup, Christopher T; Lapierre, Jean-Francois; Lottig, Noah R; Oliver, Samantha K; Scott, Caren E; Smith, Nicole J; Stopyak, Scott; Yuan, Shuai; Bremigan, Mary Tate; Downing, John A; Gries, Corinna; Henry, Emily N; Skaff, Nick K; Stanley, Emily H; Stow, Craig A; Tan, Pang-Ning; Wagner, Tyler; Webster, Katherine E

    2015-01-01

    Although there are considerable site-based data for individual or groups of ecosystems, these datasets are widely scattered, have different data formats and conventions, and often have limited accessibility. At the broader scale, national datasets exist for a large number of geospatial features of land, water, and air that are needed to fully understand variation among these ecosystems. However, such datasets originate from different sources and have different spatial and temporal resolutions. By taking an open-science perspective and by combining site-based ecosystem datasets and national geospatial datasets, science gains the ability to ask important research questions related to grand environmental challenges that operate at broad scales. Documentation of such complicated database integration efforts, through peer-reviewed papers, is recommended to foster reproducibility and future use of the integrated database. Here, we describe the major steps, challenges, and considerations in building an integrated database of lake ecosystems, called LAGOS (LAke multi-scaled GeOSpatial and temporal database), that was developed at the sub-continental study extent of 17 US states (1,800,000 km(2)). LAGOS includes two modules: LAGOSGEO, with geospatial data on every lake with surface area larger than 4 ha in the study extent (~50,000 lakes), including climate, atmospheric deposition, land use/cover, hydrology, geology, and topography measured across a range of spatial and temporal extents; and LAGOSLIMNO, with lake water quality data compiled from ~100 individual datasets for a subset of lakes in the study extent (~10,000 lakes). Procedures for the integration of datasets included: creating a flexible database design; authoring and integrating metadata; documenting data provenance; quantifying spatial measures of geographic data; quality-controlling integrated and derived data; and extensively documenting the database. Our procedures make a large, complex, and integrated

  17. Building a multi-scaled geospatial temporal ecology database from disparate data sources: Fostering open science through data reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soranno, Patricia A.; Bissell, E.G.; Cheruvelil, Kendra S.; Christel, Samuel T.; Collins, Sarah M.; Fergus, C. Emi; Filstrup, Christopher T.; Lapierre, Jean-Francois; Lotting, Noah R.; Oliver, Samantha K.; Scott, Caren E.; Smith, Nicole J.; Stopyak, Scott; Yuan, Shuai; Bremigan, Mary Tate; Downing, John A.; Gries, Corinna; Henry, Emily N.; Skaff, Nick K.; Stanley, Emily H.; Stow, Craig A.; Tan, Pang-Ning; Wagner, Tyler; Webster, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Although there are considerable site-based data for individual or groups of ecosystems, these datasets are widely scattered, have different data formats and conventions, and often have limited accessibility. At the broader scale, national datasets exist for a large number of geospatial features of land, water, and air that are needed to fully understand variation among these ecosystems. However, such datasets originate from different sources and have different spatial and temporal resolutions. By taking an open-science perspective and by combining site-based ecosystem datasets and national geospatial datasets, science gains the ability to ask important research questions related to grand environmental challenges that operate at broad scales. Documentation of such complicated database integration efforts, through peer-reviewed papers, is recommended to foster reproducibility and future use of the integrated database. Here, we describe the major steps, challenges, and considerations in building an integrated database of lake ecosystems, called LAGOS (LAke multi-scaled GeOSpatial and temporal database), that was developed at the sub-continental study extent of 17 US states (1,800,000 km2). LAGOS includes two modules: LAGOSGEO, with geospatial data on every lake with surface area larger than 4 ha in the study extent (~50,000 lakes), including climate, atmospheric deposition, land use/cover, hydrology, geology, and topography measured across a range of spatial and temporal extents; and LAGOSLIMNO, with lake water quality data compiled from ~100 individual datasets for a subset of lakes in the study extent (~10,000 lakes). Procedures for the integration of datasets included: creating a flexible database design; authoring and integrating metadata; documenting data provenance; quantifying spatial measures of geographic data; quality-controlling integrated and derived data; and extensively documenting the database. Our procedures make a large, complex, and integrated

  18. Challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René-Éric Dagorn

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Sous le titre « The Hispanic Challenge », Samuel P. Huntington propose dans le numéro de Foreign Policy de mars-avril 2004 une nouvelle démonstration du danger de sa pseudo-théorie du « choc des civilisations ». Quel est donc ce «  challenge  » auquel, d'après Huntington, la société américaine serait aujourd'hui confrontée ? C'est celui de l'immigration « hispanique » qui « menace l'identité américaine, ses valeurs et son mode de vie » ...

  19. Multi-scale osteointegration and neovascularization of biphasic calcium phosphate bone scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Sheeny K.

    osteoinductive proteins. To further investigate the effects of scaffold osteoinductivity, BCP scaffolds were implanted in porcine mandibular defects with rhBMP-2, which was partially sequestered in the micropores. Cell migration into osteoinductive scaffold micropores can be enhanced through the delivery of exogenous rhBMP-2 further promoting multi-scale osteointegration. Finally, endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) isolated from human umbilical cord blood (UCB) were evaluated in terms of their in vivo vasculogenic potential in the context of bone formation. This work was completed to determine if ECFCs could be utilized in a bone tissue engineering construct to promote neovascularization. ECFCs were combined with a BCP scaffold and rhBMP-2 and implanted subcutaneously on the abdominal wall of NOD/SCID mice. The result was formation of perfused human vessels within BCP scaffold macropores that were present at 4 weeks. The high density and persistence of human vessels at four weeks indicates that human UCB ECFCs exceed their reported in vivo vasculogenic potential when combined with rhBMP-2 and a BCP scaffold. This shows a dual role for BMP-2 in the context of bone regeneration. Collectively, the thesis demonstrates that (1) the design of synthetic bone scaffolds should include controlled multi-scale porosity to promote multi-scale osteointegration, which may significantly improve scaffold mechanical properties and (2) human umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial colony forming cells have potential for promoting neovascularization in a bone defect when combined with rhBMP-2.

  20. EPOS-WP16: A coherent and collaborative network of Solid Earth Multi-scale laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calignano, Elisa; Rosenau, Matthias; Lange, Otto; Spiers, Chris; Willingshofer, Ernst; Drury, Martyn; van Kan-Parker, Mirjam; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Funiciello, Francesca; Trippanera, Daniele; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Tesei, Telemaco; Winkler, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    Laboratory facilities are an integral part of Earth Science research. The diversity of methods employed in such infrastructures reflects the multi-scale nature of the Earth system and is essential for the understanding of its evolution, for the assessment of geo-hazards and for the sustainable exploitation of geo-resources. In the frame of EPOS (European Plate Observing System), the Working Package 16 represents a developing community of European Geoscience Multi-scale laboratories. The participant and collaborating institutions (Utrecht University, GFZ, RomaTre University, INGV, NERC, CSIC-ICTJA, CNRS, LMU, C4G-UBI, ETH, CNR*) embody several types of laboratory infrastructures, engaged in different fields of interest of Earth Science: from high temperature and pressure experimental facilities, to electron microscopy, micro-beam analysis, analogue tectonic and geodynamic modelling and paleomagnetic laboratories. The length scales encompassed by these infrastructures range from the nano- and micrometre levels (electron microscopy and micro-beam analysis) to the scale of experiments on centimetres-sized samples, and to analogue model experiments simulating the reservoir scale, the basin scale and the plate scale. The aim of WP16 is to provide two services by the year 2019: first, providing virtual access to data from laboratories (data service) and, second, providing physical access to laboratories (transnational access, TNA). Regarding the development of a data service, the current status is such that most data produced by the various laboratory centres and networks are available only in limited "final form" in publications, many data remain inaccessible and/or poorly preserved. Within EPOS the TCS Multi-scale laboratories is collecting and harmonizing available and emerging laboratory data on the properties and process controlling rock system behaviour at all relevant scales, in order to generate products accessible and interoperable through services for supporting

  1. Land-Atmosphere Coupling in the Multi-Scale Modelling Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, P. M.; Denning, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Multi-Scale Modeling Framework (MMF), in which cloud-resolving models (CRMs) are embedded within general circulation model (GCM) gridcells to serve as the model's cloud parameterization, has offered a number of benefits to GCM simulations. The coupling of these cloud-resolving models directly to land surface model instances, rather than passing averaged atmospheric variables to a single instance of a land surface model, the logical next step in model development, has recently been accomplished. This new configuration offers conspicuous improvements to estimates of precipitation and canopy through-fall, but overall the model exhibits warm surface temperature biases and low productivity.This work presents modifications to a land-surface model that take advantage of the new multi-scale modeling framework, and accommodate the change in spatial scale from a typical GCM range of ~200 km to the CRM grid-scale of 4 km.A parameterization is introduced to apportion modeled surface radiation into direct-beam and diffuse components. The diffuse component is then distributed among the land-surface model instances within each GCM cell domain. This substantially reduces the number excessively low light values provided to the land-surface model when cloudy conditions are modeled in the CRM, associated with its 1-D radiation scheme. The small spatial scale of the CRM, ~4 km, as compared with the typical ~200 km GCM scale, provides much more realistic estimates of precipitation intensity, this permits the elimination of a model parameterization of canopy through-fall. However, runoff at such scales can no longer be considered as an immediate flow to the ocean. Allowing sub-surface water flow between land-surface instances within the GCM domain affords better realism and also reduces temperature and productivity biases.The MMF affords a number of opportunities to land-surface modelers, providing both the advantages of direct simulation at the 4 km scale and a much reduced

  2. The onset of type 2 diabetes: proposal for a multi-scale model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglione, Filippo; Tieri, Paolo; De Graaf, Albert; Franceschi, Claudio; Liò, Pietro; Van Ommen, Ben; Mazzà, Claudia; Tuchel, Alexander; Bernaschi, Massimo; Samson, Clare; Colombo, Teresa; Castellani, Gastone C; Capri, Miriam; Garagnani, Paolo; Salvioli, Stefano; Nguyen, Viet Anh; Bobeldijk-Pastorova, Ivana; Krishnan, Shaji; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Sacchetti, Massimo; Morettini, Micaela; Ernst, Marc

    2013-10-31

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a common age-related disease, and is a major health concern, particularly in developed countries where the population is aging, including Europe. The multi-scale immune system simulator for the onset of type 2 diabetes (MISSION-T2D) is a European Union-funded project that aims to develop and validate an integrated, multilevel, and patient-specific model, incorporating genetic, metabolic, and nutritional data for the simulation and prediction of metabolic and inflammatory processes in the onset and progression of T2D. The project will ultimately provide a tool for diagnosis and clinical decision making that can estimate the risk of developing T2D and predict its progression in response to possible therapies. Recent data showed that T2D and its complications, specifically in the heart, kidney, retina, and feet, should be considered a systemic disease that is sustained by a pervasive, metabolically-driven state of inflammation. Accordingly, there is an urgent need (1) to understand the complex mechanisms underpinning the onset of this disease, and (2) to identify early patient-specific diagnostic parameters and related inflammatory indicators. We aim to accomplish this mission by setting up a multi-scale model to study the systemic interactions of the biological mechanisms involved in response to a variety of nutritional and metabolic stimuli and stressors. Specifically, we will be studying the biological mechanisms of immunological/inflammatory processes, energy intake/expenditure ratio, and cell cycle rate. The overall architecture of the model will exploit an already established immune system simulator as well as several discrete and continuous mathematical methods for modeling of the processes critically involved in the onset and progression of T2D. We aim to validate the predictions of our models using actual biological and clinical data. This study was initiated in March 2013 and is expected to be completed by February 2016

  3. Solving the problem of imaging resolution: stochastic multi-scale image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsanina, Marina; Mallants, Dirk; Gilyazetdinova, Dina; Gerke, Kiril

    2016-04-01

    Structural features of porous materials define the majority of its physical properties, including water infiltration and redistribution, multi-phase flow (e.g. simultaneous water/air flow, gas exchange between biologically active soil root zone and atmosphere, etc.) and solute transport. To characterize soil and rock microstructure X-ray microtomography is extremely useful. However, as any other imaging technique, this one also has a significant drawback - a trade-off between sample size and resolution. The latter is a significant problem for multi-scale complex structures, especially such as soils and carbonates. Other imaging techniques, for example, SEM/FIB-SEM or X-ray macrotomography can be helpful in obtaining higher resolution or wider field of view. The ultimate goal is to create a single dataset containing information from all scales or to characterize such multi-scale structure. In this contribution we demonstrate a general solution for merging multiscale categorical spatial data into a single dataset using stochastic reconstructions with rescaled correlation functions. The versatility of the method is demonstrated by merging three images representing macro, micro and nanoscale spatial information on porous media structure. Images obtained by X-ray microtomography and scanning electron microscopy were fused into a single image with predefined resolution. The methodology is sufficiently generic for implementation of other stochastic reconstruction techniques, any number of scales, any number of material phases, and any number of images for a given scale. The methodology can be further used to assess effective properties of fused porous media images or to compress voluminous spatial datasets for efficient data storage. Potential practical applications of this method are abundant in soil science, hydrology and petroleum engineering, as well as other geosciences. This work was partially supported by RSF grant 14-17-00658 (X-ray microtomography study of shale

  4. Simulating Multi-Scale Mercury Fate and Transport in a Coastal Plain Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knightes, C. D.; Davis, G. M.; Golden, H. E.; Conrads, P. A.; Bradley, P. M.; Journey, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury is the toxicant responsible for the largest number of fish advisories across the United States, with 1.1 million river miles under advisory. The processes governing fate, transport, and transformation of mercury in streams and rivers are not well understood, in large part, because these systems are intimately linked with their surrounding watersheds and are often highly spatially variable. In this study, we applied a linked watershed hydrology and biogeochemical cycling (N, C, and Hg) model (VELMA, Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Assessment) to simulate daily flow, fluxes, and soil and stream concentrations of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) at multiple spatial scales in McTier Creek, a Coastal Plain watershed within the Edisto River basin of South Carolina, USA. Our goals were to (1) calibrate and simulate Hg fate and transport processes at a focused reach scale (0.1 km2) and (2) assess how representative the reach-scale parameters and processes are when multi-scale watershed information is included in Hg cycling simulations. Thus, reach-scale parameterization was applied to multi-scaled watersheds, including two headwater sub-watersheds (28 km2 and 25 km2) nested within the McTier Creek watershed (79 km2), to evaluate model performance and how well reach-scale parameterization and processes characterize nested watersheds with increasing drainage areas. The current VELMA simulations suggest that stream water column THg concentration predictions perform reasonably well at different scales based on reach-scale calibrations, but the model simulations of MeHg reach, sub-watershed, and watershed stream concentrations are out-of-phase with observed MeHg concentrations. This result suggests that processes governing MeHg loading to the main channel may be under-represented in the current model structure and underscores the complexity of simulating MeHg dynamics in watershed models. This work supports the importance of hydrology in

  5. Subgrid-scale stresses and scalar fluxes constructed by the multi-scale turnover Lagrangian map

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Bairmani, Sukaina; Li, Yi; Rosales, Carlos; Xie, Zheng-tong

    2017-04-01

    The multi-scale turnover Lagrangian map (MTLM) [C. Rosales and C. Meneveau, "Anomalous scaling and intermittency in three-dimensional synthetic turbulence," Phys. Rev. E 78, 016313 (2008)] uses nested multi-scale Lagrangian advection of fluid particles to distort a Gaussian velocity field and, as a result, generate non-Gaussian synthetic velocity fields. Passive scalar fields can be generated with the procedure when the fluid particles carry a scalar property [C. Rosales, "Synthetic three-dimensional turbulent passive scalar fields via the minimal Lagrangian map," Phys. Fluids 23, 075106 (2011)]. The synthetic fields have been shown to possess highly realistic statistics characterizing small scale intermittency, geometrical structures, and vortex dynamics. In this paper, we present a study of the synthetic fields using the filtering approach. This approach, which has not been pursued so far, provides insights on the potential applications of the synthetic fields in large eddy simulations and subgrid-scale (SGS) modelling. The MTLM method is first generalized to model scalar fields produced by an imposed linear mean profile. We then calculate the subgrid-scale stress, SGS scalar flux, SGS scalar variance, as well as related quantities from the synthetic fields. Comparison with direct numerical simulations (DNSs) shows that the synthetic fields reproduce the probability distributions of the SGS energy and scalar dissipation rather well. Related geometrical statistics also display close agreement with DNS results. The synthetic fields slightly under-estimate the mean SGS energy dissipation and slightly over-predict the mean SGS scalar variance dissipation. In general, the synthetic fields tend to slightly under-estimate the probability of large fluctuations for most quantities we have examined. Small scale anisotropy in the scalar field originated from the imposed mean gradient is captured. The sensitivity of the synthetic fields on the input spectra is assessed by

  6. Multi-scale analysis of hydrologic change in the Japanese megalopolis by using integrated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, T.; Fujita, T.; Hashimoto, S.; Hamano, H.

    2008-12-01

    We coupled the process-based NIES Integrated Catchment-based Eco-hydrology (NICE) model (Nakayama,2008a,2008b; Nakayama and Watanabe,2004,2006,2008a,2008b; Nakayama et al.,2006,2007) to an urban canopy model and the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) in order to simulate the effect of urban structure and human activity on the change of water and heat cycles in the atmospheric/land and the interfacial areas of the Japanese megalopolis. The simulation was conducted with multi-scale levels in horizontally regional (130x130 mesh with a grid spacing of 2 km) - urban area (180x130 mesh with a grid spacing of 200 m), and in vertically atmosphere-surface-unsaturated-saturated layers. The model reproduced excellently the water and heat budgets including groundwater level, air temperature, and humidity, et al. in various types of natural/artificial landcover. The simulated results suggest that the latent heat flux has a strong impact on the hydrologic cycle and the cooling temperature in comparison with the heat budget analysis of observation data. Because the water temperature in an aquifer is almost constant throughout the year, it is estimated that the use of groundwater as a heat sink would be very effective for tackling the urban heat island phenomenon, particularly during the summer (Ministry of Environment, 2003). We evaluated the relationship between the effect of groundwater use to ameliorate the heat island phenomenon and the effect of infiltration on the water cycle in the catchment. The procedure to integrate the multi-scale model simulation with political scenario for the effective selection and use of ecosystem service sites in would be a very powerful approach to create thermally-pleasing environments in the megalopolis. References; Ministry of Environment,http://www.env.go.jp/air/report/h15-02/,2003. Nakayama,ECOMOD,doi:10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2008.02.017,2008a. Nakayama,FORECO,doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2008.07.017,2008b. Nakayama and Watanabe,WRR,doi:10

  7. Scrubbing Up: Multi-Scale Investigation of Woody Encroachment in a Southern African Savannah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G. Marston

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the extent of woody vegetation represent a major conservation question in many savannah systems around the globe. To address the problem of the current lack of broad-scale cost-effective tools for land cover monitoring in complex savannah environments, we use a multi-scale approach to quantifying vegetation change in Kruger National Park (KNP, South Africa. We test whether medium spatial resolution satellite data (Landsat, existing back to the 1970s, which have pixel sizes larger than typical vegetation patches, can nevertheless capture the thematic detail required to detect woody encroachment in savannahs. We quantify vegetation change over a 13-year period in KNP, examine the changes that have occurred, assess the drivers of these changes, and compare appropriate remote sensing data sources for monitoring change. We generate land cover maps for three areas of southern KNP using very high resolution (VHR and medium resolution satellite sensor imagery from February 2001 to 2014. Considerable land cover change has occurred, with large increases in shrubs replacing both trees and grassland. Examination of exclosure areas and potential environmental driver data suggests two mechanisms: elephant herbivory removing trees and at least one separate mechanism responsible for conversion of grassland to shrubs, theorised to be increasing atmospheric CO2. Thus, the combination of these mechanisms causes the novel two-directional shrub encroachment that we observe (tree loss and grassland conversion. Multi-scale comparison of classifications indicates that although spatial detail is lost when using medium resolution rather than VHR imagery for land cover classification (e.g., Landsat imagery cannot readily distinguish between tree and shrub classes, while VHR imagery can, the thematic detail contained within both VHR and medium resolution classifications is remarkably congruent. This suggests that medium resolution imagery contains sufficient

  8. Optimal Multi-scale Demand-side Management for Continuous Power-Intensive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumit

    With the advent of deregulation in electricity markets and an increasing share of intermittent power generation sources, the profitability of industrial consumers that operate power-intensive processes has become directly linked to the variability in energy prices. Thus, for industrial consumers that are able to adjust to the fluctuations, time-sensitive electricity prices (as part of so-called Demand-Side Management (DSM) in the smart grid) offer potential economical incentives. In this thesis, we introduce optimization models and decomposition strategies for the multi-scale Demand-Side Management of continuous power-intensive processes. On an operational level, we derive a mode formulation for scheduling under time-sensitive electricity prices. The formulation is applied to air separation plants and cement plants to minimize the operating cost. We also describe how a mode formulation can be used for industrial combined heat and power plants that are co-located at integrated chemical sites to increase operating profit by adjusting their steam and electricity production according to their inherent flexibility. Furthermore, a robust optimization formulation is developed to address the uncertainty in electricity prices by accounting for correlations and multiple ranges in the realization of the random variables. On a strategic level, we introduce a multi-scale model that provides an understanding of the value of flexibility of the current plant configuration and the value of additional flexibility in terms of retrofits for Demand-Side Management under product demand uncertainty. The integration of multiple time scales leads to large-scale two-stage stochastic programming problems, for which we need to apply decomposition strategies in order to obtain a good solution within a reasonable amount of time. Hence, we describe two decomposition schemes that can be applied to solve two-stage stochastic programming problems: First, a hybrid bi-level decomposition scheme with

  9. Towards Characterization, Modeling, and Uncertainty Quantification in Multi-scale Mechanics of Oragnic-rich Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, S.; Mashhadian, M.; Noshadravan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing the efficiency and sustainability in operation of hydrocarbon recovery from organic-rich shales requires a fundamental understanding of chemomechanical properties of organic-rich shales. This understanding is manifested in form of physics-bases predictive models capable of capturing highly heterogeneous and multi-scale structure of organic-rich shale materials. In this work we present a framework of experimental characterization, micromechanical modeling, and uncertainty quantification that spans from nanoscale to macroscale. Application of experiments such as coupled grid nano-indentation and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and micromechanical modeling attributing the role of organic maturity to the texture of the material, allow us to identify unique clay mechanical properties among different samples that are independent of maturity of shale formations and total organic content. The results can then be used to inform the physically-based multiscale model for organic rich shales consisting of three levels that spans from the scale of elementary building blocks (e.g. clay minerals in clay-dominated formations) of organic rich shales to the scale of the macroscopic inorganic/organic hard/soft inclusion composite. Although this approach is powerful in capturing the effective properties of organic-rich shale in an average sense, it does not account for the uncertainty in compositional and mechanical model parameters. Thus, we take this model one step forward by systematically incorporating the main sources of uncertainty in modeling multiscale behavior of organic-rich shales. In particular we account for the uncertainty in main model parameters at different scales such as porosity, elastic properties and mineralogy mass percent. To that end, we use Maximum Entropy Principle and random matrix theory to construct probabilistic descriptions of model inputs based on available information. The Monte Carlo simulation is then carried out to propagate the

  10. A multi-scale approach to quantifying non-rainfall water inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agam, Nurit; Florentin, Anat

    2015-04-01

    Non-rainfall water inputs (NRWIs) are a gain of water to the surface soil layer caused by sources other than rainfall, i.e., by fog deposition, dew formation, or water vapor adsorption. These water inputs usually evaporate the following morning, creating a diurnal cycle of water content in the uppermost soil layer, which involves exchange of latent-heat flux (LE) between the soil and the atmosphere. The significance of the formation and evaporation of NRWIs in drylands is largely acknowledged, yet understanding of the environmental conditions controlling its magnitude are still lacking, and its spatial extent was not studied before. A multi-scale approach to quantifying NWRIs and the corresponding diurnal water cycle in arid regions will be presented. The research has been conducted over a bare loess soil in the Negev desert (30o51'35.30" N, 34o46'40.97" E) during the dry season (May-September 2014). During this dry period, gain in soil water content is only a result of NRWIs. A micro-lysimeter (ML) with a 20 cm diameter and 50 cm depth filled with an undisturbed soil sample was placed on a scale buried in the soil such that the top end of the sample was level with the soil surface and the sample's mass was continuously monitored. The ML served as a point measurement to which larger-scale micrometeorological methods, i.e., eddy covariance (EC) flux tower (field scale, ~2X103 m2) and a surface layer scintillometer (field scale, ~8X103 m2). The ability to obtain spatially distributed NWRIs at the regional scale through mapping changes in land surface emissivity was tested as well. Preliminary results indicate that despite the acknowledged limitations in nighttime measurements, the EC LE followed closely the micro-lysimeter LE; and the sensible heat flux derived by the EC and the scintillometer were in good agreement; demonstrating the feasibility of measuring NRWIs with both methods. This innovative multi-scale approach sheds light on various aspects of the NRWI

  11. Facile synthesis, characterization, and electrochemical performance of multi-scale AgVO{sub 3} particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hangkong [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Li, Hailong [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); School of Energy Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Wu, Shaokang [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Liao, Changzhong; Zhou, Zhengyuan [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Liu, Xiang; Djurišić, Aleksandra B.; Xie, Maohai [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Tang, Chuyang [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Shih, Kaimin, E-mail: kshih@hku.hk [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)

    2016-07-25

    Multi-scale AgVO{sub 3} particles were successfully synthesized from different organic acids using a facile sol–gel method; a series of techniques were then used to characterize the particles. The X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that a main characteristic peak of element Ag is at around 38°. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra demonstrated the binding energies of Ag{sup 0} 3d (5/2) and Ag{sup 0} 3d (3/2), which further confirmed the existence of element Ag. In addition, the composition of the samples, including the amorphous phase, was determined with a quantitative X-ray diffraction (QXRD) analysis. With a heating rate of 10 °C/min, the products synthesized with citric acid at 450 °C had a larger amorphous phase (26.4% in wt.%) than the samples synthesized with citric acid at 500 °C. To obtain lesser amorphous phase, the precursors were treated at 500 °C with a slower heating rate of 5 °C/min. The electrochemical performance of these three samples, particularly their suitability as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries, were investigated. The products with minimum amorphous phase (9.4%) showed higher specific discharge capacity than other two samples at the first 40 cycles. However, with the increasing fading rate, only 27% of the initial capacity was retained after 100 cycles. Amorphous phase can stabilize the material and avoid the structural collapse during the cycles. Therefore, under the synergistic effect of amorphous content and particle size, the products obtained at 500 °C with quicker heating rate exhibited the optimal capacity and cycling stability. This electrode showed a high initial capacity of 243 mA h/g and retained 41% of the initial capacity after 100 cycles. - Highlights: • Multi-scale AgVO{sub 3} particles were synthesized successfully via a sol–gel method. • With a series of characterization techniques, the existence of Ag was confirmed. • The effects of amorphous phase on the electrochemical

  12. Hot cracking investigation during laser welding of high-strength steels with multi-scale modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, H.; Agarwal, G.; Amirthalingam, M.; Hermans, M.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Hot cracking during laser welding of advanced high-strength steels is reported to be a serious problem by automotive manufacturers. In this work, hot cracking susceptibilities of transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) and dual-phase (DP) steels are studied based on a multi-scale modelling

  13. Multi-scale modelling of bioreactor–separator system for wastewater treatment with two-dimensional activated sludge floc dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ofi?eru, I.D.; Bellucci, M.; Picioreanu, C.; Lavric, V.; Curtis, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    A simple “first generation” multi-scale computational model of the formation of activated sludge flocs at micro-scale and reactor performance at macro-scale is proposed. The model couples mass balances for substrates and biomass at reactor scale with an individual-based approach for the floc

  14. Source-to-exposure assessment with the Pangea multi-scale framework – case study in Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wannaz, Cedric; Fantke, Peter; Lane, Joe

    2017-01-01

    measures. This paper aims to extend the Pangea spatial multi-scale multimedia framework to evaluate source-to-receptor relationships of industrial sources of organic pollutants in Australia. Pangea solves a large compartmental system in parallel by block to determine arrays of masses at steady...

  15. Strategies for efficient numerical implementation of hybrid multi-scale agent-based models to describe biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilfone, Nicholas A; Kirschner, Denise E; Linderman, Jennifer J

    2015-03-01

    Biologically related processes operate across multiple spatiotemporal scales. For computational modeling methodologies to mimic this biological complexity, individual scale models must be linked in ways that allow for dynamic exchange of information across scales. A powerful methodology is to combine a discrete modeling approach, agent-based models (ABMs), with continuum models to form hybrid models. Hybrid multi-scale ABMs have been used to simulate emergent responses of biological systems. Here, we review two aspects of hybrid multi-scale ABMs: linking individual scale models and efficiently solving the resulting model. We discuss the computational choices associated with aspects of linking individual scale models while simultaneously maintaining model tractability. We demonstrate implementations of existing numerical methods in the context of hybrid multi-scale ABMs. Using an example model describing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, we show relative computational speeds of various combinations of numerical methods. Efficient linking and solution of hybrid multi-scale ABMs is key to model portability, modularity, and their use in understanding biological phenomena at a systems level.

  16. Landslide mapping with multi-scale object-based image analysis – a case study in the Baichi watershed, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lahousse

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We developed a multi-scale OBIA (object-based image analysis landslide detection technique to map shallow landslides in the Baichi watershed, Taiwan, after the 2004 Typhoon Aere event. Our semi-automated detection method selected multiple scales through landslide size statistics analysis for successive classification rounds. The detection performance achieved a modified success rate (MSR of 86.5% with the training dataset and 86% with the validation dataset. This performance level was due to the multi-scale aspect of our methodology, as the MSR for single scale classification was substantially lower, even after spectral difference segmentation, with a maximum of 74%. Our multi-scale technique was capable of detecting landslides of varying sizes, including very small landslides, up to 95 m2. The method presented certain limitations: the thresholds we established for classification were specific to the study area, to the landslide type in the study area, and to the spectral characteristics of the satellite image. Because updating site-specific and image-specific classification thresholds is easy with OBIA software, our multi-scale technique is expected to be useful for mapping shallow landslides at watershed level.

  17. On the computation of a retina resistivity profile for applications in multi-scale modeling of electrical stimulation and absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizos, Kyle; RamRakhyani, Anil Kumar; Anderson, James; Marc, Robert; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    This study proposes a methodology for computationally estimating resistive properties of tissue in multi-scale computational models, used for studying the interaction of electromagnetic fields with neural tissue, with applications to both dosimetry and neuroprosthetics. Traditionally, models at bulk tissue- and cellular-level scales are solved independently, linking resulting voltage from existing resistive tissue-scale models as extracellular sources to cellular models. This allows for solving the effects that external electric fields have on cellular activity. There are two major limitations to this approach: first, the resistive properties of the tissue need to be chosen, of which there are contradicting measurements in literature; second, the measurements of resistivity themselves may be inaccurate, leading to the mentioned contradicting results found across different studies. Our proposed methodology allows for constructing computed resistivity profiles using knowledge of only the neural morphology within the multi-scale model, resulting in a practical implementation of the effective medium theory; this bypasses concerns regarding the choice of resistive properties and accuracy of measurement setups. A multi-scale model of retina is constructed with an external electrode to serve as a test bench for analyzing existing and resulting resistivity profiles, and validation is presented through the reconstruction of a published resistivity profile of retina tissue. Results include a computed resistivity profile of retina tissue for use with a retina multi-scale model used to analyze effects of external electric fields on neural activity.

  18. Beyond harvests in the commons: multi-scale governance and turbulence in indigenous/community conserved areas in Oaxaca, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Barton Bray

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Some important elements of common property theory include a focus on individual communities or user groups, local level adjudication of conflicts, local autonomy in rule making, physical harvests, and low levels of articulation with markets. We present a case study of multi-scale collective action around indigenous/community conserved areas (ICCAs in Oaxaca, Mexico that suggests a modification of these components of common property theory. A multi-community ICCA in Oaxaca demonstrates the importance of inter-community collective action as key link in multi-scale governance, that conflicts are often negotiated in multiple arenas, that rules emerge at multiple scales, and that management for conservation and environmental services implies no physical harvests. Realizing economic gains from ICCAs for strict conservation may require something very different than traditional natural resource management. It requires intense engagement with extensive networks of government and civil society actors and new forms of community and inter-community collection action, or multi-scale governance. Multi-scale governance is built on trust and social capital at multiple scales and also constitutes collective action at multiple scales. However, processes of multi-scale governance are also necessarily “turbulent” with actors frequently having conflicting values and goals to be negotiated. We present an analytic history of the process of emergence of community and inter-community collective action around strict conservation and examples of internal and external turbulence. We argue that this case study and other literature requires an extensions of the constitutive elements of common property theory.

  19. Multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations of an Alcator C-Mod, ELM-y H-mode plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, N. T.; Holland, C.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, P.; Candy, J.; Creely, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    High fidelity, multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations capable of capturing both ion ({k}θ {ρ }s∼ { O }(1.0)) and electron-scale ({k}θ {ρ }e∼ { O }(1.0)) turbulence were performed in the core of an Alcator C-Mod ELM-y H-mode discharge which exhibits reactor-relevant characteristics. These simulations, performed with all experimental inputs and realistic ion to electron mass ratio ({({m}i/{m}e)}1/2=60.0) provide insight into the physics fidelity that may be needed for accurate simulation of the core of fusion reactor discharges. Three multi-scale simulations and series of separate ion and electron-scale simulations performed using the GYRO code (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) are presented. As with earlier multi-scale results in L-mode conditions (Howard et al 2016 Nucl. Fusion 56 014004), both ion and multi-scale simulations results are compared with experimentally inferred ion and electron heat fluxes, as well as the measured values of electron incremental thermal diffusivities—indicative of the experimental electron temperature profile stiffness. Consistent with the L-mode results, cross-scale coupling is found to play an important role in the simulation of these H-mode conditions. Extremely stiff ion-scale transport is observed in these high-performance conditions which is shown to likely play and important role in the reproduction of measurements of perturbative transport. These results provide important insight into the role of multi-scale plasma turbulence in the core of reactor-relevant plasmas and establish important constraints on the the fidelity of models needed for predictive simulations.

  20. Multi-scale ocean and climate drivers of widespread bleaching in the Coral Triangle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenkard, E.; Curchitser, E. N.; Kleypas, J. A.; Castruccio, F. S.

    2016-12-01

    The Maritime Continent is home to the Coral Triangle (CT): the global pinnacle of tropical coral biodiversity. Historically, extensive bleaching-induced mortality (caused by thermal stress) among corals in the CT has been associated with extremes in the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), particularly years when a strong El Niños transitions to a La Niña state (i.e., 1998 and 2010). Similarities in the spatial distribution of satellite-derived indices, and the multi-scale environmental drivers of elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) during the 1998 and 2010 bleaching events suggests a potential predictability that has important implications for reef conservation. Using numerical models and ocean and atmosphere reanalysis products, we discuss the roles of ENSO-associated anomalies in both large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns (e.g., South Asian Monsoon) and regional ocean-cooling mechanisms such as coastal upwelling, tropical storm activity, and divergent (i.e., upwelling) circulation patterns (e.g., the Mindanao Eddy) in determining SSTs and, consequently projected patterns of reef ecosystem vulnerability to thermal stress. Conditions associated with the recent and ongoing 2015/2016 coral bleaching and mortality will be compared/contrasted.

