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Sample records for chak1 binding peptides

  1. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  2. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.;

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit...

  3. Antimicrobial Peptide-Lipid Binding Interactions and Binding Selectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Lad, Mitaben D.; Birembaut, Fabrice; Clifton, Luke A.; Frazier, Richard A.; Webster, John R. P.; Green, Rebecca J.

    2007-01-01

    Surface pressure measurements, external reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and neutron reflectivity have been used to investigate the lipid-binding behavior of three antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin II, and cecropin P1. As expected, all three cationic peptides were shown to interact more strongly with the anionic lipid, 1,2 dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycerol-3-(phosphor-rac-(1-glycerol)) (DPPG), compared to the zwitterionic lipid, 1,2 dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocho...

  4. Effect of solid surface charge on the binding behaviour of a metal-binding peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Donatan, Senem; Sarikaya, Mehmet; TAMERLER, Candan; Urgen, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, solid-binding peptides have been increasingly used as molecular building blocks coupling bio- and nanotechnology. Despite considerable research being invested in this field, the effects of many surface-related parameters that define the binding of peptide to solids are still unknown. In the quest to control biological molecules at solid interfaces and, thereby, tailoring the binding characteristics of the peptides, the use of surface charge of the solid surface may proba...

  5. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin. PMID:26903196

  6. Prediction of MHC class I binding peptides, using SVMHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elofsson Arne

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T-cells are key players in regulating a specific immune response. Activation of cytotoxic T-cells requires recognition of specific peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I molecules. MHC-peptide complexes are potential tools for diagnosis and treatment of pathogens and cancer, as well as for the development of peptide vaccines. Only one in 100 to 200 potential binders actually binds to a certain MHC molecule, therefore a good prediction method for MHC class I binding peptides can reduce the number of candidate binders that need to be synthesized and tested. Results Here, we present a novel approach, SVMHC, based on support vector machines to predict the binding of peptides to MHC class I molecules. This method seems to perform slightly better than two profile based methods, SYFPEITHI and HLA_BIND. The implementation of SVMHC is quite simple and does not involve any manual steps, therefore as more data become available it is trivial to provide prediction for more MHC types. SVMHC currently contains prediction for 26 MHC class I types from the MHCPEP database or alternatively 6 MHC class I types from the higher quality SYFPEITHI database. The prediction models for these MHC types are implemented in a public web service available at http://www.sbc.su.se/svmhc/. Conclusions Prediction of MHC class I binding peptides using Support Vector Machines, shows high performance and is easy to apply to a large number of MHC class I types. As more peptide data are put into MHC databases, SVMHC can easily be updated to give prediction for additional MHC class I types. We suggest that the number of binding peptides needed for SVM training is at least 20 sequences.

  7. Peptide Arrays for Binding Studies of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klecker, Maria; Dissmeyer, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The automated SPOT (synthetic peptide arrays on membrane support technique) synthesis technology has entrenched as a rapid and robust method to generate peptide libraries on cellulose membrane supports. The synthesis method is based on conventional Fmoc chemistry building up peptides with free N-terminal amino acids starting at their cellulose-coupled C-termini. Several hundreds of peptide sequences can be assembled with this technique on one membrane comprising a strong binding potential due to high local peptide concentrations. Peptide orientation on SPOT membranes qualifies this array type for assaying substrate specificities of N-recognins, the recognition elements of the N-end rule pathway of targeted protein degradation (NERD). Pioneer studies described binding capability of mammalian and yeast enzymes depending on a peptide's N-terminus. SPOT arrays have been successfully used to describe substrate specificity of N-recognins which are the recognition elements of the N-end rule pathway of targeted protein degradation (NERD). Here, we describe the implementation of SPOT binding assays with focus on the identification of N-recognin substrates, applicable also for plant NERD enzymes. PMID:27424747

  8. The binding mechanism of a peptidic cyclic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Svane, Anna S P; Sørensen, Hans Peter; Jensen, Jan K; Hosseini, Masood; Chen, Zhuo; Weydert, Caroline; Nielsen, Jakob T; Christensen, Anni; Yuan, Cai; Jensen, Knud Jørgen; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Malmendal, Anders; Huang, Mingdong; Andreasen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases are classical objects for studies of catalytic and inhibitory mechanisms as well as interesting as therapeutic targets. Since small-molecule serine protease inhibitors generally suffer from specificity problems, peptidic inhibitors, isolated from phage-displayed peptide libraries......, have attracted considerable attention. Here, we have investigated the mechanism of binding of peptidic inhibitors to serine protease targets. Our model is upain-1 (CSWRGLENHRMC), a disulfide-bond-constrained competitive inhibitor of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator with a noncanonical...... inhibitory mechanism and an unusually high specificity. Using a number of modified variants of upain-1, we characterised the upain-1-urokinase-type plasminogen activator complex using X-ray crystal structure analysis, determined a model of the peptide in solution by NMR spectroscopy, and analysed binding...

  9. Hyaluronic Acid Binding Peptides Prevent Experimental Staphylococcal Wound Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zaleski, Kathleen J. ; Kolodka, Tadeusz; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; McLoughlin, Rachel M.; Mary L. Delaney; Charlton, Bernard T.; Johnson, Wendy; Tzianabos, Arthur O.

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of surgical wound infections. The development of mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance by this and other bacterial pathogens has prompted the search for new approaches to treat infectious diseases. Hyaluronic acid binding peptides have been shown to modulate cellular trafficking during host responses and were assessed for their ability to treat and possibly prevent experimental surgical wound infections caused by S. aureus. Treatment with these peptides...

  10. Describing the Peptide Binding Specificity of HLA-C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel Nors; Nielsen, Morten;

    for 5 HLA-C molecules and for all, but one, molecule we find a high frequency of binders, >70%, among these peptides. To extend the examined peptide space, we use bioinformatic prediction tools to search for additional binders. Finally, we update our prediction tool, NetMHCpan, with the HLA-C affinity......Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) presents peptides to T-cells for immune scrutiny. Whereas HLA-A and -B have been described in great detail, HLA-C has received much less attention. Here, to increase the coverage of HLA-C and the accuracy of the corresponding tools, we have generated HLA-C molecules......; peptide-binding assays, data and predictors; and tetramers; representing the most prevalent HLA-C molecules. We have combined positional scanning combinatorial peptide library (PSCPL) with a homogenous high-throughput dissociation assay and generated specificity matrices for 11 different HLA-C molecules...

  11. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Song, Jie; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  12. Zooming into the binding groove of HLA molecules : which positions and which substitutions change peptide binding most?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deutekom, Hanneke W M; Kesmir, C.

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. Almost all polymorphic residues are located in the peptide-binding groove, resulting in different peptide-binding preferences. Whether a single amino acid change can alter the peptide-binding repertoire of an HLA

  13. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Genetically Engineered Inorganic Binding Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresswell, Carolyn Gayle

    Understanding how organisms are capable of forming (synthesize, crystallize, and organize) solid minerals into complex architectures has been a fundamental question of biomimetic materials chemistry and biomineralization for decades. This study utilizes short peptides selected using a cell surface display library for the specific polymorphs of calcium carbonate, i.e., aragonite and calcite, to identify two sets of sequences which can then be used to examine their effects in the formation, crystal structure, morphology of the CaCO3 minerals. A procedure of counter selection, along with fluorescence microscopy (FM) characterization, was adapted to insure that the sequences on the cells were specific to their respective substrate, i.e., aragonite or calcite. From the resulting two sets of sequences selected, five distinct strong binders were identified with a variety of biochemical characteristics and synthesized for further study. Protein derived peptides, using the known sequences of the proteins that are associated with calcite or aragonite, were also designed using a bioinformatics-based similarity analysis of the two sets of binders. In particular, an aragonite binding protein segment, AP7, a protein found in nacre, was chosen for this design and the resulting effects of the designed peptides and the AP7 were examined. Specifically, the binding affinities of the selected and the protein derived peptides off the cells were then tested using FM; these studies resulted in different binding characteristics of the synthesized and cellular bound peptides. Two of the peptides that displayed strong binding on the cells bound to neither of the CaCO 3 substrates and both the high and low similarity protein-derived peptides bound to both polymorphs. However, two of the peptides were found to only bind to their respective polymorph showing; these results are significant in that with this study it is demonstrated that the designed peptides based on experimental library

  14. Binding of peptides to HLA-DQ molecules: peptide binding properties of the disease-associated HLA-DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201) molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, B H; Buus, S; Vartdal, F;

    1994-01-01

    assay. The MB 65 kDa 243-255Y peptide bound to DQ2 in a strictly pH-dependent fashion, with optimal binding around pH 5 and only weak binding at pH 7.4. The association of the MB 65 kDa 243-255Y peptide to DQ2 was slow, but once formed, the peptide-HLA complexes were very stable. The binding of peptides...

  15. Inhibition of aggregation of amyloid peptides by beta-sheet breaker peptides and their binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viet, Man Hoang; Ngo, Son Tung; Lam, Nguyen Sy; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-06-01

    The effects of beta-sheet breaker peptides KLVFF and LPFFD on the oligomerization of amyloid peptides were studied by all-atom simulations. It was found that LPFFD interferes the aggregation of Aβ(16-22) peptides to a greater extent than does KLVFF. Using the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we found that the former binds more strongly to Aβ(16-22). Therefore, by simulations, we have clarified the relationship between aggregation rates and binding affinity: the stronger the ligand binding, the slower the oligomerization process. The binding affinity of pentapeptides to full-length peptide Aβ(1-40) and its mature fibrils has been considered using the Autodock and MM-PBSA methods. The hydrophobic interaction between ligands and receptors plays a more important role for association than does hydrogen bonding. The influence of beta-sheet breaker peptides on the secondary structures of monomer Aβ(1-40) was studied in detail, and it turns out that, in their presence, the total beta-sheet content can be enhanced. However, the aggregation can be slowed because the beta-content is reduced in fibril-prone regions. Both pentapeptides strongly bind to monomer Aβ(1-40), as well as to mature fibrils, but KLVFF displays a lower binding affinity than LPFFD. Our findings are in accord with earlier experiments that both of these peptides can serve as prominent inhibitors. In addition, we predict that LPFFD inhibits/degrades the fibrillogenesis of full-length amyloid peptides better than KLVFF. This is probably related to a difference in their total hydrophobicities in that the higher the hydrophobicity, the lower the inhibitory capacity. The GROMOS96 43a1 force field with explicit water and the force field proposed by Morris et al. (Morris et al. J. Comput. Chem. 1998, 19, 1639 ) were employed for all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and Autodock experiments, respectively. PMID:21563780

  16. SH3 domain-peptide binding energy calculations based on structural ensemble and multiple peptide templates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungpyo Hong

    Full Text Available SH3 domains mediate signal transduction by recognizing short peptides. Understanding of the driving forces in peptide recognitions will help us to predict the binding specificity of the domain-peptide recognition and to understand the molecular interaction networks of cells. However, accurate calculation of the binding energy is a tough challenge. In this study, we propose three ideas for improving our ability to predict the binding energy between SH3 domains and peptides: (1 utilizing the structural ensembles sampled from a molecular dynamics simulation trajectory, (2 utilizing multiple peptide templates, and (3 optimizing the sequence-structure mapping. We tested these three ideas on ten previously studied SH3 domains for which SPOT analysis data were available. The results indicate that calculating binding energy using the structural ensemble was most effective, clearly increasing the prediction accuracy, while the second and third ideas tended to give better binding energy predictions. We applied our method to the five SH3 targets in DREAM4 Challenge and selected the best performing method.

  17. Exploring the Structural Requirements of Collagen-Binding Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Abd-Elgaliel, Wael R; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Collagen synthesis and tissue remodeling are involved in many diseases; therefore collagen specific binding agents have been developed to study collagen changes in various tissues. Based on a recently reported collagen binding peptide, which contains unnatural Biphenylalanine (Bip) amino acid residue, constructs with various structure variations were synthesized to explore the contributions of unnatural Bip residue, conformational restrain, and amino acid sequence in collagen recognition. The...

  18. Novel heparan sulfate-binding peptides for blocking herpesvirus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranay Dogra

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection can lead to congenital hearing loss and mental retardation. Upon immune suppression, reactivation of latent HCMV or primary infection increases morbidity in cancer, transplantation, and late stage AIDS patients. Current treatments include nucleoside analogues, which have significant toxicities limiting their usefulness. In this study we screened a panel of synthetic heparin-binding peptides for their ability to prevent CMV infection in vitro. A peptide designated, p5+14 exhibited ~ 90% reduction in murine CMV (MCMV infection. Because negatively charged, cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs, serve as the attachment receptor during the adsorption phase of the CMV infection cycle, we hypothesized that p5+14 effectively competes for CMV adsorption to the cell surface resulting in the reduction in infection. Positively charged Lys residues were required for peptide binding to cell-surface HSPGs and reducing viral infection. We show that this inhibition was not due to a direct neutralizing effect on the virus itself and that the peptide blocked adsorption of the virus. The peptide also inhibited infection of other herpesviruses: HCMV and herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 in vitro, demonstrating it has broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Therefore, this peptide may offer an adjunct therapy for the treatment of herpes viral infections and other viruses that use HSPGs for entry.

  19. Autologous peptides constitutively occupy the antigen binding site on Ia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M;

    1988-01-01

    Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype was...

  20. Selection of trkB-binding peptides from a phage-displayed random peptide library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马仲才; 吴晓兰; 曹明媚; 潘卫; 朱分禄; 陈景山; 戚中田

    2003-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) shows potential in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, but the therapeutic application of BDNF has been greatly limited because it is too large in molecular size to permeate blood-brain barrier. To develop low-molecular-weight BDNF-like peptides, we selected a phage-displayed random peptide library using trkB expressed on NIH 3T3 cells as target in the study. With the strategy of peptide library incubation with NIH 3T3 cells and competitive elution with 1 υg/mL of BDNF in the last round of selection, the specific phages able to bind to the natural conformation of trkB and antagonize BDNF binding to trkB were enriched effectively. Five trkB-binding peptides were obtained, in which a core sequence of CRA/TXφXXφXXC (X represents the random amino acids, φ represents T, L or I) was identified. The BDNF-like activity of these five peptides displayed on phages was not observed, though all of them antagonized the activity of BDNF in a dose-dependent manner. Similar results were obtained with the synthetic peptide of C1 clone, indicating that the 5 phage-derived peptides were trkB antagonists. These low-molecular-weight antagonists of trkB may be of potential application in the treatment of neuroblastoma and chronic pain. Meanwhile, the obtained core sequence also could be used as the base to construct the secondary phage-displayed peptide library for further development of small peptides mimicking BDNF activity.

  1. Binding of gliadin peptides to fetal chicken intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding of gliadin peptides was investigated in intact and in homogenized fetal chicken intestine by means of competitive displacement studies with 125I-labelled PPG 12,400 (proteolysis product of gliadin, Mr 12,400). Gliadin binding was shown to be specific and calcium-dependent. Labelled gliadin can be displaced by morphine and naloxone. The specific binding of gliadin also depends on the developmental stage of the chicken intestine and decreases considerably from day 12-19 of fetal development. (author)

  2. Importance of a Hydrophobic Pocket for Peptide Binding in Lactococcal OppA▿

    OpenAIRE

    Berntsson, Ronnie P-A; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H; Poolman, Bert; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan

    2011-01-01

    Lactococcal oligopeptide-binding protein A (OppA) binds peptides with widely varied lengths and sequences. We previously hypothesized that a hydrophobic pocket in OppA preferentially binds a hydrophobic peptide side chain and thus determines its binding register. Two crystal structures of OppA with different nonapeptides now indeed show binding in different registers.

  3. Competitive binding of antagonistic peptides fine-tunes stomatal patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Suk; Hnilova, Marketa; Maes, Michal; Lin, Ya-Chen Lisa; Putarjunan, Aarthi; Han, Soon-Ki; Avila, Julian; Torii, Keiko U

    2015-06-25

    During development, cells interpret complex and often conflicting signals to make optimal decisions. Plant stomata, the cellular interface between a plant and the atmosphere, develop according to positional cues, which include a family of secreted peptides called epidermal patterning factors (EPFs). How these signalling peptides orchestrate pattern formation at a molecular level remains unclear. Here we report in Arabidopsis that Stomagen (also called EPF-LIKE9) peptide, which promotes stomatal development, requires ERECTA (ER)-family receptor kinases and interferes with the inhibition of stomatal development by the EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 2 (EPF2)-ER module. Both EPF2 and Stomagen directly bind to ER and its co-receptor TOO MANY MOUTHS. Stomagen peptide competitively replaced EPF2 binding to ER. Furthermore, application of EPF2, but not Stomagen, elicited rapid phosphorylation of downstream signalling components in vivo. Our findings demonstrate how a plant receptor agonist and antagonist define inhibitory and inductive cues to fine-tune tissue patterning on the plant epidermis. PMID:26083750

  4. SABinder: A Web Service for Predicting Streptavidin-Binding Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Juanjuan; Ru, Beibei; Zhou, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Streptavidin is sometimes used as the intended target to screen phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for streptavidin-binding peptides (SBPs). More often in the biopanning system, however, streptavidin is just a commonly used anchoring molecule that can efficiently capture the biotinylated target. In this case, SBPs creeping into the biopanning results are not desired binders but target-unrelated peptides (TUP). Taking them as intended binders may mislead subsequent studies. Therefore, it is important to find if a peptide is likely to be an SBP when streptavidin is either the intended target or just the anchoring molecule. In this paper, we describe an SVM-based ensemble predictor called SABinder. It is the first predictor for SBP. The model was built with the feature of optimized dipeptide composition. It was observed that 89.20% (MCC = 0.78; AUC = 0.93; permutation test, p < 0.001) of peptides were correctly classified. As a web server, SABinder is freely accessible. The tool provides a highly efficient way to exclude potential SBP when they are TUP or to facilitate identification of possibly new SBP when they are the desired binders. In either case, it will be helpful and can benefit related scientific community.

  5. A community resource benchmarking predictions of peptide binding to MHC-I molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Bjoern Peters; Huynh-Hoa Bui; Sune Frankild; Morten Nielson; Claus Lundegaard; Emrah Kostem; Derek Basch; Kasper Lamberth; Mikkel Harndahl; Ward Fleri; Wilson, Stephen S; John Sidney; Ole Lund; Soren Buus; Alessandro Sette

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules by T lymphocytes is an essential part of immune surveillance. Each MHC allele has a characteristic peptide binding preference, which can be captured in prediction algorithms, allowing for the rapid scan of entire pathogen proteomes for peptide likely to bind MHC. Here we make public a large set of 48,828 quantitative peptide-binding affinity measurements relating to 48 different mouse, human, macaque, an...

  6. A community resource benchmarking predictions of peptide binding to MHC-I molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, B; Bui, HH; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Kostem, E; Basch, D; Lamberth, K.; Harndahl, M.; Fleri, W.; Wilson, SS; Sidney, J; Lund, Ole; Buus, S.; Sette, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules by T lymphocytes is an essential part of immune surveillance. Each MHC allele has a characteristic peptide binding preference, which can be captured in prediction algorithms, allowing for the rapid scan of entire pathogen proteomes for peptide likely to bind MHC. Here we make public a large set of 48,828 quantitative peptide-binding affinity measurements relating to 48 different mouse, human, macaque, an...

  7. A Community Resource Benchmarking Predictions of Peptide Binding to MHC-I Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Bjoern Peters; Huynh-Hoa Bui; Sune Frankild; Morten Nielson; Claus Lundegaard; Emrah Kostem; Derek Basch; Kasper Lamberth; Mikkel Harndahl; Ward Fleri; Wilson, Stephen S; John Sidney; Ole Lund; Soren Buus; Alessandro Sette

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules by T lymphocytes is an essential part of immune surveillance. Each MHC allele has a characteristic peptide binding preference, which can be captured in prediction algorithms, allowing for the rapid scan of entire pathogen proteomes for peptide likely to bind MHC. Here we make public a large set of 48,828 quantitative peptide-binding affinity measurements relating to 48 different mouse, human, macaque, an...

  8. Identification of an erythrocyte binding peptide from the erythrocyte binding antigen, EBA-175, which blocks parasite multiplication and induces peptide-blocking antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Koch, C.; Wasniowska, K.; Lemnge, M.M.; Jensen, J.B.; Sim, B.K.L.

    1998-01-01

    A biotinylated peptide covering a sequence of 21 amino acids (aa) from the erythrocyte binding antigen (EBA-175) of Plasmodium falciparum bound to human glycophorin A, an erythrocyte receptor for merozoites, as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and to erythrocytes as...... the binding of a range of truncated peptides to immobilized glycophorin A. Our data indicate that EBA(aa1085-96) is part of a ligand on the merozoite for binding to erythrocyte receptors. This binding suggests that the EBA(aa1085-96) peptide is involved in a second binding step, independent of sialic...

  9. Peptide binding predictions for HLA DR, DP and DQ molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, P.; Sidney, J.; Kim, Y.;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MHC class II binding predictions are widely used to identify epitope candidates in infectious agents, allergens, cancer and autoantigens. The vast majority of prediction algorithms for human MHC class II to date have targeted HLA molecules encoded in the DR locus. This reflects a...... significant gap in knowledge as HLA DP and DQ molecules are presumably equally important, and have only been studied less because they are more difficult to handle experimentally. RESULTS: In this study, we aimed to narrow this gap by providing a large scale dataset of over 17,000 HLA-peptide binding...... affinities for a set of 11 HLA DP and DQ alleles. We also expanded our dataset for HLA DR alleles resulting in a total of 40,000 MHC class II binding affinities covering 26 allelic variants. Utilizing this dataset, we generated prediction tools utilizing several machine learning algorithms and evaluated...

  10. SABinder: A Web Service for Predicting Streptavidin-Binding Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bifang; Kang, Juanjuan; Ru, Beibei; Ding, Hui; Zhou, Peng; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Streptavidin is sometimes used as the intended target to screen phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for streptavidin-binding peptides (SBPs). More often in the biopanning system, however, streptavidin is just a commonly used anchoring molecule that can efficiently capture the biotinylated target. In this case, SBPs creeping into the biopanning results are not desired binders but target-unrelated peptides (TUP). Taking them as intended binders may mislead subsequent studies. Therefore, it is important to find if a peptide is likely to be an SBP when streptavidin is either the intended target or just the anchoring molecule. In this paper, we describe an SVM-based ensemble predictor called SABinder. It is the first predictor for SBP. The model was built with the feature of optimized dipeptide composition. It was observed that 89.20% (MCC = 0.78; AUC = 0.93; permutation test, p web server, SABinder is freely accessible. The tool provides a highly efficient way to exclude potential SBP when they are TUP or to facilitate identification of possibly new SBP when they are the desired binders. In either case, it will be helpful and can benefit related scientific community. PMID:27610387

  11. Identification of an erythrocyte binding peptide from the erythrocyte binding antigen, EBA-175, which blocks parasite multiplication and induces peptide-blocking antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Koch, C.; Wasniowska, K.; Lemnge, M.M.; Jensen, J.B.; Sim, B.K.L.

    1998-01-01

    A biotinylated peptide covering a sequence of 21 amino acids (aa) from the erythrocyte binding antigen (EBA-175) of Plasmodium falciparum bound to human glycophorin A, an erythrocyte receptor for merozoites, as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and to erythrocytes as...... the binding of a range of truncated peptides to immobilized glycophorin A. Our data indicate that EBA(aa1085-96) is part of a ligand on the merozoite for binding to erythrocyte receptors. This binding suggests that the EBA(aa1085-96) peptide is involved in a second binding step, independent of sialic...... acid, Antibody recognition of this peptide sequence may protect against merozoite invasion, but only a small proportion of sera from adults from different areas of malaria transmission showed antibody reactivities to the EBA(aa1076-96! peptide, indicating that this sequence is only weakly immunogenic...

  12. Identification of an erythrocyte binding peptide from the erythrocyte binding antigen, EBA-175, which blocks parasite multiplication and induces peptide-blocking antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Heegaard, P M; Koch, C; Wasniowska, K; Lemnge, M M; Jensen, J B; Sim, B K

    1998-01-01

    A biotinylated peptide covering a sequence of 21 amino acids (aa) from the erythrocyte binding antigen (EBA-175) of Plasmodium falciparum bound to human glycophorin A, an erythrocyte receptor for merozoites, as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and to erythrocytes as...... the binding of a range of truncated peptides to immobilized glycophorin A. Our data indicate that EBA(aa1085-96) is part of a ligand on the merozoite for binding to erythrocyte receptors. This binding suggests that the EBA(aa1085-96) peptide is involved in a second binding step, independent of sialic...... acid. Antibody recognition of this peptide sequence may protect against merozoite invasion, but only a small proportion of sera from adults from different areas of malaria transmission showed antibody reactivities to the EBA(aa1076-96) peptide, indicating that this sequence is only weakly immunogenic...

  13. Automated benchmarking of peptide-MHC class I binding predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Thomas; Metushi, Imir G.; Greenbaum, Jason;

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Numerous in silico methods predicting peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules have been developed over the last decades. However, the multitude of available prediction tools makes it non-trivial for the end-user to select which tool to use for a giv......-user to make educated selections between participating tools. Of the four participating servers, NetMHCpan performed the best, followed by ANN, SMM and finally ARB. Availability and implementation: Up-to-date performance evaluations of each server can be found online at http...... the public access to frequent, up-to-date performance evaluations of all participating tools. To overcome potential selection bias in the data included in the IEDB, a strategy was implemented that suggests a set of peptides for which different prediction methods give divergent predictions as to their...

  14. Novel peptide ligand with high binding capacity for antibody purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, L. N.; Gustavsson, P. E.; Michael, R.;

    2012-01-01

    commonly used capture step in mAb down stream processing; however, the use of Protein A chromatography is less attractive due to toxic ligand leakage as well as high cost. Whether used as an alternative to the Protein A chromatographic media or as a subsequent polishing step, small synthetic peptide...... the interaction is favorable and entropy-driven with an enthalpy penalty. Our results show that the binding of the Fc fragment of IgG is mediated by hydrophobic interactions and that elution at low pH is most likely due to electrostatic repulsion. Furthermore, we have separated aggregated IgG from non...

  15. Relative free energy of binding between antimicrobial peptides and SDS or DPC micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyed-Ahmad, Abdallah; Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2009-09-01

    We present relative binding free energy calculations for six antimicrobial peptide-micelle systems, three peptides interacting with two types of micelles. The peptides are the scorpion derived antimicrobial peptide (AMP), IsCT and two of its analogues. The micelles are dodecylphosphatidylcholine (DPC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) micelles. The interfacial electrostatic properties of DPC and SDS micelles are assumed to be similar to those of zwitterionic mammalian and anionic bacterial membrane interfaces, respectively. We test the hypothesis that the binding strength between peptides and the anionic micelle SDS can provide information on peptide antimicrobial activity, since it is widely accepted that AMPs function by binding to and disrupting the predominantly anionic lipid bilayer of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. We also test the hypothesis that the binding strength between peptides and the zwitterionic micelle DPC can provide information on peptide haemolytic activities, since it is accepted that they also bind to and disrupt the zwitterionic membrane of mammalian cells. Equilibrium structures of the peptides, micelles and peptide-micelle complexes are obtained from more than 300 ns of molecular dynamics simulations. A thermodynamic cycle is introduced to compute the binding free energy from electrostatic, non-electrostatic and entropic contributions. We find relative binding free energy strengths between peptides and SDS to correlate with the experimentally measured rankings for peptide antimicrobial activities, and relative free energy binding strengths between peptides and DPC to correlate with the observed rankings for peptide haemolytic toxicities. These findings point to the importance of peptide-membrane binding strength for antimicrobial activity and haemolytic activity. PMID:21113423

  16. A peptide-binding assay for the disease-associated HLA-DQ8 molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straumfors, A; Johansen, B H; Vartdal, F;

    1998-01-01

    The study of peptide binding to HLA class II molecules has mostly concentrated on DR molecules. Since many autoimmune diseases show a primary association to particular DQ molecules rather than DR molecules, it is also important to study the peptide-binding properties of DQ molecules. Here we report...... panel of 43 peptides of different lengths and sequences. The DQ8 molecules showed a different pattern of peptide binding compared to a previously studied DQ2 molecule. Peptides derived from thyroid peroxidase, HLA-DQ(alpha1*0301), HLA-DQ(alpha1*0302), retinol receptor and p21ras were among the high...

  17. Pulling peptides across nanochannels: resolving peptide binding and translocation through the hetero-oligomeric channel from Nocardia farcinica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pratik Raj; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Modi, Niraj; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Benz, Roland; Winterhalter, Mathias; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R

    2012-12-21

    We investigated translocation of cationic peptides through nanochannels derived from the Gram-positive bacterium Nocardia farcinica at the single-molecule level. The two subunits NfpA and NfpB form a hetero-oligomeric cation selective channel. On the basis of amino acid comparison we performed homology modeling and obtained a channel structurally related to MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis. The quantitative single-molecule measurements provide an insight into transport processes of solutes through nanochannels. High-resolution ion conductance measurements in the presence of peptides of different charge and length revealed the kinetics of peptide binding. The observed asymmetry in peptide binding kinetics indicated a unidirectional channel insertion in the lipid bilayer. In the case of cationic peptides, the external voltage acts as a driving force that promotes the interaction of the peptide with the channel surface. At low voltage, the peptide just binds to the channel, whereas at higher voltage, the force is strong enough to pull the peptide across the channel. This allows distinguishing quantitatively between peptide binding and translocation through the channel. PMID:23121560

  18. Trastuzumab-binding peptide display by Tobacco mosaic virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2/neu) is a target for the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Recently, trastuzumab-binding peptides (TBP) of HER2/neu that inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells were identified. We have now studied conditions of efficient assembly in vivo of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based particles displaying TBP on its surface. The system is based on an Agrobacterium-mediated co-delivery of binary vectors encoding TMV RNA and coat protein (CP) with TBP in its C-terminal extension into plant leaves. We show how the fusion of amino acid substituted TBP (sTBP) to CP via a flexible peptide linker can improve the manufacturability of recombinant TMV (rTMV). We also reveal that rTMV particles with exposed sTBP retained trastuzumab-binding capacity but lost an anti-HER2/neu immunogenic scaffold function. Mouse antibodies against rTMV did not recognize HER2/neu on surface of human SK-BR-3 cells.

  19. Binding Mode of Insulin Receptor and Agonist Peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Insulin is a protein hormone secreted by pancreatic β cells. One of its main functions is to keep the balance of glucose inside the body by regulating the absorption and metabolism of glucose in the periphery tissue, as well as the production and storage of hepatic glycogen. The insulin receptor is a transmembrane glycoprotein in which two α subunits with a molecular weight of 135 kD and twoβ subunits with a molecular weight of 95 kD are joined by a disulfide bond to form a β-α-α-β structure. The extracellular α subunit, especially, its three domains near the N-terminal are partially responsible for signal transduction or ligand-binding, as indicated by the experiments. The extracellular α subunits are involved in binding the ligands. The experimental results indicate that the three domains of the N-terminal of the α subunits are the main determinative parts of the insulin receptor to bind the insulin or mimetic peptide.We employed the extracellular domain (PDBID: 1IGR) of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1 R ) as the template to simulate and optimize the spatial structures of the three domains in the extracellular domain of the insulin receptor, which includes 468 residues. The work was accomplished by making use of the homology program in the Insight Ⅱ package on an Origin3800 server. The docking calculations of the insulin receptor obtained by homology with hexapeptides were carried out by means of the program Affinity. The analysis indicated that there were hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic and hydrophobic effects in the docking complex of the insulin receptor with hexapeptides.Moreover, we described the spatial orientation of a mimetic peptide with agonist activity in the docking complex. We obtained a rough model of binding of DLAPSQ or STIVYS with the insulin receptor, which provides the powerful theoretical support for designing the minimal insulin mimetic peptide with agonist activity, making it possible to develop oral small

  20. Competition-based cellular peptide binding assays for 13 prevalent HLA class I alleles using fluorescein-labeled synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Jan H; Mommaas, Bregje; Mutis, Tuna; Huijbers, Ivo; Vissers, Debby; Benckhuijsen, Willemien E; Schreuder, Geziena M Th; Offringa, Rienk; Goulmy, Els; Melief, Cornelis J M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Drijfhout, Jan W

    2003-02-01

    We report the development, validation, and application of competition-based peptide binding assays for 13 prevalent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles. The assays are based on peptide binding to HLA molecules on living cells carrying the particular allele. Competition for binding between the test peptide of interest and a fluorescein-labeled HLA class I binding peptide is used as read out. The use of cell membrane-bound HLA class I molecules circumvents the need for laborious biochemical purification of these molecules in soluble form. Previously, we have applied this principle for HLA-A2 and HLA-A3. We now describe the assays for HLA-A1, HLA-A11, HLA-A24, HLA-A68, HLA-B7, HLA-B8, HLA-B14, HLA-B35, HLA-B60, HLA-B61, and HLA-B62. Together with HLA-A2 and HLA-A3, these alleles cover more than 95% of the Caucasian population. Several allele-specific parameters were determined for each assay. Using these assays, we identified novel HLA class I high-affinity binding peptides from HIVpol, p53, PRAME, and minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1. Thus these convenient and accurate peptide-binding assays will be useful for the identification of putative cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes presented on a diverse array of HLA class I molecules. PMID:12559627

  1. Binding of Euplotes octocarinatus centrin with target peptide melittin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Interactions between model target peptide melittin (ME) and Euplotes octocarinatus centrin (EoCen) were investigated by fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). In 0.1 mol/L N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N-2-ethanesulfonic acid (Hepes) and 150 mmol/L NaCl at pH 7.4, EoCen and isolated short C-terminal domain of EoCen (SC-EoCen) form 1:1 peptide:protein complexes. However, no detectable signal changes can be observed while isolated N-terminal domain of EoCen (N-EoCen) or isolated long C-terminal domain of EoCen (LC-EoCen) was added into solution of ME. The interaction between EoCen and ME is specified exclusively for the short C-terminal domain of EoCen. On the basis of fluorescence titration curves, the conditional binding constants of ME with EoCen and SC-EoCen were calculated to be logKME-EoCen = 6.81±0.33 and logKME-SC-EoCen = 6.51±0.45, respectively.

  2. Metal binding and folding properties of a minimalist Cys2His2 zinc finger peptide.

    OpenAIRE

    Michael, S.F.; Kilfoil, V J; Schmidt, M.H.; Amann, B T; Berg, J M

    1992-01-01

    A minimalist Cys2His2 zinc finger peptide, Lys-Tyr-Ala-Cys-Ala-Ala-Cys-Ala-Ala-Ala-Phe-Ala-Ala-Lys-Ala-Ala-Leu-Ala- Ala-His-Ala-Ala-Ala-His-Ala-Lys, has been synthesized. Metal binding studies using Co2+ as a probe indicated that this peptide forms a 1:1 peptide/metal complex with a dissociation constant comparable to that observed for other zinc finger peptides. At high peptide concentrations, a 2:1 peptide/metal complex also forms, with four cysteinates coordinated to Co2+. Additional studi...

  3. Flexible protein-peptide docking using CABS-dock with knowledge about the binding site

    OpenAIRE

    Kurcinski, Mateusz; Ciemny, Maciej Pawel; Blaszczyk, Maciej; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kmiecik, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts, structural prediction of protein-peptide complexes is still a very challenging task, mainly due to two reasons: high flexibility of the peptides and transient character of their interactions with proteins. Recently we have developed an automated web server CABS-dock (http://biocomp.chem.uw.edu.pl/CABSdock), which conducts flexible protein-peptide docking without any knowledge about the binding site. Our method allows for full flexibility of the peptide, whereas t...

  4. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated gene regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with chemically modified backbones. PNAs can bind to both DNA and RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner to form PNA/DNA and PNA/RNA duplex structures. When bound to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) targets, the PNA molecule replaces one DNA strand in the duplex by strand invasion to form a PNA/DNA/PNA [or (PNA)2/DNA] triplex structure and the displaced DNA strand exists as a singlestranded D-loop. PNA has been used in many studies as research tools for gene regulation and gene targeting. The Dloops generated from the PNA binding have also been demonstrated for its potential in initiating transcription and inducing gene expression. PNA provides a powerful tool to study the mechanism of transcription and an innovative strategy to regulate target gene expression. An understanding of the PNA-mediated gene regulation will have important clinical implications in treatment of many human diseases including genetic, cancerous, and age-related diseases.

  5. Influences of hydrocarbon linkers on the receptor binding affinities of gonadotropin-releasing hormone peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Haixun; Hathaway, Helen; Royce, Melanie E.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Miao, Yubin

    2013-01-01

    Three new DOTA-conjugated GnRH peptides with various hydrocarbon linkers were synthesized to evaluate the influences of the linkers on their receptor binding affinities. The hydrocarbon linker displayed a profound impact on the receptor binding affinities of DOTA-conjugated GnRH peptides. The Aun linker was better than Gaba, Ahx and Aoc linkers in retaining strong receptor binding affinity of the GnRH peptide. DOTA-Aun-(D-Lys6-GnRH) displayed 22.8 nM GnRH receptor binding affinity. 111In-DOTA...

  6. Predicting peptides binding to MHC class II molecules using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Lin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptides binding to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class II molecules are crucial for initiation and regulation of immune responses. Predicting peptides that bind to a specific MHC molecule plays an important role in determining potential candidates for vaccines. The binding groove in class II MHC is open at both ends, allowing peptides longer than 9-mer to bind. Finding the consensus motif facilitating the binding of peptides to a MHC class II molecule is difficult because of different lengths of binding peptides and varying location of 9-mer binding core. The level of difficulty increases when the molecule is promiscuous and binds to a large number of low affinity peptides. In this paper, we propose two approaches using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEA for predicting peptides binding to MHC class II molecules. One uses the information from both binders and non-binders for self-discovery of motifs. The other, in addition, uses information from experimentally determined motifs for guided-discovery of motifs. Results The proposed methods are intended for finding peptides binding to MHC class II I-Ag7 molecule – a promiscuous binder to a large number of low affinity peptides. Cross-validation results across experiments on two motifs derived for I-Ag7 datasets demonstrate better generalization abilities and accuracies of the present method over earlier approaches. Further, the proposed method was validated and compared on two publicly available benchmark datasets: (1 an ensemble of qualitative HLA-DRB1*0401 peptide data obtained from five different sources, and (2 quantitative peptide data obtained for sixteen different alleles comprising of three mouse alleles and thirteen HLA alleles. The proposed method outperformed earlier methods on most datasets, indicating that it is well suited for finding peptides binding to MHC class II molecules. Conclusion We present two MOEA-based algorithms for finding motifs

  7. Immunoglobulin G preparation from plasma samples and analysis of its affinity kinetic binding to peptide hormones

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Romain Legrand, Kuniko Takagi & Sergueï Fetissov ### Abstract Circulating peptide hormones such as ghrelin physiologically bind plasma immunoglobulins (Ig) which protect hormone from degradation and modulate its biological activity depending on affinity of hormone / IgG binding. Because the IgG set of each individual is unique, measuring affinity kinetics of human or animal plasma IgG binding to a specific peptide hormone may provide useful information towards understandi...

  8. Identification of binding peptides of the ADAM15 disintegrin domain using phage display

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jing Wu; Min-Chen Wu; Lian-Fen Zhang; Jian-Yong Lei; Lei Feng; Jian Jin

    2009-06-01

    ADAM15 plays an important role in tumour development by interacting with integrins. In this study, we investigated the target peptides of the ADAM15 disintegrin domain. First, we successfully produced the recombinant human ADAM15 disintegrin domain (RADD) that could inhibit melanoma cell adhesion by using Escherichia coli. Second, four specific binding peptides (peptides A, B, C, and D) were selected using a phage display 12-mer peptide library. The screening protocol involved 4 rounds of positive panning on RADD and 2 rounds of subtractive selection with streptavidin. By using the BLAST software and a relevant protein database, integrin v3 was found to be homologous to peptide A. Synthetic peptide A had a highly inhibitory effect on RADD–integrin v3 binding. The results demonstrate the potential application of short peptides for disrupting high-affinity ADAM–integrin interactions.

  9. Preliminary screening and identification of the hepatocarcinoma cell-binding peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of screening and isolating homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display random peptide library and to develop a new peptide which may be potentially used as targeting delivery carrier in the biological targeted diagnosis or therapy for liver cancer. Methods: A 12-mer peptide phage display library was used to screen and isolate peptides that bind to human hepatocarcinoma cells, and four rounds of subtractive panning were carried out with the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 as the target. The affinities of selected phage clones for human hepatocarcinoma cells were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared with that to human liver cell and other tumor cells of different tissue origins, respectively. In addition, the binding site in the tumor cells was observed with immunofluorescence analysis under confocal light microscopy. The amino acid sequences of phages that bind HepG2 specifically were deduced through DNA sequencing. Based on the results of DNA sequence, a 16-mer peptide (WH16) was designed and synthesized. Binding ability of the new peptide, WH16, was determined with competitive inhibition test. Results: After four rounds of panning, the phages that were bound to and internalized in human hepatocarcinoma cells were isolated. ELISA and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the affinity of these phages for hepatocarcinoma cells. 56.67%(17/30) of the isolated phages displayed repeated sequence FLLEPHLMDTSM, and FLEP was defined as conservative motif . Binding of the selected phage to HepG2 cells was inhibited by synthesized peptide WH16, that strongly support that cellular binding of the phage is mediated through its displayed peptide, and WH16 can also bind to HepG2. Conclusions: It is feasible to screen and isolate homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display random peptide

  10. Preliminary screening and identification of the peptide binding to hepatocarcinoma cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The present study was performed to screen and isolate homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display of random peptide library with the purpose of developing a new peptide which may be potentially used as target delivery carrier in the biological target diagnosis or therapy for liver cancer. Methods: A peptide 12-mer phage display library was used to screen and isolate peptide that bind to human hepatocarcinoma cell, and four rounds subtractive panning were carried out with the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 as the target. The affinities of selected phage clones to human hepatocarcinoma cell were determined with ELISA and compared with human liver cell and other tumor cells of different tissue origins respectively. In addition, the binding site in the tumor cells was observed with immunofluorescence analysis under confocal light microscopy. The amino acid sequences of phages that bind HepG2 specifically were deduced though DNA sequencing. Based on the results of DNA sequence, a 16-mer peptide (WH16) was designed and synthesized. Binding ability of the new peptide WH16 was determined with competitive inhibition test. Results: After four rounds panning, the phages that bound to and internalized in human hepatocarcinoma cell were isolated. ELISA and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the affinity of these phages to hepatpcarcinoma cells 56.57%(17/30) of the isolated phages displayed repeated sequence FLLEPHLMDTSM, and FLEP was defined as conservative motif. Binding of the selected phage to HepG2 cells was inhibited by synthesized peptide WH16, which strongly support that cellular binding of phage is mediated though its displayed peptide and WH16 can also bind to HepG2. Conclusion: It is feasible to screen and isolate homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display of random peptide libraries. The sequence of peptide that can bind to

  11. Structural analysis of peptides capable of binding to more than one Ia antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S;

    1989-01-01

    The Ia binding regions were analyzed for three unrelated peptide Ag (sperm whale myoglobin 106-118, influenza hemagglutinin 130-142, and lambda repressor protein 12-26) for which binding to more than one Ia molecule has previously been demonstrated. By determining the binding profile of three...

  12. Genetic induction of the gastrin releasing peptide receptor on tumor cells for radiolabeled peptide binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To improve upon existing radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) approaches, we have devised a strategy to genetically induce high levels of new membrane-associated receptors on human cancer cells targetable by radiolabeled peptides. In this context, we report successful adenoviral-mediated transduction of tumor cells to express the murine gastrin releasing peptide receptor (mGRPr) as demonstrated by125 I-labeled bombesin binding. Materials and Methods: To demonstrate the feasibility of our strategy and to provide rapid proof of principle, we constructed a plasmid encoding the mGRPr gene. We cloned the mGRPr gene into the adenoviral shuttle vector pACMVpLpARS+ (F. Graham). We then utilized the methodology of adenovirus-polylysine-mediated transfection (AdpLmGRPr) to accomplish transient gene expression of mGRPr in two human cancer cell lines including A427 non-small cell lung cancer cells and HeLa cervical cancer cells. Murine GRPr expression was then measured by a live-cell binding assay using 125I-labeled bombesin. In order to develop this strategy further, it was necessary to construct a vector that would be more efficient for in vivo transduction. In this regard, we constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector (AdCMVGRPr) encoding the mGRPr under the control of the CMV promoter based on in vivo homologous recombination methods. The recombinant shuttle vector containing mGRPr was co-transfected with the adenoviral rescue plasmid pJM17 into the E1A trans complementing cell line 293 allowing for derivation of replication-incompetent, recombinant adenoviral vector. Individual plaques were isolated and subjected to two further rounds of plaque purification. The identity of the virus was confirmed at each step by PCR employing primers for mGRPr. The absence of wild-type adenovirus was confirmed by PCR using primers to the adenoviral E1A gene. SKOV3.ip1 human ovarian cancer cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were transduced in vitro with AdCMVGRPr at

  13. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge E Suarez; Mauricio Urquiza; Hernando Curtidor; Rodriguez, Luis E.; Marisol Ocampo; Elizabeth Torres; Fanny Guzman; Manuel Elkin Patarroyo

    2000-01-01

    The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720) which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falcip...

  14. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  15. Proteomics shows Hsp70 does not bind peptide sequences indiscriminately in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) binds peptide and has several functions that include protein folding, protein trafficking, and involvement with immune function. However, endogenous Hsp70-binding peptides had not previously been identified. Therefore, we eluted and identified several hundred endogenously bound peptides from Hsp70 using liquid chromatography ion trap mass spectrophotometry (LC-ITMS). Our work shows that the peptides are capable of binding Hsp70 as previously described. They are generally 8-26 amino acids in length and correspond to specific regions of many proteins. Through computationally assisted analysis of peptides eluted from Hsp70 we determined variable amino acid sequences, including a 5 amino acid core sequence that Hsp70 favorably binds. We also developed a computer algorithm that predicts Hsp70 binding within proteins. This work helps to define what peptides are bound by Hsp70 in vivo and suggests that Hsp70 facilitates peptide selection by aiding a funneling mechanism that is flexible but allows only a limited number of peptides to be processed

  16. Investigating the Binding of Peptides to Graphene Surfaces for Biosensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garley, Amanda; Saikia, Nabanita; Barr, Stephen; Leuty, Gary; Berry, Rajiv; Heinz, Hendrik

    The Air Force Research Lab is focused on developing highly selective and sensitive graphene-based sensors functionalized with peptides for biomolecule detection. To achieve this there is a need to model interfacial binding interactions between the organic and inorganic components to complement ongoing experimental investigations. It is important to characterize the binding behavior of individual amino acids, with the goal of predicting binding of large peptides. Since polarization is important in graphene systems, a new force field which includes polarizability is used. This allows for an in depth exploration of pi-pi interactions, electrostatics and van der Waals forces involved with binding. The binding strength is determined via enthalpy and free energy calculations. Additionally, structural quantities are computed, such as how aromatic rings align with the graphene surface and the arrangement of various residue substituents in relation to the surface and water layers. Computational results are useful in guiding experimental methods focused on rapidly screening optimal peptide sequence for binding.

  17. The Different Ligand-Binding Modes of Relaxin Family Peptide Receptors RXFP1 and RXFP2

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Daniel J.; Rosengren, K. Johan; Bathgate, Ross A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Relaxin and insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) are peptide hormones with a number of important physiological roles in reproduction, regulation of extracellular matrix turnover, and cardiovascular function. Relaxin and INSL3 mediate their actions through the closely related G-protein coupled receptors, relaxin family peptide receptors 1 and 2 (RXFP1 and RXFP2), respectively. These receptors have large extracellular domains (ECD) that contain high-affinity ligand-binding sites within their 10 leuci...

  18. Relative free energy of binding between antimicrobial peptides and SDS or DPC micelles

    OpenAIRE

    Sayyed-Ahmad, Abdallah; Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2009-01-01

    We present relative binding free energy calculations for six antimicrobial peptide–micelle systems, three peptides interacting with two types of micelles. The peptides are the scorpion derived antimicrobial peptide (AMP), IsCT and two of its analogues. The micelles are dodecylphosphatidylcholine (DPC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) micelles. The interfacial electrostatic properties of DPC and SDS micelles are assumed to be similar to those of zwitterionic mammalian and anionic bacterial mem...

  19. Designed armadillo repeat proteins as general peptide-binding scaffolds: consensus design and computational optimization of the hydrophobic core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Fabio; Pellarin, Riccardo; Larsen, Anders Peter; Varadamsetty, Gautham; Stumpp, Michael T; Zerbe, Oliver; Caflisch, Amedeo; Plückthun, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    interactions with peptides or parts of proteins in extended conformation. The conserved binding mode of the peptide in extended form, observed for different targets, makes armadillo repeat proteins attractive candidates for the generation of modular peptide-binding scaffolds. Taking advantage of the large...... constitute the starting point for the generation of designed armadillo repeat protein libraries for the selection of peptide binders, exploiting their modular structure and their conserved binding mode....

  20. Competitive binding of antagonistic peptides fine-tunes stomatal patterning

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jin Suk; Hnilova, Marketa; Maes, Michal; Lin, Ya-Chen Lisa; Putarjunan, Aarthi; Han, Soon-Ki; Avila, Julian; U.Torii, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    During development, cells interpret complex, often conflicting signals to make optimal decisions. Plant stomata, the cellular interface between a plant and the atmosphere, develop according to positional cues including a family of secreted peptides, EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTORS (EPFs). How these signaling peptides orchestrate pattern formation at a molecular level remains unclear. Here we report that Stomagen/EPF-LIKE9 peptide, which promotes stomatal development, requires ERECTA (ER)-family ...

  1. Peptide Binding to HLA Class I Molecules: Homogenous, High-Throughput Screening, and Affinity Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel; Justesen, Sune Frederik Lamdahl; Lamberth, Kasper;

    2009-01-01

    The Human MHC Project aims at large-scale description of peptide-HLA binding to a wide range of HLA molecules covering all populations of the world and the accompanying generation of bioinformatics tools capable of predicting binding of any given peptide to any given HLA molecule. Here, the authors...... present a homogenous, proximity-based assay for detection of peptide binding to HLA class I molecules. It uses a conformation-dependent anti-HLA class I antibody, W6/32, as one tag and a biotinylated recombinant HLA class I molecule as the other tag, and a proximity-based signal is generated through the...... luminescent oxygen channeling immunoassay technology (abbreviated LOCI and commercialized as AlphaScreen (TM)). Compared with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based peptide-HLA class I binding assay, the LOCI assay yields virtually identical affinity measurements, although having a broader dynamic range...

  2. Longer peptide can be accommodated in the MHC class I binding site by a protrusion mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Holm, A; Buus, S

    2000-01-01

    and C termini of a bound peptide interact through hydrogen bonding networks to conserved residues at either end of the class I binding site. Accordingly, it is thought that the termini are fixed and that only minor variations in peptide size are possible through a central bulging mechanism. We find...

  3. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  4. PeptiSite: a structural database of peptide binding sites in 4D

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya, Chayan; Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    We developed PeptiSite, a comprehensive and reliable database of biologically and structurally characterized peptide-binding sites, in which each site is represented by an ensemble of its complexes with protein, peptide and small molecule partners. The unique features of the database include (1) the ensemble site representation that provides a fourth dimension to the otherwise three dimensional data, (2) comprehensive characterization of the binding site architecture that may consist of a mul...

  5. Prediction of peptides binding to MHC class I alleles by partial periodic pattern mining

    OpenAIRE

    Meydan, Cem; Sezerman, Uğur; Sezerman, Ugur; Otu, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) is a key player in the immune response of an organism. It is important to be able to predict which antigenic peptides will bind to a spe-cific MHC allele and which will not, creating possibilities for controlling immune response and for the applications of immunotherapy. However a problem encountered in the computational binding prediction methods for MHC class I is the presence of bulges and loops in the peptides, changing the total length. Most machine...

  6. Oxpholipin 11D: An Anti-Inflammatory Peptide That Binds Cholesterol and Oxidized Phospholipids

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Ruchala; Mohamad Navab; Chun-Ling Jung; Susan Hama-Levy; Micewicz, Ewa D.; Hai Luong; Reyles, Jonathan E.; Shantanu Sharma; Waring, Alan J.; Fogelman, Alan M.; Lehrer, Robert I.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many gram-positive bacteria produce pore-forming exotoxins that contain a highly conserved, 12-residue domain (ECTGLAWEWWRT) that binds cholesterol. This domain is usually flanked N-terminally by arginine and C-terminally by valine. We used this 14-residue sequence as a template to create a small library of peptides that bind cholesterol and other lipids. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: Several of these peptides manifested anti-inflammatory properties in a predictive in vitro monocyte chemot...

  7. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Suarez

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720 which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes.

  8. ZP-binding peptides identified via phage display stimulate production of sperm antibodies in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, Tatiana I; Cox, Nancy R; Cochran, Anna M; Samoylov, Alexandre M; Griffin, Brenda; Baker, Henry J

    2010-07-01

    Zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins play a central role in sperm-oocyte binding and fertilization. Sperm protein sequences that are involved in sperm-ZP recognition and have an important role in fertilization represent attractive targets for development of contraceptive vaccines, yet are currently unknown. To identify peptide sequences that recognize and bind to ZP proteins, we developed a novel selection procedure from phage display libraries that utilizes intact oocytes surrounded by ZP proteins. The major advantage of this procedure is that ZP proteins remain in their native conformation unlike a selection protocol previously published that utilized solubilized ZP on artificial solid support. Several peptides of 7 and 12 amino acids with binding specificity to canine ZP proteins were identified. Four of them (LNSFLRS, SSWYRGA, YLPIYTIPSMVY, and NNQSPILKLSIH) plus a control ZP-binding peptide (YLPVGGLRRIGG) from the literature were synthesized and tested for antigenic properties in dogs. NNQSPILKLSIH peptide stimulated production of anti-peptide antibodies. These antibodies bind to the acrosomal region of the canine sperm cell, demonstrating ability to act as sperm antibodies. The identified ZP-binding peptides (mimicking sperm cell surface antigens) may be useful in the design of immunocontraceptive agents for dogs. PMID:20434854

  9. Prediction of MHC binding peptides and epitopes from alfalfa mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomase, Virendra S; Kale, Karbhari V; Chikhale, Nandkishor J; Changbhale, Smruti S

    2007-08-01

    Peptide fragments from alfalfa mosaic virus involved multiple antigenic components directing and empowering the immune system to protect the host from infection. MHC molecules are cell surface proteins, which take active part in host immune reactions and involvement of MHC class-I & II in response to almost all antigens. Coat protein of alfalfa mosaic virus contains 221 aa residues. Analysis found five MHC ligands in coat protein as 64-LSSFNGLGV-72; 86- RILEEDLIY-94; 96-MVFSITPSY-104; 100- ITPSYAGTF-108; 110- LTDDVTTED-118; having rescaled binding affinity and c-terminal cleavage affinity more than 0.5. The predicted binding affinity is normalized by the 1% fractil. The MHC peptide binding is predicted using neural networks trained on c-terminals of known epitopes. In analysis predicted MHC/peptide binding is a log transformed value related to the IC50 values in nM units. Total numbers of peptides found are 213. Predicted MHC binding regions act like red flags for antigen specific and generate immune response against the parent antigen. So a small fragment of antigen can induce immune response against whole antigen. This theme is implemented in designing subunit and synthetic peptide vaccines. The sequence analysis method allows potential drug targets to identify active sites against plant diseases. The method integrates prediction of peptide MHC class I binding; proteosomal c-terminal cleavage and TAP transport efficiency. PMID:17691913

  10. Statistical deconvolution of enthalpic energetic contributions to MHC-peptide binding affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Michael GB

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MHC Class I molecules present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells, which forms an integral part of the adaptive immune response. Peptides are bound within a groove formed by the MHC heavy chain. Previous approaches to MHC Class I-peptide binding prediction have largely concentrated on the peptide anchor residues located at the P2 and C-terminus positions. Results A large dataset comprising MHC-peptide structural complexes was created by re-modelling pre-determined x-ray crystallographic structures. Static energetic analysis, following energy minimisation, was performed on the dataset in order to characterise interactions between bound peptides and the MHC Class I molecule, partitioning the interactions within the groove into van der Waals, electrostatic and total non-bonded energy contributions. Conclusion The QSAR techniques of Genetic Function Approximation (GFA and Genetic Partial Least Squares (G/PLS algorithms were used to identify key interactions between the two molecules by comparing the calculated energy values with experimentally-determined BL50 data. Although the peptide termini binding interactions help ensure the stability of the MHC Class I-peptide complex, the central region of the peptide is also important in defining the specificity of the interaction. As thermodynamic studies indicate that peptide association and dissociation may be driven entropically, it may be necessary to incorporate entropic contributions into future calculations.

  11. Synthesis of gold structures by gold-binding peptide governed by concentration of gold ion and peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungok; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Sylvia J; Rheem, Youngwoo; Myung, Nosang V; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2016-08-01

    Although biological synthesis methods for the production of gold structures by microorganisms, plant extracts, proteins, and peptide have recently been introduced, there have been few reports pertaining to controlling their size and morphology. The gold ion and peptide concentrations affected on the size and uniformity of gold plates by a gold-binding peptide Midas-11. The higher concentration of gold ions produced a larger size of gold structures reached 125.5 μm, but an increased amount of Midas-11 produced a smaller size of gold platelets and increased the yield percentage of polygonal gold particles rather than platelets. The mechanisms governing factors controlling the production of gold structures were primarily related to nucleation and growth. These results indicate that the synthesis of gold architectures can be controlled by newly isolated and substituted peptides under different reaction conditions. PMID:27108675

  12. An in silico analysis of the binding modes and binding affinities of small molecule modulators of PDZ-peptide interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Tiwari

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of PDZ-peptide interactions have important implications in a variety of biological processes including treatment of cancer and Parkinson's disease. Even though experimental studies have reported characterization of peptidomimetic inhibitors of PDZ-peptide interactions, the binding modes for most of them have not been characterized by structural studies. In this study we have attempted to understand the structural basis of the small molecule-PDZ interactions by in silico analysis of the binding modes and binding affinities of a set of 38 small molecules with known K(i or K(d values for PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains of PSD-95 protein. These two PDZ domains show differential selectivity for these compounds despite having a high degree of sequence similarity and almost identical peptide binding pockets. Optimum binding modes for these ligands for PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains were identified by using a novel combination of semi-flexible docking and explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Analysis of the binding modes revealed most of the peptidomimectic ligands which had high K(i or K(d moved away from the peptide binding pocket, while ligands with high binding affinities remained in the peptide binding pocket. The differential specificities of the PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains primarily arise from differences in the conformation of the loop connecting βB and βC strands, because this loop interacts with the N-terminal chemical moieties of the ligands. We have also computed the MM/PBSA binding free energy values for these 38 compounds with both the PDZ domains from multiple 5 ns MD trajectories on each complex i.e. a total of 228 MD trajectories of 5 ns length each. Interestingly, computational binding free energies show good agreement with experimental binding free energies with a correlation coefficient of approximately 0.6. Thus our study demonstrates that combined use of docking and MD simulations can help in identification of potent inhibitors

  13. Bioluminescent Ligand-Receptor Binding Assays for Protein or Peptide Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence has been widely used in biomedical research due to its high sensitivity, low background, and broad linear range. In recent studies, we applied bioluminescence to ligand-receptor binding assays for some protein or peptide hormones based on a newly developed small monomeric Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) reporter that has the so far brightest bioluminescence. The conventional ligand-receptor binding assays rely on radioligands that have drawbacks, such as radioactive hazards and short shelf lives. In contrast, the novel bioluminescent binding assays use the NanoLuc-based protein or peptide tracers that are safe, stable, and ultrasensitive. Thus, the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assay would be applied to more and more protein or peptide hormones for ligand-receptor interaction studies in future. In the present article, we provided detailed protocols for setting up the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assays using two representative protein hormones as examples. PMID:27424896

  14. Sensitive quantitative predictions of peptide-MHC binding by a 'Query by Committee' artificial neural network approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S.; Lauemoller, S.L.; Worning, Peder; Kesmir, Can; Frimurer, T.; Corbet, S.; Fomsgaard, A.; Hilden, J.; Holm, A.; Brunak, Søren

    2003-01-01

    binding vs non-binding peptides. Furthermore, quantitative ANN allowed a straightforward application of a 'Query by Committee' (QBC) principle whereby particularly information-rich peptides could be identified and subsequently tested experimentally. Iterative training based on QBC-selected peptides...

  15. Interactions of photoactive DNAs with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase: Identification of peptides in the DNA binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (terminal transferase) was specifically modified in the DNA binding site by a photoactive DNA substrate (hetero-40-mer duplex containing eight 5-azido-dUMP residues at one 3' end). Under optimal photolabeling conditions, 27-40% of the DNA was covalently cross-linked to terminal transferase. The specificity of the DNA and protein interaction was demonstrated by protection of photolabeling at the DNA binding domain with natural DNA substrates. In order to recover high yields of modified peptides from limited amounts of starting material, protein modified with 32P-labeled photoactive DNA and digested with trypsin was extracted 4 times with phenol followed by gel filtration chromatography. All peptides not cross-linked to DNA were extracted into the phenol phase while the photolyzed DNA and the covalently cross-linked peptides remained in the aqueous phase. The 32P-containing peptide-DNA fraction was subjected to amino acid sequence analysis. Two sequences, Asp221-Lys231 (peptide B8) and Cys234-Lys249 (peptide B10), present in similar yield, were identified. Structure predictions placed the two peptides in an α-helical array of 39 angstrom which would accommodate a DNA helix span of 11 nucleotides. These peptides share sequence similarity with a region in DNA polymerase β that has been implicated in the binding of DNA template

  16. Functional recombinant MHC class II molecules and high-throughput peptide-binding assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Sune; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper; Nielsen, Lise-Lotte B; Buus, Søren

    2009-01-01

    . coli , extracted into urea, and purified under denaturing and non-reducing conditions using conventional column chromatography. Subsequently, diluting the two chains into a folding reaction with appropriate peptide resulted in efficient peptide-MHC-II complex formation. Several different formats of......BACKGROUND: Molecules of the class II major histocompability complex (MHC-II) specifically bind and present exogenously derived peptide epitopes to CD4+ T helper cells. The extreme polymorphism of the MHC-II hampers the complete analysis of peptide binding. It is also a significant hurdle in the...... generation of MHC-II molecules as reagents to study and manipulate specific T helper cell responses. Methods to generate functional MHC-II molecules recombinantly, and measure their interaction with peptides, would be highly desirable; however, no consensus methodology has yet emerged. RESULTS: We generated...

  17. Improving membrane binding as a design strategy for amphipathic peptide hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Ljungberg; Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller; Jurt, Simon;

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that amphipathic peptides might bind to membranes prior to activating their cognate receptors, but this has proven difficult to test. The peptide hormone PYY3-36 is believed to perform its appetite-suppressing actions through binding to hypothalamic Y2 receptors. It has...... by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement using a spin label, which confirmed that the hydrophobic residues bound to the membrane. Our studies further support the hypothesis that PYY3-36 associates with the membrane and indicate that this can be used in the design of novel molecules with high receptor binding...... potency. These observations are likely to be generally important for peptide hormones and biopharmaceutical drugs derived from them. This new 2-helix variant of PYY3-36 will be useful as a tool compound for studying peptide-membrane interactions....