  1. Bionic electrospun ultrafine fibrous poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds with a multi-scale structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Xuefen; Jing, Dazheng; Yang, Yin; Zhu, Meifang

    2009-06-01

    Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) tissue engineering scaffolds with porous inner structures of individual fibers and controllable architectures were successfully fabricated from the homogeneous polymer-solvent-nonsolvent system (PLLA, CH(2)Cl(2) and DMF) by a single capillary electrospinning with certain conductive patterned templates as fiber collectors. PLLA was dissolved in dimethylformamide (DMF) and methylene chloride (CH(2)Cl(2)) mixed solvent with different ratios. Semi-hollow fiber with porous inner structure and compact shell wall was formed by controlling the content of DMF in the mixed solvents. It is believed that the phase separation should be the key origin for the formation of this microstructure. In order to mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) with a specific structure, conductive patterned collectors were designed and employed to manufacture PLLA ultrafine fibrous scaffolds with three-dimensional architectures. We believe these kinds of multi-scale biodegradable fibrous scaffolds with specific microstructure and macro-architectures could make the electrospun fibrous scaffold better mimic the natural extracellular matrix to satisfy tissue engineering.

  2. Bionic electrospun ultrafine fibrous poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds with a multi-scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Kai; Wang Xuefen; Jing Dazheng; Yang Yin; Zhu Meifang, E-mail: wangxf@dhu.edu.c [State Key Lab for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai, 201620 (China)

    2009-06-15

    Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) tissue engineering scaffolds with porous inner structures of individual fibers and controllable architectures were successfully fabricated from the homogeneous polymer-solvent-nonsolvent system (PLLA, CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and DMF) by a single capillary electrospinning with certain conductive patterned templates as fiber collectors. PLLA was dissolved in dimethylformamide (DMF) and methylene chloride (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) mixed solvent with different ratios. Semi-hollow fiber with porous inner structure and compact shell wall was formed by controlling the content of DMF in the mixed solvents. It is believed that the phase separation should be the key origin for the formation of this microstructure. In order to mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) with a specific structure, conductive patterned collectors were designed and employed to manufacture PLLA ultrafine fibrous scaffolds with three-dimensional architectures. We believe these kinds of multi-scale biodegradable fibrous scaffolds with specific microstructure and macro-architectures could make the electrospun fibrous scaffold better mimic the natural extracellular matrix to satisfy tissue engineering.

  3. Multi-scale CFD simulation of hydrodynamics and cracking reactions in fixed fluidized bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin H; Wang, Zhen B; Zhao, Hui; Tian, Yuan Y; Shan, Hong H; Yang, Chao H

    Fixed fluidized bed reactor is widely used to evaluate the crackability of heavy oils and the activity of catalysts. To understand the hydrodynamics, reaction kinetics and thermodynamics in conventional and modified fixed fluidized bed reactors, the computational fluid dynamics method, energy-minimization multi-scale-based two-fluid model coupled with a six-lump kinetic model was used to investigate the gas-solid flow and cracking reactions. The gas mixing and particle volume fraction distributions, as well as product yields in the conventional and modified fixed fluidized bed reactors were analyzed. The residence time distribution model was utilized to obtain the parameters indicating the back-mixing degree, such as mean residence time and dimensionless variance of the gas. The results showed that the simulated product distribution is in reasonable agreement with the experimental data; the modified fixed fluidized bed reactor is closer to the ideal plug flow reactor, which can efficiently enhance the gas-solid mixing, reduce the gas back-mixing degree, and hence improve the reaction performance.

  4. CMAQ (Community Multi-Scale Air Quality) atmospheric distribution model adaptation to region of Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázár, Dóra; Weidinger, Tamás

    2016-04-01

    For our days, it has become important to measure and predict the concentration of harmful atmospheric pollutants such as dust, aerosol particles of different size ranges, nitrogen compounds, and ozone. The Department of Meteorology at Eötvös Loránd University has been applying the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model several years ago, which is suitable for weather forecasting tasks and provides input data for various environmental models (e.g. DNDC). By adapting the CMAQ (Community Multi-scale Air Quality) model we have designed a combined ambient air-meteorological model (WRF-CMAQ). In this research it is important to apply different emission databases and a background model describing the initial distribution of the pollutant. We used SMOKE (Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions) model for construction emission dataset from EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) inventories and GEOS-Chem model for initial and boundary conditions. Our model settings were CMAQ CB05 (Carbon Bond 2005) chemical mechanism with 108 x 108 km, 36 x 36 km and 12 x 12 km grids for regions of Europe, the Carpathian Basin and Hungary respectively. i) The structure of the model system, ii) a case study for Carpathian Basin (an anticyclonic weather situation at 21th September 2012) are presented. iii) Verification of ozone forecast has been provided based on the measurements of background air pollution stations. iv) Effects of model attributes (f.e. transition time, emission dataset, parameterizations) for the ozone forecast in Hungary are also investigated.

  5. Dynamics of Multi-Scale Intra-Provincial Regional Inequality in Zhejiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenze Yue

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates regional inequality in a multi-scale framework, using Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis, based on the per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP of counties and municipalities within the Zhejiang province in China between the years of 1990 and 2010. A Spatial Markov Chain is used to identify the dynamics of regional wealth disparity in Zhejiang. The results show that the regional inequality of Zhejiang is sensitive to the geographic scale of the analysis. In addition, the inter-county inequality shows an inverted-U shape pattern. At the same time, the inter-municipality inequality displays a more consistently upward trend, and the evolution of the interregional inequality is relatively stable over time. The regional inequality is more significant at finer (larger spatial scales. The decomposition of the Theil Index shows that the contribution of the inequalities between Northeast Zhejiang and Southwest Zhejiang increased. The increasingly larger values of the Global Moran’s I show that there is an intensifying spatial aggregation of economic development. The comparison of the traditional Markov transition matrix and the Spatial Markov transition matrix illustrates how the relative wealth or poverty of neighboring counties make a significance difference in wealth in a given county as measured using domestic GDP per capita in Zhejiang province. This space-time analysis is valuable for policy making towards sustainable economic development in China given the soaring spatial inequality.

  6. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Yan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  7. Multi-Scale Pixel-Based Image Fusion Using Multivariate Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed ur Rehman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel scheme to perform the fusion of multiple images using the multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD algorithm is proposed. Standard multi-scale fusion techniques make a priori assumptions regarding input data, whereas standard univariate empirical mode decomposition (EMD-based fusion techniques suffer from inherent mode mixing and mode misalignment issues, characterized respectively by either a single intrinsic mode function (IMF containing multiple scales or the same indexed IMFs corresponding to multiple input images carrying different frequency information. We show that MEMD overcomes these problems by being fully data adaptive and by aligning common frequency scales from multiple channels, thus enabling their comparison at a pixel level and subsequent fusion at multiple data scales. We then demonstrate the potential of the proposed scheme on a large dataset of real-world multi-exposure and multi-focus images and compare the results against those obtained from standard fusion algorithms, including the principal component analysis (PCA, discrete wavelet transform (DWT and non-subsampled contourlet transform (NCT. A variety of image fusion quality measures are employed for the objective evaluation of the proposed method. We also report the results of a hypothesis testing approach on our large image dataset to identify statistically-significant performance differences.

  8. Depth estimation from multi-scale SLIC superpixels using non-parametric learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yifeng; Zhu, Yuesheng; Qing, Yin; Yang, Fan

    2017-07-01

    This study introduces a novel depth estimation method that can automatically generate plausible depth map from a single image with unstructured environment. Our goal is to extrapolate depth map with more correct, rich, and distinct depth order, which is both quantitatively accurate as well as visually pleasing. Based on the preexisting DepthTransfer algorithm, our approach primarily transfers depth information at the level of superpixels from the most photometrically similar retrieval images under the framework of non-parametric learning. Posteriorly, we propose to concurrently warp the corresponding superpixels in multi-scale levels, where we employ an improved SLIC technique to segment the RGBD images from coarse to fine. Then, modified Cross Bilateral Filter is leveraged to refine the final depth field. With respect to training and evaluation, we perform our experiment on the popular Make3D dataset and demonstrate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art in both efficacy and computational efficiency. Especially, the final results show that in qualitatively evaluation, our results are visually superior in realism and simultaneously more immersive.

  9. Multi-scale Fully Convolutional Network for Face Detection in the Wild

    KAUST Repository

    Bai, Yancheng

    2017-08-24

    Face detection is a classical problem in computer vision. It is still a difficult task due to many nuisances that naturally occur in the wild. In this paper, we propose a multi-scale fully convolutional network for face detection. To reduce computation, the intermediate convolutional feature maps (conv) are shared by every scale model. We up-sample and down-sample the final conv map to approximate K levels of a feature pyramid, leading to a wide range of face scales that can be detected. At each feature pyramid level, a FCN is trained end-to-end to deal with faces in a small range of scale change. Because of the up-sampling, our method can detect very small faces (10×10 pixels). We test our MS-FCN detector on four public face detection datasets, including FDDB, WIDER FACE, AFW and PASCAL FACE. Extensive experiments show that it outperforms state-of-the-art methods. Also, MS-FCN runs at 23 FPS on a GPU for images of size 640×480 with no assumption on the minimum detectable face size.

  10. Multi-scale genetic dynamic modelling I : an algorithm to compute generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkilionis, Markus; Janus, Ulrich; Sbano, Luca

    2011-09-01

    We present a new approach or framework to model dynamic regulatory genetic activity. The framework is using a multi-scale analysis based upon generic assumptions on the relative time scales attached to the different transitions of molecular states defining the genetic system. At micro-level such systems are regulated by the interaction of two kinds of molecular players: macro-molecules like DNA or polymerases, and smaller molecules acting as transcription factors. The proposed genetic model then represents the larger less abundant molecules with a finite discrete state space, for example describing different conformations of these molecules. This is in contrast to the representations of the transcription factors which are-like in classical reaction kinetics-represented by their particle number only. We illustrate the method by considering the genetic activity associated to certain configurations of interacting genes that are fundamental to modelling (synthetic) genetic clocks. A largely unknown question is how different molecular details incorporated via this more realistic modelling approach lead to different macroscopic regulatory genetic models which dynamical behaviour might-in general-be different for different model choices. The theory will be applied to a real synthetic clock in a second accompanying article (Kirkilioniset al., Theory Biosci, 2011).

  11. Circadian clock and cardiac vulnerability: A time stamp on multi-scale neuroautonomic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2005-03-01

    Cardiovascular vulnerability displays a 24-hour pattern with a peak between 9AM and 11AM. This daily pattern in cardiac risk is traditionally attributed to external factors including activity levels and sleep-wake cycles. However,influences from the endogenous circadian pacemaker independent from behaviors may also affect cardiac control. We investigate heartbeat dynamics in healthy subjects recorded throughout a 10-day protocol wherein the sleep/wake and behavior cycles are desynchronized from the endogenous circadian cycle,enabling assessment of circadian factors while controlling for behavior-related factors. We demonstrate that the scaling exponent characterizing temporal correlations in heartbeat dynamics over multiple time scales does exhibit a significant circadian rhythm with a sharp peak at the circadian phase corresponding to the period 9-11AM, and that this rhythm is independent from scheduled behaviors and mean heart rate. Our findings of strong circadian rhythms in the multi-scale heartbeat dynamics of healthy young subjects indicate that the underlying mechanism of cardiac regulation is strongly influenced by the endogenous circadian pacemaker. A similar circadian effect in vulnerable individuals with underlying cardiovascular disease would contribute to the morning peak of adverse cardiac events observed in epidemiological studies.

  12. Equivalent Electromagnetic Constants for Microwave Application to Composite Materials for the Multi-Scale Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaki, Keisuke; Ikeda, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    To connect different scale models in the multi-scale problem of microwave use, equivalent material constants were researched numerically by a three-dimensional electromagnetic field, taking into account eddy current and displacement current. A volume averaged method and a standing wave method were used to introduce the equivalent material constants; water particles and aluminum particles are used as composite materials. Consumed electrical power is used for the evaluation. Water particles have the same equivalent material constants for both methods; the same electrical power is obtained for both the precise model (micro-model) and the homogeneous model (macro-model). However, aluminum particles have dissimilar equivalent material constants for both methods; different electric power is obtained for both models. The varying electromagnetic phenomena are derived from the expression of eddy current. For small electrical conductivity such as water, the macro-current which flows in the macro-model and the micro-current which flows in the micro-model express the same electromagnetic phenomena. However, for large electrical conductivity such as aluminum, the macro-current and micro-current express different electromagnetic phenomena. The eddy current which is observed in the micro-model is not expressed by the macro-model. Therefore, the equivalent material constant derived from the volume averaged method and the standing wave method is applicable to water with a small electrical conductivity, although not applicable to aluminum with a large electrical conductivity. PMID:28788395

  13. Realistic Modeling of Multi-Scale MHD Dynamics of the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiashvili, Irina; Mansour, Nagi N.; Wray, Alan; Couvidat, Sebastian; Yoon, Seokkwan; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Realistic 3D radiative MHD simulations open new perspectives for understanding the turbulent dynamics of the solar surface, its coupling to the atmosphere, and the physical mechanisms of generation and transport of non-thermal energy. Traditionally, plasma eruptions and wave phenomena in the solar atmosphere are modeled by prescribing artificial driving mechanisms using magnetic or gas pressure forces that might arise from magnetic field emergence or reconnection instabilities. In contrast, our 'ab initio' simulations provide a realistic description of solar dynamics naturally driven by solar energy flow. By simulating the upper convection zone and the solar atmosphere, we can investigate in detail the physical processes of turbulent magnetoconvection, generation and amplification of magnetic fields, excitation of MHD waves, and plasma eruptions. We present recent simulation results of the multi-scale dynamics of quiet-Sun regions, and energetic effects in the atmosphere and compare with observations. For the comparisons we calculate synthetic spectro-polarimetric data to model observational data of SDO, Hinode, and New Solar Telescope.

  14. Bearing Fault Detection Using Multi-Scale Fractal Dimensions Based on Morphological Covers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Lin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration signals acquired from bearing have been found to demonstrate complicated nonlinear characteristics in literature. Fractal geometry theory has provided effective tools such as fractal dimension for characterizing the vibration signals in bearing faults detection. However, most of the natural signals are not critical self-similar fractals; the assumption of a constant fractal dimension at all scales may not be true. Motivated by this fact, this work explores the application of the multi-scale fractal dimensions (MFDs based on morphological cover (MC technique for bearing fault diagnosis. Vibration signals from bearing with seven different states under four operations conditions are collected to validate the presented MFDs based on MC technique. Experimental results reveal that the vibration signals acquired from bearing are not critical self-similar fractals. The MFDs can provide more discriminative information about the signals than the single global fractal dimension. Furthermore, three classifiers are employed to evaluate and compare the classification performance of the MFDs with other feature extraction methods. Experimental results demonstrate the MFDs to be a desirable approach to improve the performance of bearing fault diagnosis.

  15. Decomposition of multi-scale coherent structures in a turbulent boundary layer by variational mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenkang; Pan, Chong; Wang, Jinjun

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is believed to contain a wide spectrum of coherent structures, from near-wall low-speed streaks characterized by inner scale to log-layer large-scale coherent motions (LSM and VLSM) characterized by outer scale. Recent studies have evidenced the interaction between these multi-scale structures via either bottom-up or top-down mechanisms, which implies the possibility of identifying the coexistence of their footprints at medium flow layer. Here, we propose a Quasi-Bivariate Variational Mode Decomposition method (QB-VMD), which is an update of the traditional Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) with bandwidth limitation, for the decomposition of the PIV measured 2D flow fields with large ROI (Δx × Δz 4 δ × 1 . 5 δ) at specified wall-normal heights (y / δ = 0 . 05 0 . 2) of a turbulent boundary layer with Reτ = 3460 . The empirical modes identified by QB-VMD well capture the characteristics of log-layer LSMs as well as that of near-wall streak-like structures. The lateral scales of these structures are analyzed and their respective energy contribution are evaluated. Supported by both the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11372001 and 11490552) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. YWF-16-JCTD-A-05).

  16. Multi-scale analysis on nonlinear gyroscopic systems with multi-degree-of-freedoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Qun; Zhang, Yan-Lei

    2014-09-01

    A method of multiple scales is developed for n-degree-of-freedom weakly nonlinear gyroscopic systems. A general procedure is proposed to establish solvability conditions. The conditions have n different versions whose equivalence cannot be mathematically demonstrated. The procedure is applied to a 4-degree-of-freedom nonlinear gyroscopic system that is the 4-term Galerkin truncation of the governing equation of a pipe conveying fluid flowing in the supercritical speed. The investigation focuses on the primary external resonance in the first frequency ω1 and the two-to-one internal resonance of the first two frequencies ω1 and ω2. The multi-scale analysis shows that the amplitude-frequency response curve in each of the first two modes has a peak bending to the left when ω2>2ω1, two peaks with the same height and the opposite bending directions when ω2=2ω1, and a peak bending to the right when ω2<2ω1. In all those cases, the 4 different versions of the solvability conditions yield same outcomes. The responses in the last two modes uninvolved in the resonances decay to zero exponentially. The numerical integration results are qualitative agreement with the analytical ones.

  17. Multi-scale oil slicks segmentation; Segmentation multiechelle de nappes d'hydrocarbure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercier, G. [Ecole Nationals Superieurs des Telecommunications de Bretagne (GET/ENST), CNRS FRE 2658, TAMCIC, Equipe TIME, 29 - Brest (France); Derrode, St. [Ecole Generaliste d' Ingenieurs a Marseille (EGIM), Groupe GSM, CNRS UMR 6133, Institut Fresnel, 13 - Marseille (France); Pieczynski, W. [Institut National des Telecommunications (GET/NT), Dept. CITI, CNRS UMR 5157, 91 - Evry (France)

    2004-07-01

    This study focuses on the segmentation and characterization of oil slicks from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data, Viscosity notably reduces the roughness of the sea surface which takes a major part in the backscattering. Hence, an oil slick is characterized by a low-backscattered energy and appears as a dark area in images. This is the reason why most of detection algorithms are based on histogram threshold, but they appear not satisfactory as the number of false alarms is generally high. Since oil slicks have specific impact on ocean wave spectra (from gravity-capillary waves to the swell), we propose to use a Markovian model adapted to a multi-scale description of the original image. This unsupervised segmentation method allows to take into account the different states of the sea surface through its spectra. Thanks to the mixture estimation, it is possible to statistically characterize the detected areas and then to prevent from most of false alarms. Results of segmentation are shown with two types of scenarios. The first one concerns oil spill in the Mediterranean sea detected by the ERS SAR sensor at a resolution of 25 m. The second scenario is related to the Prestige's wreck acquired by the Envisat ASAR sensor in a wide swath mode at a resolution of 150 m. (authors)

  18. Multi-scale approach in numerical reservoir simulation; Uma abordagem multiescala na simulacao numerica de reservatorios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedes, Solange da Silva

    1998-07-01

    Advances in petroleum reservoir descriptions have provided an amount of data that can not be handled directly during numerical simulations. This detailed geological information must be incorporated into a coarser model during multiphase fluid flow simulations by means of some upscaling technique. the most used approach is the pseudo relative permeabilities and the more widely used is the Kyte and Berry method (1975). In this work, it is proposed a multi-scale computational model for multiphase flow that implicitly treats the upscaling without using pseudo functions. By solving a sequence of local problems on subdomains of the refined scale it is possible to achieve results with a coarser grid without expensive computations of a fine grid model. The main advantage of this new procedure is to treat the upscaling step implicitly in the solution process, overcoming some practical difficulties related the use of traditional pseudo functions. results of bidimensional two phase flow simulations considering homogeneous porous media are presented. Some examples compare the results of this approach and the commercial upscaling program PSEUDO, a module of the reservoir simulation software ECLIPSE. (author)

  19. Relay transport of aerosols to Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region by multi-scale atmospheric circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Guo, Jianping; Liu, Shuhua; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Gen; Yan, Yan; He, Jing

    2017-09-01

    The Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region experiences heavy aerosol pollution, which is found to have close relationships with the synoptic- and local-scale atmospheric circulations. However, how and to what extent these multi-scale circulations interplay to modulate aerosol transport have not been fully understood. To this end, this study comprehensively investigated the impacts of these circulations on aerosol transport in BTH by focusing on an episode occurred on 1 June 2013 through combining both observations and three-dimensional simulations. It was found that during this episode, the Bohai Sea acted as a transfer station, and the high-pressure system over the Yellow Sea and sea-breeze in BTH took turns to affect the transport of aerosols. In the morning, influenced by the high-pressure system, lots of aerosols emitted from Shandong and Jiangsu provinces were first transported to the Bohai Sea. After then, these aerosols were brought to the BTH region in the afternoon through the inland penetration of sea-breeze, significantly exacerbating the air quality in BTH. The inland penetration of sea-breeze could be identified by the sharp changes in ground-based observed temperature, humidity, and wind when the sea-breeze front (SBF) passed by. Combining observations with model outputs, the SBF was found to be able to advance inland more than ∼150 km till reaching Beijing. This study has important implications for better understanding the aerosol transport in BTH, and improving the forecast of such aerosol pollution.

  20. Multi-scale needle-network model of complex dendritic microstructure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourret, Damien; Karma, Alain

    2012-07-01

    We present a novel multi-scale Dendritic Needle Network (DNN) approach in order to model well-developed highly-ramified dendritic microstructures on the coarser scale of several crystal grains while retaining a faithful quantitative description of the transient dynamics of individual dendritic branches. This approach is intended to bridge the scale gap between phase-field and cellular automaton methods. The dynamics of each needle-like branch, characterized by its tip velocity V and radius ρ, is fixed by two conditions: (i) on the inner tip scale, a standard microscopic solvability condition relates ρ2V to the strength of surface tension anisotropy, and (ii) on the outer diffusion length scale, a flux balance condition relates the product ρV2 to a flux intensity factor extracted from a contour integral analogous to the J-integral of fracture mechanics. The method is tested for low supersaturation and reproduces the analytical solutions for both early stage and steady state growth dynamics. The results are directly compared with a quantitative phase-field simulation for an experimentally relevant supersaturation. We present as well an illustrative simulation for highly branched polycrystalline growth. This model should permit to investigate the macroscale grain evolution through the dynamics of individual primary dendrites and higher-order branches, controlled by both the intragrain history-dependent selection and the intergrain dendrite interactions.

  1. A multi-scale model for geared transmission aero-thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Sean M.

    A multi-scale, multi-physics computational tool for the simulation of high-per- formance gearbox aero-thermodynamics was developed and applied to equilibrium and pathological loss-of-lubrication performance simulation. The physical processes at play in these systems include multiphase compressible ow of the air and lubricant within the gearbox, meshing kinematics and tribology, as well as heat transfer by conduction, and free and forced convection. These physics are coupled across their representative space and time scales in the computational framework developed in this dissertation. These scales span eight orders of magnitude, from the thermal response of the full gearbox O(100 m; 10 2 s), through effects at the tooth passage time scale O(10-2 m; 10-4 s), down to tribological effects on the meshing gear teeth O(10-6 m; 10-6 s). Direct numerical simulation of these coupled physics and scales is intractable. Accordingly, a scale-segregated simulation strategy was developed by partitioning and treating the contributing physical mechanisms as sub-problems, each with associated space and time scales, and appropriate coupling mechanisms. These are: (1) the long time scale thermal response of the system, (2) the multiphase (air, droplets, and film) aerodynamic flow and convective heat transfer within the gearbox, (3) the high-frequency, time-periodic thermal effects of gear tooth heating while in mesh and its subsequent cooling through the rest of rotation, (4) meshing effects including tribology and contact mechanics. The overarching goal of this dissertation was to develop software and analysis procedures for gearbox loss-of-lubrication performance. To accommodate these four physical effects and their coupling, each is treated in the CFD code as a sub problem. These physics modules are coupled algorithmically. Specifically, the high- frequency conduction analysis derives its local heat transfer coefficient and near-wall air temperature boundary conditions from a quasi

  2. A Multi-Scale Computational Study on the Mechanism of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase (SpNic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan F. Ion

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamidase (Nic is a key zinc-dependent enzyme in NAD metabolism that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to give nicotinic acid. A multi-scale computational approach has been used to investigate the catalytic mechanism, substrate binding and roles of active site residues of Nic from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic. In particular, density functional theory (DFT, molecular dynamics (MD and ONIOM quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM methods have been employed. The overall mechanism occurs in two stages: (i formation of a thioester enzyme-intermediate (IC2 and (ii hydrolysis of the thioester bond to give the products. The polar protein environment has a significant effect in stabilizing reaction intermediates and in particular transition states. As a result, both stages effectively occur in one step with Stage 1, formation of IC2, being rate limiting barrier with a cost of 53.5 kJ•mol−1 with respect to the reactant complex, RC. The effects of dispersion interactions on the overall mechanism were also considered but were generally calculated to have less significant effects with the overall mechanism being unchanged. In addition, the active site lysyl (Lys103 is concluded to likely play a role in stabilizing the thiolate of Cys136 during the reaction.

  3. Creep and shrinkage of high performance lightweight concrete: A multi-scale investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mauricio

    This multi-scale investigation aimed to provide new knowledge and understanding of creep and shrinkage of high performance lightweight concrete (HPLC) by assessing prestress losses in HPLC prestressed members in a large-scale study; by quantifying the effect of the constituent materials and external conditions on creep and shrinkage in a medium-scale study; and by improving the fundamental understanding of creep and shrinkage in a small-scale study. Creep plus shrinkage prestress losses were between two and eight times lower than those estimated for the design standards and approximately 50% of those measured in similar strength normal weight high performance concrete girders. The lower creep and shrinkage exhibited by HPLC was found to be caused by a synergy between the pre-soaked lightweight aggregate and the low water-to-cementitious material ratio matrix. That is, the water contained in the lightweight aggregate contributes to enhance hydration by providing an internal moist curing. The water in the aggregate also contributes to maintain a high internal relative humidity which reduces or eliminates autogenous shrinkage. This higher internal relative humidity also reduces creep by preventing load-induced water migration. Finally, lightweight aggregate exhibits a better elastic compatibility with the paste than normal weight aggregate. This improved elastic matching and the enhanced hydration are believed to reduce peak deformations at the ITZ which further decreases creep and shrinkage.

  4. Multi-Scale Modeling and the Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux (EDMF) Parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, J.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence and convection play a fundamental role in many key weather and climate science topics. Unfortunately, current atmospheric models cannot explicitly resolve most turbulent and convective flow. Because of this fact, turbulence and convection in the atmosphere has to be parameterized - i.e. equations describing the dynamical evolution of the statistical properties of turbulence and convection motions have to be devised. Recently a variety of different models have been developed that attempt at simulating the atmosphere using variable resolution. A key problem however is that parameterizations are in general not explicitly aware of the resolution - the scale awareness problem. In this context, we will present and discuss a specific approach, the Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux (EDMF) parameterization, that not only is in itself a multi-scale parameterization but it is also particularly well suited to deal with the scale-awareness problems that plague current variable-resolution models. It does so by representing small-scale turbulence using a classic Eddy-Diffusivity (ED) method, and the larger-scale (boundary layer and tropospheric-scale) eddies as a variety of plumes using the Mass-Flux (MF) concept.

  5. Development and Characterization of Embedded Sensory Particles Using Multi-Scale 3D Digital Image Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Stephen R.; Leser, William P.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Hartl, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    A method for detecting fatigue cracks has been explored at NASA Langley Research Center. Microscopic NiTi shape memory alloy (sensory) particles were embedded in a 7050 aluminum alloy matrix to detect the presence of fatigue cracks. Cracks exhibit an elevated stress field near their tip inducing a martensitic phase transformation in nearby sensory particles. Detectable levels of acoustic energy are emitted upon particle phase transformation such that the existence and location of fatigue cracks can be detected. To test this concept, a fatigue crack was grown in a mode-I single-edge notch fatigue crack growth specimen containing sensory particles. As the crack approached the sensory particles, measurements of particle strain, matrix-particle debonding, and phase transformation behavior of the sensory particles were performed. Full-field deformation measurements were performed using a novel multi-scale optical 3D digital image correlation (DIC) system. This information will be used in a finite element-based study to determine optimal sensory material behavior and density.

  6. "APEC Blue" association with emission control and meteorological conditions detected by multi-scale statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Dai, Xin-Gang

    2016-09-01

    The term "APEC Blue" has been created to describe the clear sky days since the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit held in Beijing during November 5-11, 2014. The duration of the APEC Blue is detected from November 1 to November 14 (hereafter Blue Window) by moving t test in statistics. Observations show that APEC Blue corresponds to low air pollution with respect to PM2.5, PM10, SO2, and NO2 under strict emission-control measures (ECMs) implemented in Beijing and surrounding areas. Quantitative assessment shows that ECM is more effective on reducing aerosols than the chemical constituents. Statistical investigation has revealed that the window also resulted from intensified wind variability, as well as weakened static stability of atmosphere (SSA). The wind and ECMs played key roles in reducing air pollution during November 1-7 and 11-13, and strict ECMs and weak SSA become dominant during November 7-10 under weak wind environment. Moving correlation manifests that the emission reduction for aerosols can increase the apparent wind cleanup effect, leading to significant negative correlations of them, and the period-wise changes in emission rate can be well identified by multi-scale correlations basing on wavelet decomposition. In short, this case study manifests statistically how human interference modified air quality in the mega city through controlling local and surrounding emissions in association with meteorological condition.

  7. Multi-Scale Visualization Analysis of Bus Flow Average Travel Speed in Qingdao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, HAN; Man, GAO; Xiao-Lei, ZHANG; Jie, LI; Ge, CHEN

    2016-11-01

    Public transportation is a kind of complex spatiotemporal behaviour. The traffic congestion and environmental pollution caused by the increase in private cars is becoming more and more serious in our city. Spatiotemporal data visualization is an effective tool for studying traffic, transforming non-visual data into recognizable images, which can reveal where/when congestion is formed, developed and disappeared in space and time simultaneously. This paper develops a multi-scale visualization of average travel speed derived from floating bus data, to enable congestion on urban bus networks to be shown and analyzed. The techniques of R language, Echarts, WebGL are used to draw statistical pictures and 3D wall map, which show the congestion in Qingdao from the view of space and time. The results are as follows:(1) There is a more severely delay in Shibei and Shinan areas than Licun and Laoshan areas; (2) The high congestion usually occurs on Hong Kong Middle Road, Shandong Road, Nanjing Road, Liaoyang West Road and Taiping Road;(3) There is a similar law from Monday to Sunday that the congestion is severer in the morning and evening rush hours than other hours; (4) On Monday morning the severity of congestion is higher than on Friday morning, and on Friday evening the severity is higher than on Monday evening. The research results will help to improve the public transportation of Qingdao.

  8. Poincaré-Treshchev Mechanism in Multi-scale, Nearly Integrable Hamiltonian Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu; Li, Yong; Yi, Yingfei

    2017-08-01

    This paper is a continuation to our work (Xu et al. in Ann Henri Poincaré 18(1):53-83, 2017) concerning the persistence of lower-dimensional tori on resonant surfaces of a multi-scale, nearly integrable Hamiltonian system. This type of systems, being properly degenerate, arise naturally in planar and spatial lunar problems of celestial mechanics for which the persistence problem ties closely to the stability of the systems. For such a system, under certain non-degenerate conditions of Rüssmann type, the majority persistence of non-resonant tori and the existence of a nearly full measure set of Poincaré non-degenerate, lower-dimensional, quasi-periodic invariant tori on a resonant surface corresponding to the highest order of scale is proved in Han et al. (Ann Henri Poincaré 10(8):1419-1436, 2010) and Xu et al. (2017), respectively. In this work, we consider a resonant surface corresponding to any intermediate order of scale and show the existence of a nearly full measure set of Poincaré non-degenerate, lower-dimensional, quasi-periodic invariant tori on the resonant surface. The proof is based on a normal form reduction which consists of a finite step of KAM iterations in pushing the non-integrable perturbation to a sufficiently high order and the splitting of resonant tori on the resonant surface according to the Poincaré-Treshchev mechanism.

  9. Multi-Scale Finite Element Analyses of Thermal Conductivities of Three Dimensional Woven Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yufen; Song, Leilei; Li, Jialu; Jiao, Yanan

    2017-04-01

    This paper summarizes an extensive experimental and prediction study of thermal conductivities of three-dimensional woven composites (3DWCs). Three kinds of innovative 3D woven architectures are examined, including 2.5D angle-interlock, 2.5D angle-interlock (with warp reinforcement), and 3D orthogonal woven architectures. The differences of thermal behaviors of 3DWCs in plane and out of plane are assessed by using multi-scale finite element analysis. For the validation of models, the thickness direction thermal conductivity of 3DWCs are measured. It is indicated that the predicted results are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effects of weave density and fabric architecture on the distribution of heat flux and temperature have been discussed in this work, which determined the thermal conductivities of 3DWCs. From this study, it can be expected that the need of thermal performance of 3DWCs can obtained according to optimize the weave parameters based on the high designability of 3DWCs.

  10. Multi-scale sustainability assessments for biomass-based and coal-based fuels in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yi; Xiao, Honghua; Cai, Wei; Yang, Siyu

    2017-12-01

    Transportation liquid fuels production is heavily depend on oil. In recent years, developing biomass based and coal based fuels are regarded as promising alternatives for non-petroleum based fuels in China. With the rapid growth of constructing and planning b biomass based and coal based fuels production projects, sustainability assessments are needed to simultaneously consider the resource, the economic, and the environmental factors. This paper performs multi-scale analyses on the biomass based and coal based fuels in China. The production cost, life cycle cost, and ecological life cycle cost (ELCC) of these synfuels are investigated to compare their pros to cons and reveal the sustainability. The results show that BTL fuels has high production cost. It lacks of economic attractiveness. However, insignificant resource cost and environmental cost lead to a substantially lower ELCC, which may indicate better ecological sustainability. CTL fuels, on the contrary, is lower in production cost and reliable for economic benefit. But its coal consumption and pollutant emissions are both serious, leading to overwhelming resource cost and environmental cost. A shifting from petroleum to CTL fuels could double the ELCC, posing great threat to the sustainability of the entire fuels industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Multi-scale connectivity and graph theory highlight critical areas for conservation under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilts, Thomas E.; Weisberg, Peter J.; Leitner, Phillip; Matocq, Marjorie D.; Inman, Richard D.; Nussear, Ken E.; Esque, Todd C.

    2016-01-01

    Conservation planning and biodiversity management require information on landscape connectivity across a range of spatial scales from individual home ranges to large regions. Reduction in landscape connectivity due changes in land-use or development is expected to act synergistically with alterations to habitat mosaic configuration arising from climate change. We illustrate a multi-scale connectivity framework to aid habitat conservation prioritization in the context of changing land use and climate. Our approach, which builds upon the strengths of multiple landscape connectivity methods including graph theory, circuit theory and least-cost path analysis, is here applied to the conservation planning requirements of the Mohave ground squirrel. The distribution of this California threatened species, as for numerous other desert species, overlaps with the proposed placement of several utility-scale renewable energy developments in the American Southwest. Our approach uses information derived at three spatial scales to forecast potential changes in habitat connectivity under various scenarios of energy development and climate change. By disentangling the potential effects of habitat loss and fragmentation across multiple scales, we identify priority conservation areas for both core habitat and critical corridor or stepping stone habitats. This approach is a first step toward applying graph theory to analyze habitat connectivity for species with continuously-distributed habitat, and should be applicable across a broad range of taxa.

  12. Chameleon: Dynamic Color Mapping for Multi-Scale Structural Biology Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldin, Nicholas; Le Muzic, Mathieu; Waldner, Manuela; Gröller, Eduard; Goodsell, David; Ludovic, Autin; Viola, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Visualization of structural biology data uses color to categorize or separate dense structures into particular semantic units. In multiscale models of viruses or bacteria, there are atoms on the finest level of detail, then amino-acids, secondary structures, macromolecules, up to the compartment level and, in all these levels, elements can be visually distinguished by color. However, currently only single scale coloring schemes are utilized that show information for one particular scale only. We present a novel technology which adaptively, based on the current scale level, adjusts the color scheme to depict or distinguish the currently best visible structural information. We treat the color as a visual resource that is distributed given a particular demand. The changes of the color scheme are seamlessly interpolated between the color scheme from the previous views into a given new one. With such dynamic multi-scale color mapping we ensure that the viewer is able to distinguish structural detail that is shown on any given scale. This technique has been tested by users with an expertise in structural biology and has been overall well received.

  13. Multi-scale microstructural characterization of micro-textured Ti-6Al-4V surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soboyejo, W.O.; Mercer, C.; Allameh, S.; Nemetski, B. [Princeton Materials Inst., NJ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Marcantonio, N. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering; Ricci, J.L. [Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Orthodontics

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a multi-scale microstructural characterization of micro-textured Ti-6Al-4V surfaces that are used in biomedical implants. The hierarchies of substructural and microstructural features associated with laser micro-texturing, mechanical polishing and surface blasting with alumina pellets are elucidated via atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The nano-scale roughness profiles for the different surface textures are characterized via AFM. Sub-micron precipitates and dislocation substructures associated with wrought processing and laser processing are revealed by TEM. OM and SEM micro- and mesoscale images of the groove structures and then described before discussing the implications of the result for the optimization of laser processing schemes. The implications of the results are examined for the fabrication of micro-textured surfaces that will facilitate the self organization of proteins, and the attachment of mammalian cells to the Ti-6Al-4V surfaces in biomedical implants. (orig.)

  14. A multi-scale network method for two-phase flow in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khayrat, Karim, E-mail: khayratk@ifd.mavt.ethz.ch; Jenny, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Pore-network models of porous media are useful in the study of pore-scale flow in porous media. In order to extract macroscopic properties from flow simulations in pore-networks, it is crucial the networks are large enough to be considered representative elementary volumes. However, existing two-phase network flow solvers are limited to relatively small domains. For this purpose, a multi-scale pore-network (MSPN) method, which takes into account flow-rate effects and can simulate larger domains compared to existing methods, was developed. In our solution algorithm, a large pore network is partitioned into several smaller sub-networks. The algorithm to advance the fluid interfaces within each subnetwork consists of three steps. First, a global pressure problem on the network is solved approximately using the multiscale finite volume (MSFV) method. Next, the fluxes across the subnetworks are computed. Lastly, using fluxes as boundary conditions, a dynamic two-phase flow solver is used to advance the solution in time. Simulation results of drainage scenarios at different capillary numbers and unfavourable viscosity ratios are presented and used to validate the MSPN method against solutions obtained by an existing dynamic network flow solver.

  15. Adaptive Multi-scale Prognostics and Health Management for Smart Manufacturing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Benjamin Y.; Adams, Stephen C.; Weiss, Brian A.; Marvel, Jeremy A.; Beling, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    The Adaptive Multi-scale Prognostics and Health Management (AM-PHM) is a methodology designed to enable PHM in smart manufacturing systems. In application, PHM information is not yet fully utilized in higher-level decision-making in manufacturing systems. AM-PHM leverages and integrates lower-level PHM information such as from a machine or component with hierarchical relationships across the component, machine, work cell, and assembly line levels in a manufacturing system. The AM-PHM methodology enables the creation of actionable prognostic and diagnostic intelligence up and down the manufacturing process hierarchy. Decisions are then made with the knowledge of the current and projected health state of the system at decision points along the nodes of the hierarchical structure. To overcome the issue of exponential explosion of complexity associated with describing a large manufacturing system, the AM-PHM methodology takes a hierarchical Markov Decision Process (MDP) approach into describing the system and solving for an optimized policy. A description of the AM-PHM methodology is followed by a simulated industry-inspired example to demonstrate the effectiveness of AM-PHM. PMID:28736651

  16. Multi-scale simulations predict responses to non-invasive nerve root stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Hirata, Akimasa; Terao, Yasuo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Established biophysical neurone models have achieved limited success in reproducing electrophysiological responses to non-invasive stimulation of the human nervous system. This is related to our insufficient knowledge of the induced electric currents inside the human body. Despite the numerous research and clinical applications of non-invasive stimulation, it is still unclear which internal sites are actually affected by it. Approach. We performed multi-scale computer simulations that, by making use of advances in computing power and numerical algorithms, combine a microscopic model of electrical excitation of neurones with a macroscopic electromagnetic model of the realistic whole-body anatomy. Main results. The simulations yield responses consistent with those experimentally recorded following magnetic and electrical motor root stimulation in human subjects, and reproduce the observed amplitudes and latencies for a wide variety of stimulation parameters. Significance. Our findings demonstrate that modern computational techniques can produce detailed predictions about which and where neurones are activated, leading to improved understanding of the physics and basic mechanisms of non-invasive stimulation and enabling potential new applications that make use of improved targeting of stimulation.

  17. Rapid prototyping of multi-scale biomedical microdevices by combining additive manufacturing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengsbach, Stefan; Lantada, Andrés Díaz

    2014-08-01

    The possibility of designing and manufacturing biomedical microdevices with multiple length-scale geometries can help to promote special interactions both with their environment and with surrounding biological systems. These interactions aim to enhance biocompatibility and overall performance by using biomimetic approaches. In this paper, we present a design and manufacturing procedure for obtaining multi-scale biomedical microsystems based on the combination of two additive manufacturing processes: a conventional laser writer to manufacture the overall device structure, and a direct-laser writer based on two-photon polymerization to yield finer details. The process excels for its versatility, accuracy and manufacturing speed and allows for the manufacture of microsystems and implants with overall sizes up to several millimeters and with details down to sub-micrometric structures. As an application example we have focused on manufacturing a biomedical microsystem to analyze the impact of microtextured surfaces on cell motility. This process yielded a relevant increase in precision and manufacturing speed when compared with more conventional rapid prototyping procedures.

  18. Nest fidelity is driven by multi-scale information in a long-lived seabird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Alexandre; Paiva, Vítor H.; Bolton, Mark; Jiguet, Frédéric; Bried, Joël

    2014-01-01

    Although the reproductive success of most organisms depends on factors acting at several spatial scales, little is known about how organisms are able to synthesize multi-scale information to optimize reproduction. Using longitudinal data from a long-lived seabird, Monteiro's storm-petrel, we show that average breeding success is strongly related to oceanic conditions at the population level, and we postulate that (i) individuals use proximal information (their own reproduction outcome in year t) to assess the qualities of their mate and nest and to decide to retain them or not in year t + 1; (ii) the intensity of these responses depends on the quality of the oceanic environment in year t, which affects the predictability of reproduction outcome in year t + 1. Our results confirm that mate and nest fidelities are higher following successful reproduction and that the relationship between the success of a given pair and subsequent nest fidelity is stronger in years with unfavourable oceanic conditions, suggesting that individuals rely on distant information to modulate their use of proximal information and adjust their breeding strategy. PMID:25209940

  19. Moho topography of the Tibetan Plateau using multi-scale gravity analysis and its tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chuang; Liu, Ziwei; Luo, Zhicai; Wu, Yihao; Wang, Haihong

    2017-05-01

    Determining the Moho topography of the Tibetan Plateau is crucial to understand the tectonic development. Over the past decades, seismic explorations have obtained profound results about the Moho topography, except in regions where seismic station coverage is poor, especially in the central and western Tibetan Plateau. In comparison, gravity data have the advantage of global homogeneous coverage, which can thus be used to determine the Moho structure beneath the entire Tibetan Plateau. In this paper, a novel approach, the multi-scale gravity analysis method, is developed to extract the gravity signals originated from the Moho undulations and to determine the Moho topography beneath the whole Tibetan Plateau. The inverted Moho topography for the Tibetan Plateau is consistent with that derived from the previous works. In addition, a rich geophysical structure and tectonic development can be revealed from the inverted Moho topography: (1) The Moho depth in the west is deeper than that in the east, and the deepest Moho, which is approximately 77 km, is located beneath the western Qiangtang Block; (2) There is an obvious Moho offset of approximately 5 km beneath the Yarlung-Zangbo Suture at the juncture between the Himalayan and Lhasa Blocks; (3) The Moho fold and low-density channel flow, the directions of which are in agreement with the results of surface movement velocities estimated from Global Positioning System, can be observed from the Moho topography.

  20. Multi-scale sampling to evaluate assemblage dynamics in an oceanic marine reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew R; Watson, William; McClatchie, Sam; Weber, Edward D

    2012-01-01

    To resolve the capacity of Marine Protected Areas (MPA) to enhance fish productivity it is first necessary to understand how environmental conditions affect the distribution and abundance of fishes independent of potential reserve effects. Baseline fish production was examined from 2002-2004 through ichthyoplankton sampling in a large (10,878 km(2)) Southern Californian oceanic marine reserve, the Cowcod Conservation Area (CCA) that was established in 2001, and the Southern California Bight as a whole (238,000 km(2) CalCOFI sampling domain). The CCA assemblage changed through time as the importance of oceanic-pelagic species decreased between 2002 (La Niña) and 2003 (El Niño) and then increased in 2004 (El Niño), while oceanic species and rockfishes displayed the opposite pattern. By contrast, the CalCOFI assemblage was relatively stable through time. Depth, temperature, and zooplankton explained more of the variability in assemblage structure at the CalCOFI scale than they did at the CCA scale. CalCOFI sampling revealed that oceanic species impinged upon the CCA between 2002 and 2003 in association with warmer offshore waters, thus explaining the increased influence of these species in the CCA during the El Nino years. Multi-scale, spatially explicit sampling and analysis was necessary to interpret assemblage dynamics in the CCA and likely will be needed to evaluate other focal oceanic marine reserves throughout the world.

  1. A multi-scaled approach to evaluating the fish assemblage structure within southern Appalachian streams USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Joseph; Peterson, James T.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable uncertainty about the relative roles of stream habitat and landscape characteristics in structuring stream-fish assemblages. We evaluated the relative importance of environmental characteristics on fish occupancy at the local and landscape scales within the upper Little Tennessee River basin of Georgia and North Carolina. Fishes were sampled using a quadrat sample design at 525 channel units within 48 study reaches during two consecutive years. We evaluated species–habitat relationships (local and landscape factors) by developing hierarchical, multispecies occupancy models. Modeling results suggested that fish occupancy within the Little Tennessee River basin was primarily influenced by stream topology and topography, urban land coverage, and channel unit types. Landscape scale factors (e.g., urban land coverage and elevation) largely controlled the fish assemblage structure at a stream-reach level, and local-scale factors (i.e., channel unit types) influenced fish distribution within stream reaches. Our study demonstrates the utility of a multi-scaled approach and the need to account for hierarchy and the interscale interactions of factors influencing assemblage structure prior to monitoring fish assemblages, developing biological management plans, or allocating management resources throughout a stream system.

  2. Multi-scale Analysis of MEMS Sensors Subject to Drop Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Zerbini

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of accidental drops on MEMS sensors are examined within the frame-work of a multi-scale finite element approach. With specific reference to a polysilicon MEMSaccelerometer supported by a naked die, the analysis is decoupled into macro-scale (at dielength-scale and meso-scale (at MEMS length-scale simulations, accounting for the verysmall inertial contribution of the sensor to the overall dynamics of the device. Macro-scaleanalyses are adopted to get insights into the link between shock waves caused by the impactagainst a target surface and propagating inside the die, and the displacement/acceleration his-tories at the MEMS anchor points. Meso-scale analyses are adopted to detect the most stresseddetails of the sensor and to assess whether the impact can lead to possible localized failures.Numerical results show that the acceleration at sensor anchors cannot be considered an ob-jective indicator for drop severity. Instead, accurate analyses at sensor level are necessary toestablish how MEMS can fail because of drops.

  3. A brain MRI bias field correction method created in the Gaussian multi-scale space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingsheng; Qin, Mingxin

    2017-07-01

    A pre-processing step is needed to correct for the bias field signal before submitting corrupted MR images to such image-processing algorithms. This study presents a new bias field correction method. The method creates a Gaussian multi-scale space by the convolution of the inhomogeneous MR image with a two-dimensional Gaussian function. In the multi-Gaussian space, the method retrieves the image details from the differentiation of the original image and convolution image. Then, it obtains an image whose inhomogeneity is eliminated by the weighted sum of image details in each layer in the space. Next, the bias field-corrected MR image is retrieved after the Υ correction, which enhances the contrast and brightness of the inhomogeneity-eliminated MR image. We have tested the approach on T1 MRI and T2 MRI with varying bias field levels and have achieved satisfactory results. Comparison experiments with popular software have demonstrated superior performance of the proposed method in terms of quantitative indices, especially an improvement in subsequent image segmentation.

  4. Time-Varying, Multi-Scale Adaptive System Reliability Analysis of Lifeline Infrastructure Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gearhart, Jared Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kurtz, Nolan Scot [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The majority of current societal and economic needs world-wide are met by the existing networked, civil infrastructure. Because the cost of managing such infrastructure is high and increases with time, risk-informed decision making is essential for those with management responsibilities for these systems. To address such concerns, a methodology that accounts for new information, deterioration, component models, component importance, group importance, network reliability, hierarchical structure organization, and efficiency concerns has been developed. This methodology analyzes the use of new information through the lens of adaptive Importance Sampling for structural reliability problems. Deterioration, multi-scale bridge models, and time-variant component importance are investigated for a specific network. Furthermore, both bridge and pipeline networks are studied for group and component importance, as well as for hierarchical structures in the context of specific networks. Efficiency is the primary driver throughout this study. With this risk-informed approach, those responsible for management can address deteriorating infrastructure networks in an organized manner.

  5. New multi-scale perspectives on the stromatolites of Shark Bay, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suosaari, E. P.; Reid, R. P.; Playford, P. E.; Foster, J. S.; Stolz, J. F.; Casaburi, G.; Hagan, P. D.; Chirayath, V.; MacIntyre, I. G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Eberli, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    A recent field-intensive program in Shark Bay, Western Australia provides new multi-scale perspectives on the world’s most extensive modern stromatolite system. Mapping revealed a unique geographic distribution of morphologically distinct stromatolite structures, many of them previously undocumented. These distinctive structures combined with characteristic shelf physiography define eight ‘Stromatolite Provinces’. Morphological and molecular studies of microbial mat composition resulted in a revised growth model where coccoid cyanobacteria predominate in mat communities forming lithified discrete stromatolite buildups. This contradicts traditional views that stromatolites with the best lamination in Hamelin Pool are formed by filamentous cyanobacterial mats. Finally, analysis of internal fabrics of stromatolites revealed pervasive precipitation of microcrystalline carbonate (i.e. micrite) in microbial mats forming framework and cement that may be analogous to the micritic microstructures typical of Precambrian stromatolites. These discoveries represent fundamental advances in our knowledge of the Shark Bay microbial system, laying a foundation for detailed studies of stromatolite morphogenesis that will advance our understanding of benthic ecosystems on the early Earth.

  6. Nanostructuration of ionic liquids: impact on the cation mobility. A multi-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdeghini, Filippo; Berrod, Quentin; Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Sakai, Victoria García; Czakkel, Orsolya; Fouquet, Peter; Constantin, Doru

    2017-02-02

    When probed at the macroscopic scale, Ionic Liquids (ILs) behave as highly dissociated (i.e. strong) electrolytes while, at the molecular scale, they show clear characteristics of weak ionic solutions. The multi-scale analysis we report in this paper reconciles these apparently at odds behaviors. We investigate by quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and neutron spin-echo (NSE), the nanometer/nanosecond dynamics of OMIM-BF4, an imidazolium-based IL showing strong nanostructuration. We also probe the same IL on the microscopic (μm and ms) scale by pulsed field gradient NMR. To interpret the neutron data, we introduce a new physical model to account for the dynamics of the side-chains and for the diffusion of the whole molecule. This model describes the observables over the whole and unprecedented investigated spatial ([0.15-1.65] Å(-1)) and time ([0.5-2000] ps) ranges. We arrive at a coherent and unified structural/dynamical description of the local cation dynamics: a localized motion within the IL nanometric domains is combined with a genuine long-range translational motion. The QENS, NSE and NMR experiments describe the same long-range translational process, but probed at different scales. The associated diffusion coefficients are more than one order of magnitude different. We show how this apparent discrepancy is a manifestation of the IL nanostructuration.

  7. Multi-Scale Finite Element Analyses of Thermal Conductivities of Three Dimensional Woven Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yufen; Song, Leilei; Li, Jialu; Jiao, Yanan

    2017-12-01

    This paper summarizes an extensive experimental and prediction study of thermal conductivities of three-dimensional woven composites (3DWCs). Three kinds of innovative 3D woven architectures are examined, including 2.5D angle-interlock, 2.5D angle-interlock (with warp reinforcement), and 3D orthogonal woven architectures. The differences of thermal behaviors of 3DWCs in plane and out of plane are assessed by using multi-scale finite element analysis. For the validation of models, the thickness direction thermal conductivity of 3DWCs are measured. It is indicated that the predicted results are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effects of weave density and fabric architecture on the distribution of heat flux and temperature have been discussed in this work, which determined the thermal conductivities of 3DWCs. From this study, it can be expected that the need of thermal performance of 3DWCs can obtained according to optimize the weave parameters based on the high designability of 3DWCs.

  8. Understanding physicochemical properties changes from multi-scale structures of starch/CNT nanocomposite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siyuan; Li, Xiaoxi; Chen, Ling; Li, Lin; Li, Bing; Zhu, Jie

    2017-11-01

    From the view of multi-scale structures of hydroxypropyl starch (HPS)/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite films, the film physicochemical properties were affected by comprehensive factors including molecular interaction, short range molecular conformation, crystalline structure and aggregated structure. The less original HPS hydrogen bonding that was broken, less decreased order of HPS short range molecular conformation, lower film crystallinity and larger size of micro-ordered regions contributed to higher tensile strength and Young's modulus of the film with CNT content of 0.5% (g/g, CNT in HPS). The higher film overall crystallinity and larger size of micro-ordered regions of the film with CNT content of 0.05%-0.3% compared with those of control contributed to better film barrier property. The addition of CNT with the content of 0.05%-0.5% broke the original HPS hydrogen bonding and decreased the order of starch short range molecular conformation, which counteracted the positive effect of CNT on the thermal stability of the material, thus thermal degradation temperature of these nanocomposite films did not increase. But the sharp increase of film crystallinity increased film thermal degradation temperature. This study provided a better understanding of film physicochemical properties changes which guides to rational design of starch-based nanocomposite films for packaging and coating application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. A new multi-scale measure for analysing animal movement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postlethwaite, Claire M; Brown, Pieta; Dennis, Todd E

    2013-01-21

    We present a new measure for analysing animal movement data, which we term a 'Multi-Scale Straightness Index' (MSSI). The measure is a generalisation of the 'Straightness Index', the ratio of the beeline distance between the start and end of a track to the total distance travelled. In our new measure, the Straightness Index is computed repeatedly for track segments at all possible temporal scales. The MSSI offers advantages over the standard Straightness Index, and other simple measures of track tortuosity (such as Sinuosity and Fractal Dimension), because it provides multiple characterisations of straightness, rather than just a single summary measure. Thus, comparisons can be made among different segments of trajectories and changes in behaviour can be inferred, both over time and at different temporal granularities. The measure also has an important advantage over several recent and increasingly popular methods for detecting behavioural changes in time-series locational data (e.g., state-space models and positional entropy methods), in that it is extremely simple to compute. Here, we demonstrate use of the MSSI on both synthetic and real animal-movement trajectories. We show how behavioural changes can be inferred within individual tracks and how behaviour varies across spatio-temporal scales. Our aim is to present a useful tool for researchers requiring a computationally simple but effective means of analysing the movement patterns of animals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Integrating multi-scale data to create a virtual physiological mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Sander; Niederer, Steven A; Louch, William E; Sejersted, Ole M; Smith, Nicolas P

    2013-04-06

    While the virtual physiological human (VPH) project has made great advances in human modelling, many of the tools and insights developed as part of this initiative are also applicable for facilitating mechanistic understanding of the physiology of a range of other species. This process, in turn, has the potential to provide human relevant insights via a different scientific path. Specifically, the increasing use of mice in experimental research, not yet fully complemented by a similar increase in computational modelling, is currently missing an important opportunity for using and interpreting this growing body of experimental data to improve our understanding of cardiac function. This overview describes our work to address this issue by creating a virtual physiological mouse model of the heart. We describe the similarities between human- and mouse-focused modelling, including the reuse of VPH tools, and the development of methods for investigating parameter sensitivity that are applicable across species. We show how previous results using this approach have already provided important biological insights, and how these can also be used to advance VPH heart models. Finally, we show an example application of this approach to test competing multi-scale hypotheses by investigating variations in length-dependent properties of cardiac muscle.

  11. Multi-scale earthquake hazard and risk in the Chinese mainland and countermeasures for the preparedness, mitigation, and management: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z.; Jiang, C.; Ma, T.

    2012-12-01

    Earthquake hazard and risk in the Chinese mainland exhibit multi-scale characteristics. Temporal scales from centuries to months, spatial scales from the whole mainland to specific engineering structures, and energy scales from great disastrous earthquakes to small earthquakes causing social disturbance and economic loss, feature the complexity of earthquake disasters. Coping with such complex challenge, several research and application projects have been undertaken since recent years. Lessons and experiences of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake contributed much to the launching and conducting of these projects. Understandings of the scientific problems and technical approaches taken in the mainstream studies in the Chinese mainland have no significant difference from those in the international scientific communities, albeit using of some of the terminologies have "cultural differences" - for instance, in the China Earthquake Administration (CEA), the terminology "earthquake forecast/prediction (study)" is generally used in a much broader sense, mainly indicating time-dependent seismic hazard at different spatio-temporal scales. Several scientific products have been produced serving the society in different forms. These scientific products have unique academic merits due to the long-term persistence feature and the forward forecast nature, which are all essential for the evaluation of the technical performance and the falsification of the scientific ideas. On the other hand, using the language of the "actor network theory (ANT)" in science studies (or the sociology of science), at present, the hierarchical "actors' network", making the science transformed to the actions of the public and government for the preparedness, mitigation, and management of multi-scale earthquake disasters, is still in need of careful construction and improvement.

  12. Quantifying restoration effectiveness using multi-scale habitat models: implications for sage-grouse in the Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkle, Robert S.; Pilliod, David S.; Hanser, Steven E.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Grace, James B.; Knutson, Kevin C.; Pyke, David A.; Welty, Justin L.

    2014-01-01

    A recurrent challenge in the conservation of wide-ranging, imperiled species is understanding which habitats to protect and whether we are capable of restoring degraded landscapes. For Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), a species of conservation concern in the western United States, we approached this problem by developing multi-scale empirical models of occupancy in 211 randomly located plots within a 40 million ha portion of the species' range. We then used these models to predict sage-grouse habitat quality at 826 plots associated with 101 post-wildfire seeding projects implemented from 1990 to 2003. We also compared conditions at restoration sites to published habitat guidelines. Sage-grouse occupancy was positively related to plot- and landscape-level dwarf sagebrush (Artemisia arbuscula, A. nova, A. tripartita) and big sagebrush steppe prevalence, and negatively associated with non-native plants and human development. The predicted probability of sage-grouse occupancy at treated plots was low on average (0.09) and not substantially different from burned areas that had not been treated. Restoration sites with quality habitat tended to occur at higher elevation locations with low annual temperatures, high spring precipitation, and high plant diversity. Of 313 plots seeded after fire, none met all sagebrush guidelines for breeding habitats, but approximately 50% met understory guidelines, particularly for perennial grasses. This pattern was similar for summer habitat. Less than 2% of treated plots met winter habitat guidelines. Restoration actions did not increase the probability of burned areas meeting most guideline criteria. The probability of meeting guidelines was influenced by a latitudinal gradient, climate, and topography. Our results suggest that sage-grouse are relatively unlikely to use many burned areas within 20 years of fire, regardless of treatment. Understory habitat conditions are more likely to be adequate than overstory

  13. Multi-scale forcing and the formation of subtropical desert and monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. X. Wu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates three types of atmospheric forcing across the summertime subtropics that are shown to contribute in various ways to the occurrence of dry and wet climates in the subtropics. To explain the formation of desert over the western parts of continents and monsoon over the eastern parts, we propose a new mechanism of positive feedback between diabatic heating and vorticity generation that occurs via meridional advection of planetary vorticity and temperature. Monsoon and desert are demonstrated to coexist as twin features of multi-scale forcing, as follows. First, continent-scale heating over land and cooling over ocean induce the ascent of air over the eastern parts of continents and western parts of oceans, and descent over eastern parts of oceans and western parts of continents. Second, local-scale sea-breeze forcing along coastal regions enhances air descent over eastern parts of oceans and ascent over eastern parts of continents. This leads to the formation of the well-defined summertime subtropical LOSECOD quadruplet-heating pattern across each continent and adjacent oceans, with long-wave radiative cooling (LO over eastern parts of oceans, sensible heating (SE over western parts of continents, condensation heating (CO over eastern parts of continents, and double dominant heating (D: LO+CO over western parts of oceans. Such a quadruplet heating pattern corresponds to a dry climate over the western parts of continents and a wet climate over eastern parts. Third, regional-scale orographic-uplift-heating generates poleward ascending flow to the east of orography and equatorward descending flow to the west. The Tibetan Plateau (TP is located over the eastern Eurasian continent. The TP-forced circulation pattern is in phase with that produced by continental-scale forcing, and the strongest monsoon and largest deserts are formed over the Afro-Eurasian Continent. In contrast, the Rockies and the Andes are located over the western

  14. Multi-scale forcing and the formation of subtropical desert and monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. X. Wu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates three types of atmospheric forcing across the summertime subtropics that are shown to contribute in various ways to the occurrence of dry and wet climates in the subtropics. To explain the formation of desert over the western parts of continents and monsoon over the eastern parts, we propose a new mechanism of positive feedback between diabatic heating and vorticity generation that occurs via meridional advection of planetary vorticity and temperature. Monsoon and desert are demonstrated to coexist as twin features of multi-scale forcing, as follows.

    First, continent-scale heating over land and cooling over ocean induce the ascent of air over the eastern parts of continents and western parts of oceans, and descent over eastern parts of oceans and western parts of continents. Second, local-scale sea-breeze forcing along coastal regions enhances air descent over eastern parts of oceans and ascent over eastern parts of continents. This leads to the formation of the well-defined summertime subtropical LOSECOD quadruplet-heating pattern across each continent and adjacent oceans, with long-wave radiative cooling (LO over eastern parts of oceans, sensible heating (SE over western parts of continents, condensation heating (CO over eastern parts of continents, and double dominant heating (D: LO+CO over western parts of oceans. Such a quadruplet heating pattern corresponds to a dry climate over the western parts of continents and a wet climate over eastern parts. Third, regional-scale orographic-uplift-heating generates poleward ascending flow to the east of orography and equatorward descending flow to the west.

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP is located over the eastern Eurasian continent. The TP-forced circulation pattern is in phase with that produced by continental-scale forcing, and the strongest monsoon and largest deserts are formed over the Afro-Eurasian Continent. In contrast, the Rockies and the Andes are

  15. Reduced-Order Biogeochemical Flux Model for High-Resolution Multi-Scale Biophysical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine; Hamlington, Peter; Pinardi, Nadia; Zavatarelli, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Biogeochemical tracers and their interactions with upper ocean physical processes such as submesoscale circulations and small-scale turbulence are critical for understanding the role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle. These interactions can cause small-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneity in tracer distributions that can, in turn, greatly affect carbon exchange rates between the atmosphere and interior ocean. For this reason, it is important to take into account small-scale biophysical interactions when modeling the global carbon cycle. However, explicitly resolving these interactions in an earth system model (ESM) is currently infeasible due to the enormous associated computational cost. As a result, understanding and subsequently parameterizing how these small-scale heterogeneous distributions develop and how they relate to larger resolved scales is critical for obtaining improved predictions of carbon exchange rates in ESMs. In order to address this need, we have developed the reduced-order, 17 state variable Biogeochemical Flux Model (BFM-17) that follows the chemical functional group approach, which allows for non-Redfield stoichiometric ratios and the exchange of matter through units of carbon, nitrate, and phosphate. This model captures the behavior of open-ocean biogeochemical systems without substantially increasing computational cost, thus allowing the model to be combined with computationally-intensive, fully three-dimensional, non-hydrostatic large eddy simulations (LES). In this talk, we couple BFM-17 with the Princeton Ocean Model and show good agreement between predicted monthly-averaged results and Bermuda testbed area field data (including the Bermuda-Atlantic Time-series Study and Bermuda Testbed Mooring). Through these tests, we demonstrate the capability of BFM-17 to accurately model open-ocean biochemistry. Additionally, we discuss the use of BFM-17 within a multi-scale LES framework and outline how this will further our understanding

  16. Simulations of ecosystem hydrological processes using a unified multi-scale model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Liu, Chongxuan; Fang, Yilin; Hinkle, Ross; Li, Hong-Yi; Bailey, Vanessa; Bond-Lamberty, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a unified multi-scale model (UMSM) that we developed to simulate hydrological processes in an ecosystem containing both surface water and groundwater. The UMSM approach modifies the Navier–Stokes equation by adding a Darcy force term to formulate a single set of equations to describe fluid momentum and uses a generalized equation to describe fluid mass balance. The advantage of the approach is that the single set of the equations can describe hydrological processes in both surface water and groundwater where different models are traditionally required to simulate fluid flow. This feature of the UMSM significantly facilitates modelling of hydrological processes in ecosystems, especially at locations where soil/sediment may be frequently inundated and drained in response to precipitation, regional hydrological and climate changes. In this paper, the UMSM was benchmarked using WASH123D, a model commonly used for simulating coupled surface water and groundwater flow. Disney Wilderness Preserve (DWP) site at the Kissimmee, Florida, where active field monitoring and measurements are ongoing to understand hydrological and biogeochemical processes, was then used as an example to illustrate the UMSM modelling approach. The simulations results demonstrated that the DWP site is subject to the frequent changes in soil saturation, the geometry and volume of surface water bodies, and groundwater and surface water exchange. All the hydrological phenomena in surface water and groundwater components including inundation and draining, river bank flow, groundwater table change, soil saturation, hydrological interactions between groundwater and surface water, and the migration of surface water and groundwater interfaces can be simultaneously simulated using the UMSM. Overall, the UMSM offers a cross-scale approach that is particularly suitable to simulate coupled surface and ground water flow in ecosystems with strong surface water and groundwater interactions.

  17. Multi-scale hydrogeological and hydrogeophysical approach to monitor vadose zone hydrodynamics of a karst system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watlet, Arnaud; Poulain, Amaël; Van Camp, Michel; Francis, Olivier; Triantafyllou, Antoine; Rochez, Gaëtan; Hallet, Vincent; Kaufmann, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The vadose zone of karst systems plays an important role on the water dynamics. In particular, temporary perched aquifers can appear in the subsurface due to changes of weather conditions, reduced evapotranspiration and the vertical gradients of porosity and permeability. Although many difficulties are usually encountered when studying karst environments due to their heterogeneities, cave systems offer an outstanding opportunity to investigate vadose zone from the inside. We present a multi-scale study covering two years of hydrogeological and geophysical monitoring of the Lomme Karst System (LKS) located in the Variscan fold-and-thrust belt (Belgium), a region (~ 3000 ha) that shows many karstic networks within Devonian limestone units. Hydrogeological data cover the whole LKS and involve e.g. flows and levels monitoring or tracer tests performed in both vadose and saturated zones. Such data bring valuable information on the hydrological context of the studied area at the catchment scale. Combining those results with geophysical measurements allows validating and imaging them at a smaller scale, with more integrative techniques. Hydrogeophysical measurements are focused on only one cave system of the LKS, at the Rochefort site (~ 40 ha), taking benefit of the Rochefort Cave Laboratory (RCL) infrastructures. In this study, a microgravimetric monitoring and an Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) monitoring are involved. The microgravimetric monitoring consists in a superconducting gravimeter continuously measuring gravity changes at the surface of the RCL and an additional relative gravimeter installed in the underlying cave located 35 meters below the surface. While gravimeters are sensible to changes that occur in both the vadose zone and the saturated zone of the whole cave system, combining their recorded signals allows enhancing vadose zone's gravity changes. Finally, the surface ERT monitoring provide valuable information at the (sub)-meter scale on the

  18. A multi-scale spatial model of hepatitis-B viral dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Cangelosi

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B viral infection (HBV afflicts around 250 million individuals globally and few options for treatment exist. Once infected, the virus entrenches itself in the liver with a notoriously resilient colonisation of viral DNA (covalently-closed circular DNA, cccDNA. The majority of infections are cleared, yet we do not understand why 5% of adult immune responses fail leading to the chronic state with its collateral morbid effects such as cirrhosis and eventual hepatic carcinoma. The liver environment exhibits particularly complex spatial structures for metabolic processing and corresponding distributions of nutrients and transporters that may influence successful HBV entrenchment. We assembled a multi-scaled mathematical model of the fundamental hepatic processing unit, the sinusoid, into a whole-liver representation to investigate the impact of this intrinsic spatial heterogeneity on the HBV dynamic. Our results suggest HBV may be exploiting spatial aspects of the liver environment. We distributed increased HBV replication rates coincident with elevated levels of nutrients in the sinusoid entry point (the periportal region in tandem with similar distributions of hepatocyte transporters key to HBV invasion (e.g., the sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide or NTCP, or immune system activity. According to our results, such co-alignment of spatial distributions may contribute to persistence of HBV infections, depending on spatial distributions and intensity of immune response as well. Moreover, inspired by previous HBV models and experimentalist suggestions of extra-hepatic HBV replication, we tested in our model influence of HBV blood replication and observe an overall nominal effect on persistent liver infection. Regardless, we confirm prior results showing a solo cccDNA is sufficient to re-infect an entire liver, with corresponding concerns for transplantation and treatment.

  19. Bush Encroachment Mapping for Africa - Multi-Scale Analysis with Remote Sensing and GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graw, V. A. M.; Oldenburg, C.; Dubovyk, O.

    2015-12-01

    Bush encroachment describes a global problem which is especially facing the savanna ecosystem in Africa. Livestock is directly affected by decreasing grasslands and inedible invasive species which defines the process of bush encroachment. For many small scale farmers in developing countries livestock represents a type of insurance in times of crop failure or drought. Among that bush encroachment is also a problem for crop production. Studies on the mapping of bush encroachment so far focus on small scales using high-resolution data and rarely provide information beyond the national level. Therefore a process chain was developed using a multi-scale approach to detect bush encroachment for whole Africa. The bush encroachment map is calibrated with ground truth data provided by experts in Southern, Eastern and Western Africa. By up-scaling location specific information on different levels of remote sensing imagery - 30m with Landsat images and 250m with MODIS data - a map is created showing potential and actual areas of bush encroachment on the African continent and thereby provides an innovative approach to map bush encroachment on the regional scale. A classification approach links location data based on GPS information from experts to the respective pixel in the remote sensing imagery. Supervised classification is used while actual bush encroachment information represents the training samples for the up-scaling. The classification technique is based on Random Forests and regression trees, a machine learning classification approach. Working on multiple scales and with the help of field data an innovative approach can be presented showing areas affected by bush encroachment on the African continent. This information can help to prevent further grassland decrease and identify those regions where land management strategies are of high importance to sustain livestock keeping and thereby also secure livelihoods in rural areas.

  20. Multi-scale simulation of asphaltene aggregation and deposition in capillary flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boek, Edo S; Headen, Thomas F; Padding, Johan T

    2010-01-01

    Asphaltenes are known as the 'cholesterol' of crude oil. They form nano-aggregates, precipitate, adhere to surfaces, block rock pores and may alter the wetting characteristics of mineral surfaces within the reservoir, hindering oil recovery efficiency. Despite a significant research effort, the structure, aggregation and deposition of asphaltenes under flowing conditions remain poorly understood. For this reason, we have investigated asphaltenes, their aggregation and their deposition in capillary flow using multi-scale simulations and experiments. At the colloid scale, we use a hybrid simulation approach: for the solvent, we used the stochastic rotation dynamics (also known as multi particle collision dynamics) simulation method, which provides both hydrodynamics and Brownian motion. This is coupled to a coarse-grained MD approach for the asphaltene colloids. The colloids interact through a screened Coulomb potential with varying well depth epsilon. We tune the flow rate to obtain Pe(flow) > 1 (hydrodynamic interactions dominate) and Re force (PMF) between pairs of asphaltene molecules in an explicit solvent. We obtain a reasonable fit using a -1/r2 attraction for the attractive tail of the PMF at intermediate distances. We speculate that this is due to the two-dimensional nature of the asphaltene molecules. Finally, we discuss how we can relate this interaction to the mesoscopic colloid aggregate interaction. We assume that the colloidal aggregates consist of nano-aggregates. Taking into account observed solvent entrainment effects, we deduct the presence of lubrication layers between the nano-aggregates, which leads to a significant screening of the direct asphaltene-asphaltene interactions.