  18. Machine learning competition in immunology – Prediction of HLA class I binding peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Ansari, Hifzur Rahman; Bradley, Phil;

    2011-01-01

    ., 2008] and [Larsen et al., 2010]). HTMS involves HLA typing, immunoaffinity chromatography of HLA molecules, HLA extraction, and chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry, followed by the application of computational algorithms for peptide characterization (Bassani-Sternberg et al., 2010......). Hundreds of naturally processed HLA class I associated peptides have been identified in individual studies using HTMS in normal (Escobar et al., 2008), cancer ( [Antwi et al., 2009] and [Bassani-Sternberg et al., 2010]), autoimmunity-related (Ben Dror et al., 2010), and infected samples (Wahl et al, 2010...... of peptide binding, therefore, determines the accuracy of the overall method. Computational predictions of peptide binding to HLA, both class I and class II, use a variety of algorithms ranging from binding motifs to advanced machine learning techniques ( [Brusic et al., 2004] and [Lafuente and Reche...

  19. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface protein is identified that was isolated by it ability to bind to a 24-amino acid peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c, residues 81-104, containing the major antigenic determinant for B10.A mouse T cells. This peptide binding protein, purified from [35S]methionine-labeled cells, appears as two discrete bands of ≅72 and 74 kDa after NaDodSO4/PAGE. The protein can be eluted from the peptide affinity column with equivalent concentrations of either the antigenic pigeon cytochrome c peptide or the corresponding nonantigenic peptide of mouse cytochrome c. However, it does not bind to the native cytochromes c, either of pigeon or mouse, and thus the protein appears to recognize some structure available only in the free peptides. This protein plays a role in antigen presentation. Its expression is not major histocompatibility complex-restricted in that the blocking activity of the antisera can be absorbed on spleen cells from mice of different haplotypes. This peptide binding protein can be isolated from a variety of cell types, including B cells, T cells, and fibroblasts. The anchoring of processed peptides on the cell surface by such a protein may play a role in antigen presentation

  20. High-affinity binding of short peptides to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules by anchor combinations.

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, J.; Belunis, C; Bolin, D; Papadopoulos, J.; Walsky, R; Higelin, J; Danho, W; Sinigaglia, F; Nagy, Z A

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified four anchor positions in HLA-DRB1*0101-binding peptides, and three anchors involved in peptide binding to DRB1*0401 and DRB1*1101 molecules, by screening of an M13 peptide display library (approximately 20 million independent nonapeptides) for DR-binding activity. In this study, high stringency screening of the M13 library for DRB1*0401 binding has resulted in identification of three further anchor positions. Taken together, a peptide-binding motif has been obtai...

  1. The Alzheimer's disease Aβ peptide binds to the anionic DMPS lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Christopher; Klimov, Dmitri K

    2016-06-01

    We have applied isobaric-isothermal replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) and the all-atom explicit water model to study binding of Aβ10-40 peptide to the anionic DMPS bilayer. To provide comparison with a zwitterionic bilayer, we used our previous REMD simulations probing binding of the same peptide to the DMPC bilayer. Using two sets of simulations, we comparatively analyzed the equilibrium Aβ conformational ensemble, peptide-bilayer interactions, and changes in the bilayer structure induced by Aβ binding. Our results are six-fold. (1) Binding to the DMPS bilayer triggers the formation of stable helix in the Aβ C-terminal, although the helix-inducing effect caused by DMPS lipids is weaker than that of DMPC. (2) Compared to the DMPC-bound Aβ monomer, the anionic bilayer weakens intrapeptide interactions, particularly, formed by charged amino acids. (3) Binding of Aβ peptide to the DMPS bilayer is primarily governed by electrostatic interactions between charged amino acids and charged lipid groups. In contrast, these interactions play minor role in Aβ binding to the DMPC bilayer. (4) Aβ peptide generally resides on the DMPS bilayer surface causing relatively minor bilayer thinning. The opposite scenario applies to Aβ binding to the DMPC bilayer. (5) In contrast to DMPC simulations, Aβ largely expels anionic lipids from its binding "footprint" forming a ring of charged amino acids mixed with charged lipid groups around the peptide. (6) Aβ binding disorders proximal DMPS lipids more strongly than their DMPC counterparts. Our simulations show that Aβ monomers fail to perturb anionic or zwitterionic bilayers across both leaflets. PMID:26947182

  2. The characterization of high-affinity binding sites in rat brain for the mast cell-degranulating peptide from bee venom using the purified monoiodinated peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J W; Bidard, J N; Lazdunski, M

    1984-11-25

    The preparation of a pure, monoiodinated derivative of mast cell-degranulating peptide (MCD peptide), the mast cell-degranulating peptide from bee venom, has enabled us to identify binding sites in rat brain membranes that have a high affinity and specificity for this peptide. These binding sites are evenly distributed throughout the brain and copurify with synaptic membranes. Saturation-binding curves, determined by rapid centrifugation or filtration assays, indicate a single population of sites with a concentration of 200 fmol/mg membrane protein in partially fractionated, lysed brain membranes. Dissociation constants of 150 and 140 pM were calculated for the iodinated and native peptides, respectively. These binding sites are probably associated with the neurotoxic action of MCD peptide in the central nervous system. No similar binding sites have been identified in peripheral tissue preparations, and other polycationic mast cell-degranulating agents including compound 48/80 show no such specificity. Specific modification of the primary amines, arginine residues, or disulfide bridges of MCD peptide results in a complete loss of binding activity. Other components of bee venom show specificity for the MCD peptide-binding site, suggesting that a class of neurotoxins in bee venom (possibly including secapin and tertiapin, but not apamin) share the specific action of MCD peptide on the central nervous system. PMID:6501283

  3. In vitro selected peptides bind with thymidylate synthase mRNA and inhibit its translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN; Song; NIU; RongLi; WANG; Zheng; LIN; XiuKun

    2007-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS), an essential enzyme for catalyzing the biosynthesis of thymidylate, is a critical therapeutic target in cancer therapy. Recent studies have shown that TS functions as an RNA-binding protein by interacting with two different sequences on its own mRNA, thus, repressing translational efficiency. In this study, peptides binding TS RNA with high affinity were isolated using mRNA display from a large peptide library (>1013 different sequences). The randomized library was subjected up to twelve rounds of in vitro selection and amplification. Comparing the amino acid composition of the selected peptides (12th round, R12) with those from the initial random library (round zero, R0), the basic and aromatic residues in the selected peptides were enriched significantly, suggesting that these peptide regions might be important in the peptide-TS mRNA interaction. Categorizing the amino acids at each random position based on their physicochemical properties and comparing the distributions with those of the initial random pool, an obvious basic charge characteristic was found at positions 1, 12, 17 and 18, suggesting that basic side chains participate in RNA binding. Secondary structure prediction showed that the selected peptides of R12 pool represented a helical propensity compared with R0 pool, and the regions were rich in basic residues. The electrophoretic gel mobility shift and in vitro translation assays showed that the peptides selected using mRNA display could bind TS RNA specifically and inhibit the translation of TS mRNA. Our results suggested that the identified peptides could be used as new TS inhibitors and developed to a novel class of anticancer agents.

  4. Scrutinizing MHC-I binding peptides and their limits of variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian P Koch

    Full Text Available Designed peptides that bind to major histocompatibility protein I (MHC-I allomorphs bear the promise of representing epitopes that stimulate a desired immune response. A rigorous bioinformatical exploration of sequence patterns hidden in peptides that bind to the mouse MHC-I allomorph H-2K(b is presented. We exemplify and validate these motif findings by systematically dissecting the epitope SIINFEKL and analyzing the resulting fragments for their binding potential to H-2K(b in a thermal denaturation assay. The results demonstrate that only fragments exclusively retaining the carboxy- or amino-terminus of the reference peptide exhibit significant binding potential, with the N-terminal pentapeptide SIINF as shortest ligand. This study demonstrates that sophisticated machine-learning algorithms excel at extracting fine-grained patterns from peptide sequence data and predicting MHC-I binding peptides, thereby considerably extending existing linear prediction models and providing a fresh view on the computer-based molecular design of future synthetic vaccines. The server for prediction is available at http://modlab-cadd.ethz.ch (SLiDER tool, MHC-I version 2012.

  5. Peptide displacement of [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine binding to bovine cortical membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical studies have demonstrated that peptides such as the encephalitogenic (EAE) peptide of myelin basic protein (MBP) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) can bind serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in vitro. The present research was undertaken to determine whether such binding interferes with 5-HT binding to its 5-HT1 receptors on bovine cerebral cortical membranes. EAE peptide and LHRH displaced [3H]5-HT with IC50s of 4.0 x 10(-4) and 1.8 x 10(-3) M respectively. MBP itself also showed apparent displacing ability with an IC50 of 6.0 x 10(-5) M, though it also caused aggregation of cortical membranes that might have interfered with normal receptor binding. These results support previous suggestions that the tryptophan peptide region of MBP may act as a 5-HT receptor in the neural system. We also tested the effects of muramyl dipeptide (N-acetyl-muramyl-L-Ala-D-isoGln, MD), a bacterial cell-wall breakdown product that acts as a slow-wave sleep promoter, binds to LHRH and EAE peptide, and competes for 5-HT binding sites on macrophages. It showed no significant displacement of 5-HT binding to cortical membranes (IC50 greater than 10(-1) M), but its D-Ala analogue did (IC50 = 1.7 x 10(-3) M). Thus, it seems likely that the 5-HT-related effects of naturally occurring muramyl peptides are physiologically limited by receptor types

  6. Calcium Binding to Amino Acids and Small Glycine Peptides in Aqueous Solution: Toward Peptide Design for Better Calcium Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-01

    Deprotonation of amino acids as occurs during transfer from stomach to intestines during food digestion was found by comparison of complex formation constants as determined electrochemically for increasing pH to increase calcium binding (i) by a factor of around 6 for the neutral amino acids, (ii) by a factor of around 4 for anions of the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acid, and (iii) by a factor of around 5.5 for basic amino acids. Optimized structures of the 1:1 complexes and ΔHbinding for calcium binding as calculated by density functional theory (DFT) confirmed in all complexes a stronger calcium binding and shorter calcium-oxygen bond length in the deprotonated form. In addition, the stronger calcium binding was also accompanied by a binding site shift from carboxylate binding to chelation by α-amino group and carboxylate oxygen for leucine, aspartate, glutamate, alanine, and asparagine. For binary amino acid mixtures, the calcium-binding constant was close to the predicted geometric mean of the individual amino acid binding constants indicating separate binding of calcium to two amino acids when present together in solution. At high pH, corresponding to conditions for calcium absorption, the binding affinity increased in the order Lys < Arg < Cys < Gln < Gly ∼ Ala < Asn < His < Leu < Glu< Asp. In a series of glycine peptides, calcium-binding affinity was found to increase in the order Gly-Leu ∼ Gly-Gly < Ala-Gly < Gly-His ∼ Gly-Lys-Gly < Glu-Cys-Gly < Gly-Glu, an ordering confirmed by DFT calculations for the dipeptides and which also accounted for large synergistic effects in calcium binding for up to 6 kJ/mol when compared to the corresponding amino acid mixtures. PMID:27159329

  7. PeptideMine - A webserver for the design of peptides for protein-peptide binding studies derived from protein-protein interactomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Balasubramanian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transduction events often involve transient, yet specific, interactions between structurally conserved protein domains and polypeptide sequences in target proteins. The identification and validation of these associating domains is crucial to understand signal transduction pathways that modulate different cellular or developmental processes. Bioinformatics strategies to extract and integrate information from diverse sources have been shown to facilitate the experimental design to understand complex biological events. These methods, primarily based on information from high-throughput experiments, have also led to the identification of new connections thus providing hypothetical models for cellular events. Such models, in turn, provide a framework for directing experimental efforts for validating the predicted molecular rationale for complex cellular processes. In this context, it is envisaged that the rational design of peptides for protein-peptide binding studies could substantially facilitate the experimental strategies to evaluate a predicted interaction. This rational design procedure involves the integration of protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology, physico-chemical calculations, domain-domain interaction data and information on functional sites or critical residues. Results Here we describe an integrated approach called "PeptideMine" for the identification of peptides based on specific functional patterns present in the sequence of an interacting protein. This approach based on sequence searches in the interacting sequence space has been developed into a webserver, which can be used for the identification and analysis of peptides, peptide homologues or functional patterns from the interacting sequence space of a protein. To further facilitate experimental validation, the PeptideMine webserver also provides a list of physico-chemical parameters corresponding to the peptide to determine the feasibility of

  8. Iterative Conversion of Cyclin Binding Groove Peptides into Druglike CDK Inhibitors with Antitumor Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Premnath, Padmavathy Nandha; Craig, Sandra N.; Liu, Shu; Anderson, Erin L.; Grigoroudis, Asterios I.; Kontopidis, George; Perkins, Tracy L.; Wyatt, Michael D.; Pittman, Douglas L.; McInnes, Campbell

    2014-01-01

    The cyclin groove is an important recognition site for substrates of the cell cycle cyclin dependent kinases and provides an opportunity for highly selective inhibition of kinase activity through a non-ATP competitive mechanism. The key peptide residues of the cyclin binding motif have been studied in order to precisely define the structure–activity relationship for CDK kinase inhibition. Through this information, new insights into the interactions of peptide CDK inhibitors with key subsites ...

  9. A High Throughput MHC II Binding Assay for Quantitative Analysis of Peptide Epitopes

    OpenAIRE

    Salvat, Regina; Moise, Leonard; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical assays with recombinant human MHC II molecules can provide rapid, quantitative insights into immunogenic epitope identification, deletion, or design1,2. Here, a peptide-MHC II binding assay is scaled to 384-well format. The scaled down protocol reduces reagent costs by 75% and is higher throughput than previously described 96-well protocols1,3-5. Specifically, the experimental design permits robust and reproducible analysis of up to 15 peptides against one MHC II allele per 384-we...

  10. SPARC is a source of copper-binding peptides that stimulate angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    SPARC is a transiently expressed extracellular matrix-binding protein that alters cell shape and regulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we show that SPARC mRNA and protein are synthesized by endothelial cells during angiogenesis in vivo. SPARC and peptides derived from a cationic region of the protein (amino acids 113- 130) stimulated the formation of endothelial cords in vitro; moreover, these peptides stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Mapping of the active domain d...

  11. Quantitative prediction of peptide binding to HLA-DP1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Stefan; Dimitrov, Ivan; Doytchinova, Irini

    2013-01-01

    The exogenous proteins are processed by the host antigen-processing cells. Peptidic fragments of them are presented on the cell surface bound to the major hystocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules class II and recognized by the CD4+ T lymphocytes. The MHC binding is considered as the crucial prerequisite for T-cell recognition. Only peptides able to form stable complexes with the MHC proteins are recognized by the T-cells. These peptides are known as T-cell epitopes. All T-cell epitopes are MHC binders, but not all MHC binders are T-cell epitopes. The T-cell epitope prediction is one of the main priorities of immunoinformatics. In the present study, three chemometric techniques are combined to derive a model for in silico prediction of peptide binding to the human MHC class II protein HLA-DP1. The structures of a set of known peptide binders are described by amino acid z-descriptors. Data are processed by an iterative self-consisted algorithm using the method of partial least squares, and a quantitative matrix (QM) for peptide binding prediction to HLA-DP1 is derived. The QM is validated by two sets of proteins and showed an average accuracy of 86 percent. PMID:24091413

  12. Clicked bis-PEG-peptide conjugates for studying calmodulin-Kv7.2 channel binding

    OpenAIRE

    Bonache de Marcos, María Ángeles; Alaimo, Alessandro; Malo, Covadonga; Millet, Oscar; Villarroel, Alvaro; González-Muñiz, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    The recombinant Kv7.2 calmodulin (CaM) binding site (Q2AB CaMBD) shows a high tendency to aggregate, thus complicating biochemical and structural studies. To facilitate these studies we have conceived bis-PEG-peptide CaMBD-mimetics linking helices A and B in single, easy to handle molecules. Short PEG chains were selected as spacers between the two peptide molecules, and a Cu(i)-catalyzed cycloaddition (CuAAC) protocol was used to assemble the final bis-PEG-peptide conjugate, by the convenien...

  13. Structure-based optimization of GRP78-binding peptides that enhances efficacy in cancer imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Hung; Lee, Andy Chi-Lung; Chen, I-Ju; Chang, Nai-Chuan; Wu, Han-Chung; Yu, Hui-Ming; Chang, Ya-Jen; Lee, Te-Wei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Yu, Alice L; Yu, John

    2016-07-01

    It is more challenging to design peptide drugs than small molecules through molecular docking and in silico analysis. Here, we developed a structure-based approach with various computational and analytical techniques to optimize cancer-targeting peptides for molecular imaging and therapy. We first utilized a peptide-binding protein database to identify GRP78, a specific cancer cell-surface marker, as a target protein for the lead, L-peptide. Subsequently, we used homologous modeling and molecular docking to identify a peptide-binding domain within GRP78 and optimized a series of peptides with a new protein-ligand scoring program, HotLig. Binding of these peptides to GRP78 was confirmed using an oriented immobilization technique for the Biacore system. We further examined the ability of the peptides to target cancer cells through in vitro binding studies with cell lines and clinical cancer specimens, and in vivo tumor imaging and targeted chemotherapeutic studies. MicroSPECT/CT imaging revealed significantly greater uptake of (188)Re-liposomes linked to these peptides as compared with non-targeting (188)Re-liposomes. Conjugation with these peptides also significantly increased the therapeutic efficacy of Lipo-Dox. Notably, peptide-conjugated Lipo-Dox significantly reduced stem-cell subpopulation in xenografts of breast cancer. The structure-based optimization strategy for peptides described here may be useful for developing peptide drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:27088408

  14. Biological effect of varying peptide binding affinity to the BoLA-DRB3*2703 allele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizadeh Zahra

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MHC class I and II molecules are immunoregulatory cell surface glycoproteins, which selectively bind to and present antigenic peptides to T-lymphocytes. Murine and human studies show that variable peptide binding affinity to MHC II molecules influences Th1/Th2 responses by inducing distinctive cytokine expression. To examine the biological effects of peptide binding affinity to bovine MHC (BoLA, various self peptides (BoLA-DQ and fibrinogen fragments and non-self peptides from ovalbumin (OVA, as well as VP2 and VP4 peptides from foot and mouth disease virus (FMD-V were used to (1 determine binding affinities to the BoLA-DRB3*2703 allele, previously associated with mastitis susceptibility and (2 determine whether peptide binding affinity influences T-lymphocyte function. Peptide binding affinity was determined by a competitive assay using high affinity biotinylated self-peptide incubated with purified BoLA-DRB3*2703 in the presence of various concentrations of competing peptides. The concentrations of non-self peptide required to inhibit self-peptide binding by 50% (IC50 were variable, ranging from 26.92 to > 320 μM. Peptide-specific T-lymphocyte function was determined by measuring DNA synthesis, cell division, and IFN-γ production in cultures of mononuclear cells from a BoLA-DRB3*2703 homozygous cow. When compared to non-stimulated control cultures, differences in lymphocyte function were observed for all of the assessed parameters; however, peptide-binding affinity did not always account for the observed differences in lymphocyte function.

  15. Antifreeze and cryoprotective activities of ice-binding collagen peptides from pig skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Yu Bing; Xu, Fei; Yu, Jing Song; Yuan, Min

    2016-03-01

    A novel "hyperactive" ice-binding peptide from porcine collagen was prepared by alkaline protease hydrolysis and a series of column chromatography separations, and then its antifreeze and cryoprotective properties were reported. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the thermal hysteresis (TH) of ice-binding collagen peptides was closely related to their concentration and crystal fraction. Collagen hydrolysates with maximal TH were obtained by hydrolysis at pH 8.0, DH 15.0%, and 5% alkaline protease at 55°C. After purification by column chromatography, the AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide (GLLGPLGPRGLL) with 1162.8Da molecular weights exhibited the highest TH (5.28°C), which can be classified as "hyperactive". Recrystallisation and melt-resistance of ice cream were improved by AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide at 0.2% (w/v) in a similar manner to natural antifreeze proteins. Moreover, the addition of AP-3 collagen peptides in ice cream greatly elevated the glass transition temperature (Tg) to -17.64°C. PMID:26471678

  16. Sequence-based prediction of protein-peptide binding sites using support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherzadeh, Ghazaleh; Yang, Yuedong; Zhang, Tuo; Liew, Alan Wee-Chung; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2016-05-15

    Protein-peptide interactions are essential for all cellular processes including DNA repair, replication, gene-expression, and metabolism. As most protein-peptide interactions are uncharacterized, it is cost effective to investigate them computationally as the first step. All existing approaches for predicting protein-peptide binding sites, however, are based on protein structures despite the fact that the structures for most proteins are not yet solved. This article proposes the first machine-learning method called SPRINT to make Sequence-based prediction of Protein-peptide Residue-level Interactions. SPRINT yields a robust and consistent performance for 10-fold cross validations and independent test. The most important feature is evolution-generated sequence profiles. For the test set (1056 binding and non-binding residues), it yields a Matthews' Correlation Coefficient of 0.326 with a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 68%. This sequence-based technique shows comparable or more accurate than structure-based methods for peptide-binding site prediction. SPRINT is available as an online server at: http://sparks-lab.org/. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26833816

  17. Calmodulin binding to recombinant myosin-1c and myosin-1c IQ peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Cyr Janet L; Gillespie Peter G

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Bullfrog myosin-1c contains three previously recognized calmodulin-binding IQ domains (IQ1, IQ2, and IQ3) in its neck region; we identified a fourth IQ domain (IQ4), located immediately adjacent to IQ3. How calmodulin binds to these IQ domains is the subject of this report. Results In the presence of EGTA, calmodulin bound to synthetic peptides corresponding to IQ1, IQ2, and IQ3 with Kd values of 2–4 μM at normal ionic strength; the interaction with an IQ4 peptide was much...

  18. Biopanning and characterization of peptides with Fe3O4 nanoparticles-binding capability via phage display random peptide library technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Fei; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; Li, Yucan; Hu, Yang; Huang, Zhongbin; Liao, Xiaoming; Yao, Yadong; Chen, Xianchun

    2016-05-01

    Functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in biomedical applications. A proper functionalization of NPs can improve biocompatibility, avoid a loss of bioactivity, and further endow NPs with unique performances. Modification with vairous specific binding biomolecules from random biological libraries has been explored. In this work, two 7-mer peptides with sequences of HYIDFRW and TVNFKLY were selected from a phage display random peptide library by using ferromagnetic NPs as targets, and were verified to display strong binding affinity to Fe3O4 NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, fluorescence microscopy, thermal analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of peptides on the surface of Fe3O4 NPs. Sequence analyses revealed that the probable binding mechanism between the peptide and Fe3O4 NPs might be driven by Pearson hard acid-hard base specific interaction and hydrogen bonds, accompanied with hydrophilic interactions and non-specific electrostatic attractions. The cell viability assay indicated a good cytocompatibility of peptide-bound Fe3O4 NPs. Furthermore, TVNFKLY peptide and an ovarian tumor cell A2780 specific binding peptide (QQTNWSL) were conjugated to afford a liner 14-mer peptide (QQTNWSLTVNFKLY). The binding and targeting studies showed that 14-mer peptide was able to retain both the strong binding ability to Fe3O4 NPs and the specific binding ability to A2780 cells. The results suggested that the Fe3O4-binding peptides would be of great potential in the functionalization of Fe3O4 NPs for the tumor-targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:26896661

  19. A resistin binding peptide selected by phage display inhibits 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Resistin, a newly discovered cysteine-rich hormone secreted mainly by adipose tissues, has been proposed to form a biochemical link between obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the resistin receptor has not yet been identified. This study aimed to identify resistin binding proteins/receptor.Methods Three cDNA fragments with the same 11 bp 5' sequence were found by screening a cDNA phage display library of rat multiple tissues. As the reading frames of the same 11 bp 5' sequence were interrupted by a TGA stop codon, plaque lift assay was consequently used to prove the readthrough phenomenon. The stop codon in the same 11 bp 5' sequence was replaced by tryptophan, and the binding activity of the coded peptide [AWIL, which was designated as resistin binding peptide (RBP)] with resistin was identified by the confocal microscopy technique and the affinity chromatography experiment. pDual GC-resistin and pDual GC-resistin binding peptide were co-transfected into 3T3-L1 cells to confirm the function of resistin binding peptide.Results Three cDNA fragments with the same 11 bp 5' sequence were found. The TGA stop codon in reading frames of the same 11 bp 5' sequence was proved to be readthroughed. The binding activity of RBP with resistin was consequently identified. The expression of the resistin binding peptide in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes expressing pDual GC-resistin significantly inhibited the adipogenic differentiation.Conclusion RBP could effectively rescue the promoted differentiation of resistin overxepressed 3T3-L1 preadipocyte.

  20. Challenges in Optimizing a Prostate Carcinoma Binding Peptide, Identified through the Phage Display Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Debus

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of peptides identified through the phage display technology to clinical applications is difficult. Major drawbacks are the metabolic degradation and label instability. The aim of our work is the optimization of DUP-1, a peptide which was identified by phage display to specifically target human prostate carcinoma. To investigate the influence of chelate conjugation, DOTA was coupled to DUP-1 and labeling was performed with 111In. To improve serum stability cyclization of DUP-1 and targeted D-amino acid substitution were carried out. Alanine scanning was performed for identification of the binding site and based on the results peptide fragments were chemically synthesized. The properties of modified ligands were investigated in in vitro binding and competition assays. In vivo biodistribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying human prostate tumors subcutaneously. DOTA conjugation resulted in different cellular binding kinetics, rapid in vivo renal clearance and increased tumor-to-organ ratios. Cyclization and D-amino acid substitution increased the metabolic stability but led to binding affinity decrease. Fragment investigation indicated that the sequence NRAQDY might be significant for target-binding. Our results demonstrate challenges in optimizing peptides, identified through phage display libraries, and show that careful investigation of modified derivatives is necessary in order to improve their characteristics.

  1. Novel bioluminescent binding assays for interaction studies of protein/peptide hormones with their receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-05-01

    Protein/peptide hormones are the largest group of endogenous signaling molecules and exert various biological functions by binding to specific cell membrane receptors. To study the interactions between these hormones and their receptors, quantitative ligand-receptor binding assays have been widely used for decades. However, the assays conventionally relied on the use of radioligands, which have some major drawbacks and can only be used in laboratories with a radioactive material license. We recently developed novel bioluminescent binding assays for several protein/peptide hormones using the brightest bioluminescent reporter known to date, nanoluciferase (NanoLuc). The NanoLuc reporter can be either chemically conjugated to an appropriate position, or genetically fused at one terminus, of protein/peptide hormones. Compared to conventional radioligands, these bioluminescent ligands have higher sensitivity, better safety, and longer shelf lives, and thus, represent a novel class of non-radioactive tracers for quantitative receptor binding assays. In the present review, we provide some general considerations and specific examples for setting up the bioluminescent binding assays. Such techniques can be applied to other protein/peptide hormones in future to facilitate their interaction studies with their receptors. PMID:27020777

  2. Solvation of a Small Metal-Binding Peptide in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Youngseon; Jung, Younjoon [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Structural properties of a small hexapeptide molecule modeled after metal-binding siderochrome immersed in a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. We consider two different RTILs, each of which is made up of the same cationic species, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMI{sup +}), but different anions, hexafluorophosphate (PF{sub 6}{sup -}) and chloride (Cl{sup -}). We investigate how anionic properties such as hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity or hydrogen bonding capability affect the stabilization of the peptide in RTILs. To examine the effect of peptide-RTIL electrostatic interactions on solvation, we also consider a hypothetical solvent BMI{sup 0}Cl{sup 0}, a non-ionic counter-part of BMI{sup +}Cl{sup -}. For reference, we investigate solvation structures in common polar solvents, water and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Comparison of BMI{sup +}Cl{sup -} and BMI{sup 0}Cl{sup 0} shows that electrostatic interactions of the peptide and RTIL play a significant role in the conformational fluctuation of the peptide. For example, strong electrostatic interactions between the two favor an extended conformation of the peptide by reducing its structural fluctuations. The hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of RTIL anions also exerts a notable influence; specifically, structural fluctuations of the peptide become reduced in more hydrophilic BMI{sup +}Cl{sup -}, compared with those in more hydrophobic BMI{sup +}PF{sub 6}{sup -}. This is ascribed to the good hydrogen-bond accepting power of chloride anions, which enables them to bind strongly to hydroxyl groups of the peptide and to stabilize its structure. Transport properties of the peptide are examined briefly. Translations of the peptide significantly slow down in highly viscous RTILs.

  3. Proteomic Screening Method for Phosphopeptide Motif Binding Proteins Using Peptide Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Christofk, Heather R.; Wu, Ning; Cantley, Lewis C.; John M. Asara

    2011-01-01

    Phosphopeptide binding domains mediate the directed and localized assembly of protein complexes essential to intracellular kinase signaling. To identify phosphopeptide binding proteins, we developed a proteomic screening method using immobilized partially-degenerate phosphopeptide mixtures combined with SILAC and microcapillary LC/MS/MS. The method was used to identify proteins that specifically bound to phosphorylated peptide library affinity matrices, including pTyr, and the motifs pSer/pTh...

  4. Multiple antigen peptide dendrimer elicits antibodies for detecting rat and mouse growth hormone binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar, Roberto M.; Talamantes, Frank J.; Bustamante, Juan J.; Muñoz, Jesus; Treviño, Lisa R.; Martinez, Andrew O.; Haro, Luis S.

    2009-01-01

    The membrane-bound rat growth hormone receptor (GH-R) and an alternatively spliced isoform, the soluble rat GH binding protein (GH-BP), are comprised of identical N-terminal GH binding domains, however, their C-terminal sequences differ. Immunological reagents are needed to distinguish between the two isoforms in order to understand their respective roles in mediating the actions of GH. Accordingly, a tetravalent multiple antigen peptide (MAP) dendrimer with four identical branches of a C-ter...

  5. Optimization of Hydrolysis Conditions for the Production of Iron-Binding Peptides from Mackerel Processing Byproducts

    OpenAIRE

    Pan-Feng Wang; Guang-Rong Huang; Jia-Xin Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was focused on optimization of enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for the production of iron-binding peptides from marine mackerel processing byproducts. The marine mackerel processing byproducts protein were hydrolyzed using trypsin, Protamex, Flavourzyme, Alcalase and Neutrase. Alcalase and Protamex proteolytic hydrolysates exhibited the highest iron-binding capacity; however, Alcalase proteolytic hydrolysate had higher degree of hydrolysis than that of Protamex. A four-f...

  6. Sensitive quantitative predictions of peptide-MHC binding by a 'Query by Committee' artificial neural network approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Lauemøller, S L; Worning, P; Kesmir, C; Frimurer, T; Corbet, S; Fomsgaard, A; Hilden, J; Holm, A; Brunak, S

    2003-01-01

    We have generated Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) capable of performing sensitive, quantitative predictions of peptide binding to the MHC class I molecule, HLA-A*0204. We have shown that such quantitative ANN are superior to conventional classification ANN, that have been trained to predict...... binding vs non-binding peptides. Furthermore, quantitative ANN allowed a straightforward application of a 'Query by Committee' (QBC) principle whereby particularly information-rich peptides could be identified and subsequently tested experimentally. Iterative training based on QBC-selected peptides...

  7. Identification and design of p53-derived HLA-A2-binding peptides with increased CTL immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T R; Buus, S; Brunak, S;

    2001-01-01

    peptide binding to HLA-A2 molecules, we identified three p53 protein-derived nonamer peptides with intermediate binding owing to suboptimal amino acids in the P2 anchor position. These peptides were synthesized along with the corresponding analogs, where the natural P2 residue had been replaced with the...... HLA-A2 transgenic mouse fibrosarcoma cells transfected with human p53 DNA. The data suggest that modified self-peptides derived from overexpressed tumour-associated proteins can be used in vaccine development against cancer, and that quantitative predictions of HLA binding is of value in the rational...

  8. Curvature sensing MARCKS-ED peptides bind to membranes in a stereo-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; de Jesus, Armando Jerome; Tamura, Ryo; Li, Victoria; Cheng, Kui; Yin, Hang

    2015-07-01

    Membrane curvature and lipid composition plays a critical role in interchanging of matter and energy in cells. Peptide curvature sensors are known to activate signaling pathways and promote molecular transport across cell membranes. Recently, the 25-mer MARCKS-ED peptide, which is derived from the effector domain of the myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate protein, has been reported to selectively recognize highly curved membrane surfaces. Our previous studies indicated that the naturally occurring L-MARCKS-ED peptide could simultaneously detect both phosphatidylserine and curvature. Here, we demonstrate that D-MARCKS-ED, composed by unnatural D-amino acids, has the same activities as its enantiomer, L-MARCKS-ED, as a curvature and lipid sensor. An atomistic molecular dynamics simulation suggests that D-MARCKS-ED may change from linear to a boat conformation upon binding to the membrane. Comparable enhancement of fluorescence intensity was observed between D- and L-MARCKS-ED peptides, indicating similar binding affinities. Meanwhile, circular dichroism spectra of D- and L-MARCKS-ED are almost symmetrical both in the presence and absence of liposomes. These results suggest similar behavior of artificial D- and natural L-MARCKS-ED peptides when binding to curved membranes. Our studies may contribute to further understanding of how MARCKS-ED senses membrane curvature as well as provide a new direction to develop novel membrane curvature probes. PMID:25851418

  9. PeptiSite: a structural database of peptide binding sites in 4D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Chayan; Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-03-21

    We developed PeptiSite, a comprehensive and reliable database of biologically and structurally characterized peptide-binding sites, in which each site is represented by an ensemble of its complexes with protein, peptide and small molecule partners. The unique features of the database include: (1) the ensemble site representation that provides a fourth dimension to the otherwise three dimensional data, (2) comprehensive characterization of the binding site architecture that may consist of a multimeric protein assembly with cofactors and metal ions and (3) analysis of consensus interaction motifs within the ensembles and identification of conserved determinants of these interactions. Currently the database contains 585 proteins with 650 peptide-binding sites. http://peptisite.ucsd.edu/ link allows searching for the sites of interest and interactive visualization of the ensembles using the ActiveICM web-browser plugin. This structural database for protein-peptide interactions enables understanding of structural principles of these interactions and may assist the development of an efficient peptide docking benchmark. PMID:24406170

  10. The different ligand-binding modes of relaxin family peptide receptors RXFP1 and RXFP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel J; Rosengren, K Johan; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2012-11-01

    Relaxin and insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) are peptide hormones with a number of important physiological roles in reproduction, regulation of extracellular matrix turnover, and cardiovascular function. Relaxin and INSL3 mediate their actions through the closely related G-protein coupled receptors, relaxin family peptide receptors 1 and 2 (RXFP1 and RXFP2), respectively. These receptors have large extracellular domains (ECD) that contain high-affinity ligand-binding sites within their 10 leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing modules. Although relaxin can bind and activate both RXFP1 and RXFP2, INSL3 can only bind and activate RXFP2. To investigate whether this difference is related to the nature of the high-affinity ECD binding site or to differences in secondary binding sites involving the receptor transmembrane (TM) domain, we created a suite of constructs with RXFP1/2 chimeric ECD attached to single TM helices. We show that by changing as little as one LRR, representing four amino acid substitutions, we were able to engineer a high-affinity INSL3-binding site into the ECD of RXFP1. Molecular modeling of the INSL3-RXFP2 interaction based on extensive experimental data highlights the differences in the binding mechanisms of relaxin and INSL3 to the ECD of their cognate receptors. Interestingly, when the engineered RXFP1/2 ECD were introduced into full-length RXFP1 constructs, INSL3 exhibited only low affinity and efficacy on these receptors. These results highlight critical differences both in the ECD binding and in the coordination of the ECD-binding site with the TM domain, and provide new mechanistic insights into the binding and activation events of RXFP1 and RXFP2 by their native hormone ligands. PMID:22973049

  11. MULTIPRED2: A computational system for large-scale identification of peptides predicted to bind to HLA supertypes and alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; DeLuca, David S.; Keskin, Derin B.;

    2011-01-01

    MULTIPRED2 is a computational system for facile prediction of peptide binding to multiple alleles belonging to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II DR molecules. It enables prediction of peptide binding to products of individual HLA alleles, combination of alleles, or HLA supertypes...

  12. Differential binding of urokinase and peptide antagonists to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, L H; Behrendt, N

    2001-01-01

    though these sequences contain very few substitutions relative to the human uPAR, the receptor protein products differ markedly in terms of ligand selectivity. Thus, a well described competitive peptide antagonist directed against the human uPAR reacts with only one of the monkey receptors (chimpanzee u......PAR), in spite of the fact that uPAR from all of the four species cross-reacts with human uPA. Notably, uPAR from African green monkey, which is completely devoid of reactivity with the peptide, contains only three substitutions relative to chimpanzee uPAR in the molecular regions critical for binding....... These findings aid the elucidation of the structure/function relationship of uPAR and, unexpectedly, identify a structural distinction governing the binding of uPA and a very similar peptide antagonist....

  13. A community resource benchmarking predictions of peptide binding to MHC-I molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, B; Bui, HH; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune;

    2006-01-01

    entire pathogen proteomes for peptide likely to bind MHC. Here we make public a large set of 48,828 quantitative peptide-binding affinity measurements relating to 48 different mouse, human, macaque, and chimpanzee MHC class I alleles. We use this data to establish a set of benchmark predictions with one...... neural network method and two matrix-based prediction methods extensively utilized in our groups. In general, the neural network outperforms the matrix-based predictions mainly due to its ability to generalize even on a small amount of data. We also retrieved predictions from tools publicly available on...... the internet. While differences in the data used to generate these predictions hamper direct comparisons, we do conclude that tools based on combinatorial peptide libraries perform remarkably well. The transparent prediction evaluation on this dataset provides tool developers with a benchmark for...

  14. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Memczak

    Full Text Available Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing.

  15. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memczak, Henry; Lauster, Daniel; Kar, Parimal; Di Lella, Santiago; Volkmer, Rudolf; Knecht, Volker; Herrmann, Andreas; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Bier, Frank F; Stöcklein, Walter F M

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing. PMID:27415624

  16. PEPTIDE BINDING AS A MODE OF ACTION FOR THE CARCINOGENICITY AND TOXICITY OF ARSENIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic exposure leads to tumors in human skin, lung, urinary bladder, kidney and liver. Three likely initial stages of arsenical-macromolecular interaction are (1) binding of trivalent arsenicals to the sulfhydryl groups of peptides and proteins, (2) arsenical-induced generation...

  17. Preparation and Characteristic of Iron-Binding Peptides from Shrimp Processing Discards Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-yan Ren

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was focused on preparation of iron-binding peptides from Shrimp Processing Discards (SPD hydrolysate using response surface methodology (RSM and characteristic of the iron-peptides complex. Six kinds of protease (tyrpsin, pepsin, protmex, flavourzyme, neutrase and alcalase were used to hydrolysis the SPD protein and the trypsin hydrolysate showed the highest iron-binding activity. The factorial design experiments showed that pH, trypsin concentration and hydrolysis time affected significantly the ironbinding activity of hydrolysate. Then the trypsin hydrolysis conditions (time, enzyme concentration, pH were optimized by RSM using central composition design for produing highest iron-binding activity. The pH 8.18, enzyme concentration of 500 U/mL and a hydrolysis time of 120 min were found to be the optimum conditions to obtain a higher iron-binding activity of 6.75 μg-EDTA/mg-protein, which is very closed to the three verificated replicated experiments with 6.73 μg-EDTA/mg-protein. The amino acid composition of the ironpeptides complex was closed to FAO reference protein. The main compositions of the iron-peptides complex were iron of 11.1%, protein of 71.5% and ash of 19.3%. The peptides bound with iron were certified by infrared chromatgraphy.

  18. The specificity of protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides by lactoferrin binding protein B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Partha, Sarathy K; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-10-01

    A variety of Gram-negative pathogens possess host-specific lactoferrin (Lf) receptors that mediate the acquisition of iron from host Lf. The integral membrane protein component of the receptor, lactoferrin binding protein A specifically binds host Lf and is required for acquisition of iron from Lf. In contrast, the role of the bi-lobed surface lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB), in Lf binding and iron acquisition is uncertain. A common feature of LbpBs from most species is the presence of clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the protein's C-terminal lobe. Recently it has been shown that the negatively charged regions from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB are responsible for protecting against an 11 amino acid cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAP), lactoferricin (Lfcin), derived from human Lf. In this study we investigated whether the LbpB confers resistance to other CAPs since N. meningitidis is likely to encounter other CAPs from the host. LbpB provided protection against the cathelicidin derived peptide, cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (mCRAMP), but did not confer protection against Tritrp 1 or LL37 under our experimental conditions. When tested against a range of rationally designed synthetic peptides, LbpB was shown to protect against IDR-1002 and IDR-0018 but not against HH-2 or HHC10. PMID:25038734

  19. Analysis of the Resveratrol-binding Protein using Phage-displayed Random Peptide Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei FENG; Jian JIN; Lian-Feng ZHANG; Ting YAN; Wen-Yi TAO

    2006-01-01

    Resveratrol, a plant polyphenol, is found in significant amounts in the skin of grapes and in some traditional herbs. It is reported to exert different biological activities, such as inhibiting lipid peroxidation,scavenging free radicals, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and anticancer activity. In order to screen the resveratrol-binding proteins, we synthesized biotinylated resveratrol, purified by liquid chromatography and immobilized it into streptavidin-coated microplate wells. 3-(4,5-Demethylthiazol-)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay showed little change in the anticancer activity of biotinylated resveratrol in vitro. A random library of phage-displayed peptides was screened for binding to immobilized resveratrol to isolate resveratrolbinding proteins. Several peptides were found to bind to resveratrol specifically, which was proven by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Through amino acid sequence analysis of the selected peptides and human proteins using the BLAST program, the results showed that resveratrol has an affinity for various proteins such as breast cancer-associated antigen, breast cancer resistance protein, death-associated transcription factor, and human cyclin-dependent kinase. These results demonstrate that our study provides a feasible method for the study of binding proteins of natural compounds using a phage-displayed random peptide library.

  20. A peptide fusion protein in hibits angiogenesis and tumorgrowth by blocking VEGF binding to KDR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) binding to its tyrosine kinase receptors (KDR/FLK1, Flt-1) induces angiogenesis. In search of the peptides blocking VEGF binding to its receptor KDR/FLK1 to inhibit tumor- angiogenesis and growth, we screened a phage display peptide library with KDR as target protein, and some candidate peptides were isolated. In this study, we cloned the DNA fragment coding the peptide K237 from the library, into a vector pQE42 to express fusion protein DHFR-K237 in E. coli M15. The affection of fusion protein DHFR-K237 on endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis was investigated. In vitro, DHFR-K237 could completely block VEGF binding to KDR and significantly inhibit the VEGF-medi- ated proliferation of the human vascular endothelial cells. In vivo, DHFR-K237 inhibited angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioa- llantoric membrane and tumor growth in nude mice. These results suggest that K237 is an effective antagonist of VEGF binding to KDR, and could be a potential agent for cancer biotherapy.

  1. I-Ad-binding peptides derived from unrelated protein antigens share a common structural motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S;

    1988-01-01

    represent a mechanism to achieve a very permissive type of interaction that yet retained some degree of specificity. In the present set of experiments we analyzed the I-Ad binding pattern of a series of overlapping peptides derived from sperm whale myoglobin (residues 102-125) and influenza hemagglutinin...

  2. Creating Prebiotic Sanctuary: Self-Assembling Supramolecular Peptide Structures Bind and Stabilize RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carny, Ohad; Gazit, Ehud

    2011-04-01

    Any attempt to uncover the origins of life must tackle the known `blind watchmaker problem'. That is to demonstrate the likelihood of the emergence of a prebiotic system simple enough to be formed spontaneously and yet complex enough to allow natural selection that will lead to Darwinistic evolution. Studies of short aromatic peptides revealed their ability to self-assemble into ordered and stable structures. The unique physical and chemical characteristics of these peptide assemblies point out to their possible role in the origins of life. We have explored mechanisms by which self-assembling short peptides and RNA fragments could interact together and go through a molecular co-evolution, using diphenylalanine supramolecular assemblies as a model system. The spontaneous formation of these self-assembling peptides under prebiotic conditions, through the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) pathway was demonstrated. These peptide assemblies possess the ability to bind and stabilize ribonucleotides in a sequence-depended manner, thus increase their relative fitness. The formation of these peptide assemblies is dependent on the homochirality of the peptide monomers: while homochiral peptides (L-Phe-L-Phe and D-Phe-D-Phe) self-assemble rapidly in aqueous environment, heterochiral diastereoisomers (L-Phe-D-Phe and D-Phe-L-Phe) do not tend to self-assemble. This characteristic consists with the homochirality of all living matter. Finally, based on these findings, we propose a model for the role of short self-assembling peptides in the prebiotic molecular evolution and the origin of life.

  3. Screening of specific binding peptide targeting blood vessel of human esophageal cancer in vivo in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Min; WU Kai-chun; HAO Zhi-ming; GUO Chang-cun; YAO Jia-yin

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction remains a virulent malignancy with poor prognosis. Rapid progresses were made in chemotherapeutic agents and the development of molecular markers allowed better identification of candidates for targeted therapy. This study aimed to identify the candidate peptides used for anti-angiogenic therapy of esophageal cancer by in vivo screening C7C peptide library for peptides binding specifically to blood vessels of human esophageal cancer.Methods The phage displayed C7C peptide library was injected intravenously into mice bearing human esophageal tumor xenografts under renal capsule. After 5 rounds of screening, 13 clones were picked up individually and sequenced.During each round of screening, titers of phage recovery were calculated from tumor xenograft and control tissues.Homing of these 9 peptides to tumor vessel was detected by calculating phage titers in the tumor xenograft and control tissues (lung and spleen) after each phage was injected into mice model, and compared with the distribution of phage M13 and Ⅷ-related antigen in tumor xenograft by immunohistochemical staining. Comparisons among groups of data were made using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by the Bonferroni multiple comparisons test.Results The number of phage recovered from tumor tissue of each round increased gradually in tumor group while decreased in control groups (P <0.01 in tumor and spleen, P <0.05 in lung). Immunohistochemical staining showed similar staining pattern with M13 antibody or Ⅷ-related antigen antibody, suggesting that phages displaying the selected peptides could home to blood vessel of human esophageal cancer. According to their DNA, 9 corresponding peptide sequences were deduced. And the homing ability to blood vessel of phages displaying the selected peptides was confirmed by comparing with their recovery in tumor and control tissues. Two motifs, YSXNXW and PXNXXN, were also obtained by

  4. Arthritogenic peptide binding to DRB1*01 alleles correlates with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, Christina L; Anderson, Kirsten M; Aubrey, Michael T; Rosloniec, Edward F; Freed, Brian M

    2016-08-01

    Genetic susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often defined by the presence of a shared epitope (QKRAA, QRRAA, or RRRAA) at positions 70-74 in HLA-DRβ1. However, DRβ1*01:01 and 01:02 contain the same QRRAA epitope, but differ considerably in their susceptibility to RA. The purpose of this study was to determine if this difference could be explained by their ability to bind three arthritogenic peptides that we have previously shown to bind to the archetypal RA-susceptible allele, DRβ1*04:01, but not to the resistant DRβ1*08:01 allele. Binding of type II collagen(258-272), citrullinated and native vimentin(66-78), and citrullinated and native α-enolase(11-25) were measured on cell lines expressing either DRβ1*01:01, *01:02 or *01:03 in association with DRα1*01:01. DRβ1*01:01 and *01:02 both exhibited a 6.5-fold preference for citrullinated vimentin(66-78) compared to native vimentin. However, DRβ1*01:01 also exhibited a 1.7-fold preference for citrullinated α-enolase(11-25) and bound collagen(258-272), while DRβ1*01:02 bound neither of these peptides. Consistent with its known resistance to RA, DRβ1*01:03 preferentially bound native vimentin(66-78) and α-enolase(11-25) over the citrullinated forms of these peptides, and also failed to bind collagen(258-272). Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to determine which amino acid residues were responsible for the differences between these alleles. Mutating position 86 in DRβ1*01:01 from glycine to the valine residue found in DRβ1*01:02 eliminated binding of both citrullinated α-enolase(11-25) and collagen(258-272), thereby recapitulating the peptide-binding profile of DRβ1*01:02. The difference in susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis between DRβ1*01:01 and *01:02 thus correlates with the effect of position 86 on the binding of these arthritogenic peptides. Consistent with their association with RA resistance, positions I67, D70 and E71 all contributed to the inability of DRβ1*01:03 to bind

  5. The complex binding mode of the peptide hormone H2 relaxin to its receptor RXFP1

    OpenAIRE

    Sethi, Ashish; Bruell, Shoni; Patil, Nitin; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Scott, Daniel J.; Petrie, Emma J.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    H2 relaxin activates the relaxin family peptide receptor-1 (RXFP1), a class A G-protein coupled receptor, by a poorly understood mechanism. The ectodomain of RXFP1 comprises an N-terminal LDLa module, essential for activation, tethered to a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain by a 32-residue linker. H2 relaxin is hypothesized to bind with high affinity to the LRR domain enabling the LDLa module to bind and activate the transmembrane domain of RXFP1. Here we define a relaxin-binding site on the L...

  6. Strong Electrostatic Interactions Lead to Entropically Favorable Binding of Peptides to Charged Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, K G; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic analyses can provide key insights into the origins of protein self-assembly on surfaces, protein function, and protein stability. However, obtaining quantitative measurements of thermodynamic observables from unbiased classical simulations of peptide or protein adsorption is challenging because of sampling limitations brought on by strong biomolecule/surface binding forces as well as time scale limitations. We used the parallel tempering metadynamics in the well-tempered ensemble (PTMetaD-WTE) enhanced sampling method to study the adsorption behavior and thermodynamics of several explicitly solvated model peptide adsorption systems, providing new molecular-level insight into the biomolecule adsorption process. Specifically studied were peptides LKα14 and LKβ15 and trpcage miniprotein adsorbing onto a charged, hydrophilic self-assembled monolayer surface functionalized with a carboxylic acid/carboxylate headgroup and a neutral, hydrophobic methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer surface. Binding free energies were calculated as a function of temperature for each system and decomposed into their respective energetic and entropic contributions. We investigated how specific interfacial features such as peptide/surface electrostatic interactions and surface-bound ion content affect the thermodynamic landscape of adsorption and lead to differences in surface-bound conformations of the peptides. Results show that upon adsorption to the charged surface, configurational entropy gains of the released solvent molecules dominate the configurational entropy losses of the bound peptide. This behavior leads to an apparent increase in overall system entropy upon binding and therefore to the surprising and seemingly nonphysical result of an apparent increased binding free energy at elevated temperatures. Opposite effects and conclusions are found for the neutral surface. Additional simulations demonstrate that by adjusting the ionic strength of the solution

  7. Electrostatic Binding and Hydrophobic Collapse of Peptide-Nucleic Acid Aggregates Quantified Using Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Bizarro, Cristiano V; de Loreno, Sara; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Ramsch, Roland; Vilchez, Susana; Solans, Conxita; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Albericio, Fernando; Eritja, Ramon; Giralt, Ernest; Dev, Sukhendu B; Ritort, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction between self-aggregating peptides and nucleic acids or other polyanions is key to the understanding of many aggregation processes underlying several human diseases (e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). Determining the affinity and kinetic steps of such interactions is challenging due to the competition between hydrophobic self-aggregating forces and electrostatic binding forces. Kahalalide F (KF) is an anticancer hydrophobic peptide which contains a single positive charge that confers strong aggregative properties with polyanions. This makes KF an ideal model to elucidate the mechanisms by which self-aggregation competes with binding to a strongly charged polyelectrolyte such as DNA. We use optical tweezers to apply mechanical forces to single DNA molecules and show that KF and DNA interact in a two-step kinetic process promoted by the electrostatic binding of DNA to the aggregate surface followed by the stabilization of the complex due to hydrophobic interact...

  8. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D’Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-08-01

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor.

  9. A novel method to measure HLA-DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHC class II molecules based on peptide binding competition assay and differential IC(50) determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-04-01

    HLA-DM (DM) functions as a peptide editor that mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules by accelerating peptide dissociation and association kinetics. The relative DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHCII molecules correlates with antigen presentation and immunodominance hierarchy, and measurement of DM-susceptibility has been a key effort in this field. Current assays of DM-susceptibility, based on differential peptide dissociation rates measured for individually labeled peptides over a long time base, are difficult and cumbersome. Here, we present a novel method to measure DM-susceptibility based on peptide binding competition assays performed in the presence and absence of DM, reported as a delta-IC(50) (change in 50% inhibition concentration) value. We simulated binding competition reactions of peptides with various intrinsic and DM-catalyzed kinetic parameters and found that under a wide range of conditions the delta-IC(50) value is highly correlated with DM-susceptibility as measured in off-rate assay. We confirmed experimentally that DM-susceptibility measured by delta-IC(50) is comparable to that measured by traditional off-rate assay for peptides with known DM-susceptibility hierarchy. The major advantage of this method is that it allows simple, fast and high throughput measurement of DM-susceptibility for a large set of unlabeled peptides in studies of the mechanism of DM action and for identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes. PMID:24583195

  10. Specific bindings of glycine peptides of distinctly different chain length on dynamic papain surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the specific bindings of peptides of 1-10 glycine residues (1-10GLY) on dynamic papain surfaces via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Although the binding specificities of 1-5GLY on papain fluctuated little with time, the binding specificities of 6-10GLY on papain considerably fluctuated with time. Some residues had a significant impact on bindings of 6-10GLY to sites near active center of papain, and some of their residues were specific for each 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY. Modification of these specific residues should allow for control of binding specificity of 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY to the active center.

  11. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results. PMID:26537635

  12. Derivation of an amino acid similarity matrix for peptide:MHC binding and its application as a Bayesian prior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sette Alessandro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experts in peptide:MHC binding studies are often able to estimate the impact of a single residue substitution based on a heuristic understanding of amino acid similarity in an experimental context. Our aim is to quantify this measure of similarity to improve peptide:MHC binding prediction methods. This should help compensate for holes and bias in the sequence space coverage of existing peptide binding datasets. Results Here, a novel amino acid similarity matrix (PMBEC is directly derived from the binding affinity data of combinatorial peptide mixtures. Like BLOSUM62, this matrix captures well-known physicochemical properties of amino acid residues. However, PMBEC differs markedly from existing matrices in cases where residue substitution involves a reversal of electrostatic charge. To demonstrate its usefulness, we have developed a new peptide:MHC class I binding prediction method, using the matrix as a Bayesian prior. We show that the new method can compensate for missing information on specific residues in the training data. We also carried out a large-scale benchmark, and its results indicate that prediction performance of the new method is comparable to that of the best neural network based approaches for peptide:MHC class I binding. Conclusion A novel amino acid similarity matrix has been derived for peptide:MHC binding interactions. One prominent feature of the matrix is that it disfavors substitution of residues with opposite charges. Given that the matrix was derived from experimentally determined peptide:MHC binding affinity measurements, this feature is likely shared by all peptide:protein interactions. In addition, we have demonstrated the usefulness of the matrix as a Bayesian prior in an improved scoring-matrix based peptide:MHC class I prediction method. A software implementation of the method is available at: http://www.mhc-pathway.net/smmpmbec.

  13. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    CTL staining and manipulation. This has enabled a complete mapping of all HLA-I specificities (“the Human MHC Project”). Here, we demonstrate that these approaches can be applied to other species. We systematically transferred domains of the frequently expressed swine MHC-I molecule, SLA-1*0401, onto...... a HLA-I molecule (HLA-A*11:01), thereby generating recombinant human/swine chimeric MHC-I molecules as well as the intact SLA-1*0401 molecule. Biochemical peptide-binding assays and positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries were used to analyze the peptide-binding motifs of these molecules....... A pan-specific predictor of peptide–MHC-I binding, NetMHCpan, which was originally developed to cover the binding specificities of all known HLA-I molecules, was successfully used to predict the specificities of the SLA-1*0401 molecule as well as the porcine/human chimeric MHC-I molecules. These...

  14. Isolation and detection of human IgA using a streptococcal IgA-binding peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandin, Charlotta; Linse, Sara; Areschoug, Thomas; Woof, Jenny M; Reinholdt, Jesper; Lindahl, Gunnar

    2002-08-01

    Bacterial proteins that bind to the Fc part of IgG have found widespread use in immunology. A similar protein suitable for the isolation and detection of human IgA has not been described. Here, we show that a 50-residue synthetic peptide, designated streptococcal IgA-binding peptide (Sap) and derived from a streptococcal M protein, can be used for single-step affinity purification of human IgA. High affinity binding of IgA required the presence in Sap of a C-terminal cysteine residue, not present in the intact M protein. Passage of human serum through a Sap column caused depletion of >99% of the IgA, and elution of the column allowed quantitative recovery of highly purified IgA, for which the proportions of the IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses were the same as in whole serum. Moreover, immobilized Sap could be used for single-step purification of secretory IgA of both subclasses from human saliva, with a recovery of approximately 45%. The Sap peptide could also be used to specifically detect IgA bound to Ag. Together, these data indicate that Sap is a versatile Fc-binding reagent that may open new possibilities for the characterization of human IgA. PMID:12133959

  15. Identification of the bioactive and consensus peptide motif from Momordica charantia insulin receptor-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hsin-Yi; Li, Chia-Cheng; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Many food bioactive peptides with diverse functions have been discovered by studying plant proteins. We have previously identified a 68-residue insulin receptor (IR)-binding protein (mcIRBP) from Momordica charantia that exhibits hypoglycemic effects in mice via interaction with IR. By in vitro digestion, we found that mcIRBP-19, spanning residues 50-68 of mcIRBP, enhanced the binding of insulin to IR, stimulated the phosphorylation of PDK1 and Akt, induced the expression of glucose transporter 4, and stimulated both the uptake of glucose in cells and the clearance of glucose in diabetic mice. Furthermore, mcIRBP-19 homologs were present in various plants and shared similar β-hairpin structures and IR kinase-activating abilities to mcIRBP-19. In conclusion, our findings suggested that mcIRBP-19 is a blood glucose-lowering bioactive peptide that exhibits IR-binding potentials. Moreover, we newly identified novel IR-binding bioactive peptides in various plants which belonged to different taxonomic families. PMID:26988505

  16. Synthetic Peptide Ligands of the Antigen Binding Receptor Induce Programmed Cell Death in a Human B-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, Markus F.; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Dower, William J.; Levy, Ronald

    1994-04-01

    Peptide ligands for the antigen binding site of the surface immunoglobulin receptor of a human B-cell lymphoma cell line were identified with the use of filamentous phage libraries displaying random 8- and 12-amino acid peptides. Corresponding synthetic peptides bound specifically to the antigen binding site of this immunoglobulin receptor and blocked the binding of an anti-idiotype antibody. The ligands, when conjugated to form dimers or tetramers, induced cell death by apoptosis in vitro with an IC50 between 40 and 200 nM. This effect was associated with specific stimulation of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  17. V3 peptide binding pattern and HIV-1 transmission route in Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica E. Pinto

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available To characterize antibody binding to a panel of V3 loop peptides representing diverse HIV-1 neutralization epitopes, 149 HIV-1 infected individuals from Rio de Janeiro (RJ were investigated. Results were analyzed with respect to risk factors for infection and other epidemiological and clinical data. Peptide reactivity was not associated with sex, clinical status, CD4 counts, antigenemia or ß2-microglobulin serum level. A segregation of peptide reactivity according to route of infection was encountered. This finding suggests that more then one viral strain may be circulating in RJ, in subjects with different risk factors for HIV-1 infection. An investigation of prevalent HIV-1 genotypes, serotypes and immunotypes may be of importance for the design and selection of potential vaccines to be used in Brazil as well as for the selection of populations to be included in future vaccine efficacy trials.

  18. Use of synthetic peptides to locate novel integrin alpha2beta1-binding motifs in human collagen III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Nicolas; Hamaia, Samir W; Siljander, Pia R-M; Maddox, Ben; Peachey, Anthony R; Fernandez, Rafael; Foley, Loraine J; Slatter, David A; Jarvis, Gavin E; Farndale, Richard W

    2006-02-17

    A set of 57 synthetic peptides encompassing the entire triplehelical domain of human collagen III was used to locate binding sites for the collagen-binding integrin alpha(2)beta(1). The capacity of the peptides to support Mg(2+)-dependent binding of several integrin preparations was examined. Wild-type integrins (recombinant alpha(2) I-domain, alpha(2)beta(1) purified from platelet membranes, and recombinant soluble alpha(2)beta(1) expressed as an alpha(2)-Fos/beta(1)-Jun heterodimer) bound well to only three peptides, two containing GXX'GER motifs (GROGER and GMOGER, where O is hydroxyproline) and one containing two adjacent GXX'GEN motifs (GLKGEN and GLOGEN). Two mutant alpha(2) I-domains were tested: the inactive T221A mutant, which recognized no peptides, and the constitutively active E318W mutant, which bound a larger subset of peptides. Adhesion of activated human platelets to GER-containing peptides was greater than that of resting platelets, and HT1080 cells bound well to more of the peptides compared with platelets. Binding of cells and recombinant proteins was abolished by anti-alpha(2) monoclonal antibody 6F1 and by chelation of Mg(2+). We describe two novel high affinity integrin-binding motifs in human collagen III (GROGER and GLOGEN) and a third motif (GLKGEN) that displays intermediate activity. Each motif was verified using shorter synthetic peptides. PMID:16326707

  19. Membrane binding of prion protein N-terminal peptides characterised by neutron reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prion protein (PrP) is widely recognised to mis-fold into the causative agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, known as Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) in humans, scrappie in sheep or Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cows (BSE, “mad cow disease”). PrP has previously been shown to bind to lipid membranes with binding influenced by both membrane composition and pH. Aside from the mis-folding events associated with prion pathogenesis, PrP can undergo various post-translational modifications, including internal cleavage events. Alpha and beta-cleavage of PrP produces two N-terminal fragments, N1 and N2 respectively, which interact specifically with negatively charged phospholipids at low pH. Previous work probing N1 and N2 interactions with supported bilayers raised the possibility that the peptides could insert deeply with minimal disruption [1]. This work aimed to refine the binding parameters of these peptides with lipid bilayers. To this end, neutron reflectometry was used to define the structural details of the interactions in combination with quartz crystal microbalance interrogation and calcein release assays. Neutron reflectometry confirmed that peptides equivalent to N1 and N2 insert into the interstitial space between the phospholipid headgroups but do not penetrate into the acyl tail region. In accord with previous studies, interactions were stronger for the N1 fragment than for the N2, with more peptide bound per lipid. Neutron reflectometry analysis also detected lengthening of the lipid acyl tails, with a concurrent decrease in lipid area. Overall, the data shows that the N1 and N2 peptides interact with the anionic phospholipid headgroups of supported lipid bilayers, inducing lipid ordering in the absence of significant penetration into the acyl tails or permeation of the membrane.