  1. Application of multi-scale wavelet entropy and multi-resolution Volterra models for climatic downscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, V.; Lakhanpal, A.; Maheswaran, R.; Khosa, R.; Sridhar, Venkataramana

    2018-01-01

    This study proposes a wavelet-based multi-resolution modeling approach for statistical downscaling of GCM variables to mean monthly precipitation for five locations at Krishna Basin, India. Climatic dataset from NCEP is used for training the proposed models (Jan.'69 to Dec.'94) and are applied to corresponding CanCM4 GCM variables to simulate precipitation for the validation (Jan.'95-Dec.'05) and forecast (Jan.'06-Dec.'35) periods. The observed precipitation data is obtained from the India Meteorological Department (IMD) gridded precipitation product at 0.25 degree spatial resolution. This paper proposes a novel Multi-Scale Wavelet Entropy (MWE) based approach for clustering climatic variables into suitable clusters using k-means methodology. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is used to obtain the representative Principal Components (PC) explaining 90-95% variance for each cluster. A multi-resolution non-linear approach combining Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and Second Order Volterra (SoV) is used to model the representative PCs to obtain the downscaled precipitation for each downscaling location (W-P-SoV model). The results establish that wavelet-based multi-resolution SoV models perform significantly better compared to the traditional Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) based frameworks. It is observed that the proposed MWE-based clustering and subsequent PCA, helps reduce the dimensionality of the input climatic variables, while capturing more variability compared to stand-alone k-means (no MWE). The proposed models perform better in estimating the number of precipitation events during the non-monsoon periods whereas the models with clustering without MWE over-estimate the rainfall during the dry season.

  2. Understanding protected area resilience: a multi-scale, social-ecological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Graeme S.; Allen, Craig R.; Ban, Natalie C.; Biggs, Duan; Biggs, Harry C.; Cumming, David H.M; De Vos, Alta; Epstein, Graham; Etienne, Michel; Maciejewski, Kristine; Mathevet, Raphael; Moore, Christine; Nenadovic, Mateja; Schoon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Protected areas (PAs) remain central to the conservation of biodiversity. Classical PAs were conceived as areas that would be set aside to maintain a natural state with minimal human influence. However, global environmental change and growing cross-scale anthropogenic influences mean that PAs can no longer be thought of as ecological islands that function independently of the broader social-ecological system in which they are located. For PAs to be resilient (and to contribute to broader social-ecological resilience), they must be able to adapt to changing social and ecological conditions over time in a way that supports the long-term persistence of populations, communities, and ecosystems of conservation concern. We extend Ostrom's social-ecological systems framework to consider the long-term persistence of PAs, as a form of land use embedded in social-ecological systems, with important cross-scale feedbacks. Most notably, we highlight the cross-scale influences and feedbacks on PAs that exist from the local to the global scale, contextualizing PAs within multi-scale social-ecological functional landscapes. Such functional landscapes are integral to understand and manage individual PAs for long-term sustainability. We illustrate our conceptual contribution with three case studies that highlight cross-scale feedbacks and social-ecological interactions in the functioning of PAs and in relation to regional resilience. Our analysis suggests that while ecological, economic, and social processes are often directly relevant to PAs at finer scales, at broader scales, the dominant processes that shape and alter PA resilience are primarily social and economic.

  3. A Multi-Scale Energy Food Systems Modeling Framework For Climate Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, S.; Bakker, C.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Hobbs, B. F.; Broaddus, E.; Neff, R.; Haskett, J.; Parker, C.

    2016-12-01

    Our goal is to understand coupled system dynamics across scales in a manner that allows us to quantify the sensitivity of critical human outcomes (nutritional satisfaction, household economic well-being) to development strategies and to climate or market induced shocks in sub-Saharan Africa. We adopt both bottom-up and top-down multi-scale modeling approaches focusing our efforts on food, energy, water (FEW) dynamics to define, parameterize, and evaluate modeled processes nationally as well as across climate zones and communities. Our framework comprises three complementary modeling techniques spanning local, sub-national and national scales to capture interdependencies between sectors, across time scales, and on multiple levels of geographic aggregation. At the center is a multi-player micro-economic (MME) partial equilibrium model for the production, consumption, storage, and transportation of food, energy, and fuels, which is the focus of this presentation. We show why such models can be very useful for linking and integrating across time and spatial scales, as well as a wide variety of models including an agent-based model applied to rural villages and larger population centers, an optimization-based electricity infrastructure model at a regional scale, and a computable general equilibrium model, which is applied to understand FEW resources and economic patterns at national scale. The MME is based on aggregating individual optimization problems for relevant players in an energy, electricity, or food market and captures important food supply chain components of trade and food distribution accounting for infrastructure and geography. Second, our model considers food access and utilization by modeling food waste and disaggregating consumption by income and age. Third, the model is set up to evaluate the effects of seasonality and system shocks on supply, demand, infrastructure, and transportation in both energy and food.

  4. PUPIL: A systematic approach to software integration in multi-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torras, Juan; He, Yao; Cao, Chao; Muralidharan, Krishna; Deumens, E.; Cheng, H.-P.; Trickey, S. B.

    2007-08-01

    We present a relatively straightforward way to integrate existing software packages into a full multi-scale simulation package in which each application runs in its own address space and there is no run-time intervention by the researcher. The PUPIL (Program for User Package Interfacing and Linking) architectural concept is to provide a simulation Supervisor, implemented as a Manager and various Workers which involve small wrapper interfaces written and installed within each application package and various communication services. The different, autonomous packages ("Calculation Units") are plugged into the PUPIL system which one then operates as a software driver for them. Well-defined protocols are provided for communication between the different Calculation Units and the PUPIL system. The CORBA communication protocol is used to exchange information between running processes. All simulation directives from the user are stored in an XML file that is interpreted by the PUPIL Manager and Workers. An initial version has been designed using the Object Oriented (OO) paradigm and implemented in Java as a fast prototyping language. Tests of implementation ease and of operational correctness (on toy physical systems) have been carried out. In the former category, we document how interfaces to both DL_POLY and SIESTA were done relatively straightforwardly. In the latter category, the most demanding test was the joining of three different packages to do a MD calculation with pattern recognition to identify the QM-forces region and an external QM force calculation. The results show that PUPIL provides ease of operation and maintenance with little overhead.

  5. Multi-scale curvature for automated identification of glaciated mountain landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasicek, Günther; Otto, Jan-Christoph; Montgomery, David; Schrott, Lothar

    2014-05-01

    Automated morphometric interpretation of digital terrain data based on impartial rule sets holds substantial promise for large dataset processing and objective landscape classification. However, the geomorphological realm presents tremendous complexity in the translation of qualitative descriptions into geomorphometric semantics. Here, the simple, conventional distinction of V-shaped fluvial and U-shaped glacial valleys is analyzed quantitatively using the relation of multi-scale curvature and drainage area. Glacial and fluvial erosion shapes mountain landscapes in a long-recognized and characteristic way. Valleys incised by fluvial processes typically have V-shaped cross-sections with uniform and moderately steep slopes, whereas glacial valleys tend to have U-shaped profiles and topographic gradients steepening with distance from valley floor. On a DEM, thalweg cells are determined by a drainage area cutoff and multiple moving window sizes are used to derive per-cell curvature over a variety of scales ranging from the vicinity of the flow path at the valley bottom to catchment sections fully including valley sides. The relation of the curvatures calculated for the user-defined minimum scale and the automatically detected maximum scale is presented as a novel morphometric variable termed Difference of Minimum Curvature (DMC). DMC thresholds determined from typical glacial and fluvial sample catchments are employed to identify quadrats of glaciated and non-glaciated mountain landscapes and the distinctions are validated by field-based geological and geomorphological maps. A first test of the novel algorithm at three study sites in the western United States and a subsequent application to Europe and western Asia demonstrate the transferability of the approach.

  6. Automated nodule location and size estimation using a multi-scale Laplacian of Gaussian filtering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirapatnakul, Artit C; Fotin, Sergei V; Reeves, Anthony P; Biancardi, Alberto M; Yankelevitz, David F; Henschke, Claudia I

    2009-01-01

    Estimation of nodule location and size is an important pre-processing step in some nodule segmentation algorithms to determine the size and location of the region of interest. Ideally, such estimation methods will consistently find the same nodule location regardless of where the the seed point (provided either manually or by a nodule detection algorithm) is placed relative to the "true" center of the nodule, and the size should be a reasonable estimate of the true nodule size. We developed a method that estimates nodule location and size using multi-scale Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) filtering. Nodule candidates near a given seed point are found by searching for blob-like regions with high filter response. The candidates are then pruned according to filter response and location, and the remaining candidates are sorted by size and the largest candidate selected. This method was compared to a previously published template-based method. The methods were evaluated on the basis of stability of the estimated nodule location to changes in the initial seed point and how well the size estimates agreed with volumes determined by a semi-automated nodule segmentation method. The LoG method exhibited better stability to changes in the seed point, with 93% of nodules having the same estimated location even when the seed point was altered, compared to only 52% of nodules for the template-based method. Both methods also showed good agreement with sizes determined by a nodule segmentation method, with an average relative size difference of 5% and -5% for the LoG and template-based methods respectively.

  7. Water, land, fire, and forest: Multi-scale determinants of rainforests in the Australian monsoon tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondei, Stefania; Prior, Lynda D; Williamson, Grant J; Vigilante, Tom; Bowman, David M J S

    2017-03-01

    The small rainforest fragments found in savanna landscapes are powerful, yet often overlooked, model systems to understand the controls of these contrasting ecosystems. We analyzed the relative effect of climatic variables on rainforest density at a subcontinental level, and employed high-resolution, regional-level analyses to assess the importance of landscape settings and fire activity in determining rainforest density in a frequently burnt Australian savanna landscape. Estimates of rainforest density (ha/km 2 ) across the Northern Territory and Western Australia, derived from preexisting maps, were used to calculate the correlations between rainforest density and climatic variables. A detailed map of the northern Kimberley (Western Australia) rainforests was generated and analyzed to determine the importance of geology and topography in controlling rainforests, and to contrast rainforest density on frequently burnt mainland and nearby islands. In the northwestern Australian, tropics rainforest density was positively correlated with rainfall and moisture index, and negatively correlated with potential evapotranspiration. At a regional scale, rainforests showed preference for complex topographic positions and more fertile geology. Compared with mainland areas, islands had significantly lower fire activity, with no differences between terrain types. They also displayed substantially higher rainforest density, even on level terrain where geomorphological processes do not concentrate nutrients or water. Our multi-scale approach corroborates previous studies that suggest moist climate, infrequent fires, and geology are important stabilizing factors that allow rainforest fragments to persist in savanna landscapes. These factors need to be incorporated in models to predict the future extent of savannas and rainforests under climate change.

  8. Multi-scale Visualization of Molecular Architecture Using Real-Time Ambient Occlusion in Sculptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Manuel; Wriggers, Willy

    2015-10-01

    The modeling of large biomolecular assemblies relies on an efficient rendering of their hierarchical architecture across a wide range of spatial level of detail. We describe a paradigm shift currently under way in computer graphics towards the use of more realistic global illumination models, and we apply the so-called ambient occlusion approach to our open-source multi-scale modeling program, Sculptor. While there are many other higher quality global illumination approaches going all the way up to full GPU-accelerated ray tracing, they do not provide size-specificity of the features they shade. Ambient occlusion is an aspect of global lighting that offers great visual benefits and powerful user customization. By estimating how other molecular shape features affect the reception of light at some surface point, it effectively simulates indirect shadowing. This effect occurs between molecular surfaces that are close to each other, or in pockets such as protein or ligand binding sites. By adding ambient occlusion, large macromolecular systems look much more natural, and the perception of characteristic surface features is strongly enhanced. In this work, we present a real-time implementation of screen space ambient occlusion that delivers realistic cues about tunable spatial scale characteristics of macromolecular architecture. Heretofore, the visualization of large biomolecular systems, comprising e.g. hundreds of thousands of atoms or Mega-Dalton size electron microscopy maps, did not take into account the length scales of interest or the spatial resolution of the data. Our approach has been uniquely customized with shading that is tuned for pockets and cavities of a user-defined size, making it useful for visualizing molecular features at multiple scales of interest. This is a feature that none of the conventional ambient occlusion approaches provide. Actual Sculptor screen shots illustrate how our implementation supports the size-dependent rendering of molecular

  9. Infrared Harvesting Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cell Based on Multi-scale Disordered Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Yi

    2015-06-23

    Colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics (CQDPV) offer a big potential to be a renewable energy source due to low cost and tunable band-gap. Currently, the certified power conversion efficiency of CQDPV has reached 9.2%. Compared to the 31% theoretical efficiency limit of single junction solar cells, device performances have still have a large potential to be improved. For photovoltaic devices, a classical way to enhance absorption is to increase the thickness of the active layers. Although this approach can improve absorption, it reduces the charge carriers extraction efficiency. Photo-generated carriers, in fact, are prone to recombine within the defects inside CQD active layers. In an effort to solve this problem, we proposed to increase light absorption from a given thickness of colloidal quantum dot layers with the assistance of disorder. Our approach is to develop new types of electrodes with multi-scale disordered features, which localize energy into the active layer through plasmonic effects. We fabricated nanostructured gold substrates by electrochemical methods, which allow to control surface disorder as a function of deposition conditions. We demonstrated that the light absorption from 600 nm to 800 nm is impressively enhanced, when the disorder of the nanostructured surface increases. Compared to the planar case, the most disorder case increased 65% light absorption at the wavelength of λ = 700nm in the 100 nm PbS film. The average absorption enhancement across visible and infrared region in 100 nm PbS film is 49.94%. By developing a photovoltaic module, we measured a dramatic 34% improvement in the short-circuit current density of the device. The power conversion efficiency of the tested device in top-illumination configuration showed 25% enhancement.

  10. Multi-scale mechanism based life prediction of polymer matrix composites for high temperature airframe applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, Priyank

    A multi-scale mechanism-based life prediction model is developed for high-temperature polymer matrix composites (HTPMC) for high temperature airframe applications. In the first part of this dissertation the effect of Cloisite 20A (C20A) nano-clay compounding on the thermo-oxidative weight loss and the residual stresses due to thermal oxidation for a thermoset polymer bismaleimide (BMI) are investigated. A three-dimensional (3-D) micro-mechanics based finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to investigate the residual stresses due to thermal oxidation using an in-house FEA code (NOVA-3D). In the second part of this dissertation, a novel numerical-experimental methodology is outlined to determine cohesive stress and damage evolution parameters for pristine as well as isothermally aged (in air) polymer matrix composites. A rate-dependent viscoelastic cohesive layer model was implemented in an in-house FEA code to simulate the delamination initiation and propagation in unidirectional polymer composites before and after aging. Double cantilever beam (DCB) experiments were conducted (at UT-Dallas) on both pristine and isothermally aged IM-7/BMI composite specimens to determine the model parameters. The J-Integral based approach was adapted to extract cohesive stresses near the crack tip. Once the damage parameters had been characterized, the test-bed FEA code employed a micromechanics based viscoelastic cohesive layer model to numerically simulate the DCB experiment. FEA simulation accurately captures the macro-scale behavior (load-displacement history) simultaneously with the micro-scale behavior (crack-growth history).

  11. A Multi-Scale Study on the Role of Trace Metals on Physiological and Pathological Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammelkamp, Derek

    The work in this thesis provides mulit-scale contributions towards understanding the effects of trace metals on the pathological mineralization process relating to both the development of healthy bone tissue, the diseased state of osteoporosis, and microcalcifications which develop in breast cancers. A protein level study was performed on ECM protein fibronectin, which plays a role in cell adhesion. The protein studies showed zinc interactions with fibronectin and its fragment, anastellin, to influence protein structure. Zinc is also shown to decrease cell migration in vitro, which may be influenced by changes in fibronectin ECM structure. The effects of osteoporosis on micronutrient composition in vivo were examined using the technique of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) in an ovariectomized rat model. Compared to healthy bone, subtle difference are observed in zinc and iron in osteoporotic rat bones, showing micronutrients may play an important role in healthy bone regulation. Effects of micronutrient zinc was used to inhibit microcalcification formation in breast cancers. Microcalcifications have been linked malignancy of breast cancers, but the process of microcalcification formation has yet to be well understood. In this work, exogenous zinc is used to inhibit microcalcification formation, and metastatic potential in both a 2D and 3D spheroid environment. A novel in vitro self-assembled three dimensional multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) model for the study of breast cancer microcalcifications was developed for this experiment. A MCTS model for studying breast cancer microcalcifications has potential to be used in drug discovery, or for basic research applications studying mechanisms of microcalcification formation, which are still not fully understood. Taken together this study uses a multi-scale approach to gain a better understanding of micronutrients involved in pathological mineralization.

  12. Pattern-based, multi-scale segmentation and regionalization of EOSD land cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesterowicz, Jacek; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    2017-10-01

    The Earth Observation for Sustainable Development of Forests (EOSD) map is a 25 m resolution thematic map of Canadian forests. Because of its large spatial extent and relatively high resolution the EOSD is difficult to analyze using standard GIS methods. In this paper we propose multi-scale segmentation and regionalization of EOSD as new methods for analyzing EOSD on large spatial scales. Segments, which we refer to as forest land units (FLUs), are delineated as tracts of forest characterized by cohesive patterns of EOSD categories; we delineated from 727 to 91,885 FLUs within the spatial extent of EOSD depending on the selected scale of a pattern. Pattern of EOSD's categories within each FLU is described by 1037 landscape metrics. A shapefile containing boundaries of all FLUs together with an attribute table listing landscape metrics make up an SQL-searchable spatial database providing detailed information on composition and pattern of land cover types in Canadian forest. Shapefile format and extensive attribute table pertaining to the entire legend of EOSD are designed to facilitate broad range of investigations in which assessment of composition and pattern of forest over large areas is needed. We calculated four such databases using different spatial scales of pattern. We illustrate the use of FLU database for producing forest regionalization maps of two Canadian provinces, Quebec and Ontario. Such maps capture the broad scale variability of forest at the spatial scale of the entire province. We also demonstrate how FLU database can be used to map variability of landscape metrics, and thus the character of landscape, over the entire Canada.

  13. Multi-Scale Integrated Analysis of Charcoal Production in Complex Social-Ecological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael González-López

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose and illustrate a multi-scale integrated analysis of societal and ecosystem metabolism (MuSIASEM as a tool to bring nexus thinking into practice. MuSIASEM studies the relations over the structural and functional components of social-ecological systems that determine the entanglement of water, energy, and food flows in a complex metabolic pattern. MuSIASEM simultaneously considers various dimensions and multiple scales of analysis and therefore avoids the predicament of quantitative analysis based on reductionism (one dimension and one scale at the time. The different functional elements of society (the parts are characterized using the concept of “processor,” that is, a profile of expected inputs and outputs associated with the expression of a specific function. The processors of the functional elements of the social-ecological system can be either scaled-up to describe the metabolic pattern of the system as a whole, or scaled-down by considering the characteristics of its lower-level parts—i.e., the different processors associated with the structural elements required to express the specific function. An analysis of functional elements provides insight in the socio-economic factors that pose internal constraints on the development of the system. An analysis of structural elements makes it possible to study the compatibility of the system with external constraints (availability of natural resources and ecological services in spatial terms. The usefulness of the approach is illustrated in relation to an example of the use of charcoal in a rural village of Laos.

  14. High-Resolution Multi-Scale Computational Model for Non-Invasive Cervical Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourdoukoutas, Antonios P; Truong, Dennis Q; Adair, Devin K; Simon, Bruce J; Bikson, Marom

    2017-10-27

    To develop the first high-resolution, multi-scale model of cervical non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) and to predict vagus fiber type activation, given clinically relevant rheobase thresholds. An MRI-derived Finite Element Method (FEM) model was developed to accurately simulate key macroscopic (e.g., skin, soft tissue, muscle) and mesoscopic (cervical enlargement, vertebral arch and foramen, cerebral spinal fluid [CSF], nerve sheath) tissue components to predict extracellular potential, electric field (E-Field), and activating function along the vagus nerve. Microscopic scale biophysical models of axons were developed to compare axons of varying size (Aα-, Aβ- and Aδ-, B-, and C-fibers). Rheobase threshold estimates were based on a step function waveform. Macro-scale accuracy was found to determine E-Field magnitudes around the vagus nerve, while meso-scale precision determined E-field changes (activating function). Mesoscopic anatomical details that capture vagus nerve passage through a changing tissue environment (e.g., bone to soft tissue) profoundly enhanced predicted axon sensitivity while encapsulation in homogenous tissue (e.g., nerve sheath) dulled axon sensitivity to nVNS. These findings indicate that realistic and precise modeling at both macroscopic and mesoscopic scales are needed for quantitative predictions of vagus nerve activation. Based on this approach, we predict conventional cervical nVNS protocols can activate A- and B- but not C-fibers. Our state-of-the-art implementation across scales is equally valuable for models of spinal cord stimulation, cortex/deep brain stimulation, and other peripheral/cranial nerve models. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  15. Pore-scale capillary pressure analysis using multi-scale X-ray micromotography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garing, Charlotte; de Chalendar, Jacques A.; Voltolini, Marco; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Benson, Sally M.

    2017-06-01

    A multi-scale synchrotron-based X-ray microtomographic dataset of residually trapped air after gravity-driven brine imbibition was acquired for three samples with differing pore topologies and morphologies; image volumes were reconstructed with voxel sizes from 4.44 μm down to 0.64 μm. Capillary pressure distributions among the population of trapped ganglia were investigated by calculating interfacial curvature in order to assess the potential for remobilization of residually-trapped non-wetting ganglia due to differences in capillary pressure presented by neighbor ganglia. For each sample, sintered glass beads, Boise sandstone and Fontainebleau sandstone, sub-volumes with different voxel sizes were analyzed to quantify air/brine interfaces and interfacial curvatures and investigate the effect of image resolution on both fluid phase identification and curvature estimates. Results show that the method developed for interfacial curvature estimation leads to reliable capillary pressure estimates for gas ganglia. Higher resolution images increase confidence in curvature calculations, especially for the sandstone samples that display smaller gas-brine interfaces which are then represented by a higher number of voxels when imaged with a micron or sub-micron voxels size. The analysis of sub-volumes from the Boise and Fontainebleau dataset highlights the presence of a residually-trapped gas phase consisting of ganglia located in one or few pores and presenting significantly different capillary pressures, especially in the case of Fontainebleau sandstone. As a result, Ostwald ripening could occur, leading to gas transfer from ganglia with higher capillary pressure to surrounding ganglia with lower capillary pressures. More generally, at the pore-scale, most gas ganglia do present similar capillary pressures and Ostwald ripening would then not represent a major mechanism for residually-trapped gas transfer and remobilization.

  16. A multi-scale health impact assessment of air pollution over the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhvar, Victoria N; Pascal, Mathilde; Markakis, Konstantinos; Colette, Augustin; Hauglustaine, Didier; Valari, Myrto; Klimont, Zbigniew; Medina, Sylvia; Kinney, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Ozone and PM₂.₅ are current risk factors for premature death all over the globe. In coming decades, substantial improvements in public health may be achieved by reducing air pollution. To better understand the potential of emissions policies, studies are needed that assess possible future health impacts under alternative assumptions about future emissions and climate across multiple spatial scales. We used consistent climate-air-quality-health modeling framework across three geographical scales (World, Europe and Ile-de-France) to assess future (2030-2050) health impacts of ozone and PM₂.₅ under two emissions scenarios (Current Legislation Emissions, CLE, and Maximum Feasible Reductions, MFR). Consistently across the scales, we found more reductions in deaths under MFR scenario compared to CLE. 1.5 [95% CI: 0.4, 2.4] million CV deaths could be delayed each year in 2030 compared to 2010 under MFR scenario, 84% of which would occur in Asia, especially in China. In Europe, the benefits under MFR scenario (219000 CV deaths) are noticeably larger than those under CLE (109,000 CV deaths). In Ile-de-France, under MFR more than 2830 annual CV deaths associated with PM₂.₅ changes could be delayed in 2050 compared to 2010. In Paris, ozone-related respiratory mortality should increase under both scenarios. Multi-scale HIAs can illustrate the difference in direct consequences of costly mitigation policies and provide results that may help decision-makers choose between different policy alternatives at different scales. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Object-oriented mapping application of architecture based on multi-scale image segmentation and image extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, X.; Chen, X.

    2014-04-01

    Residential area detection is extremely important for supervision of rush-built and illegal construction behavior to protect arable land and basic farmland. Traditional manual recognition of illegal construction is simple but time-consuming. The specific research work in the thesis includes: the proposition and designing of a multi-scale segmentation method based on watershed segmentation combined with region merging algorithm, comparative experiments of the new algorithm and traditional algorithm. Then, architecture extraction experiment based on the multi-scale segmentation method is carried out and analysis of the precision of comparative experiment results of pixel-based and object-oriented extraction methods is made, all these steps facilitate the automatic mapping of the architecture.

  18. Representation of Block-Based Image Features in a Multi-Scale Framework for Built-Up Area Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwen Hu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The accurate extraction and mapping of built-up areas play an important role in many social, economic, and environmental studies. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for built-up area detection from high spatial resolution remote sensing images, using a block-based multi-scale feature representation framework. First, an image is divided into small blocks, in which the spectral, textural, and structural features are extracted and represented using a multi-scale framework; a set of refined Harris corner points is then used to select blocks as training samples; finally, a built-up index image is obtained by minimizing the normalized spectral, textural, and structural distances to the training samples, and a built-up area map is obtained by thresholding the index image. Experiments confirm that the proposed approach is effective for high-resolution optical and synthetic aperture radar images, with different scenes and different spatial resolutions.

  19. A multi-scale integrated modeling framework to measure comprehensive impact of coastal reclamation activities in Yellow River estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Cai, Yanpeng; Sun, Tao; Tan, Qian

    2017-09-15

    In this paper, an improved multi-scale integrated modeling framework has been established to evaluate coastal reclamation intensity (CRI). About 7 indicators are considered, including ecological degradation intensity (EDI), hydrodynamic disturbance (IHD), engineering types, water quality, economic investment, population growth, and reclaimed land area. Meanwhile, an integrated framework enhanced methods in terms of (a) measuring intensity of ecological degradation process under multi-scale impact, (b) developing the indicator system of CRI, and discussing the driving forces and trends of coastal reclamation, (c) determining fuzzy preference relations of weight and calculating the specific value of CRI with the case study areas of Yellow River estuary from 2000 to 2015. As the result, the CRI has been expanded unceasingly in recent years. The total growth rate from 2000 to 2015 is about 37.97%. It is concluded that CRI has climbed to a higher intensity level in resent 15years. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Multi-scale Constitutive Model of Solidifying Cementitious Composites and Application to Cracking Assessment of a Concrete Structure

    OpenAIRE

    石田, 哲也; 浅本, 晋吾; 前川, 宏一

    2006-01-01

    A multi-scale constitutive model of solidifying cementitious materials is presented based on a systematic knowledge coupling structural mechanics with chemo-physical phenomena. The model can reasonably simulate time-dependent deformations such as autogenous/drying shrinkage and basic/drying creep in laboratory tests under arbitrary environmental and loading conditions. Shrinkage induced cracking in an actual PRC bridge structure was examined by the analytical system, which reveals that large ...

  1. Towards a multi-scale approach for an Earth observation-based assessment of natural resource exploitation in conflict regions

    OpenAIRE

    SCHOEPFER Elisabeth; Spröhnle, Kristin; Kranz, Olaf; Blaes, Xavier; KOLOMAZNIK Jan; Hilgert, Filip; BARTALOS Tomas; Kemper, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of resources, if not properly managed, can lead to spoiling natural habitats as well as to threatening people’s health, livelihoods and security. The paper discusses a multi-scale Earth observation-based approach to provide independent information related to exploitation activities of natural resources for countries which are experiencing armed conflict. The analyses are based on medium to very high spatial resolution optical satellite data. Object-based image analysis is use...

  2. Computer-aided tumor detection based on multi-scale blob detection algorithm in automated breast ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Woo Kyung; Shen, Yi-Wei; Bae, Min Sun; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2013-07-01

    Automated whole breast ultrasound (ABUS) is an emerging screening tool for detecting breast abnormalities. In this study, a computer-aided detection (CADe) system based on multi-scale blob detection was developed for analyzing ABUS images. The performance of the proposed CADe system was tested using a database composed of 136 breast lesions (58 benign lesions and 78 malignant lesions) and 37 normal cases. After speckle noise reduction, Hessian analysis with multi-scale blob detection was applied for the detection of tumors. This method detected every tumor, but some nontumors were also detected. The tumor like lihoods for the remaining candidates were estimated using a logistic regression model based on blobness, internal echo, and morphology features. The tumor candidates with tumor likelihoods higher than a specific threshold (0.4) were considered tumors. By using the combination of blobness, internal echo, and morphology features with 10-fold cross-validation, the proposed CAD system showed sensitivities of 100%, 90%, and 70% with false positives per pass of 17.4, 8.8, and 2.7, respectively. Our results suggest that CADe systems based on multi-scale blob detection can be used to detect breast tumors in ABUS images.

  3. Multi-scale thermodynamic analysis method for 2D SiC/SiC composite turbine guide vanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin LIU

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC turbine guide vanes possess multi-scale stress and strain with inhomogeneity at the microscopic scale. Given that the macroscopic distribution cannot reflect the microscopic stress fluctuation, the macroscopic method fails to meet the requirements of stress and strain analysis of CMC turbine guide vanes. Furthermore, the complete thermodynamic properties of 2D woven SiC/SiC-CMC cannot be obtained through experimentation. Accordingly, a method to calculate the thermodynamic properties of CMC and analyze multi-scale stress and strain of the turbine guide vanes should be established. In this study, the multi-scale thermodynamic analysis is investigated. The thermodynamic properties of Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI processed SiC/SiC-CMC are predicted by a Representative Volume Element (RVE model with porosity, leading to the result that the relative error between the calculated in-plane tensile modulus and the experimental value is 4.2%. The macroscopic response of a guide vane under given conditions is predicted. The relative error between the predicted strain on the trailing edge and the experimental value is 9.7%. The calculation of the stress distribution of micro-scale RVE shows that the maximum value of microscopic stress, which is located in the interlayer matrix, is more than 1.5 times that of macroscopic stress in the same direction and the microscopic stress distribution of the interlayer matrix is related to the pore distribution of the composite.

  4. Multi-scale finite element modelling at the posterior lumbar vertebra: analysis of pedicle stresses due to pars fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inceoğlu, Serkan; Mageswaran, Prasath

    2014-05-01

    Multi-scale finite element (FE) model is a cost-effective way to analyse stress response of micro-level structures to the changes in loading at macro-level. This study deals with the development of a multi-scale model of a human vertebra and stress changes in the pedicle at high resolution after a gross fracture at the posterior neural arch. Spondylolysis (pars fracture) is a painful condition occurring in the vertebral neural arch and common especially among the athletic young population. The fracture of the pars significantly alters load distribution and load transfer characteristics at the neural arch. Structural changes in the posterior vertebra due to the new loading patterns can trigger secondary complications. Clinical reports have shown the association of pedicle hypertrophy or pedicle fracture with unilateral pars fractures. However, the biomechanical consequences of pars fracture and its effect on the pedicle have never been studied in detail. Therefore, we prepared a multi-scale model of posterior vertebra with continuum laminar complex model combined with micro-FE model of a pedicle section. The results showed that stress at the contralateral pars and pedicle increased after unilateral pars fracture simulation. High-stress regions were found around the outer boundaries of the pedicle. This model and information are helpful in understanding the stress changes in the pedicle and can be used for adaptive remodelling studies.

  5. An Improved Algorithm Based on Minimum Spanning Tree for Multi-scale Segmentation of Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Hui

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As the basis of object-oriented information extraction from remote sensing imagery,image segmentation using multiple image features,exploiting spatial context information, and by a multi-scale approach are currently the research focuses. Using an optimization approach of the graph theory, an improved multi-scale image segmentation method is proposed. In this method, the image is applied with a coherent enhancement anisotropic diffusion filter followed by a minimum spanning tree segmentation approach, and the resulting segments are merged with reference to a minimum heterogeneity criterion.The heterogeneity criterion is defined as a function of the spectral characteristics and shape parameters of segments. The purpose of the merging step is to realize the multi-scale image segmentation. Tested on two images, the proposed method was visually and quantitatively compared with the segmentation method employed in the eCognition software. The results show that the proposed method is effective and outperforms the latter on areas with subtle spectral differences.

  6. Multi-scale Model of Residual Strength of 2D Plain Weave C/SiC Composites in Oxidation Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xihui; Sun, Zhigang; Sun, Jianfen; Song, Yingdong

    2017-02-01

    Multi-scale models play an important role in capturing the nonlinear response of woven carbon fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites. In plain weave carbon fiber/silicon carbon (C/SiC) composites, the carbon fibers and interphases will be oxidized at elevated temperature and the strength of the composite will be degraded when oxygen enters micro-cracks formed in the as-produced parts due to the mismatch in thermal properties between constituents. As a result of the oxidation on fiber surface, fiber shows a notch-like morphology. In this paper, the change rule of fiber notch depth is fitted by circular function. And a multi-scale model based upon the change rule of fiber notch depth is developed to simulate the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of the composite. The multi-scale model is able to accurately predict the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of the composite. Besides, the simulated residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of 2D plain weave C/SiC composites in oxidation atmosphere show good agreements with experimental results. Furthermore, the oxidation time and temperature of the composite are investigated to show their influences upon the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of plain weave C/SiC composites.

  7. Multi scale modeling of ignition and combustion of micro and nano aluminum particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Puneesh

    With renewed interest in nano scale energetic materials like aluminum, many fundamental issues concerning the ignition and combustion characteristics at nano scales, remain to be clarified. The overall aim of the current study is the establishment of a unified theory accommodating the various processes and mechanisms involved in the combustion and ignition of aluminum particles at micro and nano scales. A comprehensive review on the ignition and combustion of aluminum particles at multi scales was first performed identifying various processes and mechanisms involved. Research focus was also placed on the establishment of a Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation tool to investigate the characteristics of nano-particulate aluminum through three major studies. The general computational framework involved parallelized preprocessing, post-processing and main code with capability to simulate different ensembles using appropriate algorithms. Size dependence of melting temperature of pure aluminum particles was investigated in the first study. Phenomena like dynamic coexistence of solid and liquid phase and effect of surface charges on melting were explored. The second study involved the study of effect of defects in the form of voids on melting of bulk and particulate phase aluminum. The third MD study was used to analyze the thermo-mechanical behavior of nano-sized aluminum particles with total diameter of 5-10 nm and oxide thickness of 1-2.5 nm. The ensuing solid-solid and solid-liquid phase changes in the core and shell, stresses developed within the shell, and the diffusion of aluminum cations in the oxide layer, were explored in depth for amorphous and crystalline oxide layers. In the limiting case, the condition for pyrophoricity/explosivity of nano-particulate aluminum was analyzed and modified. The size dependence of thermodynamic properties at nano scales were considered and incorporated into the existing theories developed for micro and larger scales. Finally, a

  8. Empirical evidence for multi-scaled controls on wildfire size distributions in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povak, N.; Hessburg, P. F., Sr.; Salter, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Ecological theory asserts that regional wildfire size distributions are examples of self-organized critical (SOC) systems. Controls on SOC event-size distributions by virtue are purely endogenous to the system and include the (1) frequency and pattern of ignitions, (2) distribution and size of prior fires, and (3) lagged successional patterns after fires. However, recent work has shown that the largest wildfires often result from extreme climatic events, and that patterns of vegetation and topography may help constrain local fire spread, calling into question the SOC model's simplicity. Using an atlas of >12,000 California wildfires (1950-2012) and maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), we fit four different power-law models and broken-stick regressions to fire-size distributions across 16 Bailey's ecoregions. Comparisons among empirical fire size distributions across ecoregions indicated that most ecoregion's fire-size distributions were significantly different, suggesting that broad-scale top-down controls differed among ecoregions. One-parameter power-law models consistently fit a middle range of fire sizes (~100 to 10000 ha) across most ecoregions, but did not fit to larger and smaller fire sizes. We fit the same four power-law models to patch size distributions of aspect, slope, and curvature topographies and found that the power-law models fit to a similar middle range of topography patch sizes. These results suggested that empirical evidence may exist for topographic controls on fire sizes. To test this, we used neutral landscape modeling techniques to determine if observed fire edges corresponded with aspect breaks more often than expected by random. We found significant differences between the empirical and neutral models for some ecoregions, particularly within the middle range of fire sizes. Our results, combined with other recent work, suggest that controls on ecoregional fire size distributions are multi-scaled and likely are not purely SOC. California

  9. Exploring multi-scale forest above ground biomass estimation with optical remote sensing imageries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koju, U.; Zhang, J.; Gilani, H.

    2017-02-01

    Forest shares 80% of total exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and the terrestrial ecosystem. Due to this monitoring of forest above ground biomass (as carbon can be calculated as 0.47 part of total biomass) has become very important. Forest above ground biomass as being the major portion of total forest biomass should be given a very careful consideration in its estimation. It is hoped to be useful in addressing the ongoing problems of deforestation and degradation and to gain carbon mitigation benefits through mechanisms like Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+). Many methods of above ground biomass estimation are in used ranging from use of optical remote sensing imageries of very high to very low resolution to SAR data and LIDAR. This paper describes a multi-scale approach for assessing forest above ground biomass, and ultimately carbon stocks, using very high imageries, open source medium resolution and medium resolution satellite datasets with a very limited number of field plots. We found this method is one of the most promising method for forest above ground biomass estimation with higher accuracy and low cost budget. Pilot study was conducted in Chitwan district of Nepal on the estimation of biomass using this technique. The GeoEye-1 (0.5m), Landsat (30m) and Google Earth (GE) images were used remote sensing imageries. Object-based image analysis (OBIA) classification technique was done on Geo-eye imagery for the tree crown delineation at the watershed level. After then, crown projection area (CPA) vs. biomass model was developed and validated at the watershed level. Open source GE imageries were used to calculate the CPA and biomass from virtual plots at district level. Using data mining technique, different parameters from Landsat imageries along with the virtual sample biomass were used for upscaling biomass estimation at district level. We found, this approach can considerably reduce field data requirements for

  10. Multi-Scale Voxel Segmentation for Terrestrial Lidar Data within Marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C. T.; Starek, M. J.; Tissot, P.; Gibeaut, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    The resilience of marshes to a rising sea is dependent on their elevation response. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is a detailed topographic approach for accurate, dense surface measurement with high potential for monitoring of marsh surface elevation response. The dense point cloud provides a 3D representation of the surface, which includes both terrain and non-terrain objects. Extraction of topographic information requires filtering of the data into like-groups or classes, therefore, methods must be incorporated to identify structure in the data prior to creation of an end product. A voxel representation of three-dimensional space provides quantitative visualization and analysis for pattern recognition. The objectives of this study are threefold: 1) apply a multi-scale voxel approach to effectively extract geometric features from the TLS point cloud data, 2) investigate the utility of K-means and Self Organizing Map (SOM) clustering algorithms for segmentation, and 3) utilize a variety of validity indices to measure the quality of the result. TLS data were collected at a marsh site along the central Texas Gulf Coast using a Riegl VZ 400 TLS. The site consists of both exposed and vegetated surface regions. To characterize structure of the point cloud, octree segmentation is applied to create a tree data structure of voxels containing the points. The flexibility of voxels in size and point density makes this algorithm a promising candidate to locally extract statistical and geometric features of the terrain including surface normal and curvature. The characteristics of the voxel itself such as the volume and point density are also computed and assigned to each point as are laser pulse characteristics. The features extracted from the voxelization are then used as input for clustering of the points using the K-means and SOM clustering algorithms. Optimal number of clusters are then determined based on evaluation of cluster separability criterions. Results for

  11. Exploring with simulations the transport properties of multi-scale porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyväluoma, Jari; Mattila, Keijo; Puurtinen, Tuomas; Timonen, Jussi

    2015-04-01

    The internal structure of many natural porous materials such as soils and carbonate rocks involves multiple length scales. This severely hinders the research relating structure and transport properties: typically laboratory experiments cannot distinguish contributions from individual scales while computer simulations cannot capture multiple scales due to limited computational resources. 3D imaging and image-based fluid flow simulations are increasingly used for studying the pore-scale transport processes. Combining imaging with pore-scale flow simulation techniques, e.g. the lattice Boltzmann method, provides direct means to quantify pore-scale transport processes. However, pore-scale computer simulations have not really been able to capture multiple scales due to the limited size of the simulation system. We show here that the current computational resources and software techniques already allow transport simulations in domains beyond the realms of current imaging techniques, and, more importantly, enable numerical experiments in multi-scale porous materials. We were able to simulate single-phase fluid flow with the lattice Boltzmann method in a synthetic x-ray-tomography image taken from the set of world's largest 3D images of a porous material [1]. The used image has 163843 image voxels and porosity of 0.134 (i.e., 5.9 - 1011 pore voxels) and it represents the microstructure of Fontainebleau sandstone. While the modelled sandstone image is rather homogeneous and therefore does not really represent a multiscale porous material, from a computational point of view it serves the purpose of demonstrating the power of contemporary software and hardware techniques. The simulation was executed at the Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre on the ARCHER supercomputer ranked number 25 among all supercomputers. ARCHER has 3008 computing nodes each of which has two 12-core Ivy Bridge 2.7 GHz CPUs and 64 GB of memory providing 1.67 Petaflops of theoretical peak performance. The

  12. Multi-scale coarse-graining of non-conservative interactions in molecular liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izvekov, Sergei, E-mail: sergiy.izvyekov.civ@mail.mil; Rice, Betsy M. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States)

    2014-03-14

    A new bottom-up procedure for constructing non-conservative (dissipative and stochastic) interactions for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) models is described and applied to perform hierarchical coarse-graining of a polar molecular liquid (nitromethane). The distant-dependent radial and shear frictions in functional-free form are derived consistently with a chosen form for conservative interactions by matching two-body force-velocity and three-body velocity-velocity correlations along the microscopic trajectories of the centroids of Voronoi cells (clusters), which represent the dissipative particles within the DPD description. The Voronoi tessellation is achieved by application of the K-means clustering algorithm at regular time intervals. Consistently with a notion of many-body DPD, the conservative interactions are determined through the multi-scale coarse-graining (MS-CG) method, which naturally implements a pairwise decomposition of the microscopic free energy. A hierarchy of MS-CG/DPD models starting with one molecule per Voronoi cell and up to 64 molecules per cell is derived. The radial contribution to the friction appears to be dominant for all models. As the Voronoi cell sizes increase, the dissipative forces rapidly become confined to the first coordination shell. For Voronoi cells of two and more molecules the time dependence of the velocity autocorrelation function becomes monotonic and well reproduced by the respective MS-CG/DPD models. A comparative analysis of force and velocity correlations in the atomistic and CG ensembles indicates Markovian behavior with as low as two molecules per dissipative particle. The models with one and two molecules per Voronoi cell yield transport properties (diffusion and shear viscosity) that are in good agreement with the atomistic data. The coarser models produce slower dynamics that can be appreciably attributed to unaccounted dissipation introduced by regular Voronoi re-partitioning as well as by larger

  13. Multi scale imaging of the Cloudy Zone in the Tazewell IIICD Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einsle, J. F.; Harrison, R. J.; Nichols, C. I. O.; Blukis, R.; Midgley, P. A.; Eggeman, A.; Saghi, Z.; Bagot, P.

    2015-12-01

    Paleomagnetic studies of iron and stony iron meteorites suggest that many small planetary bodies possessed molten cores resulting in the generation of a magnetic field. As these bodies cooled, Fe-Ni metal trapped within their mantle underwent a series of low-temperature transitions, leading to the familiar Widmanstatten intergrowth of kamacite and taenite. Adjacent to the kamacite/taenite interface is the so-called "cloudy zone" (CZ): a nanoscale intergrowth of tetrataenite islands in an Fe-rich matrix phase formed via spinodal decomposition. It has recently been shown (Bryson et al. 2015, Nature) that the CZ encodes a time-series record of the evolution of the magnetic field generated by the molten core of the planetary body. Extracting meaningful paleomagnetic data from the CZ relies, on a thorough understanding of the 3D chemical and magnetic properties of the intergrowth focsusing on the interactions between the magnetically hard tetrataenite islands and the magnetically soft matrix. Here we present a multi scale study of the chemical and crystallographic make up of the CZ in the Tazewell IIICD meteorite, using a range of advanced microscopy techniques. The results provide unprecedented insight into the architecture of the CZ, with implications for how the CZ acquires chemical transformation remanance during cooling on the parent body. Previous 2D transmission electron microscope studies of the CZ suggested that the matrix is an ordered Fe3Ni phase with the L12 structure. Interpretation of the electron diffraction patterns and chemical maps in these studies was hindered by a failure to resolve signals from overlapping island and matrix phases. Here we obtain high resolution electron diffraction and 3D chemical maps with near atomic resolution using a combination of scanning precession electron diffraction, 3D STEM EDS and atom probe tomography. Using this combined methodology we reslove for the first time the phenomena of secondary precipitation in the

  14. Patterns and multi-scale drivers of phytoplankton species richness in temperate peri-urban lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catherine, Arnaud, E-mail: arnocat@mnhn.fr [UMR7245 MCAM MNHN-CNRS, Muséum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CC 39, 12 rue Buffon, F-75231 Paris, Cedex 05 (France); Selma, Maloufi, E-mail: maloufi@mnhn.fr [UMR7245 MCAM MNHN-CNRS, Muséum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CC 39, 12 rue Buffon, F-75231 Paris, Cedex 05 (France); Mouillot, David, E-mail: david.mouillot@univ-montp2.fr [UMR 9190 MARBEC UM2-CNRS-IRD-UM1-IFREMER, CC 93, Place Eugène Bataillon, Université de Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Troussellier, Marc, E-mail: troussel@univ-montp2.fr [UMR 9190 MARBEC UM2-CNRS-IRD-UM1-IFREMER, CC 93, Place Eugène Bataillon, Université de Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Bernard, Cécile, E-mail: cbernard@mnhn.fr [UMR7245 MCAM MNHN-CNRS, Muséum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CC 39, 12 rue Buffon, F-75231 Paris, Cedex 05 (France)

    2016-07-15

    species richness in temperate lakes. This approach may prove useful and cost-effective for the management and conservation of aquatic ecosystems. - Highlights: • We studied phytoplankton communities in 50 peri-urban lakes. • We assessed the impact of multi-scale drivers of phytoplankton richness. • Local- and catchment-scale predictive models performed similarly. • Seasonal temperature variation and resource availability strongly modulate species richness. • This approach may be used for the management and conservation of aquatic ecosystems.

  15. Multi-Scale Entropy Analysis as a Method for Time-Series Analysis of Climate Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Balzter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is mounting that the temporal dynamics of the climate system are changing at the same time as the average global temperature is increasing due to multiple climate forcings. A large number of extreme weather events such as prolonged cold spells, heatwaves, droughts and floods have been recorded around the world in the past 10 years. Such changes in the temporal scaling behaviour of climate time-series data can be difficult to detect. While there are easy and direct ways of analysing climate data by calculating the means and variances for different levels of temporal aggregation, these methods can miss more subtle changes in their dynamics. This paper describes multi-scale entropy (MSE analysis as a tool to study climate time-series data and to identify temporal scales of variability and their change over time in climate time-series. MSE estimates the sample entropy of the time-series after coarse-graining at different temporal scales. An application of MSE to Central European, variance-adjusted, mean monthly air temperature anomalies (CRUTEM4v is provided. The results show that the temporal scales of the current climate (1960–2014 are different from the long-term average (1850–1960. For temporal scale factors longer than 12 months, the sample entropy increased markedly compared to the long-term record. Such an increase can be explained by systems theory with greater complexity in the regional temperature data. From 1961 the patterns of monthly air temperatures are less regular at time-scales greater than 12 months than in the earlier time period. This finding suggests that, at these inter-annual time scales, the temperature variability has become less predictable than in the past. It is possible that climate system feedbacks are expressed in altered temporal scales of the European temperature time-series data. A comparison with the variance and Shannon entropy shows that MSE analysis can provide additional information on the

  16. Multi-scale and multi-physics model of the uterine smooth muscle with mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yochum, Maxime; Laforêt, Jérémy; Marque, Catherine

    2017-12-09

    Preterm labor is an important public health problem. However, the efficiency of the uterine muscle during labor is complex and still poorly understood. This work is a first step towards a model of the uterine muscle, including its electrical and mechanical components, to reach a better understanding of the uterus synchronization. This model is proposed to investigate, by simulation, the possible role of mechanotransduction for the global synchronization of the uterus. The electrical diffusion indeed explains the local propagation of contractile activity, while the tissue stretching may play a role in the synchronization of distant parts of the uterine muscle. This work proposes a multi-physics (electrical, mechanical) and multi-scales (cell, tissue, whole uterus) model, which is applied to a realistic uterus 3D mesh. This model includes electrical components at different scales: generation of action potentials at the cell level, electrical diffusion at the tissue level. It then links these electrical events to the mechanical behavior, at the cellular level (via the intracellular calcium concentration), by simulating the force generated by each active cell. It thus computes an estimation of the intra uterine pressure (IUP) by integrating the forces generated by each active cell at the whole uterine level, as well as the stretching of the tissue (by using a viscoelastic law for the behavior of the tissue). It finally includes at the cellular level stretch activated channels (SACs) that permit to create a loop between the mechanical and the electrical behavior (mechanotransduction). The simulation of different activated regions of the uterus, which in this first "proof of concept" case are electrically isolated, permits the activation of inactive regions through the stretching (induced by the electrically active regions) computed at the whole organ scale. This permits us to evidence the role of the mechanotransduction in the global synchronization of the uterus. The

  17. Coarse-graining and hybrid methods for efficient simulation of stochastic multi-scale models of tumour growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, Roberto; Guerrero, Pilar; Calvo, Juan; Alarcón, Tomás

    2017-12-01

    The development of hybrid methodologies is of current interest in both multi-scale modelling and stochastic reaction-diffusion systems regarding their applications to biology. We formulate a hybrid method for stochastic multi-scale models of cells populations that extends the remit of existing hybrid methods for reaction-diffusion systems. Such method is developed for a stochastic multi-scale model of tumour growth, i.e. population-dynamical models which account for the effects of intrinsic noise affecting both the number of cells and the intracellular dynamics. In order to formulate this method, we develop a coarse-grained approximation for both the full stochastic model and its mean-field limit. Such approximation involves averaging out the age-structure (which accounts for the multi-scale nature of the model) by assuming that the age distribution of the population settles onto equilibrium very fast. We then couple the coarse-grained mean-field model to the full stochastic multi-scale model. By doing so, within the mean-field region, we are neglecting noise in both cell numbers (population) and their birth rates (structure). This implies that, in addition to the issues that arise in stochastic-reaction diffusion systems, we need to account for the age-structure of the population when attempting to couple both descriptions. We exploit our coarse-graining model so that, within the mean-field region, the age-distribution is in equilibrium and we know its explicit form. This allows us to couple both domains consistently, as upon transference of cells from the mean-field to the stochastic region, we sample the equilibrium age distribution. Furthermore, our method allows us to investigate the effects of intracellular noise, i.e. fluctuations of the birth rate, on collective properties such as travelling wave velocity. We show that the combination of population and birth-rate noise gives rise to large fluctuations of the birth rate in the region at the leading edge of

  18. Multi-scale Geophysical Signatures of Biogenic Calcite and FeS Precipitation Using Rifle as a Model Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Williams, K. H.; Hubbard, S. S.; Nico, P. S.

    2008-12-01

    In-situ remediation strategies are frequently considered for cleanup of DOE sites. However, the impact of induced biogeochemical transformations on remediation efficacy is not well understood. For example, the generation of remediation end-products, such as gas bubbles, precipitates, and biomass, can alter the porosity and permeability of the system, rendering it challenging to subsequently introduce amendments and/or altering the hydrobiogeochemical conditions favorable for sustained remediation. An understanding of how reaction processes modify the properties of the porous medium is critical to the design, execution, and interpretation of in-situ remediation approaches.Rent hydrogeophysical and biogeophysical studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of geophysical methods to hydrobiogeochemical processes and end products. Geophysical methods offer spatiotemporally dense geophysical data which, through combining with direct measurements, can provide a unique opportunity to better characterize biogeochemical processes/end products and their effects on the porous medium in multi-scale heterogeneous systems. Here, we present a study of synchrotron and column-based geophysical signatures of precipitates induced through biostimulation. Our experiments utilize material from the DOE Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site (IFC), where biostimulation experiments are underway to reduce and immobilize subsurface uranium contamination. At the Rifle IFC, calcite and iron sulfide are the two major end products during bioremediation. These two phases often precipitate simultaneously and are mixed together geometrically. We use two platforms to investigate the geophysical signatures of Rifle-based precipitates evolve in response to biostimulation. At the smallest scale, we conducted time-lapse synchrotron x-ray microtomography of Rifle sediments using Beamline 8.3.2 of the LBNL Advanced Light Source. The resolution of this approach permits investigation of pore

  19. Multi-scale forcing and the formation of subtropical desert and monsoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, G.X.; Liu, Y.; Ren, R.; Duan, A. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (CN). State Key Lab. of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG); Zhu, X. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (CN). State Key Lab. of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG); Graduate Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Li, W.; Liang, X. [China Meteorological Administration, Beijing (China). National Climate Center

    2009-07-01

    This study investigates three types of atmospheric forcing across the summertime subtropics that are shown to contribute in various ways to the occurrence of dry and wet climates in the subtropics. To explain the formation of desert over the western parts of continents and monsoon over the eastern parts, we propose a new mechanism of positive feedback between diabatic heating and vorticity generation that occurs via meridional advection of planetary vorticity and temperature. Monsoon and desert are demonstrated to coexist as twin features of multi-scale forcing, as follows. First, continent-scale heating over land and cooling over ocean induce the ascent of air over the eastern parts of continents and western parts of oceans, and descent over eastern parts of oceans and western parts of continents. Second, local-scale sea-breeze forcing along coastal regions enhances air descent over eastern parts of oceans and ascent over eastern parts of continents. This leads to the formation of the well-defined summertime subtropical LOSECOD quadruplet-heating pattern across each continent and adjacent oceans, with long-wave radiative cooling (LO) over eastern parts of oceans, sensible heating (SE) over western parts of continents, condensation heating (CO) over eastern parts of continents, and double dominant heating (D: LO+CO) over western parts of oceans. Such a quadruplet heating pattern corresponds to a dry climate over the western parts of continents and a wet climate over eastern parts. Third, regional-scale orographic-uplift-heating generates poleward ascending flow to the east of orography and equatorward descending flow to the west. A new mechanism of positive feedback between diabatic heating and vorticity generation, which occurs via meridional transfer of heat and planetary vorticity, is proposed as a means of explaining the formation of subtropical desert and monsoon. Strong low-level longwave radiative cooling over eastern parts of oceans and strong surface

  20. Multi-scale Eulerian model within the new National Environmental Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjic, Zavisa; Janjic, Tijana; Vasic, Ratko

    2010-05-01

    The unified Non-hydrostatic Multi-scale Model on the Arakawa B grid (NMMB) is being developed at NCEP within the National Environmental Modeling System (NEMS). The finite-volume horizontal differencing employed in the model preserves important properties of differential operators and conserves a variety of basic and derived dynamical and quadratic quantities. Among these, conservation of energy and enstrophy improves the accuracy of nonlinear dynamics of the model. Within further model development, advection schemes of fourth order of formal accuracy have been developed. It is argued that higher order advection schemes should not be used in the thermodynamic equation in order to preserve consistency with the second order scheme used for computation of the pressure gradient force. Thus, the fourth order scheme is applied only to momentum advection. Three sophisticated second order schemes were considered for upgrade. Two of them, proposed in Janjic(1984), conserve energy and enstrophy, but with enstrophy calculated differently. One of them conserves enstrophy as computed by the most accurate second order Laplacian operating on stream function. The other scheme conserves enstrophy as computed from the B grid velocity. The third scheme (Arakawa 1972) is arithmetic mean of the former two. It does not conserve enstrophy strictly, but it conserves other quadratic quantities that control the nonlinear energy cascade. Linearization of all three schemes leads to the same second order linear advection scheme. The second order term of the truncation error of the linear advection scheme has a special form so that it can be eliminated by simply preconditioning the advected quantity. Tests with linear advection of a cone confirm the advantage of the fourth order scheme. However, if a localized, large amplitude and high wave-number pattern is present in initial conditions, the clear advantage of the fourth order scheme disappears. In real data runs, problems with noisy data may

  1. Change in Urban Albedo in London: A Multi-scale Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susca, T.; Kotthaus, S.; Grimmond, S.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanization-induced change in land use has considerable implications for climate, air quality, resources and ecosystems. Urban-induced warming is one of the most well-known impacts. This directly and indirectly can extend beyond the city. One way to reduce the size of this is to modify the surface atmosphere exchanges through changing the urban albedo. As increased rugosity caused by the morphology of a city results in lower albedo with constant material characteristics, the impacts of changing the albedo has impacts across a range of scales. Here a multi-scale assessment of the potential effects of the increase in albedo in London is presented. This includes modeling at the global and meso-scale informed by local and micro-scale measurements. In this study the first order calculations are conducted for the impact of changing the albedo (e.g. a 0.01 increase) on the radiative exchange. For example, when incoming solar radiation and cloud cover are considered, based on data retrieved from NASA (http://power.larc.nasa.gov/) for ~1600 km2 area of London, would produce a mean decrease in the instantaneous solar radiative forcing on the same surface of 0.40 W m-2. The nature of the surface is critical in terms of considering the impact of changes in albedo. For example, in the Central Activity Zone in London pavement and building can vary from 10 to 100% of the plan area. From observations the albedo is seen to change dramatically with changes in building materials. For example, glass surfaces which are being used increasingly in the central business district results in dramatic changes in albedo. Using the documented albedo variations determined across different scales the impacts are considered. For example, the effect of the increase in urban albedo is translated into the corresponding amount of avoided emission of carbon dioxide that produces the same effect on climate. At local scale, the effect that the increase in urban albedo can potentially have on local

  2. Multi-scale modeling of urban air pollution: development of a Street-in-Grid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngseob; Wu, You; Seigneur, Christian; Roustan, Yelva

    2016-04-01

    A new multi-scale model of urban air pollution is presented. This model combines a chemical-transport model (CTM) that includes a comprehensive treatment of atmospheric chemistry and transport at spatial scales greater than 1 km and a street-network model that describes the atmospheric concentrations of pollutants in an urban street network. The street-network model is based on the general formulation of the SIRANE model and consists of two main components: a street-canyon component and a street-intersection component. The street-canyon component calculates the mass transfer velocity at the top of the street canyon (roof top) and the mean wind velocity within the street canyon. The estimation of the mass transfer velocity depends on the intensity of the standard deviation of the vertical velocity at roof top. The effect of various formulations of this mass transfer velocity on the pollutant transport at roof-top level is examined. The street-intersection component calculates the mass transfer from a given street to other streets across the intersection. These mass transfer rates among the streets are calculated using the mean wind velocity calculated for each street and are balanced so that the total incoming flow rate is equal to the total outgoing flow rate from the intersection including the flow between the intersection and the overlying atmosphere at roof top. In the default option, the Leighton photostationary cycle among ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) is used to represent the chemical reactions within the street network. However, the influence of volatile organic compounds (VOC) on the pollutant concentrations increases when the nitrogen oxides (NOx) concentrations are low. To account for the possible VOC influence on street-canyon chemistry, the CB05 chemical kinetic mechanism, which includes 35 VOC model species, is implemented in this street-network model. A sensitivity study is conducted to assess the uncertainties associated with the use of

  3. Multi-scale Modeling of Power Plant Plume Emissions and Comparisons with Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigan, K. R.; Lee, S.; Reisner, J.; Dubey, M. K.; Love, S. P.; Henderson, B. G.; Chylek, P.

    2011-12-01

    The Remote Sensing Verification Project (RSVP) test-bed located in the Four Corners region of Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico offers a unique opportunity to develop new approaches for estimating emissions of CO2. Two major power plants located in this area produce very large signals of co-emitted CO2 and NO2 in this rural region. In addition to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maintaining Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) on each of the power plant stacks, the RSVP program has deployed an array of in-situ and remote sensing instruments, which provide both point and integrated measurements. To aid in the synthesis and interpretation of the measurements, a multi-scale atmospheric modeling approach is implemented, using two atmospheric numerical models: the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with chemistry (WRF-Chem; Grell et al., 2005) and the HIGRAD model (Reisner et al., 2003). The high fidelity HIGRAD model incorporates a multi-phase Lagrangian particle based approach to track individual chemical species of stack plumes at ultra-high resolution, using an adaptive mesh. It is particularly suited to model buoyancy effects and entrainment processes at the edges of the power plant plumes. WRF-Chem is a community model that has been applied to a number of air quality problems and offers several physical and chemical schemes that can be used to model the transport and chemical transformation of the anthropogenic plumes out of the local region. Multiple nested grids employed in this study allow the model to incorporate atmospheric variability ranging from synoptic scales to micro-scales (~200 m), while including locally developed flows influenced by the nearby complex terrain of the San Juan Mountains. The simulated local atmospheric dynamics are provided to force the HIGRAD model, which links mesoscale atmospheric variability to the small-scale simulation of the power plant plumes. We will discuss how these two models are applied and

  4. Multi-scale investigation of tensile creep of ultra-high performance concrete for bridge applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garas Yanni, Victor Youssef

    Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) is relatively a new generation of concretes optimized at the nano and micro-scales to provide superior mechanical and durability properties compared to conventional and high performance concretes. Improvements in UHPC are achieved through: limiting the water-to-cementitious materials ratio (i.e., w/cm ≤ 0.20), optimizing particle packing, eliminating coarse aggregate, using specialized materials, and implementing high temperature and high pressure curing regimes. In addition, and randomly dispersed and short fibers are typically added to enhance the material's tensile and flexural strength, ductility, and toughness. There is a specific interest in using UHPC for precast prestressed bridge girders because it has the potential to reduce maintenance costs associated with steel and conventional concrete girders, replace functionally obsolete or structurally deficient steel girders without increasing the weight or the depth of the girder, and increase bridge durability to between 75 and 100 years. UHPC girder construction differs from that of conventional reinforced concrete in that UHPC may not need transverse reinforcement due to the high tensile and shear strengths of the material. Before bridge designers specify such girders without using shear reinforcement, the long-term tensile performance of the material must be characterized. This multi-scale study provided new data and understanding of the long-term tensile performance of UHPC by assessing the effect of thermal treatment, fiber content, and stress level on the tensile creep in a large-scale study, and by characterizing the fiber-cementitious matrix interface at different curing regimes through nanoindentation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in a nano/micro-scale study. Tensile creep of UHPC was more sensitive to investigated parameters than tensile strength. Thermal treatment decreased tensile creep by about 60% after 1 year. Results suggested the possibility of

  5. Towards a physically-based multi-scale ecohydrological simulator for semi-arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviedes-Voullième, Daniel; Josefik, Zoltan; Hinz, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    The use of numerical models as tools for describing and understanding complex ecohydrological systems has enabled to test hypothesis and propose fundamental, process-based explanations of the system system behaviour as a whole as well as its internal dynamics. Reaction-diffusion equations have been used to describe and generate organized pattern such as bands, spots, and labyrinths using simple feedback mechanisms and boundary conditions. Alternatively, pattern-matching cellular automaton models have been used to generate vegetation self-organization in arid and semi-arid regions also using simple description of surface hydrological processes. A key question is: How much physical realism is needed in order to adequately capture the pattern formation processes in semi-arid regions while reliably representing the water balance dynamics at the relevant time scales? In fact, redistribution of water by surface runoff at the hillslope scale occurs at temporal resolution of minutes while the vegetation development requires much lower temporal resolution and longer times spans. This generates a fundamental spatio-temporal multi-scale problem to be solved, for which high resolution rainfall and surface topography are required. Accordingly, the objective of this contribution is to provide proof-of-concept that governing processes can be described numerically at those multiple scales. The requirements for a simulating ecohydrological processes and pattern formation with increased physical realism are, amongst others: i. high resolution rainfall that adequately captures the triggers of growth as vegetation dynamics of arid regions respond as pulsed systems. ii. complex, natural topography in order to accurately model drainage patterns, as surface water redistribution is highly sensitive to topographic features. iii. microtopography and hydraulic roughness, as small scale variations do impact on large scale hillslope behaviour iv. moisture dependent infiltration as temporal

  6. Targeting the Biophysical Properties of the Myeloma Initiating Cell Niches: A Pharmaceutical Synergism Analysis Using Multi-Scale Agent-Based Modeling: e85059

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jing Su; Le Zhang; Wen Zhang; Dong Song Choi; Jianguo Wen; Beini Jiang; Chung-Che Chang; Xiaobo Zhou

    2014-01-01

    .... We first established a multi-scale agent-based model using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach to recapitulate the niche stiffness centric, pro-oncogenetic positive feedback loop between MICs...

  7. Multi-scale approach for 3D hydrostratigraphic and groundwater flow modelling of Milan (Northern Italy) urban aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caro, Mattia; Crosta, Giovanni; Frattini, Paolo; Perico, Roberta

    2017-04-01

    During the last century, urban groundwater was heavily exploited for public and industrial supply. As the water demands of industry have fallen, many cities are now experiencing rising groundwater levels with consequent concerns about localized flooding of basements, reduction of soil bearing capacities under foundations, soil internal erosion and the mobilization of contaminants. The city of Milan (Northern Italy) draws water for domestic and industrial purposes from aquifers beneath the urban area. The rate of abstraction has been varying during the last century, depending upon the number of inhabitants and the development of industrial activities. The groundwater abstraction raised to a maximum of about 350x106 m3/yr in the middle 1970s and has successively decreased to a value of about 230x106 m3/yr at present days. This caused a water table raise at an average rate of about 1 m/yr inducing infiltrations and flooding of deep constructions (e.g. building foundations and basements, underground subway excavations). Starting from a large hydrostratigraphic database (8628 borehole logs), a multi-scale approach for the reconstruction of the aquifers geometry (unconfined and semi-confined) at regional-scale has been used. First, a three-level hierarchical classification of the lithologies (lithofacies, hydrofacies, aquifer groups) has been adopted. Then, the interpretation of several 2D cross-sections was attained with Target for ArcGIS exploration software. The interpretation of cross-sections was based on the characteristics of depositional environments of the analysed aquifers (from meandering plain to proximal outwash deposits), on the position of quaternary deposits, and on the distribution of geochemical parameters (i.e. indicator contaminants and major ions). Finally, the aquifer boundary surfaces were interpolated with standard algorithms. The hydraulic properties of analysed aquifers were estimated through the analyses of available step-drawdown tests (Theis

  8. 3D multi-scale FCN with random modality voxel dropout learning for Intervertebral Disc Localization and Segmentation from Multi-modality MR Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomeng; Dou, Qi; Chen, Hao; Fu, Chi-Wing; Qi, Xiaojuan; Belavý, Daniel L; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Felsenberg, Dieter; Zheng, Guoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2018-02-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are small joints that lie between adjacent vertebrae. The localization and segmentation of IVDs are important for spine disease diagnosis and measurement quantification. However, manual annotation is time-consuming and error-prone with limited reproducibility, particularly for volumetric data. In this work, our goal is to develop an automatic and accurate method based on fully convolutional networks (FCN) for the localization and segmentation of IVDs from multi-modality 3D MR data. Compared with single modality data, multi-modality MR images provide complementary contextual information, which contributes to better recognition performance. However, how to effectively integrate such multi-modality information to generate accurate segmentation results remains to be further explored. In this paper, we present a novel multi-scale and modality dropout learning framework to locate and segment IVDs from four-modality MR images. First, we design a 3D multi-scale context fully convolutional network, which processes the input data in multiple scales of context and then merges the high-level features to enhance the representation capability of the network for handling the scale variation of anatomical structures. Second, to harness the complementary information from different modalities, we present a random modality voxel dropout strategy which alleviates the co-adaption issue and increases the discriminative capability of the network. Our method achieved the 1st place in the MICCAI challenge on automatic localization and segmentation of IVDs from multi-modality MR images, with a mean segmentation Dice coefficient of 91.2% and a mean localization error of 0.62 mm. We further conduct extensive experiments on the extended dataset to validate our method. We demonstrate that the proposed modality dropout strategy with multi-modality images as contextual information improved the segmentation accuracy significantly. Furthermore, experiments conducted on

  9. A Lagrangian stochastic model to demonstrate multi-scale interactions between convection and land surface heterogeneity in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsakhoo, Zahra; Shao, Yaping

    2017-04-01

    Near-surface turbulent mixing has considerable effect on surface fluxes, cloud formation and convection in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Its quantifications is however a modeling and computational challenge since the small eddies are not fully resolved in Eulerian models directly. We have developed a Lagrangian stochastic model to demonstrate multi-scale interactions between convection and land surface heterogeneity in the atmospheric boundary layer based on the Ito Stochastic Differential Equation (SDE) for air parcels (particles). Due to the complexity of the mixing in the ABL, we find that linear Ito SDE cannot represent convections properly. Three strategies have been tested to solve the problem: 1) to make the deterministic term in the Ito equation non-linear; 2) to change the random term in the Ito equation fractional, and 3) to modify the Ito equation by including Levy flights. We focus on the third strategy and interpret mixing as interaction between at least two stochastic processes with different Lagrangian time scales. The model is in progress to include the collisions among the particles with different characteristic and to apply the 3D model for real cases. One application of the model is emphasized: some land surface patterns are generated and then coupled with the Large Eddy Simulation (LES).