  20. A community resource benchmarking predictions of peptide binding to MHC-I molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern Peters

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules by T lymphocytes is an essential part of immune surveillance. Each MHC allele has a characteristic peptide binding preference, which can be captured in prediction algorithms, allowing for the rapid scan of entire pathogen proteomes for peptide likely to bind MHC. Here we make public a large set of 48,828 quantitative peptide-binding affinity measurements relating to 48 different mouse, human, macaque, and chimpanzee MHC class I alleles. We use this data to establish a set of benchmark predictions with one neural network method and two matrix-based prediction methods extensively utilized in our groups. In general, the neural network outperforms the matrix-based predictions mainly due to its ability to generalize even on a small amount of data. We also retrieved predictions from tools publicly available on the internet. While differences in the data used to generate these predictions hamper direct comparisons, we do conclude that tools based on combinatorial peptide libraries perform remarkably well. The transparent prediction evaluation on this dataset provides tool developers with a benchmark for comparison of newly developed prediction methods. In addition, to generate and evaluate our own prediction methods, we have established an easily extensible web-based prediction framework that allows automated side-by-side comparisons of prediction methods implemented by experts. This is an advance over the current practice of tool developers having to generate reference predictions themselves, which can lead to underestimating the performance of prediction methods they are not as familiar with as their own. The overall goal of this effort is to provide a transparent prediction evaluation allowing bioinformaticians to identify promising features of prediction methods and providing guidance to immunologists regarding the reliability of prediction tools.

  1. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L.; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. This algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system. PMID:27558848

  2. Inhibition of LtxA toxicity by blocking cholesterol binding with peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A C; Koufos, E; Balashova, N V; Boesze-Battaglia, K; Lally, E T

    2016-02-01

    The leukotoxin (LtxA) produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans kills host immune cells, allowing the bacterium to establish an ecological niche in the upper aerodigestive tract of its human host. The interaction of LtxA with human immune cells is both complex and multifaceted, involving membrane lipids as well as cell-surface proteins. In the initial encounter with the host cell, LtxA associates with lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, a cell surface adhesion glycoprotein. However, we have also demonstrated that the toxin associates strongly with the plasma membrane lipids, specifically cholesterol. This association with cholesterol is regulated by a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif, with a sequence of (334) LEEYSKR(340), in the N-terminal region of the toxin. Here, we have demonstrated that removal of cholesterol from the plasma membrane or mutation of the LtxA CRAC motif inhibits the activity of the toxin in THP-1 cells. To inhibit LtxA activity, we designed a short peptide corresponding to the CRAC(336) motif of LtxA (CRAC(336WT)). This peptide binds to cholesterol and thereby inhibits the toxicity of LtxA in THP-1 cells. Previously, we showed that this peptide inhibits LtxA toxicity against Jn.9 (Jurkat) cells, indicating that peptides derived from the cholesterol-binding site of LtxA may have a potential clinical applicability in controlling infections of repeats-in-toxin-producing organisms. PMID:26352738

  3. Oligonucleotide delivery with cell surface binding and cell penetrating Peptide amphiphile nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumcuoglu, Didem; Sardan, Melis; Tekinay, Turgay; Guler, Mustafa O; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2015-05-01

    A drug delivery system designed specifically for oligonucleotide therapeutics can ameliorate the problems associated with the in vivo delivery of these molecules. The internalization of free oligonucleotides is challenging, and cytotoxicity is the main obstacle for current transfection vehicles. To develop nontoxic delivery vehicles for efficient transfection of oligonucleotides, we designed a self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanosphere delivery system decorated with cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) containing multiple arginine residues (R4 and R8), and a cell surface binding peptide (KRSR), and report the efficiency of this system in delivering G-3129, a Bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide (AON). PA/AON (peptide amphiphile/antisense oligonucleotide) complexes were characterized with regards to their size and secondary structure, and their cellular internalization efficiencies were evaluated. The effect of the number of arginine residues on the cellular internalization was investigated by both flow cytometry and confocal imaging, and the results revealed that uptake efficiency improved as the number of arginines in the sequence increased. The combined effect of cell penetration and surface binding property on the cellular internalization and its uptake mechanism was also evaluated by mixing R8-PA and KRSR-PA. R8 and R8/KRSR decorated PAs were found to drastically increase the internalization of AONs compared to nonbioactive PA control. Overall, the KRSR-decorated self-assembled PA nanospheres were demonstrated to be noncytotoxic delivery vectors with high transfection rates and may serve as a promising delivery system for AONs. PMID:25828697

  4. Photounbinding of calmodulin from a family of CaM binding peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus G Neumüller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have shown that fluorescently labeled antibodies can be dissociated from their antigen by illumination with laser light. The mechanism responsible for the photounbinding effect, however, remains elusive. Here, we give important insights into the mechanism of photounbinding and show that the effect is not restricted to antibody/antigen binding. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present studies of the photounbinding of labeled calmodulin (CaM from a set of CaM-binding peptides with different affinities to CaM after one- and two-photon excitation. We found that the photounbinding effect becomes stronger with increasing binding affinity. Our observation that photounbinding can be influenced by using free radical scavengers, that it does not occur with either unlabeled protein or non-fluorescent quencher dyes, and that it becomes evident shortly after or with photobleaching suggest that photounbinding and photobleaching are closely linked. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The experimental results exclude surface effects, or heating by laser irradiation as potential causes of photounbinding. Our data suggest that free radicals formed through photobleaching may cause a conformational change of the CaM which lowers their binding affinity with the peptide or its respective binding partner.

  5. Inhibition of mu and delta opioid receptor ligand binding by the peptide aldehyde protease inhibitor, leupeptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffers, Keith H; Khokhar, Arshia; Chaturvedi, Kirti; Howells, Richard D

    2002-04-15

    We reported recently that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in agonist-induced down regulation of mu and delta opioid receptors [J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001) 12345]. While evaluating the effects of various protease inhibitors on agonist-induced opioid receptor down regulation, we observed that while the peptide aldehyde, leupeptin (acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Arginal), did not affect agonist-induced down regulation, leupeptin at submillimolar concentrations directly inhibited radioligand binding to opioid receptors. In this study, the inhibitory activity of leupeptin on radioligand binding was characterized utilizing human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell lines expressing transfected mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. The rank order of potency for leupeptin inhibition of [3H]bremazocine binding to opioid receptors was mu > delta > kappa. In contrast to the effect of leupeptin, the peptide aldehyde proteasome inhibitor, MG 132 (carbobenzoxy-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucinal), had significantly less effect on bremazocine binding to mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. We propose that leupeptin inhibits ligand binding by reacting reversibly with essential sulfhydryl groups that are necessary for high-affinity ligand/receptor interactions. PMID:11853866

  6. Anti-peptide aptamers recognize amino acid sequence and bind a protein epitope.

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, W; Ellington, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    In vitro selection of nucleic acid binding species (aptamers) is superficially similar to the immune response. Both processes produce biopolymers that can recognize targets with high affinity and specificity. While antibodies are known to recognize the sequence and conformation of protein surface features (epitopes), very little is known about the precise interactions between aptamers and their epitopes. Therefore, aptamers that could recognize a particular epitope, a peptide fragment of huma...

  7. Biophysical characterization of G-protein coupled receptor-peptide ligand binding

    OpenAIRE

    Langelaan, David N.; Ngweniform, Pascaline; Rainey, Jan K.

    2011-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are ubiquitous membrane proteins allowing intracellular response to extracellular factors that range from photons of light to small molecules to proteins. Despite extensive exploitation of GRCRs as therapeutic targets, biophysical characterization of GPCR-ligand interactions remains challenging. In this minireview, we focus on techniques which have been successfully employed for structural and biophysical characterization of peptide ligands binding to their...

  8. RNA/peptide binding driven by electrostatics -- Insight from bi-directional pulling simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Do, Trang N.; Carloni, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele; Bussi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    RNA/protein interactions play crucial roles in controlling gene expression. They are becoming important targets for pharmaceutical applications. Due to RNA flexibility and to the strength of electrostatic interactions, standard docking methods are insufficient. We here present a computational method which allows studying the binding of RNA molecules and charged peptides with atomistic, explicit-solvent molecular dynamics. In our method, a suitable estimate of the electrostatic interaction is ...

  9. Assessing high affinity binding to HLA-DQ2.5 by a novel peptide library based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jüse, Ulrike; Arntzen, Magnus; Højrup, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on a novel peptide library based method for HLA class II binding motif identification. The approach is based on water soluble HLA class II molecules and soluble dedicated peptide libraries. A high number of different synthetic peptides are competing to interact with a limited amount...... of HLA molecules, giving a selective force in the binding. The peptide libraries can be designed so that the sequence length, the alignment of binding registers, the numbers and composition of random positions are controlled, and also modified amino acids can be included. Selected library peptides...... bound to HLA are then isolated by size exclusion chromatography and sequenced by tandem mass spectrometry online coupled to liquid chromatography. The MS/MS data are subsequently searched against a library defined database using a search engine such as Mascot, followed by manual inspection of the...

  10. Binding of leachable components of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and peptide on modified SPR chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many types of polymers are often used in dentistry, which may cause allergic reaction, mainly methyl methacrylate allergy due to the leachable, degradable components of polymerized dental products. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between the leachable components of PMMA and peptides by Fourier-transform Surface Plasmon Resonance (FT SPR). In our previous work binding of oligopeptides (Ph.D.-7 and Ph.D.-12 Peptide Library Kit) was investigated to PMMA surface by phage display technique. It was found that oligopeptides bounded specifically to PMMA surface. The most common amino acids were leucine and proline inside the amino acids sequences of DNA of phages. The binding of haptens, as formaldehyde and methacrylic acid, to frequent amino acids was to investigate on the modified gold SPR chip. Self assembled monolayer (SAM) modified the surface of gold chip and ensured the specific binding between the haptens and amino acids. It was found that amino acids bounded to modified SPR gold and the haptens bounded to amino acids by creating multilayer on the chip surface. By the application of phage display and SPR modern bioanalytical methods the interaction between allergens and peptides can be investigated

  11. Mineral-binding milk proteins and peptides; occurrence, biochemical and technological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegarud, G E; Langsrud, T; Svenning, C

    2000-11-01

    Minerals and trace elements in cow's milk occur as inorganic ions and salts or form complexes with proteins and peptides, carbohydrates, fats and small molecules. The main mineral binder or chelators of calcium are the caseins, alphas1-casein, alphas2-casein, beta-casein and kappa-casein, but also whey proteins and lactoferrin bind specific minerals like calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, sodium and potassium. Less documented is the binding of trace elements. Peptides obtained by in vitro or in vivo hydrolysis act as mineral trappers through specific and non-specific binding sites. They may then function as carriers, chelators, of various minerals and thus enhance or inhibit bioavailability. Peptides from milk proteins have found interesting new applications in the food industry as products with improved functionality or as ingredients of dietary products, or used in pharmaceutical industry. Fortification of foods with minerals in a low concentration has for a long time been used in some countries to overcome mineral deficiency, which is an increasing problem in humans. These types of foods are being used to create a new generation of super foods in the industry today. PMID:11242452

  12. Oxpholipin 11D: an anti-inflammatory peptide that binds cholesterol and oxidized phospholipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Ruchala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many gram-positive bacteria produce pore-forming exotoxins that contain a highly conserved, 12-residue domain (ECTGLAWEWWRT that binds cholesterol. This domain is usually flanked N-terminally by arginine and C-terminally by valine. We used this 14-residue sequence as a template to create a small library of peptides that bind cholesterol and other lipids. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: Several of these peptides manifested anti-inflammatory properties in a predictive in vitro monocyte chemotactic assay, and some also diminished the pro-inflammatory effects of low-density lipoprotein in apoE-deficient mice. The most potent analog, Oxpholipin-11D (OxP-11D, contained D-amino acids exclusively and was identical to the 14-residue design template except that diphenylalanine replaced cysteine-3. In surface plasmon resonance binding studies, OxP-11D bound oxidized (phospholipids and sterols in much the same manner as D-4F, a widely studied cardioprotective apoA-I-mimetic peptide with anti-inflammatory properties. In contrast to D-4F, which adopts a stable alpha-helical structure in solution, the OxP-11D structure was flexible and contained multiple turn-like features. CONCLUSION: Given the substantial evidence that oxidized phospholipids are pro-inflammatory in vivo, OxP-11D and other Oxpholipins may have therapeutic potential.

  13. Predicting binding affinities of protein ligands from three-dimensional models: application to peptide binding to class I major histocompatibility proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Lauemoller, S L; Holm, A; Buus, S; Tschinke, V

    1999-01-01

    A simple and fast free energy scoring function (Fresno) has been developed to predict the binding free energy of peptides to class I major histocompatibility (MHC) proteins. It differs from existing scoring functions mainly by the explicit treatment of ligand desolvation and of unfavorable protein...... interactions were found to contribute the most to HLA-A0201-peptide interactions, whereas H-bonding predominates in H-2K(k) recognition. Both cross-validated models were afterward used to predict the binding affinity of a test set of 26 peptides to HLA-A0204 (an HLA allele closely related to HLA-A0201) and of...

  14. Molecular modeling of hair keratin/peptide complex : using MM-PBSA calculations to describe experimental binding results

    OpenAIRE

    Azóia, Nuno G.; Fernandes, Margarida M.; Micaelo, N. M.; Cláudio M Soares; Paulo, Artur Cavaco

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a keratin/peptide complex have been conducted to predict the binding affinity of four different peptides toward human hair. Free energy calculations on the peptides' interaction with the keratin model demonstrated that electrostatic interactions are believed to be the main driving force stabilizing the complex. The molecular mechanics–Poisson-Boltzmann surface area methodology used for the free energy calculations demonstrated that the dielectric constant in ...

  15. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  16. Side-chain interactions form late and cooperatively in the binding reaction between disordered peptides and PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haq, S Raza; Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    used short peptides as a model system for intrinsically disordered proteins. Linear free-energy relationships based on rate and equilibrium constants for the binding of these peptides to ordered target proteins, PDZ domains, demonstrate that native side-chain interactions form mainly after the rate-limiting...

  17. Bio-inspired Silicification of Silica-binding Peptide-Silk Protein Chimeras: Comparison of Chemically and Genetically Produced Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Canabady-Rochelle, Laetitia L.S.; Belton, David J.; Deschaume, Olivier; Currie, Heather A.; Kaplan, David L; Perry, Carole C.

    2012-01-01

    Novel protein chimeras constituted of ‘silk’ and a silica-binding peptide (KSLSRHDHIHHH) were synthesized by genetic or chemical approaches and their influence on silica-silk based chimera composite formation evaluated. Genetic chimeras were constructed from 6 or 15 repeats of the 32 amino acid consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes spider silk ([SGRGGLGGQG AGAAAAAGGA GQGGYGGLGSQG]n) to which one silica binding peptide was fused at the N terminus. For the chemical chimera, 25 equivalents of t...

  18. An approach to the construction of tailor-made amphiphilic peptides that strongly and selectively bind to hairpin RNA targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Jin; Hyun, Soonsil; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Yu, Jaehoon

    2009-02-18

    The hairpin RNA motif is one of the most frequently observed secondary structures and is often targeted by therapeutic agents. An amphiphilic peptide with seven lysine and eight leucine residues and its derivatives were designed for use as ligands against RNA hairpin motifs. We hypothesized that variations in both the hydrophobic leucine-rich and hydrophilic lysine-rich spheres of these amphiphilic peptides would create extra attractive interactions with hairpin RNA targets. A series of alanine-scanned peptides were probed to identify the most influential lysine residues in the hydrophilic sphere. The binding affinities of these modified peptides with several hairpins, such as RRE, TAR from HIV, a short hairpin from IRES of HCV, and a hairpin from the 16S A-site stem from rRNA, were determined. Since the hairpin from IRES of HCV was the most susceptible to the initial series of alanine-scanned peptides, studies investigating how further variations in the peptides effect binding employed the IRES hairpin. Next, the important Lys residues were substituted by shorter chain amines, such as ornithine, to place the peptide deeper into the hairpin groove. In a few cases, a 70-fold improved binding was observed for peptides that contained the specifically located shorter amine side chains. To further explore changes in binding affinities brought about by alterations in the hydrophobic sphere, tryptophan residues were introduced in place of leucine. A few peptides with tryptophan in specific positions also displayed 70-fold improved binding affinities. Finally, double mutant peptides incorporating both specifically located shorter amine side chains in the hydrophilic region and tryptophan residues in the hydrophobic region were synthesized. The binding affinities of peptides containing the simple double modification were observed to be 80 times lower, and their binding specificities were increased 40-fold. The results of this effort provide important information about

  19. Interference of peptides and specific antibodies with the function of the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae transferrin-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Strutzberg, K; Franz, B.; Gerlach, G F

    1997-01-01

    Multiple-antigenic peptides (MAPs) containing transferrin-binding domains of the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 7-derived transferrin-binding protein (TfbA) (K. Strutzberg, L. von Olleschik, B. Franz, C. Pyne, M. A. Schmidt, and G.-F. Gerlach, Infect. Immun. 63:3846-3850, 1995) were constructed. It was found that the MAPs inhibited transferrin binding of the recombinant TfbA protein, whereas antibodies directed against transferrin-binding domains failed to do so.

  20. Optimization of Hydrolysis Conditions for Iron Binding Peptides Production from Shrimp Processing Byproducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is one of the most popular trace elements in body and plays very important role in metabolism or construction of body. Organic iron from various sources for curing iron-deficiency anemia was one of the hot research items in recent years. The aim of this study was optimize the enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for preparing iron peptides from shrimp processing byproducts. Factorial experiments and response surface methodology were applied to optimize the enzymatic hydrolysis parameters. The iron binding capacity was used for evaluating indicator. The results showed that trypsin hydrolysate of shrimp processing byproducts had the highest iron binding ability and the three significant factors were enzyme concentration, pH and hydrolysis time, respectively. The optimum trypsin hydrolysis conditions were pH 8.2, enzyme concentration of 500 U mL-1 and hydrolysis time of 2 h, respectively. The highest iron binding ability of trypsin hydrolysate was obtained to be 6.75 μg mg-1 at these optimum conditions. Trypsin was effective for producing iron binding peptides from shrimp processing byproducts.

  1. Spectroscopic and biological activity studies of the chromium-binding peptide EEEEGDD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hirohumi; Kandadi, Machender R; Panzhinskiy, Evgeniy; Belmore, Kenneth; Deng, Ge; Love, Ebony; Robertson, Preshus M; Commodore, Juliette J; Cassady, Carolyn J; Nair, Sreejayan; Vincent, John B

    2016-06-01

    While trivalent chromium has been shown at high doses to have pharmacological effects improving insulin resistance in rodent models of insulin resistance, the mechanism of action of chromium at a molecular level is not known. The chromium-binding and transport agent low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LMWCr) has been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium. LMWCr has recently been shown to be comprised of a heptapeptide of the sequence EEEEDGG. The binding of Cr(3+) to this heptapeptide has been examined. Mass spectrometric and a variety of spectroscopic studies have shown that multiple chromic ions bind to the peptide in an octahedral fashion through carboxylate groups and potentially small anionic ligands such as oxide and hydroxide. A complex of Cr and the peptide when administered intravenously to mice is able to decrease area under the curve in intravenous glucose tolerance tests. It can also restore insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in myotubes rendered insulin resistant by treating them with a high-glucose media. PMID:26898644

  2. Functional interactions between polypyrimidine tract binding protein and PRI peptide ligand containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Miguel B; Ascher, David B; Gooding, Clare; Lang, Emma; Maude, Hannah; Turner, David; Llorian, Miriam; Pires, Douglas E V; Attig, Jan; Smith, Christopher W J

    2016-08-15

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) that plays roles in most stages of the life-cycle of pre-mRNA and mRNAs in the nucleus and cytoplasm. PTBP1 has four RNA binding domains of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) family, each of which can bind to pyrimidine motifs. In addition, RRM2 can interact via its dorsal surface with proteins containing short peptide ligands known as PTB RRM2 interacting (PRI) motifs, originally found in the protein Raver1. Here we review our recent progress in understanding the interactions of PTB with RNA and with various proteins containing PRI ligands. PMID:27528752

  3. NN-align. An artificial neural network-based alignment algorithm for MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Ole

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule plays a central role in controlling the adaptive immune response to infections. MHC class I molecules present peptides derived from intracellular proteins to cytotoxic T cells, whereas MHC class II molecules stimulate cellular and humoral immunity through presentation of extracellularly derived peptides to helper T cells. Identification of which peptides will bind a given MHC molecule is thus of great importance for the understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and large efforts have been placed in developing algorithms capable of predicting this binding event. Results Here, we present a novel artificial neural network-based method, NN-align that allows for simultaneous identification of the MHC class II binding core and binding affinity. NN-align is trained using a novel training algorithm that allows for correction of bias in the training data due to redundant binding core representation. Incorporation of information about the residues flanking the peptide-binding core is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy. The method is evaluated on a large-scale benchmark consisting of six independent data sets covering 14 human MHC class II alleles, and is demonstrated to outperform other state-of-the-art MHC class II prediction methods. Conclusion The NN-align method is competitive with the state-of-the-art MHC class II peptide binding prediction algorithms. The method is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCII-2.0.

  4. Molecular modeling of hair keratin/peptide complex: Using MM-PBSA calculations to describe experimental binding results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoia, Nuno G; Fernandes, Margarida M; Micaêlo, Nuno M; Soares, Cláudio M; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2012-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a keratin/peptide complex have been conducted to predict the binding affinity of four different peptides toward human hair. Free energy calculations on the peptides' interaction with the keratin model demonstrated that electrostatic interactions are believed to be the main driving force stabilizing the complex. The molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area methodology used for the free energy calculations demonstrated that the dielectric constant in the protein's interior plays a major role in the free energy calculations, and the only way to obtain accordance between the free energy calculations and the experimental binding results was to use the average dielectric constant. PMID:22275089

  5. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8positive T-cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presenta...

  6. Understanding Binding Peptide Design Using a Synthesis of Residue Physicality and Energetic Frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Lenaya; Tripathi, Swarnendu; Cheung, Margaret

    The ubiquitous nature of Calmodulin (CaM) allows it to bind to numerous peptides, thus altering the function of a protein complex. Variations in CaM's function are a product of the numerous binding targets (BT) and their significant biological pathways. Given that CaM is a well-studied protein, we have found that certain amino acids in CaM's sequence play an important role in the event of protein binding. 36 CaM binding targets were analyzed to find sequential, physical commonalities. Using the Frustrometer (frustrometer.tk), we obtained z-scores (a numerical value for level of frustration) for each amino acids in a given binding target sequence. From those results, we were able to identify which residues show a highly favorable energetic change after binding and those that do not. We have found charged residues show the most prominent change when bound to CaM, these amino acids may provide a critical role in the overall design and function of a CaM-BT complex.

  7. Calcium Binding by Ro 60 Multiple Antigenic Peptides on PVDF Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Biji T; Bachmann, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies directed against ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles are observed in systemic lupus erythematosus. Ro RNP particle is one such target. It is composed of a 60 kDa protein (Ro 60 or SS-A) that is non-covalently associated with at least one of the four short uridine-rich RNAs (the hY RNAs). Previously, we showed that multiple antigenic peptides (MAPs) made from the sequence of the Ro 60 autoantigen could be used, using double-immunodiffusion studies, enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, affinity chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance, to show intramolecular and intermolecular protein-protein interaction within the Ro 60 RNP particle. We also observed that calcium is important in mediating this interaction. We hypothesized, therefore, that 60 kDa Ro is a calcium-binding protein. To investigate this, we electrophoresed 60 kDa Ro MAPs, transferred them to PVDF membrane, and assayed calcium binding using the Quin-2 system. Several Ro 60 MAPs were found to bind calcium using this assay, as well as bovine serum albumin, another calcium-binding protein. However, a MAP constructed from the Sm autoantigen did not bind to calcium. These data, along with our observation regarding the involvement of calcium in protein-protein interaction occurring between Ro 60 antigen and Ro 60 MAPs, makes us propose that Ro 60 antigen is a calcium-binding protein. PMID:26139264

  8. Contribution of a p75 interleukin 2 binding peptide to a high-affinity interleukin 2 receptor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are at least two forms of cellular receptors for interleukin 2(IL-2); one with a very high affinity and the other with a lower affinity. The authors identified a non-Tac IL-2 binding peptide with a relative molecular weight of 75,000 (p75). Cell lines bearing either the p55 Tac or the p75 peptide alone manifested low-affinity IL-2 binding, whereas a cell line bearing both peptides manifested both high- and low-affinity receptors. Cross-linking studies were performed with 125I-labeled IL-2. After the internalization of labeled IL-2 through high-affinity receptors, the p75 peptide could not be detected by cross-linking studies. Furthermore, fusion of cell membranes from low-affinity IL-2 binding cell lines bearing the Tac peptide alone with membranes from a cell line bearing the p75 peptide alone generated hybrid membranes bearing high-affinity receptors. These results suggest a multichain model for the high-affinity Il-2 receptor in which high-affinity receptors would be expressed when both Tac and p75 Il-2 binding peptides are present and associated in a receptor complex

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of a novel peptide designed to bind with NF-кB p50 subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-ping WANG; Shao-xi CAI; Dong-bo LIU; Xiang XU; Hua-ping LIANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To explore the anti-inflammatory effects of a novel peptide designed to bind with the NF-кB p50 subunit. Methods: The affinity of the peptide binding with p50 was measured with a biosensor. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) from a human acute monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were measured using the ELISA method. In vivo anti-inflammatory effects of the peptide were tested with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced ear edema and zymosan A-induced peritonitis in mice. Results: The peptide has the ability to interact with the NF-кB p50 subunit and can effectively inhibit TNF-α and IL-6 production in the THP-1 cell line, PMA-induced ear edema and zymosan A-induced peritonitis in mice. Conclusion: The peptide may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of local acute inflammation.

  10. Introduction of D-Phenylalanine enhanced the receptor binding affinities of gonadotropin-releasing hormone peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jie; Hathaway, Helen J.; Royce, Melanie E.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Miao, Yubin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the introduction of D-Phe could improve the GnRH receptor binding affinities of DOTA-conjugated D-Lys6-GnRH peptides. Building upon the construct of DOTA-Ahx-(D-Lys6-GnRH1) we previously reported, an aromatic amino acid of D-Phe was inserted either between the DOTA and Ahx or between the Ahx and D-Lys6 to generate new DOTA-D-Phe-Ahx-(D-Lys6-GnRH) or DOTA-Ahx-D-Phe-(D-Lys6-GnRH) peptides. Compared to DOTA-Ahx-(D-Lys6-GnRH1) (36.1 nM), the introd...

  11. Integrating in silico and in vitro analysis of peptide binding affinity to HLA-Cw*0102: a bioinformatic approach to the prediction of new epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie A Walshe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Predictive models of peptide-Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC binding affinity are important components of modern computational immunovaccinology. Here, we describe the development and deployment of a reliable peptide-binding prediction method for a previously poorly-characterized human MHC class I allele, HLA-Cw*0102. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Using an in-house, flow cytometry-based MHC stabilization assay we generated novel peptide binding data, from which we derived a precise two-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (2D-QSAR binding model. This allowed us to explore the peptide specificity of HLA-Cw*0102 molecule in detail. We used this model to design peptides optimized for HLA-Cw*0102-binding. Experimental analysis showed these peptides to have high binding affinities for the HLA-Cw*0102 molecule. As a functional validation of our approach, we also predicted HLA-Cw*0102-binding peptides within the HIV-1 genome, identifying a set of potent binding peptides. The most affine of these binding peptides was subsequently determined to be an epitope recognized in a subset of HLA-Cw*0102-positive individuals chronically infected with HIV-1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A functionally-validated in silico-in vitro approach to the reliable and efficient prediction of peptide binding to a previously uncharacterized human MHC allele HLA-Cw*0102 was developed. This technique is generally applicable to all T cell epitope identification problems in immunology and vaccinology.

  12. Bioactivation of water-soluble peptidic quantum dot through biotin-streptavidin binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dif, A.; Touchet, S.; Nagarajan, S.; Baudy-Floc'h, M.; Dahan, M.; Piehler, J.; Marchi-Artzner, V.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the preparation of bioactive water-soluble fluorescent CdSe/ZnS semi-conductor quantum dots with a small hydrodynamic diameter of 10 nm. These quantum dots are functionalized with a biotinylated peptide that can be introduced at different ratios onto the surface of the quantum dots. Their ability to bind to streptavidin in solution is tested by using gel electrophoresis and fluorescence resonance energy transfer with a fluorescent labeled-streptavidin. The binding of these quantum dots to Agarose micrometric beads coated with streptavidin is also analyzed by fluorescent optical microscopy. A synthetic pegylated peptide is successfully used to prevent the non specific adsorption of streptavidin onto the quantum dots. A specific binding to the streptavidin results in the formation of a very stable streptavidin-quantum dot complex without any significant aggregation. The average number of streptavidin per quantum dot is found to be to 4 at the most. Such bioactivate quantum dots can be further conjugated to any biotinylated biomolecule and used in biological medium.

  13. Binding of Cu(II) ions to peptides studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Joanna; Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Wiczk, Wiesław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2016-01-15

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) were used to study the interactions of Cu(2+) with four peptides. Two of them were taken from the N-terminal part of the FBP28 protein (formin binding protein) WW domain: Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9) and its mutant Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9_M) as well as two mutated peptides from the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G derived from Streptococcus: Asp-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J1) and Glu-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J2). The measurements were carried out at 298.15K in 20mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution with a pH of 6. The fluorescence of all peptides was quenched by Cu(2+) ions. The stoichiometry, conditional stability constants and thermodynamic parameters for the interactions of the Cu(2+) ions with D9 and D9_M were determined from the calorimetric data. The values of the conditional stability constants were additionally determined from fluorescence quenching measurements and compared with those obtained from calorimetric studies. There was a good correlation between data obtained from the two techniques. On the other hand, the studies revealed that J1 and J2 do not exhibit an affinity towards metal ions. The obtained results prove that fluorescence quenching experiments may be successfully used in order to determine stability constants of complexes with fluorescent ligands. Finally, based on the obtained results, the coordinating properties of the peptides towards the Cu(2+) ions are discussed. PMID:26363471

  14. Calmodulin binding to recombinant myosin-1c and myosin-1c IQ peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyr Janet L

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bullfrog myosin-1c contains three previously recognized calmodulin-binding IQ domains (IQ1, IQ2, and IQ3 in its neck region; we identified a fourth IQ domain (IQ4, located immediately adjacent to IQ3. How calmodulin binds to these IQ domains is the subject of this report. Results In the presence of EGTA, calmodulin bound to synthetic peptides corresponding to IQ1, IQ2, and IQ3 with Kd values of 2–4 μM at normal ionic strength; the interaction with an IQ4 peptide was much weaker. Ca2+ substantially weakened the calmodulin-peptide affinity for all of the IQ peptides except IQ3. To reveal how calmodulin bound to the linearly arranged IQ domains of the myosin-1c neck, we used hydrodynamic measurements to determine the stoichiometry of complexes of calmodulin and myosin-1c. Purified myosin-1c and T701-Myo1c (a myosin-1c fragment with all four IQ domains and the C-terminal tail each bound 2–3 calmodulin molecules. At a physiologically relevant temperature (25°C and under low-Ca2+ conditions, T701-Myo1c bound two calmodulins in the absence and three calmodulins in the presence of 5 μM free calmodulin. Ca2+ dissociated nearly all calmodulins from T701-Myo1c at 25°C; one calmodulin was retained if 5 μM free calmodulin was present. Conclusions We inferred from these data that at 25°C and normal cellular concentrations of calmodulin, calmodulin is bound to IQ1, IQ2, and IQ3 of myosin-1c when Ca2+ is low. The calmodulin bound to one of these IQ domains, probably IQ2, is only weakly associated. Upon Ca2+ elevation, all calmodulin except that bound to IQ3 should dissociate.

  15. Role of solution conformation and flexibility of short peptide ligands that bind to the p56(lck) SH2 domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J; de Mol, Nico J; Bultinck, Patrick; Kemmink, Johan; Hilbers, Hans W; Liskamp, Rob M J; Dekker, Frank

    2003-01-01

    A general approach in drug design is making ligands more rigid in order to avoid loss in conformational entropy (deltaS(conf)) upon receptor binding. We hypothesized that in the high affinity binding of pYEEI peptide ligands to the p56(lck) SH2 domain this loss in deltaS(conf) might be diminished du

  16. A fluorescent glycolipid-binding peptide probe traces cholesterol dependent microdomain-derived trafficking pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Steinert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The uptake and intracellular trafficking of sphingolipids, which self-associate into plasma membrane microdomains, is associated with many pathological conditions, including viral and toxin infection, lipid storage disease, and neurodegenerative disease. However, the means available to label the trafficking pathways of sphingolipids in live cells are extremely limited. In order to address this problem, we have developed an exogenous, non-toxic probe consisting of a 25-amino acid sphingolipid binding domain, the SBD, derived from the amyloid peptide Abeta, and conjugated by a neutral linker with an organic fluorophore. The current work presents the characterization of the sphingolipid binding and live cell trafficking of this novel probe, the SBD peptide. SBD was the name given to a motif originally recognized by Fantini et al in a number of glycolipid-associated proteins, and was proposed to interact with sphingolipids in membrane microdomains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In accordance with Fantini's model, optimal SBD binding to membranes depends on the presence of sphingolipids and cholesterol. In synthetic membrane binding assays, SBD interacts preferentially with raft-like lipid mixtures containing sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and complex gangliosides in a pH-dependent manner, but is less glycolipid-specific than Cholera toxin B (CtxB. Using quantitative time-course colocalization in live cells, we show that the uptake and intracellular trafficking route of SBD is unlike that of either the non-raft marker Transferrin or the raft markers CtxB and Flotillin2-GFP. However, SBD traverses an endolysosomal route that partially intersects with raft-associated pathways, with a major portion being diverted at a late time point to rab11-positive recycling endosomes. Trafficking of SBD to acidified compartments is strongly disrupted by cholesterol perturbations, consistent with the regulation of sphingolipid trafficking by cholesterol

  17. Reversible pH-controlled DNA-binding peptide nanotweezers: An in-silico study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Gaurav Sharma1, Kaushal Rege2,3, David E Budil4, Martin L Yarmush2,5, Constantinos Mavroidis11Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; 4Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2The Center for Engineering in Medicine (CEM, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Chemical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA; 5Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers University, NJ, USAAbstract: We describe the molecular dynamics (MD-aided engineering design of mutant peptides based on the α-helical coiled-coil GCN4 leucine zipper peptide (GCN4-p1 in order to obtain environmentally-responsive nanotweezers. The actuation mechanism of the nanotweezers depends on the modification of electrostatic charges on the residues along the length of the coiled coil. Modulating the solution pH between neutral and acidic values results in the reversible movement of helices toward and away from each other and creates a complete closed-open-closed transition cycle between the helices. Our results indicate that the mutants show a reversible opening of up to 15 Å (1.5 nm; approximately 150% of the initial separation upon pH actuation. Investigation on the physicochemical phenomena that influence conformational properties, structural stability, and reversibility of the coiled-coil peptide-based nanotweezers revealed that a rationale- and design-based approach is needed to engineer stable peptide or macromolecules into stimuli-responsive devices. The efficacy of the mutant that demonstrated the most significant reversible actuation for environmentally responsive modulation of DNA-binding activity was also demonstrated. Our results have significant implications in bioseparations and in the engineering of novel transcription factors.Keywords: bionanotechnology, nanotweezers, coiled-coil, GCN4, leucine zipper, molecular dynamics, environmentally

  18. 68Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide: biodistribution and binding into atherosclerotic plaques in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased expression of αvβ3/αvβ5 integrin is involved in angiogenesis and the inflammatory process in atherosclerotic plaques. The novel 68Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide binds with high affinity to αvβ3/αvβ5 integrin. The aim of this study was to investigate the uptake of the 68Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide in atherosclerotic plaques. Uptake of intravenously administered 68Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide was studied ex vivo in excised tissue samples and aortic sections of LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 atherosclerotic mice. The uptake of the tracer in aortic cryosections was examined by using digital autoradiography. Subsequently, the autoradiographs were combined with histological and immunohistological analysis of the sections. DOTA-RGD peptide was successfully labelled with the generator-produced 68Ga. The tracer had reasonably good specific radioactivity (8.7 ± 1.1 GBq/μmol) and was quite stable in vivo. According to ex vivo biodistribution results, 68Ga-DOTA-RGD was cleared rapidly from the blood circulation and excreted through the kidneys to the urine with high radioactivity in the intestine, lungs, spleen and liver. Autoradiography results showed significantly higher uptake of 68Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide in the atherosclerotic plaques compared to healthy vessel wall (mean ratio ± SD 1.4 ± 0.1, p = 0.0004). We observed that 68Ga-DOTA-RGD is accumulated into the plaques of atherosclerotic mice. However, this data only shows the feasibility of the approach, while the clinical significance still remains to be proven. Further studies are warranted to assess the uptake of this tracer into human atherosclerotic plaques. (orig.)

  19. The complex binding mode of the peptide hormone H2 relaxin to its receptor RXFP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Ashish; Bruell, Shoni; Patil, Nitin; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Scott, Daniel J; Petrie, Emma J; Bathgate, Ross A D; Gooley, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    H2 relaxin activates the relaxin family peptide receptor-1 (RXFP1), a class A G-protein coupled receptor, by a poorly understood mechanism. The ectodomain of RXFP1 comprises an N-terminal LDLa module, essential for activation, tethered to a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain by a 32-residue linker. H2 relaxin is hypothesized to bind with high affinity to the LRR domain enabling the LDLa module to bind and activate the transmembrane domain of RXFP1. Here we define a relaxin-binding site on the LDLa-LRR linker, essential for the high affinity of H2 relaxin for the ectodomain of RXFP1, and show that residues within the LDLa-LRR linker are critical for receptor activation. We propose H2 relaxin binds and stabilizes a helical conformation of the LDLa-LRR linker that positions residues of both the linker and the LDLa module to bind the transmembrane domain and activate RXFP1. PMID:27088579

  20. Enzymatic hydrolysis of heated whey: iron-binding ability of peptides and antigenic protein fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S B; Seo, I S; Khan, M A; Ki, K S; Lee, W S; Lee, H J; Shin, H S; Kim, H S

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the influence of various enzymes on the hydrolysis of whey protein concentrate (WPC) to reduce its antigenic fractions and to quantify the peptides having iron-binding ability in its hydrolysates. Heated (for 10 min at 100 degrees C) WPC (2% protein solution) was incubated with 2% each of Alcalase, Flavourzyme, papain, and trypsin for 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, and 240 min at 50 degrees C. The highest hydrolysis of WPC was observed after 240 min of incubation with Alcalase (12.4%), followed by Flavourzyme (12.0%), trypsin (10.4%), and papain (8.53%). The nonprotein nitrogen contents of WPC hydrolysate followed the hydrolytic pattern of whey. The major antigenic fractions (beta-lactoglobulin) in WPC were degraded within 60 min of its incubation with Alcalase, Flavourzyme, or papain. Chromatograms of enzymatic hydrolysates of heated WPC also indicated complete degradation of beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, and BSA. The highest iron solubility was noticed in hydrolysates derived with Alcalase (95%), followed by those produced with trypsin (90%), papain (87%), and Flavourzyme (81%). Eluted fraction 1 (F-1) and fraction 2 (F-2) were the respective peaks for the 0.25 and 0.5 M NaCl chromatographic step gradient for analysis of hydrolysates. Iron-binding ability was noticeably higher in F-1 than in F-2 of all hydrolysates of WPC. The highest iron contents in F-1 were observed in WPC hydrolysates derived with Alcalase (0.2 mg/kg), followed by hydrolysates derived with Flavourzyme (0.14 mg/kg), trypsin (0.14 mg/kg), and papain (0.08 mg/kg). Iron concentrations in the F-2 fraction of all enzymatic hydrolysates of WPC were low and ranged from 0.03 to 0.05 mg/kg. Fraction 1 may describe a new class of iron chelates based on the reaction of FeSO4 x 7 H2O with a mixture of peptides obtained by the enzymatic hydrolysis of WPC. The chromatogram of Alcalase F-1 indicated numerous small peaks of shorter wavelengths, which probably indicated a variety of

  1. NMR characterization of the DNA binding properties of a novel Hoechst 33258 analogue peptide building block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; Behrens, Carsten; Jacobsen, Jens Peter

    2002-01-01

    A novel aryl-bis-benzimidazole amino acid analogue of the DNA-binding compound Hoechst 33258 has recently been designed for incorporation in peptide combinatorial libraries by replacing the N-methylpiperazine group with a carboxyl group and the hydroxy group with an amino-methyl group. The DNA...... preference with the bis-benzimidazole moiety displaced toward the 3'-end from the center of the duplex. Two families of models of the complexes with A(5) and A(3)T(3) were derived with restrained molecular dynamics based on a large set of 70 and 61, respectively, intermolecular ligand NOEs. Both models give...

  2. Peptide-steroids chimeras synthesis and visualization of their binding to the rat brain slices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurasek, M.; Flegel, Martin; Skopek, P.; Flegelová, Z.; Drasar, P.; Hynie, S.; Klenerová, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, S1 (2012), S123-S123. ISSN 1075-2617. [European Peptide Symposium /32./. 02.09.2012-07.09.2012, Athens] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E11071 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 245122 - DINAMO Grant ostatní: PRVOUK(CZ) P25/LF1/2; GA UK(CZ) 85210; GA UK(CZ) SVV 264514; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200100801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : oxytocin * chimeras * steroids * binding sites Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  3. Control of silicification by genetically engineered fusion proteins: Silk–silica binding peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Shun; Huang, Wenwen; Belton, David J.; Simmons, Leo O.; Perry, Carole C.; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, an artificial spider silk gene, 6mer, derived from the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline silk gene, was fused with different silica-binding peptides (SiBPs), A1, A3 and R5, to study the impact of the fusion protein sequence chemistry on silica formation and the ability to generate a silk–silica composite in two different bioinspired silicification systems: solution–solution and solution– solid. Condensed silica nanoscale particles (600–800 nm) were formed i...

  4. Specific binding sites for proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, H; Hirata, Y; Iwashina, M; Sato, K; Marumo, F

    1996-07-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), a potent and novel vasodilator 52-residue peptide originally isolated from pheochromocytoma, is processed from a precursor molecule (preproAM) in which another unique 20-residue sequence, termed proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP), exists. Using [125I Tyr0] rat PAMP as a radioligand, we have examined PAMP binding sites in various rat tissues and cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from rat aorta. Specific binding sites for rat PAMP, although very low, were widely distributed in various rat tissues examined. The relatively more abundant sites were present in aorta and adrenal glands, followed by lung, kidney, brain, spleen, and heart. An equilibrium binding study using cultured rat VSMC revealed the presence of a single class of high-affinity [dissociation constant (Kd): 3.5 x 10(-8) M] binding sites for rat PAMP with a maximal binding capacity of 4.5 x 10(6) sites per cell. Binding studies revealed that synthetic rat PAMP(1-19)-NH2 was about 10-fold less potent, and rat PAMP(1-20)-OH and human PAMP were about 20-fold less potent than rat PAMP(1-20)-NH2. SDS-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis after affinity-labeling of membranes from various rat tissues (aorta, adrenal glands, lung) and VSMC revealed a distinct labeled band with the apparent molecular mass of 90 kDa, which was diminished by excess unlabeled rat PAMP. A nonhydrolyzable GTP analog (GTP-gammaS) dose-dependently reduced binding of [125I] rat PAMP to VSMC membranes, while ATP-gammaS had no effect. Neither cyclic AMP nor inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate formation was affected by rat PAMP in rat VSMC. The present study demonstrates for the first time that PAMP receptors are widely distributed in various rat tissues, among which aorta and adrenal glands have the most abundant sites. Our data suggest that PAMP receptors are functionally coupled to G-proteins, although its signal transduction remains obscure. The present study also shows that amidation of C-terminal residue

  5. Improved pan-specific MHC class I peptide-binding predictions using a novel representation of the MHC-binding cleft environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco Pro, S.; Zimic, M.; Nielsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a key role in cell-mediated immune responses presenting bounded peptides for recognition by the immune system cells. Several in silico methods have been developed to predict the binding affinity of a given peptide to a specific MHC molecule. One...... made available, and also new structures of MHC class I molecules with a bound peptide have been published. In order to test if the NetMHCpan method can be improved by integrating this novel information, we created new pseudo-sequence definitions for the MHC-binding cleft environment from sequence and...... but also by a refined definition of the MHC-binding environment including information from non-human species....

  6. CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) peptide specific binding sites in PC12 cells have characteristics of CART peptide receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nagelová, Veronika; Pirnik, Z.; Železná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1547, Feb 14 (2014), s. 16-24. ISSN 0006-8993 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/10/1368 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : CART peptide * PC12 cell * differentiation * binding * signaling * c-Jun Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.843, year: 2014

  7. Computational Studies of Difference in Binding Modes of Peptide and Non-Peptide Inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Zhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction is considered to be a promising strategy for anticancer drug design to activate wild-type p53 in tumors. We carry out molecular dynamics (MD simulations to study the binding mechanisms of peptide and non-peptide inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. The rank of binding free energies calculated by molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA method agrees with one of the experimental values. The results suggest that van der Waals energy drives two kinds of inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. We also find that the peptide inhibitors can produce more interaction contacts with MDM2/MDMX than the non-peptide inhibitors. Binding mode predictions based on the inhibitor-residue interactions show that the π–π, CH–π and CH–CH interactions dominated by shape complimentarity, govern the binding of the inhibitors in the hydrophobic cleft of MDM2/MDMX. Our studies confirm the residue Tyr99 in MDMX can generate a steric clash with the inhibitors due to energy and structure. This finding may theoretically provide help to develop potent dual-specific or MDMX inhibitors.

  8. A conserved chloramphenicol binding site at the entrance to the ribosomal peptide exit tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Katherine S; Porse, Bo T

    2003-01-01

    The antibiotic chloramphenicol produces modifications in 23S rRNA when bound to ribosomes from the bacterium Escherichia coli and the archaeon Halobacterium halobium and irradiated with 365 nm light. The modifications map to nucleotides m(5)U747 and C2611/C2612, in domains II and V, respectively......, of E.coli 23S rRNA and G2084 (2058 in E.coli numbering) in domain V of H.halobium 23S rRNA. The modification sites overlap with a portion of the macrolide binding site and cluster at the entrance to the peptide exit tunnel. The data correlate with the recently reported chloramphenicol binding site on...

  9. Zn(II) and Hg(II) binding to a designed peptide that accommodates different coordination geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szunyogh, Dániel; Gyurcsik, Béla; Larsen, Flemming H; Stachura, Monika; Thulstrup, Peter W; Hemmingsen, Lars; Jancsó, Attila

    2015-07-28

    Designed metal ion binding peptides offer a variety of applications in both basic science as model systems of more complex metalloproteins, and in biotechnology, e.g. in bioremediation of toxic metal ions, biomining or as artificial enzymes. In this work a peptide (HS: Ac-SCHGDQGSDCSI-NH2) has been specifically designed for binding of both Zn(II) and Hg(II), i.e. metal ions with different preferences in terms of coordination number, coordination geometry, and to some extent ligand composition. It is demonstrated that HS accommodates both metal ions, and the first coordination sphere, metal ion exchange between peptides, and speciation are characterized as a function of pH using UV-absorption-, synchrotron radiation CD-, (1)H-NMR-, and PAC-spectroscopy as well as potentiometry. Hg(II) binds to the peptide with very high affinity in a {HgS2} coordination geometry, bringing together the two cysteinates close to each end of the peptide in a loop structure. Despite the high affinity, Hg(II) is kinetically labile, exchanging between peptides on the subsecond timescale, as indicated by line broadening in (1)H-NMR. The Zn(II)-HS system displays more complex speciation, involving monomeric species with coordinating cysteinates, histidine, and a solvent water molecule, as well as HS-Zn(II)-HS complexes. In summary, the HS peptide displays conformational flexibility, contains many typical metal ion binding groups, and is able to accommodate metal ions with different structural and ligand preferences with high affinity. As such, the HS peptide may be a scaffold offering binding of a variety of metal ions, and potentially serve for metal ion sequestration in biotechnological applications. PMID:26040991

  10. NN-align. An artificial neural network-based alignment algorithm for MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    this binding event. RESULTS: Here, we present a novel artificial neural network-based method, NN-align that allows for simultaneous identification of the MHC class II binding core and binding affinity. NN-align is trained using a novel training algorithm that allows for correction of bias in the...... training data due to redundant binding core representation. Incorporation of information about the residues flanking the peptide-binding core is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy. The method is evaluated on a large-scale benchmark consisting of six independent data sets covering 14...

  11. Evaluation of iron-binding activity of collagen peptides prepared from the scales of four cultivated fishes in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yung Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is one of the most concerning deficiency problems in the world. It may generate several adverse effects such as iron deficiency anemia (IDA and reduced physical and intellectual working capacity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the Fe(II-binding activity of collagen peptides from fishery by-products. Lates calcarifer, Mugil cephalus, Chanos chanos, and Oreochromis spp are four major cultivated fishes in Taiwan; thousands of scales of these fish are wasted without valuable utilization. In this study, scales of these fish were hydrolyzed by papain plus flavourzyme. Collagen peptides were obtained and compared for their Fe(II-binding activity. Collagen peptides from Chanos chanos showed the highest Fe(II-binding activity, followed by those from Lates calcarifer and Mugil cephalus; that from Oreochromis spp exhibited the lowest one. Fe(II-binding activity of collagen peptides from fish scales was also confirmed with a dialysis method. Molecular weight (MW distributions of the collagen peptides from scales of four fish are all < 10 kDa, and averaged 1.3 kDa. Hydrolysates of fish scales were further partially purified with ion exchange chromatography. Fractions having Fe(II-binding activity were obtained and their activity compared. Data obtained showed that collagen peptides from fish scales did have Fe(II-binding activity. This is the first observation elucidating fish scale collagen possessing this functionality. The results from this study also indicated that collagen peptides from fish scales could be applied in industry as a bioresource.

  12. Structural Determinants of Binding the Seven-transmembrane Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Yang, Linlin; Song, Gaojie; Dai, Antao; Cai, Xiaoqing; Feng, Yang; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Hanson, Michael A; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-06-17

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to the secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors. Members of the class B family are distinguished by their large extracellular domain, which works cooperatively with the canonical seven-transmembrane (7TM) helical domain to signal in response to binding of various peptide hormones. We have combined structure-based site-specific mutational studies with molecular dynamics simulations of a full-length model of GLP-1R bound to multiple peptide ligand variants. Despite the high sequence similarity between GLP-1R and its closest structural homologue, the glucagon receptor (GCGR), nearly half of the 62 stably expressed mutants affected GLP-1R in a different manner than the corresponding mutants in GCGR. The molecular dynamics simulations of wild-type and mutant GLP-1R·ligand complexes provided molecular insights into GLP-1R-specific recognition mechanisms for the N terminus of GLP-1 by residues in the 7TM pocket and explained how glucagon-mimicking GLP-1 mutants restored binding affinity for (GCGR-mimicking) GLP-1R mutants. Structural analysis of the simulations suggested that peptide ligand binding mode variations in the 7TM binding pocket are facilitated by movement of the extracellular domain relative to the 7TM bundle. These differences in binding modes may account for the pharmacological differences between GLP-1 peptide variants. PMID:27059958

  13. Caseins from bovine colostrum and milk strongly bind piscidin-1, an antimicrobial peptide from fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kütt, Mary-Liis; Stagsted, Jan

    2014-09-01

    A model system of bovine colostrum and piscidin, a fish-derived antimicrobial peptide, was developed to study potential interactions of antimicrobial peptides in colostrum. We did not detect any antimicrobial activity of colostrum using the radial plate diffusion assay; in fact colostrum completely abrogated activity of added piscidin. This could not be explained by degradation of piscidin by colostrum, which was less than ten percent. We found that colostrum even protected piscidin against degradation by added proteases. We further observed that colostrum and milk rapidly quenched the fluorescence of fluorescein-piscidin but not that of fluorescein. This effect was not seen with BSA and the specific quenching of fluorescein-piscidin by colostrum was saturably inhibited with unlabeled piscidin. Size exclusion chromatography indicated that fluorescein-piscidin bound to casein micelles with no apparent binding to IgG or whey proteins. Further, addition of pure caseins was able to quench fluorescence of fluorescein-piscidin and to inhibit the antimicrobial activity of piscidin. The interaction between caseins and piscidin could be dissociated by guanidine hydrochloride and recovered piscidin had antimicrobial activity against bacteria. Based on our results we propose that caseins could be carriers for antimicrobial peptides in colostrum and milk. PMID:25036607

  14. Comparison of Functional Protein Transduction Domains Using the NEMO Binding Domain Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Robbins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein transduction domains (PTDs, both naturally occurring and synthetic, have been extensively utilized for intracellular delivery of biologically active molecules both in vitro and in vivo. However, most comparisons of transduction efficiency have been performed using fluorescent markers. To compare efficiency of functional protein transduction, a peptide derived from IkB kinase ß (IKKß that prevents formation of an active IKK complex was used as a biologically active cargo. This peptide, termed NEMO Binding Domain (NBD, is able to block activation of the transcriptional factor NF-κB by IKK, but not basal NF-κB activity. Our results demonstrate that Antp and Tat PTDs were most effective for delivery of NBD for inhibition of NF-kB activation compared to other PTD-NBD in both Hela and 293 cells, however, at higher concentrations (100 µM, the Antp-NBD as well as the FGF-NBD peptide caused significant cellular toxicity. In contrast to the cell culture results, delivery of NBD using 8K (octalysine and 6R (six arginine were the most effect in blocking inflammation following local, footpad delivery in a KLH-induced DTH murine model of inflammatory arthritis. These results demonstrate differences between PTDs for delivery of a functional cargo between cell types.

  15. Weak glycolipid binding of a microdomain-tracer peptide correlates with aggregation and slow diffusion on cell membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Lauterbach

    Full Text Available Organized assembly or aggregation of sphingolipid-binding ligands, such as certain toxins and pathogens, has been suggested to increase binding affinity of the ligand to the cell membrane and cause membrane reorganization or distortion. Here we show that the diffusion behavior of the fluorescently tagged sphingolipid-interacting peptide probe SBD (Sphingolipid Binding Domain is altered by modifications in the construction of the peptide sequence that both result in a reduction in binding to ganglioside-containing supported lipid membranes, and at the same time increase aggregation on the cell plasma membrane, but that do not change relative amounts of secondary structural features. We tested the effects of modifying the overall charge and construction of the SBD probe on its binding and diffusion behavior, by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR; Biacore analysis on lipid surfaces, and by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS on live cells, respectively. SBD binds preferentially to membranes containing the highly sialylated gangliosides GT1b and GD1a. However, simple charge interactions of the peptide with the negative ganglioside do not appear to be a critical determinant of binding. Rather, an aggregation-suppressing amino acid composition and linker between the fluorophore and the peptide are required for optimum binding of the SBD to ganglioside-containing supported lipid bilayer surfaces, as well as for interaction with the membrane. Interestingly, the strength of interactions with ganglioside-containing artificial membranes is mirrored in the diffusion behavior by FCS on cell membranes, with stronger binders displaying similar characteristic diffusion profiles. Our findings indicate that for aggregation-prone peptides, aggregation occurs upon contact with the cell membrane, and rather than giving a stronger interaction with the membrane, aggregation is accompanied by weaker binding and complex diffusion profiles indicative of heterogeneous

  16. MetaMHCpan, A Meta Approach for Pan-Specific MHC Peptide Binding Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yichang; Luo, Cheng; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent computational approaches in bioinformatics can achieve high performance, by which they can be a powerful support for performing real biological experiments, making biologists pay more attention to bioinformatics than before. In immunology, predicting peptides which can bind to MHC alleles is an important task, being tackled by many computational approaches. However, this situation causes a serious problem for immunologists to select the appropriate method to be used in bioinformatics. To overcome this problem, we develop an ensemble prediction-based Web server, which we call MetaMHCpan, consisting of two parts: MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan, for predicting peptides which can bind MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan use two (MHC2SKpan and LApan) and four (TEPITOPEpan, MHC2SKpan, LApan, and MHC2MIL) existing predictors, respectively. MetaMHCpan is available at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/MetaMHCpan/index.php/pages/view/info . PMID:27076335

  17. Isolation of mercury-binding peptides in vegetative parts of Chromolaena odorata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco-Alinsug, M.P. [Inst. of Biology, Coll. of Science, Univ. of the Philippines, Quezon City (Philippines); Biology Dept., Coll. of Science, Univ. of the Philippines, Baguio City (Philippines); Rivero, G.C. [Inst. of Biology, Coll. of Science, Univ. of the Philippines, Quezon City (Philippines); Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Development, Univ. of the Philippines, Quezon City (Philippines); Quibuyen, T.A.O. [Inst. of Chemistry, Coll. of Science, Univ. of the Philippines, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2005-04-01

    Mercury-binding peptides from roots, stems, and leaves of Hg-treated Chromolaena odorata plants were isolated and partially characterized using RP-HPLC and ESI-MS. Upon exposure of C. odorata plants to high concentrations of 1.0 and 2.0 {mu}M Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} treatments from 0-28 days, they accumulated as much as 125 mg/g (dry wt) Hg in the roots, 15.280 mg/g (dry wt) Hg in the stems, and 0.800 mg/g (dry wt) Hg in the leaves indicating that C. odorata has a high potential as a phytoremediation agent of inorganic mercury. The plant's ability to accumulate and sequester Hg ions was primarily attributed to the production of Hg-binding peptides, which were initially detected through the use of Ellman's reagent. Isolation techniques using RP-HPLC equipped with a C18 column manifested a single prominent peak consistently appearing at a retention time of 2.6-2.8 min in all the plant samples treated with different Hg concentrations at varying lengths of exposure. Further characterization of this prominent peak using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed the presence of a peptide containing several cysteine residues with the highest peak concentration recorded at 91 mV and 89 mV in roots and stems of plants treated with 2.0 {mu}M Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} for 4 wk (P < 0.05) and 85 mV in leaves treated with 1.0 {mu}M Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} for 1 wk. (orig.)

  18. Isolation of mercury-binding peptides in vegetative parts of Chromolaena odorata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Alinsug, Malona P; Rivero, Gilda C; Quibuyen, Anacleto O

    2005-01-01

    Mercury-binding peptides from roots, stems, and leaves of Hg-treated Chromolaena odorata plants were isolated and partially characterized using RP-HPLC and ESI-MS. Upon exposure of C. odorata plants to high concentrations of 1.0 and 2.0 microM Hg(NO3)2 treatments from 0-28 days, they accumulated as much as 125 mg/g (dry wt) Hg in the roots, 15.280 mg/g (dry wt) Hg in the stems, and 0.800 mg/g (dry wt) Hg in the leaves indicating that C. odorata has a high potential as a phytoremediation agent of inorganic mercury. The plant's ability to accumulate and sequester Hg ions was primarily attributed to the production of Hg-binding peptides, which were initially detected through the use of Ellman's reagent. Isolation techniques using RP-HPLC equipped with a C18 column manifested a single prominent peak consistently appearing at a retention time of 2.6-2.8 min in all the plant samples treated with different Hg concentrations at varying lengths of exposure. Further characterization of this prominent peak using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed the presence of a peptide containing several cysteine residues with the highest peak concentration recorded at 91 mV and 89 mV in roots and stems of plants treated with 2.0 microM Hg(NO3)2 for 4 wk (P < 0.05) and 85 mV in leaves treated with 1.0 microM Hg(NO3)2 for 1 wk. PMID:15948592

  19. Isolation and characterisation of sericin antifreeze peptides and molecular dynamics modelling of their ice-binding interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinhong; Rong, Yuzhi; Wang, Zhengwu; Zhou, Yanfu; Wang, Shaoyun; Zhao, Bo

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to isolate and characterise a novel sericin antifreeze peptide and investigate its ice-binding molecular mechanism. The thermal hysteresis activity of ice-binding sericin peptides (I-SP) was measured and their activity reached as high as 0.94 °C. A P4 fraction, with high hypothermia protective activity and inhibition activity of ice recrystallisation, was obtained from I-SP, and a purified sericin peptide, named SM-AFP, with the sequence of TTSPTNVSTT and a molecular weight of 1009.50 Da was then isolated from the P4 fraction. Treatment of Lactobacillus delbrueckii Subsp. bulgaricus LB340 LYO with 100 μg/ml synthetic SM-AFP led to 1.4-fold increased survival (p Sericin peptides could be developed into beneficial cryoprotectants and used in frozen food processing. PMID:25529728

  20. Rat MHC-linked peptide transporter alleles strongly influence peptide binding by HLA-B27 but not B27-associated inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, W.A.; Satumtira, Nimman; Taurog, J.D. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-15

    Rats transgenic for the human MHC molecule HLA-B27 were used to study the effect of two alleles, cim{sup a} and cim{sup b}, which are associated with peptide transport by the MHC-encoded Tap2 transporter, on the function of HLA-B27 as a restriction element for CTL recognition of the male H-Y minor H Ag and on the multisystem inflammatory disease characteristic of B27 transgenic rats. Anti-H-Y CTL generated in cim{sup a} B27 transgenic rats lysed male B27 cim{sup b/b} targets significantly less well than cim{sup a/a} or cim{sup a/b} targets. Addition of exogenous H-Y peptides to male B27 cim{sup b/b} targets increased susceptibility to lysis to the level of cim{sup a/a} targets sensitized with exogenous H-Y peptides. {sup 3}H-labeled peptides eluted from B27 molecules of lymphoblasts from rats of two cim{sup b} and three cim{sup a} RT1 haplotypes showed that the cim{sup b} peptide pool favors comparatively longer and/or more hydrophobic peptides. These results indicate that RT1-linked Tap2 polymorphism in the rat strongly influences peptide loading of HLA-B27. Nonetheless, the prevalence and severity of multisystem inflammatory lesions were comparable in backcross rats bearing either cim{sup a/b} or cim{sup b/b}. It thus appears either that binding of specific peptides to B27 is unimportant in the pathogenesis of B27-associated disease or that the critical peptides, unlike H-Y and many others, are not influenced by Tap transporter polymorphism. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. A binding-site barrier affects imaging efficiency of high affinity amyloid-reactive peptide radiotracers in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a complex pathology associated with a growing number of diseases including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and myeloma. The distribution and extent of amyloid deposition in body organs establishes the prognosis and can define treatment options; therefore, determining the amyloid load by using non-invasive molecular imaging is clinically important. We have identified a heparin-binding peptide designated p5 that, when radioiodinated, was capable of selectively imaging systemic visceral AA amyloidosis in a murine model of the disease. The p5 peptide was posited to bind effectively to amyloid deposits, relative to similarly charged polybasic heparin-reactive peptides, because it adopted a polar α helix secondary structure. We have now synthesized a variant, p5R, in which the 8 lysine amino acids of p5 have been replaced with arginine residues predisposing the peptide toward the α helical conformation in an effort to enhance the reactivity of the peptide with the amyloid substrate. The p5R peptide had higher affinity for amyloid and visualized AA amyloid in mice by using SPECT/CT imaging; however, the microdistribution, as evidenced in micro-autoradiographs, was dramatically altered relative to the p5 peptide due to its increased affinity and a resultant "binding site barrier" effect. These data suggest that radioiodinated peptide p5R may be optimal for the in vivo detection of discreet, perivascular amyloid, as found in the brain and pancreatic vasculature, by using molecular imaging techniques; however, peptide p5, due to its increased penetration, may yield more quantitative imaging of expansive tissue amyloid deposits.

  2. Tumor targeting and SPECT imaging properties of an {sup 111}In-labeled galectin-3 binding peptide in prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutscher, Susan L. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Research Division, Harry S. Truman Veterans Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Figueroa, Said D. [Research Division, Harry S. Truman Veterans Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Kumar, Senthil R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)], E-mail: kumars@missouri.edu

    2009-02-15

    Introduction: Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a carbohydrate binding protein that has been implicated in cell adhesion, tumor invasion and metastasis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the tumor targeting and imaging properties of a gal-3 binding peptide selected by phage display in a mouse model of metastatic human prostate carcinoma expressing gal-3. Methods: A gal-3 binding peptide, ANTPCGPYTHDCPVKR, was synthesized with a Gly-Ser-Gly (GSG) spacer and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and then radiolabeled with {sup 111}In. The in vitro cell binding properties of {sup 111}In-DOTA-(GSG)-ANTPCGPYTHDCPVKR were determined in metastatic human PC3-M prostate carcinoma cells. The pharmacokinetics and single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT/CT) imaging with the radiolabeled peptide were evaluated in SCID mice bearing human PC3-M prostate carcinoma tumor xenografts. Results: The radiolabeled peptide bound with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 191{+-}10.2 nM to cultured PC3-M prostate carcinoma cells. In vivo tumor uptake and retention coupled with fast whole-body clearance of the peptide were demonstrated in PC3-M tumor-bearing SCID mice. The tumor uptake rates of the radiolabeled peptide were 1.27{+-}0.10%ID/g at 30 min, 0.82{+-}0.15%ID/g at 1 h and 0.57{+-}0.09%ID/g at 2 h. MicroSPECT/CT studies revealed good tumor uptake of {sup 111}In-DOTA-(GSG)-ANTPCGPYTHDCPVKR 2 h postinjection, while uptake in normal organs was low, with the exception of the kidneys. Conclusions: In vitro cell binding along with tumor uptake of {sup 111}In-DOTA-(GSG)-ANTPCGPYTHDCPVKR in PC3-M human prostate carcinoma tumor-bearing SCID mice suggests the potential of this peptide as a radiopharmaceutical for imaging of gal-3-expressing prostate tumors.

  3. A synthetic peptide from the COOH-terminal heparin-binding domain of fibronectin promotes focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; McCarthy, J B; Furcht, L T;

    1993-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix molecules such as fibronectin involves complex transmembrane signaling processes. Attachment and spreading of primary fibroblasts can be promoted by interactions of cell surface integrins with RGD-containing fragments of fibronectin, but the further process of...... focal adhesion and stress fiber formation requires additional interactions. Heparin-binding fragments of fibronectin can provide this signal. The COOH-terminal heparin-binding domain of fibronectin contains five separate heparin-binding amino acid sequences. We show here that all five sequences, as...... synthetic peptides coupled to ovalbumin, can support cell attachment. Only three of these sequences can promote focal adhesion formation when presented as multicopy complexes, and only one of these (WQPPRARI) retains this activity as free peptide. The major activity of this peptide resides in the sequence...

  4. An In-tether Chiral Center Modulates the Helicity, Cell Permeability, and Target Binding Affinity of a Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kuan; Geng, Hao; Zhang, Qingzhou; Liu, Qisong; Xie, Mingsheng; Sun, Chengjie; Li, Wenjun; Lin, Huacan; Jiang, Fan; Wang, Tao; Wu, Yun-Dong; Li, Zigang

    2016-07-01

    The addition of a precisely positioned chiral center in the tether of a constrained peptide is reported, yielding two separable peptide diastereomers with significantly different helicity, as supported by circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis suggests that the absolute configuration of the in-tether chiral center in helical form is R, which is in agreement with theoretical simulations. The relationship between the secondary structure of the short peptides and their biochemical/biophysical properties remains elusive, largely because of the lack of proper controls. The present strategy provides the only method for investigating the influence of solely conformational differences upon the biochemical/biophysical properties of peptides. The significant differences in permeability and target binding affinity between the peptide diastereomers demonstrate the importance of helical conformation. PMID:27167181

  5. Application of Celluspots peptide arrays for the analysis of the binding specificity of epigenetic reading domains to modified histone tails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhayalan Arunkumar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic reading domains are involved in the regulation of gene expression and chromatin state by interacting with histones in a post-translational modification specific manner. A detailed knowledge of the target modifications of reading domains, including enhancing and inhibiting secondary modifications, will lead to a better understanding of the biological signaling processes mediated by reading domains. Results We describe the application of Celluspots peptide arrays which contain 384 histone peptides carrying 59 post translational modifications in different combinations as an inexpensive, reliable and fast method for initial screening for specific interactions of reading domains with modified histone peptides. To validate the method, we tested the binding specificities of seven known epigenetic reading domains on Celluspots peptide arrays, viz. the HP1ß and MPP8 Chromo domains, JMJD2A and 53BP1 Tudor domains, Dnmt3a PWWP domain, Rag2 PHD domain and BRD2 Bromo domain. In general, the binding results agreed with literature data with respect to the primary specificity of the reading domains, but in almost all cases we obtained additional new information concerning the influence of secondary modifications surrounding the target modification. Conclusions We conclude that Celluspots peptide arrays are powerful screening tools for studying the specificity of putative reading domains binding to modified histone peptides.

  6. Truncated atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) analogs: relationship between receptor binding and cyclic GMP accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have shown that cultured bovine aortic smooth muscle (BASM) cells contain high affinity receptor sites for the ANP, auriculin (ANP(4-28)). Furthermore, ANP(4-28) causes cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels to increase in BASM. In the present study, the authors synthesized a series of NH2 and/or COOH truncated ANP(4-28) analogs and examined their ability to compete for 125I-ANP(4-28) binding to BASM and increase cGMP levels. ANP-mediated cGMP responses were reduced when amino acids were deleted from the NH2 and/or COOH termini of ANP(4-28). Removal of the NH2 terminal R, R-S, or R-S-S residues resulted in a 10X decrease in potency for cGMP stimulation. Deletion of the COOH terminal R-Y and F-R-Y residues resulted in a marked decline in potency. ANP's lacking the F-R-Y tripeptide were nearly inactive in stimulating cGMP accumulation. In contrast to the cGMP effects, NH2 and/or COOH truncations of ANP(4-28) did not alter apparent receptor binding affinities (Ki(app)). All of these peptide analogs exhibited Ki(app)'s of 1-5 nM. Furthermore, peptides that bound effectively and failed to elicit cGMP responses did not antagonize ANP(4-28)-mediated cGMP increases. These binding and functional data suggest the presence of a single class of ANP receptors on BASM is insufficient to explain the actions of ANP's in these cells

  7. Improved bioactivity of antimicrobial peptides by addition of amino-terminal copper and nickel (ATCUN) binding motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libardo, M Daben; Cervantes, Jorge L; Salazar, Juan C; Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M

    2014-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates to help circumvent antibiotic resistance, which is an increasing clinical problem. Amino-terminal copper and nickel (ATCUN) binding motifs are known to actively form reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon metal binding. The combination of these two peptidic constructs could lead to a novel class of dual-acting antimicrobial agents. To test this hypothesis, a set of ATCUN binding motifs were screened for their ability to induce ROS formation, and the most potent were then used to modify AMPs with different modes of action. ATCUN binding motif-containing derivatives of anoplin (GLLKRIKTLL-NH2), pro-apoptotic peptide (PAP; KLAKLAKKLAKLAK-NH2), and sh-buforin (RAGLQFPVGRVHRLLRK-NH2) were synthesized and found to be more active than the parent AMPs against a panel of clinically relevant bacteria. The lower minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for the ATCUN-anoplin peptides are attributed to the higher pore-forming activity along with their ability to cause ROS-induced membrane damage. The addition of the ATCUN motifs to PAP also increases its ability to disrupt membranes. DNA damage is the major contributor to the activity of the ATCUN-sh-buforin peptides. Our findings indicate that the addition of ATCUN motifs to AMPs is a simple strategy that leads to AMPs with higher antibacterial activity and possibly to more potent, usable antibacterial agents. PMID:24803240

  8. Prion-derived copper-binding peptide fragments catalyze the generation of superoxide anion in the presence of aromatic monoamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Kawano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Studies have proposed two opposing roles for copper-bound forms of prion protein (PrP as an anti-oxidant supporting the neuronal functions and as a pro-oxidant leading to neurodegenerative process involving the generation of reactive oxygen species. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis in which putative copper-binding peptides derived from PrP function as possible catalysts for monoamine-dependent conversion of hydrogen peroxide to superoxide in vitro. Materials and methods: Four peptides corresponding to the copper (II-binding motifs in PrP were synthesized and used for analysis of peptide-catalyzed generation of superoxide in the presence of Cu (II and other factors naturally present in the neuronal tissues. Results: Among the Cu-binding peptides tested, the amino acid sequence corresponding to the Cu-binding site in the helical region was shown to be the most active for superoxide generation in the presence of Cu(II, hydrogen peroxide and aromatic monoamines, known precursors or intermediates of neurotransmitters. Among monoamines tested, three compounds namely phenylethylamine, tyramine and benzylamine were shown to be good substrates for superoxide-generating reactions by the Cu-bound helical peptide. Conclusions: Possible roles for these reactions in development of prion disease were suggested.

  9. Amelioration of Chronic Murine Colitis by Peptide-Mediated Transduction of the IκB Kinase Inhibitor NEMO Binding Domain Peptide1

    OpenAIRE

    Davé, Shaival H.; Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Li, Fengling; Karrasch, Thomas; Uno, Jennifer K.; Sepulveda, Antonia R; Jobin, Christian; Baldwin, Albert S.; Paul D Robbins; Plevy, Scott E.

    2007-01-01

    The NF-κB family of transcription factors is a central regulator of chronic inflammation. The phosphorylation of IκB proteins by the IκB kinase (IKK) complex (IKKα, IKKβ, and NF-κB essential modulator or NEMO) is a key step in NF-κB activation. Peptides corresponding to the NEMO binding domain (NBD) of IKK blocks NF-κB activation without inhibiting basal NF-κB activity. In this report, we determined the effects of the IKK inhibitor peptide (NBD) in a model of spontaneously occurring chronic m...

  10. Adhesive and migratory effects of phosphophoryn are modulated by flanking peptides of the integrin binding motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Suzuki

    Full Text Available Phosphophoryn (PP is generated from the proteolytic cleavage of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP. Gene duplications in the ancestor dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1 genomic sequence created the DSPP gene in toothed animals. PP and DMP-1 are phosphorylated extracellular matrix proteins that belong to the family of small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs. Many SIBLING members have been shown to evoke various cell responses through the integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD domain; however, the RGD-dependent function of PP is not yet fully understood. We demonstrated that recombinant PP did not exhibit any obvious cell adhesion ability, whereas the simultaneously purified recombinant DMP-1 did. A cell adhesion inhibitory analysis was performed by pre-incubating human osteosarcoma MG63 cells with various PP peptides before seeding onto vitronectin. The results obtained revealed that the incorporation of more than one amino acid on both sides of the PP-RGD domain was unable to inhibit the adhesion of MG63 cells onto vitronectin. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of a peptide containing the PP-RGD domain with an open carboxyl-terminal side (H-463SDESDTNSESANESGSRGDA482-OH was more potent than that of a peptide containing the RGD domain with an open amino-terminal side (H-478SRGDASYTSDESSDDDNDSDSH499-OH. This phenomenon was supported by the potent cell adhesion and migration abilities of the recombinant truncated PP, which terminated with Ala482. Furthermore, various point mutations in Ala482 and/or Ser483 converted recombinant PP into cell-adhesive proteins. Therefore, we concluded that the Ala482-Ser483 flanking sequence, which was detected in primates and mice, was the key peptide bond that allowed the PP-RGD domain to be sequestered. The differential abilities of PP and DMP-1 to act on integrin imply that DSPP was duplicated from DMP-1 to serve as a crucial extracellular protein for tooth development rather than as an integrin

  11. Neuroplastin-65 and a mimetic peptide derived from its homophilic binding site modulate neuritogenesis and neuronal plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owczarek, Sylwia; Soroka, Vladislav; Kiryushko, Darya;

    2011-01-01

    , but the exact binding mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we identify the homophilic binding motif of Np65 and show that a synthetic peptide modeled after this motif, termed enplastin, binds to Np65. We demonstrate that both Np65- and enplastin-induced intracellular signaling depends...... on fibroblast growth factor receptor, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, and cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration. In addition, we show that interference with Np65 homophilic binding by enplastin has an inhibitory effect on Np65-mediated neurite outgrowth...

  12. γ-Preprotachykinin-(72-92)-peptide amide: An endogenous preprotachykinin I gene-derived peptide that preferentially binds to neurokinin-2 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of N-terminally extended forms of neurokinin A has recently been reported in the mammalian brain. Among them, gamma-preprotachykinin-(72-92)-peptide amide [gamma-PPT-(72-92)-NH2], a peptide derived by posttranslational processing of gamma-preprotachykinin, is most prominent. We report here that this peptide most likely acts on neurokinin-2 receptor sites since neurokinin A (a putative neurokinin-2 agonist) and gamma-PPT-(72-92)-NH2 are potent competitors of 125I-labeled gamma-PPT-(72-92)-NH2 binding whereas selective neurokinin-1 and -3 agonists are not. Moreover, the distribution of 125I-labeled gamma-PPT-(72-92)-NH2 and 125I-labeled neurokinin A binding sites are very similar in rat brain. On the other hand, 125I-labeled Bolton-Hunter-substance P (a neurokinin-1 ligand) and 125I-labeled Bolton-Hunter-eledoisin (a neurokinin-3 ligand) binding sites are differentially located in this tissue. Thus, it appears that gamma-PPT-(72-92)-NH2 binds to neurokinin-2 receptors and should be considered as a putative endogenous ligand for this receptor class

  13. Purification and characterisation of a glutamic acid-containing peptide with calcium-binding capacity from whey protein hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shun-Li; Zhao, Li-Na; Cai, Xixi; Wang, Shao-Yun; Huang, Yi-Fan; Hong, Jing; Rao, Ping-Fan

    2015-02-01

    The bioavailability of dietary ionised calcium is affected by intestinal basic environment. Calcium-binding peptides can form complexes with calcium to improve its absorption and bioavailability. The aim of this study was focused on isolation and characterisation of a calcium-binding peptide from whey protein hydrolysates. Whey protein was hydrolysed using Flavourzyme and Protamex with substrate to enzyme ratio of 25:1 (w/w) at 49 °C for 7 h. The calcium-binding peptide was isolated by DEAE anion-exchange chromatography, Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). A purified peptide of molecular mass 204 Da with strong calcium binding ability was identified on chromatography/electrospray ionisation (LC/ESI) tandem mass spectrum to be Glu-Gly (EG) after analysis and alignment in database. The calcium binding capacity of EG reached 67·81 μg/mg, and the amount increased by 95% compared with whey protein hydrolysate complex. The UV and infrared spectrometer analysis demonstrated that the principal sites of calcium-binding corresponded to the carboxyl groups and carbonyl groups of glutamic acid. In addition, the amino group and peptide amino are also the related groups in the interaction between EG and calcium ion. Meanwhile, the sequestered calcium percentage experiment has proved that EG-Ca is significantly more stable than CaCl2 in human gastrointestinal tract in vitro. The findings suggest that the purified dipeptide has the potential to be used as ion-binding ingredient in dietary supplements. PMID:25592629

  14. Optimization of Hydrolysis Conditions for the Production of Iron-Binding Peptides from Mackerel Processing Byproducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-Feng Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was focused on optimization of enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for the production of iron-binding peptides from marine mackerel processing byproducts. The marine mackerel processing byproducts protein were hydrolyzed using trypsin, Protamex, Flavourzyme, Alcalase and Neutrase. Alcalase and Protamex proteolytic hydrolysates exhibited the highest iron-binding capacity; however, Alcalase proteolytic hydrolysate had higher degree of hydrolysis than that of Protamex. A four-factor-three-level composition central design experiment in response surface methodology was used to optimize the enzymatic hydrolysis conditions of Alcalase. The optimal enzymatic hydrolysis conditions were temperature of 46.0°C, time of 2.01 h, pH 8.35 and enzyme to substrate 6460 U/mL. The quadratic model predicted well about the actual measured value. The average iron-binding capacity of three verification experiment was 6.62 mg-EDTA/g-protein, which was much closed to model predicted value of 6.69 mg-EDTA/g-protein.

  15. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium. PMID:27371890

  16. Heparin-binding peptide as a novel affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jacqueline; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Langston, Rebekah; Daily, Anna; Kight, Alicia; McNabb, David S; Henry, Ralph; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins constitutes a significant part of the downstream processing in biopharmaceutical industries. Major costs involved in the production of bio-therapeutics mainly depend on the number of purification steps used during the downstream process. Affinity chromatography is a widely used method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in different expression host platforms. Recombinant protein purification is achieved by fusing appropriate affinity tags to either N- or C- terminus of the target recombinant proteins. Currently available protein/peptide affinity tags have proved quite useful in the purification of recombinant proteins. However, these affinity tags suffer from specific limitations in their use under different conditions of purification. In this study, we have designed a novel 34-amino acid heparin-binding affinity tag (HB-tag) for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. HB-tag fused recombinant proteins were overexpressed in E. coli in high yields. A one-step heparin-Sepharose-based affinity chromatography protocol was developed to purify HB-fused recombinant proteins to homogeneity using a simple sodium chloride step gradient elution. The HB-tag has also been shown to facilitate the purification of target recombinant proteins from their 8 M urea denatured state(s). The HB-tag has been demonstrated to be successfully released from the fusion protein by an appropriate protease treatment to obtain the recombinant target protein(s) in high yields. Results of the two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the purified recombinant target protein(s) exist in the native conformation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the HB-peptide sequence, exhibited high binding specificity and sensitivity to the HB-fused recombinant proteins (∼10 ng) in different crude cell extracts obtained from diverse expression hosts. In our opinion, the HB-tag provides a

  17. Characterization of VCAM-1-binding peptide-functionalized quantum dots for molecular imaging of inflamed endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    Full Text Available Inflammation-induced activation of endothelium constitutes one of the earliest changes during atherogenesis. New imaging techniques that allow detecting activated endothelial cells can improve the identification of persons at high cardiovascular risk in early stages. Quantum dots (QDs have attractive optical properties such as bright fluorescence and high photostability, and have been increasingly studied and developed for bio-imaging and bio-targeting applications. We report here the development of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 binding peptide (VCAM-1 binding peptide functionalized QDs (VQDs from amino QDs. It was found that the QD fluorescence signal in tumor necrosis factor [Formula: see text] (TNF-[Formula: see text] treated endothelial cells in vitro was significantly higher when these cells were labeled with VQDs than amino QDs. The VQD labeling of TNF-[Formula: see text]-treated endothelial cells was VCAM-1 specific since pre-incubation with recombinant VCAM-1 blocked cells' uptake of VQDs. Our ex vivo and in vivo experiments showed that in the inflamed endothelium, QD fluorescence signal from VQDs was also much stronger than that of amino QDs. Moreover, we observed that the QD fluorescence peak was significantly blue-shifted after VQDs interacted with aortic endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. A similar blue-shift was observed after VQDs were incubated with recombinant VCAM-1 in tube. We anticipate that the specific interaction between VQDs and VCAM-1 and the blue-shift of the QD fluorescence peak can be very useful for VCAM-1 detection in vivo.

  18. Unbound position II in MXCXXC metallochaperone model peptides impacts metal binding mode and reactivity: Distinct similarities to whole proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshan, Michal S; Dekel, Noa; Goch, Wojciech; Shalev, Deborah E; Danieli, Tsafi; Lebendiker, Mario; Bal, Wojciech; Tshuva, Edit Y

    2016-06-01

    The effect of position II in the binding sequence of copper metallochaperones, which varies between Thr and His, was investigated through structural analysis and affinity and oxidation kinetic studies of model peptides. A first Cys-Cu(I)-Cys model obtained for the His peptide at acidic and neutral pH, correlated with higher affinity and more rapid oxidation of its complex; in contrast, the Thr peptide with the Cys-Cu(I)-Met coordination under neutral conditions demonstrated weaker and pH dependent binding. Studies with human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) and three of its mutants where S residues were replaced with Ala suggested that (a) the binding affinity is influenced more by the binding sequence than by the protein fold (b) pH may play a role in binding reactivity, and (c) mutating the Met impacted the affinity and oxidation rate more drastically than did mutating one of the Cys, supporting its important role in protein function. Position II thus plays a dominant role in metal binding and transport. PMID:26901629

  19. Organic crystal-binding peptides: morphology control and one-pot formation of protein-displaying organic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niide, Teppei; Ozawa, Kyohei; Nakazawa, Hikaru; Oliveira, Daniel; Kasai, Hitoshi; Onodera, Mari; Asano, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Izumi; Umetsu, Mitsuo

    2015-11-01

    Crystalline assemblies of fluorescent molecules have different functional properties than the constituent monomers, as well as unique optical characteristics that depend on the structure, size, and morphological homogeneity of the crystal particles. In this study, we selected peptides with affinity for the surface of perylene crystal particles by exposing a peptide-displaying phage library in aqueous solution to perylene crystals, eluting the surface-bound phages by means of acidic desorption or liquid-liquid extraction, and amplifying the obtained phages in Escherichia coli. One of the perylene-binding peptides, PeryBPb1: VQHNTKYSVVIR, selected by this biopanning procedure induced perylene molecules to form homogenous planar crystal nanoparticles by means of a poor solvent method, and fusion of the peptide to a fluorescent protein enabled one-pot formation of protein-immobilized crystalline nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were well-dispersed in aqueous solution, and Förster resonance energy transfer from the perylene crystals to the fluorescent protein was observed. Our results show that the crystal-binding peptide could be used for simultaneous control of perylene crystal morphology and dispersion and protein immobilization on the crystals.Crystalline assemblies of fluorescent molecules have different functional properties than the constituent monomers, as well as unique optical characteristics that depend on the structure, size, and morphological homogeneity of the crystal particles. In this study, we selected peptides with affinity for the surface of perylene crystal particles by exposing a peptide-displaying phage library in aqueous solution to perylene crystals, eluting the surface-bound phages by means of acidic desorption or liquid-liquid extraction, and amplifying the obtained phages in Escherichia coli. One of the perylene-binding peptides, PeryBPb1: VQHNTKYSVVIR, selected by this biopanning procedure induced perylene molecules to form homogenous planar

  20. Heparin-binding peptide amphiphile supramolecular architectures as platforms for angiogenesis and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Lesleyann W.

    A fascinating phenomenon in nature is the self-assembly of molecules into a functional, hierarchical structure. In the past decade, the Stupp Laboratory has developed several classes of self-assembling biomaterials, one of which is the synthetic peptide amphiphile (PA). Self-assembling PAs are attractive and versatile biomolecules that can be customized for specific applications in regenerative medicine. In particular, a heparin-binding peptide amphiphile (HBPA) containing a specific heparin-binding peptide sequence was used here to induce angiogenesis and serve as a delivery vehicle for growth factors and small hydrophobic molecules. Throughout this dissertation, the HBPA/heparin system is used in different architectures for a variety of regenerative medicine applications. In one aspect of this work, hybrid scaffolds made from HBPA/heparin gelled on a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fiber mesh were used to promote angiogenesis to facilitate pancreatic islet transplantation for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Delivery of growth factors with HBPA/PLLA scafflolds increased vessel density in vivo and correlated with improved transplant outcomes in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model. Soluble HBPA nanofiber architectures were also useful for islet transplantation applications. These nanofibers were used at concentrations below gelation to deliver growth factors into the dense islet cell aggregate, promoting cell survival and angiogenesis in vitro. The nanostructures infiltrated the islets and promoted the retention of heparin and growth factors within the islet. Another interesting growth factor release system discussed here is the HBPA membrane structure. HBPA was found to self-assemble with hyaluronic acid, a large biopolymer found in the body, into macroscopic, hierarchically-ordered membranes. Heparin was incorporated into these membranes and affected the membrane's mechanical properties and growth factor release. Human mesenchymal stem cells were also shown

  1. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Morgenthau

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides.

  2. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24465982

  3. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Peptide Binding Profiles and the Identification of T cell Epitopes by Tetramer Staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers

    of the specific CTL response elicited as a result of immunization against foot-and-mouth-disease virus (FMDV) and swine influenza A virus. These studies resulted in the identification of T cell epitopes from both viruses. As SLA:peptide binding data accumulates in these and similar studies, it becomes possible...

  4. Bioinspired silicification of silica-binding peptide-silk protein chimeras: comparison of chemically and genetically produced proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canabady-Rochelle, Laetitia L S; Belton, David J; Deschaume, Olivier; Currie, Heather A; Kaplan, David L; Perry, Carole C

    2012-03-12

    Novel protein chimeras constituted of "silk" and a silica-binding peptide (KSLSRHDHIHHH) were synthesized by genetic or chemical approaches and their influence on silica-silk based chimera composite formation evaluated. Genetic chimeras were constructed from 6 or 15 repeats of the 32 amino acid consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes spider silk ([SGRGGLGGQG AGAAAAAGGA GQGGYGGLGSQG](n)) to which one silica binding peptide was fused at the N terminus. For the chemical chimera, 28 equiv of the silica binding peptide were chemically coupled to natural Bombyx mori silk after modification of tyrosine groups by diazonium coupling and EDC/NHS activation of all acid groups. After silica formation under mild, biomaterial-compatible conditions, the effect of peptide addition on the properties of the silk and chimeric silk-silica composite materials was explored. The composite biomaterial properties could be related to the extent of silica condensation and to the higher number of silica binding sites in the chemical chimera as compared with the genetically derived variants. In all cases, the structure of the protein/chimera in solution dictated the type of composite structure that formed with the silica deposition process having little effect on the secondary structural composition of the silk-based materials. Similarly to our study of genetic silk based chimeras containing the R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL), the role of the chimeras (genetic and chemical) used in the present study resided more in aggregation and scaffolding than in the catalysis of condensation. The variables of peptide identity, silk construct (number of consensus repeats or silk source), and approach to synthesis (genetic or chemical) can be used to "tune" the properties of the composite materials formed and is a general approach that can be used to prepare a range of materials for biomedical and sensor-based applications. PMID:22229696

  5. Cell surface binding and uptake of arginine- and lysine-rich penetratin peptides in absence and presence of proteoglycans

    KAUST Repository

    Åmand, Helene L.

    2012-11-01

    Cell surface proteoglycans (PGs) appear to promote uptake of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), but their exact functions are unclear. To address if there is specificity in the interactions of arginines and PGs leading to improved internalization, we used flow cytometry to examine uptake in relation to cell surface binding for penetratin and two arginine/lysine substituted variants (PenArg and PenLys) in wildtype CHO-K1 and PG-deficient A745 cells. All peptides were more efficiently internalized into CHO-K1 than into A745, but their cell surface binding was independent of cell type. Thus, PGs promote internalization of cationic peptides, irrespective of the chemical nature of their positive charges. Uptake of each peptide was linearly dependent on its cell surface binding, and affinity is thus important for efficiency. However, the gradients of these linear dependencies varied significantly. Thus each peptide\\'s ability to stimulate uptake once bound to the cell surface is reliant on formation of specific uptake-promoting interactions. Heparin affinity chromatography and clustering experiments showed that penetratin and PenArg binding to sulfated sugars is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and result in clustering, whereas PenLys only interacts through electrostatic attraction. This may have implications for the molecular mechanisms behind arginine-specific uptake stimulation as penetratin and PenArg are more efficiently internalized than PenLys upon interaction with PGs. However, PenArg is also least affected by removal of PGs. This indicates that an increased arginine content not only improve PG-dependent uptake but also that PenArg is more adaptable as it can use several portals of entry into the cell. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Identification of a PA-binding peptide with inhibitory activity against influenza A and B virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Wunderlich

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need for new drugs against influenza type A and B viruses due to incomplete protection by vaccines and the emergence of resistance to current antivirals. The influenza virus polymerase complex, consisting of the PB1, PB2 and PA subunits, represents a promising target for the development of new drugs. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of targeting the protein-protein interaction domain between the PB1 and PA subunits of the polymerase complex of influenza A virus using a small peptide derived from the PA-binding domain of PB1. However, this influenza A virus-derived peptide did not affect influenza B virus polymerase activity. Here we report that the PA-binding domain of the polymerase subunit PB1 of influenza A and B viruses is highly conserved and that mutual amino acid exchange shows that they cannot be functionally exchanged with each other. Based on phylogenetic analysis and a novel biochemical ELISA-based screening approach, we were able to identify an influenza A-derived peptide with a single influenza B-specific amino acid substitution which efficiently binds to PA of both virus types. This dual-binding peptide blocked the viral polymerase activity and growth of both virus types. Our findings provide proof of principle that protein-protein interaction inhibitors can be generated against influenza A and B viruses. Furthermore, this dual-binding peptide, combined with our novel screening method, is a promising platform to identify new antiviral lead compounds.

  7. Peptide-specific, allogeneic T cell response in vitro induced by a self-peptide binding to HLA-A2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG XiuFang; LIANG ZhiHui; LU XiaoLing; ZHONG MaoHua; LU ShengJun; ZHANG CaiE; DENG Jing; WU XiongWen; GONG FeiLi

    2007-01-01

    The role of the bound peptide in alloreactive T-cell recognition is controversial, ranging from peptide-independent to peptide-specific recognition of alloreactive T-cells. The aim of this study is to find the evidence that there exist peptide/MHC complex (pMHC)-specific CTLs among alloreactive T cells generated with long-term mixed lymphocytes culture (LTMLC). A single pMHC was manipulated by loading the TAP-defective, HLA-A2 expressing T2 cells with a viral peptide (LMP2A426-434) or a self-peptide (Tyr369-377). The PBLs samples from 4 HLA-A2 positive (HLA-A2+ve) and 4 HLA-A2 negative (HLA-A2-ve) donors were included in this study. The HLA-A2+ve PBL co-cultured with the LMP2A426-434pulsed T2 (T2/LMP) stands for the nominal T-cell response to a viral antigen, and the HLA-A2-ve PBLs co-cultured with the Tyr369-377 pulsed T2 (T2/Tyr) for alloreactive T-cell response to an allogeneic antigen.The specificity of the expanded CTLs after the LTMLC was detected by their specific cytotoxicity and binding ability to specific pMHC-tetramer. An HLA-A2 restricted, HIV peptide (Gag77-85) was included for control. The cultural bulk of HLA-A2+ve PBLs with the T2/LMP showed an elevated specific cytotoxicity against the T2/LMP compared to that against the T2/HIV (26.52%±3.72% vs 7.01%±0.87%, P<0.001), and an increased frequency of binding to LMP-tetramer compared to that binding to HIV-tetramer (0.98%±0.33% vs 0.05%±0.01%, P=0.0014). The cultural bulk of HLA-A2-ve PBLs with the T2/Tyr showed a more active cytotoxicity against the T2/Tyr than that against T2/HIV (28.07%±2.58% vs 6.87%±1.01%,P<0.001), and a higher frequency of binding to the Tyr-tetramer than that binding to the HIV-tetramer (0.88%±0.3% vs 0.06%±0.03%, P=0.0018). Our results indicate that the LTMLC is able to expand the viral antigen-specific CTLs as well as allogeneic antigen-specific CTLs. A relatively large proportion of alloreactive CTLs should be pMHC-specific, i.e., the specificity of the

  8. A Novel Peptide Binding Prediction Approach for HLA-DR Molecule Based on Sequence and Structural Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao; Zhao, Yilei; Pan, Gaofeng; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-01-01

    MHC molecule plays a key role in immunology, and the molecule binding reaction with peptide is an important prerequisite for T cell immunity induced. MHC II molecules do not have conserved residues, so they appear as open grooves. As a consequence, this will increase the difficulty in predicting MHC II molecules binding peptides. In this paper, we aim to propose a novel prediction method for MHC II molecules binding peptides. First, we calculate sequence similarity and structural similarity between different MHC II molecules. Then, we reorder pseudosequences according to descending similarity values and use a weight calculation formula to calculate new pocket profiles. Finally, we use three scoring functions to predict binding cores and evaluate the accuracy of prediction to judge performance of each scoring function. In the experiment, we set a parameter α in the weight formula. By changing α value, we can observe different performances of each scoring function. We compare our method with the best function to some popular prediction methods and ultimately find that our method outperforms them in identifying binding cores of HLA-DR molecules. PMID:27340658

  9. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with [14C]penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the [14C]penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented

  10. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum RhopH3 protein peptides that specifically bind to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Reyes, Claudia; Méndez, David; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2008-01-01

    The identification of sequences involved in binding to erythrocytes is an important step for understanding the molecular basis of merozoite–erythrocyte interactions that take place during invasion of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite into host cells. Several molecules located in the apical organelles (micronemes, rhoptry, dense granules) of the invasive-stage parasite are essential for erythrocyte recognition, invasion, and establishment of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that rhoptry proteins play an important role in binding to erythrocyte surface receptors, among which is the PfRhopH3 protein, which triggers important immune responses in patients from endemic regions. It has also been reported that anti-RhopH3 antibodies inhibit in vitro invasion of erythrocytes, further supporting its direct involvement in erythrocyte invasion processes. In this study, PfRhopH3 consecutive peptides were synthesized and tested in erythrocyte binding assays for identifying those regions mediating binding to erythrocytes. Fourteen PfRhopH3 peptides presenting high specific binding activity were found, whose bindings were saturable and presented nanomolar dissociation constants. These high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) were characterized by having α-helical structural elements, as determined by circular dichroism, and having receptors of a possible sialic acid-dependent and/or glycoprotein-dependent nature, as evidenced in enzyme-treated erythrocyte binding assays and further corroborated by cross-linking assay results. Furthermore, these HABPs inhibited merozoite in vitro invasion of normal erythrocytes at 200 μM by up to 60% and 90%, suggesting that some RhopH3 protein regions are involved in the P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion. PMID:18593818

  11. A Peptide Mimetic of 5-Acetylneuraminic Acid-Galactose Binds with High Avidity to Siglecs and NKG2D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura L Eggink

    Full Text Available We previously identified several peptide sequences that mimicked the terminal sugars of complex glycans. Using plant lectins as analogs of lectin-type cell-surface receptors, a tetravalent form of a peptide with the sequence NPSHPLSG, designated svH1C, bound with high avidity to lectins specific for glycans with terminal 5-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac-galactose (Gal/N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc sequences. In this report, we show by circular dichroism and NMR spectra that svH1C lacks an ordered structure and thus interacts with binding sites from a flexible conformation. The peptide binds with high avidity to several recombinant human siglec receptors that bind preferentially to Neu5Ac(α2,3Gal, Neu5Ac(α2,6GalNAc or Neu5Ac(α2,8Neu5Ac ligands. In addition, the peptide bound the receptor NKG2D, which contains a lectin-like domain that binds Neu5Ac(α2,3Gal. The peptide bound to these receptors with a KD in the range of 0.6 to 1 μM. Binding to these receptors was inhibited by the glycoprotein fetuin, which contains multiple glycans that terminate in Neu5Ac(α2,3Gal or Neu5Ac(α2,6Gal, and by sialyllactose. Binding of svH1C was not detected with CLEC9a, CLEC10a or DC-SIGN, which are lectin-type receptors specific for other sugars. Incubation of neuraminidase-treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with svH1C resulted in binding of the peptide to a subset of the CD14+ monocyte population. Tyrosine phosphorylation of siglecs decreased dramatically when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with 100 nM svH1C. Subcutaneous, alternate-day injections of svH1C into mice induced several-fold increases in populations of several types of immune cells in the peritoneal cavity. These results support the conclusion that svH1C mimics Neu5Ac-containing sequences and interacts with cell-surface receptors with avidities sufficient to induce biological responses at low concentrations. The attenuation of inhibitory receptors suggests that svH1C

  12. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site: Overlapping Binding Modes for Small Molecule Antagonists and the Endogenous Peptide Agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W.; Frimurer, Thomas Michael

    2015-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurological disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resolution x......-ray crystal structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8–13 has been determined, providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small molecule antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compound to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties....... To investigate the binding mode of SR48692 and other small molecule compounds to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692...

  13. Identification of the bacteria-binding peptide domain on salivary agglutinin (gp-340/DMBT1), a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikker, Floris J; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Nazmi, Kamran;

    2002-01-01

    Salivary agglutinin is encoded by DMBT1 and identical to gp-340, a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily. Salivary agglutinin/DMBT1 is known for its Streptococcus mutans agglutinating properties. This 300-400 kDa glycoprotein is composed of conserved peptide motifs: 14...... containing exclusively SRCR and SID domains that binds to S. mutans. To define more closely the S. mutans-binding domain, consensus-based peptides of the SRCR domains and SIDs were designed and synthesized. Only one of the SRCR peptides, designated SRCRP2, and none of the SID peptides bound to S. mutans....... Strikingly, this peptide was also able to induce agglutination of S. mutans and a number of other bacteria. The repeated presence of this peptide in the native molecule endows agglutinin/DMBT1 with a general bacterial binding feature with a multivalent character. Moreover, our studies demonstrate for the...

  14. Use of Multiple Peptide-Based SERS Probes Binding to Different Epitopes on a Protein Biomarker To Improve Detection Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kayeong; Cho, Jun-Haeng; Yoon, Moon-Young; Chung, Hoeil

    2016-04-01

    We propose an analytical strategy to improve the sensitivity for detecting a protein biomarker through signal multiplication by manipulating multiple peptide-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes to bind the biomarker. Protective antigen (PA) was used as an Anthrax biomarker in this study. For this purpose, five small peptides selective to various PA epitopes with different binding affinities were chosen and peptide-conjugated Au nanoparticle (AuNP) SERS probes were individually prepared using each peptide. Initially, five different SERS probes were separately used to detect PA and the sensitivities were compared. Next, the possibility of enhancing sensitivity by employing multiple SERS probes was examined. Rather than applying the probes simultaneously, which would induce competitive binding, each probe was added sequentially and an optimal probe-addition sequence was determined to provide maximal sensitivity. Finally, PA samples at seven different concentrations were measured with the optimal sequence. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.1 aM, and the enhancement was more effective at lower PA concentrations. The proposed scheme can be further applicable to detect other protein biomarkers to diagnose various diseases. PMID:26948277

  15. HIV-1 vaccine development: constrained peptide immunogens show improved binding to the anti-HIV-1 gp41 MAb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaughey, G B; Citron, M; Danzeisen, R C; Freidinger, R M; Garsky, V M; Hurni, W M; Joyce, J G; Liang, X; Miller, M; Shiver, J; Bogusky, M J

    2003-03-25

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 mediates viral entry through fusion of the target cellular and viral membranes. A segment of gp41 containing the sequence Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala has previously been identified as the epitope of the HIV-1 neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2F5 (MAb 2F5). The 2F5 epitope is highly conserved among HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Antibodies directed at the 2F5 epitope have neutralizing effects on a broad range of laboratory-adapted HIV-1 variants and primary isolates. Recently, a crystal structure of the epitope bound to the Fab fragment of MAb 2F5 has shown that the 2F5 peptide adopts a beta-turn conformation [Pai, E. F., Klein, M. H., Chong, P., and Pedyczak, A. (2000) World Intellectual Property Organization Patent WO-00/61618]. We have designed cyclic peptides to adopt beta-turn conformations by the incorporation of a side-chain to side-chain lactam bridge between the i and i + 4 residues containing the Asp-Lys-Trp segment. Synthesis of extended, nonconstrained peptides encompassing the 2F5 epitope revealed that the 13 amino acid sequence, Glu-Leu-Leu-Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala-Ser-Leu-Trp-Asn, maximized MAb 2F5 binding. Constrained analogues of this sequence were explored to optimize 2F5 binding affinity. The solution conformations of the constrained peptides have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques. The results presented here demonstrate that both inclusion of the lactam constraint and extension of the 2F5 segment are necessary to elicit optimal antibody binding activity. The ability of these peptide immunogens to stimulate a high titer, peptide-specific immune response incapable of viral neutralization is discussed in regard to developing an HIV-1 vaccine designed to elicit a 2F5-like immune response. PMID:12641452

  16. Peptide-specific,allogeneic T cell response in vitro induced by a self-peptide binding to HLA-A2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The role of the bound peptide in alloreactive T-cell recognition is controversial, ranging from pep-tide-independent to peptide-specific recognition of alloreactive T-cells. The aim of this study is to find the evidence that there exist peptide/MHC complex (pMHC)-specific CTLs among alloreactive T cells generated with long-term mixed lymphocytes culture (LTMLC). A single pMHC was manipulated by loading the TAP-defective, HLA-A2 expressing T2 cells with a viral peptide (LMP2A426-434) or a self-peptide (Tyr369-377). The PBLs samples from 4 HLA-A2 positive (HLA-A2+ve) and 4 HLA-A2 negative (HLA-A2-ve) donors were included in this study. The HLA-A2+ve PBL co-cultured with the LMP2A426-434 pulsed T2 (T2/LMP) stands for the nominal T-cell response to a viral antigen, and the HLA-A2-ve PBLs co-cultured with the Tyr369-377 pulsed T2 (T2/Tyr) for alloreactive T-cell response to an allogeneic antigen. The specificity of the expanded CTLs after the LTMLC was detected by their specific cytotoxicity and binding ability to specific pMHC-tetramer. An HLA-A2 restricted, HIV peptide (Gag77-85)was included for control. The cultural bulk of HLA-A2+ve PBLs with the T2/LMP showed an elevated specific cytotoxicity against the T2/LMP compared to that against the T2/HIV (26.52%±3.72% vs 7.01%±0.87%, P<0.001), and an increased frequency of binding to LMP-tetramer compared to that binding to HIV-tetramer (0.98%±0.33% vs 0.05%±0.01%, P=0.0014). The cultural bulk of HLA-A2-ve PBLs with the T2/Tyr showed a more active cytotoxicity against the T2/Tyr than that against T2/HIV (28.07%±2.58% vs 6.87%±0.01 %, P<0.001), and a higher frequency of binding to the Tyr-tetramer than that binding to the HIV-tetramer (0.88%±0.3% vs 0.06%±0.03%, P=0.0018). Our results indicate that the LTMLC is able to expand the viral antigen-specific CTLs as well as allogeneic antigen-specific CTLs. A relatively large proportion of alloreactive CTLs should be pMHC-specific, i.e., the specificity of the

  17. In Vivo Selection of Phage Sequences and Characterization of Peptide-specific Binding to Breast Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Wang; Ruifang Niu; Lin Zhang; Hongkai Zhang; Xiyin Wei; Yi Yang; Shiwu Zhang; Jing Wu; Min Wu; Youjia Cao

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To screen specific polypeptide target binding to breast cancer xenografts in vivo from a phage-displayed peptide library in order to provide peptide sequences for breast cancer tumor-targeting diagnosis and therapy.METHODS A mouse model for carrying breast cancer xenografts was established using Tientsin Albinao Ⅱ mice (TAII). A 12-peptide library was biopanned through 4 rounds.Phages were recovered and titrated from tumor xenografts and control tissue (liver). The distribution of phages was detected by immunohistochemical staining.RESULTS Phage homing to breast cancer was enriched through 4 rounds of biopanning, being 14-fold of that recovered from liver tissue. A peptide sequence, ASANPFPTKALL was characterized by randomly picked-up clones which appeared most frequently.Immunohistochemical staining revealed phage localization in cancer xenografts 40 min after injection of the enriched phages.When a specific phage was tested individually, the phage reclaimed from breast cancer xenografts was 14 times as those from control tissues.CONCLUSION Tumor-specific homing peptides may provide an effective tool for breast cancer target therapy. The in vivo phage display selection technique employed in this study was feasible and applicable to screening peptides that home to.breast cells.

  18. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site: Overlapping Binding Modes for Small Molecule Antagonists and the Endogenous Peptide Agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurological disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been determined, providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small molecule antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compound to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate the binding mode of SR48692 and other small molecule compounds to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were observed, despite their distinct chemical nature and inverse pharmacological profiles. The optimized models showed significantly improved ligand recognition in a large-scale virtual screening assessment compared to the crystal structure. Our models provide new insights into small molecule ligand binding to NTSR1 and could facilitate the structure-based design of non-peptide ligands for the evaluation of the pharmacological potential of NTSR1 in neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:27491650

  19. Poor correspondence between predicted and experimental binding of peptides to class I MHC molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Tan, L.; Søndergaard, Ib;

    2000-01-01

    Naturally processed peptides presented by class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules display a characteristic allele specific motif of two or more essential amino acid side chains, the so-called peptide anchor residues, in the context of an 8-10 amino acid long peptide. Knowledge of...

  20. Conserved C-terminal nascent peptide binding domain of HYPK facilitates its chaperone-like activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swasti Raychaudhuri; Rachana Banerjee; Subhasish Mukhopadhyay; Nitai P Bhattacharyya

    2014-09-01

    Human HYPK (Huntingtin Yeast-two-hybrid Protein K) is an intrinsically unstructured chaperone-like protein with no sequence homology to known chaperones. HYPK is also known to be a part of ribosome-associated protein complex and present in polysomes. The objective of the present study was to investigate the evolutionary influence on HYPK primary structure and its impact on the protein’s function. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed 105 orthologs of human HYPK from plants, lower invertebrates to mammals. C-terminal part of HYPK was found to be particularly conserved and to contain nascent polypeptide-associated alpha subunit (NPAA) domain. This region experiences highest selection pressure, signifying its importance in the structural and functional evolution. NPAA domain of human HYPK has unique amino acid composition preferring glutamic acid and happens to be more stable from a conformational point of view having higher content of -helices than the rest. Cell biology studies indicate that overexpressed C-terminal human HYPK can interact with nascent proteins, co-localizes with huntingtin, increases cell viability and decreases caspase activities in Huntington’s disease (HD) cell culture model. This domain is found to be required for the chaperone-like activity of HYPK in vivo. Our study suggested that by virtue of its flexibility and nascent peptide binding activity, HYPK may play an important role in assisting protein (re)folding.

  1. Electrostatically induced recruitment of membrane peptides into clusters requires ligand binding at both interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri N Antonenko

    Full Text Available Protein recruitment to specific membrane locations may be governed or facilitated by electrostatic attraction, which originates from a multivalent ligand. Here we explored the energetics of a model system in which this simple electrostatic recruitment mechanism failed. That is, basic poly-L-lysine binding to one leaflet of a planar lipid bilayer did not recruit the triply-charged peptide (O-Pyromellitylgramicidin. Clustering was only observed in cases where PLL was bound to both channel ends. Clustering was indicated (i by the decreased diffusional PLL mobility D(PLL and (ii by an increased lifetime τ(PLL of the clustered channels. In contrast, if PLL was bound to only one leaflet, neither D(PLL nor τ(P changed. Simple calculations suggest that electrostatic repulsion of the unbound ends prevented neighboring OPg dimers from approaching each other. We believe that a similar mechanism may also operate in cell signaling and that it may e.g. contribute to the controversial results obtained for the ligand driven dimerization of G protein-coupled receptors.

  2. Inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 binding to endocytosis receptors of the low density lipoprotein receptor family by a peptide isolated from a phage displayed library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jan K.; Malmendal, Anders; Schiøtt, Birgit;

    2006-01-01

    (DVPCFGWCQDA) was determined by NMR. A binding site in the so-called flexible joint region of PAI-1 was suggested by molecular modelling and validated through binding studies with various competitors and site-directed mutagenesis of PAI-1. The peptide with an N-terminal biotin inhibited the binding of the u...

  3. Local atomic structure and oxidation processes of Cu(I) binding site in amyloid beta peptide: XAS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremennaya, M. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Stretsov, V. A.; Soldatov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    There are two different motifs of X-ray absorption spectra for Cu(I) K-edge in amyloid-β peptide which could be due to two different configurations of local Cu(I) environment. Two or three histidine ligands can coordinate copper ion in varying conformations. On the other hand, oxidation of amyloid-β peptide could play an additional role in local copper environment. In order to explore the peculiarities of local atomic and electronic structure of Cu(I) binding sites in amyloid-β peptide the x-ray absorption spectra were simulated for various Cu(I) environments including oxidized amyloid-β and compared with experimental data.

  4. The peptide-binding specificity of HLA-A*3001 demonstrates membership of the HLA-A3 supertype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberth, K; Røder, G; Harndahl, M;

    2008-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) molecules are highly polymorphic peptide receptors, which select and present endogenously derived peptide epitopes to CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTL). The specificity of the HLA-I system is an important component of the overall specificity of the CTL immune...... system. Unfortunately, the large and rapidly increasing number of known HLA-I molecules seriously complicates a comprehensive analysis of the specificities of the entire HLA-I system (as of June 2008, the international HLA registry holds >1,650 unique HLA-I protein entries). In an attempt to reduce this...... complexity, it has been suggested to cluster the different HLA-I molecules into "supertypes" of largely overlapping peptide-binding specificities. Obviously, the HLA supertype concept is only valuable if membership can be assigned with reasonable accuracy. The supertype assignment of HLA-A*3001, a common HLA...

  5. Solution structure and peptide binding of the PTB domain from the AIDA1 postsynaptic signaling scaffolding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Smirnova

    Full Text Available AIDA1 links persistent chemical signaling events occurring at the neuronal synapse with global changes in gene expression. Consistent with its role as a scaffolding protein, AIDA1 is composed of several protein-protein interaction domains. Here we report the NMR structure of the carboxy terminally located phosphotyrosine binding domain (PTB that is common to all AIDA1 splice variants. A comprehensive survey of peptides identified a consensus sequence around an NxxY motif that is shared by a number of related neuronal signaling proteins. Using peptide arrays and fluorescence based assays, we determined that the AIDA1 PTB domain binds amyloid protein precursor (APP in a similar manner to the X11/Mint PTB domain, albeit at reduced affinity (∼10 µM that may allow AIDA1 to effectively sample APP, as well as other protein partners in a variety of cellular contexts.

  6. Panning of a phage display library against a synthetic capsule for peptide ligands that bind to the native capsule of Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Beer

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax with the ability to not only produce a tripartite toxin, but also an enveloping capsule comprised primarily of γ-D-glutamic acid residues. The purpose of this study was to isolate peptide ligands capable of binding to the native capsule of B. anthracis from a commercial phage display peptide library using a synthetic form of the capsule consisting of 12 γ-D-glutamic acid residues. Following four rounds of selection, 80 clones were selected randomly and analysed by DNA sequencing. Four clones, each containing a unique consensus sequence, were identified by sequence alignment analysis. Phage particles were prepared and their derived 12-mer peptides were also chemically synthesized and conjugated to BSA. Both the phage particles and free peptide-BSA conjugates were evaluated by ELISA for binding to encapsulated cells of B. anthracis as well as a B. anthracis capsule extract. All the phage particles tested except one were able to bind to both the encapsulated cells and the capsule extract. However, the peptide-BSA conjugates could only bind to the encapsulated cells. One of the peptide-BSA conjugates, with the sequence DSSRIPMQWHPQ (termed G1, was fluorescently labelled and its binding to the encapsulated cells was further confirmed by confocal microscopy. The results demonstrated that the synthetic capsule was effective in isolating phage-displayed peptides with binding affinity for the native capsule of B. anthracis.

  7. Short Peptide Nucleic Acids Bind Strongly to Homopurine Tract of Double Helical RNA at pH 5.5

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming; Zengeya, Thomas; Rozners, Eriks

    2010-01-01

    The important role that non-coding RNA plays in cell biology makes it an attractive target for molecular recognition. However, the discovery of small molecules that bind double helical RNA selectively and may serve as biochemical probes and potential drug leads has been relatively slow. Herein, we show that peptide nucleic acids, as short as six nucleobases, bind very strongly (Ka > 107) and sequence selectively to a homopurine tract of double helical RNA at pH 5.5. The isothermal titration c...

  8. MULTIPRED2: a computational system for large-scale identification of peptides predicted to bind to HLA supertypes and alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; DeLuca, David S; Keskin, Derin B; Chitkushev, Lou; Zlateva, Tanya; Lund, Ole; Reinherz, Ellis L; Brusic, Vladimir

    2011-11-30

    MULTIPRED2 is a computational system for facile prediction of peptide binding to multiple alleles belonging to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II DR molecules. It enables prediction of peptide binding to products of individual HLA alleles, combination of alleles, or HLA supertypes. NetMHCpan and NetMHCIIpan are used as prediction engines. The 13 HLA Class I supertypes are A1, A2, A3, A24, B7, B8, B27, B44, B58, B62, C1, and C4. The 13 HLA Class II DR supertypes are DR1, DR3, DR4, DR6, DR7, DR8, DR9, DR11, DR12, DR13, DR14, DR15, and DR16. In total, MULTIPRED2 enables prediction of peptide binding to 1077 variants representing 26 HLA supertypes. MULTIPRED2 has visualization modules for mapping promiscuous T-cell epitopes as well as those regions of high target concentration - referred to as T-cell epitope hotspots. Novel graphic representations are employed to display the predicted binding peptides and immunological hotspots in an intuitive manner and also to provide a global view of results as heat maps. Another function of MULTIPRED2, which has direct relevance to vaccine design, is the calculation of population coverage. Currently it calculates population coverage in five major groups in North America. MULTIPRED2 is an important tool to complement wet-lab experimental methods for identification of T-cell epitopes. It is available at http://cvc.dfci.harvard.edu/multipred2/. PMID:21130094

  9. Protein disulfide isomerase isomerizes non-native disulfide bonds in human proinsulin independent of its peptide-binding activity

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Jeannette; Gleiter, Stefan; Klappa, Peter; Lilie, Hauke

    2011-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) supports proinsulin folding as chaperone and isomerase. Here, we focus on how the two PDI functions influence individual steps in the complex folding process of proinsulin. We generated a PDI mutant (PDI-aba′c) where the b′ domain was partially deleted, thus abolishing peptide binding but maintaining a PDI-like redox potential. PDI-aba′c catalyzes the folding of human proinsulin by increasing the rate of formation and the final yield of native proinsulin. Imp...

  10. Peptide 68-88 of apocytochrome c plays a crucial role in its insertion into membrane and binding to mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xiaoping; (王小平); HAN; Xuehai; (韩学海); YANG; Fuyu; (杨福愉)

    2003-01-01

    Apocytochrome c (Apocyt. C) is the precursor of cytochrome c. It is synthesized in the cytosol and posttranslationally imported into mitochondria. In order to determine the crucial sequence in apocyt. Ctranslocation, deleted mutant and chemically synthesized peptides with different length were used. Obtained results showed that sequence 68-88 of apocyt. C plays a critical role in its insertion into membrane and binding to mitochondria.

  11. Molecular modeling on Zn(Ⅱ) binding modes of Alzheimer's amyloid β-peptide in insoluble aggregates and soluble complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN; Daxiong; YANG; Pin

    2004-01-01

    Aggregation of the amyloid β-peptide (A β) into insoluble fibrils is a key pathological event in Alzheimer's disease. Zn(Ⅱ) ion induces significant Aβ aggregation at nearly physiological concentrations in vitro. In order to explore the induce mechanism, the possible binding modes of Zn(Ⅱ) in Aβ peptide are studied by molecular modeling method. First, the Aβ species containing 1,2,4 and 12 peptides are established respectively. And next a Zn(Ⅱ) ion is manually hold the different sits of the Aβ species based on the experimental data and subsequently the coordinate atom and number are assigned. Finally, the optimum binding site is found by the system energy minimization. Modeling results show that in soluble Zn(Ⅱ) complex, Nτ of imidazole ring of His14, O of carbonyl of main-chain, and two O of water occupy the four ligand positions of the tetrahedral complex; in the aggregation of Aβ, the His13(Nτ)-Zn(Ⅱ)-His14(Nτ)bridges are formed by Zn(Ⅱ) cross-linking action. Therefore, the possible Zn(Ⅱ) binding mode obtained by the studies will be helpful to reveal the form mechanism of pathogenic aggregates in brain.

  12. EWGWS insert in Plasmodium falciparum ookinete surface enolase is involved in binding of PWWP containing peptides: Implications to mosquito midgut invasion by the parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Mishra, Pushpa; Joshi, Mamata; Thakur, Prasoon Kumar; Hosur, R V; Jarori, Gotam K

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple stages in the life cycle of Plasmodium that invade host cells. Molecular machinery involved is such host-pathogen interactions constitute excellent drug targets and/or vaccine candidates. A screen using a phage display library has previously demonstrated presence of enolase on the surface of the Plasmodium ookinete. Phage-displayed peptides that bound to the ookinete contained a conserved motif (PWWP) in their sequence. Here, direct binding of these peptides with recombinant Plasmodium falciparum enolase (rPfeno) was investigated. These peptides showed specific binding to rPfeno, but failed to bind to other enolases. Plasmodium spp enolases are distinct in having an insert of five amino acids ((104)EWGWS(108)) that is not found in host enolases. The possibility of this insert being the recognition motif for the PWWP containing peptides was examined, (i) by comparing the binding of the peptides with rPfeno and a deletion variant Δ-rPfeno lacking (104)EWGWS(108), (ii) by measuring the changes in proton chemical shifts of PWWP peptides on binding to different enolases and (iii) by inter-molecular docking experiment to locate the peptide binding site. Results from these studies showed that the pentapeptide insert of Pfeno indeed constitutes the binding site for the PWWP domain containing peptide ligands. Search for sequences homologous to phage displayed peptides among peritrophic matrix proteins resulted in identification of perlecan, laminin, peritrophin and spacran. The possibility of these PWWP domain-containing proteins in the peritrophic matrix of insect gut to interact with ookinete cell surface enolase and facilitate the invasion of mosquito midgut epithelium is discussed. PMID:26592350

  13. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurs, Ulrike; Lohse, Brian; Ming, Shonoi A;

    2014-01-01

    KDM4C, indicating distinct binding modes. In contrast, the perturbation site of another PD-selected peptide inhibiting the function of KDM1A maps to a GST-tag. Our results demonstrate that HDX-MS can validate and map weak peptide-protein interactions, and pave the way for understanding and optimizing...

  14. Control of silicification by genetically engineered fusion proteins: silk-silica binding peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shun; Huang, Wenwen; Belton, David J; Simmons, Leo O; Perry, Carole C; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, an artificial spider silk gene, 6mer, derived from the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline silk gene, was fused with different silica-binding peptides (SiBPs), A1, A3 and R5, to study the impact of the fusion protein sequence chemistry on silica formation and the ability to generate a silk-silica composite in two different bioinspired silicification systems: solution-solution and solution-solid. Condensed silica nanoscale particles (600-800 nm) were formed in the presence of the recombinant silk and chimeras, which were smaller than those formed by 15mer-SiBP chimeras, revealing that the molecular weight of the silk domain correlated to the sizes of the condensed silica particles in the solution system. In addition, the chimeras (6mer-A1/A3/R5) produced smaller condensed silica particles than the control (6mer), revealing that the silica particle size formed in the solution system is controlled by the size of protein assemblies in solution. In the solution-solid interface system, silicification reactions were performed on the surface of films fabricated from the recombinant silk proteins and chimeras and then treated to induce β-sheet formation. A higher density of condensed silica formed on the films containing the lowest β-sheet content while the films with the highest β-sheet content precipitated the lowest density of silica, revealing an inverse correlation between the β-sheet secondary structure and the silica content formed on the films. Intriguingly, the 6mer-A3 showed the highest rate of silica condensation but the lowest density of silica deposition on the films, compared with 6mer-A1 and -R5, revealing antagonistic crosstalk between the silk and the SiBP domains in terms of protein assembly. These findings offer a path forward in the tailoring of biopolymer-silica composites for biomaterial related needs. PMID:25462851

  15. Vasoactive intestinal peptide binding sites and fibers in the brain of the pigeon Columba livia: An autoradiographic and immunohistochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) binding sites in the pigeon brain was examined by in vitro autoradiography on slide-mounted sections. A fully characterized monoiodinated form of VIP, which maintains the biological activity of the native peptide, was used throughout this study. The highest densities of binding sites were observed in the hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, auditory field L of neostriatum, area corticoidea dorsolateralis and temporo-parieto-occipitalis, area parahippocampalis, tectum opticum, nucleus dorsomedialis anterior thalami, and in the periventricular area of the hypothalamus. Lower densities of specific binding occurred in the neostriatum, hyperstriatum ventrale and nucleus septi lateralis, dorsolateral area of the thalamus, and lateral and posteromedial hypothalamus. Very low to background levels of VIP binding were detected in the ectostriatum, paleostriatum primitivum, paleostriatum augmentatum, lobus parolfactorius, nucleus accumbens, most of the brainstem, and the cerebellum. The distribution of VIP-containing fibers and terminals was examined by indirect immunofluorescence using a polyclonal antibody against porcine VIP. Fibers and terminals were observed in the area corticoidea dorsolateralis, area parahippocampalis, hippocampus, hyperstriatum accessorium, hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, tuberculum olfactorium, nuclei dorsolateralis and dorsomedialis of the thalamus, and throughout the hypothalamus and the median eminence. Long projecting fibers were visualized in the tractus septohippocampalis. In the brainstem VIP immunoreactive fibers and terminals were observed mainly in the substantia grisea centralis, fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, lemniscus lateralis, and in the area surrounding the nuclei of the 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves

  16. Vasoactive intestinal peptide binding sites and fibers in the brain of the pigeon Columba livia: An autoradiographic and immunohistochemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hof, P.R.; Dietl, M.M.; Charnay, Y.; Martin, J.L.; Bouras, C.; Palacios, J.M.; Magistretti, P.J. (Fishberg Research Center for Neurobiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (USA))

    1991-03-15

    The distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) binding sites in the pigeon brain was examined by in vitro autoradiography on slide-mounted sections. A fully characterized monoiodinated form of VIP, which maintains the biological activity of the native peptide, was used throughout this study. The highest densities of binding sites were observed in the hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, auditory field L of neostriatum, area corticoidea dorsolateralis and temporo-parieto-occipitalis, area parahippocampalis, tectum opticum, nucleus dorsomedialis anterior thalami, and in the periventricular area of the hypothalamus. Lower densities of specific binding occurred in the neostriatum, hyperstriatum ventrale and nucleus septi lateralis, dorsolateral area of the thalamus, and lateral and posteromedial hypothalamus. Very low to background levels of VIP binding were detected in the ectostriatum, paleostriatum primitivum, paleostriatum augmentatum, lobus parolfactorius, nucleus accumbens, most of the brainstem, and the cerebellum. The distribution of VIP-containing fibers and terminals was examined by indirect immunofluorescence using a polyclonal antibody against porcine VIP. Fibers and terminals were observed in the area corticoidea dorsolateralis, area parahippocampalis, hippocampus, hyperstriatum accessorium, hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, tuberculum olfactorium, nuclei dorsolateralis and dorsomedialis of the thalamus, and throughout the hypothalamus and the median eminence. Long projecting fibers were visualized in the tractus septohippocampalis. In the brainstem VIP immunoreactive fibers and terminals were observed mainly in the substantia grisea centralis, fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, lemniscus lateralis, and in the area surrounding the nuclei of the 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves.