  10. Analysing and correcting the differences between multi-source and multi-scale spatial remote sensing observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yingying; Luo, Ruisen; Feng, Haikuan; Wang, Jihua; Zhao, Jinling; Zhu, Yining; Yang, Guijun

    2014-01-01

    Differences exist among analysis results of agriculture monitoring and crop production based on remote sensing observations, which are obtained at different spatial scales from multiple remote sensors in same time period, and processed by same algorithms, models or methods. These differences can be mainly quantitatively described from three aspects, i.e. multiple remote sensing observations, crop parameters estimation models, and spatial scale effects of surface parameters. Our research proposed a new method to analyse and correct the differences between multi-source and multi-scale spatial remote sensing surface reflectance datasets, aiming to provide references for further studies in agricultural application with multiple remotely sensed observations from different sources. The new method was constructed on the basis of physical and mathematical properties of multi-source and multi-scale reflectance datasets. Theories of statistics were involved to extract statistical characteristics of multiple surface reflectance datasets, and further quantitatively analyse spatial variations of these characteristics at multiple spatial scales. Then, taking the surface reflectance at small spatial scale as the baseline data, theories of Gaussian distribution were selected for multiple surface reflectance datasets correction based on the above obtained physical characteristics and mathematical distribution properties, and their spatial variations. This proposed method was verified by two sets of multiple satellite images, which were obtained in two experimental fields located in Inner Mongolia and Beijing, China with different degrees of homogeneity of underlying surfaces. Experimental results indicate that differences of surface reflectance datasets at multiple spatial scales could be effectively corrected over non-homogeneous underlying surfaces, which provide database for further multi-source and multi-scale crop growth monitoring and yield prediction, and their corresponding

  11. Spatio-Temporal Super-Resolution Reconstruction of Remote-Sensing Images Based on Adaptive Multi-Scale Detail Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Tang, Xinming; Xie, Junfeng; Song, Weidong; Mo, Fan; Gao, Xiaoming

    2018-02-07

    There are many problems in existing reconstruction-based super-resolution algorithms, such as the lack of texture-feature representation and of high-frequency details. Multi-scale detail enhancement can produce more texture information and high-frequency information. Therefore, super-resolution reconstruction of remote-sensing images based on adaptive multi-scale detail enhancement (AMDE-SR) is proposed in this paper. First, the information entropy of each remote-sensing image is calculated, and the image with the maximum entropy value is regarded as the reference image. Subsequently, spatio-temporal remote-sensing images are processed using phase normalization, which is to reduce the time phase difference of image data and enhance the complementarity of information. The multi-scale image information is then decomposed using the L ₀ gradient minimization model, and the non-redundant information is processed by difference calculation and expanding non-redundant layers and the redundant layer by the iterative back-projection (IBP) technique. The different-scale non-redundant information is adaptive-weighted and fused using cross-entropy. Finally, a nonlinear texture-detail-enhancement function is built to improve the scope of small details, and the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) is used as an iterative constraint. Ultimately, high-resolution remote-sensing images with abundant texture information are obtained by iterative optimization. Real results show an average gain in entropy of up to 0.42 dB for an up-scaling of 2 and a significant promotion gain in enhancement measure evaluation for an up-scaling of 2. The experimental results show that the performance of the AMED-SR method is better than existing super-resolution reconstruction methods in terms of visual and accuracy improvements.

  12. Defect detection in industrial radiography: a multi-scale approach; Detection de defauts en radiographie industrielle: approches multiechelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, M.

    1995-10-01

    Radiography is used by Electricite de France for pipe inspection in nuclear power plant in order to detect defects. For several years, the RD Division of EDF has undertaken research to define image processing methods well adapted to radiographic images. The main issues raised by these images are their low contrast, their high level of noise, the presence of a trend and the variable size of the defects. A data base of digitized radiographs of pipes has been gathered and the statistical, topological and geometrical properties of all of these images have been analyzed. From this study, a global indicator of the presence of defects and local features, leading to a classification of images into areas with or without defects, have been extracted. The defect localisation problem has been considered in a multi-scale framework based on the creation of a family of images with increasing regularity and defined as a solution of a partial differential equation. From a choice of axioms, a set of equations may be deduced which define various multi-scale analyses. The survey of the properties of such analysed, when applied to images altered with different types of noise, has lead to the selection of the digitized radiographs best adapted multi-scale analysis. The segmentation process, uses the geodesic information attached to defects via connection cost concept. The final decision is based on a summary of the information extracted at several scales. A fuzzy logic approach has been proposed to solve this part. We then developed methods and tools for expertise guidance and validated them on a complete data base of images. Some global indicators have been extracted and a detection and localisation process has been achieved for large defects. (author). 117 refs., 73 figs.

  13. Comparison of single- and multi-scale models for the prediction of the Culicoides biting midge distribution in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renke Lühken

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study analysed Culicoides presence-absence data from 46 sampling sites in Germany, where monitoring was carried out from April 2007 until May 2008. Culicoides presence-absence data were analysed in relation to land cover data, in order to study whether the prevalence of biting midges is correlated to land cover data with respect to the trapping sites. We differentiated eight scales, i.e. buffer zones with radii of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7.5 and 10 km, around each site, and chose several land cover variables. For each species, we built eight single-scale models (i.e. predictor variables from one of the eight scales for each model based on averaged, generalised linear models and two multiscale models (i.e. predictor variables from all of the eight scales based on averaged, generalised linear models and generalised linear models with random forest variable selection. There were no significant differences between performance indicators of models built with land cover data from different buffer zones around the trapping sites. However, the overall performance of multi-scale models was higher than the alternatives. Furthermore, these models mostly achieved the best performance for the different species using the index area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. However, as also presented in this study, the relevance of the different variables could significantly differ between various scales, including the number of species affected and the positive or negative direction. This is an even more severe problem if multi-scale models are concerned, in which one model can have the same variable at different scales but with different directions, i.e. negative and positive direction of the same variable at different scales. However, multi-scale modelling is a promising approach to model the distribution of Culicoides species, accounting much more for the ecology of biting midges, which uses different resources (breeding sites, hosts, etc. at

  14. Evolutionary, multi-scale analysis of river bank line retreat using continuous wavelet transforms: Jamuna River, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mount, Nick J.; Tate, Nicholas J.; Sarker, Maminul H.; Thorne, Colin R.

    2013-01-01

    In this study continuous wavelet transforms are used to explore spatio-temporal patterns of multi-scale bank line retreat along a 204 km reach of the Jamuna River, Bangladesh. A sequence of eight bank line retreat series, derived from remotely-sensed imagery for the period 1987-1999, is transformed using the Morlet mother wavelet. Bank erosion is shown to operate at several characteristic spatial and temporal scales. Local erosion and bank line retreat are shown to occur in short, well def...

  15. Use of ARM Data to address the Climate Change Further Development and Applications of A Multi-scale Modeling Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Randall; Marat Khairoutdinov

    2007-12-14

    The Colorado State University (CSU) Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) is a new type of general circulation model (GCM) that replaces the conventional parameterizations of convection, clouds and boundary layer with a cloud-resolving model (CRM) embedded into each grid column. The MMF that we have been working with is a “super-parameterized” version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). As reported in the publications listed below, we have done extensive work with the model. We have explored the MMF’s performance in several studies, including an AMIP run and a CAPT test, and we have applied the MMF to an analysis of climate sensitivity.

  16. Final Progress Report: FRACTURE AND SUBCRITICAL DEBONDING IN THIN LAYERED STRUCTURES: EXPERIMENTS AND MULTI-SCALE MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    2005-08-30

    Final technical report detailing unique experimental and multi-scale computational modeling capabilities developed to study fracture and subcritical cracking in thin-film structures. Our program to date at Stanford has studied the mechanisms of fracture and fatigue crack-growth in structural ceramics at high temperature, bulk and thin-film glasses in selected moist environments where we demonstrated the presence of a true mechanical fatigue effect in some glass compositions. We also reported on the effects of complex environments and fatigue loading on subcritical cracking that effects the reliability of MEMS and other micro-devices using novel micro-machined silicon specimens and nanomaterial layers.

  17. Using multi-scale entropy and principal component analysis to monitor gears degradation via the motor current signature analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouabdi, Salim; Taibi, Mahmoud; Bouras, Slimane; Boutasseta, Nadir

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes an approach for identifying localized gear tooth defects, such as pitting, using phase currents measured from an induction machine driving the gearbox. A new tool of anomaly detection based on multi-scale entropy (MSE) algorithm SampEn which allows correlations in signals to be identified over multiple time scales. The motor current signature analysis (MCSA) in conjunction with principal component analysis (PCA) and the comparison of observed values with those predicted from a model built using nominally healthy data. The Simulation results show that the proposed method is able to detect gear tooth pitting in current signals.

  18. Mechanics of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures: Atomistic, continuum, and multi-scale approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Arash

    A new multiscale modeling technique called the Consistent Atomic-scale Finite Element (CAFE) method is introduced. Unlike traditional approaches for linking the atomic structure to its equivalent continuum, this method directly connects the atomic degrees of freedom to a reduced set of finite element degrees of freedom without passing through an intermediate homogenized continuum. As a result, there is no need to introduce stress and strain measures at the atomic level. The Tersoff-Brenner interatomic potential is used to calculate the consistent tangent stiffness matrix of the structure. In this finite element formulation, all local and non-local interactions between carbon atoms are taken into account using overlapping finite elements. In addition, a consistent hierarchical finite element modeling technique is developed for adaptively coarsening and refining the mesh over different parts of the model. This process is consistent with the underlying atomic structure and, by refining the mesh to the scale of atomic spacing, molecular dynamic results can be recovered. This method is valid across the scales and can be used to concurrently model atomistic and continuum phenomena so, in contrast with most other multi-scale methods, there is no need to introduce artificial boundaries for coupling atomistic and continuum regions. Effect of the length scale of the nanostructure is also included in the model by building the hierarchy of elements from bottom up using a finite size atom cluster as the building block. To be consistent with the bravais multi-lattice structure of sp2-bonded carbon, two independent displacement fields are used for reducing the order of the model. Sparse structure of the stiffness matrix of these nanostructures is exploited to reduce the memory requirement and to speed up the formation of the system matrices and solution of the equilibrium equations. Applicability of the method is shown with several examples of the nonlinear mechanics of carbon

  19. Sample Entropy, Univariate, and Multivariate Multi-Scale Entropy in Comparison with Classical Postural Sway Parameters in Young Healthy Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiann-Shing Shieh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare various entropy measures to assess the dynamics and complexity of center of pressure (COP displacements. Perturbing balance tests are often used in healthy subjects to imitate either pathological conditions or to test the sensitivity of postural analysis techniques. Eleven healthy adult subjects were asked to stand in normal stance in three experimental conditions while the visuo-kinesthetic input was altered. COP displacement was recorded using a force plate. Three entropy measures [Sample Entropy (SE, Multi-Scale Entropy (MSE, and Multivariate Multi Scale Entropy (MMSE] describing COP regularity at different scales were compared to traditional measures of COP variability. The analyses of the COP trajectories revealed that suppression of vision produced minor changes in COP displacement and in the COP characteristics. The comparison with the reference analysis showed that the entropy measures analysis techniques are more sensitive in the incremented time series compared to the classical parameters and entropy measures of original time series. Non-linear methods appear to be an additional valuable tool for analysis of the dynamics of posture especially when applied on incremental time series.

  20. Bridging multi-scale approach to consider the effects of local deformations in the analysis of thin-walled members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkmen, R. Emre

    2013-07-01

    Thin-walled members that have one dimension relatively large in comparison to the cross-sectional dimensions are usually modelled by using beam-type one-dimensional finite elements. Beam-type elements, however, are based on the assumption of rigid cross-section, thus they only allow considerations associated with the beam axis behaviour such as flexural-, torsional- or lateral-buckling and cannot consider the effects of local deformations such as flange local buckling or distortional buckling. In order to capture the local effects of this type shell-type finite element models can be used. Based on the Bridging multi-scale approach, this study proposes a numerical technique that is able to split the global analysis, which is performed by using simple beam-type elements, from the local analysis which is based on more sophisticated shell-type elements. As a result, the proposed multi-scale method allows the usage of shell elements in a local region to incorporate the local deformation effects on the overall behaviour of thin-walled members without necessitating a shell-type model for the whole member. Comparisons with full shell-type analysis are provided in order to illustrate the efficiency of the method developed herein.

  1. Multi-Scale Impact and Compression-After-Impact Modeling of Reinforced Benzoxazine/Epoxy Composites using Micromechanics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Marc Villa; Barjasteh, Ehsan; Baid, Harsh K.; Godines, Cody; Abdi, Frank; Nikbin, Kamran

    A multi-scale micromechanics approach along with finite element (FE) model predictive tool is developed to analyze low-energy-impact damage footprint and compression-after-impact (CAI) of composite laminates which is also tested and verified with experimental data. Effective fiber and matrix properties were reverse-engineered from lamina properties using an optimization algorithm and used to assess damage at the micro-level during impact and post-impact FE simulations. Progressive failure dynamic analysis (PFDA) was performed for a two step-process simulation. Damage mechanisms at the micro-level were continuously evaluated during the analyses. Contribution of each failure mode was tracked during the simulations and damage and delamination footprint size and shape were predicted to understand when, where and why failure occurred during both impact and CAI events. The composite laminate was manufactured by the vacuum infusion of the aero-grade toughened Benzoxazine system into the fabric preform. Delamination footprint was measured using C-scan data from the impacted panels and compared with the predicated values obtained from proposed multi-scale micromechanics coupled with FE analysis. Furthermore, the residual strength was predicted from the load-displacement curve and compared with the experimental values as well.

  2. Photocurable high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) containing hydroxyapatite for additive manufacture of tissue engineering scaffolds with multi-scale porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ai-Juan; Paterson, Thomas; Owen, Robert; Sherborne, Colin; Dugan, James; Li, Jun-Ming; Claeyssens, Frederik

    2016-10-01

    Porous composites containing hydroxyapatite (HA) were templated from high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) and were further structured using direct-write UV stereolithography to produce composite scaffolds with multi-scale porosity. FTIR, TGA and SEM analyses confirmed that HA was retained after photocuring and subsequent treatments and was incorporated within the polymerised HIPE (polyHIPE). The addition of HA particles to the polyHIPE caused changes in the mechanical properties of the material. An increase in both the Young's modulus and maximum stress at yield was observed compared with the pure polyHIPE from 1.544±0.231 to 4.614±0.775 and 0.177±0.009 to 0.267±0.034MPa, respectively. Except at very high concentrations, adding HA did not adversely cause the phase separation of the HIPE or the porous microstructure of the resulting polyHIPE. In combination with a photoinitiator, the HIPE emulsion containing HA was investigated as a photocurable resin for stereolithography-based additive manufacturing. The material was readily processable into "woodpile" structures via direct-write UV stereolithography, producing scaffolds with multi-scale porosity which may be useful for medical applications such as tissue engineering. In conclusion, HA was successfully added into polyHIPEs, producing a similar porous structure to that of the pure polyHIPE whilst improving the mechanical performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Documentation, Multi-scale and Multi-dimensional Representation of Cultural Heritage for the Policies of Redevelopment, Development and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. De Masi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes reading criteria for the documentation for important buildings in Milan, Italy, as a case study of the research on the integration of new technologies to obtain 3D multi-scale representation architectures. In addition, affords an overview of the actual optical 3D measurements sensors and techniques used for surveying, mapping, digital documentation and 3D modeling applications in the Cultural Heritage field. Today new opportunities for an integrated management of data are given by multiresolution models, that can be employed for different scale of representation. The goal of multi-scale representations is to provide several representations where each representation is adapted to a different information density with several degrees of detail. The Digital Representation Platform, along with the 3D City Model, are meant to be particularly useful to heritage managers who are developing recording, documentation, and information management strategies appropriate to territories, sites and monuments. Digital Representation Platform and 3D City Model are central activities in a the decision-making process for heritage conservation management and several urban related problems. This research investigates the integration of the different level-of-detail of a 3D City Model into one consistent 4D data model with the creation of level-of-detail using algorithms from a GIS perspective. In particular, such project is based on open source smart systems, and conceptualizes a personalized and contextualized exploration of the Cultural Heritage through an experiential analysis of the territory.

  4. Documentation, Multi-scale and Multi-dimensional Representation of Cultural Heritage for the Policies of Redevelopment, Development and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, A.

    2015-09-01

    The paper describes reading criteria for the documentation for important buildings in Milan, Italy, as a case study of the research on the integration of new technologies to obtain 3D multi-scale representation architectures. In addition, affords an overview of the actual optical 3D measurements sensors and techniques used for surveying, mapping, digital documentation and 3D modeling applications in the Cultural Heritage field. Today new opportunities for an integrated management of data are given by multiresolution models, that can be employed for different scale of representation. The goal of multi-scale representations is to provide several representations where each representation is adapted to a different information density with several degrees of detail. The Digital Representation Platform, along with the 3D City Model, are meant to be particularly useful to heritage managers who are developing recording, documentation, and information management strategies appropriate to territories, sites and monuments. Digital Representation Platform and 3D City Model are central activities in a the decision-making process for heritage conservation management and several urban related problems. This research investigates the integration of the different level-of-detail of a 3D City Model into one consistent 4D data model with the creation of level-of-detail using algorithms from a GIS perspective. In particular, such project is based on open source smart systems, and conceptualizes a personalized and contextualized exploration of the Cultural Heritage through an experiential analysis of the territory.

  5. Multi-Scale Entropy Analysis of Body Sway for Investigating Balance Ability During Exergame Play Under Different Parameter Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hsuan Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to investigate the parameters affecting exergame performance using multi-scale entropy analysis, with the aim of informing the design of exergames for personalized balance training. Test subjects’ center of pressure (COP displacement data were recorded during exergame play to examine their balance ability at varying difficulty levels of a balance-based exergame; the results of a multi-scale entropy-based analysis were then compared to traditional COP indicators. For games involving static posture frames, variation in posture frame travel time was found to significantly affect the complexity of both the anterior-posterior (MSE-AP and medio-lateral (MSE-ML components of balancing movements. However, in games involving dynamic posture frames, only MSE-AP was found to be sensitive to the variation of parameters, namely foot-lifting speed. Findings were comparable to the COP data published by Sun et al., indicating that the use of complexity data is a feasible means of distinguishing between different parameter sets and of understanding how human design considerations must be taken into account in exergame development. Not only can this method be used as another assessment index in the future, it can also be used in the optimization of parameters within the virtual environments of exergames.

  6. Cardiac Light-Sheet Fluorescent Microscopy for Multi-Scale and Rapid Imaging of Architecture and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Peng; Lee, Juhyun; Packard, René R. Sevag; Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Xu, Hao; Ma, Jianguo; Ding, Yichen; Kang, Hanul; Chen, Harrison; Sung, Kevin; Kulkarni, Rajan; Ardehali, Reza; Kuo, C.-C. Jay; Xu, Xiaolei; Ho, Chih-Ming; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2016-03-01

    Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) enables multi-dimensional and multi-scale imaging via illuminating specimens with a separate thin sheet of laser. It allows rapid plane illumination for reduced photo-damage and superior axial resolution and contrast. We hereby demonstrate cardiac LSFM (c-LSFM) imaging to assess the functional architecture of zebrafish embryos with a retrospective cardiac synchronization algorithm for four-dimensional reconstruction (3-D space + time). By combining our approach with tissue clearing techniques, we reveal the entire cardiac structures and hypertrabeculation of adult zebrafish hearts in response to doxorubicin treatment. By integrating the resolution enhancement technique with c-LSFM to increase the resolving power under a large field-of-view, we demonstrate the use of low power objective to resolve the entire architecture of large-scale neonatal mouse hearts, revealing the helical orientation of individual myocardial fibers. Therefore, our c-LSFM imaging approach provides multi-scale visualization of architecture and function to drive cardiovascular research with translational implication in congenital heart diseases.

  7. Multi-scale Modeling of the Impact Response of a Strain Rate Sensitive High-Manganese Austenitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orkun eÖnal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A multi-scale modeling approach was applied to predict the impact response of a strain rate sensitive high-manganese austenitic steel. The roles of texture, geometry and strain rate sensitivity were successfully taken into account all at once by coupling crystal plasticity and finite element (FE analysis. Specifically, crystal plasticity was utilized to obtain the multi-axial flow rule at different strain rates based on the experimental deformation response under uniaxial tensile loading. The equivalent stress – equivalent strain response was then incorporated into the FE model for the sake of a more representative hardening rule under impact loading. The current results demonstrate that reliable predictions can be obtained by proper coupling of crystal plasticity and FE analysis even if the experimental flow rule of the material is acquired under uniaxial loading and at moderate strain rates that are significantly slower than those attained during impact loading. Furthermore, the current findings also demonstrate the need for an experiment-based multi-scale modeling approach for the sake of reliable predictions of the impact response.

  8. Dayside response of the magnetosphere to a small shock compression: Van Allen Probes, Magnetospheric MultiScale, and GOES‐13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A.; Colpitts, C.; Dombeck, J.; Thaller, S.; Tian, S.; Wygant, J.; Fennell, J.; Hudson, M. K.; Ergun, Robert; Russell, C. T.; Torbert, Roy; Lindqvist, Per‐Arne; Burch, J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Observations from Magnetospheric MultiScale (~8 Re) and Van Allen Probes (~5 and 4 Re) show that the initial dayside response to a small interplanetary shock is a double‐peaked dawnward electric field, which is distinctly different from the usual bipolar (dawnward and then duskward) signature reported for large shocks. The associated E × B flow is radially inward. The shock compressed the magnetopause to inside 8 Re, as observed by Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS), with a speed that is comparable to the E × B flow. The magnetopause speed and the E × B speeds were significantly less than the propagation speed of the pulse from MMS to the Van Allen Probes and GOES‐13, which is consistent with the MHD fast mode. There were increased fluxes of energetic electrons up to several MeV. Signatures of drift echoes and response to ULF waves also were seen. These observations demonstrate that even very weak shocks can have significant impact on the radiation belts. PMID:29104327

  9. Dayside response of the magnetosphere to a small shock compression: Van Allen Probes, Magnetospheric MultiScale, and GOES-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell, C.; Breneman, A.; Colpitts, C.; Dombeck, J.; Thaller, S.; Tian, S.; Wygant, J.; Fennell, J.; Hudson, M. K.; Ergun, Robert; Russell, C. T.; Torbert, Roy; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Burch, J.

    2017-09-01

    Observations from Magnetospheric MultiScale ( 8 Re) and Van Allen Probes ( 5 and 4 Re) show that the initial dayside response to a small interplanetary shock is a double-peaked dawnward electric field, which is distinctly different from the usual bipolar (dawnward and then duskward) signature reported for large shocks. The associated E × B flow is radially inward. The shock compressed the magnetopause to inside 8 Re, as observed by Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS), with a speed that is comparable to the E × B flow. The magnetopause speed and the E × B speeds were significantly less than the propagation speed of the pulse from MMS to the Van Allen Probes and GOES-13, which is consistent with the MHD fast mode. There were increased fluxes of energetic electrons up to several MeV. Signatures of drift echoes and response to ULF waves also were seen. These observations demonstrate that even very weak shocks can have significant impact on the radiation belts.

  10. Multi-Scale Parameter Identification of Lithium-Ion Battery Electric Models Using a PSO-LM Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jing Shen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a multi-scale parameter identification algorithm for the lithium-ion battery (LIB electric model by using a combination of particle swarm optimization (PSO and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM algorithms. Two-dimensional Poisson equations with unknown parameters are used to describe the potential and current density distribution (PDD of the positive and negative electrodes in the LIB electric model. The model parameters are difficult to determine in the simulation due to the nonlinear complexity of the model. In the proposed identification algorithm, PSO is used for the coarse-scale parameter identification and the LM algorithm is applied for the fine-scale parameter identification. The experiment results show that the multi-scale identification not only improves the convergence rate and effectively escapes from the stagnation of PSO, but also overcomes the local minimum entrapment drawback of the LM algorithm. The terminal voltage curves from the PDD model with the identified parameter values are in good agreement with those from the experiments at different discharge/charge rates.

  11. Multi-Level and Multi-Scale Feature Aggregation Using Pretrained Convolutional Neural Networks for Music Auto-Tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongpil; Nam, Juhan

    2017-08-01

    Music auto-tagging is often handled in a similar manner to image classification by regarding the 2D audio spectrogram as image data. However, music auto-tagging is distinguished from image classification in that the tags are highly diverse and have different levels of abstractions. Considering this issue, we propose a convolutional neural networks (CNN)-based architecture that embraces multi-level and multi-scaled features. The architecture is trained in three steps. First, we conduct supervised feature learning to capture local audio features using a set of CNNs with different input sizes. Second, we extract audio features from each layer of the pre-trained convolutional networks separately and aggregate them altogether given a long audio clip. Finally, we put them into fully-connected networks and make final predictions of the tags. Our experiments show that using the combination of multi-level and multi-scale features is highly effective in music auto-tagging and the proposed method outperforms previous state-of-the-arts on the MagnaTagATune dataset and the Million Song Dataset. We further show that the proposed architecture is useful in transfer learning.

  12. Multi-scale aquifer characterization and groundwater flow model parameterization using direct push technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Rogiers, Bart; Vienken, Thomas; Gedeon, Matej; Batelaan, Okke; Mallants, Dirk; Huysmans, Marijke; Dassargues, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater flow and contaminant transport models are used to support decision making regarding waste disposal options, sites contaminated by surface or subsurface sources, or to develop and test cost-effective groundwater remediation schemes. Such models are influenced by different sources of uncertainty, including those due to spatial variability in aquifer and aquitard properties including hydraulic conductivity (K). However, quantifying spatial variability in K remains challenging. Classi...

  13. Multi-scale glycemic variability: a link to gray matter atrophy and cognitive decline in type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingran Cui

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM accelerates brain aging and cognitive decline. Complex interactions between hyperglycemia, glycemic variability and brain aging remain unresolved. This study investigated the relationship between glycemic variability at multiple time scales, brain volumes and cognition in type 2 DM.Forty-three older adults with and 26 without type 2 DM completed 72-hour continuous glucose monitoring, cognitive tests and anatomical MRI. We described a new analysis of continuous glucose monitoring, termed Multi-Scale glycemic variability (Multi-Scale GV, to examine glycemic variability at multiple time scales. Specifically, Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition was used to identify five unique ultradian glycemic variability cycles (GVC1-5 that modulate serum glucose with periods ranging from 0.5-12 hrs.Type 2 DM subjects demonstrated greater variability in GVC3-5 (period 2.0-12 hrs than controls (P<0.0001, during the day as well as during the night. Multi-Scale GV was related to conventional markers of glycemic variability (e.g. standard deviation and mean glycemic excursions, but demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity to conventional markers, and was associated with worse long-term glycemic control (e.g. fasting glucose and HbA1c. Across all subjects, those with greater glycemic variability within higher frequency cycles (GVC1-3; 0.5-2.0 hrs had less gray matter within the limbic system and temporo-parietal lobes (e.g. cingulum, insular, hippocampus, and exhibited worse cognitive performance. Specifically within those with type 2 DM, greater glycemic variability in GVC2-3 was associated with worse learning and memory scores. Greater variability in GVC5 was associated with longer DM duration and more depression. These relationships were independent of HbA1c and hypoglycemic episodes.Type 2 DM is associated with dysregulation of glycemic variability over multiple scales of time. These time-scale-dependent glycemic fluctuations

  14. Efficient multi-scale 3D CNN with fully connected CRF for accurate brain lesion segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnitsas, Konstantinos; Ledig, Christian; Newcombe, Virginia F J; Simpson, Joanna P; Kane, Andrew D; Menon, David K; Rueckert, Daniel; Glocker, Ben

    2017-02-01

    We propose a dual pathway, 11-layers deep, three-dimensional Convolutional Neural Network for the challenging task of brain lesion segmentation. The devised architecture is the result of an in-depth analysis of the limitations of current networks proposed for similar applications. To overcome the computational burden of processing 3D medical scans, we have devised an efficient and effective dense training scheme which joins the processing of adjacent image patches into one pass through the network while automatically adapting to the inherent class imbalance present in the data. Further, we analyze the development of deeper, thus more discriminative 3D CNNs. In order to incorporate both local and larger contextual information, we employ a dual pathway architecture that processes the input images at multiple scales simultaneously. For post-processing of the network's soft segmentation, we use a 3D fully connected Conditional Random Field which effectively removes false positives. Our pipeline is extensively evaluated on three challenging tasks of lesion segmentation in multi-channel MRI patient data with traumatic brain injuries, brain tumours, and ischemic stroke. We improve on the state-of-the-art for all three applications, with top ranking performance on the public benchmarks BRATS 2015 and ISLES 2015. Our method is computationally efficient, which allows its adoption in a variety of research and clinical settings. The source code of our implementation is made publicly available. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multi scale analysis by acoustic emission of damage mechanisms in natural fibre woven fabrics/epoxy composites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touchard F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to develop an experimental program to characterize the type and the development of damage in composite with complex microstructure. A multi-scale analysis by acoustic emission has been developed and applied to hemp fibre woven fabrics/epoxy composite. The experimental program consists of tensile tests performed on single yarn, neat epoxy resin and composite materials to identify their AE amplitude signatures. A statistical analysis of AE amplitude signals has been realised and correlated with microscopic observations. Results have enabled to identify three types of damage in composites and their associated AE amplitudes: matrix cracking, interfacial debonding and reinforcement damage and fracture. Tracking of these damage mechanisms in hemp/epoxy composites has been performed to show the process of damage development in natural fibre reinforced composites.

  16. Multi-scale exploration of the technical, economic, and environmental dimensions of bio-based chemical production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Kai; Herrgard, Markus

    2015-01-01

    factories. To address this issue, we have developed a comprehensive Multi-scale framework for modeling Sustainable Industrial Chemicals production (MuSIC), which integrates modeling approaches for cellular metabolism, bioreactor design, upstream/downstream processes and economic impact assessment. We...... demonstrate the use of the MuSIC framework in a case study where two major polymer precursors (1,3-propanediol and 3-hydroxypropionic acid) are produced from two biomass feedstocks (corn-based glucose and soy-based glycerol) through 66 proposed biosynthetic pathways in two host organisms (Escherichia coli...... and Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The MuSIC framework allows exploration of tradeoffs and interactions between economy-scale objectives (e.g. profit maximization, emission minimization), constraints (e.g. land-use constraints) and process- and cell-scale technology choices (e.g. strain design or oxygenation conditions...

  17. Multi-Scale Modeling of the Structural and Vibrational Behavior of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymeric Nanocomposite Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doagou Rad, Saeed; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Islam, Aminul

    2017-01-01

    Polymeric nanocomposites reinforced with carbon nanotubes are being considered as alternatives in many industrial applications. However, the mechanical behavior of the industrially produced nanocomposites is yet to be fully understood. In this study, Polyamide 6,6-based nanocomposites reinforced...... with different contents of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were manufactured using an injection moulding process. A multi-scale approach was followed to numerically model the mechanical behavior of the nanostructured materials. In order to find the stiffness matrix of the carbon nanotubes, different...... in the produced nanocomposites with different arrangements and contents of the nanotubes. The numerical results were also compared with the experimental properties of the nanocomposites produced via different processing settings leading to distinct microstructures. Eventually the derived properties and stiffness...

  18. Robust segmentation of trabecular bone for in vivo CT imaging using anisotropic diffusion and multi-scale morphological reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Jin, Dakai; Zhang, Xiaoliu; Levy, Steven M.; Saha, Punam K.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoporosis is associated with an increased risk of low-trauma fractures. Segmentation of trabecular bone (TB) is essential to assess TB microstructure, which is a key determinant of bone strength and fracture risk. Here, we present a new method for TB segmentation for in vivo CT imaging. The method uses Hessian matrix-guided anisotropic diffusion to improve local separability of trabecular structures, followed by a new multi-scale morphological reconstruction algorithm for TB segmentation. High sensitivity (0.93), specificity (0.93), and accuracy (0.92) were observed for the new method based on regional manual thresholding on in vivo CT images. Mechanical tests have shown that TB segmentation using the new method improved the ability of derived TB spacing measure for predicting actual bone strength (R2=0.83).

  19. Stochastic multi-scale models of competition within heterogeneous cellular populations: simulation methods and mean-field analysis

    CERN Document Server

    de la Cruz, Roberto; Spill, Fabian; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    We propose a modelling framework to analyse the stochastic behaviour of heterogeneous, multi-scale cellular populations. We illustrate our methodology with a particular example in which we study a population with an oxygen-regulated proliferation rate. Our formulation is based on an age-dependent stochastic process. Cells within the population are characterised by their age. The age-dependent (oxygen-regulated) birth rate is given by a stochastic model of oxygen-dependent cell cycle progression. We then formulate an age-dependent birth-and-death process, which dictates the time evolution of the cell population. The population is under a feedback loop which controls its steady state size: cells consume oxygen which in turns fuels cell proliferation. We show that our stochastic model of cell cycle progression allows for heterogeneity within the cell population induced by stochastic effects. Such heterogeneous behaviour is reflected in variations in the proliferation rate. Within this set-up, we have established...

  20. Modelling of fractured reservoirs. Case of multi-scale media; Modelisation des reservoirs fractures. Cas des milieux multi-echelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henn, N.

    2000-12-13

    Some of the most productive oil and gas reservoirs are found in formations crossed by multi-scale fractures/faults. Among them, conductive faults may closely control reservoir performance. However, their modelling encounters numerical and physical difficulties linked with (a) the necessity to keep an explicit representation of faults through small-size grid blocks, (b) the modelling of multiphase flow exchanges between the fault and the neighbouring medium. In this thesis, we propose a physically-representative and numerically efficient modelling approach in order to incorporate sub-vertical conductive faults in single and dual-porosity simulators. To validate our approach and demonstrate its efficiency, simulation results of multiphase displacements in representative field sector models are presented. (author)

  1. Cloud Feedbacks on Greenhouse Warming in a Multi-Scale Modeling Framework with a Higher-Order Turbulence Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Anning; Xu, Kuan-Man

    2015-01-01

    Five-year simulation experiments with a multi-scale modeling Framework (MMF) with a advanced intermediately prognostic higher-order turbulence closure (IPHOC) in its cloud resolving model (CRM) component, also known as SPCAM-IPHOC (super parameterized Community Atmospheric Model), are performed to understand the fast tropical (30S-30N) cloud response to an instantaneous doubling of CO2 concentration with SST held fixed at present-day values. SPCAM-IPHOC has substantially improved the low-level representation compared with SPCAM. It is expected that the cloud responses to greenhouse warming in SPCAM-IPHOC is more realistic. The change of rising motion, surface precipitation, cloud cover, and shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing in SPCAM-IPHOC from the greenhouse warming will be presented in the presentation.

  2. An Integrated, Multi-Stage, Multi-Scale Framework for Achieving Sustainable Process Synthesis-Intensification-Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babi, Deenesh Kavi; Kumar Tula, Anjan; Mansouri, Seyed Soheil

    a major role because it provides the opportunity to perform the same tasks in a more sustainable way, new/novel unit operations can be generated (Lutze et al, 2013) and more sustainable processes can be designed (Babi et al., 2014). An integrated, multi-stage, multi-scale, computer-aided framework has...... is analysed using economic and sustainability analyses in order to identify process limitations (hot-spots) that are translated into intensification design targets. In stage 3, an integrated task-phenomena-based synthesis-intensification method is embedded and applied (Babi et al., 2015) that consists......The chemical and biochemical industry needs major reductions in energy consumption, waste generation, etc., in order to remain competitive through the design and operation of more sustainable chemical and biochemical processes. These required reductions can be addressed through process synthesis...

  3. Evaluating 20th Century precipitation characteristics between multi-scale atmospheric models with different land-atmosphere coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M.; Denning, A. S.; Randall, D. A.; Branson, M.

    2016-12-01

    Multi-scale models of the atmosphere provide an opportunity to investigate processes that are unresolved by traditional Global Climate Models while at the same time remaining viable in terms of computational resources for climate-length time scales. The MMF represents a shift away from large horizontal grid spacing in traditional GCMs that leads to overabundant light precipitation and lack of heavy events, toward a model where precipitation intensity is allowed to vary over a much wider range of values. Resolving atmospheric motions on the scale of 4 km makes it possible to recover features of precipitation, such as intense downpours, that were previously only obtained by computationally expensive regional simulations. These heavy precipitation events may have little impact on large-scale moisture and energy budgets, but are outstanding in terms of interaction with the land surface and potential impact on human life. Three versions of the Community Earth System Model were used in this study; the standard CESM, the multi-scale `Super-Parameterized' CESM where large-scale parameterizations have been replaced with a 2D cloud-permitting model, and a multi-instance land version of the SP-CESM where each column of the 2D CRM is allowed to interact with an individual land unit. These simulations were carried out using prescribed Sea Surface Temperatures for the period from 1979-2006 with daily precipitation saved for all 28 years. Comparisons of the statistical properties of precipitation between model architectures and against observations from rain gauges were made, with specific focus on detection and evaluation of extreme precipitation events.