  17. Determining the Binding Sites of β-Cyclodextrin and Peptides by Electron-Capture Dissociation High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yulin; Geib, Timon; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2015-07-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are a group of cyclic oligosaccharides, which readily form inclusion complexes with hydrophobic compounds to increase bioavailability, thus making CDs ideal drug excipients. Recent studies have also shown that CDs exhibit a wide range of protective effects, preventing proteins from aggregation, degradation, and folding. These effects strongly depend on the binding sites on the protein surface. CDs only exhibit weak interactions with amino acids, however; conventional analytical techniques therefore usually fail to reveal the exact location of the binding sites. Moreover, some studies even suggest that CD inclusion complexes are merely electrostatic adducts. Here, electron capture dissociation (ECD) was applied in this proof-of-concept study to examine the exact nature of the CD/peptide complexes, and CD binding sites were unambiguously located for the first time via Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) tandem mass spectrometry.

  18. Inhibition of 125I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cells by the peptides related to bacterial cell wall mucopeptide precursors: quantitative structure-activity relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) of N-Ac amino acids, N-Ac dipeptides, and N-Ac tripeptides in inhibition of 125I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cell wall have been developed to probe the details of the binding between ristocetin and N-acetylated peptides. The correlation equations indicate that (1) the binding is stronger for peptides in which the side chain of the C-terminal amino acid has a large molar refractivity (MR) value, (2) the binding is weaker for peptides with polar than for those with nonpolar C-terminal side chains, (3) the N-terminal amino acid in N-Ac dipeptides contributes 12 times that of the C-terminal amino acid to binding affinity, and (4) the interactions between ristocetin and the N-terminal amino acid of N-acetyl tripeptides appear to be much weaker than those with the first two amino acids

  19. Intranasal Delivery of NEMO-Binding Domain Peptide Prevents Memory Loss in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangasamy, Suresh B; Corbett, Grant T; Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K; Bennett, David A; Mufson, Elliott J; Ghosh, Sankar; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Despite intense investigations, no effective therapy is available to halt its progression. We found that NF-κB was activated within the hippocampus and cortex of AD subjects and that activated forms of NF-κB negatively correlated with cognitive function monitored by Mini-Mental State Examination and global cognitive z score. Accordingly, NF-κB activation was also observed in the hippocampus of a transgenic (5XFAD) mouse model of AD. It has been shown that peptides corresponding to the NF-κB essential modifier (NEMO)-binding domain (NBD) of IκB kinase α (IKKα) or IκB kinase β (IKKβ) specifically inhibit the induction of NF-κB activation without inhibiting the basal NF-κB activity. Interestingly, after intranasal administration, wild-type NBD peptide entered into the hippocampus, reduced hippocampal activation of NF-κB, suppressed hippocampal microglial activation, lowered the burden of Aβ in the hippocampus, attenuated apoptosis of hippocampal neurons, protected plasticity-related molecules, and improved memory and learning in 5XFAD mice. Mutated NBD peptide had no such protective effect, indicating the specificity of our finding. These results suggest that selective targeting of NF-κB activation by intranasal administration of NBD peptide may be of therapeutic benefit for AD patients. PMID:26401561

  20. Influence of Cysteine and Tryptophan Substitution on DNA-Binding Activity on Maize α-Hairpinin Antimicrobial Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Daniel A; Porto, William F; Silva, Maria Z; da Silva, Tatiane R; Franco, Octávio L

    2016-01-01

    For almost four decades, antimicrobial peptides have been studied, and new classes are being discovered. However, for therapeutic use of these molecules, issues related to the mechanism of action must be answered. In this work, the antimicrobial activity of the hairpinin MBP-1 was studied by the synthesis of two variants, one replacing cysteines and one tryptophan with alanine. Antibacterial activity was abolished in both variants. No membrane disturbance, even in concentrations higher than those required to inhibit the bacteria, was observed in SEM microscopy. The gel retardation assay showed that MBP-1 possesses a higher DNA-binding ability than variants. Finally, molecular modelling showed that the lack of cysteines resulted in structure destabilization and lack of tryptophan resulted in a less flexible peptide, with less solvent assessable surface area, both characteristics that could contribute to absence of activity. In summary, the data here reported add more information about the multiple mechanisms of action of α-hairpinins. PMID:27529210

  1. The Structure of the Amyloid-β Peptide High-Affinity Copper II Binding Site in Alzheimer Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-β (Aβ) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of Aβ-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in Aβ may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of Aβ peptides complexed with Cu2+ in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length Aβ-Cu2+ peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the Aβ-Cu2+ complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu2+ binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to Aβ can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  2. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lakey, E K; Margoliash, E.; Pierce, S K

    1987-01-01

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface ...

  3. Comparison of Functional Protein Transduction Domains Using the NEMO Binding Domain Peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Robbins; Khaleel Khaja

    2010-01-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs), both naturally occurring and synthetic, have been extensively utilized for intracellular delivery of biologically active molecules both in vitro and in vivo. However, most comparisons of transduction efficiency have been performed using fluorescent markers. To compare efficiency of functional protein transduction, a peptide derived from IkB kinase ß (IKKß) that prevents formation of an active IKK complex was used as a biologically active cargo. This peptid...

  4. Cross-competition of somatostatin with vasoactive intestinal peptide for binding to the somatostatin receptor subtype 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Recent studies suggest that a variety of tumor cells express both receptors (R) for somatostatin-14 (SST) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). We have observed cross-competition between SST and VIP for binding to various tumor cells. The present study was conducted to identify the common binding site of SST and VIP. For this purpose, COS-7 cells were transfected with the hSSTR1 through 5 as well as with the hVIPR1 and hVIPR2. 125I-SST, 123I-Tyr3-OCT and 123I-VIP were used as radioligands. A direct binding studies and northern blot analysis were performed. High affinity binding of 125I-SST to hSSTR1, hSSTR2, hSSTR3, hSSTR4 and hSSTR5 was observed. 123I-Tyr3-OCT bound to hSSTR2 and hSSTR5 with high affinity and to hSSTR3 with moderate affinity. 125I-SST as well as 123I-Tyr3-OCT did not bind to hVIPR1 or hVIPR2. In contrast, high affinity binding of 123I-VIP to hVIPR1, hVIPR2 and to hSSTR3, but not to other hSSTR, was detectable. Binding of 125I-SST to hSSTR3 was displaced by unlabeled SST, VIP as well as by Tyr3-OCT. Binding of 123I-VIP to hSSTR3 was inhibited by unlabeled VIP, SST and Tyr3-OCT. Our data provide evidence that the hSSTR3 may act as an acceptor for VIP and is the primary site responsible of cross-competition between 125I-SST and 123I-VIP. (author)

  5. Novel exenatide analogs with peptidic albumin binding domains: potent anti-diabetic agents with extended duration of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odile E Levy

    Full Text Available The design, synthesis and pharmacology of novel long-acting exenatide analogs for the treatment of metabolic diseases are described. These molecules display enhanced pharmacokinetic profile and potent glucoregulatory and weight lowering actions compared to native exenatide. [Leu(14]exenatide-ABD is an 88 residue peptide amide incorporating an Albumin Binding Domain (ABD scaffold. [Leu(14]exenatide-ABP is a 53 residue peptide incorporating a short Albumin Binding Peptide (ABP. [Leu(14]exenatide-ABD and [Leu(14]exenatide-ABP exhibited nanomolar functional GLP-1 receptor potency and were metabolically stable in vitro in human plasma and in a pancreatic digestive enzyme mixture. Both molecules displayed picomolar and nanomolar binding association with albumin across multiple species and circulating half lives of 16 and 11 hours, respectively, post a single IV dose in rats. Unlike exenatide, both molecules elicited robust glucose lowering when injected 1 day prior to an oral glucose tolerance test, indicative of their extended duration of action. [Leu(14]exenatide-ABD was compared to exenatide in a Lep (ob/ob mouse model of diabetes. Twice-weekly subcutaneously dosed [Leu(14]exenatide-ABD displayed superior glucose lowering and weight loss in diabetic mice when compared to continuously infused exenatide at the same total weekly dose. A single oral administration of each molecule via an enteric coated capsule to cynomolgus monkeys showed superior pharmacokinetics for [Leu(14]exenatide-ABD as compared to [Leu(14]exenatide-ABP with detectable exposure longer than 14 days. These studies support the potential use of these novel long acting exenatide analogs with different routes of administration for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  6. Binding stability of peptides derived from 1ALA residue and 7GLY residues to sites near active center of fluctuating papain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the binding stability of peptides derived from 1ALA residue and 7GLY residues to sites near active center of fluctuating papain via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Replacing GLY residue in 8GLY with ALA residue had a positive effect on binding stability to the sites in some cases although the replacing had a negative effect on it in other cases. Furthermore the replacing had a negative effect on the chance of binding to the sites. Residue in peptide should be replaced on the basis of systematic exploration of its position.

  7. Demonstration of a non-Tac peptide that binds interleukin 2: a potential participant in a multichain interleukin 2 receptor complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsudo, M; Kozak, R W; Goldman, C K; Waldmann, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    The interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor system plays a key role in the T-cell immune response. Although IL-2 binding was reported to be restricted to the Tac peptide, we have identified an IL-2 binding peptide that does not react with anti-human IL-2 receptor monoclonal antibodies, including anti-Tac on MLA 144, a gibbon ape T-cell line. The MLA 144 cell line expressed 6800 IL-2 binding sites per cell with a low (Kd = 14 nM) affinity for human recombinant IL-2. Using cross-linking methodology, we d...

  8. Autoradiographic localization of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) binding sites in human and guinea pig lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    125I-Human calcitonin gene-related peptide (hCGRP) binding sites were localized in human and guinea pig lungs by an autoradiographic method. Scatchard analysis of saturation experiments from slide-mounted sections of guinea pig lung displayed specific 125I-hCGRP binding sites with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.72 +/- 0.05 nM (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3) and a maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 133.4 +/- 5.6 fmol/mg protein. In both human and guinea pig lung, autoradiography revealed that CGRP binding sites were widely distributed, with particularly dense labeling over bronchial and pulmonary blood vessels of all sizes and alveolar walls. Airway smooth muscle and epithelium of large airways was sparsely labeled but no labeling was found over submucosal glands. This localization corresponds well to the reported pattern of CGRP-like immunoreactive innervation. The findings of localization of CGRP binding sites on bronchial and pulmonary blood vessels indicate that CGRP may be important in the regulation of airway and pulmonary blood flow

  9. The Peptide Vaccine Combined with Prior Immunization of a Conventional Diphtheria-Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Induced Amyloid β Binding Antibodies on Cynomolgus Monkeys and Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of brain amyloid beta (Aβ peptides by anti-Aβ antibodies is one of the possible therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported that the Aβ peptide vaccine including the T-cell epitope of diphtheria-tetanus combined toxoid (DT induced anti-Aβ antibodies, and the prior immunization with conventional DT vaccine enhanced the immunogenicity of the peptide. Cynomolgus monkeys were given the peptide vaccine subcutaneously in combination with the prior DT vaccination. Vaccination with a similar regimen was also performed on guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine induced anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs without chemical adjuvants, and excessive immune responses were not observed. Those antibodies could preferentially recognize Aβ40, and Aβ42 compared to Aβ fibrils. The levels of serum anti-Aβ antibodies and plasma Aβ peptides increased in both animals and decreased the brain Aβ40 level of guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine could induce a similar binding profile of anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs. The peptide vaccination could be expected to reduce the brain Aβ peptides and their toxic effects via clearance of Aβ peptides by generated antibodies.

  10. Strains of Actinomyces naeslundii and Actinomyces viscosus Exhibit Structurally Variant Fimbrial Subunit Proteins and Bind to Different Peptide Motifs in Salivary Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tong; Johansson, Ingegerd; Hay, Donald I.; Strömberg, Nicklas

    1999-01-01

    Oral strains of Actinomyces spp. express type 1 fimbriae, which are composed of major FimP subunits, and bind preferentially to salivary acidic proline-rich proteins (APRPs) or to statherin. We have mapped genetic differences in the fimP subunit genes and the peptide recognition motifs within the host proteins associated with these differential binding specificities. The fimP genes were amplified by PCR from Actinomyces viscosus ATCC 19246, with preferential binding to statherin, and from Act...

  11. Enhanced striatial 3H-spiroperidol binding induced by chronic haloperidol treatment inhibited by peptides administered during the withdrawal phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic intragastric administration of haloperidol (1.5 mg/kg/day) for 21 days followed by a 3-day withdrawal period resulted in the development of enhanced locomotor activity response to apomorphine, and an increase in the number of binding sites for 3H-spiroperidol in the striatal membranes of the rat brain. Subcutaneous administration of Pro-Leu-Gly-NH2 or cyclo-(Leu-Gly) in doses of 2 mg/kg/day given for 3-days after termination of haloperidol treatment inhibited the enhanced response to apomorphine, as well as the increases in the number of 3H-spiroperidol binding sites in the striatum. If indeed, the supersensitivity of striatal dopamine receptors is one of the mechanisms in the development of tardive dyskinesia symptoms, the present results suggest that the above peptides may be helpful in ameliorating some of the symptoms of tardive dyskinesia induced by neuroleptic drugs. 31 references, 3 figures

  12. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of Cy5.5 conjugated epidermal growth factor receptor binding peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a tyrosine kinase receptor and plays an important role in carcinogenesis. In this study, the epidermal growth factor receptor binding peptide (EGBP) was identified using a phage display method and evaluated in U87MG cells in order to investigate the possibility to target the EGFR using an optical imaging system. Cyanine dye 5.5 (Cy5.5) was conjugated with EGBP-GGG-SC, EGBP-AOC-SC, and EGBP-AM2BA-SC. Cellular binding study of EGBP-Linker-Cy5.5 conjugates or 125I-EGBP-Linker compounds was performed in U87MG cells. Optical imaging studies were performed in U87MG bearing mice. Three of seven clones from the 12-mer peptide library showed a specific binding affinity to rhEGFR, and they encoded the same 12 amino acid peptide sequence, FPMFNHWEQWPP. Confocal images show that the fluorescent signal of EGBP-Linker-Cy5.5 conjugates was decreased in the order: EGBP-AOC-Cy5.5≫EGBP-AM2BA-Cy5.5>EGBP-GGG-Cy5.5. EGBP-AOC-Cy5.5 appeared in cell cytoplasm and surface, and it was inhibited by free EGBP apparently. The cellular binding of EGBP-AOC-Cy5.5 exhibited a higher average radiance value than EGBP-GGG-Cy5.5 and EGBP-AM2BA-Cy5.5. Among various 125I-EGBP-Linker compounds, EGBP-GGG showed a higher binding than other compounds. However, uptake of 125I-EGBP-AOC was clearly inhibited by free EGBP in inhibition study. In an in vivo study, the fluorescent signal of EGBP-AOC-Cy5.5 treated mouse was mainly detected in the tumor and kidney. Among the three derivatives, EGBP-AOC-Cy5.5 was the optimized optical imaging agent for U87MG EGFR positive tumors in the animal model. This study demonstrated the EGBP-Linker-Cy5.5 conjugates may be useful as a potential EGFR target optical probe.

  13. Prion Fragment Peptides Are Digested with Membrane Type Matrix Metalloproteinases and Acquire Enzyme Resistance through Cu2+-Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Kojima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Prions are the cause of neurodegenerative disease in humans and other mammals. The structural conversion of the prion protein (PrP from a normal cellular protein (PrPC to a protease-resistant isoform (PrPSc is thought to relate to Cu2+ binding to histidine residues. In this study, we focused on the membrane-type matrix metalloproteinases (MT-MMPs such as MT1-MMP and MT3-MMP, which are expressed in the brain as PrPC-degrading proteases. We synthesized 21 prion fragment peptides. Each purified peptide was individually incubated with recombinant MT1-MMP or MT3-MMP in the presence or absence of Cu2+ and the cleavage sites determined by LC-ESI-MS analysis. Recombinant MMP-7 and human serum (HS were also tested as control. hPrP61-90, from the octapeptide-repeat region, was cleaved by HS but not by the MMPs tested here. On the other hand, hPrP92-168 from the central region was cleaved by MT1-MMP and MT3-MMP at various sites. These cleavages were inhibited by treatment with Cu2+. The C-terminal peptides had higher resistance than the central region. The data obtained from this study suggest that MT-MMPs expressed in the brain might possess PrPC-degrading activity.

  14. A peptide that binds the pea aphid gut impedes entry of Pea enation mosaic virus into the aphid hemocoel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of ways to block virus transmission by aphids could lead to novel and broad-spectrum means of controlling plant viruses. Viruses in the Luteoviridae enhanced are obligately transmitted by aphids in a persistent manner that requires virion accumulation in the aphid hemocoel. To enter the hemocoel, the virion must bind and traverse the aphid gut epithelium. By screening a phage display library, we identified a 12-residue gut binding peptide (GBP3.1) that binds to the midgut and hindgut of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Binding was confirmed by labeling the aphid gut with a GBP3.1-green fluorescent protein fusion. GBP3.1 reduced uptake of Pea enation mosaic virus (Luteoviridae) from the pea aphid gut into the hemocoel. GBP3.1 also bound to the gut epithelia of the green peach aphid and the soybean aphid. These results suggest a novel strategy for inhibiting plant virus transmission by at least three major aphid pest species.

  15. PEGylated nanoparticles bind to and alter amyloid-beta peptide conformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brambilla, Davide; Verpillot, Romain; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin;

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona of long-circulating polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) favors interaction with the amyloid-beta (Aß(1-42)) peptide both in solution and in serum. The influence of PEGylation of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) and poly(lactic acid) NPs on the...

  16. Characterization of Protein and Peptide Binding to Nanogels Formed by Differently Charged Chitosan Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Zubareva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (Chi is a natural biodegradable cationic polymer with remarkable potency as a vehicle for drug or vaccine delivery. Chi possesses multiple groups, which can be used both for Chi derivatization and for particle formation. The aim of this work was to produce stable nanosized range Chi gels (nanogels, NGs with different charge and to study the driving forces of complex formation between Chi NGs and proteins or peptides. Positively charged NGs of 150 nm in diameter were prepared from hexanoyl chitosan (HC by the ionotropic gelation method while negatively charged NGs of 190 nm were obtained from succinoyl Chi (SC by a Ca2+ coacervation approach. NGs were loaded with a panel of proteins or peptides with different weights and charges. We show that NGs preferentially formed complexes with oppositely charged molecules, especially peptides, as was demonstrated by gel-electrophoresis, confocal microscopy and HPLC. Complex formation was accompanied by a change in zeta-potential and decrease in size. We concluded that complex formation between Chi NGs and peptide/proteins is mediated mostly by electrostatic interactions.

  17. NMR characterization of the DNA binding properties of a novel Hoechst 33258 analogue peptide building block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; Behrens, Carsten; Jacobsen, Jens Peter

    2002-01-01

    ')(2). Chemical shift footprinting shows that the ligand binds at the center of the A(3)T(3) sequence but at the 3'-end of A(5). A large number of NOEs show a well-defined complex with the ligand situated at the center of the palindromic A(3)T(3) but with the asymmetric A(5) the ligand binds with an orientational...

  18. Computational Exploration of a Protein Receptor Binding Space with Student Proposed Peptide Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew D.; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W.; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M.

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective "in silico" method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The…

  19. A computational docking study on the pH dependence of peptide binding to HLA-B27 sub-types differentially associated with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serçinoğlu, Onur; Özcan, Gülin; Kabaş, Zeynep Kutlu; Ozbek, Pemra

    2016-07-01

    A single amino acid difference (Asp116His), having a key role in a pathogenesis pathway, distinguishes HLA-B*27:05 and HLA-B*27:09 sub-types as associated and non-associated with ankylosing spondylitis, respectively. In this study, molecular docking simulations were carried out with the aim of comprehending the differences in the binding behavior of both alleles at varying pH conditions. A library of modeled peptides was formed upon single point mutations aiming to address the effect of 20 naturally occurring amino acids at the binding core peptide positions. For both alleles, computational docking was applied using Autodock 4.2. Obtained free energies of binding (FEB) were compared within the peptide library and between the alleles at varying pH conditions. The amino acid preferences of each position were studied enlightening the role of each on binding. The preferred amino acids for each position of pVIPR were found to be harmonious with experimental studies. Our results indicate that, as the pH is lowered, the capacity of HLA-B*27:05 to bind peptides in the library is largely lost. Hydrogen bonding analysis suggests that the interaction between the main anchor positions of pVIPR and their respective binding pocket residues are affected from the pH the most, causing an overall shift in the FEB profiles. PMID:27506766

  20. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Studies of the Binding of a Rationally Designed Analogue of the Antimicrobial Peptide Gramicidin S to Phospholipid Bilayer Membranes†

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Thomas; Lewis, Ruthven N. A. H.; Hodges, Robert S.; McElhaney, Ronald N.

    2005-01-01

    The binding of the positively charged antimicrobial peptide cyclo[VKLdKVdYPLKVKLdYP] (GS14dK4) to various lipid bilayer model membranes was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry. GS14dK4 is a diastereomeric lysine ring-size analogue of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S which exhibits enhanced antimicrobial and markedly reduced hemolytic activities compared with GS itself. Large unilamellar vesicles composed of various zwitterionic (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-s...

  1. Structure-Function Analysis of the Glioma Targeting NFL-TBS.40-63 Peptide Corresponding to the Tubulin-Binding Site on the Light Neurofilament Subunit

    OpenAIRE

    Berges, Raphael; Balzeau, Julien; Takahashi, Masayuki; Prevost, Chantal; Eyer, Joel

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that a 24 amino acid peptide (NFL-TBS.40-63) corresponding to the tubulin-binding site located on the light neurofilament subunit, selectively enters in glioblastoma cells where it disrupts their microtubule network and inhibits their proliferation. Here, we analyzed the structure-function relationships using an alanine-scanning strategy, in order to identify residues essential for these biological activities. We showed that the majority of modified peptides present a d...

  2. NetMHCpan, a method for quantitative predictions of peptide binding to any HLA-A and -B locus protein of known sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Blicher, Thomas;

    2007-01-01

    surpassed 1500. Characterizing the specificity of each separately would be a major undertaking. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have drawn on a large database of known peptide-HLA-I interactions to develop a bioinformatics method, which takes both peptide and HLA sequence information into account, and...... generates quantitative predictions of the affinity of any peptide-HLA-I interaction. Prospective experimental validation of peptides predicted to bind to previously untested HLA-I molecules, cross-validation, and retrospective prediction of known HIV immune epitopes and endogenous presented peptides, all...... provide new basic insights into HLA structure-function relationships. The method is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCpan....

  3. A synthetic peptide with the putative iron binding motif of amyloid precursor protein (APP does not catalytically oxidize iron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Honarmand Ebrahimi

    Full Text Available The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP, which is a key player in Alzheimer's disease, was recently reported to possess an Fe(II binding site within its E2 domain which exhibits ferroxidase activity [Duce et al. 2010, Cell 142: 857]. The putative ligands of this site were compared to those in the ferroxidase site of ferritin. The activity was indirectly measured using transferrin, which scavenges the Fe(III product of the reaction. A 22-residue synthetic peptide, named FD1, with the putative ferroxidase site of APP, and the E2 domain of APP were each reported to exhibit 40% of the ferroxidase activity of APP and of ceruloplasmin. It was also claimed that the ferroxidase activity of APP is inhibited by Zn(II just as in ferritin. We measured the ferroxidase activity indirectly (i by the incorporation of the Fe(III product of the ferroxidase reaction into transferrin and directly (ii by monitoring consumption of the substrate molecular oxygen. The results with the FD1 peptide were compared to the established ferroxidase activities of human H-chain ferritin and of ceruloplasmin. For FD1 we observed no activity above the background of non-enzymatic Fe(II oxidation by molecular oxygen. Zn(II binds to transferrin and diminishes its Fe(III incorporation capacity and rate but it does not specifically bind to a putative ferroxidase site of FD1. Based on these results, and on comparison of the putative ligands of the ferroxidase site of APP with those of ferritin, we conclude that the previously reported results for ferroxidase activity of FD1 and - by implication - of APP should be re-evaluated.

  4. Molecular design of specific metal-binding peptide sequences from protein fragments: Theory and Experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Milan; Svatoš, A.; Buděšínský, Miloš; Muck, A.; Bauer, M. C.; Kotrba, P.; Ruml, T.; Havlas, Zdeněk; Linse, S.; Rulíšek, Lubomír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 26 (2008), s. 7836-7846. ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA MŠk 1M0508 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : ab initio calculations * massspectrometry * metal-ion chelation * molecular design * peptides Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.454, year: 2008

  5. SR-A and SREC-I binding peptides increase HDAd-mediated liver transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Pasquale; Annunziata, Patrizia; Mithbaokar, Pratibha; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors can mediate long-term, high-level transgene expression from transduced hepatocytes without inducing chronic toxicity. However, vector therapeutic index is narrow because of a toxic acute response with potentially lethal consequences elicited by high vector doses. Kupffer cells and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are major barriers to efficient hepatocyte transduction. We investigated two small peptides (PP1 and PP2) developed by phage display to block scavenger receptor type A (SR-A) and scavenger receptor expressed on endothelial cells type I (SREC-I) respectively, for enhancement of HDAd-mediated hepatocyte transduction efficiency. Pre-incubation of J774A.1 macrophages with either PP1 or PP2 prior to HDAd infection significantly reduced viral vector uptake. In vivo, fluorochrome-conjugated PP1 and PP2 injected intravenously into mice co-localized with both CD68 and CD31 on Kupffer cells and LSECs, respectively. Compared to saline pre-treated animals, intravenous injections of both peptides prior to the injection of an HDAd resulted in up to 3.7- and 2.9-fold increase of hepatic transgene expression with PP1 and PP2, respectively. In addition to hepatocyte transduction, compared to control saline injected mice, pre-treatment with either peptide resulted in no increased levels of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), the major marker of adenoviral vector acute toxicity. In summary, we developed small peptides that significantly increase hepatocyte transduction efficacy and improve HDAd therapeutic index with potential for clinical applications. PMID:25119377

  6. A β-hairpin structure in a 13-mer peptide that binds α-bungarotoxin with high affinity and neutralizes its toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Scherf, Tali; Kasher, Roni; Balass, Moshe; Fridkin, Mati; Fuchs, Sara; Katchalski-Katzir, Ephraim

    2001-01-01

    Snake-venom α-bungarotoxin is a member of the α-neurotoxin family that binds with very high affinity to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the neuromuscular junction. The structure of the complex between α-bungarotoxin and a 13-mer peptide (WRYYESSLEPYPD) that binds the toxin with high affinity, thus inhibiting its interactions with AChR with an IC50 of 2 nM, has been solved by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The bound peptide folds into a β-hairpin structure crea...

  7. Artificial 64-Residue HIV-1 Enhancer-Binding Peptide Is a Potent Inhibitor of Viral Replication in HIV-1-Infected Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mouhssin Oufir; Bisset, Leslie R.; Hoffmann, Stefan R. K.; Gongda Xue; Stephan Klauser; Bianca Bergamaschi; Alain Gervaix; Jürg Böni; Jörg Schüpbach; Bernd Gutte

    2011-01-01

    An artificial HIV-1 enhancer-binding peptide was extended by nine consecutive arginine residues at the C-terminus and by the nuclear localization signal of SV40 large T antigen at the N-terminus. The resulting synthetic 64-residue peptide was found to bind to the two enhancers of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, cross the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope of human cells, and suppress the HIV-1 enhancer-controlled expression of a green fluorescent protein reporter gene. Moreover, HIV-1 r...

  8. Immunohistochemical localization of the calcitonin gene-related peptide binding site in the primate trigeminovascular system using functional antagonist antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Silke; Liu, Hantao; Warfvinge, Karin; Shi, Licheng; Dovlatyan, Mary; Xu, Cen; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-07-22

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent vasodilator and a neuromodulator implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. It binds to the extracellular domains of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP) 1 that together form the CGRP receptor. Antagonist antibodies against CGRP and its binding site at the receptor are clinically effective in preventing migraine attacks. The blood-brain barrier penetration of these antagonist antibodies is limited, suggesting that a potential peripheral site of action is sufficient to prevent migraine attacks. To further understand the sites of CGRP-mediated signaling in migraine, we used immunohistochemical staining with recently developed antagonist antibodies specifically recognizing a fusion protein of the extracellular domains of RAMP1 and CLR that comprise the CGRP binding pocket at the CGRP receptor in monkey and man. We confirmed binding of the antagonist antibodies to human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of dural meningeal arteries and neurons in the trigeminal ganglion, both of which are likely sites of action for therapeutic antibodies in migraine patients. We further used one of these antibodies for detailed mapping on cynomolgus monkey tissue and found antagonist antibody binding sites at multiple levels in the trigeminovascular system: in the dura mater VSMCs, in neurons and satellite glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion, and in neurons in the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis. These data reinforce and clarify our understanding of CGRP receptor localization in a pattern consistent with a role for CGRP receptors in trigeminal sensitization and migraine pathology. PMID:27155150

  9. Plasticity in the contribution of T cell receptor variable region residues to binding of peptide-HLA-A2 complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheena N.; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Blevins, Sydney J.; Bernhard, Helga; Uckert, Wolfgang; Baker, Brian M.; Kranz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    One hypothesis to account for MHC-restriction by T cell receptors (TCRs) holds that there are several evolutionary-conserved residues in TCR variable regions that contact MHC. While this ‘germline-codon’ hypothesis is supported by various lines of evidence, it has been difficult to test. The difficulty stems in part from the fact that TCRs exhibit low affinities for pep/MHC, thus limiting the range of binding energies that can be assigned to these key interactions using mutational analyses. To measure the magnitude of binding energies involved, here we used high-affinity TCRs engineered by mutagenesis of CDR3. The TCRs included a high-affinity, MART-1/HLA-A2-specific single-chain TCR and two other high-affinity TCRs that all contain the same Vα (HLA-A2), with different peptides and Vβ regions. Mutational analysis of residues in CDR1 and CDR2 of the three Vα2 regions showed the importance of the key ‘germline codon” residue Y51. However, two other proposed key residues showed significant differences among the TCRs in their relative contributions to binding. Using single-position, yeast-display libraries in two of the key residues, MART-1/HLA-A2 selections also revealed strong preferences for wild-type ‘germline codon’ residues, but several alternative residues could also accommodate binding and hence, MHC-restriction. Thus, although a single residue (Y51) could account for a proportion of the energy associated with positive selection (i.e. MHC-restriction), there is significant plasticity in requirements for particular side-chains in CDR1 and CDR2 and in their relative binding contributions among different TCRs. PMID:23954306

  10. Bacterial cell-cell communication in the host via RRNPP peptide-binding regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePerez-Pascual

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human microbiomes are composed of complex and dense bacterial consortia. In these environments, bacteria are able to react quickly to change by coordinating their gene expression at the population level via small signaling molecules. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication is mostly mediated by peptides that are released into the extracellular environment. Cell-cell communication based on these peptides is especially widespread in the group Firmicutes, in which they regulate a wide array of biological processes, including functions related to host-microbe interactions. Among the different agents of communication, the RRNPP family of cytoplasmic transcriptional regulators, together with their cognate re-internalized signaling peptides, represents a group of emerging importance. RRNPP members that have been studied so far are found mainly in species of bacilli, streptococci, and enterococci. These bacteria are characterized as both human commensal and pathogenic, and share different niches in the human body with other microorganisms. The goal of this mini-review is to present the current state of research on the biological relevance of RRNPP mechanisms in the context of the host, highlighting their specific roles in commensalism or virulence.

  11. Enhanced peptide nucleic acid binding to supercoiled DNA: possible implications for DNA "breathing" dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentin, T; Nielsen, Peter E.

    1996-01-01

    efficient with supercoiled than with linear DNA. In the presence of 140 mM KCI, the PNA binding rate was reduced but, notably, highly dependent on template topology. Negative supercoiling (mean superhelix density, sigma approximately -0.051) increased the rate of binding by 2 orders of magnitude compared...... to that of relaxed DNA. The pseudo-first-order rate constant [k psi (sigma)] obeys an exponential function, k psi (sigma) = k psi (lin)e-sigma delta, where delta is a constant of 105 and k psi lin is the rate of PNA binding to linear DNA (sigma = 0). The activation energy [Ea(sigma)] was determined as approximately...... 93 and approximately 48 kJ mol-1 for PNA binding to linear and supercoiled DNA, respectively. The results are discussed in relation to the possible future use of PNA as an antigene agent and in the framework of DNA "breathing" dynamics....

  12. Potent inhibition of the classical pathway of complement by a novel C1q-binding peptide derived from the human astrovirus coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronemus, Jenny Q; Hair, Pamela S; Crawford, Katrina B; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K

    2010-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratories has demonstrated that purified, recombinant human astrovirus coat protein (HAstV CP) binds C1q and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, respectively. Analysis of the 787 amino acid CP molecule revealed that residues 79-139 share limited sequence homology with human neutrophil defensin-1 (HNP-1), a molecule previously demonstrated to bind C1q and MBL, inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, respectively. A 30 amino acid peptide derived from this region of the CP molecule competitively inhibited the binding of wild-type CP to C1q. The parent peptide and various derivatives were subsequently assayed for C1q binding, inhibition of C1 and C4 activation as well as suppression of complement activation in hemolytic assays. The parent peptide and several derivatives inhibited complement activation in these functional assays to varying degrees. One peptide derivative in particular (E23A) displayed superior inhibition of complement activation in multiple assays of classical complement pathway activation. Further analysis revealed homology to a plant defensin allowing development of a proposed structural model for E23A. Based upon these findings, we hypothesize that further rationale optimization of E23A may result in a promising therapeutic inhibitor for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in which dysregulated activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:20728940

  13. Comparison of the binding and internalization properties of 12 DOTA-coupled and {sup 111}In-labelled CCK2/gastrin receptor binding peptides: a collaborative project under COST Action BM0607

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aloj, Luigi; Aurilio, Michela; Rinaldi, Valentina; D' Ambrosio, Laura [Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Fondazione ' ' G. Pascale' ' , AF Medicina Nucleare, Naples (Italy); Tesauro, Diego [Universita ' ' Federico II' ' , CIRPeB, Naples (Italy); Peitl, Petra Kolenc [University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Maina, Theodosia [National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Molecular Radiopharmacy, Institute of Radioisotopes-Radiodiagnostic Products, Athens (Greece); Mansi, Rosalba [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Guggenberg, Elisabeth von [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Joosten, Lieke [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Institute of Cancer, Barts and the London Queen Mary' s School of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Molecular Oncology and Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Breeman, W.A.P.; Blois, Erik de; Koelewijn, Stuart; Melis, Marleen; Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Waser, Beatrice; Beetschen, Karin; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    Specific overexpression of cholecystokinin 2 (CCK2)/gastrin receptors has been demonstrated in several tumours of neuroendocrine origin. In some of these cancer types, such as medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), a sensitive diagnostic modality is still unavailable and therapeutic options for inoperable lesions are needed. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) may be a viable therapeutic strategy in the management of these patients. Several CCK2R-targeted radiopharmaceuticals have been described in recent years. As part of the European Union COST Action BM0607 we studied the in vitro and in vivo characteristics of 12 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated CCK2R binding peptides. In the present study, we analysed binding and internalization characteristics. Stability, biodistribution and imaging studies have been performed in parallel by other centres involved in the project. Determination of IC{sub 50} values was performed using autoradiography, with DOTA-peptides displacing {sup 125}I-CCK from receptors on tissue sections from human tumours. Saturation binding and internalization experiments were performed using {sup 111}In-labelled peptides. The rat AR42J cell line and the human A431-CCK2R transfected cell line were utilized for in vitro experiments; dissociation constants (K{sub d}) and apparent number of binding sites (B{sub max}) were determined. Internalization was determined in receptor-expressing cells by incubating with tracer amounts of peptide at 37 and 4 C for different times up to 120 min. Surface-bound peptide was then stripped either by acid wash or subsequent incubation with 1 {mu}M unlabelled peptide at 4 C. All peptides showed high receptor affinity with IC{sub 50} values ranging from 0.2 to 3.4 nM. Saturation experiments also showed high affinity with K{sub d} values in the 10{sup -9}-10{sup -8} M range. B{sub max} values estimated in A431-CCK2R cells ranged from 0.6 to 2.2 x 10{sup 6} per cell. All peptides

  14. Ligand binding and activation mechanism og the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underwood, Christina Rye

    In recent years, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have become important drug targets, which makes elucidation of their molecular structure and functional domains increasingly important for designing new and better therapeutic agents. The Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a GPCR. Its...... molecule-mediated activation of GLP-1R (Study II). A fully functional, cysteine-deprived and Cterminally truncated GLP-1R is developed and characterised in Study III. In Study IV, a cAMP biosensor is used to investigate the cAMP kinetics of GLP-1R upon stimulation with different receptor agonists...

  15. Dataset size and composition impact the reliability of performance benchmarks for peptide-MHC binding predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yohan; Sidney, John; Buus, Søren;

    2014-01-01

    cross-validation, in which all available data are iteratively split into training and testing data, and the use of blind sets generated separately from the data used to construct the predictive method. In the present study, we have compared cross-validated prediction performances generated on our last...... presence of similar peptides in the cross-validation dataset. Rather, we found that small size and low sequence/affinity diversity of either training or blind datasets were associated with large differences in cross-validated vs. blind prediction performances. We use these findings to derive quantitative...

  16. Comprehensive Analysis of Contributions from Protein Conformational Stability and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Peptide Binding Affinity to CD4+ Epitope Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tingfeng; Steede, N. Kalaya; Nguyen, Hong-Nam P.; Freytag, Lucy C.; McLachlan, James B.; Mettu, Ramgopal R.; Robinson, James E.; Landry, Samuel J.

    2014-01-01

    Helper T-cell epitope dominance in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is not adequately explained by peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Antigen processing potentially influences epitope dominance, but few, if any, studies have attempted to reconcile the influences of antigen processing and MHC protein binding for all helper T-cell epitopes of an antigen. Epitopes of gp120 identified in both humans and mice occur on the C-te...

  17. Effects of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides upon cyclic GMP levels, potassium transport, and receptor binding in rat astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumont, K.; Tan, P.K. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The ability of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) to alter cyclic GMP levels and NaKCl cotransport in rat neocortical astrocytes was determined. At concentrations of 10(-9)-10(-6) M, rat ANP99-126 (rANF), rat ANP102-126 (auriculin B), and rat ANP103-126 (atriopeptin III) stimulated 6- to 100-fold increases in cyclic GMP levels. Porcine BNP (pBNP) and rat BNP (rBNP) were 20%-90% as effective as rANF over most of this concentration range, although 10(-6) M pBNP produced a greater effect than rANF. NaKCl cotransport as measured by bumetanide-sensitive 86Rb+ influx was not altered by exposure of astrocytes to 10(-6)M rANF, pBNP, or rBNP. Both pBNP and rBNP, as well as rat ANP103-123 (atriopeptin I) and des(gl18, ser19, gly20, leu21, gly22) ANF4-23-NH2 (C-ANF4-23) strongly competed for specific 125I-rANF binding sites in astrocyte membranes with affinities ranging from 0.03 to 0.4 nM, suggesting that virtually all binding sites measured at subnanomolar concentrations of 125I-rANF were of the ANP-C (ANF-R2) receptor subtype. These receptors are thought to serve a clearance function and may be linked to a guanylate cyclase activity that is chemically and pharmacologically distinct from that coupled to ANP-A (ANF-R1) receptors. ANP receptors on astrocytes may function in limiting the access of ANP and BNP to neurons involved in body fluid and cardiovascular regulation.

  18. Effects of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides upon cyclic GMP levels, potassium transport, and receptor binding in rat astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) to alter cyclic GMP levels and NaKCl cotransport in rat neocortical astrocytes was determined. At concentrations of 10(-9)-10(-6) M, rat ANP99-126 (rANF), rat ANP102-126 (auriculin B), and rat ANP103-126 (atriopeptin III) stimulated 6- to 100-fold increases in cyclic GMP levels. Porcine BNP (pBNP) and rat BNP (rBNP) were 20%-90% as effective as rANF over most of this concentration range, although 10(-6) M pBNP produced a greater effect than rANF. NaKCl cotransport as measured by bumetanide-sensitive 86Rb+ influx was not altered by exposure of astrocytes to 10(-6)M rANF, pBNP, or rBNP. Both pBNP and rBNP, as well as rat ANP103-123 (atriopeptin I) and des[gl18, ser19, gly20, leu21, gly22] ANF4-23-NH2 (C-ANF4-23) strongly competed for specific 125I-rANF binding sites in astrocyte membranes with affinities ranging from 0.03 to 0.4 nM, suggesting that virtually all binding sites measured at subnanomolar concentrations of 125I-rANF were of the ANP-C (ANF-R2) receptor subtype. These receptors are thought to serve a clearance function and may be linked to a guanylate cyclase activity that is chemically and pharmacologically distinct from that coupled to ANP-A (ANF-R1) receptors. ANP receptors on astrocytes may function in limiting the access of ANP and BNP to neurons involved in body fluid and cardiovascular regulation

  19. Conformational and thermodynamic properties of peptide binding to the human S100P protein

    OpenAIRE

    Gribenko, Alexey V.; Guzmán-Casado, Mercedes; Lopez, Maria M.; Makhatadze, George I.

    2002-01-01

    S100P is a member of the S100 subfamily of calcium-binding proteins that are believed to be associated with various diseases, and in particular deregulation of S100P expression has been documented for prostate and breast cancer. Previously, we characterized the effects of metal binding on the conformational properties of S100P and proposed that S100P could function as a Ca2+ conformational switch. In this study we used fluorescence and CD spectroscopies and isothermal titration calorimetry to...

  20. A thermodynamic study of peptides binding to carbon nanotubes based on a hydrophobic-polar lattice model using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are outstanding novel materials that have great potential for a variety of chemical and biomedical applications. However, the mechanism of their interactions with biomaterials is still not fully understood, and more insightful research work is needed. In this work, we use the 2D hydrophobic-polar lattice model and the Monte Carlo simulation method to study the interactions between model peptides and CNTs. The energy parameters of the coarse-grained lattice model are qualitatively determined based on experimental data and molecular dynamics simulation results. Our model is capable of reproducing the essential phenomena of peptides folding in bulk water and binding to CNTs, as well as providing new insights into the thermodynamics and conformational properties of peptides interacting with nanotubes. The results suggest that both the internal energy and the peptide conformational entropy contribute to the binding process. Upon binding to the CNTs, peptides generally unfold into their denatured structures before they reach the lowest-accessible energy states of the system. Temperature has a significant influence on the adsorption process

  1. Primary structure of the 175K Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding antigen and identification of a peptide which elicits antibodies that inhibit malaria merozoite invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, B K; Orlandi, P A; Haynes, J D; Klotz, F W; Carter, J M; Camus, D; Zegans, M E; Chulay, J D

    1990-11-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum gene encoding erythrocyte binding antigen-175 (EBA-175), a putative receptor for red cell invasion (Camus, D., and T. J. Hadley. 1985. Science (Wash. DC). 230:553-556.), has been isolated and characterized. DNA sequencing demonstrated a single open reading frame encoding a translation product of 1,435 amino acid residues. Peptides corresponding to regions on the deduced amino acid sequence predicted to be B cell epitopes were assessed for immunogenicity. Immunization of mice and rabbits with EBA-peptide 4, a synthetic peptide encompassing amino acid residues 1,062-1,103, produced antibodies that recognized P. falciparum merozoites in an indirect fluorescent antibody assay. When compared to sera from rabbits immunized with the same adjuvant and carrier protein, sera from rabbits immunized with EBA-peptide 4 inhibited merozoite invasion of erythrocytes in vitro by 80% at a 1:5 dilution. Furthermore, these sera inhibited the binding of purified, authentic EBA-175 to erythrocytes, suggesting that their activity in inhibiting merozoite invasion of erythrocytes is mediated by blocking the binding of EBA-175 to erythrocytes. Since the nucleotide sequence of EBA-peptide 4 is conserved among seven strains of P. falciparum from throughout the world (Sim, B. K. L. 1990. Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 41:293-296.), these data identify a region of the protein that should be a focus of vaccine development efforts. PMID:2229177

  2. Structural and computational analysis of peptide recognition mechanism of class-C type penicillin binding protein, alkaline D-peptidase from Bacillus cereus DF4-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shogo; Okazaki, Seiji; Ishitsubo, Erika; Kawahara, Nobuhiro; Komeda, Hidenobu; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline D-peptidase from Bacillus cereus DF4-B, called ADP, is a D-stereospecific endopeptidase reacting with oligopeptides containing D-phenylalanine (D-Phe) at N-terminal penultimate residue. ADP has attracted increasing attention because it is useful as a catalyst for synthesis of D-Phe oligopeptides or, with the help of substrate mimetics, L-amino acid peptides and proteins. Structure and functional analysis of ADP is expected to elucidate molecular mechanism of ADP. In this study, the crystal structure of ADP (apo) form was determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The fold of ADP is similar to that of the class C penicillin-binding proteins of type-AmpH. Docking simulations and fragment molecular orbital analyses of two peptides, (D-Phe)4 and (D-Phe)2-(L-Phe)2, with the putative substrate binding sites of ADP indicated that the P1 residue of the peptide interacts with hydrophobic residues at the S1 site of ADP. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation of ADP for 50 nsec suggested that the ADP forms large cavity at the active site. Formation of the cavity suggested that the ADP has open state in the solution. For the ADP, having the open state is convenient to bind the peptides having bulky side chain, such as (D-Phe)4. Taken together, we predicted peptide recognition mechanism of ADP. PMID:26370172

  3. Characterisation of peptide microarrays for studying antibody-antigen binding using surface plasmon resonance imagery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Nogues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-specific binding to biosensor surfaces is a major obstacle to quantitative analysis of selective retention of analytes at immobilized target molecules. Although a range of chemical antifouling monolayers has been developed to address this problem, many macromolecular interactions still remain refractory to analysis due to the prevalent high degree of non-specific binding. We describe how we use the dynamic process of the formation of self assembling monolayers and optimise physical and chemical properties thus reducing considerably non-specific binding and allowing analysis of specific binding of analytes to immobilized target molecules. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We illustrate this approach by the production of specific protein arrays for the analysis of interactions between the 65kDa isoform of human glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65 and a human monoclonal antibody. Our data illustrate that we have effectively eliminated non-specific interactions with the surface containing the immobilised GAD65 molecules. The findings have several implications. First, this approach obviates the dubious process of background subtraction and gives access to more accurate kinetic and equilibrium values that are no longer contaminated by multiphase non-specific binding. Second, an enhanced signal to noise ratio increases not only the sensitivity but also confidence in the use of SPR to generate kinetic constants that may then be inserted into van't Hoff type analyses to provide comparative DeltaG, DeltaS and DeltaH values, making this an efficient, rapid and competitive alternative to ITC measurements used in drug and macromolecular-interaction mechanistic studies. Third, the accuracy of the measurements allows the application of more intricate interaction models than simple Langmuir monophasic binding. CONCLUSIONS: The detection and measurement of antibody binding by the type 1 diabetes autoantigen GAD65 represents an example of an antibody

  4. Delivery of RANKL-Binding Peptide OP3-4 Promotes BMP-2-Induced Maxillary Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, T; Mise-Omata, S; Matsui, M; Tabata, Y; Murali, R; Miyashin, M; Aoki, K

    2016-06-01

    Although bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) is known to stimulate osteogenesis, there is evidence that high doses of BMP-2 can lead to side effects, including inflammation and carcinogenesis. The supplementation of other bone-augmenting agents is considered helpful in preventing such side effects by reducing the amount of BMP-2 required to obtain a sufficient amount of bone. We recently showed that a receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-binding peptide promotes osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether OP3-4, a RANKL-binding peptide, promotes BMP-2-induced bone formation in the murine maxilla using an injectable gelatin hydrogel (GH) carrier. A GH carrier containing OP3-4 with BMP-2 was subperiosteally injected into the murine maxillary right diastema between the incisor and the first molar. The mice were sacrificed 28 d after the injections. The local bone formation in the OP3-4-BMP-2-injected group was analyzed in comparison to the carrier-injected, BMP-2-injected, and control-peptide-BMP-2-injected groups. The GH carrier containing OP3-4 with BMP-2 enlarged the radio-opaque area and increased the bone mineral content and density in the radiological analyses in comparison to the other experimental groups. Interestingly, fluorescence-based histological analyses revealed that the mineralization had started from the outside, then proceeded inward, suggesting that the size of the newly formed bone had already been set before calcification started and that the effects of OP3-4 might be involved in accelerating the early steps of osteogenesis. Actually, OP3-4 enhanced the BMP-2-induced 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cell numbers at the injected site on day 7 and the expression of Runx2 and Col1a1, which are early osteogenic cell markers, on day 10 after the subperiosteal injections. In summary, we demonstrated, for the first time, that the application of OP3-4 by subperiosteal injection promoted BMP

  5. Influence of a mutation in the ATP-binding region of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II on its interaction with peptide substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praseeda, Mullasseril; Pradeep, Kurup K; Krupa, Ananth; Krishna, S Sri; Leena, Suseela; Kumar, R Rajeev; Cheriyan, John; Mayadevi, Madhavan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Omkumar, Ramakrishnapillai V

    2004-03-01

    CaMKII (Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II) is expressed in high concentrations in the brain and is found enriched in the postsynaptic densities. The enzyme is activated by the binding of calmodulin to the autoregulatory domain in the presence of high levels of intracellular Ca2+, which causes removal of auto-inhibition from the N-terminal catalytic domain. Knowledge of the 3D (three-dimensional) structure of this enzyme at atomic resolution is restricted to the association domain, a region at the extreme C-terminus. The catalytic domain of CaMKII shares high sequence similarity with CaMKI. The 3D structure of the catalytic core of CaMKI comprises ATP- and substrate-binding regions in a cleft between two distinct lobes, similar to the structures of all protein kinases solved to date. Mutation of Glu-60, a residue in the ATP-binding region of CaMKII, to glycine exerts different effects on phosphorylation of two peptide substrates, syntide and NR2B ( N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B) 17-mer. Although the mutation caused increases in the Km values for phosphorylation for both the peptide substrates, the effect on the kcat values for each was different. The kcat value decreased in the case of syntide, whereas it increased in the case of the NR2B peptide as a result of the mutation. This resulted in a significant decrease in the apparent kcat/Km value for syntide, but the change was minimal for the NR2B peptide. These results indicate that different catalytic mechanisms are employed by the kinase for the two peptides. Molecular modelling suggests structural changes are likely to occur at the peptide-binding pocket in the active state of the enzyme as a consequence of the Glu-60-->Gly mutation. PMID:14558884

  6. RXP-E: a connexin43-binding peptide that prevents action potential propagation block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewandowski, Rebecca; Procida, Kristina; Vaidyanathan, Ravi;

    2008-01-01

    . Separately, RXP-E was concatenated to a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) for cytoplasmic translocation (CTP-RXP-E). The effect of RXP-E on action potential propagation was assessed by high-resolution optical mapping in monolayers of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, containing approximately 20% of...... randomly distributed myofibroblasts. In contrast to control experiments, when heptanol (2 mmol/L) was added to the superfusate of monolayers loaded with CTP-RXP-E, action potential propagation was maintained, albeit at a slower velocity. Similarly, intracellular acidification (pH(i) 6.2) caused a loss of...... action potential propagation in control monolayers; however, propagation was maintained in CTP-RXP-E-treated cells, although at a slower rate. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that RXP-E did not prevent heptanol-induced block of sodium currents, nor did it alter voltage dependence or amplitude of Kir2...

  7. Label-free detection of biomolecular interaction — DNA — Antimicrobial peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fojan, Peter; Jensen, Kasper Risgaard; Gurevich, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    molecule. In particular, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have been already demonstrated suitable for food-safety control, label-free screening for various disease markers in bodily fluids, as well as for real-time continuous monitoring of drug levels in intensive care environment. We envisage such...... sensors to be integrated into wireless communication infrastructure for e-health and environmental monitoring applications. One of the important threats in hospital environment is multi-resistant organisms that are not affected by common antibiotics. The growth of multi-resistant infections spurred an...... interest in Antimicrobial peptides that are active against broad range of infections including bacteria, fungi and viruses and were shown to be capable of treating multi-resistant infection either alone or in combination with the conventional antibiotics. In this paper , we demonstrate an application of...

  8. Efficient docking of peptides to proteins without prior knowledge of the binding site

    OpenAIRE

    Hetényi, Csaba; van der Spoel, David

    2002-01-01

    Reliability in docking of ligand molecules to proteins or other targets is an important challenge for molecular modeling. Applications of the docking technique include not only prediction of the binding mode of novel drugs, but also other problems like the study of protein-protein interactions. Here we present a study on the reliability of the results obtained with the popular AutoDock program. We have performed systematical studies to test the ability of AutoDock to reproduce eight different...

  9. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide specific binding in pheochromocytoma cells PC12

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maletínská, Lenka; Maixnerová, Jana; Matyšková, Resha; Haugvicová, Renata; Šloncová, Eva; Elbert, Tomáš; Slaninová, Jiřina; Železná, Blanka

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 559, 2/3 (2007), s. 109-114. ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/05/0614 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : radioligand binding * CART * PC12 cells * food intake Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.376, year: 2007

  10. Dissect Kif5b in nuclear positioning during myogenesis: The light chain binding domain and the autoinhibitory peptide are both indispensable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zai, E-mail: wangzai81@hotmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong); Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, China–Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Xue, Wenqian; Li, Xiuling; Lin, Raozhou [Department of Biochemistry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong); Cui, Ju [Department of Biochemistry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong); Beijing Institute of Geriatrics, Beijing Hospital, Ministry of Health (China); Huang, Jian-Dong, E-mail: jdhuang@hku.hk [Department of Biochemistry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Kif5b localizes at myonuclear membrane and is responsible for nuclear dispersion. ► Kif5b stalk/tail domain contains signal for nuclear membrane targeting. ► Kif5b stalk/tail domain directly binds to a nesprin 4 in vitro. ► KLC binding domain and autoinhibitory peptide are both functionally indispensable. -- Abstract: The microtubule motor kinesin-1 is responsible for the nuclear positioning during myogenesis. Here we show that the coiled-coil stalk/tail domain containing the kinesin light chain (KLC) binding sites targets to the perinuclear region like endogenous Kif5b, while the globular tail domain cannot. To investigate which fragments of kinesin heavy chain (Kif5b) is responsible for the myonuclear positioning, we transfect Kif5b expression constructs into Kif5b deficient myoblasts and test their ability to rescue the myonuclear phenotype. We find that the KLC binding domain and the autoinhibitory peptide in the globular tail region are both indispensable for the nuclear membrane localization of Kif5b and the kinesin-1-mediated myonuclear positioning. These results suggest that while the KLC binding domain may directly targets Kif5b to the myonuclear membrane, the autoinhibitory peptide may play an indirect role in regulating the kinesin-1-mediated myonuclear positioning.

  11. Dissect Kif5b in nuclear positioning during myogenesis: the light chain binding domain and the autoinhibitory peptide are both indispensable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zai; Xue, Wenqian; Li, Xiuling; Lin, Raozhou; Cui, Ju; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2013-03-01

    The microtubule motor kinesin-1 is responsible for the nuclear positioning during myogenesis. Here we show that the coiled-coil stalk/tail domain containing the kinesin light chain (KLC) binding sites targets to the perinuclear region like endogenous Kif5b, while the globular tail domain cannot. To investigate which fragments of kinesin heavy chain (Kif5b) is responsible for the myonuclear positioning, we transfect Kif5b expression constructs into Kif5b deficient myoblasts and test their ability to rescue the myonuclear phenotype. We find that the KLC binding domain and the autoinhibitory peptide in the globular tail region are both indispensable for the nuclear membrane localization of Kif5b and the kinesin-1-mediated myonuclear positioning. These results suggest that while the KLC binding domain may directly targets Kif5b to the myonuclear membrane, the autoinhibitory peptide may play an indirect role in regulating the kinesin-1-mediated myonuclear positioning. PMID:23402760

  12. Discovery and characterization of a novel cyclic peptide that effectively inhibits ephrin binding to the EphA4 receptor and displays anti-angiogenesis activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Han

    Full Text Available The EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinase regulates a variety of physiological and pathological processes during neural development and the formation of tumor blood vessels; thus, it represents a new and promising therapeutic target. We used a combination of phage peptide display and computer modeling/docking approaches and discovered a novel cyclic nonapeptide, now designated TYY. This peptide selectively inhibits the binding of the ephrinA5 ligand with EphA4 and significantly blocks angiogenesis in a 3D matrigel culture system. Molecular docking reveals that TYY recognizes the same binding pocket on EphA4 that the natural ephrin ligand binds to and that the Tyr3 and Tyr4 side chains of TYY are both critical for the TYY/EphA4 interaction. The discovery of TYY introduces a valuable probe of EphA4 function and a new lead for EphA4-targeted therapeutic development.

  13. Identification of specificity determining residues in peptide recognition domains using an information theoretic approach applied to large-scale binding maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidhu Sachdev S

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptide Recognition Domains (PRDs are commonly found in signaling proteins. They mediate protein-protein interactions by recognizing and binding short motifs in their ligands. Although a great deal is known about PRDs and their interactions, prediction of PRD specificities remains largely an unsolved problem. Results We present a novel approach to identifying these Specificity Determining Residues (SDRs. Our algorithm generalizes earlier information theoretic approaches to coevolution analysis, to become applicable to this problem. It leverages the growing wealth of binding data between PRDs and large numbers of random peptides, and searches for PRD residues that exhibit strong evolutionary covariation with some positions of the statistical profiles of bound peptides. The calculations involve only information from sequences, and thus can be applied to PRDs without crystal structures. We applied the approach to PDZ, SH3 and kinase domains, and evaluated the results using both residue proximity in co-crystal structures and verified binding specificity maps from mutagenesis studies. Discussion Our predictions were found to be strongly correlated with the physical proximity of residues, demonstrating the ability of our approach to detect physical interactions of the binding partners. Some high-scoring pairs were further confirmed to affect binding specificity using previous experimental results. Combining the covariation results also allowed us to predict binding profiles with higher reliability than two other methods that do not explicitly take residue covariation into account. Conclusions The general applicability of our approach to the three different domain families demonstrated in this paper suggests its potential in predicting binding targets and assisting the exploration of binding mechanisms.

  14. Structure and Bioactivity of a Modified Peptide Derived from the LPS-Binding Domain of an Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor (ALF) of Shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2016-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide binding domain (LBD) in anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is the main functional element of ALF, which exhibits antimicrobial activities. Our previous studies show that the peptide LBDv, synthesized based on the modified sequence of LBD (named LBD2) from FcALF2, exhibited an apparently enhanced antimicrobial activity. To learn the prospect of LBDv application, the characteristics of LBDv were analyzed in the present study. The LBDv peptide showed higher antimicrobial and bactericidal activities compared with LBD2. These activities of the LBDv peptide were stable after heat treatment. LBDv could also exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity to Vibrio harveyi. The LBDv peptide was found to bind bacteria, quickly cause bacterial agglutination, and kill bacteria by damaging their membrane integrity. Structure analysis showed that both LBDv and LBD2 held the β-sheet structure, and the positive net charge and amphipathicity characteristic were speculated as two important components for their antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity of LBDv was evaluated in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and Cherax quadricarinatus hemocytes. More than 80% cells could survive with the LBDv concentration up to 16 μM. Collectively, these findings highlighted the potential antimicrobial mechanism of LBD peptides, and provided important information for the commercial use of LBDv in the future. PMID:27213409

  15. Structure and Bioactivity of a Modified Peptide Derived from the LPS-Binding Domain of an Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor (ALF) of Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2016-05-01

    The lipopolysaccharide binding domain (LBD) in anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is the main functional element of ALF, which exhibits antimicrobial activities. Our previous studies show that the peptide LBDv, synthesized based on the modified sequence of LBD (named LBD2) from FcALF2, exhibited an apparently enhanced antimicrobial activity. To learn the prospect of LBDv application, the characteristics of LBDv were analyzed in the present study. The LBDv peptide showed higher antimicrobial and bactericidal activities compared with LBD2. These activities of the LBDv peptide were stable after heat treatment. LBDv could also exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity to Vibrio harveyi. The LBDv peptide was found to bind bacteria, quickly cause bacterial agglutination, and kill bacteria by damaging their membrane integrity. Structure analysis showed that both LBDv and LBD2 held the β-sheet structure, and the positive net charge and amphipathicity characteristic were speculated as two important components for their antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity of LBDv was evaluated in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and Cherax quadricarinatus hemocytes. More than 80% cells could survive with the LBDv concentration up to 16 μM. Collectively, these findings highlighted the potential antimicrobial mechanism of LBD peptides, and provided important information for the commercial use of LBDv in the future. PMID:27213409

  16. Structure and Bioactivity of a Modified Peptide Derived from the LPS-Binding Domain of an Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor (ALF of Shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The lipopolysaccharide binding domain (LBD in anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF is the main functional element of ALF, which exhibits antimicrobial activities. Our previous studies show that the peptide LBDv, synthesized based on the modified sequence of LBD (named LBD2 from FcALF2, exhibited an apparently enhanced antimicrobial activity. To learn the prospect of LBDv application, the characteristics of LBDv were analyzed in the present study. The LBDv peptide showed higher antimicrobial and bactericidal activities compared with LBD2. These activities of the LBDv peptide were stable after heat treatment. LBDv could also exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity to Vibrio harveyi. The LBDv peptide was found to bind bacteria, quickly cause bacterial agglutination, and kill bacteria by damaging their membrane integrity. Structure analysis showed that both LBDv and LBD2 held the β-sheet structure, and the positive net charge and amphipathicity characteristic were speculated as two important components for their antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity of LBDv was evaluated in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9 cells and Cherax quadricarinatus hemocytes. More than 80% cells could survive with the LBDv concentration up to 16 μM. Collectively, these findings highlighted the potential antimicrobial mechanism of LBD peptides, and provided important information for the commercial use of LBDv in the future.

  17. Cadmium detoxification strategies in two phytoplankton species: Metal binding by newly synthesized thiolated peptides and metal sequestration in granules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether intracellular detoxification mechanisms could explain, at least partially, the different sensitivity to Cd of two freshwater green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. Subcellular Cd distribution and the synthesis of metal-binding thiolated peptides were thus examined in both algae exposed to a range of free [Cd2+] from 0.7 to 253 nM. Cadmium partitioning among five subcellular fractions (cellular debris, granules, organelles, heat-denaturable proteins - HDP, and heat-stable proteins - HSP) was determined after differential centrifugation of algal homogenates. Thiolated-peptides, phytochelatins (PCn) and precursors, were analyzed by HPLC with pre-column monobromobimane derivatization. Cadmium accumulation per cell was 2-4 times greater for C. reinhardtii than for P. subcapitata, yet C. reinhardtii was more resistant to Cd with an EC50 of 273 nM Cd2+ [244-333 nM Cd2+ CI95%]) compared to 127 nM Cd2+ [111-143 nM Cd2+ CI95%] for P. subcapitata. Although [Cd] generally increased in the organelle fractions when free [Cd2+] increased in the experimental media, their relative contributions to the total Cd cellular content decreased, suggesting that partial protection of some metal sensitive sites was achieved by the initiation of cellular detoxification mechanisms. An increase in the proportion of Cd in the granules fraction was observed for C. reinhardtii between 6 and 15 nM Cd2+ (i.e., at [Cd2+] n, but with longer oligomers for C. reinhardtii. Unknown thiolated compounds (Xn), which were not canonical or hydroxymethyl PCn, were also found in both algae but at much higher concentrations for C. reinhardtii than for P. subcapitata. This difference in thiol synthesis could also be involved in the higher Cd resistance of C. reinhardtii with respect to P. subcapitata. This study demonstrates the importance of metal detoxification strategies in explaining the Cd sensitivity of different algal species

  18. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandya, Mital; Rasmussen, Michael; Hansen, Andreas;

    2015-01-01

    pathogens, such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Six synthetic BoLA class I (BoLA-I) molecules were produced, and the peptide binding motif was generated for five of the six molecules using a combined approach of positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries (PSCPLs) and neural network......-based predictions (NetMHCpan). The updated NetMHCpan server was used to predict BoLA-I binding peptides within the P1 structural polyprotein sequence of FMDV (strain A24 Cruzeiro) for BoLA-1*01901, BoLA-2*00801, BoLA-2*01201, and BoLA-4*02401. Peptide binding affinity and stability were determined for these Bo....... The results of these analyses showed that BoLA alleles cluster into three distinct groups with the potential to define “BoLA supertypes.” This streamlined approach identifies potential T cell epitopes from pathogens, such as FMDV, and provides insight into T cell immunity following infection or vaccination....

  19. A Highly Tilted Binding Mode by a Self-Reactive T Cell Receptor Results in Altered Engagement of Peptide and MHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Sethi; D Schubert; A Anders; A Heroux; D Bonsor; C Thomas; E Sundberg; J Pyrdol; K Wucherpfennig

    2011-12-31

    Self-reactive T cells that escape elimination in the thymus can cause autoimmune pathology, and it is therefore important to understand the structural mechanisms of self-antigen recognition. We report the crystal structure of a T cell receptor (TCR) from a patient with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that engages its self-peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand in an unusual manner. The TCR is bound in a highly tilted orientation that prevents interaction of the TCR-{alpha} chain with the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. In this structure, only a single germline-encoded TCR loop engages the MHC protein, whereas in most other TCR-pMHC structures all four germline-encoded TCR loops bind to the MHC helices. The tilted binding mode also prevents peptide contacts by the short complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3{beta} loop, and interactions that contribute to peptide side chain specificity are focused on the CDR3{alpha} loop. This structure is the first example in which only a single germline-encoded TCR loop contacts the MHC helices. Furthermore, the reduced interaction surface with the peptide may facilitate TCR cross-reactivity. The structural alterations in the trimolecular complex are distinct from previously characterized self-reactive TCRs, indicating that there are multiple unusual ways for self-reactive TCRs to bind their pMHC ligand.

  20. Short communication: Identification of iron-binding peptides from whey protein hydrolysates using iron (III)-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography and reversed phase-HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Huerta, Elvia; Martínez Maqueda, Daniel; de la Hoz, Lucia; da Silva, Vera S Nunes; Pacheco, Maria Teresa Bertoldo; Amigo, Lourdes; Recio, Isidra

    2016-01-01

    Peptides with iron-binding capacity obtained by hydrolysis of whey protein with Alcalase (Novozymes, Araucaria, PR, Brazil), pancreatin, and Flavourzyme (Novozymes) were identified. Hydrolysates were subjected to iron (III)-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and the bound peptides were sequenced by mass spectrometry. Regardless of the enzyme used, the domains f(42-59) and f(125-137) from β-lactoglobulin enclosed most of identified peptides. This trend was less pronounced in the case of peptides derived from α-lactalbumin, with sequences deriving from diverse regions. Iron-bound peptides exhibited common structural characteristics, such as an abundance of Asp, Glu, and Pro, as revealed by mass spectrometry and AA analysis. In conclusion, this characterization of iron-binding peptides helps clarify the relationship between peptide structure and iron-chelating activity and supports the promising role of whey protein hydrolysates as functional ingredients in iron supplementation treatments. PMID:26601589

  1. Neuritogenic and survival-promoting effects of the P2 peptide derived from a homophilic binding site in the neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin V; Køhler, Lene B; Ditlevsen, Dorte K;

    2004-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in neural development, regeneration, and plasticity. NCAM mediates adhesion and subsequent signal transduction through NCAM-NCAM binding. Recently, a peptide ligand termed P2 corresponding to a 12-amino-acid sequence in the FG loop of...... fragmentation were lowered by P2. Finally, treatment of neurons with P2 resulted in phosphorylation of the ser/thr kinase Akt. Thus, a small peptide mimicking homophilic NCAM interaction is capable of inducing differentiation as reflected by neurite outgrowth in several neuronal cell types and inhibiting...

  2. The IkB kinase inhibitor nuclear factor-kB essential modulator–binding domain peptide for inhibition of balloon injury-induced neointimal formation

    OpenAIRE

    Grassia, G.; Maddaluno, M.; Musilli, C.; De Stefano, D.; Carnuccio, R.; Di Lauro, M.V.; Parratt, C.A.; Kennedy, S.; di Meglio, P; Ianaro, A; Maffia, P.; Parenti., A; Ialenti, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective—The activation of nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) is a crucial step in the arterial wall’s response to injury. The identification and characterization of the NF-kB essential modulator– binding domain (NBD) peptide, which can block the activation of the IkB kinase complex, have provided an opportunity to selectively abrogate the inflammation-induced activation of NF-kB. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the NBD peptide on neointimal formation. Method...

  3. Photoaffinity labeling of human serum vitamin D binding protein and chemical cleavage of the labeled protein: Identification of an 11.5-kDa peptide containing the putative 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors describe photoaffinity labeling and related studies of human serum vitamin D binding protein (hDBP) with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 3β-3'-[N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)amino]propyl ether (25-ANE) and its radiolabeled counterpart, i.e., 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 3β-3'-[N-(4-azido-2-nitro-[3,5-3H]phenyl)amino]propyl ether (3H-25-ANE). They have carried out studies to demonstrate that (1) 25-ANE competes with 25-OH-D3 for the binding site of the latter in hDBP and (2) 3H-25-ANE is capable of covalently labeling the hDBP molecule when exposed ot UV light. Treatment of a sample of purified hDBP, labeled with 3H-25-ANE, with BNPS-skatole produced two Coomassie Blue stained peptide fragments, and the majority of the radioactivity was assoicated with the smaller of the two peptide fragments (16.5 kDa). On the other hand, cleavage of the labeled protein with cyanogen bromide produced a peptide (11.5 kDa) containing most of the covalently attached radioactivity. Considering the primary amino acid structure of hDBP, this peptide fragment (11.5 kDa) represents the N-terminus through residue 108 of the intact protein. Thus, the results tentatively identify this segment of the protein containing the binding pocket for 25-OH-D3

  4. Enhancement of the Regenerative Potential of Anorganic Bovine Bone Graft Utilizing a Polyglutamate-Modified BMP2 Peptide with Improved Binding to Calcium-Containing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Jennifer L; Bonvallet, Paul P; Abou-Arraj, Ramzi V; Schupbach, Peter; Reddy, Michael S; Bellis, Susan L

    2015-09-01

    Autogenous bone is the gold standard material for bone grafting in craniofacial and orthopedic regenerative medicine. However, due to complications associated with harvesting donor bone, clinicians often use commercial graft materials that may lose their osteoinductivity due to processing. This study was aimed to functionalize one of these materials, anorganic bovine bone (ABB), with osteoinductive peptides to enhance regenerative capacity. Two peptides known to induce osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells were evaluated: (1) DGEA, an amino acid motif within collagen I and (2) a biomimetic peptide derived from bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2pep). To achieve directed coupling of the peptides to the graft surface, the peptides were engineered with a heptaglutamate domain (E7), which confers specific binding to calcium moieties within bone mineral. Peptides with the E7 domain exhibited greater anchoring to ABB than unmodified peptides, and E7 peptides were retained on ABB for at least 8 weeks in vivo. To assess the osteoinductive potential of the peptide-conjugated ABB, ectopic bone formation was evaluated utilizing a rat subcutaneous pouch model. ABB conjugated with full-length recombinant BMP2 (rBMP2) was also implanted as a model for current clinical treatments utilizing rBMP2 passively adsorbed to carriers. These studies showed that E7BMP2pep/ABB samples induced more new bone formation than all other peptides, and an equivalent amount of new bone as compared with rBMP2/ABB. A mandibular defect model was also used to examine intrabony healing of peptide-conjugated ABB. Bone healing was monitored at varying time points by positron emission tomography imaging with (18)F-NaF, and it was found that the E7BMP2pep/ABB group had greater bone metabolic activity than all other groups, including rBMP2/ABB. Importantly, animals implanted with rBMP2/ABB exhibited complications, including inflammation and formation of cataract-like lesions in the eye, whereas

  5. Structures of the human Pals1 PDZ domain with and without ligand suggest gated access of Crb to the PDZ peptide-binding groove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Marina E.; Fletcher, Georgina C.; O’Reilly, Nicola; Purkiss, Andrew G.; Thompson, Barry J. [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); McDonald, Neil Q., E-mail: neil.mcdonald@cancer.org.uk [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    This study characterizes the interaction between the carboxy-terminal (ERLI) motif of the essential polarity protein Crb and the Pals1/Stardust PDZ-domain protein. Structures of human Pals1 PDZ with and without a Crb peptide are described, explaining the highly conserved nature of the ERLI motif and revealing a sterically blocked peptide-binding groove in the absence of ligand. Many components of epithelial polarity protein complexes possess PDZ domains that are required for protein interaction and recruitment to the apical plasma membrane. Apical localization of the Crumbs (Crb) transmembrane protein requires a PDZ-mediated interaction with Pals1 (protein-associated with Lin7, Stardust, MPP5), a member of the p55 family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs). This study describes the molecular interaction between the Crb carboxy-terminal motif (ERLI), which is required for Drosophila cell polarity, and the Pals1 PDZ domain using crystallography and fluorescence polarization. Only the last four Crb residues contribute to Pals1 PDZ-domain binding affinity, with specificity contributed by conserved charged interactions. Comparison of the Crb-bound Pals1 PDZ structure with an apo Pals1 structure reveals a key Phe side chain that gates access to the PDZ peptide-binding groove. Removal of this side chain enhances the binding affinity by more than fivefold, suggesting that access of Crb to Pals1 may be regulated by intradomain contacts or by protein–protein interaction.

  6. Enhanced Peptide Stability Against Protease Digestion Induced by Intrinsic Factor Binding of a Vitamin B12 Conjugate of Exendin-4

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaccorso, Ron L.; Chepurny, Oleg G.; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; HOLZ, GEORGE G.; Doyle, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide digestion from proteases is a significant limitation in peptide therapeutic development. It has been hypothesized that the dietary pathway of vitamin B12 (B12) may be exploited in this area, but an open question is whether B12-peptide conjugates bound to the B12 gastric uptake protein intrinsic factor (IF) can provide any stability against proteases. Herein, we describe a new conjugate of B12 with the incretin peptide exendin 4 that demonstrates picomolar agonism of the glugacon-like ...

  7. Membrane Binding and Insertion of a pHLIP Peptide Studied by All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghong Wei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments in function mechanism study reported that a pH low-insertion peptide (pHLIP can insert into a zwitterionic palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC lipid bilayer at acidic pH while binding to the bilayer surface at basic pH. However, the atomic details of the pH-dependent interaction of pHLIP with a POPC bilayer are not well understood. In this study, we investigate the detailed interactions of pHLIP with a POPC bilayer at acidic and basic pH conditions as those used in function mechanism study, using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Simulations have been performed by employing the initial configurations, where pHLIP is placed in aqueous solution, parallel to bilayer surface (system S, partially-inserted (system P, or fully-inserted (system F in POPC bilayers. On the basis of multiple 200-ns MD simulations, we found (1 pHLIP in system S can spontaneously insert into a POPC bilayer at acidic pH, while binding to the membrane surface at basic pH; (2 pHLIP in system P can insert deep into a POPC bilayer at acidic pH, while it has a tendency to exit, and stays at bilayer surface at basic pH; (3 pHLIP in system F keeps in an α-helical structure at acidic pH while partially unfolding at basic pH. This study provides at atomic-level the pH-induced insertion of pHLIP into POPC bilayer.

  8. Expression of the peptide C4b‐binding protein β in the arthritic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez‐Pernaute, O; Esparza‐Gordillo, J; Largo, R; Calvo, E; Alvarez‐Soria, M A; Marcos, M E; Herrero‐Beaumont, G; de Córdoba, S R

    2006-01-01

    Background C4b‐binding protein (C4BP) is a plasma oligomeric glycoprotein that participates in the regulation of complement and haemostasis. Complement‐regulatory activity depends on the C4BPα‐polypeptide, whereas the C4BPβ‐polypeptide inactivates protein S, interfering with the anti‐coagulatory protein C‐dependent pathway. Objective To investigate the expression of C4BPβ in the rheumatoid joint. Methods Expression of C4BP was studied in synovial explants from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and healthy controls, using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation. C4BP isoforms and free C4BPβ were studied in synovial effusions from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and microcrystalline arthritis (MCA) by immunoblotting; total and free protein S levels were studied by enzyme immunoassay. Results C4BPβ was overexpressed in the synovial membranes of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, in close association with the severity of synovitis and the extension of interstitial fibrin deposits. As many as 85% fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis contained free C4BPβ, whereas this unusual polypeptide was present in 50% fluids from patients with MCA and 40% fluids from patients with osteoarthritis. Free protein S at the effusions was pathologically reduced in patients with rheumatoid arthrits and MCA, and remained normal in patients with osteoarthritis. Conclusion C4BPβ is expressed by the inflamed synovial tissue, where it can participate in processes of tissue remodelling associated with invasive growth. PMID:16679431

  9. Proton and tritium NMR relaxation studies of peptide inhibitor binding to bacterial collagenase: Conformation and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of succinyl-Pro-Ala, a competitive inhibitor of Achromobacter iophagus collagenase, with the enzyme was studied by longitudinal proton and tritium relaxation. Specific deuterium and tritium labeling of the succinyl part at vicinal positions allowed the measurement of the cross-relaxation rates of individual proton or tritium spin pairs in the inhibitor-enzyme complex as well as in the free inhibitor. Overall correlation times, internuclear distances, and qualitative information on the internal mobility in Suc1 (as provided by the generalized order parameter S2) could be deduced by the comparison of proton and tritium cross-relaxation of spin pairs at complementary positions in the -CH2- CH2- moiety as analyzed in terms of the model-free approach by Lipari and Szabo. The conformational and motional parameters of the inhibitor in the free and enzyme-bound state were directly compared by this method. The measurement of proton cross-relaxation in the Ala residue provided additional information on the inhibitor binding. The determination of the order parameter in different parts of the inhibitor molecule in the bound state indicates that the succinyl and alanyl residues are primarily involved in the interaction with the enzyme activity site. The succinyl moiety, characterized in solution by the conformational equilibrium among the three staggered rotamers--i.e., trans: 50%; g+: 20%; g-: 30%--adopted in the bound state the unique trans conformation

  10. Immunization of rabbits with synthetic peptides derived from a highly conserved β-sheet epitope region underneath the receptor binding site of influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ideno S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Shoji Ideno,1,3 Kaoru Sakai,1 Mikihiro Yunoki,2–4 Ritsuko Kubota-Koketsu,3,5 Yuji Inoue,3 Shota Nakamura,6 Teruo Yasunaga,6 Yoshinobu Okuno,5 Kazuyoshi Ikuta3 1Infectious Pathogen Research Section, Central Research Laboratory, Research and Development Division, Japan Blood Products Organization, Kobe, Japan; 2Research and Development Promotion Section, Research and Development Division, Japan Blood Products Organization, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan; 4Department of Veterinary Microbiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan; 5Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa, Japan; 6Department of Genome Informatics, Genome Information Research Center, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan Background: There is increasing concern about the speed with which health care providers can administer prophylaxis and treatment in an influenza pandemic. Generally, it takes several months to manufacture an influenza vaccine by propagation of the virus in chicken eggs or cultured cells. Newer, faster protocols for the production of vaccines that induce broad-spectrum immunity are therefore highly desirable. We previously developed human monoclonal antibody B-1 that shows broadly neutralizing activity against influenza A virus H3N2. B-1 recognizes an epitope region that includes an antiparallel β-sheet structure underneath the receptor binding site of influenza hemagglutinin (HA. In this study, the efficacy of a synthetic peptide vaccine derived from this epitope region against influenza A was evaluated. Materials and methods: Two peptides were synthesized, the upper and lower peptides. These peptides comprise amino acid residues 167–187 and 225–241, respectively, of the B-1 epitope region of HA, which is involved in

  11. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xiaoyong; Cai, Cuizan [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiao, Fei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiong, Yaoling [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Huang, Yadong; Zhang, Qihao [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiang, Qi [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Lou, Guofeng [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Lian, Mengyang [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Su, Zhijian, E-mail: tjnuszj@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Zheng, Qing, E-mail: tzhengq@jnu.edu.cn [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China)

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • A specific aFGF-binding peptide AP8 was identified from a phage display library. • AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. • AP8 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing Cyclin D1. • AP8 could block the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase. • AP8 counteracted proliferation and cell cycle via influencing PA2G4 and PCNA. - Abstract: It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182–188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  12. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A specific aFGF-binding peptide AP8 was identified from a phage display library. • AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. • AP8 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing Cyclin D1. • AP8 could block the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase. • AP8 counteracted proliferation and cell cycle via influencing PA2G4 and PCNA. - Abstract: It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182–188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer

  13. Effect of CD44 binding peptide conjugated to an engineered inert matrix on maintenance of breast cancer stem cells and tumorsphere formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Yang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: As cancer cells are affected by many factors in their microenvironment, a major challenge is to isolate the effect of a specific factor on cancer stem cells (CSCs while keeping other factors unchanged. We have developed a synthetic inert 3D polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA gel culture system as a unique tool to study the effect of microenvironmental factors on CSCs response. We have reported that CSCs formed in the inert PEGDA gel by encapsulation of breast cancer cells maintain their stemness within a certain range of gel stiffness. The objective was to investigate the effect of CD44 binding peptide (CD44BP conjugated to the gel on the maintenance of breast CSCs. METHODS: 4T1 or MCF7 breast cancer cells were encapsulated in PEGDA gel with CD44BP conjugation. Control groups included dissolved CD44BP and the gel with mutant CD44BP conjugation. Tumorsphere size and density, and expression of CSC markers were determined after 9 days. For in vivo, cell encapsulated gels were inoculated in syngeneic Balb/C mice and tumor formation was determined after 4 weeks. Effect of CD44BP conjugation on breast CSC maintenance was compared with integrin binding RGD peptide (IBP and fibronectin-derived heparin binding peptide (FHBP. RESULTS: Conjugation of CD44BP to the gel inhibited breast tumorsphere formation in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the encapsulated cells to form tumorspheres in the peptide-conjugated gels correlated with the expression of CSC markers. Tumorsphere formation in vitro was enhanced by FHBP while it was abolished by IBP. CONCLUSION: CD44BP and IBP conjugated to the gel abolished tumorsphere formation by encapsulated 4T1 cells while FHBP enhanced tumorsphere formation compared to cells in the gel without peptide. The PEGDA hydrogel culture system provides a novel tool to investigate the individual effect of factors in the microenvironment on CSC maintenance without interference of other factors.

  14. In silico peptide-binding predictions of passerine MHC class I reveal similarities across distantly related species, suggesting convergence on the level of protein function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Follin, Elna; Karlsson, Maria; Lundegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Morten; Wallin, Stefan; Paulsson, Kajsa Maria; Westerdahl, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are the most polymorphic genes found in the vertebrate genome, and they encode proteins that play an essential role in the adaptive immune response. Many songbirds (passerines) have been shown to have a large number of transcribed MHC class I genes...... compared to most mammals. To elucidate the reason for this large number of genes, we compared 14 MHC class I alleles (α1–α3 domains), from great reed warbler, house sparrow and tree sparrow, via phylogenetic analysis, homology modelling and in silico peptide-binding predictions to investigate their...... functional significance. The MHC class I allomorphs from house sparrow and tree sparrow, species that diverged 10 million years ago (MYA), had overlapping peptide-binding specificities, and these similarities across species were also confirmed in phylogenetic analyses based on amino acid sequences. Notably...

  15. Identification of a synthetic peptide inducing cross-reactive antibodies binding to Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus BM86 homologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Nadja; Diaz, Diana; Amacker, Mario; Odongo, David O; Beier, Konstantin; Nitsch, Cordula; Bishop, Richard P; Daubenberger, Claudia A

    2009-12-10

    The BM86 antigen, originally identified in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, is the basis of the only commercialized anti-tick vaccine. The long-term goal of our study is to improve BM86 based vaccines by induction of high levels of tick gut binding antibodies that are also cross-reactive with a range of BM86 homologues expressed in other important tick species. Here we have used a BD86 derived synthetic peptide, BD86-3, to raise a series of mouse monoclonal antibodies. One of these mAbs, named 12.1, recognized BM86 homologues in immuno-histochemical analyses in four out of five tick species including R. (B.) microplus, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus, Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. Our results indicate that broadly cross-reactive tick gut binding antibodies can be induced after immunization with a synthetic peptide derived from the protein BD86. PMID:19808026

  16. Metallothionein and a peptide modeled after metallothionein, EmtinB, induce neuronal differentiation and survival through binding to receptors of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Malene; Asmussen, Johanne W; Lindstam, Mats;

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metallothionein (MT)-I and -II promote neuronal survival and regeneration in vivo. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation and survival-promoting effects of MT and a peptide modeled after MT, EmtinB. Both MT and...... granule neurons. By means of surface plasmon resonance MT and EmtinB were found to bind to both megalin and LRP. The bindings were abrogated in the presence of receptor-associated protein-1, an antagonist of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which also inhibited MT- and EmtinB-induced neurite...... of cell death (Bim(S)). Finally, evidence is provided that MT and EmtinB activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase, protein kinase B, and cAMP response element binding protein. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that MT and EmtinB induce their neuronal effects through direct binding to...

  17. Interaction between the Alzheimer's survival peptide humanin and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 regulates cell survival and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ikonen, Maaria; LIU, BINGRONG; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Ma, Liqun; Lee, Kuk-Wha; Niikura, Takako; Nishimoto, Ikuo; Cohen, Pinchas

    2003-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) regulates IGF bioactivity and also independently modulates cell growth and survival. By using a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify IGFBP-3-interacting proteins, we cloned humanin (HN) as an IGFBP-3-binding partner. HN is a 24-aa peptide that has been shown to specifically inhibit neuronal cell death induced by familial Alzheimer's disease mutant genes and amyloid-β (Aβ). The physical interaction of HN with IGFBP-3 was determined to be of...

  18. Ridge preservation with acellular dermal matrix and anorganic bone matrix cell-binding peptide P-15 after tooth extraction in humans. A histologic and morphometric study

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur B. Novaes Jr.; Patricia Garani Fernandes; Flávia Adelino Suaid; Marcio Fernando de Moraes Grisi; Sergio Luis Scombatti de Souza; Mario Taba Jr.; Daniela Bazan Palioto; Valdir Antonio Muglia

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze by histomorphometric parameters the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) with or without anorganic bovine bone matrix (ABM) / synthetic cell-binding peptide P-15 in the formation of bone in human alveoli. Materials and methods: Eighteen patients in need of extraction of maxillary anterior teeth were selected and randomly assigned to the test group (ADM plus ABM/P-15) or the control group (ADM only). Histomorphometric measurements and histological a...

  19. Peptide binding motifs associated with MHC molecules common in Chinese rhesus macaques are analogous to those of human HLA supertypes, and include HLA-B27-like alleles

    OpenAIRE

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Southwood, Scott; Sidney, John; English, A. Michelle; Wriston, Amanda; Hoof, Ilka; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Chinese rhesus macaques are of particular interest in SIV/HIV research as these animals have prolonged kinetics of disease progression to AIDS, compared to their Indian counterparts, suggesting that they may be a better model for HIV. Nevertheless, the specific mechanism(s) accounting for these kinetics remains unclear. The study of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecules, including their MHC:peptide binding motifs, provides valuable information for measuring cellular immune response...

  20. Improving bacterial cellulose for blood vessel replacement: functionalization with a chimeric protein containing a cellulose-binding module and an adhesion peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Fábia K.; Costa, Raquel; Domingues, Lucília; Soares, Raquel; Gama, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    Chimeric proteins containing a cellulose-binding module (CBM) and an adhesion peptide (RGD or GRGDY) were produced and used to improve the adhesion of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) to bacterial cellulose (BC). The effect of these proteins on the HMEC–BC interaction was studied. The results obtained demonstrated that recombinant proteins containing adhesion sequences were able to significantly increase the attachment of HMEC to BC surfaces, especially the RGD sequenc...

  1. The N-terminal Peptide of Mammalian GTP Cyclohydrolase I Is an Autoinhibitory Control Element and Contributes to Binding the Allosteric Regulatory Protein GFRP*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Christina E.; Gross, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity. PMID:21163945

  2. The N-terminal peptide of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is an autoinhibitory control element and contributes to binding the allosteric regulatory protein GFRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Christina E; Gross, Steven S

    2011-04-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity. PMID:21163945

  3. The N-terminal Peptide of Mammalian GTP Cyclohydrolase I Is an Autoinhibitory Control Element and Contributes to Binding the Allosteric Regulatory Protein GFRP*

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, Christina E.; Gross, Steven S.

    2010-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may als...

  4. Acceleration of wound healing in acute full-thickness skin wounds using a collagen-binding peptide with an affinity for MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huili Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been accepted as a promising cell source in tissue repair and regeneration. However, the inability to enrich MSCs in target areas limits their wide application. As a result, it has been a major goal to induce MSCs to be abundantly and specifically recruited to the injury site. In this study, a peptide with a specific affinity for MSCs (E7 peptide was immobilized to a collagen scaffold via a collagen-binding domain (CBD to construct a functional collagen scaffold. In addition, the hypothesis that this method could recruit MSCs specifically was evaluated in a porcine model. In vivo investigations indicated that due to the immunoreaction, the CBD-MSC-peptide collagen scaffold enhanced MSC adhesion and infiltration and promoted wound healing. At day 7 after surgery, we found more infiltrating cells and capillaries in the Collagen/CBD-E7 peptide group compared to the Scaffold group. At day 14, 21 and 28, a faster healing process was observed in the Collagen/CBD-E7 peptide group, with significant differences compared with the other groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01. The results demonstrate the potential use of targeted therapy to rapidly heal skin wounds.

  5. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) B27 Allotype-Specific Binding and Candidate Arthritogenic Peptides Revealed through Heuristic Clustering of Data-independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry (DIA-MS) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittenhelm, Ralf B; Sivaneswaran, Saranjah; Lim Kam Sian, Terry C C; Croft, Nathan P; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-06-01

    Expression of HLA-B27 is strongly associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other spondyloarthropathies. While this is true for the majority of HLA-B27 allotypes, HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 are not associated with AS. These two subtypes contain polymorphisms that are ideally positioned to influence the bound peptide repertoire. The existence of disease-inducing peptides (so-called arthritogenic peptides) has therefore been proposed that are exclusively presented by disease-associated HLA-B27 allotypes. However, we have recently demonstrated that this segregation of allotype-bound peptides is not the case and that many peptides that display sequence features predicted to favor binding to disease-associated subtypes are also capable of being presented naturally by protective alleles. To further probe more subtle quantitative changes in peptide presentation, we have used a combination of data-independent acquisition (DIA) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to quantify the abundance of 1646 HLA-B27 restricted peptides across the eight most frequent HLA-B27 allotypes (HLA-B*27:02-HLA-B*27:09). We utilized K means cluster analysis to group peptides with similar allelic binding preferences across the eight HLA-B27 allotypes, which enabled us to identify the most-stringent binding characteristics for each HLA-B27 allotype and further refined their existing consensus-binding motifs. Moreover, a thorough analysis of this quantitative dataset led to the identification of 26 peptides, which are presented in lower abundance by HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 compared with disease-associated HLA-B27 subtypes. Although these differences were observed to be very subtle, these 26 peptides might encompass the sought-after arthritogenic peptide(s). PMID:26929215

  6. The SKW 6.4 line of human B lymphocytes specifically binds and responds to vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, P P; Sreedharan, S P; Kishiyama, J L; Goetzl, E J

    1993-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP1-28) is a neuromediator recognized by high-affinity receptors on human lymphocytes, which inhibits T-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion, and suppresses immunoglobulin production by mitogen-stimulated mixed mononuclear leucocytes. The direct interactions of VIP1-28 with B cells were studied in the SKW 6.4 line of EBV-transformed human B cells, that express a mean (+/- SD) of 6116 +/- 969 receptors for [125I]VIP1-28 with a mean Kd of 59 nM, that decreases to 12 nM after exposure to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The secretion of IgM by SKW 6.4 B cells stimulated optimally with 100 ng/ml of PMA, but not unstimulated secretion of IgM, was suppressed significantly by 10(-12) M to 10(-9) M VIP1-28 and up to a mean maximum (+/- SD) of 40 +/- 2% by 10(-10) M VIP1-28. VIP1-28 elicited concomitant increases in intracellular cyclic AMP up to a mean maximum of 163% at 10(-10) M VIP1-28. The requirement for specific signal transduction by the occupied VIP receptors to inhibit IgM secretion was demonstrated by the lack of effect of VIP4-28 on both cyclic AMP concentration and IgM secretion, despite the equal affinity of binding of VIP4-28 and VIP1-28. The effects of VIP on immunoglobulin secretion by stimulated mixed mononuclear leucocytes thus may be due in part to a direct action on B cells. PMID:8509142

  7. Biodistribution on Tc-99m labeled somatostatin receptor-binding peptide (Depreotide, NeoTec) planar and SPECT studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the biodistribution of Tc-99m labeled somatostatin receptor-binding peptide (Depreotide) on planar and SPECT studies of the thorax and upper abdomen in order to improve diagnostic accuracy. Retrospectively 29 planar and SPECT studies from 28 patients (all males, average age of 65.79) were reviewed. All the patients had been referred for evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules. Two to four hours after IV injection of 555- to 740-MBq (15-20 mCi) Tc-99m Depreotide, anterior and posterior total body images, and anterior, posterior, right lateral and left lateral planar images were obtained, and thoracic SPECT was acquired with a three-head gamma camera. The degree of uptake in the lungs, thoracic cage, and organs of the upper abdomen was rated from ''0'' to ''++++''. The range of normal activity in the thorax includes cardiac, ''0''; pulmonary, +''; rib, ''+/++''; sternum, ''++''; vertebrae, ''++''. The degree of normal activity seen in the upper abdominal organs includes liver and spleen, +++'', and kidneys, '''+++/++++''. Eight patients with emphysema had diffuse pulmonary uptake graded as ''+/++''. One patient with left pneumonectomy and radiation therapy to the left hemithorax had photon-deficiency in the left hemithorax and decreased to absent uptake including the vertebrae and ribs. Although some cases had background pulmonary uptake of Tc-99m Depreotide, the bone/bone marrow activity of the thoracic cage including the ribs, sternum, and thoracic spine is sufficiently great enough to produce a clear distinction between bone and lung in the thoracic cavity that gives high-contrast resolution on SPECT. The intensity of radioactivity in the sub-diaphragmatic organs such as the liver, spleen, and kidneys provides useful guidance for the categorization of pulmonary lesions. The uptake of land marks such as the sternum, which is anteriorly located, and the thoracic vertebrae, which are posteriorly located in the thoracic cage

  8. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir Bashir

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1 poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV. Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection.

  9. A convenient method for europium-labeling of a recombinant chimeric relaxin family peptide R3/I5 for receptor-binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Jie; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Xin-Yi; Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2013-06-01

    Relaxin family peptides have important biological functions, and so far, four G-protein-coupled receptors have been identified as their receptors (RXFP1-4). A chimeric relaxin family peptide R3/I5, containing the B-chain of relaxin-3 and the A-chain of INSL5, is a selective agonist for both RXFP3 and RXFP4. In a previous study, europium-labeled R3/I5, as a nonradioactive and low-background receptor-binding tracer, was prepared through a chemical synthesis approach. In the present study, we established a convenient alternative approach for preparing the europium-labeled R3/I5 tracer based on a recombinant R3/I5 designed to carry a solubilizing tag at the A-chain N-terminus and a pyroglutamate residue at the B-chain N-terminus. Because of the presence of a single primary amine moiety, the recombinant R3/I5 peptide was site-specifically mono-labeled at the A-chain N-terminus by a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid/europium moiety through a convenient one-step procedure. The diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid/Eu3+-labeled R3/I5 bound both receptors RXFP3 and RXFP4 with high binding affinities and low nonspecific binding. Thus, we have presented a valuable nonradioactive tracer for future interaction studies on RXFP3 and RXFP4 with various natural or designed ligands. The present approach could also be adapted for preparing and labeling of other chimeric relaxin family peptides. PMID:23526726

  10. Toxoplasma gondii peptide ligands open the gate of the HLA class I binding groove

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Trolle, Thomas; Sansom, Tiffany; Remesh, Soumya G.; Kaever, Thomas; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Kenneth; McLeod, Rima; Sette, Alessandro; Nielsen, Morten; Zajonc, Dirk M.; Blader, Ira J.; Peters, Bjoern; Hildebrand, William

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I presentation of pathogen-derived peptide ligands is essential for CD8+ T cell recognition of Toxoplasma gondii infected cells. Currently, little data exist pertaining to peptides that are presented after T. gondii infection. Herein we purify HLA-A*02:01 complexes from T. gondii infected...

  11. Binding, conformational transition and dimerization of amyloid-β peptide on GM1-containing ternary membrane: insights from molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moutusi Manna

    Full Text Available Interactions of amyloid-β (Aβ with neuronal membrane are associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Ganglioside GM1 has been shown to promote the structural conversion of Aβ and increase the rate of peptide aggregation; but the exact nature of interaction driving theses processes remains to be explored. In this work, we have carried out atomistic-scale computer simulations (totaling 2.65 µs to investigate the behavior of Aβ monomer and dimers in GM1-containing raft-like membrane. The oligosaccharide head-group of GM1 was observed to act as scaffold for Aβ-binding through sugar-specific interactions. Starting from the initial helical peptide conformation, a β-hairpin motif was formed at the C-terminus of the GM1-bound Aβ-monomer; that didn't appear in absence of GM1 (both in fluid POPC and liquid-ordered cholesterol/POPC bilayers and also in aqueous medium within the simulation time span. For Aβ-dimers, the β-structure was further enhanced by peptide-peptide interactions, which might influence the propensity of Aβ to aggregate into higher-ordered structures. The salt-bridges and inter-peptide hydrogen bonds were found to account for dimer stability. We observed spontaneous formation of intra-peptide D(23-K(28 salt-bridge and a turn at V(24GSN(27 region - long been accepted as characteristic structural-motifs for amyloid self-assembly. Altogether, our results provide atomistic details of Aβ-GM1 and Aβ-Aβ interactions and demonstrate their importance in the early-stages of GM1-mediated Aβ-oligomerisation on membrane surface.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the human androgen receptor ligand-binding domain with a coactivator-like peptide and selective androgen receptor modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human androgen receptor ligand-binding domain has been crystallized as a ternary complex with a coactivator-like undecapeptide and two different synthetic ligands. The ligand-binding domain of the human androgen receptor has been cloned, overproduced and crystallized in the presence of a coactivator-like 11-mer peptide and two different nonsteroidal ligands. The crystals of the two ternary complexes were isomorphous and belonged to space group P212121, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. They diffracted to 1.7 and 1.95 Å resolution, respectively. Structure determination of these two complexes will help in understanding the mode of binding of selective nonsteroidal androgens versus endogenous steroidal ligands and possibly the origin of their tissue selectivity

  13. Photoaffinity labeling of human serum vitamin D binding protein and chemical cleavage of the labeled protein: Identification of an 11. 5-kDa peptide containing the putative 25-hydroxyvitamin D sub 3 binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, R.; Holick, M.F. (Boston Univ., MA (United States)); Bouillon, R.; Baelen, H.V. (Laboratorium voor Experimentele Geneeskunde en Endocrinologie, Leuven (Belgium))

    1991-07-30

    In this paper, the authors describe photoaffinity labeling and related studies of human serum vitamin D binding protein (hDBP) with 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} 3{beta}-3{prime}-(N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)amino)propyl ether (25-ANE) and its radiolabeled counterpart, i.e., 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} 3{beta}-3{prime}-(N-(4-azido-2-nitro-(3,5-{sup 3}H)phenyl)amino)propyl ether ({sup 3}H-25-ANE). They have carried out studies to demonstrate that (1) 25-ANE competes with 25-OH-D{sub 3} for the binding site of the latter in hDBP and (2) {sup 3}H-25-ANE is capable of covalently labeling the hDBP molecule when exposed ot UV light. Treatment of a sample of purified hDBP, labeled with {sup 3}H-25-ANE, with BNPS-skatole produced two Coomassie Blue stained peptide fragments, and the majority of the radioactivity was assoicated with the smaller of the two peptide fragments (16.5 kDa). On the other hand, cleavage of the labeled protein with cyanogen bromide produced a peptide (11.5 kDa) containing most of the covalently attached radioactivity. Considering the primary amino acid structure of hDBP, this peptide fragment (11.5 kDa) represents the N-terminus through residue 108 of the intact protein. Thus, the results tentatively identify this segment of the protein containing the binding pocket for 25-OH-D{sub 3}.

  14. An altered gp100 peptide ligand with decreased binding by TCR and CD8alpha dissects T cell cytotoxicity from production of cytokines and activation of NFAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels eSchaft

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered peptide ligands (APLs provide useful tools to study T cell activation and potentially direct immune responses to improve treatment of cancer patients. To better understand and exploit APLs, we studied the relationship between APLs and T cell function in more detail. Here, we tested a broad panel of gp100(280-288 APLs with respect to T cell cytotoxicity, production of cytokines and activation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT by human T cells gene-engineered with a gp100-HLA-A2-specific TCRalpha/beta. We demonstrated that gp100-specific cytotoxicity, production of cytokines, and activation of NFAT were not affected by APLs with single amino acid substitutions, except for an APL with an amino acid substitution at position 3 (APL A3, which did not elicit any T cell response. A gp100 peptide with a double amino acid mutation (APL S4S6 elicited T cell cytotoxicity and production of IFNgamma, and to a lesser extent TNFalpha, IL-4, and IL-5, but not production of IL-2 and IL-10, or activation of NFAT. Notably, TCR-mediated functions showed decreases in sensitivities for S4S6 versus gp100 wt peptide, which were minor for cytotoxicity but at least a 1000-fold more prominent for the production of cytokines. TCR-engineered T cells did not bind A3-HLA-A2, but did bind S4S6-HLA-A2 although to a lowered extent compared to wt peptide-HLA-A2. Moreover, S4S6-induced T cell function demonstrated an enhanced dependency on CD8alpha. Taken together, most gp100 APLs functioned as agonists, but A3 and S4S6 peptides acted as a null ligand and partial agonist, respectively. Our results further suggest that TCR-mediated cytotoxicity can be dissected from production of cytokines and activation of NFAT, and that the agonist potential of peptide mutants relates to the extent of binding by TCR and CD8alpha. These findings may facilitate the design of APLs to advance the study of T cell activation and their use for therapeutic applications.

  15. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Li, Xiaokun [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Wu, Xiaoping, E-mail: twxp@jnu.edu.cn [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer.

  16. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer

  17. Sustained inhibition of the NaV1.7 sodium channel by engineered dimers of the domain II binding peptide GpTx-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Justin K; Biswas, Kaustav; Holder, J Ryan; Zou, Anruo; Ligutti, Joseph; Liu, Dong; Poppe, Leszek; Andrews, Kristin L; Lin, Fen-Fen; Meng, Shi-Yuan; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Miranda, Les P

    2015-11-01

    Many efforts are underway to develop selective inhibitors of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 as new analgesics. Thus far, however, in vitro selectivity has proved difficult for small molecules, and peptides generally lack appropriate pharmacokinetic properties. We previously identified the NaV1.7 inhibitory peptide GpTx-1 from tarantula venom and optimized its potency and selectivity via structure-guided analoging. To further understand GpTx-1 binding to NaV1.7, we have mapped the binding site to transmembrane segments 1-4 of the second pseudosubunit internal repeat (commonly referred to as Site 4) using NaV1.5/NaV1.7 chimeric protein constructs. We also report that select GpTx-1 amino acid residues apparently not contacting NaV1.7 can be derivatized with a hydrophilic polymer without adversely affecting peptide potency. Homodimerization of GpTx-1 with a bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker resulted in a compound with increased potency and a significantly reduced off-rate, demonstrating the ability to modulate the function and properties of GpTx-1 by linking to additional molecules. PMID:26112439

  18. Solid-phase synthesis of amidine-substituted phenylbenzimidazoles and incorporation of this DNA binding and recognition motif into amino acid and peptide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Matthew L; Georgiadis, Taxiarchis M; Li, Jessica Bo; Wang, Tianxiu; Long, Eric C

    2014-05-01

    Amidine-substituted phenylbenzimidazoles are well-established DNA-binding structural motifs that have contributed to the development of diverse classes of DNA-targeted agents; this ring system not only assists in increasing the overall DNA affinity of an agent, but can also influence its site selectivity. Seeking a means to conveniently exploit these attributes, a protocol for the on-resin synthesis of amino acid- and peptide-phenylbenzimidazole-amidine conjugates was developed to facilitate installation of phenylbenzimidazole-amidines into peptide chains during the course of standard solid-phase syntheses. Building from a resin-bound amino acid or peptide on Rink amide resin, 4-formyl benzoic acid was coupled to the resin-bound free amine followed by introduction of 3,4-diamino-N'-hydroxybenzimidamide (in the presence of 1,4-benzoquinone) to construct the benzimidazole heterocycle. Finally, the resin-bound N'-hydroxybenzimidamide functionality was reduced to an amidine via 1 M SnCl2·2H2O in DMF prior to resin cleavage to release final product. This procedure permits the straightforward synthesis of amino acids or peptides that are N-terminally capped by a phenylbenzimidazole-amidine ring system. Employing this protocol, a series of amino acid-phenylbenzimidazole-amidine (Xaa-R) conjugates was synthesized as well as dipeptide conjugates of the general form Xaa-Gly-R (where R is the phenylbenzimidazole-amidine and Xaa is any amino acid). PMID:24562478

  19. A single-chain fusion molecule consisting of peptide, major histocompatibility gene complex class I heavy chain and beta2-microglobulin can fold partially correctly, but binds peptide inefficiently

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Buus, S

    1999-01-01

    was denatured, extracted, purified and folded using a recently developed in vitro reiterative refolding strategy. This led to the formation of soluble, recombinant MHC-I molecules, which migrated as monomers of the expected size when submitted to non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel...... electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Serological analysis revealed the presence of some, but not all, MHC-I-specific epitopes. Biochemically, PepSc could bind peptide, however, rather ineffectively. We suggest that a partially correctly refolded MHC-I has been obtained....

  20. Boosting immune response with the invariant chain segments via association with non-peptide binding region of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Fangfang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on binding of invariant chain (Ii to major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecules to form complexes, Ii-segment hybrids, Ii-key structure linking an epitope, or Ii class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP replaced with an epitope were used to increase immune response. It is currently unknown whether the Ii-segment cytosolic and transmembrane domains bind to the MHC non-peptide binding region (PBR and consequently influence immune response. To investigate the potential role of Ii-segments in the immune response via MHC II/peptide complexes, a few hybrids containing Ii-segments and a multiepitope (F306 from Newcastle disease virus fusion protein (F were constructed, and their binding effects on MHC II molecules and specific antibody production were compared using confocal microscopy, immunoprecipitation, western blotting and animal experiments. Results One of the Ii-segment/F306 hybrids, containing ND (Asn–Asp outside the F306 in the Ii-key structure (Ii-key/F306/ND, neither co-localized with MHC II molecules on plasma membrane nor bound to MHC II molecules to form complexes. However, stimulation of mice with the structure produced 4-fold higher antibody titers compared with F306 alone. The two other Ii-segment/F306 hybrids, in which the transmembrane and cytosolic domains of Ii were linked to this structure (Cyt/TM/Ii-key/F306/ND, partially co-localized on plasma membrane with MHC class II molecules and weakly bound MHC II molecules to form complexes. They induced mice to produce approximately 9-fold higher antibody titers compared with F306 alone. Furthermore, an Ii/F306 hybrid (F306 substituting CLIP co-localized well with MHC II molecules on the membrane to form complexes, although it increased antibody titer about 3-fold relative to F306 alone. Conclusions These results suggest that Ii-segments improve specific immune response by binding to the non-PBR on MHC class II molecules and enabling

  1. The most common Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule shares peptide binding repertoire with the HLA-B7 supertype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, C.; Southwood, S.; Hoof, Ilka;

    2010-01-01

    Of the two rhesus macaque subspecies used for AIDS studies, the Simian immunodeficiency virus-infected Indian rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is the most established model of HIV infection, providing both insight into pathogenesis and a system for testing novel vaccines. Despite the Chinese rhesus...... macaque potentially being a more relevant model for AIDS outcomes than the Indian rhesus macaque, the Chinese-origin rhesus macaques have not been well-characterized for their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) composition and function, reducing their greater utilization. In this study, we...... sequences identified were novel. From all MHC alleles detected, we prioritized Mamu-A1*02201 for functional characterization based on its higher frequency of expression. Upon the development of MHC/peptide binding assays and definition of its associated motif, we revealed that this allele shares peptide...

  2. Effect of nanoparticles binding ß-amyloid peptide on nitric oxide production by cultured endothelial cells and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Antonina Orlando,1 Francesca Re,1 Silvia Sesana,1 Ilaria Rivolta,1 Alice Panariti,1 Davide Brambilla,2 Julien Nicolas,2 Patrick Couvreur,2 Karine Andrieux,2 Massimo Masserini,1 Emanuela Cazzaniga1 1Department of Health Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy; 2Institut Galien Paris Sud, University Paris-Sud, Châtenay-Malabry, France Background: As part of a project designing nanoparticles for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, we have synthesized and characterized a small library of nanoparticles binding with high affinity to the β-amyloid peptide and showing features of biocompatibility in vitro, which are important properties for administration in vivo. In this study, we focused on biocompatibility issues, evaluating production of nitric oxide by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells and macrophages, used as models of cells which would be exposed to nanoparticles after systemic administration. Methods: The nanoparticles tested were liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles carrying phosphatidic acid or cardiolipin, and PEGylated poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PEG-PACA. We measured nitric oxide production using the Griess method as well as phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and intracellular free calcium, which are biochemically related to nitric oxide production. MTT viability tests and caspase-3 detection were also undertaken. Results: Exposure to liposomes did not affect the viability of endothelial cells at any concentration tested. Increased production of nitric oxide was detected only with liposomes carrying phosphatidic acid or cardiolipin at the highest concentration (120 µg/mL, together with increased synthase phosphorylation and intracellular calcium levels. Macrophages exposed to liposomes showed a slightly dose-dependent decrease in viability, with no increase in production of nitric oxide. Exposure to solid lipid nanoparticles carrying phosphatidic acid decreased viability in

  3. Biodistribution on Tc-99m labeled somatostatin receptor-binding peptide (Depreotide, NeoTec) planar and SPECT studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, W; Hirschowitz, E.; Bensadoun, E.; Woodring, J.; Ryo, Y.U.; Kraman, S. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Medical Center

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the biodistribution of Tc-99m labeled somatostatin receptor-binding peptide (Depreotide) on planar and SPECT studies of the thorax and upper abdomen in order to improve diagnostic accuracy. Retrospectively 29 planar and SPECT studies from 28 patients (all males, average age of 65.79) were reviewed. All the patients had been referred for evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules. Two to four hours after IV injection of 555- to 740-MBq (15-20 mCi) Tc-99m Depreotide, anterior and posterior total body images, and anterior, posterior, right lateral and left lateral planar images were obtained, and thoracic SPECT was acquired with a three-head gamma camera. The degree of uptake in the lungs, thoracic cage, and organs of the upper abdomen was rated from ''0'' to ''++++''. The range of normal activity in the thorax includes cardiac, ''0''; pulmonary, +''; rib, ''+/++''; sternum, ''++''; vertebrae, ''++''. The degree of normal activity seen in the upper abdominal organs includes liver and spleen, +++'', and kidneys, '''+++/++++''. Eight patients with emphysema had diffuse pulmonary uptake graded as ''+/++''. One patient with left pneumonectomy and radiation therapy to the left hemithorax had photon-deficiency in the left hemithorax and decreased to absent uptake including the vertebrae and ribs. Although some cases had background pulmonary uptake of Tc-99m Depreotide, the bone/bone marrow activity of the thoracic cage including the ribs, sternum, and thoracic spine is sufficiently great enough to produce a clear distinction between bone and lung in the thoracic cavity that gives high-contrast resolution on SPECT. The intensity of radioactivity in the sub-diaphragmatic organs such as the liver, spleen, and kidneys provides useful guidance for the

  4. Interleukin-1 interaction with neuroregulatory systems: selective enhancement by recombinant human and mouse interleukin-1 of in vitro opioid peptide receptor binding in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) exerts a wide variety of biological effects on various cell types and may be regarded as a pleiotropic peptide hormone. Biological evidence suggests that IL-1 participates in the modulation of central nervous system physiology and behavior in a fashion characteristic of neuroendocrine hormones. In this investigation, recombinant (r) human (h) IL-1 and r mouse (m) IL-1 were examined for their modulation of opioid peptide receptor binding in vitro. Experiments were performed on frozen sections of rat brain. Receptor binding of radiolabeled substance P and of radiolabeled neurotensin were not significantly affected by the presence of rIL-1s. Recombinant IL-1s, however, significantly enhanced specific binding of 125I-beta-endorphin (125I-beta-END) and of D-ala2-(tyrosyl-3,5-3H)enkephalin-(5-D-leucine) (3H-D-ALA), equipotently and in a concentration-dependent manner with maximal activity occurring at a concentration of 10 LAF units/ml. The increased binding of 125I-beta-END and 3H-D-ALA was blocked steroselectively by (-)-naloxone and by etorphine, suggesting detection of opiate receptors. In addition, brain distribution patterns of receptors labeled in the presence of rIL-1s corresponded to patterns previously published for opiate receptors. Autoradiographic visualization of receptors revealed that rIL-1s in the different areas of the brain exert their effect on opioid binding with comparable potencies. The data suggest that certain central nervous system effects of IL-1s may be mediated by their selective interaction with opiatergic systems at the receptor level

  5. Interleukin-1 interaction with neuroregulatory systems: selective enhancement by recombinant human and mouse interleukin-1 of in vitro opioid peptide receptor binding in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedermann, C.J.

    1989-02-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) exerts a wide variety of biological effects on various cell types and may be regarded as a pleiotropic peptide hormone. Biological evidence suggests that IL-1 participates in the modulation of central nervous system physiology and behavior in a fashion characteristic of neuroendocrine hormones. In this investigation, recombinant (r) human (h) IL-1 and r mouse (m) IL-1 were examined for their modulation of opioid peptide receptor binding in vitro. Experiments were performed on frozen sections of rat brain. Receptor binding of radiolabeled substance P and of radiolabeled neurotensin were not significantly affected by the presence of rIL-1s. Recombinant IL-1s, however, significantly enhanced specific binding of 125I-beta-endorphin (125I-beta-END) and of D-ala2-(tyrosyl-3,5-3H)enkephalin-(5-D-leucine) (3H-D-ALA), equipotently and in a concentration-dependent manner with maximal activity occurring at a concentration of 10 LAF units/ml. The increased binding of 125I-beta-END and 3H-D-ALA was blocked steroselectively by (-)-naloxone and by etorphine, suggesting detection of opiate receptors. In addition, brain distribution patterns of receptors labeled in the presence of rIL-1s corresponded to patterns previously published for opiate receptors. Autoradiographic visualization of receptors revealed that rIL-1s in the different areas of the brain exert their effect on opioid binding with comparable potencies. The data suggest that certain central nervous system effects of IL-1s may be mediated by their selective interaction with opiatergic systems at the receptor level.

  6. [3H]Azidodantrolene photoaffinity labeling, synthetic domain peptides and monoclonal antibody reactivity identify the dantrolene binding sequence on RyR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul-Pletzer, Kalanethee; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Bhat, Manju B.; Ma, Jianjie; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Jimenez, Leslie S.; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, Philip G.; Parness, Jerome

    2002-06-14

    Dantrolene is a drug that suppresses intracellular Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum in normal skeletal muscle and is used as a therapeutic agent in individuals susceptible to malignant hyperthermia. Though its precise mechanism of action has not been elucidated, we have identified the N-terminal region (amino acids 1-1400) of the skeletal muscle isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the primary Ca2+ release channel in sarcoplasmic reticulum, as a molecular target for dantrolene using the photoaffinity analog [3H]azidodantrolene(1). Here, we demonstrate that heterologously expressed RyR1 retains its capacity to be specifically labeled with [3H]azidodantrolene,indicating that muscle specific factors are not required for this ligand-receptor interaction. Synthetic domain peptides of RyR1, previously shown to affect RyR1 function in vitro and in vivo, were exploited as potential drug binding site mimics and used in photoaffinity labeling experiments. Only DP1 and DP1-2, peptide s containing the amino acid sequence corresponding to RyR1 residues 590-609, were specifically labeled by [3H]azidodantrolene. A monoclonal anti-RyR1 antibody which recognizes RyR1 and its 1400 amino acid N-terminal fragment, recognizes DP1 and DP1-2 in both Western blots and immunoprecipitation assays, and specifically inhibits [3H]azidodantrolene photolabeling of RyR1 and its N-terminal fragment in sarcoplasmic reticulum. Our results indicate that synthetic domain peptides can mimic a native, ligand binding conformation in vitro, and that the dantrolene binding site and the epitope for the monoclonal antibody on RyR1 are equivalent and composed of amino-acids 590-609.

  7. 113Cd NMR studies of a 1:1 Cd adduct with an 18-residue finger peptide from HIV-1 nucleic acid binding protein, p7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Zn2+ and Cd2+ adducts with the 18-residue peptide comprising the amino acid sequence of the first finger (residues 13 through 30) of retroviral nucleic acid binding proteins p7 from HIV-1 (the causative agent of AIDS) have been prepared. 1H NMR data indicate that the metal adducts are 1:1 compounds that are stable in aqueous solutions for at least a month. The 113Cd NMR spectral results for the adduct are presented and analyzed. 26 references, 3 figures

  8. Novel tetra-peptide insertion in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding motif in HIV-1 subtype C associated with protease inhibitor failure in Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Ujjwal; Rao, Shwetha D; Bontell, Irene; Verheyen, Jens; Rao, Vasudev R; Gore, Sagar C; Soni, Neelesh; Shet, Anita; Schülter, Eugen; Ekstrand, Maria L; Wondwossen, Amogne; Kaiser, Rolf; Madhusudhan, Mallur S; Prasad, Vinayaka R; Sonnerborg, Anders

    2014-09-24

    A novel tetra-peptide insertion was identified in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding region, which appeared in protease inhibitor failure Indian HIV-1C sequences (odds ratio=17.1, P < 0.001) but was naturally present in half of untreated Ethiopian HIV-1C sequences. The insertion is predicted to restore ALIX-mediated virus release pathway, which is lacking in HIV-1C. The clinical importance of the insertion needs to be evaluated in HIV-1C dominating regions wherein the use of protease inhibitor drugs are being scaled up. PMID:25102091

  9. Novel tetra-peptide insertion in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding motif in HIV-1 subtype C associated with protease inhibitor failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Ujjwal; RAO, Shwetha D; BONTELL, Irene; VERHEYEN, Jens; RAO, Vasudev R; GORE, Sagar C; SONI, Neelesh; SHET, Anita; SCHÜLTER, Eugen; EKSTRAND, Maria L.; WONDWOSSEN, Amogne; KAISER, Rolf; MADHUSUDHAN, Mallur S.; PRASAD, Vinayaka R; SONNERBORG, Anders

    2014-01-01

    A novel tetra-peptide insertion was identified in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding region which is appears in protease inhibitor (PI) failure Indian HIV-1C sequences (Odds Ratio 17.1, p<0.001) but naturally present in half of untreated Ethiopian sequences. The insertion will probably restore the ALIX mediated virus release pathway, which is lacking in HIV-1C. The clinical importance of such insertion need to be evaluated in HIV-1C dominating regions were PI-drugs are being scaled up as second line treatment options. PMID:25102091

  10. Comprehensive Analysis of Contributions from Protein Conformational Stability and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Peptide Binding Affinity to CD4+ Epitope Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingfeng; Steede, N. Kalaya; Nguyen, Hong-Nam P.; Freytag, Lucy C.; McLachlan, James B.; Mettu, Ramgopal R.; Robinson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helper T-cell epitope dominance in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is not adequately explained by peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Antigen processing potentially influences epitope dominance, but few, if any, studies have attempted to reconcile the influences of antigen processing and MHC protein binding for all helper T-cell epitopes of an antigen. Epitopes of gp120 identified in both humans and mice occur on the C-terminal flanks of flexible segments that are likely to be proteolytic cleavage sites. In this study, the influence of gp120 conformation on the dominance pattern in gp120 from HIV strain 89.6 was examined in CBA mice, whose MHC class II protein has one of the most well defined peptide-binding preferences. Only one of six dominant epitopes contained the most conserved element of the I-Ak binding motif, an aspartic acid. Destabilization of the gp120 conformation by deletion of single disulfide bonds preferentially enhanced responses to the cryptic I-Ak motif-containing sequences, as reported by T-cell proliferation or cytokine secretion. Conversely, inclusion of CpG in the adjuvant with gp120 enhanced responses to the dominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes. The gp120 destabilization affected secretion of some cytokines more than others, suggesting that antigen conformation could modulate T-cell functions through mechanisms of antigen processing. IMPORTANCE CD4+ helper T cells play an essential role in protection against HIV and other pathogens. Thus, the sites of helper T-cell recognition, the dominant epitopes, are targets for vaccine design; and the corresponding T cells may provide markers for monitoring infection and immunity. However, T-cell epitopes are difficult to identify and predict. It is also unclear whether CD4+ T cells specific for one epitope are more protective than T cells specific for other epitopes. This work shows that the three-dimensional (3D) structure of an

  11. Use of chimeric proteins to investigate the role of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) structural domains in peptide binding and translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Arora, Shikha; Lapinski, Philip Edward; Raghavan, Malini

    2001-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) comprises two subunits, TAP1 and TAP2, each containing a hydrophobic membrane-spanning region (MSR) and a nucleotide binding domain (NBD). The TAP1/TAP2 complex is required for peptide translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. To understand the role of each structural unit of the TAP1/TAP2 complex, we generated two chimeras containing TAP1 MSR and TAP2 NBD (T1MT2C) or TAP2 MSR and TAP1 NBD (T2MT1C). We show that TAP1/T2MT...

  12. Inhibition of β-bungarotoxin binding to brain membranes by mast cell degranulating peptide, toxin I, and ethylene glycol bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presynaptically active snake venom neurotoxin β-bungarotoxin (β-Butx) is known to affect neurotransmitter release by binding to a subtype of voltage-activated K+ channels. Here the authors show that mast cell degranulating (MCD) peptide from bee venom inhibits the binding of 125I-labeled β-Butx to chick and rat brain membranes with apparent K/sub i/ values of 180 nM and 1100 nM, respectively. The mechanisms of inhibition of MCD peptide is noncompetitive, as is inhibition of 125I-β-Butx binding by the protease inhibitor homologue from mamba venom, toxin I. β-Butx and its binding antagonists thus bind to different sites of the same membrane protein. Removal of Ca2+ by ethylene glycol bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid inhibits the binding of 125I-β-Butx by lowering its affinity to brain membranes

  13. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  14. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  16. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  17. Enhanced striatial /sup 3/H-spiroperidol binding induced by chronic haloperidol treatment inhibited by peptides administered during the withdrawal phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargava, H.N.

    1984-02-27

    Chronic intragastric administration of haloperidol (1.5 mg/kg/day) for 21 days followed by a 3-day withdrawal period resulted in the development of enhanced locomotor activity response to apomorphine, and an increase in the number of binding sites for /sup 3/H-spiroperidol in the striatal membranes of the rat brain. Subcutaneous administration of Pro-Leu-Gly-NH/sub 2/ or cyclo-(Leu-Gly) in doses of 2 mg/kg/day given for 3-days after termination of haloperidol treatment inhibited the enhanced response to apomorphine, as well as the increases in the number of /sup 3/H-spiroperidol binding sites in the striatum. If indeed, the supersensitivity of striatal dopamine receptors is one of the mechanisms in the development of tardive dyskinesia symptoms, the present results suggest that the above peptides may be helpful in ameliorating some of the symptoms of tardive dyskinesia induced by neuroleptic drugs. 31 references, 3 figures.

  18. Expanding the druggable space of the LSD1/CoREST epigenetic target: new potential binding regions for drug-like molecules, peptides, protein partners, and chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Robertson

    Full Text Available Lysine specific demethylase-1 (LSD1/KDM1A in complex with its corepressor protein CoREST is a promising target for epigenetic drugs. No therapeutic that targets LSD1/CoREST, however, has been reported to date. Recently, extended molecular dynamics (MD simulations indicated that LSD1/CoREST nanoscale clamp dynamics is regulated by substrate binding and highlighted key hinge points of this large-scale motion as well as the relevance of local residue dynamics. Prompted by the urgent need for new molecular probes and inhibitors to understand LSD1/CoREST interactions with small-molecules, peptides, protein partners, and chromatin, we undertake here a configurational ensemble approach to expand LSD1/CoREST druggability. The independent algorithms FTMap and SiteMap and our newly developed Druggable Site Visualizer (DSV software tool were used to predict and inspect favorable binding sites. We find that the hinge points revealed by MD simulations at the SANT2/Tower interface, at the SWIRM/AOD interface, and at the AOD/Tower interface are new targets for the discovery of molecular probes to block association of LSD1/CoREST with chromatin or protein partners. A fourth region was also predicted from simulated configurational ensembles and was experimentally validated to have strong binding propensity. The observation that this prediction would be prevented when using only the X-ray structures available (including the X-ray structure bound to the same peptide underscores the relevance of protein dynamics in protein interactions. A fifth region was highlighted corresponding to a small pocket on the AOD domain. This study sets the basis for future virtual screening campaigns targeting the five novel regions reported herein and for the design of LSD1/CoREST mutants to probe LSD1/CoREST binding with chromatin and various protein partners.