  4. Multi-scale dispersion in fuel cell anode catalysts: Role of TiO{sub 2} towards achieving nanostructured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiun-Ming; Sarma, Loka Subramanyam; Chen, Ching-Hsiang; Cheng, Ming-Yao; Shih, Shou-Chu; Wang, Guo-Rung; Hwang, Bing-Joe [Nanoelectrochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (ROC); Liu, Din-Goa; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Tang, Mau-Tsu [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (ROC)

    2006-09-13

    Multi-scale dispersion involving dispersion of catalyst particles on carbon support as well as intra-particle dispersion within the particles of a ternary Pt-Ru-Ti/C catalyst has been demonstrated. The presence of TiO{sub 2} can dramatically decreases the grain size of the obtained catalyst to about 1-2nm when compared with similarly prepared Pt-Ru/C (3-4nm) catalyst indicating that TiO{sub 2} can enhance the dispersion of the catalyst particles on carbon support. The structure and distribution of the Pt-Ru-Ti/C catalyst nanoparticles has been studied from high angle annular dark-field (HAADF) images combining with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The composition of the Pt-Ru-Ti/C was found to be 50:34:16 (Pt:Ru:Ti, at%). The role of TiO{sub 2} in improving the intra-particle distribution has been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at extended X-ray absorption fine structure region (EXAFS). The XAS parameters suggest that the Pt-Ru-Ti/C catalyst possess a structure in which the core is rich in Pt-Ru alloy and the shell is rich in Pt. In the shell, the Pt, Ru and TiO{sub 2} species are distributed homogenously. As a result of the improved multi-scale dispersion, the Pt-Ru-Ti/C catalyst exhibited enhanced activity towards methanol oxidation when compared to the commercial E-TEK 30 Pt-Ru/C catalyst and shows nearly similar performance when compared to the commercial JM 30 Pt-Ru/C catalyst with promising applications in fuel cells. (author)

  5. A Multi-Scale Validation Strategy for Albedo Products over Rugged Terrain and Preliminary Application in Heihe River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwen Lin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue for the validation of land surface remote sensing albedo products over rugged terrain is the scale effects between the reference albedo measurements and coarse scale albedo products, which is caused by the complex topography. This paper illustrates a multi-scale validation strategy specified for coarse scale albedo validation over rugged terrain. A Mountain-Radiation-Transfer-based (MRT-based albedo upscaling model was proposed in the process of multi-scale validation strategy for aggregating fine scale albedo to coarse scale. The simulated data of both the reference coarse scale albedo and fine scale albedo were used to assess the performance and uncertainties of the MRT-based albedo upscaling model. The results showed that the MRT-based model could reflect the albedo scale effects over rugged terrain and provided a robust solution for albedo upscaling from fine scale to coarse scale with different mean slopes and different solar zenith angles. The upscaled coarse scale albedos had the great agreements with the simulated coarse scale albedo with a Root-Mean-Square-Error (RMSE of 0.0029 and 0.0017 for black sky albedo (BSA and white sky albedo (WSA, respectively. Then the MRT-based model was preliminarily applied for the assessment of daily MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Albedo Collection V006 products (MCD43A3 C6 over rugged terrain. Results showed that the MRT-based model was effective and suitable for conducting the validation of MODIS albedo products over rugged terrain. In this research area, it was shown that the MCD43A3 C6 products with full inversion algorithm, were generally in agreement with the aggregated coarse scale reference albedos over rugged terrain in the Heihe River Basin, with the BSA RMSE of 0.0305 and WSA RMSE of 0.0321, respectively, which were slightly higher than those over flat terrain.

  6. Morphology Dependent Flow Stress in Nickel-Based Superalloys in the Multi-Scale Crystal Plasticity Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriyar Keshavarz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a framework to obtain the flow stress of nickel-based superalloys as a function of γ-γ’ morphology. The yield strength is a major factor in the design of these alloys. This work provides additional effects of γ’ morphology in the design scope that has been adopted for the model developed by authors. In general, the two-phase γ-γ’ morphology in nickel-based superalloys can be divided into three variables including γ’ shape, γ’ volume fraction and γ’ size in the sub-grain microstructure. In order to obtain the flow stress, non-Schmid crystal plasticity constitutive models at two length scales are employed and bridged through a homogenized multi-scale framework. The multi-scale framework includes two sub-grain and homogenized grain scales. For the sub-grain scale, a size-dependent, dislocation-density-based finite element model (FEM of the representative volume element (RVE with explicit depiction of the γ-γ’ morphology is developed as a building block for the homogenization. For the next scale, an activation-energy-based crystal plasticity model is developed for the homogenized single crystal of Ni-based superalloys. The constitutive models address the thermo-mechanical behavior of nickel-based superalloys for a large temperature range and include orientation dependencies and tension-compression asymmetry. This homogenized model is used to obtain the morphology dependence on the flow stress in nickel-based superalloys and can significantly expedite crystal plasticity FE simulations in polycrystalline microstructures, as well as higher scale FE models in order to cast and design superalloys.

  7. Multi-Scale Multi-physics Methods Development for the Calculation of Hot-Spots in the NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downar, Thomas [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Seker, Volkan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-04-30

    Radioactive gaseous fission products are released out of the fuel element at a significantly higher rate when the fuel temperature exceeds 1600°C in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Therefore, it is of paramount importance to accurately predict the peak fuel temperature during all operational and design-basis accident conditions. The current methods used to predict the peak fuel temperature in HTGRs, such as the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), estimate the average fuel temperature in a computational mesh modeling hundreds of fuel pebbles or a fuel assembly in a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) or prismatic block type reactor (PMR), respectively. Experiments conducted in operating HTGRs indicate considerable uncertainty in the current methods and correlations used to predict actual temperatures. The objective of this project is to improve the accuracy in the prediction of local "hot" spots by developing multi-scale, multi-physics methods and implementing them within the framework of established codes used for NGNP analysis.The multi-scale approach which this project will implement begins with defining suitable scales for a physical and mathematical model and then deriving and applying the appropriate boundary conditions between scales. The macro scale is the greatest length that describes the entire reactor, whereas the meso scale models only a fuel block in a prismatic reactor and ten to hundreds of pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. The smallest scale is the micro scale--the level of a fuel kernel of the pebble in a PBR and fuel compact in a PMR--which needs to be resolved in order to calculate the peak temperature in a fuel kernel.

  8. A multi-scale GIS and hydrodynamic modelling approach to fish passage assessment: Clarence and Shoalhaven Rivers, NSW Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Rita M.; Reinfelds, Ivars V.; Butler, Gavin L.; Walsh, Chris T.; Broderick, Tony J.; Chisholm, Laurie A.

    2016-05-01

    Natural barriers such as waterfalls, cascades, rapids and riffles limit the dispersal and in-stream range of migratory fish, yet little is known of the interplay between these gradient dependent landforms, their hydraulic characteristics and flow rates that facilitate fish passage. The resurgence of dam construction in numerous river basins world-wide provides impetus to the development of robust techniques for assessment of the effects of downstream flow regime changes on natural fish passage barriers and associated consequences as to the length of rivers available to migratory species. This paper outlines a multi-scale technique for quantifying the relative magnitude of natural fish passage barriers in river systems and flow rates that facilitate passage by fish. First, a GIS-based approach is used to quantify channel gradients for the length of river or reach under investigation from a high resolution DEM, setting the magnitude of identified passage barriers in a longer context (tens to hundreds of km). Second, LiDAR, topographic and bathymetric survey-based hydrodynamic modelling is used to assess flow rates that can be regarded as facilitating passage across specific barriers identified by the river to reach scale gradient analysis. Examples of multi-scale approaches to fish passage assessment for flood-flow and low-flow passage issues are provided from the Clarence and Shoalhaven Rivers, NSW, Australia. In these river systems, passive acoustic telemetry data on actual movements and migrations by Australian bass (Macquaria novemaculeata) provide a means of validating modelled assessments of flow rates associated with successful fish passage across natural barriers. Analysis of actual fish movements across passage barriers in these river systems indicates that two dimensional hydraulic modelling can usefully quantify flow rates associated with the facilitation of fish passage across natural barriers by a majority of individual fishes for use in management

  9. Thermo-Oxidative Induced Damage in Polymer Composites: Microstructure Image-Based Multi-Scale Modeling and Experimental Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Rafid M.; Chandrashekhara, K.

    2017-11-01

    A multi-scale modeling approach is presented to simulate and validate thermo-oxidation shrinkage and cracking damage of a high temperature polymer composite. The multi-scale approach investigates coupled transient diffusion-reaction and static structural at macro- to micro-scale. The micro-scale shrinkage deformation and cracking damage are simulated and validated using 2D and 3D simulations. Localized shrinkage displacement boundary conditions for the micro-scale simulations are determined from the respective meso- and macro-scale simulations, conducted for a cross-ply laminate. The meso-scale geometrical domain and the micro-scale geometry and mesh are developed using the object oriented finite element (OOF). The macro-scale shrinkage and weight loss are measured using unidirectional coupons and used to build the macro-shrinkage model. The cross-ply coupons are used to validate the macro-shrinkage model by the shrinkage profiles acquired using scanning electron images at the cracked surface. The macro-shrinkage model deformation shows a discrepancy when the micro-scale image-based cracking is computed. The local maximum shrinkage strain is assumed to be 13 times the maximum macro-shrinkage strain of 2.5 × 10-5, upon which the discrepancy is minimized. The microcrack damage of the composite is modeled using a static elastic analysis with extended finite element and cohesive surfaces by considering the modulus spatial evolution. The 3D shrinkage displacements are fed to the model using node-wise boundary/domain conditions of the respective oxidized region. Microcrack simulation results: length, meander, and opening are closely matched to the crack in the area of interest for the scanning electron images.

  10. Multi-scale model of the ionosphere from the combination of modern space-geodetic satellite techniques - project status and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Hugentobler, U.; Jakowski, N.; Dettmering, D.; Liang, W.; Limberger, M.; Wilken, V.; Gerzen, T.; Hoque, M.; Berdermann, J.

    2012-04-01

    Near real-time high resolution and high precision ionosphere models are needed for a large number of applications, e.g. in navigation, positioning, telecommunications or astronautics. Today these ionosphere models are mostly empirical, i.e., based purely on mathematical approaches. In the DFG project 'Multi-scale model of the ionosphere from the combination of modern space-geodetic satellite techniques (MuSIK)' the complex phenomena within the ionosphere are described vertically by combining the Chapman electron density profile with a plasmasphere layer. In order to consider the horizontal and temporal behaviour the fundamental target parameters of this physics-motivated approach are modelled by series expansions in terms of tensor products of localizing B-spline functions depending on longitude, latitude and time. For testing the procedure the model will be applied to an appropriate region in South America, which covers relevant ionospheric processes and phenomena such as the Equatorial Anomaly. The project connects the expertise of the three project partners, namely Deutsches Geodätisches Forschungsinstitut (DGFI) Munich, the Institute of Astronomical and Physical Geodesy (IAPG) of the Technical University Munich (TUM) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Neustrelitz. In this presentation we focus on the current status of the project. In the first year of the project we studied the behaviour of the ionosphere in the test region, we setup appropriate test periods covering high and low solar activity as well as winter and summer and started the data collection, analysis, pre-processing and archiving. We developed partly the mathematical-physical modelling approach and performed first computations based on simulated input data. Here we present information on the data coverage for the area and the time periods of our investigations and we outline challenges of the multi-dimensional mathematical-physical modelling approach. We show first results, discuss problems

  11. Expression-robust 3D face recognition via weighted sparse representation of multi-scale and multi-component local normal patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huibin

    2014-06-01

    In the theory of differential geometry, surface normal, as a first order surface differential quantity, determines the orientation of a surface at each point and contains informative local surface shape information. To fully exploit this kind of information for 3D face recognition (FR), this paper proposes a novel highly discriminative facial shape descriptor, namely multi-scale and multi-component local normal patterns (MSMC-LNP). Given a normalized facial range image, three components of normal vectors are first estimated, leading to three normal component images. Then, each normal component image is encoded locally to local normal patterns (LNP) on different scales. To utilize spatial information of facial shape, each normal component image is divided into several patches, and their LNP histograms are computed and concatenated according to the facial configuration. Finally, each original facial surface is represented by a set of LNP histograms including both global and local cues. Moreover, to make the proposed solution robust to the variations of facial expressions, we propose to learn the weight of each local patch on a given encoding scale and normal component image. Based on the learned weights and the weighted LNP histograms, we formulate a weighted sparse representation-based classifier (W-SRC). In contrast to the overwhelming majority of 3D FR approaches which were only benchmarked on the FRGC v2.0 database, we carried out extensive experiments on the FRGC v2.0, Bosphorus, BU-3DFE and 3D-TEC databases, thus including 3D face data captured in different scenarios through various sensors and depicting in particular different challenges with respect to facial expressions. The experimental results show that the proposed approach consistently achieves competitive rank-one recognition rates on these databases despite their heterogeneous nature, and thereby demonstrates its effectiveness and its generalizability. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Multi-scale assimilation of remotely sensed snow observations for hydrologic estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreadis, K.; Lettenmaier, D.

    2008-12-01

    Data assimilation provides a framework for optimally merging model predictions and remote sensing observations of snow properties (snow cover extent, water equivalent, grain size, melt state), ideally overcoming limitations of both. A synthetic twin experiment is used to evaluate a data assimilation system that would ingest remotely sensed observations from passive microwave and visible wavelength sensors (brightness temperature and snow cover extent derived products, respectively) with the objective of estimating snow water equivalent. Two data assimilation techniques are used, the Ensemble Kalman filter and the Ensemble Multiscale Kalman filter (EnMKF). One of the challenges inherent in such a data assimilation system is the discrepancy in spatial scales between the different types of snow-related observations. The EnMKF represents the sample model error covariance with a tree that relates the system state variables at different locations and scales through a set of parent-child relationships. This provides an attractive framework to efficiently assimilate observations at different spatial scales. This study provides a first assessment of the feasibility of a system that would assimilate observations from multiple sensors (MODIS snow cover and AMSR-E brightness temperatures) and at different spatial scales for snow water equivalent estimation. The relative value of the different types of observations is examined. Additionally, the error characteristics of both model and observations are discussed.

  13. Multi-scale simulations of Na2S + SiS2 glassy electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Scott; Dive, Aniruddha; King, Clarence; Martin, Steve; Banerjee, Soumik

    Developing solid electrolytes with high ionic conductivity is a significant challenge. Here we explore sulfide glasses as potential electrolytes. A classical molecular dynamics approach was applied to evaluate the structures and ionic conductivity of a wide range of xNa2S - (1-x) SiS2 glassy electrolytes. Due to their amorphous nature, various starting configurations obtained using a typical melt-quench technique were explored to gather statistically reasonable structures. In order to validate the model, the results from the pair distribution functions for [0.5Na2S - 0.5SiS2] were compared with structure factor data from experiments. Finally, ionic conductivity was calculated for varying compositions to identify the most promising electrolytes. To scale up the calculations, allowing for the determination of interface properties and large scale calculations, a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is developed to work in conjunction with the molecular dynamics calculations. Using this approach, it is possible to model the conductivity in these glasses from the atomic level to the macroscale.

  14. Multi-Scale Variations in Streamwater Chemistry and Hydropedological Implications for Hotspot Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, K. J.; Bailey, S. W.; Gannon, J. P.; Likens, G.; Buso, D.; Torgersen, C.; Lowe, W.

    2014-12-01

    Treating non-point source pollution is one of our greatest challenges in environmental hydrology. Previous efforts in agricultural or urban settings have focused on removing sources or implementing distributed best management practices (BMPs) throughout a watershed. However, for stream pollution, the most efficient point of treatment would be within the stream itself, which integrates flows from the entire watershed. Engineered streambed modifications in urban or agricultural streams and constructed channels have the potential to mitigate nonpoint source pollution. Geomedia designed to treat water pollutants and achieve an optimal residence time via hydraulic conductivity modifications are termed biohydrochemical enhancement structures for stream water treatment (BEST). BEST modules can efficiently drive interchange, attenuating nutrients and pathogens (and can be designed to remove other pollutants such as phosphorus, metals or trace organics). Numerical models, combined with data from bench-top and 2D experiments, demonstrate effective contaminant removal potential for practical applications. Nitrogen and pathogens could be attenuated within a series of BEST on the order of 50 m of stream length, and at a favorable cost compared to traditional BMPs, suggesting that BEST could be an effective best management practice for constructed stormwater channels (particularly outlets of detention ponds) or channels carrying irrigation return flows. New results from a constructed stream demonstrate the real-world applicability of the BEST system.

  15. Multi-Scale Computational Enzymology: Enhancing Our Understanding of Enzymatic Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Gherib

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the origin of enzymatic catalysis stands as one the great challenges of contemporary biochemistry and biophysics. The recent emergence of computational enzymology has enhanced our atomistic-level description of biocatalysis as well the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of their mechanisms. There exists a diversity of computational methods allowing the investigation of specific enzymatic properties. Small or large density functional theory models allow the comparison of a plethora of mechanistic reactive species and divergent catalytic pathways. Molecular docking can model different substrate conformations embedded within enzyme active sites and determine those with optimal binding affinities. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into the dynamics and roles of active site components as well as the interactions between substrate and enzymes. Hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM can model reactions in active sites while considering steric and electrostatic contributions provided by the surrounding environment. Using previous studies done within our group, on OvoA, EgtB, ThrRS, LuxS and MsrA enzymatic systems, we will review how these methods can be used either independently or cooperatively to get insights into enzymatic catalysis.

  16. Stress distribution retrieval in granular materials: A multi-scale model and digital image correlation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Luigi; Decuzzi, Paolo; Gentile, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The promise of nanotechnology lies in the possibility of engineering matter on the nanoscale and creating technological interfaces that, because of their small scales, may directly interact with biological objects, creating new strategies for the treatment of pathologies that are otherwise beyond the reach of conventional medicine. Nanotechnology is inherently a multiscale, multiphenomena challenge. Fundamental understanding and highly accurate predictive methods are critical to successful manufacturing of nanostructured materials, bio/mechanical devices and systems. In biomedical engineering, and in the mechanical analysis of biological tissues, classical continuum approaches are routinely utilized, even if these disregard the discrete nature of tissues, that are an interpenetrating network of a matrix (the extra cellular matrix, ECM) and a generally large but finite number of cells with a size falling in the micrometer range. Here, we introduce a nano-mechanical theory that accounts for the-non continuum nature of bio systems and other discrete systems. This discrete field theory, doublet mechanics (DM), is a technique to model the mechanical behavior of materials over multiple scales, ranging from some millimeters down to few nanometers. In the paper, we use this theory to predict the response of a granular material to an external applied load. Such a representation is extremely attractive in modeling biological tissues which may be considered as a spatial set of a large number of particulate (cells) dispersed in an extracellular matrix. Possibly more important of this, using digital image correlation (DIC) optical methods, we provide an experimental verification of the model.

  17. Toward Multi-scale Modeling and simulation of conduction in heterogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechman, Jeremy B. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bolintineanu, Dan [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cooper, Marcia A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Erikson, William W. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kay, Jeffrey J [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Phinney, Leslie M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Piekos, Edward S. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Specht, Paul Elliott [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wixom, Ryan R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yarrington, Cole [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes a project in which the authors sought to develop and deploy: (i) experimental techniques to elucidate the complex, multiscale nature of thermal transport in particle-based materials; and (ii) modeling approaches to address current challenges in predicting performance variability of materials (e.g., identifying and characterizing physical- chemical processes and their couplings across multiple length and time scales, modeling information transfer between scales, and statically and dynamically resolving material structure and its evolution during manufacturing and device performance). Experimentally, several capabilities were successfully advanced. As discussed in Chapter 2 a flash diffusivity capability for measuring homogeneous thermal conductivity of pyrotechnic powders (and beyond) was advanced; leading to enhanced characterization of pyrotechnic materials and properties impacting component development. Chapter 4 describes success for the first time, although preliminary, in resolving thermal fields at speeds and spatial scales relevant to energetic components. Chapter 7 summarizes the first ever (as far as the authors know) application of TDTR to actual pyrotechnic materials. This is the first attempt to actually characterize these materials at the interfacial scale. On the modeling side, new capabilities in image processing of experimental microstructures and direct numerical simulation on complicated structures were advanced (see Chapters 3 and 5). In addition, modeling work described in Chapter 8 led to improved prediction of interface thermal conductance from first principles calculations. Toward the second point, for a model system of packed particles, significant headway was made in implementing numerical algorithms and collecting data to justify the approach in terms of highlighting the phenomena at play and pointing the way forward in developing and informing the kind of modeling approach originally envisioned (see Chapter 6). In

  18. Optimization of multi-scale modelling of CNT/polymer composite strain sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Blacha, Izabela; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Packo, Pawel

    2017-04-01

    Carbon nanotube-based composites have been deeply investigated in recent years. CNTs due to their unique physical properties have been employed for various applications in different disciplines of science and engineering. Due to the remarkable electrical conductivity of CNTs, one of practical applications is related to the development of strain sensing smart coatings. Up to now, high sensitivity strain sensors for micro- and macro-scale applications were proposed. However, controlling electro-mechanical properties of those devices is still a challenging issue. In order to facilitate the design process and to investigate multi-domain relationships between sensor's parameters and its properties, numerical models and simulations of CNT-based structures have been carried out with the primary focus on investigation of electrical conductivity for various concentrations of CNTs within the composite material. More accurate and detailed studies include analysis of the influence of deformation on changes in conductivity. However, due to significant microstructural complexity of the system (i.e. large number of CNTs within the structure) multiscale modeling and analysis approach must be employed. The main objective of this paper is to outline an relationships between micro- and macro-structural properties of CNT-based strain sensors and to discuss guidelines for a multiscale electro-mechanical model based on the Representative Volume Element (RVE) concept. The device employs the change in electrical conductivity of a CNT-based nanocomposite under applied deformation. The study investigates the impact of various micro-scale model parameters (e.g. size of an RVE, CNTs parameters etc.), on the macro scale model. Model parameters convergence studies are performed for different geometrical properties of CNTs and for various sizes of RVEs - revealing their critical mutual relationships. Also, the impact of boundary conditions at the micro-scale RVE structure is discussed.

  19. Probabilistic Downscaling of Remote Sensing Data with Applications for Multi-Scale Biogeochemical Flux Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoy, Paul C; Quaife, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    Upscaling ecological information to larger scales in space and downscaling remote sensing observations or model simulations to finer scales remain grand challenges in Earth system science. Downscaling often involves inferring subgrid information from coarse-scale data, and such ill-posed problems are classically addressed using regularization. Here, we apply two-dimensional Tikhonov Regularization (2DTR) to simulate subgrid surface patterns for ecological applications. Specifically, we test the ability of 2DTR to simulate the spatial statistics of high-resolution (4 m) remote sensing observations of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in a tundra landscape. We find that the 2DTR approach as applied here can capture the major mode of spatial variability of the high-resolution information, but not multiple modes of spatial variability, and that the Lagrange multiplier (γ) used to impose the condition of smoothness across space is related to the range of the experimental semivariogram. We used observed and 2DTR-simulated maps of NDVI to estimate landscape-level leaf area index (LAI) and gross primary productivity (GPP). NDVI maps simulated using a γ value that approximates the range of observed NDVI result in a landscape-level GPP estimate that differs by ca 2% from those created using observed NDVI. Following findings that GPP per unit LAI is lower near vegetation patch edges, we simulated vegetation patch edges using multiple approaches and found that simulated GPP declined by up to 12% as a result. 2DTR can generate random landscapes rapidly and can be applied to disaggregate ecological information and compare of spatial observations against simulated landscapes.

  20. Automatic reconstruction of neural morphologies with multi-scale graph-based tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eChoromanska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurons have complicated axonal and dendritic morphologies and their peculiar structures probably reflect functional differences and thus have been traditionally used to classify neurons into different classes. Because of this, reconstruction of neural morphologies is an important step towards understanding the structure of the brain circuits. Manual reconstructions of 3D neural structure from image stacks obtained using confocal or bright-field microscopy are time-consuming and partly subjective, and, also given the large number and variety of neuronal cell types, it appears essential to develop automatic or semi-automatic reconstruction algorithms. Nevertheless, despite the fast development of new techniques in data acquisition and image processing, automatic reconstructions still remain a challenge. In this paper we present a novel and fast method for tracking neural morphologies in 3D space with simultaneous detection of branching processes. The method exploits some existing procedures and adds to them the machine vision technique of multiscaling. Specifically, the algorithm starts from a seed point and tracks the structure using a ball of a variable radius. In each step the algorithm moves the ball center to the new point on the ball’s surface with the shortest Dijkstra path. It detects the presence of the branching point by examining the spatial spread of points on the surface of the ball. The algorithm scales the ball size until branches are well separated and then continues tracking each branch. We evaluate the performance of our algorithm on synthetic data stacks obtained by manual reconstructions of neural cells, corrupted with different levels of noise. Additionally, we report results on real data sets. Our proposed algorithm is able to reconstruct 3D neural morphology that is highly similar to the ground truth and simultaneously achieves 90% average precision and 81% average recall in branching region detection. The introduction of

  1. The U.S. Shale Oil and Gas Resource - a Multi-Scale Analysis of Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'sullivan, F.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past decade, the large-scale production of natural gas, and more recently oil, from U.S. shale formations has had a transformative impact on the energy industry. The emergence of shale oil and gas as recoverable resources has altered perceptions regarding both the future abundance and cost of hydrocarbons, and has shifted the balance of global energy geopolitics. However, despite the excitement, shale is a resource in its nascency, and many challenges surrounding its exploitation remain. One of the most significant of these is the dramatic variation in resource productivity across multiple length scales, which is a feature of all of today's shale plays. This paper will describe the results of work that has looked to characterize the spatial and temporal variations in the productivity of the contemporary shale resource. Analysis will be presented that shows there is a strong stochastic element to observed shale well productivity in all the major plays. It will be shown that the nature of this stochasticity is consistent regardless of specific play being considered. A characterization of this stochasticity will be proposed. As a parallel to the discussion of productivity, the paper will also address the issue of "learning" in shale development. It will be shown that "creaming" trends are observable and that although "absolute" well productivity levels have increased, "specific" productivity levels (i.e. considering well and stimulation size) have actually falling markedly in many plays. The paper will also show that among individual operators' well ensembles, normalized well-to-well performance distributions are almost identical, and have remained consistent year-to-year. This result suggests little if any systematic learning regarding the effective management of well-to-well performance variability has taken place. The paper will conclude with an articulation of how the productivity characteristics of the shale resource are impacting on the resources

  2. Final Report: Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, Roy [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Day-Lewis, Fred [U.S. Geological Survey, Storrs, CT (United States); Singha, Kamini [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Johnson, Timothy [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Binley, Andrew [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Lane, John [U.S. Geological Survey, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2014-03-20

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  3. Quantification of structural uncertainties in multi-scale models; case study of the Lublin Basin, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małolepszy, Zbigniew; Szynkaruk, Ewa

    2015-04-01

    The multiscale static modeling of regional structure of the Lublin Basin is carried on in the Polish Geological Institute, in accordance with principles of integrated 3D geological modelling. The model is based on all available geospatial data from Polish digital databases and analogue archives. Mapped regional structure covers the area of 260x80 km located between Warsaw and Polish-Ukrainian border, along NW-SE-trending margin of the East European Craton. Within the basin, the Paleozoic beds with coalbearing Carboniferous and older formations containing hydrocarbons and unconventional prospects are covered unconformably by Permo-Mesozoic and younger rocks. Vertical extent of the regional model is set from topographic surface to 6000 m ssl and at the bottom includes some Proterozoic crystalline formations of the craton. The project focuses on internal consistency of the models built at different scales - from basin (small) scale to field-scale (large-scale). The models, nested in the common structural framework, are being constructed with regional geological knowledge, ensuring smooth transition in the 3D model resolution and amount of geological detail. Major challenge of the multiscale approach to subsurface modelling is the assessment and consistent quantification of various types of geological uncertainties tied to those various scale sub-models. Decreasing amount of information with depth and, particularly, very limited data collected below exploration targets, as well as accuracy and quality of data, all have the most critical impact on the modelled structure. In deeper levels of the Lublin Basin model, seismic interpretation of 2D surveys is sparsely tied to well data. Therefore time-to-depth conversion carries one of the major uncertainties in the modeling of structures, especially below 3000 m ssl. Furthermore, as all models at different scales are based on the same dataset, we must deal with different levels of generalization of geological structures. The

  4. Multi-method, multi-scale geophysical observations in the Obsidian Pool Thermal Area, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, W. S.; Carr, B.; Pasquet, S.; Sims, K. W. W.; Dickey, K.

    2016-12-01

    Despite the prominence of Yellowstone as the world's most active hydrothermal province, relatively little is known about the plumbing systems that link deeper hydrothermal fluids to the charismatic hot springs, geysers and mud pots at the surface. We present the results of a multi-method, multi-scale geophysical investigation of the Obsidian Pool Thermal Area (OPTA) in Yellowstone National Park. OPTA hosts acid-sulfate hot springs and mud pots with relatively low pH. We present the results of seismic refraction, electrical resistivity, time-domain EM (TEM), soil conductivity meter (EMI), and GPR data acquired in July 2016. There is a strong contrast in physical properties in the upper 50 m of the subsurface between the low-lying hydrothermal area and surrounding hills: the hydrothermal area has much lower seismic velocities ( 1 km/s vs 3 km/s) and electrical resistivity ( 20 ohm-m vs 300 ohm-m). A prominent zone of very low resistivity (<10 ohm-m) exists at about 20 m depth beneath all hydrothermal features. Poisson's ratio, calculated from P-wave refraction tomography and surface wave inversions, shows low values beneath the "frying pan," where gas is emerging in small fumaroles, suggesting that Poisson's ratio is an effective "gas detector" in hydrothermal areas. Near-surface resistivity mapped from EMI shows a strong correlation with hydrothermal areas previously mapped by heat flow, with areas of high heat flow generally having low resistivity near the surface. Two exceptions are (1) the "frying pan," which shows a central area of high resistivity (corresponding to escaping gas) surrounding by a halo of low resistivity, and (2) a broad area of low resistivity connecting the hydrothermal centers to the lake, which may be clay deposits. TEM data penetrate up to 200 m in depth and suggest that a reservoir of hydrothermal fluids may underlie the entire area, including beneath the forested hills, at depths greater than 100 m, but that they rise toward the surface in

  5. ProteoLens: a visual analytic tool for multi-scale database-driven biological network data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Tianxiao; Sivachenko, Andrey Y; Harrison, Scott H; Chen, Jake Y

    2008-08-12

    New systems biology studies require researchers to understand how interplay among myriads of biomolecular entities is orchestrated in order to achieve high-level cellular and physiological functions. Many software tools have been developed in the past decade to help researchers visually navigate large networks of biomolecular interactions with built-in template-based query capabilities. To further advance researchers' ability to interrogate global physiological states of cells through multi-scale visual network explorations, new visualization software tools still need to be developed to empower the analysis. A robust visual data analysis platform driven by database management systems to perform bi-directional data processing-to-visualizations with declarative querying capabilities is needed. We developed ProteoLens as a JAVA-based visual analytic software tool for creating, annotating and exploring multi-scale biological networks. It supports direct database connectivity to either Oracle or PostgreSQL database tables/views, on which SQL statements using both Data Definition Languages (DDL) and Data Manipulation languages (DML) may be specified. The robust query languages embedded directly within the visualization software help users to bring their network data into a visualization context for annotation and exploration. ProteoLens supports graph/network represented data in standard Graph Modeling Language (GML) formats, and this enables interoperation with a wide range of other visual layout tools. The architectural design of ProteoLens enables the de-coupling of complex network data visualization tasks into two distinct phases: 1) creating network data association rules, which are mapping rules between network node IDs or edge IDs and data attributes such as functional annotations, expression levels, scores, synonyms, descriptions etc; 2) applying network data association rules to build the network and perform the visual annotation of graph nodes and edges

  6. Development of an Image-based Multi-Scale Finite Element Approach to Predict Fatigue Damage in Asphalt Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, Amir

    Image-based simulation of complex materials is a very important tool for understanding their mechanical behavior and an effective tool for successful design of composite materials. In this thesis an image-based multi-scale finite element approach is developed to predict the mechanical properties of asphalt mixtures. In this approach the "up-scaling" and homogenization of each scale to the next is critically designed to improve accuracy. In addition to this multi-scale efficiency, this study introduces an approach for consideration of particle contacts at each of the scales in which mineral particles exist. One of the most important pavement distresses which seriously affects the pavement performance is fatigue cracking. As this cracking generally takes place in the binder phase of the asphalt mixture, the binder fatigue behavior is assumed to be one of the main factors influencing the overall pavement fatigue performance. It is also known that aggregate gradation, mixture volumetric properties, and filler type and concentration can affect damage initiation and progression in the asphalt mixtures. This study was conducted to develop a tool to characterize the damage properties of the asphalt mixtures at all scales. In the present study the Viscoelastic continuum damage model is implemented into the well-known finite element software ABAQUS via the user material subroutine (UMAT) in order to simulate the state of damage in the binder phase under the repeated uniaxial sinusoidal loading. The inputs are based on the experimentally derived measurements for the binder properties. For the scales of mastic and mortar, the artificially 2-Dimensional images of mastic and mortar scales were generated and used to characterize the properties of those scales. Finally, the 2D scanned images of asphalt mixtures are used to study the asphalt mixture fatigue behavior under loading. In order to validate the proposed model, the experimental test results and the simulation results were

  7. A multi-scale automatic observatory of soil moisture and temperature served for satellite product validation in Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S.; Dong, L.; Lu, P.; Zhou, K.; Wang, F.; Han, S.; Min, M.; Chen, L.; Xu, N.; Chen, J.; Zhao, P.; Li, B.; Wang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Due to the lack of observing data which match the satellite pixel size, the inversion accuracy of satellite products in Tibetan Plateau(TP) is difficult to be evaluated. Hence, the in situ observations are necessary to support the calibration and validation activities. Under the support of the Third Tibetan Plateau Atmospheric Scientific Experiment (TIPEX-III) projec a multi-scale automatic observatory of soil moisture and temperature served for satellite product validation (TIPEX-III-SMTN) were established in Tibetan Plateau. The observatory consists of two regional scale networks, including the Naqu network and the Geji network. The Naqu network is located in the north of TP, and characterized by alpine grasslands. The Geji network is located in the west of TP, and characterized by marshes. Naqu network includes 33 stations, which are deployed in a 75KM*75KM region according to a pre-designed pattern. At Each station, soil moisture and temperature are measured by five sensors at five soil depths. One sensor is vertically inserted into 0 2 cm depth to measure the averaged near-surface soil moisture and temperature. The other four sensors are horizontally inserted at 5, 10, 20, and 30 cm depths, respectively. The data are recorded every 10 minutes. A wireless transmission system is applied to transmit the data in real time, and a dual power supply system is adopted to keep the continuity of the observation. The construction of Naqu network has been accomplished in August, 2015, and Geji network will be established before Oct., 2016. Observations acquired from TIPEX-III-SMTN can be used to validate satellite products with different spatial resolution, and TIPEX-III-SMTN can also be used as a complementary of the existing similar networks in this area, such as CTP-SMTMN (the multiscale Soil Moistureand Temperature Monitoring Network on the central TP) . Keywords: multi-scale soil moisture soil temperature, Tibetan Plateau Acknowledgments: This work was jointly

  8. Multi-scale drivers of spatial variation in old-growth forest carbon density disentangled with Lidar and an individual-based landscape model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert Seidl; Thomas A. Spies; Werner Rammer; E. Ashley Steel; Robert J. Pabst; Keith. Olsen

    2012-01-01

    Forest ecosystems are the most important terrestrial carbon (C) storage globally, and presently mitigate anthropogenic climate change by acting as a large and persistent sink for atmospheric CO2. Yet, forest C density varies greatly in space, both globally and at stand and landscape levels. Understanding the multi-scale drivers of this variation...