  19. Mucosal adjuvanticity of fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3: systemic and local antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhisheng Dang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that a bacterial fibronectin attachment protein (FAP is able to stimulate strong systemic and mucosal antibody responses when it is used alone or co-administrated with other antigens (Ags. Thus, it has been suggested to be a promising adjuvant candidate for the development of efficient vaccines. However, the co-administered Ags and FAP were cloned, expressed and purified individually to date. In a recent study, we first evaluated the adjuvanticity of a fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP, 24 amino acids of Mycobacterium avium FAP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3 (Em-TSP3 by detecting systemic and local antibody responses in intranasally (i.n. immunized BALB/c mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Em-TSP3 and FBP fragments were linked with a GSGGSG linker and expressed as a single fusion protein (Em-TSP3-FBP using the pBAD/Thio-TOPO expression vector. BALB/c mice were immunized i.n. with recombinant Em-TSP3-FBP (rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG and the systemic and local antibody responses were detected by ELISA. The results showed that both rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG evoked strong serum IgG (p<0.001 and IgG1 responses (p<0.001, whereas only the latter induced a high level IgG2α production (p<0.001, compared to that of rEm-TSP3 alone without any adjuvant. There were no significant differences in IgG and IgG1 production between the groups. Low level of serum IgA and IgM were detected in both groups. The tendency of Th1 and Th2 cell immune responses were assessed via detecting the IgG1/IgG2α ratio after the second and third immunizations. The results indicated that i.n. immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP resulted in an increased IgG1/IgG2α ratio (a Th2 tendency, while rEm-TSP3+CpG caused a rapid Th1 response that later shifted to a Th2 response. Immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP provoked significantly stronger IgA antibody responses in intestine (p<0.05, lung (p<0.001 and spleen (p<0.001 compared to those

  20. A tarantula-venom peptide that antagonises the TRPA1 nociceptor ion channel by binding to the S1-S4 gating domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Junhong; Liu, Boyi; Cao, Guan; Lipchik, Andrew M.; Perez, Minervo; Dekan, Zoltan; Mobli, Mehdi; Daly, Norelle L.; Alewood, Paul F.; Parker, Laurie L.; King, Glenn F.; Zhou, Yufeng; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Background The venoms of predators such as spiders, scorpions, cone snails, sea anemones, and snakes, have been an excellent source of pharmacological diversity for drug discovery and as pharmacological tools for elucidating the structure, function, and physiological properties of ion channels. Here we describe the first known peptide antagonist of the nociceptor ion channel transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1). Results We constructed a recombinant cDNA library encoding ∼100 diverse GPI-anchored peptide toxins (t-toxins) derived from spider venoms and screened this library by co-expression in Xenopus oocytes with TRPA1. This screen resulted in identification of protoxin-I (ProTx-I), a 35-residue peptide from the venom of the Peruvian green-velvet tarantula, Thrixopelma pruriens, as the first known high-affinity peptide TRPA1 antagonist. Interestingly, ProTx-I was previously identified as an antagonist of voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels. To identify the surfaces of ProTx-I by which it binds to these distinct ion channel types, we constructed a t-toxin library of ProTx-I alanine-scanning mutants and screened this library against NaV1.2 and TRPA1. This revealed distinct partially overlapping surfaces of ProTx-I by which it binds to these two ion channels, and whose specific chemical features explain its higher affinity for NaV1.2 than for TRPA1. Importantly, this mutagenesis yielded two novel ProTx-I variants that are only active against either TRPA1or NaV1.2, but not both. By testing its activity against chimeric channels, we identified the extracellular loops of the TRPA1 S1-S4 gating domain as the ProTx-I binding site. Conclusions These studies establish screening of t-toxin libraries of native and mutated toxins, which we term “toxineering”, as a generally applicable method for isolation of novel ion channel modifiers and for design of ion channel modifiers with altered target selectivity. They also suggest that ProTx-I will be a valuable

  1. Analysis of binding behavior between dynamic structures of a papain and the peptide consisting of 10 GLY residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2010-07-01

    The binding of 10GLY to dynamic structures of papain was investigated by molecular dynamics and docking simulations. The binding free energies and sites were greatly fluctuated depending on the time and the binding was more stable and existed at the near site of active center when the structural changes in the highly flexible residues in papain were larger. Binding stability and sites would be significantly influenced by the highly flexible residues. Analysis of such residues would provide an important guideline for clarification of enzymatic activities and modification of structural dynamics of such residues would allow us to control enzymatic activities.

  2. The most common Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule shares peptide binding repertoire with the HLA-B7 supertype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Christopher; Southwood, Scott; Hoof, Ilka; Rudersdorf, Richard; Peters, Bjoern; Sidney, John; Pinilla, Clemencia; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; Ling, Binhua; Marx, Preston; Sette, Alessandro; Mothé, Bianca R

    2010-07-01

    Of the two rhesus macaque subspecies used for AIDS studies, the Simian immunodeficiency virus-infected Indian rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is the most established model of HIV infection, providing both insight into pathogenesis and a system for testing novel vaccines. Despite the Chinese rhesus macaque potentially being a more relevant model for AIDS outcomes than the Indian rhesus macaque, the Chinese-origin rhesus macaques have not been well-characterized for their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) composition and function, reducing their greater utilization. In this study, we characterized a total of 50 unique Chinese rhesus macaques from several varying origins for their entire MHC class I allele composition and identified a total of 58 unique complete MHC class I sequences. Only nine of the sequences had been associated with Indian rhesus macaques, and 28/58 (48.3%) of the sequences identified were novel. From all MHC alleles detected, we prioritized Mamu-A1*02201 for functional characterization based on its higher frequency of expression. Upon the development of MHC/peptide binding assays and definition of its associated motif, we revealed that this allele shares peptide binding characteristics with the HLA-B7 supertype, the most frequent supertype in human populations. These studies provide the first functional characterization of an MHC class I molecule in the context of Chinese rhesus macaques and the first instance of HLA-B7 analogy for rhesus macaques. PMID:20480161

  3. Electrostatic Modifications of the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR P9 Peptide-Binding Pocket and Susceptibility to Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hov, Johannes R; Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Traherne, James A; Olsson, Marita; Boberg, Kirsten M; Bergquist, Annika; Schrumpf, Erik; Bradley, J Andrew; Taylor, Craig J; Lie, Benedicte A; Trowsdale, John; Karlsen, Tom H

    2011-01-01

    The strongest genetic risk factors for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are found in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex at chromosome 6p21. Genes in the HLA class II region encode molecules that present antigen to T lymphocytes. Polymorphisms in these genes are associated with most autoimmune diseases, most likely because they contribute to the specificity of immune responses. The aim of this study was to analyze the structure and electrostatic properties of the peptide-binding groove of HLA-DR in relation to PSC. Thus, four-digit resolution HLA-DRB1 genotyping was performed in 356 PSC patients and 366 healthy controls. Sequence information was used to assign which amino acids were encoded at all polymorphic positions. In stepwise logistic regressions, variations at residues 37 and 86 were independently associated with PSC (P = 1.2 × 10−32 and P = 1.8 × 10−22 in single-residue models, respectively). Three-dimensional modeling was performed to explore the effect of these key residues on the HLA-DR molecule. This analysis indicated that residue 37 was a major determinant of the electrostatic properties of pocket P9 of the peptide-binding groove. Asparagine at residue 37, which was associated with PSC, induced a positive charge in pocket P9. Tyrosine, which protected against PSC, induced a negative charge in this pocket. Consistent with the statistical observations, variation at residue 86 also indirectly influenced the electrostatic properties of this pocket. DRB1*13:01, which was PSC-associated, had a positive P9 pocket and DRB1*13:02, protective against PSC, had a negative P9 pocket. Conclusion: The results suggest that in patients with PSC, residues 37 and 86 of the HLA-DRβ chain critically influence the electrostatic properties of pocket P9 and thereby the range of peptides presented. (Hepatology 2011;53:1967-1976) PMID:21413052

  4. Simulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) structure and peptide loading into an MHC binding pocket with teachers'hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankian, Mojtaba

    2013-10-01

    Molecular understanding of three-dimensional (3D) peptide: MHC models require both basic knowledge of computational modeling and skilled visual perception, which are not possessed by all students. The present model aims to simulate MHC molecular structure with the hands and make a profound impression on the students. PMID:26989722

  5. Binding of the Cationic Peptide (KL)4K to Lipid Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface: Effect of Lipid Headgroup Charge, Acyl Chain Length, and Acyl Chain Saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädicke, André; Blume, Alfred

    2016-04-28

    The binding of the cationic peptide (KL)4K to monolayers of different anionic lipids was determined by adsorption experiments. The chemical structure of the anionic phospholipids was changed in different ways. First, the hydrophobic region of phosphatidylglycerols was altered by elongation of the acyl chain length. Second, an unsaturated chain was introduced. Third, lipids with negatively charged headgroups of different chemical structure were compared. (KL)4K itself shows no surface activity and does not bind to monolayers of zwitterionic lipids. Analysis of (KL)4K binding to anionic lipid monolayers reveals a competition between two binding processes: (i) incorporation of the peptide into the acyl chain region (surface pressure increase) and (ii) electrostatic interaction screening the negative charges with reduction of charge repulsion (surface pressure decrease due to monolayer condensation). The lipid acyl chain length and the chemical structure of the headgroup have minor effects on the binding properties. However, a strong dependence on the phase state of the monolayer was observed. In the liquid-expanded (LE) phase, the fluid monolayer provides enough space, so that peptide insertion due to hydrophobic interactions dominates. For monolayers in the liquid-condensed (LC) phase, peptide binding followed by monolayer condensation is the main effect. PMID:27049846

  6. An HIV-1 encoded peptide mimics the DNA binding loop of NF-κB and binds thioredoxin with high affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pro-fs is a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-l)-encoded putative selenoprotein, predicted by a theoretical analysis of the viral genome; it is potentially expressed by a -1 frameshift from the protease coding region. Pro-fs has significant sequence similarity to the DNA binding loop of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), which is known to bind thioredoxin (Trx). We hypothesize that the putative HIV-1 pro-fs gene product functions by mimicry of NF-κB via binding to Trx. The hypothesis was tested in vitro by co-immunoprecipitation and GST-pull down assays, using a purified mutant pro-fs protein, in which the two potential selenocysteine residues were mutated to cysteines, in order to permit expression in bacteria. Both experiments showed that pro-fs binds to human wild type Trx (Trx-wt) with high affinity. Mutation of the two conserved cysteine residues in the Trx active site redox center to serine (Ser) (Trx-CS) weakened but failed to abolish the interaction. In pro-fs-transfected 293T cells, using confocal microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we have observed that pro-fs localizes in cell nuclei and forms oligomers. Upon stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), Trx translocates into cell nuclei. Significant FRET efficiency was detected in the nuclei of PMA-stimulated 293T cells co-expressing fluorescence-tagged pro-fs and Trx-wt or Trx-CS. These results indicate that in living cells the double cysteine mutant of pro-fs binds to both Trx and Trx-CS with high affinity, suggesting that Trx-pro-fs binding is a structurally-specific interaction, involving more of the Trx molecule than just its active site cysteine residues. These results establish the capacity for functional mimicry of the Trx binding ability of the NF-κB/Rel family of transcription factors by the putative HIV-1 pro-fs protein

  7. Osteopontin and the C-terminal peptide of thrombospondin-4 compete for CD44 binding and have opposite effects on CD133+ cell colony formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobocan Monica C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C21, the C-terminal peptide of thrombospondin-4, has growth promoting activity and was discovered as one of several erythropoietin-dependent endothelial proteins. C21 stimulates red cell formation in anemic mice and is a growth factor for CD34+ and CD36+ hematopoietic cells, skin fibroblasts and kidney epithelial cells. ROD1 has been identified as an intracellular mediator. Nothing is known about the existence of putative C21 receptors on plasma membranes of target cells. Findings We analyzed the nature of C21-binding proteins in cell lysates of skin fibroblasts using C21 affinity columns. The membrane receptor CD44 was identified as C21-binding protein by mass spectrometry. We were unable to demonstrate any direct involvement of CD44 on cell growth or the effect of C21 on cell proliferation. A soluble form of CD44 was synthesized in insect cells and purified from culture supernatants with a combination of PVDF filtration in the presence of ammonium sulphate and HPLC. Both osteopontin and hyaluronic acid competitively displaced Biotin-C21 binding to CD44. In a colony-forming assay using primitive CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells from cord blood, osteopontin and C21 had opposite effects and C21 reduced the inhibitory action of osteopontin. Conclusion CD44 is a C21-binding membrane protein. We could not demonstrate an involvement of CD44 in the proliferative action of C21. Nevertheless, based on the antagonism of C21 and osteopontin in hematopoietic precursors, we speculate that C21 could indirectly have a major impact on hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, by hindering osteopontin membrane binding at the level of the bone marrow niche.

  8. The housekeeping dipeptide permease is the Escherichia coli heme transporter and functions with two optional peptide binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Létoffé, Sylvie; Delepelaire, Philippe; Wandersman, Cécile

    2006-01-01

    Heme, a major iron source, is transported through the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria by specific heme/hemoprotein receptors and through the inner membrane by heme-specific, periplasmic, binding protein-dependent, ATP-binding cassette permeases. Escherichia coli K12 does not use exogenous heme, and no heme uptake genes have been identified. Nevertheless, a recombinant E. coli strain expressing just one foreign heme outer membrane receptor can use exogenous heme as an iron source. Thi...

  9. Antibody to E1 peptide of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 inhibits virus binding and entry to HepG2 cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Awady, Mostafa K; Tabll, Ashraf A; Atef, Khaled; Yousef, Samar S; Omran, Moataza H; El-Abd, Yasmin; Bader-Eldin, Noha G; Salem, Ahmad M; Zohny, Samir F; El-Garf, Wael T

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the neutralizing activity of antibodies against E1 region of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Specific polyclonal antibody was raised via immunization of New Zealand rabbits with a synthetic peptide that had been derived from the E1 region of HCV and was shown to be highly conserved among HCV published genotypes. METHODS: Hyper-immune HCV E1 antibodies were incubated over night at 4 °C with serum samples positive for HCV RNA, with viral loads ranging from 615 to 3.2 million IU/ mL. Treated sera were incubated with HepG2 cells for 90 min. Blocking of viral binding and entry into cells by anti E1 antibody were tested by means of RT-PCR and flow cytometry. RESULTS: Direct immunostaining using FITC conjugated E1 antibody followed by Flow cytometric analysis showed reduced mean fluorescence intensity in samples pre-incubated with E1 antibody compared with untreated samples. Furthermore, 13 out of 18 positive sera (72%) showed complete inhibition of infectivity as detected by RT-PCR. CONCLUSION: In house produced E1 antibody, blocks binding and entry of HCV virion infection to target cells suggesting the involvement of this epitope in virus binding and entry. Isolation of these antibodies that block virus attachment to human cells are useful as therapeutic reagents. PMID:16688798

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  11. Determination of osteogenic or adipogenic lineages in muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) by a collagen-binding peptide (CBP) derived from bone sialoprotein (BSP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung [Dental Regenerative Biotechnology Major, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jue Yeon [Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Jin [Department of Industrial Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chong-Pyoung, E-mail: ccpperio@snu.ac.kr [Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yoon Jeong, E-mail: parkyj@snu.ac.kr [Dental Regenerative Biotechnology Major, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CBP sequence is identified from BSP and has collagen binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CBP directly activates the MAPK signaling, especially ERK1/2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CBP increase osteoblastic differentiation by the activation of Runx2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CBP decrease adipogenic differentiation by the inhibition of PPAR{gamma}. -- Abstract: Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a mineralized, tissue-specific, non-collagenous protein that is normally expressed only in mineralized tissues such as bone, dentin, cementum, and calcified cartilage, and at sites of new mineral formation. The binding of BSP to collagen is thought to be important for initiating bone mineralization and bone cell adhesion to the mineralized matrix. Several recent studies have isolated stem cells from muscle tissue, but their functional properties are still unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of a synthetic collagen-binding peptide (CBP) on the differentiation efficiency of muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs). The CBP sequence (NGVFKYRPRYYLYKHAYFYPHLKRFPVQ) corresponds to residues 35-62 of bone sialoprotein (BSP), which are located within the collagen-binding domain in BSP. Interestingly, this synthetic CBP inhibited adipogenic differentiation but increased osteogenic differentiation in MDSCs. The CBP also induced expression of osteoblastic marker proteins, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), type I collagen, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), and osteocalcin; prevented adipogenic differentiation in MDSCs; and down-regulated adipose-specific mRNAs, such as adipocyte protein 2 (aP2) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}. The CBP increased Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 protein phosphorylation, which is important in lineage determination. These observations suggest that this CBP determines the osteogenic or adipogenic lineage in MDSCs by activating ERK1/2. Taken together, a

  12. Identification of IgE-binding peptide and critical amino acids of Jatropha curcas allergen involved in allergenic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Livia Maia; de Oliveira, Natalia Deus; Damatta, Renato Augusto; do Nascimento, Viviane Veiga; Soares, Thais Pacheco; Machado, Olga Lima Tavares

    2016-01-01

    Increasing energy demand has spurred interest in the use of biofuels. Jatropha curcas (physic nut), an inedible oilseed, is a potential source of bioenergy. The seeds, however, contain allergens such as Jat c 1, a 2S albumin that can induce hypersensitivity reactions in humans and result in allergic diseases. Recent advances in identifying and characterizing plant allergens and, in particular, their immunoglobulin E (IgE)-binding epitopes have produced a wealth of information. We identified IgE-binding regions and the critical amino acids involved in the degranulation of mast cells and the release of histamine, preliminary steps for the prevention and treatment of this allergy. Four IgE-binding regions were identified in the sequence of Jat c 1. We identified and demonstrated the fundamental role of two glutamic acid residues in IgE binding. The sequence LEKQLEEGEVGS produces a random loop on the most exposed part of Jat c 1. This region is important to the stimulation of the allergic response. The possibility of using this information to produce vaccines and other pharmacological agents for allergy treatment is discussed. PMID:27119058

  13. Binding of cationic peptides (KX)4K to DPPG bilayers. Increasing the hydrophobicity of the uncharged amino acid X drives formation of membrane bound β-sheets: A DSC and FT-IR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädicke, André; Blume, Alfred

    2016-06-01

    The binding of cationic peptides of the sequence (KX)4K to lipid vesicles of negatively charged dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and temperature dependent Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The hydrophobicity of the uncharged amino acid X was changed from G (glycine) over A (alanine), Abu (α-aminobutyric acid), V (valine) to L (leucine). The binding of the peptides caused an increase of the phase transition temperature (Tm) of DPPG by up to 20°C. The shift depended on the charge ratio and on the hydrophobicity of the amino acid X. Unexpectedly, the upward shift of Tm increased with increasing hydrophobicity of X. FT-IR spectroscopy showed a shift of the CH2 stretching vibrations of DPPG to lower frequency, particularly for bilayers in the liquid-crystalline phase, indicating an ordering of the hydrocarbon chains when the peptides were bound. Changes in the lipid C=O vibrational band indicated a dehydration of the lipid headgroup region after peptide binding. (KG)4K was bound in an unordered structure at all temperatures. All other peptides formed intermolecular antiparallel β-sheets, when bound to gel phase DPPG. However, for (KA)4K and (KAbu)4K, the β-sheets converted into an unordered structure above Tm. In contrast, the β-sheet structures of (KV)4K and (KL)4K remained stable even at 80°C when bound to the liquid-crystalline phase of DPPG. Strong aggregation of DPPG vesicles occurred after peptide binding. For the aggregates, we suggest a structure, where aggregated single β-sheets are sandwiched between opposing DPPG bilayers with a dehydrated interfacial region. PMID:26903220

  14. Correspondences between the binding characteristics of a non-natural peptide, Lei-Dab7, and the distribution of SK subunits in the rat central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidi-Knani, Sabrine; Pezard, Laurent; Mpari, Bedel; Ben Hamida, Jeannette; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Mourre, Christiane; Regaya, Imed

    2015-04-01

    Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK1-SK3 channels) are responsible for long-lasting hyperpolarization following action potential and contribute to the neuronal firing and integration signal. Two peptide toxins: apamin and Leiurotoxin 1, block this SK channels with high affinities. We generated a modified Leiurotoxin 1 (Lei-Dab7) that inhibits SK2 channels with a high selectivity. Competitive binding of radio-iodinated apamin to different rat brain structures, in the presence of native apamin and Lei-Dab7, has shown that dissociation constants differ by a factor of 1000 and thus demonstrated that ligand affinity is as important as ligand selectivity for a specific receptor. However, the lack of ligands discriminating between SK channel subunits is impeding the understanding of the role of each heteromeric SK channel type in different tissues. Our study aims to better understand the molecular combinations of SK channels and their association with specific functional implications. On this purpose, a clustering technique allows us to identify five groups of brain structures reflecting singular profiles of affinity and selectivity of Lei-Dab7 in comparison with apamin. The analysis of correspondences between Lei-Dab7 binding and distribution of SK subunits in these groups of brain structures suggests that functional heteromeric SK channels are involved in specific information processes. PMID:25704615

  15. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum RhopH3 protein peptides that specifically bind to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Reyes, Claudia; Méndez, David; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2008-01-01

    The identification of sequences involved in binding to erythrocytes is an important step for understanding the molecular basis of merozoite–erythrocyte interactions that take place during invasion of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite into host cells. Several molecules located in the apical organelles (micronemes, rhoptry, dense granules) of the invasive-stage parasite are essential for erythrocyte recognition, invasion, and establishment of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole. Partic...

  16. Highly selective enrichment of phosphorylated peptides from peptide mixtures using titanium dioxide microcolumns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Røssel; Thingholm, Tine E; Jensen, Ole N;

    2005-01-01

    not. Other substituted aromatic carboxylic acids were also capable of specifically reducing binding of nonphosphorylated peptides, whereas phosphoric acid reduced binding of both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated peptides. A putative mechanism for this intriguing effect is presented....

  17. The role of amino acid electron-donor/acceptor atoms in host-cell binding peptides is associated with their 3D structure and HLA-binding capacity in sterile malarial immunity induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Fundamental residues located in some HABPs are associated with their 3D structure. ► Electron-donor atoms present in β-turn, random, distorted α-helix structures. ► Electron-donor atoms bound to HLA-DR53. ► Electron-acceptor atoms present in regular α-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. -- Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum malaria continues being one of the parasitic diseases causing the highest worldwide mortality due to the parasite’s multiple evasion mechanisms, such as immunological silence. Membrane and organelle proteins are used during invasion for interactions mediated by high binding ability peptides (HABPs); these have amino acids which establish hydrogen bonds between them in some of their critical binding residues. Immunisation assays in the Aotus model using HABPs whose critical residues had been modified have revealed a conformational change thereby enabling a protection-inducing response. This has improved fitting within HLA-DRβ1∗ molecules where amino acid electron-donor atoms present in β-turn, random or distorted α-helix structures preferentially bound to HLA-DR53 molecules, whilst HABPs having amino acid electron-acceptor atoms present in regular α-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. This data has great implications for vaccine development.

  18. The role of amino acid electron-donor/acceptor atoms in host-cell binding peptides is associated with their 3D structure and HLA-binding capacity in sterile malarial immunity induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@mail.com [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Almonacid, Hannia; Moreno-Vranich, Armando [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fundamental residues located in some HABPs are associated with their 3D structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random, distorted {alpha}-helix structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms bound to HLA-DR53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. -- Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum malaria continues being one of the parasitic diseases causing the highest worldwide mortality due to the parasite's multiple evasion mechanisms, such as immunological silence. Membrane and organelle proteins are used during invasion for interactions mediated by high binding ability peptides (HABPs); these have amino acids which establish hydrogen bonds between them in some of their critical binding residues. Immunisation assays in the Aotus model using HABPs whose critical residues had been modified have revealed a conformational change thereby enabling a protection-inducing response. This has improved fitting within HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules where amino acid electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random or distorted {alpha}-helix structures preferentially bound to HLA-DR53 molecules, whilst HABPs having amino acid electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. This data has great implications for vaccine development.

  19. Erythromycin, roxithromycin, and clarithromycin: use of slow-binding kinetics to compare their in vitro interaction with a bacterial ribosomal complex active in peptide bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinos, George P; Connell, Sean R; Nierhaus, Knud H; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L

    2003-03-01

    In a cell-free system derived from Escherichia coli, it is shown that clarithromycin and roxithromycin, like their parent compound erythromycin, do not inhibit the puromycin reaction (i.e., the peptide bond formation between puromycin and AcPhe-tRNA bound at the P-site of 70S ribosomes programmed with heteropolymeric mRNA). Nevertheless, all three antibiotics compete for binding on the ribosome with tylosin, a 16-membered ring macrolide that behaves as a slow-binding, slowly reversible inhibitor of peptidyltransferase. The mutually exclusive binding of these macrolides to ribosomes is also corroborated by the fact that they protect overlapping sites in domain V of 23S rRNA from chemical modification by dimethyl sulfate. From this competition effect, detailed kinetic analysis revealed that roxithromycin or clarithromycin (A), like erythromycin, reacts rapidly with AcPhe-tRNA.MF-mRNA x 70S ribosomal complex (C) to form the encounter complex CA which is then slowly isomerized to a more tight complex, termed C*A. The value of the overall dissociation constant, K, encompassing both steps of macrolide interaction with complex C, is 36 nM for erythromycin, 20 nM for roxithromycin, and 8 nM for clarithromycin. Because the off-rate constant of C*A complex does not significantly differ among the three macrolides, the superiority of clarithromycin as an inhibitor of translation in E. coli cells and many Gram-positive bacteria may be correlated with its greater rate of association with ribosomes. PMID:12606769

  20. Correction: Identification of specific calcitonin-like receptor residues important for calcitonin gene-related peptide high affinity binding

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Sugato; Evanson, Janel; Harris, Erik; Lowe, Stephen L; Speth, Robert C.; Thomasson, Kathryn A; Porter, James E.

    2006-01-01

    This is a correction article. After publication of this work [1], we became aware of the fact that Robert C. Speth was not included as an author. Dr. Speth put a considerable amount of time and effort into developing and preparing the radiopeptide used to carry out the radioligand binding studies reported in this manuscript and therefore should have originally been included as an author. We apologize to Dr. Speth for any inconvenience that this oversight might have caused and thank him for hi...

  1. Quantitative predictions of peptide binding to any HLA-DR molecule of known sequence: NetMHCIIpan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Blicher, Thomas;

    2008-01-01

    of TEPITOPE while outperforming TEPITOPE on novel alleles. We propose that the method can be used to identify those hitherto uncharacterized alleles, which should be addressed experimentally in future updates of the method to cover the polymorphism of HLA-DR most efficiently. We thus conclude that...... the presented method meets the challenge of keeping up with the MHC polymorphism discovery rate and that it can be used to sample the MHC "space," enabling a highly efficient iterative process for improving MHC class II binding predictions....

  2. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a...

  3. Ligand binding analyses of the putative peptide transporter YjdL from E. coli display a significant selectivity towards dipeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs) are secondary active transporters that couple the inwards translocation of di- and tripeptides to inwards proton translocation. Escherichia coli contains four genes encoding the putative POT proteins YhiP, YdgR, YjdL and YbgH. We have over-expressed the previously uncharacterized YjdL and investigated the peptide specificity by means of uptake inhibition. The IC50 value for the dipeptide Ala-Ala was measured to 22 mM while Ala-Ala-Ala was not able to inhibit uptake. In addition, IC50 values of 0.3 mM and 1.5 mM were observed for Ala-Lys and Tyr-Ala, respectively, while the alanyl-extended tripeptides Ala-Lys-Ala, Ala-Ala-Lys, Ala-Tyr-Ala and Tyr-Ala-Ala displayed values of 8, >50, 31 and 31 mM, respectively. These results clearly indicate that unlike most POT members characterized to date, including YdgR and YhiP, YjdL shows significantly higher specificity towards dipeptides.

  4. Rescue of amyloid-Beta-induced inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by a peptide homologous to the nicotine binding domain of the alpha 7 subtype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur A Nery

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by brain accumulation of the neurotoxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ and by loss of cholinergic neurons and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. Recent evidence indicates that memory loss and cognitive decline in AD correlate better with the amount of soluble Aβ than with the extent of amyloid plaque deposits in affected brains. Inhibition of nAChRs by soluble Aβ40 is suggested to contribute to early cholinergic dysfunction in AD. Using phage display screening, we have previously identified a heptapeptide, termed IQ, homologous to most nAChR subtypes, binding with nanomolar affinity to soluble Aβ40 and blocking Aβ-induced inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced currents in PC12 cells expressing α7 nAChRs. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis and whole-cell current recording, we have now defined the amino acids in IQ essential for reversal of Aβ40 inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced responses in PC12 cells, mediated by α7 subtypes and other endogenously expressed nAChRs. We further investigated the effects of soluble Aβ, IQ and analogues of IQ on α3β4 nAChRs recombinantly expressed in HEK293 cells. Results show that nanomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ40 potently inhibit the function of α3β4 nAChRs, and that subsequent addition of IQ or its analogues does not reverse this effect. However, co-application of IQ makes the inhibition of α3β4 nAChRs by Aβ40 reversible. These findings indicate that Aβ40 inhibits different subtypes of nAChRs by interacting with specific receptor domains homologous to the IQ peptide, suggesting that IQ may be a lead for novel drugs to block the inhibition of cholinergic function in AD.

  5. Peptide P5 (residues 628–683, comprising the entire membrane proximal region of HIV-1 gp41 and its calcium-binding site, is a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clavel François

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The membrane proximal region (MPR of the transmembrane subunit, gp41, of the HIV envelope glycoprotein plays a critical role in HIV-1 infection of CD4+ target cells and CD4-independent mucosal entry. It contains continuous epitopes recognized by neutralizing IgG antibodies 2F5, 4E10 and Z13, and is therefore considered to be a promising target for vaccine design. Moreover, some MPR-derived peptides, such as T20 (enfuvirtide, are in clinical use as HIV-1 inhibitors. We have shown that an extended MPR peptide, P5, harbouring the lectin-like domain of gp41 and a calcium-binding site, is implicated in the interaction of HIV with its mucosal receptor. We now investigate the potential antiviral activities of P5 and other such long MPR-derived peptides. Structural studies of gp41 MPR-derived peptides using circular dichroism showed that the peptides P5 (a.a.628–683, P1 (a.a.648–683, P5L (a.a.613–683 and P7 (a.a.613–746 displayed a well-defined α-helical structure. Peptides P5 inhibited HIV-1 envelope mediated cell-cell fusion and infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by both X4- and R5-tropic HIV-1 strains, whereas peptides P5 mutated in the calcium binding site or P1 lacked antiviral activity, when P5L blocked cell fusion in contrast to P7. Strikingly, P5 inhibited CD4-dependent infection by T20-resistant R5-tropic HIV-1 variants. Cell-cell fusion studies indicated that the anti-HIV-1 activity of P5, unlike T20, could not be abrogated in the presence of the N-terminal leucine zipper domain (LZ. These results suggested that P5 could serve as a potent fusion inhibitor.

  6. Binding of peptides from the N-terminal region of alpha-gliadin to the celiac disease-associated HLA-DQ2 molecule assessed in biochemical and T cell assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, B H; Gjertsen, H A; Vartdal, F;

    1996-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is most probably an immunological disease, precipitated in susceptible individuals by ingestion of wheat gliadin and related proteins from other cereals. The disease shows a strong HLA association predominantly to the cis- or trans-encoded HLA-DQ(alpha1*0501, beta1*02) (i.e., DQ......2) heterodimer. T cell recognition of gliadin peptides presented by DQ2 in the intestinal mucosa is central in the immunopathogenesis of CD. Here we describe a study where overlapping peptides from the N-terminal region of alpha-gliadin have been tested in biochemical assays for binding to affinity......-purified DQ2 and DR3 (i.e., DR(alpha, beta1*0301)) molecules. The peptides were also tested for binding to DQ2 in a functional binding assay, where binding was measured as the capacity to inhibit the stimulation of a gliadin-specific, DQ2-restricted T lymphocyte clone RNnTalpha33. In both assay systems the...

  7. Identification of Peptides That Inhibit the DNA Binding, trans-Activator, and DNA Replication Functions of the Human Papillomavirus Type 11 E2 Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Su-Jun; Pearce, Kenneth H.; Dixon, Eric P.; Hartley, Kelly A.; Stanley, Thomas B.; Lobe, David C.; Garvey, Edward P.; Kost, Thomas A.; Petty, Regina L.; Rocque, Warren J.; Alexander, Kenneth A.; Underwood, Mark R.

    2004-01-01

    Peptide antagonists of the human papillomavirus type 11 (HPV-11) E2-DNA association were identified using a filamentous bacteriophage random peptide library. Synthetic peptides antagonized the E2-DNA interaction, effectively blocked E2-mediated transcriptional activation of a reporter gene in cell culture, and inhibited E1-E2-mediated HPV-11 DNA replication in vitro. These peptides may prove to be useful tools for characterizing E2 function and for exploring the effectiveness of E2-inhibitor-...

  8. Novel Hybrid Compound of a Plinabulin Prodrug with an IgG Binding Peptide for Generating a Tumor Selective Noncovalent-Type Antibody-Drug Conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Kyohei; Yakushiji, Fumika; Kawamata, Ryosuke; Akiyama, Daichi; Arima, Risako; Shirasaka, Takuya; Kikkawa, Yamato; Taguchi, Akihiro; Takayama, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Takeshi; Watabe, Tetsuro; Ito, Yuji; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2016-07-20

    Although several approaches for making antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) have been developed, it has yet to be reported that an antibody binding peptide such as Z33 from protein A is utilized as the pivotal unit to generate the noncovalent-type ADC (NC-ADC). Herein we aim to establish a novel probe for NC-ADC by synthesizing the Z33-conjugated antitumor agent, plinabulin. Due to the different solubility of two components, including hydrophobic plinabulin and hydrophilic Z33, an innovative method with a solid-supported disulfide coupling reagent is required for the synthesis of the target compounds with prominent efficiency (29% isolated yield). We demonstrate that the synthesized hybrid exhibits a binding affinity against the anti-HER2 antibody (Herceptin) and the anti-CD71 antibody (6E1) (Kd = 46.6 ± 0.5 nM and 4.5 ± 0.56 μM, respectively) in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. In the cell-based assays, the hybrid provides a significant cytotoxicity in the presence of Herceptin against HER2 overexpressing SKBR-3 cells, but not against HER2 low-expressing MCF-7 cells. Further, it is noteworthy that the hybrid in combination with Herceptin induces cytotoxicity against Herceptin-resistant SKBR-3 (SKBR-3HR) cells. Similar results are obtained with the 6E1 antibody, suggesting that the synthesized hybrid can be widely applicable for NC-ADC using the antibody of interest. In summary, a series of evidence presented here strongly indicate that NC-ADCs have high potential for the next generation of antitumor agents. PMID:27304609

  9. NCAM Mimetic Peptides: An Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    pharmacological tools interfering with NCAM functions. Recent progress in our understanding of the structural basis of NCAM-mediated cell adhesion and signaling has allowed a structure-based design of NCAM mimetic peptides. Using this approach a number of peptides termed P2, P1-B, P-3-DE and P-3-G, whose...... sequences contain one or several NCAM homophilic binding sites involved in NCAM binding to itself, have been identified. By means of NMR titration analysis and molecular modeling a number of peptides derived from NCAM and targeting NCAM heterophilic ligands such as the fibroblast growth factor receptor and...... heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) have been identified. The FGL, dekaCAM, FRM/EncaminA, BCL, EncaminC and EncaminE peptides all target the FGF receptor whereas the heparin binding peptide HBP targets HSPG. Moreover, a number of NCAM binding peptides have been identified employing screening of...

  10. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, P.; Sosabowski, J.K.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of resea

  11. Alterations in chemical shifts and exchange broadening upon peptide boronic acid inhibitor binding to α-lytic protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    α-Lytic protease, a bacterial serine protease of 198 aminoacids (19800 Da), has been used as a model system for studies of catalytic mechanism, structure-function relationships, and more recently for studies of pro region-assisted protein folding. We have assigned the backbones of the enzyme alone, and of its complex with the tetrahedral transition state mimic N-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-Ala-Pro-boroVal, using double- and triple-resonance 3D NMR spectroscopy on uniformly15N- and 13C/15N-labeled protein.Changes in backbone chemical shifts between the uncomplexed and inhibited form of the protein are correlated with distance from the inhibitor, the displacement of backbone nitrogens, and change in hydrogen bond strength upon inhibitor binding (derived from previously solved crystal structures).A comparison of the solution secondary structure of the uninhibited enzyme with that of the X-ray structure reveals no significant differences.Significant line broadening, indicating intermediate chemical exchange, was observed in many of the active site amides (including three broadened to invisibility), and in a majority of cases the broadening was reversed upon addition of the inhibitor. Implications and possible mechanisms of this line broadening are discussed

  12. 68Ga-labeling and in vivo evaluation of a uPAR binding DOTA- and NODAGA-conjugated peptide for PET imaging of invasive cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a well-established biomarker for tumor aggressiveness and metastatic potential. DOTA-AE105 and DOTA-AE105-NH2 labeled with 64Cu have previously been demonstrated to be able to noninvasively monitor uPAR expression using positron emission tomography (PET) in human cancer xenograft mice models. Here we introduce 68Ga-DOTA-AE105-NH2 and 68Ga-NODAGA-AE105-NH2 and evaluate their imaging properties using small-animal PET. Methods: Synthesis of DOTA-AE105-NH2 and NODAGA-AE105-NH2 was based on solid-phase peptide synthesis protocols using the Fmoc strategy. 68GaCl3 was eluted from a 68Ge/68Ga generator. The eluate was either concentrated on a cation-exchange column or fractionated and used directly for labeling. For in vitro characterization of both tracers, partition coefficient, buffer and plasma stability, uPAR binding affinity and cell uptake were determined. To characterize the in vivo properties, dynamic microPET imaging was carried out in nude mice bearing human glioma U87MG tumor xenograft. Results: In vitro experiments revealed uPAR binding affinities in the lower nM range for both conjugated peptides and identical to AE105. Labeling of DOTA-AE105-NH2 and NODAGA-AE105-NH2 with 68Ga was done at 95°C and room temperature, respectively. The highest radiochemical yield and purity were obtained using fractionated elution, whereas a negative effect of acetone on labeling efficiency for NODAGA-AE105-NH2 was observed. Good stability in phosphate-buffered saline and mouse plasma was observed. High cell uptake was found for both tracers in U87MG tumor cells. Dynamic microPET imaging demonstrated good tumor-to-background ratio for both tracers. Tumor uptake was 2.1% ID/g and 1.3% ID/g 30 min postinjection and 2.0% ID/g and 1.1% ID/g 60 min postinjection for 68Ga-NODAGA-AE105-NH2 and 68Ga-DOTA-AE105-NH2, respectively. A significantly higher tumor-to-muscle ratio (P68Ga-NODAGA-AE105-NH2 60 min

  13. An Immunosensor Based on Antibody Binding Fragments Attached to Gold Nanoparticles for the Detection of Peptides Derived from Avian Influenza Hemagglutinin H5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Jarocka

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the development of an immunosensor for detection of peptides derived from avian influenza hemagglutinin H5. Its preparation consists of successive gold electrode modification steps: (i modification with 1,6-hexanedithiol and gold colloidal nanoparticles; (ii immobilization of antibody-binding fragments (Fab’ of anti-hemagglutinin H5 monoclonal antibodies Mab 6-9-1 via S-Au covalent bonds; and (iii covering the remaining free space on the electrode surfaces with bovine serum albumin. The interactions between Fab’ fragments and hemagglutinin (HA variants have been explored with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS in the presence of [Fe(CN6]3−/4− as an electroactive marker. The immunosensor was able to recognize three different His-tagged variants of recombinant hemagglutinin from H5N1 viruses: H1 subunit (17–340 residues of A/swan/Poland/305-135V08/2006, the long HA (17–530 residues A/Bar-headed Goose/Qinghai/12/2005 and H1 subunit (1–345 residues of A/Vietnam/1194/2004. The strongest response has been observed for the long variant with detection limit of 2.2 pg/mL and dynamic range from 4.0 to 20.0 pg/mL.

  14. Ridge preservation with acellular dermal matrix and anorganic bone matrix cell-binding peptide P-15 after tooth extraction in humans. A histologic and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur B. Novaes Jr

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze by histomorphometric parameters the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM with or without anorganic bovine bone matrix (ABM / synthetic cell-binding peptide P-15 in the formation of bone in human alveoli. Materials and methods: Eighteen patients in need of extraction of maxillary anterior teeth were selected and randomly assigned to the test group (ADM plus ABM/P-15 or the control group (ADM only. Histomorphometric measurements and histological analysis were recorded about 6 months after ridge preservation procedures in ten patients. The amount of newly formed bone, the most recently formed bone, fibrous tissue plus marrow spaces and remaining graft particles were measured and analyzed. Results: At 6 months, the new bone area parameter and the percentage of fibrous tissue plus marrow space areas showed higher values to the control group, and statistically significant differences when compared with the test group (p=0.03. Conclusion: The ADM acted as a membrane. The association of ABM/P-15 with ADM resulted in new bone formation within the alveoli, but the results were not considered relevant when used in this indication.

  15. Retest imaging of [11C]NOP-1A binding to nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptors in the brain of healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohith, Talakad G; Zoghbi, Sami S; Morse, Cheryl L; Araneta, Maria D Ferraris; Barth, Vanessa N; Goebl, Nancy A; Tauscher, Johannes T; Pike, Victor W; Innis, Robert B; Fujita, Masahiro

    2014-02-15

    [(11)C]NOP-1A is a novel high-affinity PET ligand for imaging nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptors. Here, we report reproducibility and reliability measures of binding parameter estimates for [(11)C]NOP-1A binding in the brain of healthy humans. After intravenous injection of [(11)C]NOP-1A, PET scans were conducted twice on eleven healthy volunteers on the same (10/11 subjects) or different (1/11 subjects) days. Subjects underwent serial sampling of radial arterial blood to measure parent radioligand concentrations. Distribution volume (VT; a measure of receptor density) was determined by compartmental (one- and two-tissue) modeling in large regions and by simpler regression methods (graphical Logan and bilinear MA1) in both large regions and voxel data. Retest variability and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of VT were determined as measures of reproducibility and reliability respectively. Regional [(11)C]NOP-1A uptake in the brain was high, with a peak radioactivity concentration of 4-7 SUV (standardized uptake value) and a rank order of putamen>cingulate cortex>cerebellum. Brain time-activity curves fitted well in 10 of 11 subjects by unconstrained two-tissue compartmental model. The retest variability of VT was moderately good across brain regions except cerebellum, and was similar across different modeling methods, averaging 12% for large regions and 14% for voxel-based methods. The retest reliability of VT was also moderately good in most brain regions, except thalamus and cerebellum, and was similar across different modeling methods averaging 0.46 for large regions and 0.48 for voxels having gray matter probability >20%. The lowest retest variability and highest retest reliability of VT were achieved by compartmental modeling for large regions, and by the parametric Logan method for voxel-based methods. Moderately good reproducibility and reliability measures of VT for [(11)C]NOP-1A make it a useful PET ligand for comparing NOP receptor

  16. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. PMID:23355488

  17. Computer-assisted prediction of HLA-DR binding and experimental analysis for human promiscuous Th1-cell peptides in the 24 kDa secreted lipoprotein (LppX) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Attiyah, R; Mustafa, A S

    2004-01-01

    The secreted 24 kDa lipoprotein (LppX) is an antigen that is specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and M. leprae. The present study was carried out to identify the promiscuous T helper 1 (Th1)-cell epitopes of the M. tuberculosis LppX (MT24, Rv2945c) antigen by using 15 overlapping synthetic peptides (25 mers overlapping by 10 residues) covering the sequence of the complete protein. The analysis of Rv2945c sequence for binding to 51 alleles of nine serologically defined HLA-DR molecules, by using a virtual matrix-based prediction program (propred), showed that eight of the 15 peptides of Rv2945c were predicted to bind promiscuously to >/=10 alleles from more than or equal to three serologically defined HLA-DR molecules. The Th1-cell reactivity of all the peptides was assessed in antigen-induced proliferation and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-secretion assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 37 bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-vaccinated healthy subjects. The results showed that 17 of the 37 donors, which represented an HLA-DR-heterogeneous group, responded to one or more peptides of Rv2945c in the Th1-cell assays. Although each peptide stimulated PBMCs from one or more donors in the above assays, the best positive responses (12/17 (71%) responders) were observed with the peptide p14 (aa 196-220). This suggested a highly promiscuous presentation of p14 to Th1 cells. In addition, the sequence of p14 is completely identical among the LppX of M. tuberculosis, M. bovis and M. leprae, which further supports the usefulness of Rv2945c and p14 in the subunit vaccine design against both tuberculosis and leprosy. PMID:14723617

  18. Efficient expression of isotopically labeled peptides for high resolution NMR studies: Application to the Cdc42/Rac binding domains of virulent kinases in Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of bioactive peptides and small protein fragments is commonly achieved via solid-phase chemical synthesis. However, such techniques become unviable and prohibitively expensive when the peptides are large (e.g., >30 amino acids) or when isotope labeling is required for NMR studies. Expression and purification of large quantities of unfolded peptides in E. coli have also proved to be difficult even when the desired peptides are carried by fusion proteins such as GST. We have developed a peptide expression system that utilizes a novel fusion protein (SFC120) which is highly expressed and directs the peptides to inclusion bodies, thereby minimizing in-cell proteolysis whilst maintaining high yields of peptide expression. The expressed peptides can be liberated from the carrier protein by CNBr cleavage at engineered methionine sites or through proteolysis by specific proteases for peptides containing methionine residues. In the present systems, we use CNBr, due to the absence of methionine residues in the target peptides, although other cleavage sites can be easily inserted. We report the production of six unfolded protein fragments of different composition and lengths (19 to 48 residues) derived from the virulent effector kinases, Cla4 and Ste20 of Candida albicans. All six peptides were produced with high yields of purified material (30-40 mg/l in LB, 15-20 mg/l in M9 medium), pointing to the general applicability of this expression system for peptide production. The enrichment of these peptides with 15N, 15N/13C and even 15N/13C/2H isotopes is presented allowing speedy assignment of poorly-resolved resonances of flexible peptides

  19. Evaluation of anorganic bovine-derived hydroxyapatite matrix/cell binding peptide as a bone graft material in the treatment of human periodontal infrabony defects: A clinico-radiographic study

    OpenAIRE

    Ghousia Fatima; Ravindra Shivamurthy; Srinath Thakur; Mohammad Abdul Baseer

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various bone graft materials have been used in the treatment of periodontal defects. A synthetic bone substitute material composed of P-15 with anorganic bone mineral has been scantly studied. Hence, the present study was aimed to evaluate and compare the efficacy of anorganic bovine-derived hydroxyapatite matrix (ABM)/cell binding peptide (P-15) in human periodontal infrabony defects with that of open flap debridement (OFD) alone. Materials and Methods: A split-mouth, randomized ...

  20. The Effects of Endogenous Non-Peptide Molecule Isatin and Hydrogen Peroxide on Proteomic Profiling of Rat Brain Amyloid-β Binding Proteins: Relevance to Alzheimer’s Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei E. Medvedev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid-β peptide is considered as a key player in the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Although good evidence exists that amyloid-β accumulates inside cells, intracellular brain amyloid-binding proteins remain poorly characterized. Proteomic profiling of rat brain homogenates, performed in this study, resulted in identification of 89 individual intracellular amyloid-binding proteins, and approximately 25% of them were proteins that we had previously identified as specifically binding to isatin, an endogenous neuroprotector molecule. A significant proportion of the amyloid-binding proteins (more than 30% are differentially expressed or altered/oxidatively modified in AD patients. Incubation of brain homogenates with 70 µM hydrogen peroxide significantly influenced the profile of amyloid-β binding proteins and 0.1 mM isatin decreased the number of identified amyloid-β binding proteins both in control and hydrogen peroxide treated brain homogenates. The effects of hydrogen peroxide and isatin have been confirmed in optical biosensor experiments with purified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, one of the known crucial amyloid-β binding proteins (also identified in this study. Data obtained suggest that isatin protects crucial intracellular protein targets against amyloid binding, and possibly favors intracellular degradation of this protein via preventing formation of amyloid-β oligomers described in the literature for some isatin derivatives.

  1. Involvement of three meningococcal surface-exposed proteins, the heparin-binding protein NhbA, the α-peptide of IgA protease and the autotransporter protease NalP, in initiation of biofilm formation

    KAUST Repository

    Arenas, Jesús

    2012-12-04

    Neisseria meningitidis is a common and usually harmless inhabitant of the mucosa of the human nasopharynx, which, in rare cases, can cross the epithelial barrier and cause meningitis and sepsis. Biofilm formation favours the colonization of the host and the subsequent carrier state. Two different strategies of biofilm formation, either dependent or independent on extracellular DNA (eDNA), have been described for meningococcal strains. Here, we demonstrate that the autotransporter protease NalP, the expression of which is phase variable, affects eDNA-dependent biofilm formation in N.meningitidis. The effect of NalP was found in biofilm formation under static and flow conditions and was dependent on its protease activity. Cleavage of the heparin-binding antigen NhbA and the α-peptide of IgA protease, resulting in the release of positively charged polypeptides from the cell surface, was responsible for the reduction in biofilm formation when NalP is expressed. Both NhbA and the α-peptide of IgA protease were shown to bind DNA. We conclude that NhbA and the α-peptide of IgA protease are implicated in biofilm formation by binding eDNA and that NalP is an important regulator of this process through the proteolysis of these surface-exposed proteins. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Distinctive binding modes and inhibitory mechanisms of two peptidic inhibitors of urokinase-type plasminogen activator with isomeric P1 residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng;

    2015-01-01

    Two isomeric piperidine derivatives (meta and para isomers) were used as arginine mimics in the P1 position of a cyclic peptidic inhibitor (CPAYSRYLDC) of urokinase-type plasminogen activator. The two resulting cyclic peptides showed vastly different affinities (~70 fold) to the target enzyme. X......-ray crystal structure analysis showed that the two P1 residues were inserted into the S1 specificity pocket in indistinguishable manners. However, the rest of the peptides bound in entirely different ways on the surface of the enzyme, and the two peptides have different conformations, despite the highly...... similar sequence. These results demonstrate how the subtle difference in P1 residue can dictate the exosite interactions and the potencies of peptidic inhibitors, and highlight the importance of P1 residue for protease inhibition. This study provides important information for the development of peptidic...

  3. A New Versatile Immobilization Tag Based on the Ultra High Affinity and Reversibility of the Calmodulin-Calmodulin Binding Peptide Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Somnath; Ura, Marcin; Hoey, Robert J; Kossiakoff, Anthony A

    2015-08-14

    Reversible, high-affinity immobilization tags are critical tools for myriad biological applications. However, inherent issues are associated with a number of the current methods of immobilization. Particularly, a critical element in phage display sorting is functional immobilization of target proteins. To circumvent these problems, we have used a mutant (N5A) of calmodulin binding peptide (CBP) as an immobilization tag in phage display sorting. The immobilization relies on the ultra high affinity of calmodulin to N5A mutant CBP (RWKKNFIAVSAANRFKKIS) in presence of calcium (KD~2 pM), which can be reversed by EDTA allowing controlled "capture and release" of the specific binders. To evaluate the capabilities of this system, we chose eight targets, some of which were difficult to overexpress and purify with other tags and some had failed in sorting experiments. In all cases, specific binders were generated using a Fab phage display library with CBP-fused constructs. KD values of the Fabs were in subnanomolar to low nanomolar (nM) ranges and were successfully used to selectively recognize antigens in cell-based experiments. Some of these targets were problematic even without any tag; thus, the fact that all led to successful selection endpoints means that borderline cases can be worked on with a high probability of a positive outcome. Taken together with examples of successful case specific, high-level applications like generation of conformation-, epitope- and domain-specific Fabs, we feel that the CBP tag embodies all the attributes of covalent immobilization tags but does not suffer from some of their well-documented drawbacks. PMID:26159704

  4. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Boerman, Otto C.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of research in nuclear medicine. The {sup 111}In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (OctreoScan trademark) is the most successful radiopeptide for tumour imaging, and was the first to be approved for diagnostic use. Based on the success of these studies, other receptor-targeting peptides such as cholecystokinin/gastrin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1, bombesin (BN), chemokine receptor CXCR4 targeting peptides, and RGD peptides are currently under development or undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of these peptides and their analogues, with regard to their potential for radionuclide imaging of tumours. (orig.)

  5. The Amyloid-β Peptide of Alzheimer’s Disease Binds CuI in a Linear Bis-His Coordination Environment: Insight into a Possible Neuroprotective Mechanism for the Amyloid-β Peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, J.; Szalai, V

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to contribute to neuronal apoptosis associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Copper may participate in oxidative stress through redox-cycling between its +2 and +1 oxidation states to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). In vitro, copper binds to the amyloid-? peptide of AD, and in vivo, copper is associated with amyloid plaques characteristic of AD. As a result, the A?CuI complex may be a critical reactant involved in ROS associated with AD etiology. To characterize the A?CuI complex, we have pursued X-ray absorption (XAS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of A?CuII and A?CuI (produced by ascorbate reduction of A?CuII). The A?CuII complex Cu K-edge XAS spectrum is indicative of a square-planar CuII center with mixed N/O ligation. Multiple scattering analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data for A?CuII indicates that two of the ligands are imidazole groups of histidine ligands, indicating a (NIm)2(N/O)2 CuII ligation sphere for A?CuII. After reduction of the A?CuII complex with ascorbate, the edge region decreases in energy by 4 eV. The X-ray absorption near-edge spectrum region of A?CuI displays an intense pre-edge feature at 8984.1(2) eV. EXAFS data fitting yielded a two-coordinate geometry, with two imidazole ligands coordinated to CuI at 1.877(2) A in a linear geometry. Ascorbate reduction of A?CuII under inert atmosphere and subsequent air oxidation of A?CuI to regenerate A?CuII was monitored by low-temperature EPR spectroscopy. Slow reappearance of the A?CuII EPR signal indicates that O2 oxidation of the A?CuI complex is kinetically sluggish and A? damage is occurring following reoxidation of A?CuI by O2. Together, these results lead us to hypothesize that CuI is ligated by His13 and His14 in a linear coordination environment in ??, that A? may be playing a neuroprotective role, and that metal-mediated oxidative damage of A? occurs over multiple redox cycles.

  6. High-affinity human leucocyte antigen class I binding variola-derived peptides induce CD4(+) T cell responses more than 30 years post-vaccinia virus vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M.; Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Lund, Ole; Dziegiel, M. H.; Buus, S.; Claesson, M. H.

    2009-01-01

    Interferon-gamma secreting T lymphocytes against pox virus-derived synthetic 9-mer peptides were tested by enzyme-linked immunospot in peripheral blood of individuals vaccinated with vaccinia virus more than 30 years ago. The peptides were characterized biochemically as high-affinity human leucoc...

  7. Improved affinity of engineered streptavidin for the Strep-tag II peptide is due to a fixed open conformation of the lid-like loop at the binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korndörfer, Ingo P.; Skerra, Arne

    2002-01-01

    The Strep-tag II is a nine-amino acid peptide that was developed as an affinity tool for the purification of corresponding fusion proteins on streptavidin columns. The peptide recognizes the same pocket of streptavidin where the natural ligand is normally bound so that biotin or its chemical derivatives can be used for competitive elution. We report here the crystal structures of the streptavidin mutants `1' and `2,' which had been engineered for 10-fold higher affinity towards the Strep-tag II. Both streptavidin mutants carry mutations at positions 44, 45, and 47, that is, in a flexible loop region close to the binding site. The crystal structures of the two apo-proteins and their complexes with the Strep-tag II peptide were refined at resolutions below 2 Å. Both in the presence and absence of the peptide, the lid-like loop next to the ligand pocket—comprising residues 45 through 52—adopts an `open' conformation in all four subunits within the asymmetric unit. The same loop was previously described to be disordered in the wild-type apo-streptavidin and to close over the pocket upon complexation of the natural ligand biotin. Our findings suggest that stabilization of the `open' loop conformation in the absence of a ligand abolishes the need for conformational rearrangement prior to the docking of the voluminous peptide. Because no direct contacts between the flexible part of the loop and the peptide ligand were detected, it seems likely that the higher affinity of the two streptavidin mutants for the Strep-tag II is caused by a predominantly entropic mechanism. PMID:11910031

  8. Different binding motifs of the celiac disease-associated HLA molecules DQ2.5, DQ2.2, and DQ7.5 revealed by relative quantitative proteomics of endogenous peptide repertoires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergseng, Elin; Dørum, Siri; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.;

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is caused by intolerance to cereal gluten proteins, and HLA-DQ molecules are involved in the disease pathogenesis by presentation of gluten peptides to CD4+ T cells. The α- or β-chain sharing HLA molecules DQ2.5, DQ2.2, and DQ7.5 display different risks for the disease. It was...... recently demonstrated that T cells of DQ2.5 and DQ2.2 patients recognize distinct sets of gluten epitopes, suggesting that these two DQ2 variants select different peptides for display. To explore whether this is the case, we performed a comprehensive comparison of the endogenous self-peptides bound to HLA...... established binding motifs. The binding motif of DQ2.2 was strikingly different from that of DQ2.5 with position P3 being a major anchor having a preference for threonine and serine. This is notable as three recently identified epitopes of gluten recognized by T cells of DQ2.2 celiac patients harbor serine at...

  9. Inhibition of αIIbβ3 Ligand Binding by an αIIb Peptide that Clasps the Hybrid Domain to the βI Domain of β3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Hwa Lee

    Full Text Available Agonist-stimulated platelet activation triggers conformational changes of integrin αIIbβ3, allowing fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation. We have previously shown that an octapeptide, p1YMESRADR8, corresponding to amino acids 313-320 of the β-ribbon extending from the β-propeller domain of αIIb, acts as a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. Here we have performed in silico modelling analysis of the interaction of this peptide with αIIbβ3 in its bent and closed (not swing-out conformation and show that the peptide is able to act as a substitute for the β-ribbon by forming a clasp restraining the β3 hybrid and βI domains in a closed conformation. The involvement of species-specific residues of the β3 hybrid domain (E356 and K384 and the β1 domain (E297 as well as an intrapeptide bond (pE315-pR317 were confirmed as important for this interaction by mutagenesis studies of αIIbβ3 expressed in CHO cells and native or substituted peptide inhibitory studies on platelet functions. Furthermore, NMR data corroborate the above results. Our findings provide insight into the important functional role of the αIIb β-ribbon in preventing integrin αIIbβ3 head piece opening, and highlight a potential new therapeutic approach to prevent integrin ligand binding.

  10. Measurement of the Interaction Between Recombinant I-domain from Integrin alpha 2 beta 1 and a Triple Helical Collagen Peptide with the GFOGER Binding Motif Using Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Welland

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the collagen-platelet interaction is of crucial importance to the haemostatic response during both injury and pathogenesis of the blood vessel wall. Of particular interest is the high affinity interaction of the platelet transmembrane receptor, alpha 2 beta 1, responsible for firm attachment of platelets to collagen at and around injury sites. We employ single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS using the atomic force microscope (AFM to study the interaction of the I-domain from integrin alpha 2 beta 1 with a synthetic collagen related triple-helical peptide containing the high-affinity integrin-binding GFOGER motif, and a control peptide lacking this sequence, referred to as GPP. By utilising synthetic peptides in this manner we are able to study at the molecular level subtleties that would otherwise be lost when considering cell-to-collagen matrix interactions using ensemble techniques. We demonstrate for the first time the complexity of this interaction as illustrated by the complex multi-peaked force spectra and confirm specificity using control blocking experiments. In addition we observe specific interaction of the GPP peptide sequence with the I-domain. We propose a model to explain these observations.

  11. Novel targeted nuclear imaging agent for gastric cancer diagnosis: glucose-regulated protein 78 binding peptide-guided 111In-labeled polymeric micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng CC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Chia Cheng,1,2,* Chiung-Fang Huang,3,4,* Ai-Sheng Ho,5 Cheng-Liang Peng,6 Chun-Chao Chang,7,8 Fu-Der Mai,1,9 Ling-Yun Chen,10 Tsai-Yueh Luo,2 Jungshan Chang1,11,121Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 2Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan, 3School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 4Division of Family and Operative Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 5Division of Gastroenterology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, 6Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 7Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 8Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 9Department of Biochemistry, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 10Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, 11Neuroscience Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 12Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Increased expression of cellular membrane bound glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78 is considered to be one of the biomarkers for gastric cancers. Therefore, peptides or molecules with specific recognition to GRP78 can act as a guiding probe to direct conjugated imaging agents to localized cancers. Based on this rationale, GRP78-guided polymeric micelles were designed and manufactured for nuclear imaging detection of tumors. Thiolated GRP78 binding peptide (GRP78BP was first labeled with maleimide-terminated poly(ethylene glycol–poly(ε-caprolactone and then mixed with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA-linked poly(ethylene glycol–poly(ε-caprolactone to form DTPA/GRP78BP-conjugated micelles. The coupling efficiency of micelles with

  12. Peptide-binding motif prediction by using phage display library for SasaUBA*0301, a resistance haplotype of MHC class I molecule from Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Hermsen, Trudi; Stet, Rene J M;

    2008-01-01

    proteins, beta(2)m/SasaUBA*0301, were produced in Escherichia coli, in which the carboxyl terminus of beta(2)-microglobulin is joined together with a flexible (GGGGS)(3) linker to the amino terminus of the heavy chain. One hundred and seven individual phages bound to beta(2)m/SasaUBA*0301 were isolated...... after four rounds of panning from the 7mer random-peptide library. The peptide encoding sequences were determined and peptide alignment led to the prediction of position-specific anchor residue. A prominent proline at position 2 was observed and we predict that it might be one of the anchors at the N...

  13. Oostatic peptides with .sup.3./sup.H-labeled proline: synthesis, biological activity, binding and distribution studies in the flesh fly .I.Neobellieria bullata./I..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Jan; Bennettová, Blanka; Nazarov, Elšan; Slaninová, Jiřina; Černý, B.; Holík, Josef; Tykva, Richard

    Napoli : Edizioni Ziino, 2002 - (Benedetti, E.; Pedone, C.), s. 130-131 ISBN 88-900948-1-8. [Peptides 2002. European Peptide Symposium /27./. Sorrento (IT), 31.08.2002-06.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0955; GA ČR GA203/02/0247 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907; CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : oostatic peptides * .I.Neobellieria bullata./I. * synthesis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  14. A peptide derived from the CD loop-D helix region of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces neuronal differentiation and survival by binding to the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor and common cytokine receptor chain gp130

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathje, Mette; Pankratova, Stanislava; Nielsen, Janne; Gotfryd, Kamil; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces neuronal differentiation and promotes the survival of various neuronal cell types by binding to a receptor complex formed by CNTF receptor a (CNTFRa), gp130, and the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor (LIFR). The CD loop-D helix region of CNTF has...... that these receptors are involved in the effects of cintrofin. The C-terminal part of the peptide, corresponding to the D helix region of CNTF, was shown to be essential for the neuritogenic action of the peptide. CNTF and LIF induced neurite outgrowth in CGNs plated on laminin-coated slides. On...... uncoated slides, CNTF and LIF had no neuritogenic effect but were able to inhibit cintrofin-induced neuronal differentiation, indicating that cintrofin and cytokines compete for the same receptors. In addition, cintrofin induced the phosphorylation of STAT3, Akt, and ERK, indicating that it exerts cell...

  15. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ErkkiRuoslahti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  16. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  17. Synthetic Peptide Immunogens Elicit Polyclonal and Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Linear Epitopes in the D Motifs of Staphylococcus aureus Fibronectin-Binding Protein, Which Are Composed of Amino Acids That Are Essential for Fibronectin Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Huesca, Mario; Sun, Qing; Peralta, Robert; Shivji, Gulnar M.; Sauder, Daniel N.; McGavin, Martin J.