  9. EMD-regression for modelling multi-scale relationships, and application to weather-related cardiovascular mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselot, Pierre; Chebana, Fateh; Bélanger, Diane; St-Hilaire, André; Abdous, Belkacem; Gosselin, Pierre; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2018-01-01

    In a number of environmental studies, relationships between natural processes are often assessed through regression analyses, using time series data. Such data are often multi-scale and non-stationary, leading to a poor accuracy of the resulting regression models and therefore to results with moderate reliability. To deal with this issue, the present paper introduces the EMD-regression methodology consisting in applying the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) algorithm on data series and then using the resulting components in regression models. The proposed methodology presents a number of advantages. First, it accounts of the issues of non-stationarity associated to the data series. Second, this approach acts as a scan for the relationship between a response variable and the predictors at different time scales, providing new insights about this relationship. To illustrate the proposed methodology it is applied to study the relationship between weather and cardiovascular mortality in Montreal, Canada. The results shed new knowledge concerning the studied relationship. For instance, they show that the humidity can cause excess mortality at the monthly time scale, which is a scale not visible in classical models. A comparison is also conducted with state of the art methods which are the generalized additive models and distributed lag models, both widely used in weather-related health studies. The comparison shows that EMD-regression achieves better prediction performances and provides more details than classical models concerning the relationship.

  10. Development of high-resolution multi-scale modelling system for simulation of coastal-fluvial urban flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Joanne; Indiana Olbert, Agnieszka; Nash, Stephen; Hartnett, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Urban developments in coastal zones are often exposed to natural hazards such as flooding. In this research, a state-of-the-art, multi-scale nested flood (MSN_Flood) model is applied to simulate complex coastal-fluvial urban flooding due to combined effects of tides, surges and river discharges. Cork city on Ireland's southwest coast is a study case. The flood modelling system comprises a cascade of four dynamically linked models that resolve the hydrodynamics of Cork Harbour and/or its sub-region at four scales: 90, 30, 6 and 2 m. Results demonstrate that the internalization of the nested boundary through the use of ghost cells combined with a tailored adaptive interpolation technique creates a highly dynamic moving boundary that permits flooding and drying of the nested boundary. This novel feature of MSN_Flood provides a high degree of choice regarding the location of the boundaries to the nested domain and therefore flexibility in model application. The nested MSN_Flood model through dynamic downscaling facilitates significant improvements in accuracy of model output without incurring the computational expense of high spatial resolution over the entire model domain. The urban flood model provides full characteristics of water levels and flow regimes necessary for flood hazard identification and flood risk assessment.

  11. Multi-scale radiomic analysis of sub-cortical regions in MRI related to autism, gender and age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Desrosiers, Christian; Toews, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    We propose using multi-scale image textures to investigate links between neuroanatomical regions and clinical variables in MRI. Texture features are derived at multiple scales of resolution based on the Laplacian-of-Gaussian (LoG) filter. Three quantifier functions (Average, Standard Deviation and Entropy) are used to summarize texture statistics within standard, automatically segmented neuroanatomical regions. Significance tests are performed to identify regional texture differences between ASD vs. TDC and male vs. female groups, as well as correlations with age (corrected p Autism spectrum disorder (ASD, 65 female and 474 male) subjects. Statistically significant texture differences between ASD vs. TDC groups are identified asymmetrically in the right hippocampus, left choroid-plexus and corpus callosum (CC), and symmetrically in the cerebellar white matter. Sex-related texture differences in TDC subjects are found in primarily in the left amygdala, left cerebellar white matter, and brain stem. Correlations between age and texture in TDC subjects are found in the thalamus-proper, caudate and pallidum, most exhibiting bilateral symmetry.

  12. Multi-scale biomechanical remodeling in aging and genetic mutant murine mitral valve leaflets: insights into Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Russell A; Sinha, Ravi; Aziz, Hamza; Rouf, Rosanne; Dietz, Harry C; Judge, Daniel P; Butcher, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Mitral valve degeneration is a key component of the pathophysiology of Marfan syndrome. The biomechanical consequences of aging and genetic mutation in mitral valves are poorly understood because of limited tools to study this in mouse models. Our aim was to determine the global biomechanical and local cell-matrix deformation relationships in the aging and Marfan related Fbn1 mutated murine mitral valve. To conduct this investigation, a novel stretching apparatus and gripping method was implemented to directly quantify both global tissue biomechanics and local cellular deformation and matrix fiber realignment in murine mitral valves. Excised mitral valve leaflets from wild-type and Fbn1 mutant mice from 2 weeks to 10 months in age were tested in circumferential orientation under continuous laser optical imaging. Mouse mitral valves stiffen with age, correlating with increases in collagen fraction and matrix fiber alignment. Fbn1 mutation resulted in significantly more compliant valves (modulus 1.34 ± 0.12 vs. 2.51 ± 0.31 MPa, respectively, Paging. In comparison, Fbn1 mutated valves have decoupled cellular deformation and fiber alignment with tissue stretch. Taken together, quantitative understanding of multi-scale murine planar tissue biomechanics is essential for establishing consequences of aging and genetic mutations. Decoupling of local cell-matrix deformation kinematics with global tissue stretch may be an important mechanism of normal and pathological biomechanical remodeling in valves.

  13. Investigation of urban faults in Shenzhen using wavelet multi-scale analysis and modeling of gravity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chuang; Chen, Liang; Liu, Xi-kai

    2016-04-01

    Urban faults in Shenzhen are potential threat to the city security and sustainable development. To improve the knowledge of the Shenzhen fault zone, interpretation and inversion of gravity data were carried out. Bouguer gravity covering the whole Shenzhen city was calculated with a resolution of 1kmx1km. Wavelet multi-scale analysis (MSA) was applied to the Bouguer gravity data to obtain the multilayer residual anomalies corresponding to different depths. In addition, 2D gravity models were constructed along three profiles. The Bouguer gravity anomaly shows a NE-striking high-low-high pattern from northwest to southeast, strongly related to the main faults. According to the result of MSA, the correlation between gravity anomaly and faults is particularly significant from 4 to 12 km depth. The residual gravity with small amplitude in each layer indicates weak tectonic activity in the crust. In the upper layers, positive anomalies along most of faults reveal the upwelling of high-density materials during the past tectonic movements. The multilayer residual anomalies also implicate important information about the faults, such as the vertical extension and the dip direction. The maximum depth of the faults is about 20km. In general, NE-striking faults extend deeper than NW-striking Faults and have a larger dip angle. This study is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.41504015) and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No.2015M572146).

  14. Global multi-scale segmentation of continental and coastal waters from the watersheds to the continental margins

    KAUST Repository

    Laruelle, G. G.

    2013-05-29

    Past characterizations of the land-ocean continuum were constructed either from a continental perspective through an analysis of watershed river basin properties (COSCATs: COastal Segmentation and related CATchments) or from an oceanic perspective, through a regionalization of the proximal and distal continental margins (LMEs: large marine ecosystems). Here, we present a global-scale coastal segmentation, composed of three consistent levels, that includes the whole aquatic continuum with its riverine, estuarine and shelf sea components. Our work delineates comprehensive ensembles by harmonizing previous segmentations and typologies in order to retain the most important physical characteristics of both the land and shelf areas. The proposed multi-scale segmentation results in a distribution of global exorheic watersheds, estuaries and continental shelf seas among 45 major zones (MARCATS: MARgins and CATchments Segmentation) and 149 sub-units (COSCATs). Geographic and hydrologic parameters such as the surface area, volume and freshwater residence time are calculated for each coastal unit as well as different hypsometric profiles. Our analysis provides detailed insights into the distributions of coastal and continental shelf areas and how they connect with incoming riverine fluxes. The segmentation is also used to re-evaluate the global estuarine CO2 flux at the air-water interface combining global and regional average emission rates derived from local studies. © 2013 Author(s).

  15. Assessment of Heart Rate Variability during an Endurance Mountain Trail Race by Multi-Scale Entropy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Vallverdú

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze heart rate variability (HRV response to high-intensity exercise during a 35-km mountain trail race and to ascertain whether fitness level could influence autonomic nervous system (ANS modulation. Time-domain, frequency-domain, and multi-scale entropy (MSE indexes were calculated for eleven mountain-trail runners who completed the race. Many changes were observed, mostly related to exercise load and fatigue. These changes were characterized by increased mean values and standard deviations of the normal-to-normal intervals associated with sympathetic activity, and by decreased differences between successive intervals related to parasympathetic activity. Normalized low frequency (LF power suggested that ANS modulation varied greatly during the race and between individuals. Normalized high frequency (HF power, associated with parasympathetic activity, varied considerably over the race, and tended to decrease at the final stages, whereas changes in the LF/HF ratio corresponded to intervals with varying exercise load. MSE indexes, related to system complexity, indicated the existence of many interactions between the heart and its neurological control mechanism. The time-domain, frequency-domain, and MSE indexes were also able to discriminate faster from slower runners, mainly in the more difficult and in the final stages of the race. These findings suggest the use of HRV analysis to study cardiac function mechanisms in endurance sports.

  16. A Comprehensive, Multi-Scale Dynamical Model of ErbB Receptor Signal Transduction in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helikar, Tomáš; Kochi, Naomi; Kowal, Bryan; Dimri, Manjari; Naramura, Mayumi; Raja, Srikumar M.; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid; Rogers, Jim A.

    2013-01-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src and receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB1) have been established as collaborators in cellular signaling and their combined dysregulation plays key roles in human cancers, including breast cancer. In part due to the complexity of the biochemical network associated with the regulation of these proteins as well as their cellular functions, the role of Src in EGFR regulation remains unclear. Herein we present a new comprehensive, multi-scale dynamical model of ErbB receptor signal transduction in human mammary epithelial cells. This model, constructed manually from published biochemical literature, consists of 245 nodes representing proteins and their post-translational modifications sites, and over 1,000 biochemical interactions. Using computer simulations of the model, we find it is able to reproduce a number of cellular phenomena. Furthermore, the model predicts that overexpression of Src results in increased endocytosis of EGFR in the absence/low amount of the epidermal growth factor (EGF). Our subsequent laboratory experiments also suggest increased internalization of EGFR upon Src overexpression under EGF-deprived conditions, further supporting this model-generated hypothesis. PMID:23637902

  17. A comprehensive, multi-scale dynamical model of ErbB receptor signal transduction in human mammary epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Helikar

    Full Text Available The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src and receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB1 have been established as collaborators in cellular signaling and their combined dysregulation plays key roles in human cancers, including breast cancer. In part due to the complexity of the biochemical network associated with the regulation of these proteins as well as their cellular functions, the role of Src in EGFR regulation remains unclear. Herein we present a new comprehensive, multi-scale dynamical model of ErbB receptor signal transduction in human mammary epithelial cells. This model, constructed manually from published biochemical literature, consists of 245 nodes representing proteins and their post-translational modifications sites, and over 1,000 biochemical interactions. Using computer simulations of the model, we find it is able to reproduce a number of cellular phenomena. Furthermore, the model predicts that overexpression of Src results in increased endocytosis of EGFR in the absence/low amount of the epidermal growth factor (EGF. Our subsequent laboratory experiments also suggest increased internalization of EGFR upon Src overexpression under EGF-deprived conditions, further supporting this model-generated hypothesis.

  18. Characterizing multi-scale self-similar behavior and non-statistical properties of fluctuations in financial time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sayantan; Manimaran, P.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2011-11-01

    We make use of wavelet transform to study the multi-scale, self-similar behavior and deviations thereof, in the stock prices of large companies, belonging to different economic sectors. The stock market returns exhibit multi-fractal characteristics, with some of the companies showing deviations at small and large scales. The fact that, the wavelets belonging to the Daubechies’ (Db) basis enables one to isolate local polynomial trends of different degrees, plays the key role in isolating fluctuations at different scales. One of the primary motivations of this work is to study the emergence of the k-3 behavior [X. Gabaix, P. Gopikrishnan, V. Plerou, H. Stanley, A theory of power law distributions in financial market fluctuations, Nature 423 (2003) 267-270] of the fluctuations starting with high frequency fluctuations. We make use of Db4 and Db6 basis sets to respectively isolate local linear and quadratic trends at different scales in order to study the statistical characteristics of these financial time series. The fluctuations reveal fat tail non-Gaussian behavior, unstable periodic modulations, at finer scales, from which the characteristic k-3 power law behavior emerges at sufficiently large scales. We further identify stable periodic behavior through the continuous Morlet wavelet.

  19. Evolution of turbulence and in-plane vortices in the near field flow behind multi-scale planar grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, L.; Krogstad, P.-Å.

    2016-08-01

    In this experimental work, we carry out detailed two-dimensional particle image velocimetry investigations for the near field wakes behind a conventional and two multi-scale planar grids, using stitched camera fields of view. Statistical independent measurements are conducted focusing on the first few mesh distances downstream of the grid. It is found that the multiple integral length scales originated from the grids loose their importance on the turbulence development after about three mesh distances downstream, much earlier than the distance where the turbulence becomes homogeneous. The largest eddy size, represented by the integral length scales, does not show clear differences in its growth rate among the three grids after an initial development of three times the largest grid size downstream. Nevertheless, when examining individual vortex behaviours using conditional averaging and filtering processes, clear differences are found. The grids are found to have different decay rates of peak vorticity and projected vortex strengths. Despite these differences, the in-plane vorticity correlation function reveals that the mean vortex shape of all the grids shows a universal near-Gaussian pattern which does not change much as the turbulence decays.

  20. Potential slab avalanche release area identification from estimated winter terrain: a multi-scale, fuzzy logic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Veitinger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Avalanche hazard assessment requires a very precise estimation of the release area, which still depends, to a large extent, on expert judgement of avalanche specialists. Therefore, a new algorithm for automated identification of potential avalanche release areas was developed. It overcomes some of the limitations of previous tools, which are currently not often applied in hazard mitigation practice. By introducing a multi-scale roughness parameter, fine-scale topography and its attenuation under snow influence is captured. This allows the assessment of snow influence on terrain morphology and, consequently, potential release area size and location. The integration of a wind shelter index enables the user to define release area scenarios as a function of the prevailing wind direction or single storm events. A case study illustrates the practical usefulness of this approach for the definition of release area scenarios under varying snow cover and wind conditions. A validation with historical data demonstrated an improved estimation of avalanche release areas. Our method outperforms a slope-based approach, in particular for more frequent avalanches; however, the application of the algorithm as a forecasting tool remains limited, as snowpack stability is not integrated. Future research activity should therefore focus on the coupling of the algorithm with snowpack conditions.

  1. Assessing the relationship between environmental factors and malaria vector breeding sites in Swaziland using multi-scale remotely sensed data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabelo Nick Dlamini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many entomological studies have analyzed remotely sensed data to assess the relationship between malaria vector distribution and the associated environmental factors. However, the high cost of remotely sensed products with high spatial resolution has often resulted in analyses being conducted at coarse scales using open-source, archived remotely sensed data. In the present study, spatial prediction of potential breeding sites based on multi-scale remotely sensed information in conjunction with entomological data with special reference to presence or absence of larvae was realized. Selected water bodies were tested for mosquito larvae using the larva scooping method, and the results were compared with data on land cover, rainfall, land surface temperature (LST and altitude presented with high spatial resolution. To assess which environmental factors best predict larval presence or absence, Decision Tree methodology and logistic regression techniques were applied. Both approaches showed that some environmental predictors can reliably distinguish between the two alternatives (existence and non-existence of larvae. For example, the results suggest that larvae are mainly present in very small water pools related to human activities, such as subsistence farming that were also found to be the major determinant for vector breeding. Rainfall, LST and altitude, on the other hand, were less useful as a basis for mapping the distribution of breeding sites. In conclusion, we found that models linking presence of larvae with high-resolution land use have good predictive ability of identifying potential breeding sites.

  2. Analytic and Computational Perspectives of Multi-Scale Theory for Homogeneous, Laminated Composite, and Sandwich Beams and Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessler, Alexander; Gherlone, Marco; Versino, Daniele; DiSciuva, Marco

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the theoretical foundation and computational mechanics aspects of the recently developed shear-deformation theory, called the Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT). The theory is based on a multi-scale formalism in which an equivalent single-layer plate theory is refined with a robust set of zigzag local layer displacements that are free of the usual deficiencies found in common plate theories with zigzag kinematics. In the RZT, first-order shear-deformation plate theory is used as the equivalent single-layer plate theory, which represents the overall response characteristics. Local piecewise-linear zigzag displacements are used to provide corrections to these overall response characteristics that are associated with the plate heterogeneity and the relative stiffnesses of the layers. The theory does not rely on shear correction factors and is equally accurate for homogeneous, laminated composite, and sandwich beams and plates. Regardless of the number of material layers, the theory maintains only seven kinematic unknowns that describe the membrane, bending, and transverse shear plate-deformation modes. Derived from the virtual work principle, RZT is well-suited for developing computationally efficient, C(sup 0)-continuous finite elements; formulations of several RZT-based elements are highlighted. The theory and its finite element approximations thus provide a unified and reliable computational platform for the analysis and design of high-performance load-bearing aerospace structures.

  3. Potential habitat of Javan Hawk-Eagle based on multi-scale approach and its implication for conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurfatimah, C.; Syartinilia; Mulyani, Y. A.

    2017-01-01

    In Indonesia the Javan Hawk-Eagle has been designated as one of the 25 top priority protected species to be increased by 10% of current population number. Lack of suitable habitat is most likely the reason for the decline of the species in landscapes subject to major human modification. Central part of Java Island has suffered the most severe forest damage and fragmentation compared to the western part and eastern part of the island. This study presents the number of predicted suitable habitats for Javan Hawk-Eagle in the central part of Java Island based on habitat probability model. Multi-scale approach was being used to determine the accuracy level of patches reading between different image resolutions. 38 patches were detected at 30 m2, 28 patches at 90 m2, and 19 patches were detected at 250 m2 images resolutions. Higher reading implied more landscape structures within different regions should be considered during management of habitat conservation. Therefore, larger scale of conservation management application should be conducted as well.

  4. Label-free, multi-scale imaging of ex-vivo mouse brain using spatial light interference microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Eunjung; Kandel, Mikhail E.; Ko, Chemyong J.; Popescu, Gabriel; Jung, Woonggyu; Best-Popescu, Catherine

    2016-12-01

    Brain connectivity spans over broad spatial scales, from nanometers to centimeters. In order to understand the brain at multi-scale, the neural network in wide-field has been visualized in detail by taking advantage of light microscopy. However, the process of staining or addition of fluorescent tags is commonly required, and the image contrast is insufficient for delineation of cytoarchitecture. To overcome this barrier, we use spatial light interference microscopy to investigate brain structure with high-resolution, sub-nanometer pathlength sensitivity without the use of exogenous contrast agents. Combining wide-field imaging and a mosaic algorithm developed in-house, we show the detailed architecture of cells and myelin, within coronal olfactory bulb and cortical sections, and from sagittal sections of the hippocampus and cerebellum. Our technique is well suited to identify laminar characteristics of fiber tract orientation within white matter, e.g. the corpus callosum. To further improve the macro-scale contrast of anatomical structures, and to better differentiate axons and dendrites from cell bodies, we mapped the tissue in terms of its scattering property. Based on our results, we anticipate that spatial light interference microscopy can potentially provide multiscale and multicontrast perspectives of gross and microscopic brain anatomy.

  5. Managing Understory Vegetation for Maintaining Productivity in Black Spruce Forests: A Synthesis within a Multi-Scale Research Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Joanisse

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable management of boreal ecosystems involves the establishment of vigorous tree regeneration after harvest. However, two groups of understory plants influence regeneration success in eastern boreal Canada. Ericaceous shrubs are recognized to rapidly dominate susceptible boreal sites after harvest. Such dominance reduces recruitment and causes stagnant conifer growth, lasting decades on some sites. Additionally, peat accumulation due to Sphagnum growth after harvest forces the roots of regenerating conifers out of the relatively nutrient rich and warm mineral soil into the relatively nutrient poor and cool organic layer, with drastic effects on growth. Shifts from once productive black spruce forests to ericaceous heaths or paludified forests affect forest productivity and biodiversity. Under natural disturbance dynamics, fires severe enough to substantially reduce the organic layer thickness and affect ground cover species are required to establish a productive regeneration layer on such sites. We succinctly review how understory vegetation influences black spruce ecosystem dynamics in eastern boreal Canada, and present a multi-scale research model to understand, limit the loss and restore productive and diverse ecosystems in this region. Our model integrates knowledge of plant-level mechanisms in the development of silvicultural tools to sustain productivity. Fundamental knowledge is integrated at stand, landscape, regional and provincial levels to understand the distribution and dynamics of ericaceous shrubs and paludification processes and to support tactical and strategic forest management. The model can be adapted and applied to other natural resource management problems, in other biomes.

  6. A Sharable and Efficient Metadata Model for Heterogeneous Earth Observation Data Retrieval in Multi-Scale Flood Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengcheng Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing plays an important role in flood mapping and is helping advance flood monitoring and management. Multi-scale flood mapping is necessary for dividing floods into several stages for comprehensive management. However, existing data systems are typically heterogeneous owing to the use of different access protocols and archiving metadata models. In this paper, we proposed a sharable and efficient metadata model (APEOPM for constructing an Earth observation (EO data system to retrieve remote sensing data for flood mapping. The proposed model contains two sub-models, an access protocol model and an enhanced encoding model. The access protocol model helps unify heterogeneous access protocols and can achieve intelligent access via a semantic enhancement method. The enhanced encoding model helps unify a heterogeneous archiving metadata model. Wuhan city, one of the most important cities in the Yangtze River Economic Belt in China, is selected as a study area for testing the retrieval of heterogeneous EO data and flood mapping. The past torrential rain period from 25 March 2015 to 10 April 2015 is chosen as the temporal range in this study. To aid in comprehensive management, mapping is conducted at different spatial and temporal scales. In addition, the efficiency of data retrieval is analyzed, and validation between the flood maps and actual precipitation was conducted. The results show that the flood map coincided with the actual precipitation.

  7. FUSION OF MULTI-SCALE DEMS FROM DESCENT AND NAVCM IMAGES OF CHANG’E-3 USING COMPRESSED SENSING METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Peng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The multi-source DEMs generated using the images acquired in the descent and landing phase and after landing contain supplementary information, and this makes it possible and beneficial to produce a higher-quality DEM through fusing the multi-scale DEMs. The proposed fusion method consists of three steps. First, source DEMs are split into small DEM patches, then the DEM patches are classified into a few groups by local density peaks clustering. Next, the grouped DEM patches are used for sub-dictionary learning by stochastic coordinate coding. The trained sub-dictionaries are combined into a dictionary for sparse representation. Finally, the simultaneous orthogonal matching pursuit (SOMP algorithm is used to achieve sparse representation. We use the real DEMs generated from Chang’e-3 descent images and navigation camera (Navcam stereo images to validate the proposed method. Through the experiments, we have reconstructed a seamless DEM with the highest resolution and the largest spatial coverage among the input data. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method.

  8. Multi-scale computational modeling reveals a critical role for TNF receptor 1 dynamics in tuberculosis granuloma formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; El-Kebir, Mohammed; Marino, Simeone; Kirschner, Denise E.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple immune factors control host responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, including the formation of granulomas, aggregates of immune cells whose function may reflect success or failure of the host to contain infection. One such factor is tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF). TNF has been experimentally characterized to have the following activities in Mtb infection: macrophage activation, apoptosis, chemokine and cytokine production. Availability of TNF within a granuloma has been proposed to play a critical role in immunity to Mtb. However, in vivo measurement of a TNF concentration gradient and activities within a granuloma are not experimentally feasible. Further, processes that control TNF concentration and activities in a granuloma remain unknown. We developed a multi-scale computational model that includes molecular, cellular and tissue scale events that occur during granuloma formation and maintenance in lung. We use our model to identify processes that regulate TNF concentration and cellular behaviors and thus influence the outcome of infection within a granuloma. Our model predicts that TNF receptor 1 internalization kinetics play a critical role in infection control within a granuloma, controlling whether there is clearance of bacteria, excessive inflammation, containment of bacteria within a stable granuloma, or uncontrolled growth of bacteria. Our results suggest that there is an inter-play between TNF and bacterial levels in a granuloma that is controlled by the combined effects of both molecular and cellular scale processes. Finally, our model elucidates processes involved in immunity to Mtb that may be new targets for therapy. PMID:21321109

  9. Combined multi-scale characterization of a sedimentary structure beneath a river embankment to expand conventional flood protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienken, T.; Kreck, M.; Hausmann, J.; Werban, U.

    2011-12-01

    Embankments along rivers and streams are a common measure of constructional flood protection in Germany. At a test site along the River Mulde near the town of Löbnitz, Saxony, Germany, aerial photographs reveal the presence of a surface near underground sedimentary structure that crosses the embankment. This sedimentary structure is suspected to consist of sedimentary channel deposits that may serve as preferential flow path during seasonal flooding, leading to increased water propagation beneath the embankment. During normal water level, this structure is within the unsaturated zone. Geophysical techniques, GPR and geoelectrics, were used to characterize the extent of the sedimentary structure. At selected points high resolution vertical one-dimensional profiles of geotechnical and hydrogeological sediment properties were measured using minimum invasive direct push technology. The combination of multi-scale data allows the characterization of the identified sedimentary structure at the test site regarding its extent and hydraulic properties in respect to the fluviatile floodplain deposits present at the test site along a 500m transect. In this study, the combination of non-invasive geophysics and minimum invasive direct push technology provided high resolution geospatial information of a sedimentary regime, which could not have been achieved with conventional characterization methods, e.g. retrieval and analysis of soil samples, regarding resolution and work efficiency.

  10. The NASA-Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling Framework - Land Information System: Global Land/atmosphere Interaction with Resolved Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Karen Irene; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, Jiun-Dar; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2013-01-01

    The present generation of general circulation models (GCM) use parameterized cumulus schemes and run at hydrostatic grid resolutions. To improve the representation of cloud-scale moist processes and landeatmosphere interactions, a global, Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) coupled to the Land Information System (LIS) has been developed at NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center. The MMFeLIS has three components, a finite-volume (fv) GCM (Goddard Earth Observing System Ver. 4, GEOS-4), a 2D cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble, GCE), and the LIS, representing the large-scale atmospheric circulation, cloud processes, and land surface processes, respectively. The non-hydrostatic GCE model replaces the single-column cumulus parameterization of fvGCM. The model grid is composed of an array of fvGCM gridcells each with a series of embedded GCE models. A horizontal coupling strategy, GCE4fvGCM4Coupler4LIS, offered significant computational efficiency, with the scalability and I/O capabilities of LIS permitting landeatmosphere interactions at cloud-scale. Global simulations of 2007e2008 and comparisons to observations and reanalysis products were conducted. Using two different versions of the same land surface model but the same initial conditions, divergence in regional, synoptic-scale surface pressure patterns emerged within two weeks. The sensitivity of largescale circulations to land surface model physics revealed significant functional value to using a scalable, multi-model land surface modeling system in global weather and climate prediction.

  11. Early Warning Signals of Financial Crises with Multi-Scale Quantile Regressions of Log-Periodic Power Law Singularities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Zhang

    Full Text Available We augment the existing literature using the Log-Periodic Power Law Singular (LPPLS structures in the log-price dynamics to diagnose financial bubbles by providing three main innovations. First, we introduce the quantile regression to the LPPLS detection problem. This allows us to disentangle (at least partially the genuine LPPLS signal and the a priori unknown complicated residuals. Second, we propose to combine the many quantile regressions with a multi-scale analysis, which aggregates and consolidates the obtained ensembles of scenarios. Third, we define and implement the so-called DS LPPLS Confidence™ and Trust™ indicators that enrich considerably the diagnostic of bubbles. Using a detailed study of the "S&P 500 1987" bubble and presenting analyses of 16 historical bubbles, we show that the quantile regression of LPPLS signals contributes useful early warning signals. The comparison between the constructed signals and the price development in these 16 historical bubbles demonstrates their significant predictive ability around the real critical time when the burst/rally occurs.

  12. Early Warning Signals of Financial Crises with Multi-Scale Quantile Regressions of Log-Periodic Power Law Singularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Zhang, Qunzhi; Sornette, Didier

    2016-01-01

    We augment the existing literature using the Log-Periodic Power Law Singular (LPPLS) structures in the log-price dynamics to diagnose financial bubbles by providing three main innovations. First, we introduce the quantile regression to the LPPLS detection problem. This allows us to disentangle (at least partially) the genuine LPPLS signal and the a priori unknown complicated residuals. Second, we propose to combine the many quantile regressions with a multi-scale analysis, which aggregates and consolidates the obtained ensembles of scenarios. Third, we define and implement the so-called DS LPPLS Confidence™ and Trust™ indicators that enrich considerably the diagnostic of bubbles. Using a detailed study of the "S&P 500 1987" bubble and presenting analyses of 16 historical bubbles, we show that the quantile regression of LPPLS signals contributes useful early warning signals. The comparison between the constructed signals and the price development in these 16 historical bubbles demonstrates their significant predictive ability around the real critical time when the burst/rally occurs.

  13. Identification of DNA–protein Binding Sites through Multi-Scale Local Average Blocks on Sequence Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Shen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA–protein interactions appear as pivotal roles in diverse biological procedures and are paramount for cell metabolism, while identifying them with computational means is a kind of prudent scenario in depleting in vitro and in vivo experimental charging. A variety of state-of-the-art investigations have been elucidated to improve the accuracy of the DNA–protein binding sites prediction. Nevertheless, structure-based approaches are limited under the condition without 3D information, and the predictive validity is still refinable. In this essay, we address a kind of competitive method called Multi-scale Local Average Blocks (MLAB algorithm to solve this issue. Different from structure-based routes, MLAB exploits a strategy that not only extracts local evolutionary information from primary sequences, but also using predicts solvent accessibility. Moreover, the construction about predictors of DNA–protein binding sites wields an ensemble weighted sparse representation model with random under-sampling. To evaluate the performance of MLAB, we conduct comprehensive experiments of DNA–protein binding sites prediction. MLAB gives M C C of 0.392 , 0.315 , 0.439 and 0.245 on PDNA-543, PDNA-41, PDNA-316 and PDNA-52 datasets, respectively. It shows that MLAB gains advantages by comparing with other outstanding methods. M C C for our method is increased by at least 0.053 , 0.015 and 0.064 on PDNA-543, PDNA-41 and PDNA-316 datasets, respectively.

  14. Global multi-scale segmentation of continental and coastal waters from the watersheds to the continental margins

    KAUST Repository

    Laruelle, G. G.

    2012-10-04

    Past characterizations of the land–ocean continuum were constructed either from a continental perspective through an analysis of watershed river basin properties (COSCATs: COastal Segmentation and related CATchments) or from an oceanic perspective, through a regionalization of the proximal and distal continental margins (LMEs: large marine ecosystems). Here, we present a global-scale coastal segmentation, composed of three consistent levels, that includes the whole aquatic continuum with its riverine, estuarine and shelf sea components. Our work delineates comprehensive ensembles by harmonizing previous segmentations and typologies in order to retain the most important physical characteristics of both the land and shelf areas. The proposed multi-scale segmentation results in a distribution of global exorheic watersheds, estuaries and continental shelf seas among 45 major zones (MARCATS: MARgins and CATchments Segmentation) and 149 sub-units (COSCATs). Geographic and hydrologic parameters such as the surface area, volume and freshwater residence time are calculated for each coastal unit as well as different hypsometric pro- files. Our analysis provides detailed insights into the distributions of coastal and continental shelf areas and how they connect with incoming riverine fluxes. The segmentation is also used to re-evaluate the global estuarine CO2 flux at the air–water interface combining global and regional average emission rates derived from local studies.

  15. Multi-scale modelling of radiation damage in Fe-Cr based on ab initio electronic structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Paer

    2004-04-01

    The efficiency of fast neutron reactors, such as for fusion, breeding and transmutation, depend strongly on the neutron radiation resistance of the materials used in the reactors. The binary Fe-Cr alloy, which has many attractive properties in this regard, is the base for the best steels of today which are, however, still not up to the required standards. Therefore, substantial effort has been devoted to finding new materials that can cope with the demands better. Experimental studies must be complemented with extensive theoretical modelling in order to understand the effects that different alloying elements has on the resistance properties of materials. To this end, the first steps of multi-scale modelling has been taken, starting out with ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of the complete concentration range range of the disordered binary Fe-C alloy. The mixing enthalpy of Fe-Cr has been quantitatively predicted and has, together with data from literature, been used in order to fit two sets of interatomic potentials for the purpose of simulating defect evolution with molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte-Carlo codes. These dedicated Fe-Cr alloy potentials are new and represent important additions to the pure element potentials that can be found in literature.

  16. Can multi-scale calibrations allow MT-derived resistivities to be used to probe the structure of the deep crust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Virginia; Billia, Marco; Easingwood, Richard; Kirilova, Martina; Kluge, Emma; Sauer, Katrina; Sutherland, Rupert; Timms, Nicholas; Townend, John

    2017-04-01

    Our current knowledge of microstructural and mechanical controls on rock resistivity is such that identical magnetotelluric (MT) anomalies could result from a highly mineralized but extinct shear zone, or from an unmineralized, fluid saturated, active shear zone. In pursuit of the ability to interpret the structure and activity (rather than just the presence) of buried geological structures from electromagnetic data, we are investigating correlations between rock structure and electrical properties of ductile shear zone rocks recovered from the active Alpine Fault Zone, New Zealand. Multi-scale measurements of resistivity exist for this zone: its ductile portions have anomalously high electrical conductivity identified in MT models constructed as part of the South Island Geophysical Transect (SIGHT). Additionally wireline resistivities were measured in situ to 820 m depth during the recent Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-2), and resisistivity of hand samples has been measured at laboratory conditions [Kluge et al., Abstract EGU2017-10139]. In exhumed and borehole samples, the distributions and arrangements of conductivity carriers - graphite, amorphous carbon, and grain boundary pores that would have contained brines or other conductive fluids at depth, have been characterised. These vary systematically according to the total ductile shear strain they have accommodated [Kirilova et al., Abstract EGU2017-5773; Sauer et al., Abstract EGU2017-10485]. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of grain boundaries also indicate that they contain carbon. The next phases of our investigation involve: (i) construction of crustal fluid composition models by quantitative microstructural and compositional/mineralogical mapping of fluid remnants and their solid residues and calibration of these using in situ measurements of fluid composition in DFDP-2 at depths to 820 m; (ii) calculation of resistivities for real microstructures based on electrical properties of the

  17. Multi-scale full-field measurements and near-wall modeling of turbulent subcooled boiling flow using innovative experimental techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Yassin A., E-mail: y-hassan@tamu.edu

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • Near wall full-field velocity components under subcooled boiling were measured. • Simultaneous shadowgraphy, infrared thermometry wall temperature and particle-tracking velocimetry techniques were combined. • Near wall velocity modifications under subcooling boiling were observed. - Abstract: Multi-phase flows are one of the challenges on which the CFD simulation community has been working extensively with a relatively low success. The phenomena associated behind the momentum and heat transfer mechanisms associated to multi-phase flows are highly complex requiring resolving simultaneously for multiple scales on time and space. Part of the reasons behind the low predictive capability of CFD when studying multi-phase flows, is the scarcity of CFD-grade experimental data for validation. The complexity of the phenomena and its sensitivity to small sources of perturbations makes its measurements a difficult task. Non-intrusive and innovative measuring techniques are required to accurately measure multi-phase flow parameters while at the same time satisfying the high resolution required to validate CFD simulations. In this context, this work explores the feasible implementation of innovative measuring techniques that can provide whole-field and multi-scale measurements of two-phase flow turbulence, heat transfer, and boiling parameters. To this end, three visualization techniques are simultaneously implemented to study subcooled boiling flow through a vertical rectangular channel with a single heated wall. These techniques are listed next and are used as follow: (1) High-speed infrared thermometry (IR-T) is used to study the impact of the boiling level on the heat transfer coefficients at the heated wall, (2) Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) is used to analyze the influence that boiling parameters have on the liquid phase turbulence statistics, (3) High-speed shadowgraphy with LED illumination is used to obtain the gas phase dynamics. To account

  18. Evaluation of Fengyun satellite retrievals and ERA reanalyzes products based on a multi-scale soil moisture monitoring network in Tibet Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, L.

    2016-12-01

    Due to the lack of observation data which match the pixels size of satellite remote sensing data or the grid size of reanalyzes product, the accuracy of inv