    2000-01-01

    A fibronectin (Fn)-binding adhesin of Staphylococcus aureus contains three tandem 37- or 38-amino-acid motifs (D1, D2, and D3), which function to bind Fn. Plasma from patients with S. aureus infections contain antibodies that preferentially recognize ligand induced binding sites in the D motifs and do not inhibit Fn binding (F. Casolini, L. Visai, D. Joh, P. G. Conaldi, A. Toniolo, M. Höök, and P. Speziale, Infect. Immun. 66:5433–5442, 1998). To eliminate the influence of Fn binding on antibo...

  18. Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry Reveal Self-Association and Metal-Ion Binding of Hydrophobic Peptides: A Study of the Gramicidin Dimer

    OpenAIRE

    Chitta, Raghu K.; Gross, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Gramicidin is a membrane pentadecapeptide that acts as a channel, allowing the passage of monovalent metal ions and assisting in bacterial cell death. The active form is a noncovalently bound dimer. One means to study the self-assembly of this peptide has been to compare the state of the peptide in various solvents ranging from hydrophilic (e.g., trifluoroethanol) to hydrophobic (e.g., n-propanol). In this article, we report the use of electrospray mass spectrometry to study the self-associat...

  19. The Inhibition of Stat5 by a Peptide Aptamer Ligand Specific for the DNA Binding Domain Prevents Target Gene Transactivation and the Growth of Breast and Prostate Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Vafaizadeh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The signal transducer and activator of transcription Stat5 is transiently activated by growth factor and cytokine signals in normal cells, but its persistent activation has been observed in a wide range of human tumors. Aberrant Stat5 activity was initially observed in leukemias, but subsequently also found in carcinomas. We investigated the importance of Stat5 in human tumor cell lines. shRNA mediated downregulation of Stat5 revealed the dependence of prostate and breast cancer cells on the expression of this transcription factor. We extended these inhibition studies and derived a peptide aptamer (PA ligand, which directly interacts with the DNA-binding domain of Stat5 in a yeast-two-hybrid screen. The Stat5 specific PA sequence is embedded in a thioredoxin (hTRX scaffold protein. The resulting recombinant protein S5-DBD-PA was expressed in bacteria, purified and introduced into tumor cells by protein transduction. Alternatively, S5-DBD-PA was expressed in the tumor cells after infection with a S5-DBD-PA encoding gene transfer vector. Both strategies impaired the DNA-binding ability of Stat5, suppressed Stat5 dependent transactivation and caused its intracellular degradation. Our experiments describe a peptide based inhibitor of Stat5 protein activity which can serve as a lead for the development of a clinically useful compound for cancer treatment.

  20. A class of DNA-binding peptides from wheat bud causes growth inhibition, G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgjo Kjell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deproteinized DNA from eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells still contains a low-molecular weight peptidic fraction which can be dissociated by alkalinization of the medium. This fraction inhibits RNA transcription and tumor cell growth. Removal from DNA of normal cells causes amplification of DNA template activity. This effect is lower or absent in several cancer cell lines. Likewise, the amount of active peptides in cancer cell DNA extracts is lower than in DNA preparation of the corresponding normal cells. Such evidence, and their ubiquitous presence, suggests that they are a regulatory, conserved factor involved in the control of normal cell growth and gene expression. Results We report that peptides extracted from wheat bud chromatin induce growth inhibition, G2 arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis in HeLa cells. The growth rate is decreased in cells treated during the S phase only and it is accompanied by DNA damage and DNA synthesis inhibition. In G2 cells, this treatment induces inactivation of the CDK1-cyclin B1 complex and an increase of active chk1 kinase expression. Conclusion The data indicate that the chromatin peptidic pool inhibits HeLa cell growth by causing defective DNA replication which, in turn, arrests cell cycle progression to mitosis via G2 checkpoint pathway activation.

  1. Synthesis of a Hoechst 32258 analogue amino acid building block for direct incorporation of a fluorescent, high-affinity DNA binding motif into peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, C; Harrit, N; Nielsen, P E

    2001-01-01

    The synthesis of a new versatile "Hoechst 33258-like" Boc-protected amino acid building block for peptide synthesis is described. It is demonstrated that this new ligand is an effective mimic of Hoechst 33258 in terms of DNA affinity and sequence specificity. Furthermore, this minor groove binder...

  2. Antibody to E1 peptide of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 inhibits virus binding and entry to HepG2 cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    El-Awady, Mostafa K.; Tabll, Ashraf A.; Atef, Khaled; Yousef, Samar S; Omran, Moataza H; El-Abd, Yasmin; Bader-Eldin, Noha G; Salem, Ahmad M; Zohny, Samir F; El-Garf, Wael T

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the neutralizing activity of antibodies against E1 region of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Specific polyclonal antibody was raised via immunization of New Zealand rabbits with a synthetic peptide that had been derived from the E1 region of HCV and was shown to be highly conserved among HCV published genotypes.

  3. Mannose-binding lectin gene polymorphisms are associated with disease activity and physical disability in untreated, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide-positive patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Garred, Peter; Madsen, Hans Ole;

    2009-01-01

    modifying antirheumatic drugs, participating in a treatment trial (CIMESTRA study) were examined at inclusion for MBL2 pooled structural genotypes (O/O, A/O, A/A), regulatory MBL2 promoter polymorphism in position -221 (XX, XY, YY), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide 2 antibodies (anti-CCP2), disease...

  4. Synthesis, {sup 68}Ga labeling and preliminary evaluation of DOTA peptide binding vascular adhesion protein-1: a potential PET imaging agent for diagnosing osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ujula, Tiina [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Salomaeki, Satu [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Virsu, Pauliina [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Lankinen, Petteri; Maekinen, Tatu J. [Orthopedic Research Unit, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Autio, Anu [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Yegutkin, Gennady G. [MediCity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Knuuti, Juhani [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Jalkanen, Sirpa [MediCity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); National Public Health Institute, Turku (Finland); Roivainen, Anne [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Turku Center for Disease Modeling, University of Turku, Turku (Finland)], E-mail: anne.roivainen@utu.fi

    2009-08-15

    Introduction: Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an infection/inflammation-inducible endothelial glycoprotein. Based on our previous studies, the most VAP-1-selective peptide (VAP-P1) was 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N',N'',N''',N,,,,-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated, {sup 68}gallium ({sup 68}Ga)-labeled (named [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1) and evaluated preliminarily. Methods: Targeting was evaluated by using VAP-1-transfected cells. Biodistribution of [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 was studied by positron emission tomography imaging of healthy rats and rats with bone inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection. Uptake of [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 in osteomyelitis was compared with negative control peptide and competition with an excess of unlabeled DOTAVAP-P1. Results: [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 bound more efficiently to VAP-1-transfected cells than to controls. In rats, [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 cleared rapidly from blood circulation, excreted quickly in urine and showed an in vivo half-life of 26{+-}2.3 min. Imaging of osteomyelitis demonstrated modest target-to-background ratio. Studies with the negative control peptide and competitors revealed a significantly lower uptake at the infection site compared to [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1. Conclusions: The results represent a proof-of-concept that infection-induced VAP-1 can be targeted by [{sup 68}Ga]DOTA peptide. [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 is just the first candidate peptide and an essential opening for developing VAP-1-specific imaging agents.

  5. Synthesis, 68Ga labeling and preliminary evaluation of DOTA peptide binding vascular adhesion protein-1: a potential PET imaging agent for diagnosing osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an infection/inflammation-inducible endothelial glycoprotein. Based on our previous studies, the most VAP-1-selective peptide (VAP-P1) was 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N',N'',N''',N,,,,-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated, 68gallium (68Ga)-labeled (named [68Ga]DOTAVAP-P1) and evaluated preliminarily. Methods: Targeting was evaluated by using VAP-1-transfected cells. Biodistribution of [68Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 was studied by positron emission tomography imaging of healthy rats and rats with bone inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection. Uptake of [68Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 in osteomyelitis was compared with negative control peptide and competition with an excess of unlabeled DOTAVAP-P1. Results: [68Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 bound more efficiently to VAP-1-transfected cells than to controls. In rats, [68Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 cleared rapidly from blood circulation, excreted quickly in urine and showed an in vivo half-life of 26±2.3 min. Imaging of osteomyelitis demonstrated modest target-to-background ratio. Studies with the negative control peptide and competitors revealed a significantly lower uptake at the infection site compared to [68Ga]DOTAVAP-P1. Conclusions: The results represent a proof-of-concept that infection-induced VAP-1 can be targeted by [68Ga]DOTA peptide. [68Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 is just the first candidate peptide and an essential opening for developing VAP-1-specific imaging agents.

  6. Mapping binding sites for the PDE4D5 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase to the N- and C-domains of beta-arrestin using spot-immobilized peptide arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, George S; Adams, David R; Bhari, Narinder; Houslay, Thomas M; Vadrevu, Suryakiran; Meng, Dong; Li, Xiang; Dunlop, Allan; Milligan, Graeme; Bolger, Graeme B; Klussmann, Enno; Houslay, Miles D

    2007-05-15

    Beta2-ARs (beta2-adrenoceptors) become desensitized rapidly upon recruitment of cytosolic beta-arrestin. PDE4D5 (family 4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, subfamily D, isoform 5) can be recruited in complex with beta-arrestin, whereupon it regulates PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) phosphorylation of the beta2-AR. In the present study, we have used novel technology, employing a library of overlapping peptides (25-mers) immobilized on cellulose membranes that scan the entire sequence of beta-arrestin 2, to define the interaction sites on beta-arrestin 2 for binding of PDE4D5 and the cognate long isoform, PDE4D3. We have identified a binding site in the beta-arrestin 2 N-domain for the common PDE4D catalytic unit and two regions in the beta-arrestin 2 C-domain that confer specificity for PDE4D5 binding. Alanine-scanning peptide array analysis of the N-domain binding region identified severely reduced interaction with PDE4D5 upon R26A substitution, and reduced interaction upon either K18A or T20A substitution. Similar analysis of the beta-arrestin 2 C-domain identified Arg286 and Asp291, together with the Leu215-His220 region, as being important for binding PDE4D5, but not PDE4D3. Transfection with wild-type beta-arrestin 2 profoundly decreased isoprenaline-stimulated PKA phosphorylation of the beta2-AR in MEFs (mouse embryo fibroblasts) lacking both beta-arrestin 1 and beta-arrestin 2. This effect was negated using either the R26A or the R286A mutant form of beta-arrestin 2 or a mutant with substitution of an alanine cassette for Leu215-His220, which showed little or no PDE4D5 binding, but was still recruited to the beta2-AR upon isoprenaline challenge. These data show that the interaction of PDE4D5 with both the N- and C-domains of beta-arrestin 2 are essential for beta2-AR regulation. PMID:17288540

  7. Dennexin peptides modeled after the homophilic binding sites of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) promote neuronal survival, modify cell adhesion and impair spatial learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Lene B; Christensen, Claus; Rossetti, Clara; Fantin, Martina; Sandi, Carmen; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-mediated cell adhesion results in activation of intracellular signaling cascades that lead to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth, neuronal survival, and modulation of synaptic activity associated with cognitive processes. The crystal structure of the...... between Ig1 and Ig3 and between Ig2 and Ig2, respectively, observed in the crystal structure. Although the two dennexin peptides differed in amino acid sequence, they both modulated cell adhesion, reflected by inhibition of NCAM-mediated neurite outgrowth. Both dennexins also promoted neuronal survival...... immunoglobulin (Ig) 1-2-3 fragment of the NCAM ectodomain has revealed novel mechanisms for NCAM homophilic adhesion. The present study addressed the biological significance of the so called dense zipper formation of NCAM. Two peptides, termed dennexinA and dennexinB, were modeled after the contact interfaces...

  8. Human p53(264-272) HLA-A2 binding peptide is an immunodominant epitope in DNA-immunized HLA-A2 transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T R; Bregenholta, S; Pedersen, L O;

    1999-01-01

    C57BL/10 mice transgenic for HLA-A2 were immunized with either a full-length DNA-construct of the tumor suppressor p53 or with a minigene encoding the p53-derived immunodominant peptide p53(264)LLGRNSFEV272 (L9V). Vaccination with the full-length p53 construct induced potent cytotoxic activity of...... concordance with this, immunization with L9V-pulsed dendritic cells also induced a potent and specific anti-L9V cytotoxic response in vitro. These data show that HLA-A2/peptide-specific cytotoxic immunity can be generated in vivo against the same immunodominant epitope by immunizing either with full...

  9. Combined effects of ankylosing spondylitis-associated ERAP1 polymorphisms outside the catalytic and peptide-binding sites on the processing of natural HLA-B27 ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Esteban, Adrian; Gómez-Molina, Patricia; Sanz-Bravo, Alejandro; López de Castro, José A

    2014-02-14

    ERAP1 polymorphism involving residues 528 and 575/725 is associated with ankylosing spondylitis among HLA-B27-positive individuals. We used four recombinant variants to address the combined effects of the K528R and D575N polymorphism on the processing of HLA-B27 ligands. The hydrolysis of a fluorogenic substrate, Arg-528/Asp-575 ERAP1 was a major determinant of the abundance of these peptides in vivo. The hydrolysis of fluorogenic and peptide substrates by an HLA-B27 ligand or a shorter peptide, respectively, was increasingly inhibited as a function of ERAP1 activity, indicating that residues 528 and 575 affect substrate inhibition of ERAP1 trimming. The significant and complex effects of co-occurring ERAP1 polymorphisms on multiple HLA-B27 ligands, and their potential to alter the immunological and pathogenetic features of HLA-B27 as a function of the ERAP1 context, explain the epistatic association of both molecules in ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:24352655

  10. Peptide dendrimers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niederhafner, Petr; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Ježek, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), 757-788. ISSN 1075-2617 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : multiple antigen peptides * peptide dendrimers * synthetic vaccine * multipleantigenic peptides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.803, year: 2005

  11. A synthetic peptide corresponding to human FSH β-subunit 33-53 binds to FSH receptor, stimulates basal estradiol biosynthesis, and is a partial antagonist of FSH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have previously shown that hFSH-β 34-37 (KTCT) and 49-52 (TRDL) inhibit binding of 125I-hFSH to FSH receptor in calf testis membranes and that hFSH-β 33-53, which encompasses these tetrapeptides, inhibits binding with increased potency. hFSH-β 33-53 rapidly dimerizes under conditions utilized in the receptor binding assay (pH 7.5) so that the binding inhibition reported earlier was due to the hFSH-β 33-53 dimer rather than the monomer. At pH 6.5, conversion to dimer does not occur, and binding inhibition could be unequivocally attributed to the monomer. Radioiodinated and alkylated hFSH-β 33-53 binds to the FSH receptor. The biological activity of hFSH-β 33-53 was assessed by its ability to affect the conversion of androstenedione to estradiol in rat Sertoli cells cultures. This result demonstrates that the free R-SH group at Cys51 is not responsible for the inhibition. FSH-β 33-53 also significantly stimulated basal levels of estradiol synthesis, but not to maximal levels observed with FSH (partial agonist). Neither the carbohydrate content of hFSH-β nor the α subunit of FSH appears to be essential for signal transduction and expression of the hormone effect of FSH-β 33-53

  12. A synthetic peptide corresponding to human FSH. beta. -subunit 33-53 binds to FSH receptor, stimulates basal estradiol biosynthesis, and is a partial antagonist of FSH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Coloma, T.A.; Dattatreyamurty, B.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. (Albany Medical College, NY (USA))

    1990-02-06

    The authors have previously shown that hFSH-{beta} 34-37 (KTCT) and 49-52 (TRDL) inhibit binding of {sup 125}I-hFSH to FSH receptor in calf testis membranes and that hFSH-{beta} 33-53, which encompasses these tetrapeptides, inhibits binding with increased potency. hFSH-{beta} 33-53 rapidly dimerizes under conditions utilized in the receptor binding assay (pH 7.5) so that the binding inhibition reported earlier was due to the hFSH-{beta} 33-53 dimer rather than the monomer. At pH 6.5, conversion to dimer does not occur, and binding inhibition could be unequivocally attributed to the monomer. Radioiodinated and alkylated hFSH-{beta} 33-53 binds to the FSH receptor. The biological activity of hFSH-{beta} 33-53 was assessed by its ability to affect the conversion of androstenedione to estradiol in rat Sertoli cells cultures. This result demonstrates that the free R-SH group at Cys51 is not responsible for the inhibition. FSH-{beta} 33-53 also significantly stimulated basal levels of estradiol synthesis, but not to maximal levels observed with FSH (partial agonist). Neither the carbohydrate content of hFSH-{beta} nor the {alpha} subunit of FSH appears to be essential for signal transduction and expression of the hormone effect of FSH-{beta} 33-53.

  13. Selective inhibition of nuclear factor-κB by nuclear factor-κB essential modulator-binding domain peptide suppresses the metastasis of highly metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takuya; Nakayama, Hideki; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Irie, Atsushi; Nagata, Masashi; Kawahara, Kenta; Takamune, Yasuo; Yoshida, Ryoji; Nakagawa, Yoshihiro; Ogi, Hidenao; Shinriki, Satoru; Ota, Kazutoshi; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Ikebe, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Shinohara, Masanori

    2012-03-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation contributes to the development of metastasis, thus leading to a poor prognosis in many cancers, including OSCC. However, little in vivo experimental data are available about the effects of NF-κB inhibition on OSCC metastasis. OSCC sublines were established from a GFP-expressing parental cell line, GSAS, and designated GSAS/N3 and N5 according to the in vivo passage number after cervical lymph node metastasis by a serial orthotopic transplantation model. In vitro migration and invasion were assessed in these cells, and the NF-κB activities and expression of NF-κB-regulated metastasis-related molecules were also examined. In in vivo experiments, the metastasis and survival of tumor-engrafted mice were monitored. Furthermore, the effects of a selective NF-κB inhibitor, NEMO-binding domain (NBD) peptide, on metastasis in GSAS/N5-engrafted mice were assessed, and engrafted tongue tumors were immunohistochemically examined. Highly metastatic GSAS/N3 and N5 cells showed an enhanced NF-κB activity, thus contributing to increased migration, invasion, and a poor prognosis compared with the parent cells. Furthermore, the expression levels of NF-κB-regulated metastasis-related molecules, such as fibronectin, β1 integrin, MMP-1, -2, -9, and -14, and VEGF-C, were upregulated in the highly metastatic cells. The NBD peptide suppressed metastasis and tongue tumor growth in GSAS/N5-inoculated mice, and was accompanied by the downregulation of the NF-κB-regulated metastasis-related molecules in engrafted tongue tumors. Our results suggest that the selective inhibition of NF-κB activation by NBD peptide may provide an effective approach for the treatment of highly metastatic OSCC. PMID:22136381

  14. Uncovering the Peptide-Binding Specificities of HLA-C: A General Strategy To Determine the Specificity of Any MHC Class I Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel; Stryhn, Anette;

    2014-01-01

    molecules. Assessing the functional significance of these new tools, HLA-C*07:01 transgenic mice were immunized with stable HLA-C*07:01 binders; six of six tested stable peptide binders were immunogenic. Finally, we generated HLA-C tetramers and labeled human CD8(+) T cells and NK cells. These new resources...... should support future research on the biology of HLA-C molecules. The data are deposited at the Immune Epitope Database, and the updated NetMHCpan predictor is available at the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis and the Immune Epitope Database....

  15. 68Ga-labeling and in vivo evaluation of a uPAR binding DOTA- and NODAGA-conjugated peptide for PET imaging of invasive cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Madsen, Jacob; Østergaard, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a well-established biomarker for tumor aggressiveness and metastatic potential. DOTA-AE105 and DOTA-AE105-NH(2) labeled with (64)Cu have previously been demonstrated to be able to noninvasively monitor uPAR expression using...... positron emission tomography (PET) in human cancer xenograft mice models. Here we introduce (68)Ga-DOTA-AE105-NH(2) and (68)Ga-NODAGA-AE105-NH(2) and evaluate their imaging properties using small-animal PET. METHODS: Synthesis of DOTA-AE105-NH(2) and NODAGA-AE105-NH(2) was based on solid-phase peptide...... peptides and identical to AE105. Labeling of DOTA-AE105-NH(2) and NODAGA-AE105-NH(2) with (68)Ga was done at 95°C and room temperature, respectively. The highest radiochemical yield and purity were obtained using fractionated elution, whereas a negative effect of acetone on labeling efficiency for NODAGA...

  16. Vaccination of cattle with TickGARD induces cross-reactive antibodies binding to conserved linear peptides of Bm86 homologues in Boophilus decoloratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odongo, David; Kamau, Lucy; Skilton, Robert; Mwaura, Stephen; Nitsch, Cordula; Musoke, Anthony; Taracha, Evans; Daubenberger, Claudia; Bishop, Richard

    2007-01-26

    Vaccines based on recombinant Bm86 gut antigen from Boophilus microplus are a useful component of integrated control strategies against B. microplus infestations of cattle. The capacity of such vaccines to control heterologous infestations by two African tick species was investigated. The mean weight of engorged female ticks and mean egg mass per tick were significantly reduced in B. decoloratus infestations, but there was no effect of the vaccine against adult Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. We cloned, sequenced and expressed two Bm86 homologues (Bd86) from B. decoloratus. Amino acid sequence identity between Bd86 homologues (Bd86-1 and Bd86-2) and Bm86 was 86% and 85%, respectively, compared to 93% identity between the variants. Native Bd86 protein in B. decoloratus tick mid-gut sections and recombinant Bd86-1 reacted strongly with sera from TickGARD vaccinated cattle. TickGARD can therefore protect against a heterologous tick species with multiple antigen sequences. Epitope mapping using sera from TickGARD-vaccinated cattle identified two linear peptides conserved between the Bd86 homologues and Bm86. These epitopes represent candidate synthetic peptide vaccines for control of Boophilus spp. and the pathogens transmitted by these tick vectors. PMID:17070625

  17. Binding of elastin peptides to S-Gal protects the heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury by triggering the RISK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinet, Arnaud; Millart, Hervé; Oszust, Floriane; Hornebeck, William; Bellon, Georges

    2007-07-01

    Elastin peptides (EPs) generated by hydrolysis of elastic fibers by elastinolytic enzymes display a wide spectrum of biological activities. Here, we investigated their influence on rat heart ischemia-mediated injury using the Langendorff ex vivo model. EPs, i.e., kappa elastin, at 1.32- and 660-nM concentrations, when administered before the ischemia period, elicited a beneficial influence against ischemia by accelerating the recovery rate of heart contractile parameters and by decreasing significantly creatine kinase release and heart necrosis area when measured at the onset of the reperfusion. All effects were S-Gal-dependent, as being reproduced by (VGVAPG)3 and as being inhibited by receptor antagonists, such as lactose and V14 peptide (VVGSPSAQDEASPL). EPs interaction with S-Gal triggered NO release and activation of PI3-kinase/Akt and ERK1/2 in human coronary endothelial cells (HCAECs) and rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (RCs). This signaling pathway, as designated as RISK, for reperfusion injury salvage kinase pathway, was shown to be responsible for the beneficial influence of EPs on ischemia/reperfusion injury on the basis of its inhibition by specific pharmacological inhibitors. EPs survival activity was attained at a concentration averaging that present into the blood circulation, supporting the contention that these matrikines might offer a natural protection against cardiac injury in young and adult individuals. Such protective effect might be lost with aging, since we found that hearts from 24-month-old rats did not respond to EPs. PMID:17341689

  18. Stable Peptides Instead of Stapled Peptides: Highly Potent αvβ6-Selective Integrin Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Oleg V; Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Kapp, Tobias G; Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Di Maro, Salvatore; Nieberler, Markus; Reuning, Ute; Schwaiger, Markus; Novellino, Ettore; Marinelli, Luciana; Kessler, Horst

    2016-01-22

    The αvβ6 integrin binds the RGD-containing peptide of the foot and mouth disease virus with high selectivity. In this study, the long binding helix of this ligand was downsized to an enzymatically stable cyclic peptide endowed with sub-nanomolar binding affinity toward the αvβ6 receptor and remarkable selectivity against other integrins. Computational studies were performed to disclose the molecular bases underlying the high binding affinity and receptor subtype selectivity of this peptide. Finally, the utility of the ligand for use in biomedical studies was also demonstrated here. PMID:26663660

  19. Characterization of the Cu(Π) and Zn(Π) binding to the Amyloid-β short peptides by both the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure and the Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and devastating neurodegenerative pathology, clinically characterized by dementia, cognitive impairment, personality disorders and memory loss. It is generally accepted that, misfolding of Aβ peptides is the key element in pathogenesis and the secondary structure of Aβ can be changed to major β-strand with reasons unknown yet. Many studies have shown that the misfolding may be linked with some biometals, mainly copper and zinc ions. To characterize interactions of Aβ and metal ions, we utilized both the extended X-ray fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and the synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy (SRCD). Aβ (13-22), Aβ (13-21), Aβ (E22G) and Aβ(HH-AA) were selected to study the mechanism of copper and zinc binding to Aβ. We found that Cu interaction with H13 and H14 residues led to the disappearance of the PPΠ, while the Cu binding E22 residue caused a remarkable conformation change to β-sheet enrichment. The Zn ion, in contrast, made little effect on the conformation and it coordinated to only one histidine (H residue) or not.

  20. The cell-penetrating peptide domain from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) has anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► HBP sequence identified from HB-EGF has cell penetration activity. ► HBP inhibits the NF-κB dependent inflammatory responses. ► HBP directly blocks phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. ► HBP inhibits nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit. -- Abstract: A heparin-binding peptide (HBP) sequence from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) was identified and was shown to exhibit cell penetration activity. This cell penetration induced an anti-inflammatory reaction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. HBP penetrated the cell membrane during the 10 min treatment and reduced the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, HBP inhibited the LPS-induced upregulation of cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-6, and decreased the interstitial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a lung inflammation model. HBP inhibited NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses by directly blocking the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα and by subsequently inhibiting the nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB. Taken together, this novel HBP may be potentially useful candidate for anti-inflammatory treatments and can be combined with other drugs of interest to transport attached molecules into cells.

  1. Characterization of the Cu(Π) and Zn(Π) binding to the Amyloid-β short peptides by both the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure and the Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyin; Sun, Shuaishuai; Xu, Jianhua; Zhang, Jing; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Bingbing; Tao, Ye

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and devastating neurodegenerative pathology, clinically characterized by dementia, cognitive impairment, personality disorders and memory loss. It is generally accepted that, misfolding of Aβ peptides is the key element in pathogenesis and the secondary structure of Aβ can be changed to major β-strand with reasons unknown yet. Many studies have shown that the misfolding may be linked with some biometals, mainly copper and zinc ions. To characterize interactions of Aβ and metal ions, we utilized both the extended X-ray fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and the synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy (SRCD). Aβ (13-22), Aβ (13-21), Aβ (E22G) and Aβ(HH-AA) were selected to study the mechanism of copper and zinc binding to Aβ. We found that Cu interaction with H13 and H14 residues led to the disappearance of the PPΠ, while the Cu binding E22 residue caused a remarkable conformation change to β-sheet enrichment. The Zn ion, in contrast, made little effect on the conformation and it coordinated to only one histidine (H residue) or not.

  2. The CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP δ is differently regulated by fibrillar and oligomeric forms of the Alzheimer amyloid-β peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Lars NG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factors CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBP α, β and δ have been shown to be expressed in brain and to be involved in regulation of inflammatory genes in concert with nuclear factor κB (NF-κB. In general, C/EBPα is down-regulated, whereas both C/EBPβ and δ are up-regulated in response to inflammatory stimuli. In Alzheimer's disease (AD one of the hallmarks is chronic neuroinflammation mediated by astrocytes and microglial cells, most likely induced by the formation of amyloid-β (Aβ deposits. The inflammatory response in AD has been ascribed both beneficial and detrimental roles. It is therefore important to delineate the inflammatory mediators and signaling pathways affected by Aβ deposits with the aim of defining new therapeutic targets. Methods Here we have investigated the effects of Aβ on expression of C/EBP family members with a focus on C/EBPδ in rat primary astro-microglial cultures and in a transgenic mouse model with high levels of fibrillar Aβ deposits (tg-ArcSwe by western blot analysis. Effects on DNA binding activity were analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Cross-talk between C/EBPδ and NF-κB was investigated by analyzing binding to a κB site using a biotin streptavidin-agarose pull-down assay. Results We show that exposure to fibril-enriched, but not oligomer-enriched, preparations of Aβ inhibit up-regulation of C/EBPδ expression in interleukin-1β-activated glial cultures. Furthermore, we observed that, in aged transgenic mice, C/EBPα was significantly down-regulated and C/EBPβ was significantly up-regulated. C/EBPδ, on the other hand, was selectively down-regulated in the forebrain, a part of the brain showing high levels of fibrillar Aβ deposits. In contrast, no difference in expression levels of C/EBPδ between wild type and transgenic mice was detected in the relatively spared hindbrain. Finally, we show that interleukin-1β-induced C/EBPδ DNA

  3. Screening of TACE Peptide Inhibitors from Phage Display Peptide Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To obtain the recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) ectodomain and use it as a selective molecule for the screening of TACE peptide inhibitors, the cDNA coding catalytic domain (T800) and full-length ectodomain (T1300) of TACE were amplified by RTPCR, and the expression plasmids were constructed by inserting T800 and T1300 into plasmid pET28a and pET-28c respectively. The recombinant T800 and T1300 were induced by IPTG, and SDSPAGE and Western blotting analysis results revealed that T800 and T1300 were highly expressed in the form of inclusion body. After Ni2+-NTA resin affinity chromatography, the recombinant proteins were used in the screening of TACE-binding peptides from phage display peptide library respectively. After 4 rounds of biopanning, the positive phage clones were analyzed by ELISA, competitive inhibition assay and DNA sequencing. A common amino acid sequence (TRWLVYFSRPYLVAT) was found and synthesized. The synthetic peptide could inhibit the TNF-α release from LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) up to 60.3 %. FACS analysis revealed that the peptide mediated the accumulation of TNF-α on the cell surface. These results demonstrate that the TACE-binding peptide is an effective antagonist of TACE.

  4. Gene Transfer with Poly-Melittin Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chang-Po; Kim, Ji-Seon; Steenblock, Erin; Liu, Dijie; Rice, Kevin G.

    2006-01-01

    The 26 amino acid hemolytic melittin peptide was converted into a gene transfer peptide that binds to DNA and polymerized through disulfide bond formation. Melittin analogues were synthesized by addition of one to four Lys repeats at either the C or N-subterminal end along with terminal Cys residues. Melittin analogues were able to bind and polymerize on plasmids resulting in the formation of DNA condensates. In the absence of DNA, melittin analogues retained their red blood cell hemolytic po...

  5. Endotoxin-Binding Peptides Derived from Casein Glycomacropeptide Inhibit Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Inflammatory Responses via Blockade of NF-κB activation in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic low-grade inflammation and increased circulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS contribute to metabolic dysfunction. The inhibitory effects and underlying molecular mechanisms of casein glycomacropeptide (GMP hydrolysate on the inflammatory response of LPS-stimulated macrophages were investigated. Results showed that the inhibitory effect of GMP hydrolysates obtained with papain on nitric oxide (NO production were obviously higher than that of GMP hydrolysates obtained with pepsin, alcalase and trypsin (p < 0.05, and the hydrolysate obtained with papain for 1 h hydrolysis (GHP exhibited the highest inhibitory effect. Compared with native GMP, GHP markedly inhibited LPS-induced NO production in a dose-dependent manner with decreased mRNA level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. GHP blocked toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4/myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB signaling pathway activation, accompanied by downregulation of LPS-triggered significant upregulation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-1β gene expression. Furthermore, GHP could neutralize LPS not only by direct binding to LPS, but also by inhibiting the engagement of LPS with the TLR4/MD2 complex, making it a potential LPS inhibitor. In conclusion, these findings suggest that GHP negatively regulates TLR4-mediated inflammatory response in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, and therefore may hold potential to ameliorate inflammation-related issues.

  6. Evaluation of anorganic bovine-derived hydroxyapatite matrix/cell binding peptide as a bone graft material in the treatment of human periodontal infrabony defects: A clinico-radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghousia Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various bone graft materials have been used in the treatment of periodontal defects. A synthetic bone substitute material composed of P-15 with anorganic bone mineral has been scantly studied. Hence, the present study was aimed to evaluate and compare the efficacy of anorganic bovine-derived hydroxyapatite matrix (ABM/cell binding peptide (P-15 in human periodontal infrabony defects with that of open flap debridement (OFD alone. Materials and Methods: A split-mouth, randomized controlled clinical study was designed to investigate the efficacy of ABM/P-15. In this clinical trial, 10 patients having bilateral periodontal infrabony defects were treated either with ABM/P-15 or OFD and followed for a period of 9 months. At baseline and at 9 months probing pocket depth (PPD, relative attachment level (RAL, depth of a defect, and radiographic bone level were measured; and compared between test and control sites. Results: A statistically significant reduction (P < 0.001 in PPD was observed in test sites compared to control sites. Both sites showed a gain in RAL without any significant difference. Similarly, the radiographic evaluation revealed significantly higher radiographic defect fill in test sites as compared to control sites (P < 0.001. Conclusion: ABM/P-15 bone graft material appears to be useful and beneficial in the treatment of human periodontal infrabony defects.

  7. Peptide-binding motifs associated with MHC molecules common in Chinese rhesus macaques are analogous to those of human HLA supertypes and include HLA-B27-like alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Southwood, Scott; Sidney, John;

    2013-01-01

    deciphering outcomes of infection and vaccine efficacy. In this study, we have provided detailed characterization of six prevalent Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I alleles, yielding a combined phenotypic frequency of 29 %. The peptide-binding specificity of two of these alleles, Mamu-A2*01:02 and Mamu-B*010......:01, as well as the previously characterized allele Mamu-B*003:01 (and Indian rhesus Mamu-B*003:01), was found to be analogous to that of alleles in the HLA-B27 supertype family. Specific alleles in the HLA-B27 supertype family, including HLA-B*27:05, have been associated with long-term nonprogression to...... AIDS in humans. All six alleles characterized in the present study were found to have specificities analogous to HLA supertype alleles. These data contribute to the concept that Chinese rhesus macaque MHC immunogenetics is more similar to HLA than their Indian rhesus macaque counterparts and thereby...

  8. Facilitating protein solubility by use of peptide extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Paul I; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Howitt, Jason

    2013-09-17

    Expression vectors for expression of a protein or polypeptide of interest as a fusion product composed of the protein or polypeptide of interest fused at one terminus to a solubility enhancing peptide extension are provided. Sequences encoding the peptide extensions are provided. The invention further comprises antibodies which bind specifically to one or more of the solubility enhancing peptide extensions.

  9. Solid-phase peptide quantitation assay using labeled monoclonal antibody and glutaraldehyde fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay utilizing iodinated peptide-specific monoclonal antibody as a detection system instead of labeled peptide has been developed. Regional specific monoclonal antibodies to either gastrin-releasing peptide or gastrin were used as models to validate the general application of our modified assay. Conditions for radioactive labeling of the monoclonal antibody were determined to minimize oxidant damage, which compromises the sensitivity of other reported peptide quantitation assays. Pretreatment of 96-well polyvinyl chloride test plates with a 5% glutaraldehyde solution resulted in consistent retention of sufficient target peptide on the solid-phase matrix to allow precise quantitation. This quantitative method is completed within 1 h of peptide solid phasing. Pretreatment of assay plates with glutaraldehyde increased binding of target peptide and maximized antibody binding by optimizing antigen presentation. The hypothesis that glutaraldehyde affects both peptide binding to the plate and orientation of the peptide was confirmed by analysis of several peptide analogs. These studies indicate that peptide binding was mediated through a free amino group leaving the carboxy-terminal portion of the target peptide accessible for antibody binding. It was observed that the length of the peptide also affects the amount of monoclonal antibody that will bind. Under the optimal conditions, results from quantitation of gastrin-releasing peptide in relevant samples agree well with those from previously reported techniques. Thus, we report here a modified microplate assay which may be generally applied for the rapid and sensitive quantitation of peptide hormones

  10. The novel amyloid-beta peptide aptamer inhibits intracellular amyloid-beta peptide toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Wang; Yi Yang; Mingyue Jia; Chi Ma; Mingyu Wang; Lihe Che; Yu Yang; Jiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β peptide binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) decoy peptide (DP) can competitively antagonize binding of amyloid β peptide to ABAD and inhibit the cytotoxic effects of amyloid β peptide. Based on peptide aptamers, the present study inserted ABAD-DP into the disulfide bond of human thioredoxin (TRX) using molecular cloning technique to construct a fusion gene that can express the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer. Moreover, adeno-associated virus was used to allow its stable expression. Immunofluorescent staining revealed the co-expression of the transduced fusion gene TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 and amyloid β peptide in NIH-3T3 cells, indicating that the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer can bind amyloid β peptide within cells. In addition, cell morphology and MTT results suggested that TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 attenuated amyloid β peptide-induced SH-SY5Y cell injury and improved cell viability. These findings confirmed the possibility of constructing TRX-based peptide aptamer using ABAD-DP. Moreover, TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 inhibited the cytotoxic effect of amyloid β peptide.

  11. Bicyclic Peptide Inhibitor of Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée; Paaske, Berit; Jiang, Longguang;

    2013-01-01

    The development of protease inhibitors for pharmacological intervention has taken a new turn with the use of peptidebased inhibitors. Here, we report the rational design of bicyclic peptide inhibitors of the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), based on the established...... monocyclic peptide, upain-2. It was successfully converted to a bicyclic peptide, without loss of inhibitory properties. The aim was to produce a peptide cyclised by an amide bond with an additional stabilising across-the-ring covalent bond. We expected this bicyclic peptide to exhibit a lower entropic...... burden upon binding. Two bicyclic peptides were synthesised with affinities similar to that of upain-2, and their binding energetics were evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry. Indeed, compared to upain-2, the bicyclic peptides showed reduced loss of entropy upon binding to uPA. We also...

  12. Oxidative stress can alter the antigenicity of immunodominant peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiskopf, Daniela; Schwanninger, Angelika; Weinberger, Birgit; Almanzar, Giovanni; Parson, Walther; Buus, Søren; Lindner, Herbert; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix

    2010-01-01

    APCs operate frequently under oxidative stress induced by aging, tissue damage, pathogens, or inflammatory responses. Phagocytic cells produce peroxides and free-radical species that facilitate pathogen clearance and can in the case of APCs, also lead to oxidative modifications of antigenic...... proteins and peptides. Little information is available presently about the consequences of such modifications on the immune response. To model oxidative modification of an immunodominant antigenic peptide, we oxidized the methionine residue of the human CMV pp65(495-503) (NLVPMVATV) peptide. Such...... modifications of an antigenic peptide can affect MHC binding or TCR recognition. Using binding and dissociation assays, we demonstrate that oxidative modification of the CMVpp65(495-503) peptide leads to a decreased binding of the pMHC complex to the TCR, whereas binding of the peptide to the MHC class I...

  13. Intracellular signalling by C-peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Claire E; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2008-01-01

    C-peptide, a cleavage product of the proinsulin molecule, has long been regarded as biologically inert, serving merely as a surrogate marker for insulin release. Recent findings demonstrate both a physiological and protective role of C-peptide when administered to individuals with type I diabetes. Data indicate that C-peptide appears to bind in nanomolar concentrations to a cell surface receptor which is most likely to be G-protein coupled. Binding of C-peptide initiates multiple cellular effects, evoking a rise in intracellular calcium, increased PI-3-kinase activity, stimulation of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, increased eNOS transcription, and activation of the MAPK signalling pathway. These cell signalling effects have been studied in multiple cell types from multiple tissues. Overall these observations raise the possibility that C-peptide may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of long-term complications associated with diabetes. PMID:18382618

  14. Intracellular Signalling by C-Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Hills

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available C-peptide, a cleavage product of the proinsulin molecule, has long been regarded as biologically inert, serving merely as a surrogate marker for insulin release. Recent findings demonstrate both a physiological and protective role of C-peptide when administered to individuals with type I diabetes. Data indicate that C-peptide appears to bind in nanomolar concentrations to a cell surface receptor which is most likely to be G-protein coupled. Binding of C-peptide initiates multiple cellular effects, evoking a rise in intracellular calcium, increased PI-3-kinase activity, stimulation of the Na+/K+ ATPase, increased eNOS transcription, and activation of the MAPK signalling pathway. These cell signalling effects have been studied in multiple cell types from multiple tissues. Overall these observations raise the possibility that C-peptide may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of long-term complications associated with diabetes.

  15. Highly flexible protein-peptide docking using CABS-dock

    OpenAIRE

    Ciemny, Maciej Pawel; Kurcinski, Mateusz; Kozak, Konrad Jakub; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kmiecik, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Protein-peptide molecular docking is a difficult modeling problem. It is even more challenging when significant conformational changes that may occur during the binding process need to be predicted. In this chapter, we demonstrate the capabilities and features of the CABS-dock server for flexible protein-peptide docking. CABS-dock allows highly efficient modeling of full peptide flexibility and significant flexibility of a protein receptor. During CABS-dock docking, the peptide folding and bi...

  16. Porcine parvovirus removal using trimer and biased hexamer peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Heldt, Caryn L.; Gurgel, Patrick V.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Carbonell, Ruben G.

    2011-01-01

    Assuring the microbiological safety of biological therapeutics remains an important concern. Our group has recently reported small trimeric peptides that have the ability to bind and remove a model non-enveloped virus, porcine parvovirus (PPV), from complex solutions containing human blood plasma. In an effort to improve the removal efficiency of these small peptides, we created a biased library of hexamer peptides that contain two previously reported trimeric peptides designated WRW and KYY....

  17. A common landscape for membrane-active peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Last, Nicholas B.; Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Miranker, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Three families of membrane-active peptides are commonly found in nature and are classified according to their initial apparent activity. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient components of the innate immune system and typically act by disruption of microbial membranes leading to cell death. Amyloid peptides contribute to the pathology of diverse diseases from Alzheimer's to type II diabetes. Preamyloid states of these peptides can act as toxins by binding to and permeabilizing cellular membranes...

  18. Novel Zn2+-chelating peptides selected from a fimbria-displayed random peptide library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kristian; Schembri, Mark; Klemm, Per

    2001-01-01

    The display of peptide sequences on the surface of bacteria is a technology that offers exciting applications in biotechnology and medical research. Type 1 fimbriae are surface organelles of Escherichia coli which mediate D-mannose-sensitive binding to different host surfaces by virtue of the Fim...... peptide sequences that conferred on recombinant cells the ability to bind Zn2+. By serial selection, sequences that exhibited various degrees of binding affinity and specificity toward Zn2+ were enriched. None of the isolated sequences showed similarity to known Zn2+-binding proteins, indicating that...

  19. Rationale for the use of radiolabelled peptides in diagnosis and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopmans, K.P. [Martini Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Groningen (Netherlands); Glaudemans, A.W.J.M. [University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    Nuclear medicine techniques are becoming more important in imaging oncological and infectious diseases. For metabolic imaging of these diseases, antibody and peptide imaging are currently used. In recent years peptide imaging has become important, therefore the rationale for the use of peptide imaging is described in this article. Criteria for a successful peptide tracer are a high target specificity, a high binding affinity, a long metabolic stability and a high target-to-background ratio. Tracer internalization is also beneficial. For oncological imaging, many tracers are available, most originating from regulatory peptides, but penetrating peptides are also being developed. Peptides for imaging inflammatory and infectious diseases include regulatory peptides, antimicrobial peptides and others. In conclusion, for the imaging of oncological, inflammatory and infectious diseases, many promising peptides are being developed. The ideal peptide probe is characterized by rapid and specific target localization and binding with a high tumour-to-background ratio. (orig.)

  20. Computational Design of Peptide Ligands for Ochratoxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Heurich

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe a peptide library designed by computational modelling and the selection of two peptide sequences showing affinity towards the mycotoxin, ochratoxin A (OTA. A virtual library of 20 natural amino acids was used as building blocks to design a short peptide library against ochratoxin A template using the de novo design program, LeapFrog, and the dynamic modelling software, FlexiDock. Peptide sequences were ranked according to calculated binding scores in their capacity to bind to ochratoxin A. Two high scoring peptides with the sequences N'-Cys-Ser-Ile-Val-Glu-Asp-Gly-Lys-C' (octapeptide and N'-Gly-Pro-Ala-Gly-Ile-Asp-Gly-Pro-Ala-Gly-Ile-Arg-Cys-C' (13-mer were selected for synthesis from the resulting database. These synthesized peptides were characterized using a microtitre plate-based binding assay and a surface plasmon resonance biosensor (Biacore 3000. The binding assay confirmed that both de novo designed peptides did bind to ochratoxin A in vitro. SPR analysis confirmed that the peptides bind to ochratoxin A, with calculated KD values of ~15.7 μM (13-mer and ~11.8 μM (octamer. The affinity of the peptides corresponds well with the molecular modelling results, as the 13-mer peptide affinity is about 1.3-times weaker than the octapeptide; this is in accordance with the binding energy values modelled by FlexiDock. This work illustrates the potential of using computational modelling to design a peptide sequence that exhibits in vitro binding affinity for a small molecular weight toxin.

  1. Peptide-membrane interactions of arginine-tryptophan peptides probed using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A

    2014-04-18

    Membrane-active peptides include peptides that can cross cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo as well as peptides that inhibit bacterial growth. Some of these peptides can act as both transporters and antibacterial agents. It is desirable to combine the knowledge from these two different fields of membrane-active peptides into design of new peptides with tailored actions, as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances, targeting specific membranes. We have previously shown that the position of the amino acid tryptophan in the peptide sequence of three arginine-tryptophan peptides affects their uptake and intracellular localization in live mammalian cells, as well as their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. Here, we use quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring to assess the induced changes caused by binding of the three peptides to supported model membranes composed of POPC, POPC/POPG, POPC/POPG/cholesterol or POPC/lactosyl PE. Our results indicate that the tryptophan position in the peptide sequence affects the way these peptides interact with the different model membranes and that the presence of cholesterol in particular seems to affect the membrane interaction of the peptide with an even distribution of tryptophans in the peptide sequence. These results give mechanistic insight into the function of these peptides and may aid in the design of membrane-active peptides with specified cellular targets and actions.

  2. Natriuretic peptides and their therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y; Somer, B G; Amatya, A

    1999-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides are a group of naturally occurring substances that act in the body to oppose the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. There are three major natriuretic peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), which is synthesized in the atria; brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), which is synthesized in the ventricles; and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), which is synthesized in the brain. Both ANP and BNP are released in response to atrial and ventricular stretch, respectively, and will cause vasorelaxation, inhibition of aldosterone secretion in the adrenal cortex, and inhibition of renin secretion in the kidney. Both ANP and BNP will cause natriuresis and a reduction in intravascular volume, effects amplified by antagonism of antidiuretic hormone (ADH). The physiologic effects of CNP are different from those of ANP and BNP. CNP has a hypotensive effect, but no significant diuretic or natriuretic actions. Three natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) have been described that have different binding capacities for ANP, BNP, and CNP. Removal of the natriuretic peptides from the circulation is affected mainly by binding to clearance receptors and enzymatic degradation in the circulation. Increased blood levels of natriuretic peptides have been found in certain disease states, suggesting a role in the pathophysiology of those diseases, including congestive heart failure (CHF), systemic hypertension, and acute myocardial infarction. The natriuretic peptides also serve as disease markers and indicators of prognosis in various cardiovascular conditions. The natriuretic peptides have been used in the treatment of disease, with the most experience with intravenous BNP in the treatment of CHF. Another pharmacologic approach being used is the inhibition of natriuretic peptide metabolism by neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor drugs. The NEP inhibitors are currently being investigated as treatments for CHF and systemic hypertension. PMID:11720638

  3. In Vitro Binding Capacity of Bile Acids by Defatted Corn Protein Hydrolysate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Claver Irakoze

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Defatted corn protein was digested using five different proteases, Alcalase, Trypsin, Neutrase, Protamex and Flavourzyme, in order to produce bile acid binding peptides. Bile acid binding capacity was analyzed in vitro using peptides from different proteases of defatted corn hydrolysate. Some crystalline bile acids like sodium glycocholate, sodium cholate and sodium deoxycholate were individually tested using HPLC to see which enzymes can release more peptides with high bile acid binding capacity. Peptides from Flavourzyme defatted corn hydrolysate exhibited significantly (p

  4. The potential impacts of formyl peptide receptor 1 in inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. N-formyl peptides, which originate from bacterial peptides or mitochondrial proteins bind with a high binding affinity to formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). N-formyl peptide-FPR1 is involved in the pathogenesis of sterile and infectious inflammatory processes and causes phagocytosis of pathogens or injured cells by neutrophils. Excessive activation of neutrophils by binding of N-formyl peptides is associated with tissue injury requiring drugs that block FPR1-dependent signaling. Here, we review the roles of FPR1 as a critical regulator of inflammatory processes and its involvement in pathological conditions. PMID:27100350

  5. The hepcidin-binding site on ferroportin is evolutionarily conserved

    OpenAIRE

    De Domenico, Ivana; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Nelson, Jenifer M.; Phillips, John D.; Ajioka, Richard S.; Kay, Michael S.; Kushner, James P.; Ganz, Tomas; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian iron homeostasis is regulated by the interaction of the liver-produced peptide hepcidin and its receptor, the iron transporter ferroportin. Hepcidin binds to ferroportin resulting in degradation of ferroportin and decreased cellular iron export. We identify the hepcidin-binding domain (HBD) on ferroportin and show that a synthetic 19 amino acid peptide corresponding to the HBD recapitulates the characteristics and specificity of hepcidin binding to cell surface ferroportin. The bind...

  6. Effect of the DEF motif on phosphorylation of peptide substrates by ERK

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Neychelle; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2009-01-01

    MAP kinase ERK maintains specificity by binding to docking sites such as the DEF domain or D domain. It was previously shown that appending peptides derived from D domains to a substrate peptide increased apparent efficiency of peptide phosphorylation while preserving its apparent specificity for ERK. Here we determine the effect of the DEF motif on efficiency and specificity of peptide phosphorylation by ERK. The DEF motif modulated the apparent affinity of the peptide for ERK while the subs...

  7. Synthetic Polymer Nanoparticles with Antibody-Like Affinity for a Hydrophilic Peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Zhiyang; Hoshino, Yu; Rodriguez, Andy; Yoo, Hoseong; Shea, Kenneth J

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic polymer nanoparticles with antibody-like affinity for a hydrophilic peptide have been prepared by inverse microemulsion polymerization. Peptide affinity was achieved in part by incorporating the target (imprint) peptide in the polymerization reaction mixture. Incorporation of the imprint peptide assists in the creation of complementary binding sites in the resulting polymer nanoparticle (NP). To orient the imprint peptide at the interface of the water and oil domains during polymeri...

  8. Peptide-Lipid Interactions: Experiments and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Galdiero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between peptides and lipids are of fundamental importance in the functioning of numerous membrane-mediated cellular processes including antimicrobial peptide action, hormone-receptor interactions, drug bioavailability across the blood-brain barrier and viral fusion processes. Moreover, a major goal of modern biotechnology is obtaining new potent pharmaceutical agents whose biological action is dependent on the binding of peptides to lipid-bilayers. Several issues need to be addressed such as secondary structure, orientation, oligomerization and localization inside the membrane. At the same time, the structural effects which the peptides cause on the lipid bilayer are important for the interactions and need to be elucidated. The structural characterization of membrane active peptides in membranes is a harsh experimental challenge. It is in fact accepted that no single experimental technique can give a complete structural picture of the interaction, but rather a combination of different techniques is necessary.

  9. Salt-resistant short antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanram, Harini; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising leads for the development of antibiotics against drug resistant bacterial pathogens. However, in vivo applications of AMPs remain obscure due to salt and serum mediated inactivation. The high cost of chemical synthesis of AMPs also impedes potential clinical application. Consequently, short AMPs resistant toward salt and serum inactivation are desirable for the development of peptide antibiotics. In this work, we designed a 12-residue amphipathic helical peptide RR12 (R-R-L-I-R-L-I-L-R-L-L-R-amide) and two Trp containing analogs of RR12 namely RR12Wpolar (R-R-L-I-W-L-I-L-R-L-L-R-amide), and RR12Whydro (R-R-L-I-R-L-W-L-R-L-L-R-amide). Designed peptides demonstrated potent antibacterial activity; MIC ranging from 2 to 8 μM, in the presence of sodium chloride (150 mM and 300 mM). Antibacterial activity of these peptides was also detected in the presence of human serum. Designed peptides, in particular RR12 and RR12Whydro, were only poorly hemolytic. As a mode of action; these peptides demonstrated efficient permeabilization of bacterial cell membrane and lysis of cell structure. We further investigated interactions of the designed peptides with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major component of the outer membrane permeability barrier of Gram-negative bacteria. Designed peptides adopted helical conformations in complex with LPS. Binding of peptides with LPS has yielded dissociation the aggregated structures of LPS. Collectively, these designed peptides hold ability to be developed for salt-resistant antimicrobial compounds. Most importantly, current work provides insights for designing salt-resistant antimicrobial peptides. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 345-356, 2016. PMID:26849911

  10. C-Peptide and its intracellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Claire E; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2009-01-01

    Although long believed to be inert, C-peptide has now been shown to have definite biological effects both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic animals and in patients with type 1 diabetes. These effects point to a protective action of C-peptide against the development of diabetic microvascular complications. Underpinning these observations is undisputed evidence of C-peptide binding to a variety of cell types at physiologically relevant concentrations, and the downstream stimulation of multiple cell signaling pathways and gene transcription via the activation of numerous transcription factors. These pathways affect such fundamental cellular processes as re-absorptive and/or secretory phenotype, migration, growth, and survival. Whilst the receptor remains to be identified, experimental data points strongly to the existence of a specific G-protein-coupled receptor for C-peptide. Of the cell types studied so far, kidney tubular cells express the highest number of C-peptide binding sites. Accordingly, C-peptide exerts major effects on the function of these cells, and in the context of diabetic nephropathy appears to antagonise the pathophysiological effects of major disease mediators such as TGFbeta1 and TNFalpha. Therefore, based on its cellular activity profile C-peptide appears well positioned for development as a therapeutic tool to treat microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes. PMID:20039003

  11. Copper(II) binding properties of hepcidin

    OpenAIRE

    Kulprachakarn, Kanokwan; Chen, Yu-Lin; Kong, Xiaole; Arno, Maria Chiara; Hider, Robert Charles; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Bansal, Sukhvinder

    2016-01-01

    Hepcidin is a peptide hormone that regulates the homeostasis of iron metabolism. The N-terminal domain of hepcidin is conserved amongst a range of species and is capable of binding CuII and NiII through the amino terminal copper–nickel binding motif (ATCUN). It has been suggested that the binding of copper to hepcidin may have biological relevance. In this study we have investigated the binding of CuII with model peptides containing the ATCUN motif, fluorescently labelled hepcidin and hepcidi...

  12. Rapid Generation of a Nanocrystal-Labeled Peptide Library for Specific Identification of the Bacterium Clostrium Botulinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several peptide libraries containing up to 2 million unique peptide ligands have been synthesized. The peptides are attached onto a 80 micron resin and the length of these peptide ligands ranges from 5 to 9 amino acid residues. Using a novel calorimetric assay, the libraries were screened for binding to the ganglioside-binding domain of Clostridium Tetanus Toxin, a structural similar analog of the Clostridium Botulinum toxin. Several binding peptide sequences were identified, in which the detailed binding kinetics are currently underway using the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique

  13. Rapid Generation of a Nanocrystal-Labeled Peptide Library for Specific Identification of the Bacterium Clostrium Botulinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tok, J B

    2004-11-11

    Several peptide libraries containing up to 2 million unique peptide ligands have been synthesized. The peptides are attached onto a 80 micron resin and the length of these peptide ligands ranges from 5 to 9 amino acid residues. Using a novel calorimetric assay, the libraries were screened for binding to the ganglioside-binding domain of Clostridium Tetanus Toxin, a structural similar analog of the Clostridium Botulinum toxin. Several binding peptide sequences were identified, in which the detailed binding kinetics are currently underway using the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique.

  14. Interactions of Bio-Inspired Membranes with Peptides and Peptide-Mimetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sebastiano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Via Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD and implicit solvent coarse-grained (CG Molecular Dynamics (MD we examine the interaction of an amphiphilic cell-penetrating peptide PMLKE and its synthetic counterpart with a bio-inspired membrane. We use the DPD technique to investigate the interaction of peptide-mimetic nanoparticles, or nanopins, with a three-component membrane. The CG MD approach is used to investigate the interaction of a cell-penetrating peptide PMLKE with single-component membrane. We observe the spontaneous binding and subsequent insertion of peptide and nanopin in the membrane by using CG MD and DPD approaches, respectively. In addition, we find that the insertion of peptide and nanopins is mainly driven by the favorable enthalpic interactions between the hydrophobic components of the peptide, or nanopin, and the membrane. Our study provides insights into the mechanism underlying the interactions of amphiphilic peptide and peptide-mimetic nanoparticles with a membrane. The result of this study can be used to guide the functional integration of peptide and peptide-mimetic nanoparticles with a cell membrane.

  15. Engineered Adhesion Peptides for Improved Silicon Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish Kumar; Jebors, Said; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Agarwal, Vivechana; Mehdi, Ahmad; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles; Gergely, Csilla

    2015-11-01

    Engineering peptides that present selective recognition and high affinity for a material is a major challenge for assembly-driven elaboration of complex systems with wide applications in the field of biomaterials, hard-tissue regeneration, and functional materials for therapeutics. Peptide-material interactions are of vital importance in natural processes but less exploited for the design of novel systems for practical applications because of our poor understanding of mechanisms underlying these interactions. Here, we present an approach based on the synthesis of several truncated peptides issued from a silicon-specific peptide recovered via phage display technology. We use the photonic response provided by porous silicon microcavities to evaluate the binding efficiency of 14 different peptide derivatives. We identify and engineer a short peptide sequence (SLVSHMQT), revealing the highest affinity for p(+)-Si. The molecular recognition behavior of the obtained peptide fragment can be revealed through mutations allowing identification of the preferential affinity of certain amino acids toward silicon. These results constitute an advance in both the engineering of peptides that reveal recognition properties for silicon and the understanding of biomolecule-material interactions. PMID:26440047

  16. Targeting cyclin-dependent kinases in Drosophila with peptide aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    Kolonin, Mikhail G.; Finley, Russell L.

    1998-01-01

    Two-hybrid technology provides a simple way to isolate small peptide aptamers that specifically recognize and strongly bind to a protein of interest. These aptamers have the potential to dominantly interfere with specific activities of their target proteins and, therefore, could be used as in vivo inhibitors. Here we explore the ability to use peptide aptamers as in vivo inhibitors by expressing aptamers directed against cell cycle regulators in Drosophila. We expressed two peptide aptamers, ...

  17. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements in NMR peptide-membrane interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small membrane-bound proteins or peptides are involved in numerous essential biological processes, like cellular recognition, signaling, channel formation, and cytolysis. The secondary structure, orientation, mode of interaction and dynamics of these peptides can be as varied as their functions. Their localization in the membrane, the immersion depth, and their binding mode are factors critical to the function of these peptides. The atomic 3D solution structure of peptides bound to micelles can be determined by NMR spectroscopy. However, by employing paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) information on the complete topology of peptide bound to a micelle can be obtained. The antimicrobial peptide maximin H6, fst, a bacterial toxin, and the human peptide hormone ghrelin served as membrane-bound model peptides of similar sizes but strongly differing amino acid sequences. Their structures and binding behavior were determined and compared.The measured PREs provided suitable data for determining and distinguishing the different topologies of the investigated peptides bound to micelles. Maximin H6 and fst fold into α-helices upon insertion into a membrane, whereas the unstructured ghrelin is freely mobile in solution and interacts only via a covalently bound octanoyl group with the lipids. Maximin H6 is oriented parallel to the membrane surface, enabling the peptide to aggregate at the membrane water interface. Fst binds in transmembrane orientation with a protruding intrinsically disordered region near the C-terminus. Aside from determining the orientation of the bound peptides from the PREs, the moieties critical for membrane binding could be mapped in ghrelin. If suitable relaxation-edited spectra are acquired, the complete orientation and immersion depth of a peptide bound to a micelle can readily be obtained. (author)

  18. Glucan binding regions of dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-512F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funane, K; Ookura, T; Kobayashi, M

    1998-01-01

    We isolated glucan-binding peptides of a dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512F. The dextransucrase was bound to DEAE-Sephadex A-50, Sephadex G-100, and mutan from Streptococcus mutans. Mild trypsin digestion dissociated the enzyme and glucan binding. In the presence of ammonium sulfate, several peptides were bound to glucan after trypsin digestion. Four main mutan-binding peptides were obtained by this method, and those amino acid sequences were analyzed. One of them was identical with the dextran-binding peptide that contains lysine, which was previously isolated by differential chemical modification with o-phthalaldehyde. We also found mutan-binding peptides in sucrose- and dextran-binding regions and a lysine-rich region. Also, there was a peptide similar in sequence to glucan-binding A-repeat of streptococcal glucosyltransferases. PMID:9501523

  19. Imaging tumors with peptide-based radioligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behr, T. M.; Gotthardt, M.; Barth, A.; Behe, M. [Philipps-University of Marburg, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Marburg (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    Regulatory peptides are small, readily diffusable and potent natural substances with a wide spectrum of receptor-mediated actions in humans. High affinity receptors for these peptides are (over)-expressed in many neoplasms, and these receptors may represent, therefore, new molecular targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy. This review aims to give an overview of the peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals which are presently already commercially available or which are in advanced stages of their clinical testing so that their broader availability is anticipated soon. Physiologically, these peptides bind to and act through G protein-coupled receptors in the cell membrane. Historically, somatostatin analogs are the first class of receptor binding peptides having gained clinical application. In {sup 111}In-DTPA-(D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is the first and only radio peptide which has obtained regulatory approval in Europe and the United States to date. Extensive clinical studies involving several thousands of patients have shown that the major clinical application of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is the detection and the staging of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids). In these tumors, octreotide scintigraphy is superior to any other staging method. However, its sensitivity and accuracy in other, more frequent neoplasms is limited. Radiolabeled vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has been shown to visualize the majority of gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, as well as some neuroendocrine tumors, including insulinomas (the latter being often missed by somatostatin receptor scintigraphy). Due to the outstanding diagnostic accuracy of the pentagastrin test in detecting the presence, persistence, or recurrence of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), it was postulated the expression of the corresponding (i.e. cholecystokinin (CCK-)-B) receptor type in human MTC. This receptor is also widely expressed on human small-cell lung. Indeed, {sup 111}In-labeled DTPA

  20. Improved affinity of engineered streptavidin for the Strep-tag II peptide is due to a fixed open conformation of the lid-like loop at the binding site

    OpenAIRE

    Korndörfer, Ingo P.; Skerra, Arne

    2002-01-01

    The Strep-tag II is a nine-amino acid peptide that was developed as an affinity tool for the purification of corresponding fusion proteins on streptavidin columns. The peptide recognizes the same pocket of streptavidin where the natural ligand is normally bound so that biotin or its chemical derivatives can be used for competitive elution. We report here the crystal structures of the streptavidin mutants `1' and `2,' which had been engineered for 10-fold higher affinity towards the Strep-tag ...